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Sample records for color rendering index

  1. Excellent color rendering indexes of multi-package white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Hye; Yang, Su Ji; Sung, Yeon-Goog; Do, Y R

    2012-08-27

    This study introduces multi-package white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) system with the ability to realize high luminous efficacy and an excellent color rendering index (CRI, R a) using the R B,M A B,M G B,M C B (R B,M A B,M G B,M denoted as a long-pass dichroic filter (LPDF)-capped, monochromatic red, amber and green phosphor converted-LED (pc-LED) pumped by a blue LED chip, and C B denoted as a cyan and blue mixed pc-LED pumped by a blue LED) system. The luminous efficacy and color rendering index (CRI) of multi-package white LED systems are compared while changing the concentration of the cyan phosphor used in the paste of a cyan-blue LED package and the driving current of individual LEDs in multi-package white LEDs at correlated color temperatures (CCTs) ranging from 6,500 K (cold white) to 2,700 K (warm white) using a set of eight CCTs as specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard number C78.377-2008. A R B,M A B,M G B,M C B white LED system provides high luminous efficacy (≥ 96 lm/W) and a color rendering index (≥ 91) encompassing the complete CCT range. We also compare the optical properties of the R B,M A B,M G B,M C B system with those of the R B,M A B,M G B,M B and RAGB (red, amber, green, and blue semiconductor-type narrow-spectrum-band LEDs) systems. It can be expected that the cyan color added to a blue LED in multi-package white LEDs based on LPDF-capped, phosphor-converted monochromatic LEDs will meet the needs of the high-quality, highly efficient, full-color white LED lighting market in the near future. PMID:23037079

  2. Color temperature tunable white-light LED cluster with extrahigh color rendering index.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minhao; Chen, Yu; He, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    The correlated color temperature (CCT) tunable white-light LED cluster with extrahigh color rendering property has been found by simulation and fabricated, which consists of three WW LEDs (CCT = 3183 K), one red LED (634.1 nm), one green LED (513.9 nm), and one blue LED (456.2 nm). The experimental results show that this cluster can realize the CCT tunable white-lights with a color rendering index (CRI) above 93, special CRI R9 for strong red above 90, average value of the special CRIs of R9 to R12 for the four saturated colors (red, yellow, green, and blue) above 83, and luminous efficacies above 70 lm/W at CCTs of 2719 K to 6497 K. PMID:24578665

  3. Color temperature tunable white-light light-emitting diode clusters with high color rendering index.

    PubMed

    He, Guoxing; Zheng, Lihong

    2010-08-20

    A model for LED spectra at different drive currents is established. The simulation program of color rendering of a white-light LED cluster is developed according to the principle of additive color mixtures. The program can predict not only the spectral power distribution, chromaticity coordinates, correlated color temperature (CCT), and color rendering index (CRI), but also the drive currents of LEDs, luminous flux, input power, and luminous efficacy of white-light LED clusters. Three types of CCT tunable white-light LED clusters [warm-white/red/green/blue (WW/R/G/B), neutral-white (NW)/R/G/B, and cool-white/R/amber/G clusters] with high CRI are found by simulation analysis and realized in our laboratory. The experimental results show that the WW/R/G/B cluster can realize CCT tunable white light with high CRIs (above 90) but lower luminous efficacies (below 65 lm/W), and that the NW/R/G/B cluster can realize CCT tunable white light with high CRIs (above 86), as well as high luminous efficacies (above 64 lm/W). PMID:20733639

  4. General Color Rendering Index of Wall-stabilized Arc of Water-cooled Vortex Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takaya; Yanagi, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    The arc lighting to obtain the environment to evacuate, save the life, keep the safety and be comfortable are focus on. The lack of radiation intensity and color rendering is problem because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched the high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp which is one of the arc lamp with metal vapor, and the line spectrum emitted from the metal vapor is used for improvement of color rendering spectrum. The broad spectrum emitted from continuous spectrum is needed for improvement of color rendering spectrum. It is necessary to perform the calculation using the wall-stabilized arc to equalize the contribution to the temperature distribution which the convection gives it to bell-shaped form in the gas flow-stabilized arc for the axial distance. This research elucidates the development of the argon wall-stabilized arc in order to control the spectrum for improvement of color rendering spectrum with controlling the current and radius. The color rendering is measured by the general color rendering index. As a result, the general color rendering index increases with increasing the current and radius of the wall-stabilized arc in the case of simulation. However, it doesn't change so much in the case of experiment. Therefore, the radius, i.e. the arc temperature distribution, is more important factor.

  5. Emission Characteristics of High Color Rendering Index Low-Pressure Xe and CO ICP's Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri, Ahmad; Kondo, Akira; Motomura, Hideki; Jinno, Masafumi

    High color rendering index (CRI) has been obtained from mercury-free ICP’s lamp. Due to the strong demand on the development of mercury-free light sources, the authors investigated xenon and CO as an alternative element. These rare (Xe) and molecule (CO) gases have been used as a substitute for mercury as the environmental problems related necessitate the development of new type of light sources. The target of this study is to develop a new type of mercury-free lamp without using a phosphor where the authors concentrate on how to obtain a strong visible light instead of UV. In this paper, the colors, luminance and emission characteristics of these types of mercury-free ICP’s lamp is discussed. Without the use of phosphor, the authors obtained a good color rendering from xenon and CO ICP’s lamp where their CRI’s above 90. A strong continuum emission in visible region is obtained where luminance are ranged from 2000 to 25000 cd/m2 at 100 W of input power. Spectral distribution shows the continuum emissions are similar to the daylight distribution and chromaticity diagrams shows they are close to white region in color coordinates and color temperatures bringing a high index of the lamp’s color rendering.

  6. Case Study on Combination of Fluorescent Materials for White LED to Obtain High Color Rendering Indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayama, Shunsuke; Itoh, Kunio

    This letter reports on white-LED with high color rendering property. We realized the white-LED whose average Color Rendering Index (CRI) is as high as 94.2 by applying the commercial Red, Yellow, Green and Blue phosphors to near ultraviolet-LED. So far as we know, this value is the highest ever attained in white-LED around the color temperature of 5500[K]. In order to realize the good Ra (average CRI), we made a CRI simulator and simulated the spectrum distribution of white-LED with good Ra. The spectrum distribution obtained by this simulation was proved to be very useful as a landmark for realizing a prototype white-LED with good Ra.

  7. Approach for optimization of the color rendering index of light mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ku Chin

    2010-07-01

    The general CIE color rendering index (CRI) of light is an important index to evaluate the quality of illumination. However, because of the complexity in measurement of the rendering ability under designated constraints, an approach for general mathematical formulation and global optimization of the rendering ability of light emitting diode (LED) light mixtures is difficult to develop. This study is mainly devoted to developing mathematical formulation and a numerical method for the CRI optimization. The method is developed based on the so-called complex method [Computer J.8, 42 (1965); G. V. Reklaitis et al., Engineering Optimization-Methods and Applications (Wiley, 1983)] with modifications. It is first applicable to 3-color light mixtures and then extended to a hierarchical and iterative structure for higher-order light mixtures. The optimization is studied under the constraints of bounded relative intensities of the light mixture, designated correlated color temperature (CCT), and the required approximate white of the light mixture. The problems of inconsistent constraints and solutions are addressed. The CRI is a complicated function of the relative intensities of the compound illuminators of the mixture. The proposed method requires taking no derivatives of the function and is very adequate for the optimization. This is demonstrated by simulation for RGBW LED light mixtures. The results show that global and unique convergence to the optimal within required tolerances for CRI and spatial dispersivity is always achieved. PMID:20596135

  8. Color-converting combinations of nanocrystal emitters for warm-white light generation with high color rendering index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamoglu, Sedat; Zengin, Gulis; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2008-01-01

    Warm-white light emitting diodes with high color rendering indices are required for the widespread use of solid state lighting especially indoors. To meet these requirements, we propose and demonstrate warm-white hybrid light sources that incorporate the right color-converting combinations of CdSe /ZnS core-shell nanocrystals hybridized on InGaN /GaN LEDs for high color rendering index. Three sets of proof-of-concept devices are developed to generate high-quality warm-white light with (1) tristimulus coordinates (x,y)=(0.37,0.30), luminous efficacy (LE)=307lm/W, color rending index (CR)=82.4, and correlated color temperature (CCT)=3228K; (2) (x,y)=(0.38,0.31), LE =323lm/W, CRI =81.0, and CCT =3190K; and (3) (x,y)=(0.37,0.30), LE =303lm/W, CRI =79.6, and CCT =1982K.

  9. Dimmable sunlight-like organic light emitting diodes with ultra-high color rendering index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin-Han; Chi, Chien-An; Chiang, Chang-Lin; Chen, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yi-Ping; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Ho, Shu-Yi; Chen, Shih-Pu; Li, Jung-Yu

    2016-05-01

    We propose novel dimmable sunlight-like white organic light-emitting diodes that were fabricated using three luminophores to form an emitting spectrum similar to black body radiation at 2250 K with ultra-high color rendering index (CRI) value of 91, which nearly remained the constant at various luminance values ranging from 100 to more than 2500 cd/m2 at Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.51, 0.41). Introducing charge modification layers suppressed the energy transfer between the emitting material layers and increased the probability of carrier recombination. Moreover, we reveal that covering long-wavelength ranges played a vital role in achieving high CRI values; the CRI values of a spectrum artificially shifted toward a long-wavelength direction (from 610 to 620 nm) remained constant, whereas those of a spectrum shifted toward a short-wavelength direction (from 610 to 600 nm) dropped to 79.

  10. High color rendering index white organic light-emitting diode using levofloxacin as blue emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yan-Qin; Gao, Zhi-Xiang; Zhang, Ai-Qin; Li, Yuan-Hao; Wang, Hua; Jia, Hu-Sheng; Liu, Xu-Guang; Tsuboi, Taijuf

    2015-05-01

    Levofloxacin (LOFX), which is well-known as an antibiotic medicament, was shown to be useful as a 452-nm blue emitter for white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this paper, the fabricated white OLED contains a 452-nm blue emitting layer (thickness of 30 nm) with 1 wt% LOFX doped in CBP (4,4’-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl) host and a 584-nm orange emitting layer (thickness of 10 nm) with 0.8 wt% DCJTB (4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidin-4-yl-vinyl)-4H-pyran) doped in CBP, which are separated by a 20-nm-thick buffer layer of TPBi (2,2’,2”-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl)-tri(1-phenyl-1H-benzimidazole). A high color rendering index (CRI) of 84.5 and CIE chromaticity coordinates of (0.33, 0.32), which is close to ideal white emission CIE (0.333, 0.333), are obtained at a bias voltage of 14 V. Taking into account that LOFX is less expensive and the synthesis and purification technologies of LOFX are mature, these results indicate that blue fluorescence emitting LOFX is useful for applications to white OLEDs although the maximum current efficiency and luminance are not high. The present paper is expected to become a milestone to using medical drug materials for OLEDs. Project supported by the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-13-0927), the International Science & Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2012DFR50460), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21101111 and 61274056), and the Shanxi Provincial Key Innovative Research Team in Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2012041011).

  11. Linear calculation model for prediction of color rendering index performance associated with correlated color temperature of white light-emitting diodes with two phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Chen, Ching-Yi; Chang, Jung-Hsuan; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Ji, Wei-Shih; Jeng, Yow-Shiuan; Wu, Hsin-Mei

    2012-05-01

    Linear calculation models are proposed and demonstrated to evaluate the color rendering index (CRI) performance associated with the correlated color temperature (CCT) of a white light emitting diode with two phosphors. All the three proposed models are simple and easy, and the error in predicting the CRI is within 1, while the deviation of the CCT is around 300 K and less. Such models can be useful in evaluating the chromatic performance of a specific recipe with two phosphors.

  12. A spectrum-adjusted white organic light-emitting diode for the optimization of luminous efficiency and color rendering index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Shu-ming

    2015-01-01

    High luminous efficiency and high color rendering index (CRI) are both the foremost factors for white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) to serve as next generation solid-state lighting sources. In this paper, we show that both luminous efficiency and CRI can be improved by adjusting the green/red spectra of WOLEDs. With green emission spectra matching with the human photopic curve, the WOLEDs exhibit higher luminous efficiency and higher CRI. Theoretical calculation shows that by tuning the white emission spectra to maximally match with the human photopic curve, the luminous efficiency can be improved by 41.8% without altering the color coordinates, the color correlated temperature (CCT) and the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the WOLEDs.

  13. High-Efficiency WOLEDs with High Color-Rendering Index based on a Chromaticity-Adjustable Yellow Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Long; Xie, Gaozhan; Liu, Ming; Chen, Dongcheng; Cai, Xinyi; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong; Su, Shi-Jian

    2016-06-01

    A chromaticity-adjustable yellow thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) material, PXZDSO2 as a triplet harvester provides a rational device concept, giving two-color and three-color pure organic white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with unprecedented color-rendering index of 95 and external quantum efficiency of 19.2%. PMID:27062637

  14. High Color-Rendering-index Hybrid White LEDs Employing CdSe/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yajing; Sun, Dapeng; Zhang, Zhongping; Zhang, Yugang; Yao, Xudong; Jiang, Danlu; Yu, Yalan; Mi, Longfei; Chen, Lei; Zhong, Honghai; Jiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid white LEDs were constructed by leveraging a combination of CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs and YAG: Ce³⁺ phosphors. The CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs were synthesized by a two-step process in which CdSe QDs were first prepared via a hot-injection method, followed by ZnS coating through a facile single-molecular precursor approach. The resultant red-emitting CdSe/ZnS QDs showed decent fluorescent quantum yielding (36%). The resultant hybrid white LEDs--that based on CdSe/ZnS QDs and solid-state-reaction-processed YAG: Ce³⁺ phosphors--showed good luminescence properties, including bright warm light, a high color rendering index of 91.3, a low color temperature of 4965 K and a luminous efficiency of 44.22 lm/W. Moreover, increased luminous intensity has been observed in the presence of increased forward current without luminescence saturation, promising an ideal approach to construct warm-white LEDs with excellent color rendering properties. PMID:27398506

  15. A white organic light-emitting diode with ultra-high color rendering index, high efficiency, and extremely low efficiency roll-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Yongbiao; Zhao, Fangchao; Chen, Yonghua; Yang, Dezhi; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge

    2014-07-01

    Ultra-high color rendering index (>90) is considered to be crucial for lighting in museum, studio, art gallery, medical, and wide-color-gamut display. However, all relevant works reported to exhibit ultra-high color rendering index suffer from a low efficiency and serious efficiency roll-off. In order to achieve ultra-high color rendering index and maintain high device efficiency at the same time, we incorporate four organic dyes in an elaborate device structure. The resulting white organic light-emitting diode exhibits rather high color rendering index up to 94 over a wide brightness range and yields electroluminescence efficiencies up to 14.2%, 26.0 cd/A, and 21.9 lm/W at the brightness of 1000 cd m-2, which are the highest values reported to date for such ultra-high color rendering index white organic light-emitting diodes. In addition, the current issue on efficiency roll-off is well resolved in the resulting device. The critical current density jc is as high as 203 mA cm-2.

  16. The thermal stability performances of the color rendering index of white light emitting diodes with the red quantum dots encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Luqiao; Bai, Yang; Zhou, Jie; Cao, Jin; Sun, Xiaowei; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-04-01

    Red phosphors are the traditional material used to improve the color rendering index (CRI) of white light emitting diode (WLEDs). In this paper, red quantum dots (QDs) were fabricated and coated on the blue LED chip to replace the red phosphors. By comparing the thermal performances of the CRI for the two WLEDs, we found that WLEDs with the encapsulation of yellow phosphors and red QDs exhibited higher CRI and lower sensitivity to temperature than those with the encapsulation of yellow and red phosphors. The CRI of WLEDs with yellow phosphors and red QDs was 90.9, and its range ability was only 0.3 when the environment temperature changed from 25 °C to 100 °C, while the CRI of WLEDs with yellow and red phosphors was as low as 81.8, and the change of CRI was 2.2 during the same temperature variation.

  17. Highly efficient semitransparent polymer solar cells with color rendering index approaching 100 using one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjuan; Jia, Xu; Long, Yongbing; Shen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-05-13

    Window application is the important aim for semitransparent solar cells (STPSC) investigation. Here, we demonstrate a method to achieve significantly improved color rendering index (CRI), depressed chromaticity difference (DC), and enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) simultaneously by introducing the one-dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) Bragg reflector structure onto the STPSC. The device performance is studied from aspects of color perception, electrical properties, and theoretical optical simulations. The STPSCs exhibit achromatic transparency nature color perceptions, especially for the STPSCs with 1DPCs (pairs ≥ 3) under AM 1.5G illumination light source, standard illuminant D65, and standard illuminant A. The excellent CRI is approaching 97 with lower DC about 0.0013 for the device with 5 pairs of 1DPC illumined by AM 1.5G illumination light source. At the same time, the PCE of STPSC devices with 5 pairs of 1DPC was improved from 4.87 ± 0.14% to 5.31 ± 0.13% compared to without. This method provides a facilitative approach to realizing excellent SPTSC window application. PMID:25854166

  18. Color rendering of color camera data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions under which a computational procedure can be applied to arbitrary camera sensors to permit estimation of the human photoreceptor response are considered. The adopted procedures recover the effective surface reflectance at the time of measurement, and the reflectance estimates depend not only on the surface, but upon the viewing geometry. The present method for color rendering assumes that the observer's state of adaptation at the time of viewing the original and the rendered images is the same. The analysis aids in specifying which classes of surfaces are required to be accurately rendered, and for which surfaces some error can be tolerated.

  19. Museum lighting for golden artifacts, with low correlated color temperature, high color uniformity and high color rendering index, using diffusing color mixing of red, cyan, and white-light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorseth, Anders; Corell, Dennis D.; Poulsen, Peter B.; Hansen, Søren S.; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2012-03-01

    Museum lighting present challenges due to the demand for a high color rendering index (CRI), color uniformity and the damaging effects of both visible and invisible radiation. Golden objects are furthermore normally displayed with illumination which has a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2200 K, a CCT that is not commercially available from single LEDs. An LED system that conforms with these requirements has been developed and implemented at The Royal Danish Collection at Rosenborg Castle. Color mixing of commercial LEDs (red, cyan, and white) was employed to achieve the spectral power distribution needed for the CCT and a CRI above 90, for all CRI test color samples. Replacing the traditional low voltage incandescent lighting has shown energy saving above 70 %. Harmful IR radiation was reduced by 99 %. Temperature fluctuations in the display cases were reduced from several degrees Celsius to below one, despite the fact that the lighting units were placed within the display case. Spatial color uniformity of the illumination and uniformly colored shadows was achieved by use of a highly diffusing reflector dish which avoids direct illumination from the LEDs.

  20. Excellent color rendering index and high quantum efficiency of rare-earth-free fluosilicate glass for single-phase white light phosphor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Zheng, Ruilin; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Weitao; Zheng, Jiajin; Wei, Wei

    2016-07-01

    A rare-earth-free Sn-doped fluosilicate (SF) glass for single-phase white light phosphor has been investigated, which has a high color rendering index (98.3) and a quantum efficiency (85%). Moreover, by combining with a 280 nm LED chip directly, the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) coordinate (x=0.32, y=0.33) and correlated color temperature (5620 K) are close to the standard white light illumination. SF glass is a promising candidate as an alternative single-phase white light phosphor for use in general lighting devices. PMID:27367117

  1. High color rendering index white light emitting diodes fabricated from a combination of carbon dots and zinc copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chun; Liu, Wenyan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com; Wang, Yu; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Kershaw, Stephen V.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhao, Jun; Yu, William W. E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com

    2014-06-30

    In a line with most recent trends in developing non-toxic fluorescent nanomaterials, we combined blue emissive carbon dots with green and red emissive zinc copper indium sulfide (ZCIS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) to achieve white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with a high color rendering index of 93. This indicates that ZCIS QDs, with their broad emission bands, can be employed to effectively make up the emission of carbon dots in the yellow and red regions to produce WLEDs in the wide region of color temperature by tuning the volume ratio of these constituting luminophores. Their electroluminescence characteristics including color rendering index, Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates, and color temperatures were evaluated as a function of forward current. The CIE-1931 chromaticity coordinates of the as-prepared WLEDs, exhibiting good stability, were slightly shifted from (0.321, 0.312) at 10 mA to (0.351, 0.322) at 30 mA, which was mainly caused by the different thermal quenching coefficients of carbon dots and ZCIS QDs.

  2. A photometric investigation of ultra-efficient LEDs with high color rendering index and high luminous efficacy employing nanocrystal quantum dot luminophores.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Talha; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2010-01-01

    We report a photometric study of ultra-efficient light emitting diodes (LEDs) that exhibit superior color rendering index (CRI) and luminous efficacy of optical radiation (LER) using semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystal (NC) luminophores. Over 200 million systematically varied NC-LED designs have been simulated to understand feasible performance in terms of CRI vs. LER. We evaluated the effects of design parameters including peak emission wavelength, full-width-at-half-maximum, and relative amplitudes of each NC color component on LED performance. Warm-white LEDs with CRI >90 and LER >380 lm/W at a correlated color temperature of 3000 K are shown to be achieved using nanocrystal luminophores. PMID:20173854

  3. Antireflective sub-wavelength structures for improvement of the extraction efficiency and color rendering index of monolithic white light-emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yiyu; Corell, Dennis Dan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Petersen, Paul Michael; Ou, Haiyan

    2011-03-14

    We have theoretically investigated the influence of antireflective sub-wavelength structures on a monolithic white light-emitting diode (LED). The simulation is based on the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) algorithm, and both cylinder and moth-eye structures have been studied in the work. Our simulation results show that a moth-eye structure enhances the light extraction efficiency over the entire visible light range with an extraction efficiency enhancement of up to 26 %. Also for the first time to our best knowledge, the influence of sub-wavelength structures on both the color rendering index (CRI) and the correlated color temperature (CCT) of the monolithic white LED have been demonstrated. The CRI of the monolithic white LED could be improved from 92.68 to around 94 by applying a cylinder structure, and the CCT could be modified in a very large range with appropriate design of the cylinder structure. PMID:21445218

  4. An experiment on the color rendering of different light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Simonetta; Bonanomi, Cristian; Rizzi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    The color rendering index (CRI) of a light source attempts to measure how much the color appearance of objects is preserved when they are illuminated by the given light source. This problem is of great importance for various industrial and scientific fields, such as lighting architecture, design, ergonomics, etc. Usually a light source is specified through the Correlated Color Temperature or CCT. However two (or more) light sources with the same CCT but different spectral power distribution can exist. Therefore color samples viewed under two light sources with equal CCTs can appear different. Hence, the need for a method to assess the quality of a given illuminant in relation to color. Recently CRI has had a renewed interest because of the new LED-based lighting systems. They usually have a color rendering index rather low, but good preservation of color appearance and a pleasant visual appearance (visual appeal). Various attempts to develop a new color rendering index have been done so far, but still research is working for a better one. This article describes an experiment performed by human observers concerning the appearance preservation of color under some light sources, comparing it with a range of available color rendering indices.

  5. High color rendering index WLED based on YAG:Ce phosphor and CdS/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Changyu; Li, Ke

    2009-08-01

    White LED combining of blue chip and YAG:Ce phosphor suffers from a red spectral deficiency, resulting in a relatively low value of color rendering index (CRI). In our study, for an effort to improve color rendering properties of YAG:Ce phosphor-based white LEDs, highly luminescent red-orange emitting CdS/ZnS QDs were blended with YAG:Ce phosphors. Core/shell CdS/ZnS quantum dots with the emission wavelength of 618nm, was synthesized by thermal deposition using cadmium oxide and selenium as precursors in a hot lauric acid and hexadecylamine trioctylphosphine oxide hybrid. YAG:Ce phosphor was synthesized by high-temperature solid state reaction at 900-1200°C in a slightly reducing atmosphere for 4 hours. Blends of phosphors and QDs exhibited the prominent spectral evolution with an increasing content of QDs. A hybrid white LED, which combines a blue LED with the blend of YAG phosphor and QDs with a weight ratio of 1.5:1,was demonstrated with an improved CRI value of 86.

  6. Bicolor Mn-doped CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals for white light-emitting diode with high color rendering index

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Bo; Dai, Qian; Zhang, Huichao; Liao, Chen; Cui, Yiping; Zhang, Jiayu; Zhuo, Ningze; Jiang, Qingsong; Shi, Fenghua; Wang, Haibo

    2014-09-07

    We synthesized bicolor Mn-doped CuInS{sub 2} (CIS)/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals (NCs), in which Mn{sup 2+} ions and the CIS core were separated with a ZnS layer, and both Mn{sup 2+} ions and CIS cores could emit simultaneously. Transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction measurements indicated the epitaxial growth of ZnS shell on the CuInS{sub 2} core, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum indicated that Mn{sup 2+} ions were on the lattice points of ZnS shell. By integrating these bicolor NCs with commercial InGaN-based blue-emitting diodes, tricolor white light-emitting diodes with color rendering index of 83 were obtained.

  7. Color rendering indices in global illumination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler-Moroder, David; Dür, Arne

    2009-02-01

    Human perception of material colors depends heavily on the nature of the light sources used for illumination. One and the same object can cause highly different color impressions when lit by a vapor lamp or by daylight, respectively. Based on state-of-the-art colorimetric methods we present a modern approach for calculating color rendering indices (CRI), which were defined by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) to characterize color reproduction properties of illuminants. We update the standard CIE method in three main points: firstly, we use the CIELAB color space, secondly, we apply a Bradford transformation for chromatic adaptation, and finally, we evaluate color differences using the CIEDE2000 total color difference formula. Moreover, within a real-world scene, light incident on a measurement surface is composed of a direct and an indirect part. Neumann and Schanda1 have shown for the cube model that interreflections can influence the CRI of an illuminant. We analyze how color rendering indices vary in a real-world scene with mixed direct and indirect illumination and recommend the usage of a spectral rendering engine instead of an RGB based renderer for reasons of accuracy of CRI calculations.

  8. Spectral optimization of warm-white light-emitting diode lamp with both color rendering index (CRI) and special CRI of R9 above 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guoxing; Xu, Jing; Yan, Huafeng

    2011-09-01

    The optimal spectra of the warm-white LED (WWLED) lamp consisting of AlGaInP red LED and the p-W LED packaged by combining silicate green and orange phosphors with a InGaN blue LED die was obtained by nonlinear program for maximizing the luminous efficacy of radiation while both color rendering index (CRI) and special CRI of R9 for strong red above 90 at correlated color temeratures (CCTs) of 2700 K. The optimal peak wavelengths of red LED, blue LED die, silicate green and orange phosphors are 626 nm, 454 nm, 535 nm and 584 nm, respectively. Their optimal relative radation fluxs are 9.7%, 33.4 %, 26.1 %, 30.8 %, respectively. The real WWLED lamp with CCT of 2653 K, CRI of 90, R9 of 94 and R(9-12) of 88, as well as luminous efficacy (LE) of 80.2 lm/W have been realized. Furthermore, the WWLED lamp can realized CCT tunable warm-white-light with CRIs of 86 ˜ 93, R9s of 86 ˜ 95 and LEs of 78.2 ˜ 80.3 lm/W at CCTs of 2392 K to 3014 K by adjusting drive current of the red LED.

  9. Warm-white light-emitting diode with high color rendering index fabricated by combining trichromatic InGaN emitter with single red phosphor.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Chen, Fu-Bang; Wang, Yen-Chin; Chang, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Shih-Hsien; Liu, Chun-Nan; Lee, Ming-Lun

    2015-04-01

    We present a trichromatic GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) that emits near-ultraviolet (n-UV) blue and green peaks combined with red phosphor to generate white light with a low correlated color temperature (CCT) and high color rendering index (CRI). The LED structure, blue and green unipolar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) stacked with a top p-i-n structure containing an InGaN/GaN MQW emitting n-UV light, was grown epitaxially on a single substrate. The trichromatic LED chips feature a vertical conduction structure on a silicon substrate fabricated through wafer bonding and laser lift-off techniques. The blue and green InGaN/GaN MQWs were pumped with n-UV light to re-emit low-energy photons when the LEDs were electrically driven with a forward current. The emission spectrum included three peaks at approximately 405, 468, and 537 nm. Furthermore, the trichromatic LED chips were combined with red phosphor to generate white light with a CCT and CRI of approximately 2900 and 92, respectively. PMID:25968789

  10. Image-based color ink diffusion rendering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Ming; Wang, Ren-Jie

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an image-based painterly rendering algorithm for automatically synthesizing an image with color ink diffusion. We suggest a mathematical model with a physical base to simulate the phenomenon of color colloidal ink diffusing into absorbent paper. Our algorithm contains three main parts: a feature extraction phase, a Kubelka-Munk (KM) color mixing phase, and a color ink diffusion synthesis phase. In the feature extraction phase, the information of the reference image is simplified by luminance division and color segmentation. In the color mixing phase, the KM theory is employed to approximate the result when one pigment is painted upon another pigment layer. Then, in the color ink diffusion synthesis phase, the physically-based model that we propose is employed to simulate the result of color ink diffusion in absorbent paper using a texture synthesis technique. Our image-based ink diffusing rendering (IBCIDR) algorithm eliminates the drawback of conventional Chinese ink simulations, which are limited to the black ink domain, and our approach demonstrates that, without using any strokes, a color image can be automatically converted to the diffused ink style with a visually pleasing appearance. PMID:17218741

  11. High color rendering index of remote-type white LEDs with multi-layered quantum dot-phosphor films and short-wavelength pass dichroic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hee Chang; Oh, Ji Hye; Do, Young Rag

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces high color rendering index (CRI) white light-emitting diodes (W-LEDs) coated with red emitting (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphors and yellowish-green emitting AgIn5S8/ZnS (AIS/ZS) quantum dots (QDs) on glass or a short-wavelength pass dichroic filter (SPDF), which transmit blue wavelength regions and reflect yellow wavelength regions. The red emitting (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphor film is coated on glass and a SPDF using a screen printing method, and then the yellowish-green emitting AIS/ZS QDs are coated on the red phosphor (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu film-coated glass and SPDF using the electrospray (e-spray) method.To fabricate the red phosphor film, the optimum amount of phosphor is dispersed in a silicon binder to form a red phosphor paste. The AIS/ZS QDs are mixed with dimethylformamide (DMF), toluene, and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for the e-spray coating. The substrates are spin-coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) to fabricate a conductive surface. The CRI of the white LEDs is improved through inserting the red phosphor film between the QD layer and the glass substrate. Furthermore, the light intensities of the multi-layered phosphor films are enhanced through changing the glass substrate to the SPDF. The correlated color temperatures (CCTs) vary as a function of the phosphor concentration in the phosphor paste. The optical properties of the yellowish-green AIS/ZS QDs and red (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphors are characterized using photoluminescence (PL), and the multi-layered QD-phosphor films are measured using electroluminescence (EL) with an InGaN blue LED (λmax = 450 nm) at 60 mA.

  12. Two Host-Dopant Emitting Systems Realizing Four-Color Emission: A Simple and Effective Strategy for Highly Efficient Warm-White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with High Color-Rendering Index at High Luminance.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xuming; Zhang, Hao; Ye, Kaiqi; Liu, Yu; Wang, Yue

    2016-05-11

    A four-color warm-white organic light-emitting diode employing a simple adjacent two-emitting-layer structure as a blue host-orange dopant/green host-red dopant has been fabricated, which exhibited a stable high electroluminescent performance: an external quantum efficiency of 23.3% and a power efficiency of 63.2 lm W(-1) at an illumination-relevant luminance of 1000 cd m(-2) with a high color-rendering index (CRI) of 92 and maintained high levels of 21.6% and 48.8 lm W(-1) with a CRI value of 93 at the extremely high luminance of 5000 cd m(-2). To our knowledge, this should be the best result so far for a white-light organic light-emitting diode with CRI > 90, simultaneously exhibiting very high efficiencies based on a high luminance level for the solid-state lighting. PMID:27105391

  13. Modulating dual-wavelength multiple quantum wells in white light emitting diodes to suppress efficiency droop and improve color rendering index

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yukun; Wang, Shuai; Zheng, Min; Ding, Wen; Yun, Feng; Su, Xilin; Yang, Xiangrong; Liu, Shuo; Guo, Maofeng; Zhang, Ye

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, gallium nitride (GaN) based white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with modulated quantities of blue (In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N) quantum wells (QWs) and cyan QWs (In{sub 0.18}Ga{sub 0.82}N) in multiple QW (MQW) structures have been investigated numerically and experimentally. It is demonstrated that the optical performance of LEDs is sensitive to the quantities of cyan QWs in dual-wavelength MQW structures. Compared to the LEDs with respective 0, 4, and 8 cyan QWs (12 QWs in total), the optical performance of the sample with 6 cyan QWs is the best. The deterioration of the optical performance in the sample with less (4 pairs) cyan QWs or more (8 pairs) cyan QWs than 6 cyan QWs may be ascribed to weakened reservoir effect or more defects induced. Compared to conventional blue LEDs (12 blue QWs), the sample with 6 cyan QWs could effectively suppress the efficiency droop (the experimental droop ratio decreases from 50.3% to 39.5% at 80 A/cm{sup 2}) and significantly improve the color rendering index (CRI, increases from 66.4 to 77.0) simultaneously. We attribute the droop suppression to the strengthened reservoir effect and carrier confinement of deeper QWs (higher indium composition) incorporated in the dual-wavelength MQW structures, which lead to the better hole spreading and enhanced radiative recombination. Meanwhile, the remarkable experimental CRI improvement may result from the wider full-width at half-maximum of electroluminescence spectra and higher cyan intensity in WLED chips with dual-wavelength MQW structures.

  14. Novel Emitting System Based on a Multifunctional Bipolar Phosphor: An Effective Approach for Highly Efficient Warm-White Light-Emitting Devices with High Color-Rendering Index at High Luminance.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingxu; Feng, Yansong; Zhu, Dongxia; Peng, Tai; Liu, Yu; Wang, Yue; Bryce, Martin R

    2016-07-01

    A three-color warm-white organic light-emitting diode employing an efficient phosphor-phosphor type host-guest emitting system achieves efficiencies of 27.3% for external quantum efficiency and 74.5 lm W(-1) for power efficiency at a luminance of 1000 cd m(-2) , which maintained the high levels of 24.3% and 45.8 lm W(-1) at 10 000 cd m(-2) , with a stable color-rendering index of 86-87. PMID:27172456

  15. High color rendering index white LED based on nano-YAG:Ce3+ phosphor hybrid with CdSe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Changyu; Chu, Jinlei; Qian, Feng; Zou, Xin; Zhong, Chuan; Li, Ke; Jin, Shangzhong

    2012-08-01

    To improve the poor color rendering index (CRI) of YAG:Ce-based white light-emitting diode (LED) due to the lack of red spectral component, core/shell/shell CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized and blended into nano-YAG:Ce3+ phosphors. Prominent spectral evolution has been achieved by increasing the content of QDs. A white LED combining a blue LED with the blends of nano-YAG phosphors and orange- and red-emission QDs with a weight ratio of 1:1:1 was obtained. This kind of white LED showed excellent white light with luminescent efficiency, color coordinates, CRI and correlated color temperature (CCT) of 82.5 lm/W, (0.3264, 0.3255), 91 and 4580 K, respectively.

  16. Color rendering ability and luminous efficacy enhancements in white light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Roya; Schubert, Martin; Chhajed, Sameer; Cho, Jaehee; Kim, Jong Kyu; Schubert, E. Fred

    2009-08-01

    There exists a fundamental trade-off relation between color rendering index (CRI) and luminous efficacy; in other words, improvements in one are generally detrimental to the other. We analyze and demonstrate through simulation that phosphor-converted white LEDs with dual-blue emitting active regions, as opposed to single-blue emitting active regions, significantly enhance color rendering ability while maximizing the output luminous flux. The improvements are achieved over a broad range of correlated color temperatures.

  17. Sr-Ba combinational effect on spectral broadening of blue (Sr, Ba)5(PO4)3Cl:Ce3+ phosphor for a high color-rendering index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deressa, G.; Park, K. W.; Kim, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral broadening of blue apatite phosphors (Sr, Ba)5(PO4)3Cl:Ce3+ was achieved by changing Sr-Ba combinations. The blue colors came from 5d1 to 4f1 transitions of Ce3+ ions, and the excitation bands were ranged from 250 nm to 400 nm. The broad Raman spectrum in Sr2.45Ba2.45(PO4)3Cl:Ce3+ supported its highest disorder, leading to the spectral broadening with a half width of 95.5 nm. The temperature dependence showed the emission maintenance of 80% around 100 °C. The 310 nm-pumped white LED was simulated so as to show a color rendering index (Ra) of 74 at white point.

  18. Realistic fetus skin color processing for ultrasound volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Tae; Kim, Kyuhong; Park, Sung-Chan; Kang, Jooyoung; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes realistic fetus skin color processing using a 2D color map and a tone mapping function (TMF) for ultrasound volume rendering. The contributions of this paper are a 2D color map generated through a gamut model of skin color and a TMF that depends on the lighting position. First, the gamut model of fetus skin color is calculated by color distribution of baby images. The 2D color map is created using a gamut model for tone mapping of ray casting. For the translucent effect, a 2D color map in which lightness is inverted is generated. Second, to enhance the contrast of rendered images, the luminance, color, and tone curve TMF parameters are changed using 2D Gaussian function that depends on the lighting position. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves better realistic skin color reproduction than the conventional method.

  19. Hybrid 2D photonic crystal-assisted Lu3Al5O12:Ce ceramic-plate phosphor and free-standing red film phosphor for white LEDs with high color-rendering index.

    PubMed

    Park, Hoo Keun; Oh, Ji Hye; Kang, Heejoon; Zhang, Jian; Do, Young Rag

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports the combined optical effects of a two-dimensional (2D) SiNx photonic crystal layer (PCL)-assisted Lu3Al5O12:Ce (LuAG:Ce) green ceramic-plate phosphor (CPP) and a free-standing (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu red film phosphor to enhance luminous efficacy, color rendering index (CRI), and special CRI (R9) of LuAG:Ce CPP-capped white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for high-power white LEDs at 350 mA. By introducing the 2D SiNx PCL, the luminous efficacy was improved by a factor of 1.25 and 1.15 compared to that of the conventional flat CPP-capped LED and the thickness-increased CPP-capped LED (with a thickness of 0.15 mm), respectively, while maintaining low color-rendering properties. The combining of the free-standing red film phosphor in the flat CPP-capped, the 2D PCL-assisted CPP-capped, and the thickness-increased CPP-capped LEDs led to enhancement of the CRI and the special CRI (R9); it also led to a decrease of the correlated color temperature (CCT) due to broad wavelength coverage via the addition of red emission. High CRI (94), natural white CCT (4450 K), and acceptable luminous efficacy (71.1 lm/W) were attained from the 2D PCL-assisted LuAG:Ce CPP/free-standing red film phosphor-based LED using a red phosphor concentration of 7.5 wt %. It is expected that the combination of the 2D PCL and the free-standing red film phosphor will be a good candidate for achieving a high-power white CPP-capped LED with excellent CRI. PMID:25675264

  20. Color-rendering indices in global illumination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler-Moroder, David; Dür, Arne

    2009-10-01

    Human perception of material colors depends heavily on the nature of the light sources that are used for illumination. One and the same object can cause highly different color impressions when lit by a vapor lamp or by daylight, respectively. On the basis of state-of-the-art colorimetric methods, we present a modern approach for the calculation of color-rendering indices (CRI), which were defined by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) to characterize color reproduction properties of illuminants. We update the standard CIE method in three main points: first, we use the CIELAB color space; second, we apply a linearized Bradford transformation for chromatic adaptation; and finally, we evaluate color differences using the CIEDE2000 total color difference formula. Moreover, within a real-world scene, light incident on a measurement surface is composed of a direct and an indirect part. Neumann and Schanda [Proc. CGIV'06 Conf., Leeds, UK, pp. 283-286 (2006)] have shown for the cube model that diffuse interreflections can influence the CRI of a light source. We analyze how color-rendering indices vary in a real-world scene with mixed direct and indirect illumination and recommend the usage of a spectral rendering engine instead of an RGB-based renderer for reasons of accuracy of CRI calculations.

  1. Novel yellow-emitting Sr8MgLn(PO4)7:Eu2+ (Ln=Y, La) phosphors for applications in white LEDs with excellent color rendering index.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hao; Chen, Teng-Ming

    2011-06-20

    Eu(2+)-activated Sr(8)MgY(PO(4))(7) and Sr(8)MgLa(PO(4))(7) yellow-emitting phosphors were successfully synthesized by solid-state reactions for applications in excellent color rendering index white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The excitation and reflectance spectra of these phosphors show broad band excitation and absorption in the 250-450 nm near-ultraviolet region, which is ascribed to the 4f(7) → 4f(6)5d(1) transitions of Eu(2+). Therefore, these phosphors meet the application requirements for near-UV LED chips. Upon excitation at 400 nm, the Sr(8)MgY(PO(4))(7):Eu(2+) and Sr(8)MgLa(PO(4))(7):Eu(2+) phosphors exhibit strong yellow emissions centered at 518, 610, and 611 nm with better thermal stability than (Ba,Sr)(2)SiO(4) (570 nm) commodity phosphors. The composition-optimized concentrations of Eu(2+) in Sr(8)MgLa(PO(4))(7):Eu(2+) and Sr(8)MgY(PO(4))(7):Eu(2+) phosphors were determined to be 0.01 and 0.03 mol, respectively. A warm white-light near-UV LED was fabricated using a near-UV 400 nm chip pumped by a phosphor blend of blue-emitting BaMgAl(10)O(17):Eu(2+) and yellow-emitting Sr(8)MgY(PO(4))(7):0.01Eu(2+) or Sr(8)MgLa(PO(4))(7):0.03Eu(2+), driven by a 350 mA current. The Sr(8)MgY(PO(4))(7):0.01Eu(2+) and Sr(8)MgLa(PO(4))(7):0.03Eu(2+) containing LEDs produced a white light with Commission International de I'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates of (0.348, 0.357) and (0.365, 0.328), warm correlated color temperatures of 4705 and 4100 K, and excellent color rendering indices of 95.375 and 91.75, respectively. PMID:21591766

  2. Color Rendering Plasmonic Aluminum Substrates with Angular Symmetry Breaking.

    PubMed

    Duempelmann, Luc; Casari, Daniele; Luu-Dinh, Angélique; Gallinet, Benjamin; Novotny, Lukas

    2015-12-22

    We fabricate and characterize large-area plasmonic substrates that feature asymmetric periodic nanostructures made of aluminum. Strong coupling between localized and propagating plasmon resonances leads to characteristic Fano line shapes with tunable spectral positions and widths. Distinctive colors spanning the entire visible spectrum are generated by tuning the system parameters, such as the period and the length of the aluminum structures. Moreover, the asymmetry of the aluminum structures gives rise to a strong symmetry broken color rendering effect, for which colors are observed only from one side of the surface normal. Using a combination of immersed laser interference lithography and nanoimprint lithography, our color rendering structures can be fabricated on areas many inches in size. We foresee applications in anticounterfeiting, photovoltaics, sensing, displays, and optical security. PMID:26498131

  3. Facile Atmospheric Pressure Synthesis of High Thermal Stability and Narrow-Band Red-Emitting SrLiAl3N4:Eu(2+) Phosphor for High Color Rendering Index White Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejie; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Shin-Mou; Lin, Yin-Chih; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2016-08-01

    Red phosphors (e.g., SrLiAl3N4:Eu(2+)) with high thermal stability and narrow-band properties are urgently explored to meet the next-generation high-power white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, to date, synthesis of such phosphors remains an arduous task. Herein, we report, for the first time, a facile method to synthesize SrLiAl3N4:Eu(2+) through Sr3N2, Li3N, Al, and EuN under atmospheric pressure. The as-synthesized narrow-band red-emitting phosphor exhibits excellent thermal stability, including small chromaticity shift and low thermal quenching. Intriguingly, the title phosphor shows an anomalous increase in theoretical lumen equivalent with the increase of temperature as a result of blue shift and band broadening of the emission band, which is crucial for high-power white LEDs. Utilizing the title phosphor, commercial YAG:Ce(3+), and InGaN-based blue LED chip, a proof-of-concept warm white LEDs with a color rendering index (CRI) of 91.1 and R9 = 68 is achieved. Therefore, our results highlight that this method, which is based on atmospheric pressure synthesis, may open a new means to explore narrow-band-emitting nitride phosphor. In addition, the underlying requirements to design Eu(2+)-doped narrow-band-emitting phosphors were also summarized. PMID:27403812

  4. Ce-doped YAG nanophosphor and red emitting CuInS2/ZnS core/shell quantum dots for warm white light-emitting diode with high color rendering index.

    PubMed

    Aboulaich, Abdelhay; Michalska, Martyna; Schneider, Raphaël; Potdevin, Audrey; Deschamps, Jérôme; Deloncle, Rodolphe; Chadeyron, Geneviève; Mahiou, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the solvothermal synthesis of Ce-doped YAG (YAG:Ce) nanoparticles (NPs) and their association with a free-Cd CuInS2/ZnS (CIS/ZnS) core/shell QDs for application into white light emitting diode (WLED). 1500 °C-annealed YAG:Ce NPs and CIS/ZnS core/shell QDs exhibited intense yellow and red emissions band with maxima at 545 and 667 nm, respectively. Both YAG:Ce nanophosphor and CIS/ZnS QDs showed high photoluminescence quantum yield (PL QY) of about 50% upon 460 nm excitation. YAG:Ce nanophosphor layer and bilayered YAG:Ce nanophosphor-CIS/ZnS QDs were applied on blue InGaN chip as converter wavelength to achieve WLED. While YAG:Ce nanophosphor converter layer showed low color rendering index (CRI) and cold white light, bilayered YAG:Ce nanophosphor-CIS/ZnS QDs displayed higher CRI of about 84 and warm white light with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2784 K. WLED characteristics were measured as a function of forward current from 20 to 1200 mA. The white light stability of bilayered nanophosphor-QDs-based WLED operated at 200 mA was also studied as a function of operating time up to 40 h. Interestingly, CRI and CCT of such device tend to remain constant after 7 h of operating time suggesting that layer-by-layer structure of YAG:Ce phosphor and red-emitting CIS/ZnS QDs could be a good solution to achieve stable warm WLED, especially when high current density is applied. PMID:24320991

  5. Adaptive color rendering of maps for users with color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvitle, Anne Kristin; Green, Phil; Nussbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A map is an information design object for which canonical colors for the most common elements are well established. For a CVD observer, it may be difficult to discriminate between such elements - for example, it may be hard to distinguish a red road from a green landscape on the basis of color alone. We address this problem through an adaptive color schema in which the conspicuity of elements in a map to the individual user is maximized. This paper outlines a method to perform adaptive color rendering of map information for users with color vision deficiencies. The palette selection method is based on a pseudo-color palette generation technique which constrains colors to those which lie on the boundary of a reference object color gamut. A user performs a color vision discrimination task, and based on the results of the test, a palette of colors is selected using the pseudo-color palette generation method. This ensures that the perceived difference between palette elements is high but which retains the canonical color of well-known elements as far as possible. We show examples of color palettes computed for a selection of normal and CVD observers, together with maps rendered using these palettes.

  6. Bright three-band white light generated from CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot-assisted Sr{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}:Ce{sup 3+},Li{sup +}-based white light-emitting diode with high color rendering index

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Ho Seong; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Jeon, Duk Young; Yang, Heesun

    2009-10-19

    In this study, bright three-band white light was generated from the CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot (QD)-assisted Sr{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}:Ce{sup 3+},Li{sup +}-based white light-emitting diode (WLED). The CdSe/ZnSe core/shell structure was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CdSe/ZnSe QDs showed high quantum efficiency (79%) and contributed to the high luminous efficiency ({eta}{sub L}) of the fabricated WLED. The WLED showed bright natural white with excellent color rendering property ({eta}{sub L}=26.8 lm/W, color temperature=6140 K, and color rendering index=85) and high stability against the increase in forward bias currents from 20 to 70 mA.

  7. Accurate chromatic control and color rendering optimization in LED lighting systems using junction temperature feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisto, Marco Michele; Gauvin, Jonny

    2014-09-01

    Accurate color control of LED lighting systems is a challenging task: noticeable chromaticity shifts are commonly observed in mixed-color and phosphor converted LEDs due to intensity dimming. Furthermore, the emitted color varies with the LED temperature. We present a novel color control method for tri-chromatic and tetra-chromatic LEDs, which enable to set and maintain the LED emission at a target color, or combination of correlated color temperature (CCT) and intensity. The LED color point is maintained over variations in the LED junctions' temperatures and intensity dimming levels. The method does not require color feedback sensors, so to minimize system complexity and cost, but relies on estimation of the LED junctions' temperatures from the junction voltages. If operated with tetra-chromatic LEDs, the method allows meeting an additional optimization criterion: for example, the maximization of a color rendering metric like the Color Rendering Index (CRI) or the Color Quality Scale (CQS), thus providing a high quality and clarity of colors on the surface illuminated by the LED. We demonstrate the control of a RGBW LED at target D65 white point with CIELAB color difference metric triangle;a,bE < 1 for simultaneous variations of flux from approximately 30 lm to 100 lm and LED heat sink temperature from 25°C to 58°C. In the same conditions, we demonstrate a CCT error <1%. Furthermore, the method allows varying the LED CCT from 5500K to 8000K while maintaining luminance within 1% of target. Further work is ongoing to evaluate the stability of the method over LED aging.

  8. Image indexing using color correlograms

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Jing; Kumar, Shanmugasundaram Ravi; Mitra, Mandar; Zhu, Wei-Jing

    2001-01-01

    A color correlogram is a three-dimensional table indexed by color and distance between pixels which expresses how the spatial correlation of color changes with distance in a stored image. The color correlogram may be used to distinguish an image from other images in a database. To create a color correlogram, the colors in the image are quantized into m color values, c.sub.i . . . c.sub.m. Also, the distance values k.epsilon.[d] to be used in the correlogram are determined where [d] is the set of distances between pixels in the image, and where dmax is the maximum distance measurement between pixels in the image. Each entry (i, j, k) in the table is the probability of finding a pixel of color c.sub.i at a selected distance k from a pixel of color c.sub.i. A color autocorrelogram, which is a restricted version of the color correlogram that considers color pairs of the form (i,i) only, may also be used to identify an image.

  9. Changing the color of textiles with realistic visual rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Mathieu; Henckens, Lambert; Barbier, Justine; Leboulleux, Lucie; Page, Marine; Roujas, Lucie; Cazier, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Fast and easy preview of a fabric without having to produce samples would be very profitable for textile designers, but remains a technological challenge. As a first step towards this objective, we study the possibility of making images of a real sample, and changing virtually the colors of its yarns while preserving the shine and shadow texture. We consider two types of fabrics: Jacquard weave fabrics made of polyester warp and weft yarns of different colors, and satin ribbons made of polyester and metallic yarns. For the Jacquard fabric, we make a color picture with a scanner on a sample in which the yarns have contrasted colors, threshold this image in order to distinguish the pixels corresponding to each yarn, and accordingly modify their hue and chroma values. This method is simple to operate but do not enable to simulate the angle-dependent shine. A second method, tested on the satin ribbon made of black polyester and achromatic metallic yarns, is based on polarized imaging. We analyze the polarization state of the reflected light which is different for dielectric and metallic materials illuminated by polarized light. We then add a fixed color value to the pixels representing the polyester yarns and modify the hue and chroma of the pixels representing the metallic yarns. This was performed for many incident angles of light, in order to render the twinkling effect displayed by these ribbons. We could verify through a few samples that the simulated previews reproduce real pictures with visually acceptable accuracy.

  10. Spectral optimization of color temperature tunable white LEDs with excellent color rendering and luminous efficacy.

    PubMed

    He, Guoxing; Tang, Ju

    2014-10-01

    The optimization model of limited luminous efficacy (LLE) for correlated color temperature (CCT) tunable phosphor-coated white light-emitting diodes (pc-W LEDs) consisting of blue chips, green and yellow phosphors, and red chips, including downconversion energy loss, has been developed under the constraint of a designated color-rendering index (CRI) and a special CRI of R9 for strong red. The optimal spectra of pc-W LEDs are obtained with a nonlinear program for maximizing LLE under conditions of both CRI and R9 above 90, 95, and 98 at CCTs of 2700-6500 K. The pc-W LEDs with LLE>301  lm/W for both CRI and R9 above 90, LLE>290  lm/W for both CRI and R9 above 95, and LLE>276  lm/W for both CRI and R9 above 98 could be achieved at CCTs of 2700-6500 K. The recommended peak wavelengths and full widths at half-maximum (FWHMs) for the current LEDs and phosphors and their photometric and colorimetric performances are presented. PMID:25360930

  11. Improving color saturation for color managed images rendered using the perceptual intent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Gabriel G.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases, rendering images using color management approach may result in unsatisfactory color, particularly for cases when the gamut mismatch is large and the source / destination profile pair does not lead to a satisfactory color. This more often the case when images on laptop computer screens with limited color gamut are transferred to print and color management is used. For those cases, we present a method of improving image quality by manipulating the display profile such that the color quality of the printouts is not compromised by the small gamut of the portable display and color management. The basic idea consists of using in the color management pipeline of a virtual gamut that has the role of either the source or of the destination depending on the type of transformation and the gamut size of the source and destination in the color management pipeline. In case the mismatch between the source and destination gamut is under a threshold the virtual gamut is not used. This virtual gamut is constructed directly in the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram, although other color spaces may be used. A procedure to derive a constant hue line from two adjacent lines is presented. The chromaticities of the virtual gamut are computed based on the replaced gamut chromaticities and a weighting factor computed automatically at the time of rendering. The method proves to give very pleasing results in prints for example and the boost in saturation approximates very well the color enhancement achieved in silver halide photographic prints even for relatively modest print media.

  12. Using nanoimprint lithography to improve the light extraction efficiency and color rendering of dichromatic white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang-Chun; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Lu, Chih-Yu; Wu, Hung-Sen; Chou, Yung-Fang; Chen, Szu-Huang

    2015-10-21

    Despite the efficiency of gallium nitride (GaN)-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), the light extraction arising from the packaging of the phosphor remains an important issue when enhancing the performance of dichromatic white LEDs. In this study, we employed a simple, inexpensive nanoimprinting process to increase both the light extraction efficiency and color rendering of dichromatic white LEDs. We employed the rigorous coupled wave approach (RCWA) to optimize the light extraction efficiency of yellow and blue light. We found that the presence of the light extracting structures could also improve the color rendering of the dichromatic white LEDs, due to the different light extraction efficiencies of the textured structures at different wavelengths. After fabricating inverted pyramid structures on the surface of the encapsulation layer, the intensity of the blue light at 455 nm increased by 20%. When we further considered the color rendering and correlated color temperature (CCT), the enhancement of blue light was 15% and that of yellow light was 4%. Meanwhile, the light extraction of the intensity dip near 490 nm was enhanced significantly (by 25%), resulting in an increased dip-intensity of light at 490 nm relative to the intensities of the blue and yellow light. Accordingly, the color rendering index (CRI) of this dichromatic white LED increased from 69 to 73. Because it improved both the light extraction efficiency and color rendering of dichromatic white LEDs, this simple method should be very helpful for enhancing their applications in solid state illumination. PMID:26381707

  13. A two-metric proposal to specify the color-rendering properties of light sources for retail lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Rea, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Lighting plays an important role in supporting retail operations, from attracting customers, to enabling the evaluation of merchandise, to facilitating the completion of the sale. Lighting also contributes to the identity, comfort, and visual quality of a retail store. With the increasing availability and quality of white LEDs, retail lighting specifiers are now considering LED lighting in stores. The color rendering of light sources is a key factor in supporting retail lighting goals and thus influences a light source's acceptance by users and specifiers. However, there is limited information on what consumers' color preferences are, and metrics used to describe the color properties of light sources often are equivocal and fail to predict preference. The color rendering of light sources is described in the industry solely by the color rendering index (CRI), which is only indirectly related to human perception. CRI is intended to characterize the appearance of objects illuminated by the source and is increasingly being challenged because new sources are being developed with increasingly exotic spectral power distributions. This paper discusses how CRI might be augmented to better use it in support of the design objectives for retail merchandising. The proposed guidelines include the use of gamut area index as a complementary metric to CRI for assuring good color rendering.

  14. Spectral optimization of phosphor-conversion light-emitting diodes for ultimate color rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Ivanauskas, F.; Vaitkevičius, H.; Shur, M. S.

    2008-08-01

    We apply an optimization scheme based on rendering of all colors of the enhanced Munsell palette to phosphor-conversion (PC) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This approach yields combinations of peak wavelengths and bandwidths for white PC LEDs with partial and complete conversion that enable lighting with better quality than that obtained using designs based on the standard color-rendering assessment procedure.

  15. Using nanoimprint lithography to improve the light extraction efficiency and color rendering of dichromatic white light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yang-Chun; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Lu, Chih-Yu; Wu, Hung-Sen; Chou, Yung-Fang; Chen, Szu-Huang

    2015-10-01

    Despite the efficiency of gallium nitride (GaN)-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), the light extraction arising from the packaging of the phosphor remains an important issue when enhancing the performance of dichromatic white LEDs. In this study, we employed a simple, inexpensive nanoimprinting process to increase both the light extraction efficiency and color rendering of dichromatic white LEDs. We employed the rigorous coupled wave approach (RCWA) to optimize the light extraction efficiency of yellow and blue light. We found that the presence of the light extracting structures could also improve the color rendering of the dichromatic white LEDs, due to the different light extraction efficiencies of the textured structures at different wavelengths. After fabricating inverted pyramid structures on the surface of the encapsulation layer, the intensity of the blue light at 455 nm increased by 20%. When we further considered the color rendering and correlated color temperature (CCT), the enhancement of blue light was 15% and that of yellow light was 4%. Meanwhile, the light extraction of the intensity dip near 490 nm was enhanced significantly (by 25%), resulting in an increased dip-intensity of light at 490 nm relative to the intensities of the blue and yellow light. Accordingly, the color rendering index (CRI) of this dichromatic white LED increased from 69 to 73. Because it improved both the light extraction efficiency and color rendering of dichromatic white LEDs, this simple method should be very helpful for enhancing their applications in solid state illumination.Despite the efficiency of gallium nitride (GaN)-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), the light extraction arising from the packaging of the phosphor remains an important issue when enhancing the performance of dichromatic white LEDs. In this study, we employed a simple, inexpensive nanoimprinting process to increase both the light extraction efficiency and color rendering of dichromatic white

  16. Red-emitting silicon quantum dot phosphors in warm white LEDs with excellent color rendering.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chang-Ching; Hoo, Ji H; Böhringer, Karl F; Lin, Lih Y; Cao, Guozhong

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate red-emitting silicon quantum dot (SiQD) phosphors as a low-cost and environment-friendly alternative to rare-earth element phosphors or CdSe quantum dots. After surface passivation, the SiQD-phosphors achieve high photoluminescence quantum yield = 51% with 365-nm excitation. The phosphors also have a peak photoluminescence wavelength at 630 nm and a full-width-at-half-maximum of 145 nm. The relatively broadband red emission is ideal for forming the basis of a warm white spectrum. With 365-nm or 405-nm LED pumping and the addition of green- and/or blue-emitting rare-earth element phosphors, warm white LEDs with color rendering index ~95 have been achieved. PMID:24922236

  17. Red-emitting silicon quantum dot phosphors in warm white LEDs with excellent color rendering.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chang-Ching; Hoo, Ji H; Böhringer, Karl F; Lin, Lih Y; Cao, Guozhong

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate red-emitting silicon quantum dot (SiQD) phosphors as a low-cost and environment-friendly alternative to rare-earth element phosphors or CdSe quantum dots. After surface passivation, the SiQD-phosphors achieve high photoluminescence quantum yield = 51% with 365-nm excitation. The phosphors also have a peak photoluminescence wavelength at 630 nm and a full-width-at-half-maximum of 145 nm. The relatively broadband red emission is ideal for forming the basis of a warm white spectrum. With 365-nm or 405-nm LED pumping and the addition of green- and/or blue-emitting rare-earth element phosphors, warm white LEDs with color rendering index ~95 have been achieved. PMID:24800283

  18. Energy-Efficient, High-Color-Rendering LED Lamps Using Oxyfluoride and Fluoride Phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Setlur, A.; Radkov, E; Henderson, C; Her, J; Srivastava, A; Karkada, N; Kishore, M; Kumar, N; Aesram, D; et al.

    2010-01-01

    LED lamps using phosphor downconversion can be designed to replace incandescent or halogen sources with a 'warm-white' correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2700-3200 K and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 90. However, these lamps have efficacies of {approx}70% of standard 'cool-white' LED packages (CCT = 4500-6000 K; CRI = 75-80). In this report, we describe structural and luminescence properties of fluoride and oxyfluoride phosphors, specifically a (Sr,Ca){sub 3}(Al,Si)O{sub 4}(F,O):Ce{sup 3+} yellow-green phosphor and a K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} red phosphor, that can reduce this gap and therefore meet the spectral and efficiency requirements for high-efficacy LED lighting. LED lamps with a warm-white color temperature (3088 K), high CRI (90), and an efficacy of {approx}82 lm/W are demonstrated using these phosphors. This efficacy is {approx}85% of comparable cool-white lamps using typical Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}-based phosphors, significantly reducing the efficacy gap between warm-white and cool-white LED lamps that use phosphor downconversion.

  19. On ratio-based color indexing.

    PubMed

    Adjeroh, D A; Lee, M C

    2001-01-01

    The color ratio approach to indexing has been found to be robust and effective in indexing image and video databases, in different color spaces, and when using transformed color features, such as those from the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) or the discrete cosine transform (DCT). However, the reason for the superior performance of the color ratio model, especially on different color spaces or with transformed color features has, at best, been speculative. This paper develops a generalized form for the color ratio model, based on which we characterize the general distribution of the color ratios. From the distribution, we present a theory that explains and supports the performance of the color ratio approach in image and video indexing. It is shown that the same theory accounts for its effectiveness in different color spaces and in the transform domain. Some general problems encountered in using the original retinex lightness algorithm, and some other issues specific to ratio-based color indexing are discussed in the light of the theory. Results are presented which show that the proposed theory is supported by empirical evidence. PMID:18249595

  20. High Dynamic Range Image rendering of color in chameleons' camouflage using optical thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prusten, Mark

    2008-08-01

    High Dynamic Range Image (HDRI) rendering and animation of color in the camouflage of chameleons is developed utilizing thin film optics. Chameleons are a lizard species, and have the ability to change their skin color. This change in color is an expression of the physical and physiological conditions of the lizard, and plays a part in communication. The different colors that can be produced depending on the species include pink, blue, red, orange, green, black, brown and yellow. The modeling, simulation, and rendering of the color, which their skin incorporates, thin film optical stacks. The skin of a chameleon has four layers, which together produce various colors. The outside transparent layer has chromatophores cells, of two kinds of color, yellow and red. Next there are two more layers that reflect light: one blue and the other white. The innermost layer contains dark pigment granules or melanophore cells that influences the amount of reflected light. All of these pigment cells can rapidly relocate their pigments, thereby influencing the color of the chameleon. Techniques like subsurface scattering, the simulation of volumetric scattering of light underneath the objects surface, and final gathering are defined in custom shaders and material phenomena for the renderer. The workflow developed to model the chameleon's skin is also applied to simulation and rendering of hair and fur camouflage, which does not exist in nature.

  1. Near-ultraviolet LED of the External Quantum Efficiency Over 45% and its Application to High-color Rendering Phosphor Conversion White LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuta, Hiroaki; Fukui, Takeshi; Miyachi, Tsutomu; Kamon, Kunihito; Hayashi, Hideki; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Uchida, Yuji; Kurai, Satoshi; Taguchi, Tsunemasa

    Highly luminous efficiency and color rendering index (CRI) of 70 lm/W and 95 under low correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3177 K has been obtained by phosphor conversion (PC) white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using near-ultra violet (n-UV) LEDs with the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 46.7%. The homogeneous spatial color uniformity on chromaticity of PC white LEDs excited by n-UV LEDs are particularly adequate to the general lighting applications.

  2. Accelerating Time-Varying Hardware Volume Rendering Using TSP Trees and Color-Based Error Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Chiang, Ling-Jen; Shen, Han-Wei; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new hardware volume rendering algorithm for time-varying data. The algorithm uses the Time-Space Partitioning (TSP) tree data structure to identify regions within the data that have spatial or temporal coherence. By using this coherence, the rendering algorithm can improve performance when the volume data is larger than the texture memory capacity by decreasing the amount of textures required. This coherence can also allow improved speed by appropriately rendering flat-shaded polygons instead of textured polygons, and by not rendering transparent regions. To reduce the polygonization overhead caused by the use of the hierarchical data structure, we introduce an optimization method using polygon templates. The paper also introduces new color-based error metrics, which more accurately identify coherent regions compared to the earlier scalar-based metrics. By showing experimental results from runs using different data sets and error metrics, we demonstrate that the new methods give substantial improvements in volume rendering performance.

  3. Ammonium hydroxide modulated synthesis of high-quality fluorescent carbon dots for white LEDs with excellent color rendering properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengda; Zhu, Zhifeng; Chang, Yajing; Wang, Hui; Yuan, Nan; Li, Guopeng; Yu, Dabin; Jiang, Yang

    2016-07-22

    A novel type of aqueous fluorescent carbon dot (CD) was synthesized using citric acid as the only carbon source via an ammonium hydroxide modulated method, providing a blue color gamut. The amino group is considered to be the key factor in the high fluorescence of CDs and a model is established to investigate the mechanism of fluorescence. In addition, white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) are fabricated by utilizing the prepared CDs and rare earth luminescent materials (SrSi2O2N2:Eu and Sr2Si5N8:Eu) as color conversion layers and UV-LED chips as the excitation light source. The WLEDs produce bright white light with attractive color rendering properties including a color rendering index of up to 95.1, a CIE coordinate of (0.33, 0.37), and a T c of 5447 K under a 100 mA driven current, indicating that the CDs are promising in the field of optoelectronic devices. PMID:27276359

  4. Ammonium hydroxide modulated synthesis of high-quality fluorescent carbon dots for white LEDs with excellent color rendering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengda; Zhu, Zhifeng; Chang, Yajing; Wang, Hui; Yuan, Nan; Li, Guopeng; Yu, Dabin; Jiang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A novel type of aqueous fluorescent carbon dot (CD) was synthesized using citric acid as the only carbon source via an ammonium hydroxide modulated method, providing a blue color gamut. The amino group is considered to be the key factor in the high fluorescence of CDs and a model is established to investigate the mechanism of fluorescence. In addition, white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) are fabricated by utilizing the prepared CDs and rare earth luminescent materials (SrSi2O2N2:Eu and Sr2Si5N8:Eu) as color conversion layers and UV-LED chips as the excitation light source. The WLEDs produce bright white light with attractive color rendering properties including a color rendering index of up to 95.1, a CIE coordinate of (0.33, 0.37), and a T c of 5447 K under a 100 mA driven current, indicating that the CDs are promising in the field of optoelectronic devices.

  5. Fabrication of LED lighting goggle for surgical operation and approach toward high-color rendering performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Yoichi; Shimada, Junichi; Fujita, Shigeo

    2001-12-01

    The first internal shunt operation in the left forearm has successfully been performed using the surgical lighting goggle composed of InGaN-yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG)-based white light emitting diode(LED) arrays. This system supplies a total luminous flux of about 200 lumen for several hours by driving with rechargeable Li-ion batteries. Further increase in luminous flux can be achieved by both the progress of emission efficiency of white LEDs and the development of dense packaging technique of LED chips. Moreover, the color rendering properties of white LEDs are inferior to the standard illuminant especially in violet, green and red spectral range. In this paper, several device structures are proposed for achieving power lighting and for higher color rendering properties. The key technology for power lighting is how to radiate the heat out of LED chips, and that for higher color rendering is how to add desired illumination-spectral-components to LEDs according to the application fields.

  6. High color-rendering warm-white lamps using quantum-dot color conversion films.

    PubMed

    Lien, Jiun-Yi; Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2016-07-11

    Colloidal quantum dots are promising next-generation phosphors to enhance the color rendition of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) while minimizing the brightness droop. In order to exploit the beneficial tunability of quantum dots for highly efficient devices, optimization and determination of the performance limit are of crucial importance. In this work, a facile preparation process of red-emission quantum dot films and simulation algorithm for fitting this film with two commercial LED flat lamps to the optimized performance are developed. Based on the algorithm, one lamp improves from cold-white light (8669 K) with poor color rendition (Ra = 72) and luminous efficacy (85 lm/W) to warm-white light (2867 K) with Ra = 90.8 and R9 = 74.9, and the other reaches Ra = 93 ∼ 95. Impressively, the brightness droop is only about 15 ∼ 20% and the luminous efficacy of 68 lm/W is achieved. Furthermore, our device shows reliability over 1000 hours with only PET (polyethylene-terephthalate) films as the barrier, indicating that this auxiliary red-emission film can be easily applied to improve the color rendition of most commercial LED flat lamps. PMID:27410891

  7. High color-rendering warm-white lamps using quantum-dot color conversion films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Jiun-Yi; Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2016-07-01

    Colloidal quantum dots are promising next-generation phosphors to enhance the color rendition of light-emitting devices (LEDs) while minimizing the brightness drop. In order to exploit the beneficial tunability of quantum dots for highly efficient devices, optimization and determination of the performance limit are of crucial importance. In this work, a facile preparation process of red-emission quantum dot films and simulation algorithm for fitting this film with two commercial LED flat lamps to the optimized performance are developed. Based on the algorithm, one lamp improves from cold-white light (8669 K) with poor color rendition ($R_{a}=72$) and luminous efficacy (85 lm/W) to warm-white light (2867 K) with $R_{a}=90.8$ and $R_{9}=74.9$, and the other reaches $R_{a}=93\\sim95$. Impressively, the brightness drop is only about $15\\sim20\\%$. Furthermore, our device shows reliability over 1000 hours with only PET (polyethylene-terephthalate) films as the barrier, indicating that this auxiliary red-emission film can be easily applied to improve the color rendition of most commercial LED flat lamps.

  8. Study on the correlations between color rendering indices and the spectral power distribution.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhonghua; Guo, Ziquan; Liu, Zhuguang; Lan, Hai; Lu, Yijun; Cao, Yongge

    2014-06-30

    The intrinsic spectrally resolved sensitivity (ISRS) of color rendering indices (CRIs) is investigated by using spectral loss simulations. It is demonstrated that R(a) exhibits large sensitivities around 444, 480, 564, and 622 nm, while for R(9) the sensitivity peaks are around 461, 581 and 630 nm, which all shift slightly with the correlated color temperature. If considering the ISRS as a bridge between the spectral power distribution of LED and its CRI, one could obtain a high CRI by minimizing the deviation between the shapes of the illuminant spectrum and the reference spectrum, both after modulations by the ISRS as a weighting function. This approach, recommended as a guideline for the spectra design aiming at a high CRI, is described and justified in depth via a mathematical model. This method is spectra-oriented and could largely facilitate the spectra design. PMID:24978066

  9. High-color rendering indices performance of glass based phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes for solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chun-Chin; Cheng, Wei-Chih; Chen, Guan-Hao; Lee, Yu-Chun; Kuo, Cheng Ta; Cheng, Wood-Hi

    2014-02-01

    The high-temperature operation of glass based phosphor-converted warm-white light-emitting diodes (PC-WWLEDs) is demonstrated. The fabrication and characteristics of low-temperature phosphor (Yollow:Ce:3+:YAG, Greed:Tb3+:YAG, Red:CaAlClSiN3:Eu2+) doped glass applied to high color rendering indices warm-white-light-emitting diodes was presented. In this property is color coordinates (x, y) = (0.32, 0.28), quantum yield (QY) = 55%, color rending index (CRI) =85, correlated color temperature (CCT) =3900K. The result showed the PC-WLEDs maintained good thermal stability at the high temperature operation. The QY decay, CRI attenuation and chromaticity shift in glass and silicone based high-power PC-WLEDs under thermal aging at 150°C and 250°C are also presented and compared. The result indicated that the glass based PC-WLEDs exhibited better thermal stability than the silicone. And the color rendering indices (CRI) glass phosphor may have potential used as a phosphor layer for high-performance and low-cost PCWLEDs used in next-generation indoors solid-state lighting applications.

  10. Modeling a color-rendering operator for high dynamic range images using a cone-response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ho-Hyoung; Kim, Gi-Seok; Yun, Byoung-Ju

    2015-09-01

    Tone-mapping operators are the typical algorithms designed to produce visibility and the overall impression of brightness, contrast, and color of high dynamic range (HDR) images on low dynamic range (LDR) display devices. Although several new tone-mapping operators have been proposed in recent years, the results of these operators have not matched those of the psychophysical experiments based on the human visual system. A color-rendering model that is a combination of tone-mapping and cone-response functions using an XYZ tristimulus color space is presented. In the proposed method, the tone-mapping operator produces visibility and the overall impression of brightness, contrast, and color in HDR images when mapped onto relatively LDR devices. The tone-mapping resultant image is obtained using chromatic and achromatic colors to avoid well-known color distortions shown in the conventional methods. The resulting image is then processed with a cone-response function wherein emphasis is placed on human visual perception (HVP). The proposed method covers the mismatch between the actual scene and the rendered image based on HVP. The experimental results show that the proposed method yields an improved color-rendering performance compared to conventional methods.

  11. High color rendering white light-emitting-diode illuminator using the red-emitting Eu(2+)-activated CaZnOS phosphors excited by blue LED.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Te-Wen; Liu, Wei-Ren; Chen, Teng-Ming

    2010-04-12

    A red phosphor CaZnOS:Eu(2+) was synthesized by solid state reaction and has been evaluated as a candidate for white LEDs. For this material, the XRD, PL, PL excitation (PLE) and diffuse reflection spectra have also been investigated. CaZnOS:Eu(2+) reveals a broad absorption band and good color purity. By utilizing a mixture of red-emitting CaZnOS:Eu(2+), green-emitting (Ba,Sr)(2)SiO(4):Eu(2+) and yellow-emitting Y(3)Al(5)O(12):Ce(3+) as light converters, an intense white InGaN-based blue-LED (~460 nm) was fabricated to exhibit a high color-rendering index Ra of 85 at a correlated color temperature of 4870 K. Based on the results, we are currently evaluating the potential application of CaZnOS:Eu(2+) as a red-emitting blue-chip convertible phosphor. PMID:20588664

  12. Chromatic settings and the structural color constancy index.

    PubMed

    Roca-Vila, Jordi; Parraga, C Alejandro; Vanrell, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Color constancy is usually measured by achromatic setting, asymmetric matching, or color naming paradigms, whose results are interpreted in terms of indexes and models that arguably do not capture the full complexity of the phenomenon. Here we propose a new paradigm, chromatic setting, which allows a more comprehensive characterization of color constancy through the measurement of multiple points in color space under immersive adaptation. We demonstrated its feasibility by assessing the consistency of subjects' responses over time. The paradigm was applied to two-dimensional (2-D) Mondrian stimuli under three different illuminants, and the results were used to fit a set of linear color constancy models. The use of multiple colors improved the precision of more complex linear models compared to the popular diagonal model computed from gray. Our results show that a diagonal plus translation matrix that models mechanisms other than cone gain might be best suited to explain the phenomenon. Additionally, we calculated a number of color constancy indices for several points in color space, and our results suggest that interrelations among colors are not as uniform as previously believed. To account for this variability, we developed a new structural color constancy index that takes into account the magnitude and orientation of the chromatic shift in addition to the interrelations among colors and memory effects. PMID:23479473

  13. Spectral estimation from laser scanner data for accurate color rendering of objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baribeau, Rejean

    2002-06-01

    Estimation methods are studied for the recovery of the spectral reflectance across the visible range from the sensing at just three discrete laser wavelengths. Methods based on principal component analysis and on spline interpolation are judged based on the CIE94 color differences for some reference data sets. These include the Macbeth color checker, the OSA-UCS color charts, some artist pigments, and a collection of miscellaneous surface colors. The optimal three sampling wavelengths are also investigated. It is found that color can be estimated with average accuracy ΔE94 = 2.3 when optimal wavelengths 455 nm, 540 n, and 610 nm are used.

  14. Virtual Exploration and Comparison of Linear Mastoid Drilling Trajectories with True-Color Volume Rendering and the Visible Ear Dataset

    PubMed Central

    KAHRS, Lueder A.; LABADIE, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides instructions for a virtual exploration and self-study of surgical approaches within the temporal bone. Linear drilling trajectories in the sense of keyhole accesses are compared with free true-color rendering techniques to introduce and evaluate new otologic approaches. On the basis of free cyro-histology image data from a temporal bone six different drill canals are presented. Such a virtual method has the potential to be a first step of investigation of new surgical approaches before moving to cadaver testing. PMID:23400159

  15. Effect of phosphor geometry on the luminous efficiency of high-power white light-emitting diodes with excellent color rendering property.

    PubMed

    Won, Yu-Ho; Jang, Ho Seong; Cho, Kyoung Woo; Song, Yong Seon; Jeon, Duk Young; Kwon, Ho Ki

    2009-01-01

    High-power white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are fabricated by combining blue LEDs and green (Ba,Sr)(2)SiO(4):Eu(2+) and red CaAlSiN(3):Eu(2+) phosphors with varying phosphor geometry. The white LED having separated the phosphor layer by the silicone gel layer between green and red phosphor layers shows superior optical properties. The luminous efficiency (eta(L)) is improved by a decrease of reabsorption of green light by red phosphor owing to a difference among refractive indices. The white LED shows very high eta(L) of 51 lm/W and a high color rendering index of 95 under 350 mA. In addition, improved luminous properties of the white LED including a separated phosphor layer are confirmed via ray-trace simulation. PMID:19109620

  16. Usage of Data-Encoded Web Maps with Client Side Color Rendering for Combined Data Access, Visualization and Modeling Purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narashimha S.

    2013-01-01

    Current approaches to satellite observation data storage and distribution implement separate visualization and data access methodologies which often leads to the need in time consuming data ordering and coding for applications requiring both visual representation as well as data handling and modeling capabilities. We describe an approach we implemented for a data-encoded web map service based on storing numerical data within server map tiles and subsequent client side data manipulation and map color rendering. The approach relies on storing data using the lossless compression Portable Network Graphics (PNG) image data format which is natively supported by web-browsers allowing on-the-fly browser rendering and modification of the map tiles. The method is easy to implement using existing software libraries and has the advantage of easy client side map color modifications, as well as spatial subsetting with physical parameter range filtering. This method is demonstrated for the ASTER-GDEM elevation model and selected MODIS data products and represents an alternative to the currently used storage and data access methods. One additional benefit includes providing multiple levels of averaging due to the need in generating map tiles at varying resolutions for various map magnification levels. We suggest that such merged data and mapping approach may be a viable alternative to existing static storage and data access methods for a wide array of combined simulation, data access and visualization purposes.

  17. Warm-white light-emitting diodes integrated with colloidal quantum dots for high luminous efficacy and color rendering: reply to comment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamoglu, Sedat; Erdem, Talha; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2011-08-01

    The correlated color temperatures and the corresponding color rendering indices calculated using actual experimental data (and not any prediction) in the original Letter [Opt. Lett. 35, 3372 (2010)] are correct. In addition, here the color rendering of our white LEDs integrated with nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) is provided for all test samples. Also, a new NQD-LED design with both high luminous efficacy of optical radiation and CRI is presented to have a chromaticity point in the quadrangle stated in the comment Letter [Opt. Lett. 36, 2851 (2011)]. The points made in the original Letter and all the calculation results provided therein are valid.

  18. Volumetric rendering and metrology of spherical gradient refractive index lens imaged by angular scan optical coherence tomography system.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianing; Thompson, Kevin P; Ma, Bin; Ponting, Michael; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-08-22

    In this paper, we develop the methodology, including the refraction correction, geometrical thickness correction, coordinate transformation, and layer segmentation algorithms, for 3D rendering and metrology of a layered spherical gradient refractive index (S-GRIN) lens based on the imaging data collected by an angular scan optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The 3D mapping and rendering enables direct 3D visualization and internal defect inspection of the lens. The metrology provides assessment of the surface geometry, the lens thickness, the radii of curvature of the internal layer interfaces, and the misalignment of the internal S-GRIN distribution with respect to the lens surface. The OCT metrology results identify the manufacturing defects, and enable targeted process development for optimizing the manufacturing parameters. The newly fabricated S-GRIN lenses show up to a 7x spherical aberration reduction that allows a significantly increased utilizable effective aperture. PMID:27557217

  19. Concentric ring phosphor geometry on the luminous efficiency of white-light-emitting diodes with excellent color rendering property.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shang-Ping; Shen, Jian-Yu

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a novel remote phosphor design involving a concentric ring remote phosphor layer in which green and red phosphors are separated. The green and red phosphor rings were separately illuminated by blue light emitted from the light-emitting diode (LED), causing low reabsorption in phosphor-converted LEDs (pcLEDs) using green and red phosphors. The experimental results revealed that the pcLEDs with green and red phosphors showed high color rendering, indicating that the LEDs are suitable for certain medical applications and architectural lighting. Moreover, for given green/red phosphor ratio and weights of the green and red phosphors, the output power and luminous flux of the pcLED with a concentric ring remote phosphor layer were greater than those of the pcLED with a mixed remote phosphor layer. The reduction in the reabsorption of green emission by red phosphor in pcLED with a concentric ring remote phosphor layer was responsible for the high luminous flux and indicated a high correlated color temperature of pcLED. PMID:27128056

  20. Influence of junction temperature on chromaticity and color-rendering properties of trichromatic white-light sources based on light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhajed, S.; Xi, Y.; Li, Y.-L.; Gessmann, Th.; Schubert, E. F.

    2005-03-01

    Trichromatic white-light sources based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offer a high luminous efficacy of radiation, a broad range of color temperatures and excellent color-rendering properties with color-rendering indices (CRIs) exceeding 85. An analysis of the luminous efficacy and CRI of a trichromatic light source is performed for a very broad range of wavelength combinations. The peak emission wavelength, spectral width, and the output power of LEDs strongly depend on temperature and the dependencies for red, green, and blue LEDs are established. A detailed analysis of the temperature dependence of trichromatic white LED sources reveals that the luminous efficacy decreases, the color temperature increases, the CRI decreases and the chromaticity point shifts towards the blue as the junction temperature increases. A high CRI >80 can be maintained, by adjusting the LED power ratio so that the chromaticity point is conserved.

  1. Dual emissive manganese and copper Co-doped Zn-In-S quantum dots as a single color-converter for high color rendering white-light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xi; Ma, Ruixin; Zhang, Wenjin; Hua, Jie; Meng, Xiangdong; Zhong, Xinhua; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhao, Jialong; Li, Haibo

    2015-04-29

    Novel white light emitting diodes (LEDs) with environmentally friendly dual emissive quantum dots (QDs) as single color-converters are one of the most promising high-quality solid-state lighting sources for meeting the growing global demand for resource sustainability. A facile method was developed for the synthesis of the bright green-red-emitting Mn and Cu codoped Zn-In-S QDs with an absorption bangdgap of 2.56 eV (485 nm), a large Stokes shift of 150 nm, and high emission quantum yield up to 75%, which were suitable for warm white LEDs based on blue GaN chips. The wide photoluminescence (PL) spectra composed of Cu-related green and Mn-related red emissions in the codoped QDs could be controlled by varying the doping concentrations of Mn and Cu ions. The energy transfer processes in Mn and Cu codoped QDs were proposed on the basis of the changes in PL intensity and lifetime measured by means of steady-state and time-resolved PL spectra. By integrating these bicolor QDs with commercial GaN-based blue LEDs, the as-fabricated tricolor white LEDs showed bright natural white light with a color rendering index of 95, luminous efficacy of 73.2 lm/W, and color temperature of 5092 K. These results indicated that (Mn,Cu):Zn-In-S/ZnS QDs could be used as a single color-converting material for the next generation of solid-state lighting. PMID:25866991

  2. Color Index Imaging of the Stellar Stream Around NGC 5907

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo; Grillmair, Carl J.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Capak, Peter; Arendt, Richard G.; Ashby, Matthew; Davies, James E.; Majewski, Steven R.; GaBany, R. Jay

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained deep g, r, and i-band Subaru and ultra-deep 3.6 micron Spitzer/IRAC images of parts of the stellar stream around the nearby edge-on disk galaxy NGC 5907. We report on the color index distribution of the resolved emission along the stream, and indicators of recent star formation associated with the stream. We present scenarios regarding the nature of the disrupted satellite galaxy, based on our data. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. This work is based in part on data collected with the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  3. Color Index Imaging of the Stellar Stream Around NGC 5907

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo; Grillmair, Carl J.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Romanowsky, Aaron; Capak, Peter; Arendt, Richard G.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Davies, James; Majewski, Steven; GaBany, R. Jay

    2015-08-01

    We have obtained deep g, r, and i-band Subaru and ultra-deep 3.6 micron Spitzer/IRAC images of parts of the spectacular, multiply-looped stellar stream around the nearby edge-on disk galaxy NGC 5907. We report on the color index distribution of the integrated starlight and the derived stellar populations along the stream. We present scenarios regarding the nature of the disrupted satellite galaxy, based on our data. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. This work is based in part on data collected with the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  4. One-Step Preparation of Blue-Emitting (La,Ca)Si3(O,N)5:Ce3+ Phosphors for High-Color Rendering White Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaguchi, Atsuro; Suehiro, Takayuki; Sato, Tsugio; Hirosaki, Naoto

    2011-02-01

    Highly phase-pure (La,Ca)Si3(O,N)5:Ce3+ blue-emitting phosphors were successfully synthesized via the one-step solid-state reaction from the system La2O3-CaO-CeO2-Si3N4. The synthesized (La,Ca)Si3(O,N)5:Ce3+ exhibits tunable blue broadband emission with the dominant wavelength of 466-479 nm and the external quantum efficiency up to ˜45% under 380 nm near-UV (NUV) excitation. Spectral simulations of the trichromatic white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using (La,Ca)Si3(O,N)5:Ce3+ demonstrated markedly higher color rendering index Ra values of 93-95, compared to 76-90 attained by the systems using a conventional BAM:Eu2+ phosphor or InGaN blue LED. The present achievement indicates the promising applicability of (La,Ca)Si3(O,N)5:Ce3+ as a blue luminescent source for NUV-converting high-color rendering white LEDs.

  5. Evaluation of the effectiveness of color attributes for video indexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Bertrand; Forest, Ronan

    2001-10-01

    Color features are reviewed and their effectiveness assessed in the application framework of key-frame clustering for abstracting unconstrained video. Existing color spaces and associated quantization schemes are first studied. Description of global color distribution by means of histograms is then detailed. In our work, 12 combinations of color space and quantization were selected, together with 12 histogram metrics. Their respective effectiveness with respect to picture similarity measurement was evaluated through a query-by-example scenario. For that purpose, a set of still-picture databases was built by extracting key frames from several video clips, including news, documentaries, sports and cartoons. Classical retrieval performance evaluation criteria were adapted to the specificity of our testing methodology.

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of color attributes for video indexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Bertrand; Forest, Ronan

    2000-12-01

    Color features are reviewed and their effectiveness assessed in the application framework of key-frame clustering for abstracting unconstrained video. Existing color spaces and associated quantization schemes are first studied. Description of global color distribution by means of histograms is then detailed. In our work, twelve combinations of color space and quantization were selected, together with twelve histogram metrics. Their respective effectiveness with respect to picture similarity measurement was evaluated through a query-be-example scenario. For that purpose, a set of still-picture databases was built by extracting key-frames from several video clips, including news, documentaries, sports and cartoons. Classical retrieval performance evaluation criteria were adapted to the specificity of our testing methodology.

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of color attributes for video indexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Bertrand; Forest, Ronan

    2001-01-01

    Color features are reviewed and their effectiveness assessed in the application framework of key-frame clustering for abstracting unconstrained video. Existing color spaces and associated quantization schemes are first studied. Description of global color distribution by means of histograms is then detailed. In our work, twelve combinations of color space and quantization were selected, together with twelve histogram metrics. Their respective effectiveness with respect to picture similarity measurement was evaluated through a query-be-example scenario. For that purpose, a set of still-picture databases was built by extracting key-frames from several video clips, including news, documentaries, sports and cartoons. Classical retrieval performance evaluation criteria were adapted to the specificity of our testing methodology.

  8. SRTM Data Release for Eurasia, Index Map and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    , various landforms place constraints upon land use planning for a great population. Volcanoes in the East Indies, the Philippines, Japan, and the Kamchatka Peninsula form the western part of the 'Ring of Fire' around the Pacific Ocean.

    Many of these regions were previously very poorly mapped due to persistent cloud cover or the inaccessibility of the terrain. Digital elevation data, such as provided by SRTM, are particularly in high demand by scientists studying earthquakes, volcanism, and erosion patterns for use in mapping and modeling hazards to human habitation. But the shape of Earth's surface affects nearly every natural process and human endeavor that occurs there, so elevation data are used in a wide range of applications.

    In this index map color-coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations. The large, very dark green feature in western Asia is the Caspian Sea, which is below sea level. Blue areas on the map represent water within the mapped tiles, each of which includes shorelines or islands.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion

  9. SRTM Data Release for Eurasia, Index Map and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    , various landforms place constraints upon land use planning for a great population. Volcanoes in the East Indies, the Philippines, Japan, and the Kamchatka Peninsula form the western part of the 'Ring of Fire' around the Pacific Ocean.

    Many of these regions were previously very poorly mapped due to persistent cloud cover or the inaccessibility of the terrain. Digital elevation data, such as provided by SRTM, are particularly in high demand by scientists studying earthquakes, volcanism, and erosion patterns for use in mapping and modeling hazards to human habitation. But the shape of Earth's surface affects nearly every natural process and human endeavor that occurs there, so elevation data are used in a wide range of applications.

    In this index map color-coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations. The large, very dark green feature in western Asia is the Caspian Sea, which is below sea level. Blue areas on the map represent water within the mapped tiles, each of which includes shorelines or islands.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion

  10. Parallel rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides a broad introduction to the subject of parallel rendering, encompassing both hardware and software systems. The focus is on the underlying concepts and the issues which arise in the design of parallel rendering algorithms and systems. We examine the different types of parallelism and how they can be applied in rendering applications. Concepts from parallel computing, such as data decomposition, task granularity, scalability, and load balancing, are considered in relation to the rendering problem. We also explore concepts from computer graphics, such as coherence and projection, which have a significant impact on the structure of parallel rendering algorithms. Our survey covers a number of practical considerations as well, including the choice of architectural platform, communication and memory requirements, and the problem of image assembly and display. We illustrate the discussion with numerous examples from the parallel rendering literature, representing most of the principal rendering methods currently used in computer graphics.

  11. The site occupation and valence of Mn ions in the crystal lattice of Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25} and its deep red emission for high color-rendering white light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Xue, Shaochan; Chen, Xiuling; Bahader, Ali; Deng, Xiaorong; Zhao, Erlong; Jiang, Yang; Chen, Shifu; Chan, Ting-Shan; Zhao, Zhi; Zhang, Wenhua

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Different valences of Mn ions in Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25} were identified using XANES and EPR. • Red luminescence was attributed to Mn{sup 4+} occupying the center of AlO{sub 6} octahedron. • The Mn{sup 3+} incorporated in the center of AlO{sub 4} tetrahedron was non-luminescent. • The bond-valence theory was used to analyze the effective valences of cations. • A white LED device with CRI up to Ra 93.23 was packaged by using the red phosphor. - Abstract: The synthesis and component of red phosphor, Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25}: Mn, were optimized for application in white light-emitting diodes. The microstructure and morphology were investigated by the X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Different valences of Mn ions in Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25} were discriminated using the electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy techniques. The bond-valence theory was used to analyze the effective valences of Sr{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} in Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25}. As a result, the strong covalence of Al{sup 3+} in the AlO{sub 4} tetrahedron other than in the AlO{sub 6} octahedron is disclosed. The deep red emission is attributed to Mn{sup 4+} occupying the center of AlO{sub 6} octahedron. The mechanism of energy transfer is mainly through dipole–dipole interaction, revealed by the analyses of critical distance and concentration quench. A high color rendering white LED prototype with color-rendering index up to Ra 93.23 packaged by using the red phosphor demonstrates its applicability.

  12. Color of kerogen as index of organic maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, K. E.; Kaplan, I. R.; Ishiwatari, R.

    1977-01-01

    Kerogen from the Tanner basin off southern California was heated under nitrogen at different temperatures and times and subsequently was studied under the transmitted light microscope. Samples darken in color from yellow through shades of brown to black with increasing thermal maturation. The transition from dark brown to very dark brown marks the range of maximum n-alkane generation where the residue attains an atomic H/C of about 0.80 plus or minus 0.05. The apparent activation energy for this transition was about 45 plus or minus 5 kcal per mole.

  13. Quaternion structural similarity: a new quality index for color images.

    PubMed

    Kolaman, Amir; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important issues for researchers developing image processing algorithms is image quality. Methodical quality evaluation, by showing images to several human observers, is slow, expensive, and highly subjective. On the other hand, a visual quality matrix (VQM) is a fast, cheap, and objective tool for evaluating image quality. Although most VQMs are good in predicting the quality of an image degraded by a single degradation, they poorly perform for a combination of two degradations. An example for such degradation is the color crosstalk (CTK) effect, which introduces blur with desaturation. CTK is expected to become a bigger issue in image quality as the industry moves toward smaller sensors. In this paper, we will develop a VQM that will be able to better evaluate the quality of an image degraded by a combined blur/desaturation degradation and perform as well as other VQMs on single degradations such as blur, compression, and noise. We show why standard scalar techniques are insufficient to measure a combined blur/desaturation degradation and explain why a vectorial approach is better suited. We introduce quaternion image processing (QIP), which is a true vectorial approach and has many uses in the fields of physics and engineering. Our new VQM is a vectorial expansion of structure similarity using QIP, which gave it its name-Quaternion Structural SIMilarity (QSSIM). We built a new database of a combined blur/desaturation degradation and conducted a quality survey with human subjects. An extensive comparison between QSSIM and other VQMs on several image quality databases-including our new database-shows the superiority of this new approach in predicting visual quality of color images. PMID:22203713

  14. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: High colour rendering index non-doped-type white organic light-emitting devices with a RGB-stacked multilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenfa; Zhao, Yi; Li, Chuannan; Liu, Shiyong

    2005-12-01

    A non-doped-type white organic light-emitting device with high colour rendering index has been reported. The structure of the device is ITO/NPB (50 nm)/TPBI (3 nm)/Alq3 (d nm)/DCM2 (0.1 nm)/TPBI (40 - d nm)/Alq3 (10 nm)/LiF/Al, where NPB is N, N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N, N'-diphenyl-1, 1'-biph-enyl-4, 4'-diamine, TPBI is 2, 2', 2''-(1, 3, 5-phenylene) tris(1-phenyl-1H-benzimidazole), Alq3 is tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium, DCM2 is [2-methyl-6-[2-(2, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydro-1H, 5H-benzo[ij] quinolizin-9-yl)ethenyl]-4H-pyran-4-ylidene] propane-dinitrile. Through the optimization of d, pure white emission with CIE coordinates of (0.3198, 0.3400) at 9 V was obtained, at which the colour temperature and colour rendering index were 6080 K and 97, respectively. The CIE coordinates of the device change from (0.4552, 0.3867) at 4 V to (0.2864, 0.2865) at 19 V that are well in the white region. Its maximum luminance was 10 855 cd m-2 at 19 V and maximum power efficiency was 1.31 lm W-1 at 5 V.

  15. Quantum rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Gomez, Richard B.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, computer graphics has emerged as a critical component of the scientific and engineering process, and it is recognized as an important computer science research area. Computer graphics are extensively used for a variety of aerospace and defense training systems and by Hollywood's special effects companies. All these applications require the computer graphics systems to produce high quality renderings of extremely large data sets in short periods of time. Much research has been done in "classical computing" toward the development of efficient methods and techniques to reduce the rendering time required for large datasets. Quantum Computing's unique algorithmic features offer the possibility of speeding up some of the known rendering algorithms currently used in computer graphics. In this paper we discuss possible implementations of quantum rendering algorithms. In particular, we concentrate on the implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm for Z-buffering, ray-tracing, radiosity, and scene management techniques. We also compare the theoretical performance between the classical and quantum versions of the algorithms.

  16. Index theorem and Majorana zero modes along a non-Abelian vortex in a color superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Takanori; Fukui, Takahiro; Nitta, Muneto; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-10-01

    Color superconductivity in high-density QCD exhibits the color-flavor-locked phase. To explore zero modes in the color-flavor-locked phase in the presence of a non-Abelian vortex with an SU(2) symmetry in the vortex core, we apply the index theorem to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) Hamiltonian. From the calculation of the topological index, we find that triplet, doublet and singlet sectors of SU(2) have certain number of chiral Majorana zero modes in the limit of vanishing chemical potential. We also solve the BdG equation by the use of the series expansion to show that the number of zero modes and their chirality match the result of the index theorem. From particle-hole symmetry of the BdG Hamiltonian, we conclude that if and only if the index of a given sector is odd, one zero mode survives generically for a finite chemical potential. We argue that this result should hold nonperturbatively even in the high-density limit.

  17. Color-coding Improves Parental Understanding of Body Mass Index Charting

    PubMed Central

    Oettinger, Matthew D.; Finkle, Joanne P.; Esserman, Denise; Whitehead, Lisa; Spain, Thomas K.; Pattishall, Steven R.; Rothman, Russell; Perrin, Eliana M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess parental understanding of body mass index (BMI) and BMI percentiles using standard versus color-coded charts and investigate how parental literacy and/or numeracy (quantitative skills) impacts that understanding. Methods A convenience sample of 163 parents of children aged 2–8 years at two academic pediatric centers completed a demographics questionnaire, the mathematics portion of the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT-3R), the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA), and an “Understanding BMI” questionnaire, which included parallel BMI charting questions to compare understanding of standard versus color-coded BMI charting. Outcomes included parental-reported versus actual understanding of BMI, the odds (obtained by generalized estimating equations) of answering parallel questions correctly using standard versus color-coded charting, and odds of answering questions correctly based on numeracy and literacy. Results Many parents (60%) reported knowing what BMI was, but only 30% could define it even roughly correctly. Parents using color-coded charts had greater odds of answering parallel BMI charting questions correctly than parents using standard charts (mean 88% vs. 65% correct; pooled AOR=4.32, 95% CI: 3.14–5.95; p<.01). Additionally, parents with lower numeracy (K-5 level) benefited more from color-coded charts (increased from 51% to 81% correct) than did higher numeracy parents (≥ high school level), who performed well using both charts (89% vs. 99% correct). Conclusions Parents consistently performed better using color-coded than standard BMI charts. Color-coding was particularly helpful for lower numeracy parents. Future studies should investigate whether these results translate into offices and whether understanding motivates parents toward important lifestyle change. PMID:19679524

  18. Color applied to printing graphic design: the importance of lighting in the color perception and specification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, Berenice S.; Pereira, Alice C.; Pereira, Fernando R.

    2002-06-01

    This work approaches the importance of lighting in the process of chromatic categorization, selection and specification applied to the printed media. Some concepts regarding lighting are presented, such as color temperature, color appearance and color rendering index. Finally, stands out the necessity to evaluate the samples under standard lighting conditions regarding the environment where the final product will be exposed.

  19. A survey on palette reordering methods for improving the compression of color-indexed images.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Armando J; Neves, António J R

    2004-11-01

    Palette reordering is a well-known and very effective approach for improving the compression of color-indexed images. In this paper, we provide a survey of palette reordering methods, and we give experimental results comparing the ability of seven of them in improving the compression efficiency of JPEG-LS and lossless JPEG 2000. We concluded that the pairwise merging heuristic proposed by Memon et al. is the most effective, but also the most computationally demanding. Moreover, we found that the second most effective method is a modified version of Zeng's reordering technique, which was 3%-5% worse than pairwise merging, but much faster. PMID:15540450

  20. Spectral reflectance of conodonts: A step toward quantitative color alteration and thermal maturity indexes

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, B.C.; Nestell, M.; Balsam, W.L.

    1996-07-01

    Changes in the color of conodonts have long been used to assess thermal maturity. Color is a subjective measure, and color changes in conodonts are related to a subjective scale, the conodont alteration index or CAI. In this paper, we propose a simple, nondestructive method for objectively determining CAI and relating CAI to thermal maturity, the spectral reflectance of conodonts (SRC). The diffuse reflectance of about 30 large conodont fragments arranged on a barium-sulfate slide was determined with a total reflectance spectrophotometer in the wavelength range of 300-850 nm. By examining conodonts that ranged form a CAI of 1 to a CAI of 6 we found that the average slope of the reflectance curve from 550 to 800 nm is a good proxy for CAI. A second-order regression equation estimates CAI from this slope with high accuracy (correlation coefficient = 0.99). These estimates appear most accurate for a CAI of 1 to a CAI of 4, where the slopes change most rapidly, but give reasonable results up to a CAI of 6. Based on the results of our analysis of two samples with known thermal maturities form the Valles Caldera region of New Mexico, we propose a preliminary relationship among SRC slope, CAI, and in-situ alteration temperature.

  1. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. V. NONLINEAR ABSORPTION-LINE INDEX VERSUS METALLICITY RELATIONS AND BIMODAL INDEX DISTRIBUTIONS OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Kang, Yongbeom; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2013-05-10

    Recent spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of M31 with unprecedented precision witnessed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Such division of extragalactic GCs, so far asserted mainly by photometric color bimodality, has been viewed as the presence of merely two distinct metallicity subgroups within individual galaxies and forms a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Given that spectroscopy is a more detailed probe into stellar population than photometry, the discovery of index bimodality may point to the very existence of dual GC populations. However, here we show that the observed spectroscopic dichotomy of M31 GCs emerges due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and thus one does not necessarily have to invoke two separate GC subsystems. We take this as a close analogy to the recent view that metallicity-color nonlinearity is primarily responsible for observed GC color bimodality. We also demonstrate that the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line displays non-negligible metallicity-index nonlinearity and Balmer lines show rather strong nonlinearity. This gives rise to bimodal index distributions, which are routinely interpreted as bimodal metallicity distributions, not considering metallicity-index nonlinearity. Our findings give a new insight into the constitution of M31's GC system, which could change much of the current thought on the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.

  2. Interference color modulation, tunable refractive index, and chiroptical electrochromism in a π-conjugated polymer with cholesteric liquid crystal order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hiromasa

    2009-06-01

    A π-conjugated polymer film prepared by electrolytic polymerization using a cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) is demonstrated to have a tunable interference function under electrochemical doping and dedoping. The polymer exhibits a CLC-like periodic structure with a potential-dependent refractive index and optical absorption properties. The interference color of the polymer film can thus be modulated dynamically by appropriate application of a voltage in the ±1 V range. This research involves structural chirality and tunable chiroptical properties, doping-dedoping driven tunable refractive index, electrochromism, and interference color modulation for the present polymer. The phenomena demonstrate the possibility of electrochemical photonics.

  3. Color Photographic Index of Fall Chinook Salmon Embryonic Development and Accumulated Thermal Units

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, James W.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the relationship between accumulated thermal units and developmental stages of Chinook salmon embryos can be used to determine the approximate date of egg fertilization in natural redds, thus providing insight into oviposition timing of wild salmonids. However, few studies have documented time to different developmental stages of embryonic Chinook salmon and no reference color photographs are available. The objectives of this study were to construct an index relating developmental stages of hatchery-reared fall Chinook salmon embryos to time and temperature (e.g., degree days) and provide high-quality color photographs of each identified developmental stage. Methodology/Principal Findings Fall Chinook salmon eggs were fertilized in a hatchery environment and sampled approximately every 72 h post-fertilization until 50% hatch. Known embryonic developmental features described for sockeye salmon were used to describe development of Chinook salmon embryos. A thermal sums model was used to describe the relationship between embryonic development rate and water temperature. Mean water temperature was 8.0°C (range; 3.9–11.7°C) during the study period. Nineteen stages of embryonic development were identified for fall Chinook salmon; two stages in the cleavage phase, one stage in the gastrulation phase, and sixteen stages in the organogenesis phase. The thermal sums model used in this study provided similar estimates of fall Chinook salmon embryonic development rate in water temperatures varying from 3.9–11.7°C (mean = 8°C) to those from several other studies rearing embryos in constant 8°C water temperature. Conclusions/Significance The developmental index provides a reasonable description of timing to known developmental stages of Chinook salmon embryos and was useful in determining developmental stages of wild fall Chinook salmon embryos excavated from redds in the Columbia River. This index should prove useful to other researchers who

  4. [Research on developping the spectral dataset for Dunhuang typical colors based on color constancy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Wan, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chan; Liang, Jin-Xing

    2013-11-01

    The present paper aims at developping a method to reasonably set up the typical spectral color dataset for different kinds of Chinese cultural heritage in color rendering process. The world famous wall paintings dating from more than 1700 years ago in Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes was taken as typical case in this research. In order to maintain the color constancy during the color rendering workflow of Dunhuang culture relics, a chromatic adaptation based method for developping the spectral dataset of typical colors for those wall paintings was proposed from the view point of human vision perception ability. Under the help and guidance of researchers in the art-research institution and protection-research institution of Dunhuang Academy and according to the existing research achievement of Dunhuang Research in the past years, 48 typical known Dunhuang pigments were chosen and 240 representative color samples were made with reflective spectral ranging from 360 to 750 nm was acquired by a spectrometer. In order to find the typical colors of the above mentioned color samples, the original dataset was devided into several subgroups by clustering analysis. The grouping number, together with the most typical samples for each subgroup which made up the firstly built typical color dataset, was determined by wilcoxon signed rank test according to the color inconstancy index comprehensively calculated under 6 typical illuminating conditions. Considering the completeness of gamut of Dunhuang wall paintings, 8 complementary colors was determined and finally the typical spectral color dataset was built up which contains 100 representative spectral colors. The analytical calculating results show that the median color inconstancy index of the built dataset in 99% confidence level by wilcoxon signed rank test was 3.28 and the 100 colors are distributing in the whole gamut uniformly, which ensures that this dataset can provide reasonable reference for choosing the color with highest

  5. Space weathering and the color indexes of minor bodies in the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Z.; Brunetto, R.; Melita, M.; Strazzulla, G.

    2012-09-01

    We present a model based on laboratory results which contributes to the "nature" versus "nurture" debate on the colors of small bodies in the outer Solar System (OSS). According to our model, objects having suffered the same balance of irradiation and impacts follow specific curves in color-color diagrams. Appropriate combination of composition and weathering can reproduce the whole range of colors observed on OSS small bodies

  6. Conodont color alteration index and upper Paleozoic thermal history of the Amazonas Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Cassiane Negreiros; Sanz-López, Javier; Blanco-Ferrera, Silvia; Lemos, Valesca Brasil; Scomazzon, Ana Karina

    2015-12-01

    The conodont color alteration index (CAI) was determined in elements from core samples of the Frasnian Barreirinha Formation (one well) and of the Pennsylvanian-Permian Tapajós Group (twenty three wells and one limestone quarry) in the Amazonas Basin. The thermal history of the basin is analyzed using the CAI value distribution represented in maps and stratigraphic sections through correlation schemes, and in conjunction with previously published data. The pattern of palaeotemperatures for CAI values of 1.5-3 is coincident with organic matter maturation under a sedimentary overburden providing diagenetic conditions in the oil/gas window. Locally, conodonts show metamorphism (CAI value of 6-7) in relation to the intrusion of diabase bodies in beds including high geothermal gradient evaporites. Microtextural alteration on the surface conodonts commonly shows several types of overgrowth microtextures developed in diagenetic conditions. Locally, recrystallization in conodonts with a high CAI value is congruent with contact metamorphism in relation to Mesozoic intrusions. The CAI values of 1.5 or 2 observed close to the surface in several areas of the basin may be interpreted in relation to a high thermal palaeogradient derived from the magmatic episode or/and to the local denudation of the upper part of the Paleozoic succession prior to this thermal event.

  7. High color rending index and high-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes based on the control of red phosphorescent dye-doped hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M Y; Wang, F F; Wei, N; Zhou, P C; Peng, K J; Yu, J N; Wang, Z X; Wei, B

    2013-01-14

    We have investigated the transport characteristics of red phosphorescent dye bis(1-(phenyl)isoquinoline) iridium (III) acetylanetonate (Ir(piq)₂acac) doped 4,4',4"-tri(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), and found that the increasing doping ratio was facilitated to improve the ability of hole transporting. A high color rendering index (CRI) and high-efficiency WOLED was achieved by employing Ir(piq)₂acac doped TCTA film as an effective red emissive layer due to the generation of charge transfer complex (CTC) at the interface. The relative proportion in red: green: blue emission intensity can be controlled by the CTC concentration to obtain high CRI WOLEDs. The WOLED with an optimal red dye doping concentration of 5 wt% exhibits a high CRI of 89 and a power efficiency of 31.2 lm/W and 27.5 lm/W at the initial luminance and 100 cd/m², respectively. The devices show little variation of the Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage coordinates in a wide range of luminance. PMID:23389269

  8. Acquisition of Digital Color-Infrared Photographs for Monitoring Leaf Area Index of Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerial color-infrared photography has the high spatial resolution required for assessing within-field variability of crop growth. We describe a new method for acquiring digital color-infrared photographs for monitoring vegetation on the ground or from Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAVs). A red-block...

  9. Space weathering and the color indexes of minor bodies in the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Zuzana; Brunetto, Rosario; Melita, Mario; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2012-09-01

    The surfaces of small bodies in the outer Solar System are rich in organic compounds and carbonaceous refractories mixed with ices and silicates. As made clear by dedicated laboratory experiments space weathering (e.g. energetic ion bombardment) can produce red colored materials starting from bright and spectrally flat ices. In a classical scenario, the space weathering processes “nurture” alter the small bodies surface spectra but are in competition with resurfacing agents that restore the original colors, and the result of these competing processes continuously modifying the surfaces is supposed to be responsible for the observed spectral variety of those small bodies. However an alternative point of view is that the different colors are due to “nature” i.e. to the different primordial composition of different objects. In this paper we present a model, based on laboratory results, that gives an original contribution to the “nature” vs. “nurture” debate by addressing the case of surfaces showing different fractions of rejuvenated vs. space weathered surface, and calculating the corresponding color variations. We will show how a combination of increasing dose coupled to different resurfacing can reproduce the whole range of observations of small outer Solar System bodies. Here we demonstrate, for the first time that objects having a fully weathered material turn back in the color-color diagrams. At the same time, object with the different ratio of pristine and weathered surface areas lay on specific lines in color-color diagrams, if exposed to the same amount of irradiation.

  10. Lifetime Reduction and Enhanced Emission of Single Photon Color Centers in Nanodiamond via Surrounding Refractive Index Modification

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Asma; Chung, Kelvin; Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Lau, Desmond W.M.; Karle, Timothy J.; Gibson, Brant C.; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana

    2015-01-01

    The negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy (NV−) center in diamond is of great interest for quantum information processing and quantum key distribution applications due to its highly desirable long coherence times at room temperature. One of the challenges for their use in these applications involves the requirement to further optimize the lifetime and emission properties of the centers. Our results demonstrate the reduction of the lifetime of NV− centers, and hence an increase in the emission rate, achieved by modifying the refractive index of the environment surrounding the nanodiamond (ND). By coating the NDs in a polymer film, experimental results and numerical calculations show an average of 63% reduction in the lifetime and an average enhancement in the emission rate by a factor of 1.6. This strategy is also applicable for emitters other than diamond color centers where the particle refractive index is greater than the refractive index of the surrounding media. PMID:26109500

  11. Lifetime Reduction and Enhanced Emission of Single Photon Color Centers in Nanodiamond via Surrounding Refractive Index Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Asma; Chung, Kelvin; Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Lau, Desmond W. M.; Karle, Timothy J.; Gibson, Brant C.; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana

    2015-06-01

    The negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy (NV-) center in diamond is of great interest for quantum information processing and quantum key distribution applications due to its highly desirable long coherence times at room temperature. One of the challenges for their use in these applications involves the requirement to further optimize the lifetime and emission properties of the centers. Our results demonstrate the reduction of the lifetime of NV- centers, and hence an increase in the emission rate, achieved by modifying the refractive index of the environment surrounding the nanodiamond (ND). By coating the NDs in a polymer film, experimental results and numerical calculations show an average of 63% reduction in the lifetime and an average enhancement in the emission rate by a factor of 1.6. This strategy is also applicable for emitters other than diamond color centers where the particle refractive index is greater than the refractive index of the surrounding media.

  12. North Atlantic Plio-Pliestocene sediment color climate index indicates enhanced 41-k.y. world variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrochta, Stephen; Bailey, Ian; Channell, James; Hodell, David; Timmermann, Axel; Tyler, Jonathan; Xuan, Chuang; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Sediment color variations at North Atlantic Site DSDP609/U1308 exhibit a very similar pattern to the water isotope record of the North GRIP ice core. Moving window cross correlation between NGRIP oxygen isotopes and sediment lightness (L*) reveals a consistently high and significant correlation. Based on this relationship, we construct a color-based climate index by calculating color reflectance values from the shipboard line-scanner images. Use of the line-scanner images provides a higher-resolution series (0.01 cm) than the 2-cm shipboard spectrophotometer data and permits for manual removal of disturbed pixels prior to analysis. At present, the composite benthic oxygen isotope and paleomagnetic records at Site U1308 extend to MIS K2, providing age control beyond 3 Ma. The same approach at a more northerly location (IODP Site U1304) yields very similar results, in terms of event pattern, timing, and duration, over the past few glacial cycles, suggesting the much longer Site U1308 record likely reflects conditions over a relatively large spatial area. Rapidity of color variations decreases following the onset of the large amplitude 100-k.y. glaciations. Both Sites U1304 and U1308 exhibit near identical color changes during the penultimate glaciation (MIS 6), which is characterized by fluctuations that are among the most gradual of the entire ~3 Ma record. With the exception of MIS 6, results generally agree with the synthetic Greenland isotope record. Orbital scale color variations are near synchronous with benthic oxygen isotopes at a 41 k.y. period but lag significantly at 100 k.y.

  13. High-accuracy self-correction of refractive index of air using two-color interferometry of optical frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Minoshima, Kaoru; Arai, Kaoru; Inaba, Hajime

    2011-12-19

    Long-path pulse-to-pulse interferometers of two-color frequency combs are developed using fundamental and second harmonics of a mode-locked fiber laser. Interferometric phase difference between two-color frequency combs was precisely measured by stabilizing the fundamental fringe phase by controlling the repetition frequency of the comb, and a stability of 10(-10) for 1000 s was achieved in the measurement of an optical path length difference between two wavelengths. In long-term measurements performed for 10 h, results of phase variation of interferometric measurements were highly consistent with the fluctuations in the calculated difference of refractive indices of air at two wavelengths with an accuracy of 10(-10). The difference between the measured optical distances corresponding to two wavelengths and the optical distance corresponding to the fundamental wavelength were used in the two-color method; high-accuracy self-correction of the fluctuation of refractive index of air was performed with an uncertainty of 5 × 10(-8) for 10-h measurements when the maximum refractive index change was on the order of 10(-6). PMID:22274198

  14. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  15. 10 CFR Appendix R to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring Average Lamp Efficacy (LE), Color Rendering Index (CRI), and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Lamps 4.3.1The measurement procedure shall be as described in IESNA LM-20 (see 10 CFR 430.22). Lamps... characterization shall be conducted in accordance with the methods given in IESNA LM-58 and IESNA LM-16 (see 10 CFR... appropriate reference ballast at input voltage specified by the reference circuit as described in ANSI...

  16. 10 CFR Appendix R to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring Average Lamp Efficacy (LE), Color Rendering Index (CRI), and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Lamps 4.3.1 The measurement procedure shall be as described in IESNA LM-20 (see 10 CFR 430.22). Lamps... reference circuit as described in ANSI C82.3 (incorporated by reference; see § 430.3). If, for a lamp,...

  17. 10 CFR Appendix R to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring Average Lamp Efficacy (LE), Color Rendering Index (CRI), and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Lamps 4.3.1The measurement procedure shall be as described in IESNA LM-20 (see 10 CFR 430.22). Lamps... characterization shall be conducted in accordance with the methods given in IESNA LM-58 and IESNA LM-16 (see 10 CFR... appropriate reference ballast at input voltage specified by the reference circuit as described in ANSI...

  18. 10 CFR Appendix R to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring Average Lamp Efficacy (LE), Color Rendering Index (CRI), and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Lamps 4.3.1 The measurement procedure shall be as described in IESNA LM-20 (see 10 CFR 430.22). Lamps... reference circuit as described in ANSI C82.3 (incorporated by reference; see § 430.3). If, for a lamp,...

  19. 10 CFR Appendix R to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring Average Lamp Efficacy (LE), Color Rendering Index (CRI), and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Lamps 4.3.1The measurement procedure shall be as described in IESNA LM-20 (see 10 CFR 430.22). Lamps... characterization shall be conducted in accordance with the methods given in IESNA LM-58 and IESNA LM-16 (see 10 CFR... appropriate reference ballast at input voltage specified by the reference circuit as described in ANSI...

  20. Integration of Color and Local Derivative Pattern Features for Content-Based Image Indexing and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipparthi, Santosh Kumar; Nagar, Shyam Krishna

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents two new feature descriptors for content based image retrieval (CBIR) application. The proposed two descriptors are named as color local derivative patterns (CLDP) and inter color local derivative pattern (ICLDP). In order to reduce the computational complexity the uniform patterns are applied to both CLDP and ICLDP. Further, uniform CLDP (CLDPu2) and uniform ICLDP (ICLDPu2) are generated respectively. The proposed descriptors are able to exploit individual (R, G and B) spectral channel information and co-relating pair (RG, GB, BR, etc.) of spectral channel information. The retrieval performances of the proposed descriptors (CLDP and ICLDP) are tested by conducting two experiments on Corel-5000 and Corel-10000 benchmark databases. The results after investigation show a significant improvement in terms of precision, average retrieval precision (ARP), recall and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to local binary patterns (LBP), local derivative patterns (LDP) and other state-of-the-art techniques for image retrieval.

  1. Integration of Color and Local Derivative Pattern Features for Content-Based Image Indexing and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipparthi, Santosh Kumar; Nagar, Shyam Krishna

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new feature descriptors for content based image retrieval (CBIR) application. The proposed two descriptors are named as color local derivative patterns (CLDP) and inter color local derivative pattern (ICLDP). In order to reduce the computational complexity the uniform patterns are applied to both CLDP and ICLDP. Further, uniform CLDP (CLDPu2) and uniform ICLDP (ICLDPu2) are generated respectively. The proposed descriptors are able to exploit individual (R, G and B) spectral channel information and co-relating pair (RG, GB, BR, etc.) of spectral channel information. The retrieval performances of the proposed descriptors (CLDP and ICLDP) are tested by conducting two experiments on Corel-5000 and Corel-10000 benchmark databases. The results after investigation show a significant improvement in terms of precision, average retrieval precision (ARP), recall and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to local binary patterns (LBP), local derivative patterns (LDP) and other state-of-the-art techniques for image retrieval.

  2. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  3. Multivariate volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  4. Sorting and hardware assisted rendering for volume visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.; Becker, B.; Max, N.

    1994-03-01

    We present some techniques for volume rendering unstructured data. Interpolation between vertex colors and opacities is performed using hardware assisted texture mapping, and color is integrated for use with a volume rendering system. We also present an O(n{sup 2}) method for sorting n arbitrarily shaped convex polyhedra prior to visualization. It generalizes the Newell, Newell and Sancha sort for polygons to 3-D volume elements.

  5. A practical approach to spectral volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Steven; Möller, Torsten; Tory, Melanie; Drew, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To make a spectral representation of color practicable for volume rendering, a new low-dimensional subspace method is used to act as the carrier of spectral information. With that model, spectral light material interaction can be integrated into existing volume rendering methods at almost no penalty. In addition, slow rendering methods can profit from the new technique of postillumination-generating spectral images in real-time for arbitrary light spectra under a fixed viewpoint. Thus, the capability of spectral rendering to create distinct impressions of a scene under different lighting conditions is established as a method of real-time interaction. Although we use an achromatic opacity in our rendering, we show how spectral rendering permits different data set features to be emphasized or hidden as long as they have not been entirely obscured. The use of postillumination is an order of magnitude faster than changing the transfer function and repeating the projection step. To put the user in control of the spectral visualization, we devise a new widget, a "light-dial," for interactively changing the illumination and include a usability study of this new light space exploration tool. Applied to spectral transfer functions, different lights bring out or hide specific qualities of the data. In conjunction with postillumination, this provides a new means for preparing data for visualization and forms a new degree of freedom for guided exploration of volumetric data sets. PMID:15747643

  6. Ghostscript color management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrhel, Michael J.; Johnston, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    This document introduces an updated color architecture that has been designed for Ghostscript. Ghostscript is a well known open source document rendering and conversion engine. Prior to this update, the handling of color in Ghostscript was based primarily upon PostScript color management. The new design results in a flexible ICC-based architecture that works well in Ghostscript's multi-threaded rendering environment.

  7. Method and apparatus for enhanced evanescent fluorescence and color filtering using a high refractive index thin film coating

    DOEpatents

    Kao, Hung Pin; Schoeniger, Joseph; Yang, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    A technique for increasing the excitation and collection of evanescent fluorescence radiation emanating from a fiber optic sensor having a high refractive index (n.sub.r), dielectric thin film coating has been disclosed and described. The invention comprises a clad optical fiber core whose cladding is removed on a distal end, the distal end coated with a thin, non-porous, titanium dioxide sol-gel coating. It has been shown that such a fiber will exhibit increased fluorescence coupling due in part by 1) increasing the intensity of the evanescent field at the fiber core surface by a constructive interference effect on the propagating light, and 2) increasing the depth of penetration of the field in the sample. The interference effect created by the thin film imposes a wavelength dependence on the collection of the fluorescence and also suggests a novel application of thin films for color filtering as well as increasing collected fluorescence in fiber sensors. Collected fluorescence radiation increased by up to 6-fold over that of a bare fused silica fiber having a numerical aperture (N.A.) of O.6.

  8. Rendering the Topological Spines

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves-Rivera, D.

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  9. Using color management in color document processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehab, Smadar

    1995-04-01

    Color Management Systems have been used for several years in Desktop Publishing (DTP) environments. While this development hasn't matured yet, we are already experiencing the next generation of the color imaging revolution-Device Independent Color for the small office/home office (SOHO) environment. Though there are still open technical issues with device independent color matching, they are not the focal point of this paper. This paper discusses two new and crucial aspects in using color management in color document processing: the management of color objects and their associated color rendering methods; a proposal for a precedence order and handshaking protocol among the various software components involved in color document processing. As color peripherals become affordable to the SOHO market, color management also becomes a prerequisite for common document authoring applications such as word processors. The first color management solutions were oriented towards DTP environments whose requirements were largely different. For example, DTP documents are image-centric, as opposed to SOHO documents that are text and charts centric. To achieve optimal reproduction on low-cost SOHO peripherals, it is critical that different color rendering methods are used for the different document object types. The first challenge in using color management of color document processing is the association of rendering methods with object types. As a result of an evolutionary process, color matching solutions are now available as application software, as driver embedded software and as operating system extensions. Consequently, document processing faces a new challenge, the correct selection of the color matching solution while avoiding duplicate color corrections.

  10. Rendered virtual view image objective quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Li, Xiangchun; Zhang, Yi; Peng, Kai

    2013-08-01

    The research on rendered virtual view image (RVVI) objective quality assessment is important for integrated imaging system and image quality assessment (IQA). Traditional IQA algorithms cannot be applied directly on the system receiver-side due to interview displacement and the absence of original reference. This study proposed a block-based neighbor reference (NbR) IQA framework for RVVI IQA. Neighbor views used for rendering are employed for quality assessment in the proposed framework. A symphonious factor handling noise and interview displacement is defined and applied to evaluate the contribution of the obtained quality index in each block pair. A three-stage experiment scheme is also presented to testify the proposed framework and evaluate its homogeneity performance when comparing to full reference IQA. Experimental results show the proposed framework is useful in RVVI objective quality assessment at system receiver-side and benchmarking different rendering algorithms.

  11. Vector quantization for volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    Volume rendering techniques typically process volumetric data in raw, uncompressed form. As algorithmic and architectural advances improve rendering speeds, however, larger data sets will be evaluated requiring consideration of data storage and transmission issues. In this paper, we analyze the data compression requirements for volume rendering applications and present a solution based on vector quantization. The proposed system compresses volumetric data and then renders images directly from the new data format. Tests on a fluid flow data set demonstrate that good image quality may be achieved at a compression ratio of 17:1 with only a 5 percent cost in additional rendering time.

  12. Enriching text with images and colored light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulovski, Dragan; Geleijnse, Gijs; Kater, Bram; Korst, Jan; Pauws, Steffen; Clout, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    We present an unsupervised method to enrich textual applications with relevant images and colors. The images are collected by querying large image repositories and subsequently the colors are computed using image processing. A prototype system based on this method is presented where the method is applied to song lyrics. In combination with a lyrics synchronization algorithm the system produces a rich multimedia experience. In order to identify terms within the text that may be associated with images and colors, we select noun phrases using a part of speech tagger. Large image repositories are queried with these terms. Per term representative colors are extracted using the collected images. Hereto, we either use a histogram-based or a mean shift-based algorithm. The representative color extraction uses the non-uniform distribution of the colors found in the large repositories. The images that are ranked best by the search engine are displayed on a screen, while the extracted representative colors are rendered on controllable lighting devices in the living room. We evaluate our method by comparing the computed colors to standard color representations of a set of English color terms. A second evaluation focuses on the distance in color between a queried term in English and its translation in a foreign language. Based on results from three sets of terms, a measure of suitability of a term for color extraction based on KL Divergence is proposed. Finally, we compare the performance of the algorithm using either the automatically indexed repository of Google Images and the manually annotated Flickr.com. Based on the results of these experiments, we conclude that using the presented method we can compute the relevant color for a term using a large image repository and image processing.

  13. Software for Acoustic Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Joel D.

    2003-01-01

    SLAB is a software system that can be run on a personal computer to simulate an acoustic environment in real time. SLAB was developed to enable computational experimentation in which one can exert low-level control over a variety of signal-processing parameters, related to spatialization, for conducting psychoacoustic studies. Among the parameters that can be manipulated are the number and position of reflections, the fidelity (that is, the number of taps in finite-impulse-response filters), the system latency, and the update rate of the filters. Another goal in the development of SLAB was to provide an inexpensive means of dynamic synthesis of virtual audio over headphones, without need for special-purpose signal-processing hardware. SLAB has a modular, object-oriented design that affords the flexibility and extensibility needed to accommodate a variety of computational experiments and signal-flow structures. SLAB s spatial renderer has a fixed signal-flow architecture corresponding to a set of parallel signal paths from each source to a listener. This fixed architecture can be regarded as a compromise that optimizes efficiency at the expense of complete flexibility. Such a compromise is necessary, given the design goal of enabling computational psychoacoustic experimentation on inexpensive personal computers.

  14. Sea modeling and rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2010-10-01

    More and more defence and civil applications require simulation of marine synthetic environment. Currently, the "Future Anti-Surface-Guided-Weapon" (FASGW) or "anti-navire léger" (ANL) missile needs this kind of modelling. This paper presents a set of technical enhancement of the SE-Workbench that aim at better representing the sea profile and the interaction with targets. The operational scenario variability is a key criterion: the generic geographical area (e.g. Persian Gulf, coast of Somalia,...), the type of situation (e.g. peace keeping, peace enforcement, anti-piracy, drug interdiction,...)., the objectives (political, strategic, or military objectives), the description of the mission(s) (e.g. antipiracy) and operation(s) (e.g. surveillance and reconnaissance, escort, convoying) to achieve the objectives, the type of environment (Weather, Time of day, Geography [coastlines, islands, hills/mountains]). The paper insists on several points such as the dual rendering using either ray tracing [and the GP GPU optimization] or rasterization [and GPU shaders optimization], the modelling of sea-surface based on hypertextures and shaders, the wakes modelling, the buoyancy models for targets, the interaction of coast and littoral, the dielectric infrared modelling of water material.

  15. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  16. The physics of volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Radiation transfer is an important topic in several physical disciplines, probably most prominently in astrophysics. Computer scientists use radiation transfer, among other things, for the visualization of complex data sets with direct volume rendering. In this article, I point out the connection between physical radiation transfer and volume rendering, and I describe an implementation of direct volume rendering in the astrophysical radiation transfer code RADMC-3D. I show examples for the use of this module on analytical models and simulation data.

  17. Time-Critical Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Arie

    1998-01-01

    For the past twelve months, we have conducted and completed a joint research entitled "Time- Critical Volume Rendering" with NASA Ames. As expected, High performance volume rendering algorithms have been developed by exploring some new faster rendering techniques, including object presence acceleration, parallel processing, and hierarchical level-of-detail representation. Using our new techniques, initial experiments have achieved real-time rendering rates of more than 10 frames per second of various 3D data sets with highest resolution. A couple of joint papers and technique reports as well as an interactive real-time demo have been compiled as the result of this project.

  18. 11. Photographic copy of rendering (February 15, 1913, original rendering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of rendering (February 15, 1913, original rendering in Archives, Public Affairs Department, Sears Merchandise Group, Hoffman Estates, Illinois), Artist unknown. OVERALL VIEW OF MAIL ORDER PLANT, VIEW TO SOUTH - Sears Roebuck & Company Mail Order Plant, Bounded by Lexington & Grenshaw Streets, Kedzie Avenue & Independence Boulevard, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  19. New Uses for Rendered Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The history of rendering shows that current uses for rendered protein are a result of value-adding research. Feed nutritionists discovered how to use this formerly very low value by-product as an important component of formulated livestock feed. Today the feed market is mature and has been severel...

  20. Massively parallel visualization: Parallel rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.D.; Krogh, M.; White, W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume renderer use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Machines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  1. Progress in characterizing the multidimensional color quality properties of white LED light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teunissen, Kees; Hoelen, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    With the introduction of solid state light sources, the variety in emission spectra is almost unlimited. However, the set of standardized parameters to characterize a white LED light source, such as correlated color temperature (CCT) and CIE general color rendering index (Ra), is known to be limited and insufficient for describing perceived differences between light sources. Several characterization methods have been proposed over the past decades, but their contribution to perceived color quality has not always been validated. To gain more insight in the relevant characteristics of the emission spectra for specific applications, we have conducted a perception experiment to rate the attractiveness of three sets of objects, including fresh food, packaging materials and skin tones. The objects were illuminated with seven different combinations of Red, Green, Blue, Amber and White LEDs, all with the same CCT and illumination level, but with differences in Ra and color saturation. The results show that, in general, object attractiveness does not correlate well with Ra, but shows a positive correlation with saturation increase for two out of three applications. There is no clear relation between saturation and skin tone attractiveness, partly due to differences in preference between males and females. A relative gamut area index (Ga) represents the average change in saturation and a complementary color vector graphic shows the direction and magnitude of chromatic differences for the eight CIE-1974 test-color samples. Together with the CIE general color rendering index (Ra) they provide useful information for designing and optimizing application specific emission spectra.

  2. Color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity is a preload insensitive index of left ventricular relaxation: animal and human validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M. J.; Smedira, N. G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Main, M.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Odabashian, J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of preload in color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity (v(p)). BACKGROUND: The interpretation of Doppler filling patterns is limited by confounding effects of left ventricular (LV) relaxation and preload. Color M-mode v(p) has been proposed as a new index of LV relaxation. METHODS: We studied four dogs before and during inferior caval (IVC) occlusion at five different inotropic stages and 14 patients before and during partial cardiopulmonary bypass. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volumes (LV-EDV), the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (tau), left atrial (LA) pre-A and LV end-diastolic pressures (LV-EDP) were measured. Peak velocity during early filling (E) and v(p) were extracted by digital analysis of color M-mode Doppler images. RESULTS: In both animals and humans, LV-EDV and LV-EDP decreased significantly from baseline to IVC occlusion (both p < 0.001). Peak early filling (E) velocity decreased in animals from 56 +/- 21 to 42 +/- 17 cm/s (p < 0.001) without change in v(p) (from 35 +/- 15 to 35 +/- 16, p = 0.99). Results were similar in humans (from 69 +/- 15 to 53 +/- 22 cm/s, p < 0.001, and 37 +/- 12 to 34 +/- 16, p = 0.30). In both species, there was a strong correlation between LV relaxation (tau) and v(p) (r = 0.78, p < 0.001, r = 0.86, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that color M-mode Doppler v(p) is not affected by preload alterations and confirms that LV relaxation is its main physiologic determinant in both animals during varying lusitropic conditions and in humans with heart disease.

  3. Exposure Render: An Interactive Photo-Realistic Volume Rendering Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, Thomas; Post, Frits H.; Botha, Charl P.

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR) by integrating a number of visually plausible but often effect-specific rendering techniques, for instance modeling of light occlusion and depth of field. Besides yielding more attractive renderings, especially the more realistic lighting has a positive effect on perceptual tasks. Although these new rendering techniques yield impressive results, they exhibit limitations in terms of their exibility and their performance. Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT), coupled with physically based light transport, is the de-facto standard for synthesizing highly realistic images in the graphics domain, although usually not from volumetric data. Due to the stochastic sampling of MCRT algorithms, numerous effects can be achieved in a relatively straight-forward fashion. For this reason, we have developed a practical framework that applies MCRT techniques also to direct volume rendering (DVR). With this work, we demonstrate that a host of realistic effects, including physically based lighting, can be simulated in a generic and flexible fashion, leading to interactive DVR with improved realism. In the hope that this improved approach to DVR will see more use in practice, we have made available our framework under a permissive open source license. PMID:22768292

  4. Color perception under illumination by quadrichromatic solid-state lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanikunas, Rytis; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas; Svegzda, Algimantas; Viliunas, Vilius; Bliznikas, Zenius; Breive, Kestutis; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Novickovas, Algirdas; Kurilcik, Genadij; Zukauskas, Arturas; Gaska, Remis; Shur, Michael S.

    2004-10-01

    Lighting based on sources of light composed of colored light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offers versatile control of color and a possibility of trade-off between efficiency and color rendering. However, psychophysical issues related to such polychromatic solid-state sources have to be addressed. In this work, studies of the perception of standard colors under illumination with a quadrichromatic red-amber-green-blue (RAGB) solid-state source were carried out. An RAGB lamp containing primary LEDs with the emission peaks at 638 nm, 594 nm, 523 nm, and 441 nm and optimized for the highest value of the general color rendering index (86 points) was investigated and compared to a tungsten lamp. 40 standard Munsell samples of value 6, chroma /6, and hue incremented by 2.5 were used in the investigation. Changes in the saturation and hue of the Munsell samples illuminated by the RAGB lamp versus tungsten lamp (both with the correlated temperature of 2600 K) were obtained by colorimetric calculation comparisons and by psychophysical experiments on subjective matching of the samples. Subjective differences in hue and subjective color discrimination differences under the tungsten and RAGB lamps were found in the wavelength range of 440-500 nm and 560-580 nm. We attribute these differences to non-optimal peak wavelengths of the primary LEDs and to the narrow-band components of the RAGB spectrum.

  5. Scalable rendering on PC clusters

    SciTech Connect

    WYLIE,BRIAN N.; LEWIS,VASILY; SHIRLEY,DAVID NOYES; PAVLAKOS,CONSTANTINE

    2000-04-25

    This case study presents initial results from research targeted at the development of cost-effective scalable visualization and rendering technologies. The implementations of two 3D graphics libraries based on the popular sort-last and sort-middle parallel rendering techniques are discussed. An important goal of these implementations is to provide scalable rendering capability for extremely large datasets (>> 5 million polygons). Applications can use these libraries for either run-time visualization, by linking to an existing parallel simulation, or for traditional post-processing by linking to an interactive display program. The use of parallel, hardware-accelerated rendering on commodity hardware is leveraged to achieve high performance. Current performance results show that, using current hardware (a small 16-node cluster), they can utilize up to 85% of the aggregate graphics performance and achieve rendering rates in excess of 20 million polygons/second using OpenGL{reg_sign} with lighting, Gouraud shading, and individually specified triangles (not t-stripped).

  6. Efficient volume rendering using octree space subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhauer, Peter; Tsygankov, Michael; Reich, Christian; Evgrafov, Anton

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes a discrete ray-tracing algorithm, which employs the adaptive hierarchical spatial subdivision (octree) technique for 3D uniform binary voxel space representation. The binary voxel space contains voxels of two kinds: 'surface' and 'non-surface.' Surface voxels include property information like the surface normal and color. The usage of octrees dramatically reduces the memory amount required to store 3D models. The average compression ratio is in the range between 1:24 up to 1:50 compared to uncompressed voxels. A fast ray casting algorithm called BOXER was developed, which allows rendering 256 X 256 X 256 and 512 X 512 X 512 volumes nearly in real-time on standard Intel-based PCs.

  7. Fast data parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, F.A.; Hansen, C.D.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a parallel method for polygonal rendering on a massively parallel SIMD machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast polygon rendering for extremely large sets of polygons such as is found in many scientific visualization applications. The algorithms described in this paper are incorporated into a library of 3D graphics routines written for the Connection Machine. The routines are implemented on both the CM-200 and the CM-5. This library enables a scientists to display 3D shaded polygons directly from a parallel machine without the need to transmit huge amounts of data to a post-processing rendering system.

  8. RenderMan design principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apodaca, Tony; Porter, Tom

    1989-01-01

    The two worlds of interactive graphics and realistic graphics have remained separate. Fast graphics hardware runs simple algorithms and generates simple looking images. Photorealistic image synthesis software runs slowly on large expensive computers. The time has come for these two branches of computer graphics to merge. The speed and expense of graphics hardware is no longer the barrier to the wide acceptance of photorealism. There is every reason to believe that high quality image synthesis will become a standard capability of every graphics machine, from superworkstation to personal computer. The significant barrier has been the lack of a common language, an agreed-upon set of terms and conditions, for 3-D modeling systems to talk to 3-D rendering systems for computing an accurate rendition of that scene. Pixar has introduced RenderMan to serve as that common language. RenderMan, specifically the extensibility it offers in shading calculations, is discussed.

  9. Study of Perovskite QD Down-Converted LEDs and Six-Color White LEDs for Future Displays with Excellent Color Performance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hee Chang; Kang, Heejoon; Lee, Soyoung; Oh, Ji Hye; Yang, Heesun; Do, Young Rag

    2016-07-20

    A narrow-emitting red, green, and blue (RGB) perovskite quantum dot (PeQD)-based tricolored display system can widen the color gamut over the National Television System Committee (NTSC) to 120%, but this value is misleading with regard to the color perception of cyan and yellow reproduced in the narrow RGB spectra. We propose that a PeQD-based six-color display system can reproduce true-to-life spectral distributions with high fidelity, widen the color gamut, and close the cyan and yellow gap in the RGB tricolored display by adding cyan (Cy), yellowish green (Yg), and orange colors (Or). In this study, we demonstrated pure-colored CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I, or their halide mixtures; Cl/Br and Br/I) PeQD-based monochromatic down-converted light-emitting diodes (DC-LED) for the first time, and we incorporated PeQDs with UV-curable binders and long-wavelength-pass-dichroic filters (LPDFs). CsPbX3 PeQD-based pure Cy-, G-, Yg-, Or-, R-emitting monochromatic DC-LED provide luminous efficacy (LE) values of 81, 184, 79, 80, and 35 lm/W, respectively, at 20 mA. We also confirmed the suitability and the possibility of access to future color-by-blue backlights for field-sequential-color liquid crystal displays, using six-color multipackage white LEDs, as well as future six-colored light-emitting devices with high vision and color performance. The fabricated six-color multipackage white LEDs exhibited an appropriate LE (62 lm/W at total 120 mA), excellent color qualities (color rendering index (CRI) = 96, special CRI for red (R9) = 97) at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 6500 K, and a wide color gamut covering the NTSC up to 145% in the 1931 Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates space. PMID:27349270

  10. Development of the IES method for evaluating the color rendition of light sources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    David, Aurelien; Fini, Paul T.; Houser, Kevin W.; Ohno, Yoshi; Royer, Michael P.; USA, Richland Washington; Smet, Kevin A. G.; Wei, Minchen; Whitehead, Lorne

    2015-06-08

    We have developed a two-measure system for evaluating light sources’ color rendition that builds upon conceptual progress of numerous researchers over the last two decades. The system quantifies the color fidelity and color gamut (change in object chroma) of a light source in comparison to a reference illuminant. The calculations are based on a newly developed set of reflectance data from real samples uniformly distributed in color space (thereby fairly representing all colors) and in wavelength space (thereby precluding artificial optimization of the color rendition scores by spectral engineering). The color fidelity score Rf is an improved version of themore » CIE color rendering index. The color gamut score Rg is an improved version of the Gamut Area Index. In combination, they provide two complementary assessments to guide the optimization of future light sources. This method summarizes the findings of the Color Metric Task Group of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES). It is adopted in the upcoming IES TM-30-2015, and is proposed for consideration with the International Commission on Illumination (CIE).« less

  11. Development of the IES method for evaluating the color rendition of light sources

    SciTech Connect

    David, Aurelien; Fini, Paul T.; Houser, Kevin W.; Ohno, Yoshi; Royer, Michael P.; USA, Richland Washington; Smet, Kevin A. G.; Whitehead, Lorne

    2015-06-08

    We have developed a two-measure system for evaluating light sources’ color rendition that builds upon conceptual progress of numerous researchers over the last two decades. The system quantifies the color fidelity and color gamut (change in object chroma) of a light source in comparison to a reference illuminant. The calculations are based on a newly developed set of reflectance data from real samples uniformly distributed in color space (thereby fairly representing all colors) and in wavelength space (thereby precluding artificial optimization of the color rendition scores by spectral engineering). The color fidelity score Rf is an improved version of the CIE color rendering index. The color gamut score Rg is an improved version of the Gamut Area Index. In combination, they provide two complementary assessments to guide the optimization of future light sources. This method summarizes the findings of the Color Metric Task Group of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES). It is adopted in the upcoming IES TM-30-2015, and is proposed for consideration with the International Commission on Illumination (CIE).

  12. Text Rendering: Beginning Literary Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Sandra L.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that "text rendering"--responding to oral readings by saying back remembered words or phrases--forces students to prolong their initial responses to texts and opens initial response to the influence of other readers. Argues that silence following oral readings allows words to sink into students' minds, creating individual images and…

  13. Color image simulation for underwater optics.

    PubMed

    Boffety, Matthieu; Galland, Frédéric; Allais, Anne-Gaëlle

    2012-08-10

    Underwater optical image simulation is a valuable tool for oceanic science, especially for the characterization of image processing techniques such as color restoration. In this context, simulating images with a correct color rendering is crucial. This paper presents an extension of existing image simulation models to RGB imaging. The influence of the spectral discretization of the model parameters on the color rendering of the simulated images is studied. It is especially shown that, if only RGB data of the scene chosen for simulations are available, a spectral reconstruction step prior to the simulations improves the image color rendering. PMID:22885575

  14. Compressive rendering: a rendering application of compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Sen, Pradeep; Darabi, Soheil

    2011-04-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in compressed sensing (CS), the new theory that shows how a small set of linear measurements can be used to reconstruct a signal if it is sparse in a transform domain. Although CS has been applied to many problems in other fields, in computer graphics, it has only been used so far to accelerate the acquisition of light transport. In this paper, we propose a novel application of compressed sensing by using it to accelerate ray-traced rendering in a manner that exploits the sparsity of the final image in the wavelet basis. To do this, we raytrace only a subset of the pixel samples in the spatial domain and use a simple, greedy CS-based algorithm to estimate the wavelet transform of the image during rendering. Since the energy of the image is concentrated more compactly in the wavelet domain, less samples are required for a result of given quality than with conventional spatial-domain rendering. By taking the inverse wavelet transform of the result, we compute an accurate reconstruction of the desired final image. Our results show that our framework can achieve high-quality images with approximately 75 percent of the pixel samples using a nonadaptive sampling scheme. In addition, we also perform better than other algorithms that might be used to fill in the missing pixel data, such as interpolation or inpainting. Furthermore, since the algorithm works in image space, it is completely independent of scene complexity. PMID:21311092

  15. Equivalent Colorings with "Maple"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2005-01-01

    Many counting problems can be modeled as "colorings" and solved by considering symmetries and Polya's cycle index polynomial. This paper presents a "Maple 7" program link http://users.tamuk.edu/kfdrc00/ that, given Polya's cycle index polynomial, determines all possible associated colorings and their partitioning into equivalence classes. These…

  16. Microbial pathogen quality criteria of rendered products.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Pramod K; Biswas, Sagor; Kass, Philip

    2016-06-01

    The North American rendering industry processes approximately 24 million metric tons (Mt) of raw materials and produces more than 8 million Mt of rendered products. More than 85 % of rendered products produced annually in the USA are used for producing animal feed. Pathogen contamination in rendered products is an important and topical issue. Although elevated temperatures (115-140 °C) for 40-90 min during the standard rendering processes are mathematically sufficient to completely destroy commonly found pathogens, the presence of pathogens in rendered products has nevertheless been reported. Increased concern over the risk of microbial contamination in rendered products may require additional safeguards for producing pathogen-free rendered products. This study provides an overview of rendered products, existing microbial pathogen quality criteria of rendered products (MPQCR), limitations, and the scope of improving the MPQCR. PMID:27121572

  17. GPU-based Volume Rendering for Medical Image Visualization.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yang; Gu, Lixu

    2005-01-01

    During the quick advancements of medical image visualization and augmented virtual reality application, the low performance of the volume rendering algorithm is still a "bottle neck". To facilitate the usage of well developed hardware resource, a novel graphics processing unit (GPU)-based volume ray-casting algorithm is proposed in this paper. Running on a normal PC, it performs an interactive rate while keeping the same image quality as the traditional volume rendering algorithm does. Recently, GPU-accelerated direct volume rendering has positioned itself as an efficient tool for the display and visual analysis of volume data. However, for large sized medical image data, it often shows low efficiency for too large memories requested. Furthermore, it always holds a drawback of writing color buffers multi-times per frame. The proposed algorithm improves the situation by implementing ray casting operation completely in GPU. It needs only one slice plane from CPU and one 3Dtexture to store data when GPU calculates the two terminals of the ray and carries out the color blending operation in its pixel programs. So both the rendering speed and the memories consumed are improved, and the algorithm can deal most medical image data on normal PCs in the interactive speed. PMID:17281405

  18. Color temperature tunable white light emitting diodes packaged with an omni-directional reflector.

    PubMed

    Su, Jung-Chieh; Lu, Chun-Lin

    2009-11-23

    This study proposed a correlated color temperature (CCT) tunable phosphor-converted white light emitting diode (LED) with an omni-directional reflector (ODR). Applying current to each individual InGaN based ultraviolet, purple and blue source LED chip of the white LED package, we can achieve the CCT tunability. The optimum color properties of the resulting white light are (0.3347, 0.3384), 5398 K, 81, 3137-8746 K for color coordinates, CCT, color rendering index (CRI) and CCT tuning range, respectively. Roughening the ODR substrate, we solve the non-uniformity color distribution caused by the reflectance of the ODR and positioning of source LED chips. PMID:19997380

  19. Tuning the correlated color temperature of white LED with a guest-host liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiwei; Luo, Zhenyue; Zhu, Ruidong; Hong, Qi; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate an electro-optic method to tune the correlated color temperature (CCT) of white light-emitting-diode (WLED) with a color conversion film, consisting of fluorescent dichroic dye doped in a liquid crystal host. By controlling the molecular reorientation of dichroic dyes, the power ratio of the transmitted blue and red lights of the white light can be accurately manipulated, resulting in different CCT. In a proof-of-concept experiment, we showed that the CCT of a yellow phosphor-converted WLED can be tuned from 3200 K to 4100 K. With further optimizations, the tuning range could be enlarged to 2500 K with fairly good color performance: luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) > 300 lm/W, color rendering index (CRI) > 75, and Duv < 0.005. Besides, the operation voltage is lower than 5 V and good angular color uniformity is achieved with remote-phosphor coating. This approach is promising for next generation smart lighting. PMID:26074559

  20. Color rendition engine.

    PubMed

    Zukauskas, Artūras; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Vitta, Pranciškus; Tuzikas, Arūnas; Petrulis, Andrius; Shur, Michael

    2012-02-27

    A source of white light with continuously tuned color rendition properties, such as color fidelity, as well as color saturating and color dulling ability has been developed. The source, which is composed of red (R), amber (A), green (G), and blue (B) light-emitting diodes, has a spectral power distribution varied as a weighted sum of "white" RGB and AGB blends. At the RGB and AGB end-points, the source has a highest color saturating and color dulling ability, respectively, as follows from the statistical analysis of the color-shift vectors for 1269 Munsell samples. The variation of the weight parameter allows for continuously traversing all possible metameric RAGB blends, including that with the highest color fidelity. The source was used in a psychophysical experiment on the estimation of the color appearance of familiar objects, such as vegetables, fruits, and soft-drink cans of common brands, at correlated color temperatures of 3000 K, 4500 K, and 6500 K. By continuously tuning the weight parameter, each of 100 subjects selected RAGB blends that, to their opinion, matched lighting characterized as "most saturating," "most dulling," "most natural," and "preferential". The end-point RGB and AGB blends have been almost unambiguously attributed to "most saturating" and "most dulling" lighting, respectively. RAGB blends that render a highest number of colors with high fidelity have, on average, been attributed to "most natural" lighting. The "preferential" color quality of lighting has, on average, been matched to RAGB blends that provide color rendition with fidelity somewhat reduced in favor of a higher saturation. Our results infer that tunable "color rendition engines" can validate color rendition metrics and provide lighting meeting specific needs and preferences to color quality. PMID:22418343

  1. Image space adaptive volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Andrew; Dingliana, John

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique for interactive direct volume rendering which provides adaptive sampling at a reduced memory requirement compared to traditional methods. Our technique exploits frame to frame coherence to quickly generate a two-dimensional importance map of the volume which guides sampling rate optimisation and allows us to provide interactive frame rates for user navigation and transfer function changes. In addition our ray casting shader detects any inconsistencies in our two-dimensional map and corrects them on the fly to ensure correct classification of important areas of the volume.

  2. Impact of cross-regional differences on color rendition evaluation of white light sources.

    PubMed

    Smet, Kevin A G; Hanselaer, Peter

    2015-11-16

    In a study, involving laboratories from seven geographic regions, the memory colors of eleven familiar objects were investigated. Based on that study, one global and seven regional memory color rendition indices (MCRIs) are created and the impact of cross-regional differences on the evaluation of color rendition was investigated. A first analysis focuses on the impact on MCRI index values by comparing the regional index values, calculated for 401 light sources, with those of the global index. A second analysis examines the impact on predictive performance in terms of the visual appreciation and naturalness of rendered objects colors as evaluated in respectively twenty-one and fifteen experiments published in literature. Both analyses show that, although there are small differences in absolute level of color rendition, the regional metrics are generally comparable in terms of predicting light source rank order and correlation with visual data. Therefore, ànd considering between-region variability to be smaller than or of the same size as the within-region variability, a globally valid memory color rendition metric can be proposed without introducing substantial errors. Finally, Smet's Rm index, obtained using real objects, is suggested as a good approximation to that globally valid metric. PMID:26698502

  3. Color naming: color scientists do it between Munsell sheets of color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Giordano B.; Moroney, Nathan M.

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of high dynamic range imaging and wide gamut color spaces, gamut mapping algorithms have to nudge image colors much more drastically to constrain them within a rendering device's gamut. Classical colorimetry is concerned with color matching and the developed color difference metrics are for small distances. For larger distances, categorization becomes a more useful concept. In the gamut mapping case, lexical distance induced by color names is a more useful metric, which translates to the condition that a nudged color may not cross a name boundary. The new problem is to find these color name boundaries. We compare the experimental procedures used for color naming by linguists, ethnologists, and color scientists and propose a methodology that leads to robust repeatable experiments.

  4. Linked-View Parallel Coordinate Plot Renderer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-06-28

    This software allows multiple linked views for interactive querying via map-based data selection, bar chart analytic overlays, and high dynamic range (HDR) line renderings. The major component of the visualization package is a parallel coordinate renderer with binning, curved layouts, shader-based rendering, and other techniques to allow interactive visualization of multidimensional data.

  5. Volume Rendering of Heliospheric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hick, P. P.; Jackson, B. V.; Bailey, M. J.; Buffington, A.

    2001-12-01

    We demonstrate some of the techniques we currently use for the visualization of heliospheric volume data. Our 3D volume data usually are derived from tomographic reconstructions of the solar wind density and velocity from remote sensing observations (e.g., Thomson scattering and interplanetary scintillation observations). We show examples of hardware-based volume rendering using the Volume Pro PCI board (from TeraRecon, Inc.). This board updates the display at a rate of up to 30 frames per second using a parallel projection algorithm, allowing the manipulation of volume data in real-time. In addition, the manipulation of 4D volume data (the 4th dimension usually representing time) enables the visualization in real-time of an evolving (time-dependent) data set. We also show examples of perspective projections using IDL. This work was supported through NASA grant NAG5-9423.

  6. Volume Rendering of AMR Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadens, M.; Pomarède, D.; Chapon, D.; Teyssier, R.; Bournaud, F.; Renaud, F.; Grandjouan, N.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution simulations often rely on the Adaptive Mesh Resolution (AMR) technique to optimize memory consumption versus attainable precision. While this technique allows for dramatic improvements in terms of computing performance, the analysis and visualization of its data outputs remain challenging. The lack of effective volume renderers for the octree-based AMR used by the RAMSES simulation program has led to the development of the solutions presented in this paper. Two custom algorithms are discussed, based on the splatting and the ray-casting techniques. Their usage is illustrated in the context of the visualization of a high-resolution, 6000-processor simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy. Performance obtained in terms of memory management and parallelism speedup are presented.

  7. Matching rendered and real world images by digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitjà, Carles; Bover, Toni; Bigas, Miquel; Escofet, Jaume

    2010-05-01

    Recent advances in computer-generated images (CGI) have been used in commercial and industrial photography providing a broad scope in product advertising. Mixing real world images with those rendered from virtual space software shows a more or less visible mismatching between corresponding image quality performance. Rendered images are produced by software which quality performance is only limited by the resolution output. Real world images are taken with cameras with some amount of image degradation factors as lens residual aberrations, diffraction, sensor low pass anti aliasing filters, color pattern demosaicing, etc. The effect of all those image quality degradation factors can be characterized by the system Point Spread Function (PSF). Because the image is the convolution of the object by the system PSF, its characterization shows the amount of image degradation added to any taken picture. This work explores the use of image processing to degrade the rendered images following the parameters indicated by the real system PSF, attempting to match both virtual and real world image qualities. The system MTF is determined by the slanted edge method both in laboratory conditions and in the real picture environment in order to compare the influence of the working conditions on the device performance; an approximation to the system PSF is derived from the two measurements. The rendered images are filtered through a Gaussian filter obtained from the taking system PSF. Results with and without filtering are shown and compared measuring the contrast achieved in different final image regions.

  8. Rendering-oriented multiview video coding based on chrominance information reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Feng; Yu, Mei; Jiang, Gangyi; Zhang, Zhaoyang

    2010-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) video systems are expected to be a next-generation visual application. Since multiview video for 3-D video systems is composed of color and associated depth information, its huge requirement for data storage and transmission is an important problem. We propose a rendering-oriented multiview video coding (MVC) method based on chrominance information reconstruction that incorporates the rendering technique into the MVC process. The proposed method discards certain chrominance information to reduce bitrates, and performs reasonable bitrate allocation between color and depth videos. At the decoder, a chrominance reconstruction algorithm is presented to achieve accurate reconstruction by warping the neighboring views and colorizing the luminance-only pixels. Experimental results show that the proposed method can save nearly 20% on bitrates against the results without discarding the chrominance information. Moreover, under a fixed bitrate budget, the proposed method can greatly improve the rendering quality.

  9. A novel method for designing dichroic color filter transmittance curves for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Rui; Shum, Frank

    2014-09-01

    This paper focuses on designing dichroic filters for changing the color of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps. Dichroic filters are composed of multiple dielectric layers on a substrate. By applying a dichroic filter, some of the LED's spectral energy is reflected and some is transmitted, which changes the lamp's color. Conventional methods to obtain spectral transmittance curves have shortcomings. The design criteria for the transmittance curves are incompatible with the metrics used in lighting applications, such as correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Thus, the color rendering performance and the optical transmission of a lighting system are not optimized. This observation leads to the development of a proposed method for designing dichroic filter transmittance curves to provide accurate color shift, high CRI, and sufficient optical transmission. The method initially uses the transmittance curve of an existing color filter that provides a roughly close color shift for the LED lamp to calculate the transmittance curve that causes an accurate color shift by polynomial approximation. Based on the approximated curve, a preliminary transmittance curve without the effect of the LED lamp's secondary optics is derived and verified in thin-film design and optical design software tools. Further, the derived preliminary transmittance curve is optimized by applying an algorithm to loop through a large amount of representative curves fluctuating near the preliminary curve. The resulting dichroic filter provides an accurate color shift (ΔCCT = -800±50K, Duv = ±0.003), high CRI (Ra and R9 <= 95), and sufficient luminous flux transmission (<= 70%).

  10. Progress in color night vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toet, Alexander; Hogervorst, Maarten A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of our recent progress and the current state-of-the-art techniques of color image fusion for night vision applications. Inspired by previously developed color opponent fusing schemes, we initially developed a simple pixel-based false color-mapping scheme that yielded fused false color images with large color contrast and preserved the identity of the input signals. This method has been successfully deployed in different areas of research. However, since this color mapping did not produce realistic colors, we continued to develop a statistical color-mapping procedure that would transfer the color distribution of a given example image to a multiband nighttime image. This procedure yields a realistic color rendering. However, it is computationally expensive and achieves no color constancy since the mapping depends on the relative amounts of the different materials in the scene. By applying the statistical mapping approach in a color look-up-table framework, we finally achieved both color constancy and computational simplicity. This sample-based color transfer method is specific for different types of materials in a scene and can be easily adapted for the intended operating theatre and the task at hand. The method can be implemented as a look-up-table transform and is highly suitable for real-time implementations.

  11. Volume rendering for interactive 3D segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toennies, Klaus D.; Derz, Claus

    1997-05-01

    Combined emission/absorption and reflection/transmission volume rendering is able to display poorly segmented structures from 3D medical image sequences. Visual cues such as shading and color let the user distinguish structures in the 3D display that are incompletely extracted by threshold segmentation. In order to be truly helpful, analyzed information needs to be quantified and transferred back into the data. We extend our previously presented scheme for such display be establishing a communication between visual analysis and the display process. The main tool is a selective 3D picking device. For being useful on a rather rough segmentation, the device itself and the display offer facilities for object selection. Selective intersection planes let the user discard information prior to choosing a tissue of interest. Subsequently, a picking is carried out on the 2D display by casting a ray into the volume. The picking device is made pre-selective using already existing segmentation information. Thus, objects can be picked that are visible behind semi-transparent surfaces of other structures. Information generated by a later connected- component analysis can then be integrated into the data. Data examination is continued on an improved display letting the user actively participate in the analysis process. Results of this display-and-interaction scheme proved to be very effective. The viewer's ability to extract relevant information form a complex scene is combined with the computer's ability to quantify this information. The approach introduces 3D computer graphics methods into user- guided image analysis creating an analysis-synthesis cycle for interactive 3D segmentation.

  12. RenderToolbox3: MATLAB tools that facilitate physically based stimulus rendering for vision research

    PubMed Central

    Heasly, Benjamin S.; Cottaris, Nicolas P.; Lichtman, Daniel P.; Xiao, Bei; Brainard, David H.

    2014-01-01

    RenderToolbox3 provides MATLAB utilities and prescribes a workflow that should be useful to researchers who want to employ graphics in the study of vision and perhaps in other endeavors as well. In particular, RenderToolbox3 facilitates rendering scene families in which various scene attributes and renderer behaviors are manipulated parametrically, enables spectral specification of object reflectance and illuminant spectra, enables the use of physically based material specifications, helps validate renderer output, and converts renderer output to physical units of radiance. This paper describes the design and functionality of the toolbox and discusses several examples that demonstrate its use. We have designed RenderToolbox3 to be portable across computer hardware and operating systems and to be free and open source (except for MATLAB itself). RenderToolbox3 is available at https://github.com/DavidBrainard/RenderToolbox3. PMID:24511145

  13. Direct Volume Rendering of Curvilinear Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Wilhelms, J.; Challinger, J.; Alper, N.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Direct volume rendering can visualize sampled 3D scalar data as a continuous medium, or extract features. However, it is generally slow. Furthermore, most algorithms for direct volume rendering have assumed rectilinear gridded data. This paper discusses methods for using direct volume rendering when the original volume is curvilinear, i.e. is divided into six-sided cells which are not necessarily equilateral hexahedra. One approach is to ray-cast such volumes directly. An alternative approach is to interpolate the sample volumes to a rectilinear grid, and use this regular volume for rendering. Advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches in terms of speed and image quality are explored.

  14. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the most ...

  15. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... three color cone cells to determine our color perception. Color blindness can occur when one or more ... Anyone who experiences a significant change in color perception should see an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.). Next ...

  16. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the ...

  17. Hierarchical image-based rendering using texture mapping hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    1999-01-15

    Multi-layered depth images containing color and normal information for subobjects in a hierarchical scene model are precomputed with standard z-buffer hardware for six orthogonal views. These are adaptively selected according to the proximity of the viewpoint, and combined using hardware texture mapping to create ''reprojected'' output images for new viewpoints. (If a subobject is too close to the viewpoint, the polygons in the original model are rendered.) Specific z-ranges are selected from the textures with the hardware alpha test to give accurate 3D reprojection. The OpenGL color matrix is used to transform the precomputed normals into their orientations in the final view, for hardware shading.

  18. Applying Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, David

    1984-01-01

    Most schools teach the triadic color system, utilizing red, blue, and yellow as primary colors. Other systems, such as additive and subtractive color systems, Munsell's Color Notation System, and the Hering Opponent Color Theory, can broaden children's concepts and free them to better choose color in their own work. (IS)

  19. Color temperature tunable white light LED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speier, Ingo; Salsbury, Marc

    2006-08-01

    Efficient white light LED systems with continuously tunable color temperature (CT) over a range of 3000 K to 6500 K are reviewed. Typically, white light sources have a fixed CT and color rendering index (CRI). White light with user-specified color temperatures is currently generated by solid-state systems with red green blue ("R/G/B"), red green blue amber ("R/G/B/A"), and warm white cool white ("WW/CW") LED combinations, but their performance is suboptimal for architectural lighting applications. We propose and discuss an LED module with a combination of warm white, green and blue ("WW/G/B") LEDs. In this scenario, the white LEDs have fixed intensity, while the blue and green LED intensities are adjusted to shift the LED module chromaticity along the blackbody locus. We also propose and discuss an LED module with a combination of red, green, blue, and cool white ("R/G/B/CW") LEDs. The white LEDs still have a fixed intensity, while the intensities of the red, green, and blue LEDs are again adjusted to shift the LED module chromaticity along the blackbody locus. The white LEDs ensure that an improved CRI is maintained in comparison to a simple "R/G/B" solution.

  20. OLED-based physiologically-friendly very low-color temperature illumination for night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Shen, Shih-Ming; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Pin-Chu; Chen, Szu-Hao; Wang, Yi-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Wang, Ching-Chun; Hsieh, Chun-Yu; Lin, Chin-Chiao; Chen, Chien-Tien

    2012-09-01

    Numerous medical research studies reveal intense white or blue light to drastically suppress at night the secretion of melatonin (MLT), a protective oncostatic hormone. Lighting devices with lower color-temperature (CT) possess lesser MLT suppression effect based on the same luminance, explaining why physicians have long been calling for the development of lighting sources with low CT or free from blue emission for use at night to safeguard human health. We will demonstrate in the presentation the fabrication of OLED devices with very-low CT, especially those with CT much lower than that of incandescent bulbs (2500K) or even candles (2000K). Without any light extraction method, OLEDs with an around 1800K CT are easily obtainable with an efficacy of 30 lm/W at 1,000 nits. To also ensure high color-rendering to provide visual comfort, low CT OLEDs composing long wavelength dominant 5-spectrum emission have been fabricated. While keeping the color-rendering index as high as 85 and CT as low as 2100K, the resulting efficacy can also be much greater than that of incandescent bulbs (15 lm/W), proving these low CT OLED devices to be also capable of being energy-saving and high quality. The color-temperature can be further decreased to 1700K or lower upon removing the undesired short wavelength emission but on the cost of losing some color rendering index. It is hoped that the devised energy-saving, high quality low CT OLED could properly echo the call for a physiologically-friendly illumination for night, and more attention could be drawn to the development of MLT suppression-less non-white light.

  1. Parallel rendering techniques for massively parallel visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Krogh, M.; Painter, J.

    1995-07-01

    As the resolution of simulation models increases, scientific visualization algorithms which take advantage of the large memory. and parallelism of Massively Parallel Processors (MPPs) are becoming increasingly important. For large applications rendering on the MPP tends to be preferable to rendering on a graphics workstation due to the MPP`s abundant resources: memory, disk, and numerous processors. The challenge becomes developing algorithms that can exploit these resources while minimizing overhead, typically communication costs. This paper will describe recent efforts in parallel rendering for polygonal primitives as well as parallel volumetric techniques. This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume render use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Ma.chines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  2. Capturing, processing, and rendering real-world scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, Lars S.; Lastra, Anselmo A.; McAllister, David K.; Popescu, Voicu; McCue, Chris; Fuchs, Henry

    2000-12-01

    While photographs vividly capture a scene from a single viewpoint, it is our goal to capture a scene in such a way that a viewer can freely move to any viewpoint, just as he or she would in an actual scene. We have built a prototype system to quickly digitize a scene using a laser rangefinder and a high-resolution digital camera that accurately captures a panorama of high-resolution range and color information. With real-world scenes, we have provided data to fuel research in many area, including representation, registration, data fusion, polygonization, rendering, simplification, and reillumination. The real-world scene data can be used for many purposes, including immersive environments, immersive training, re-engineering and engineering verification, renovation, crime-scene and accident capture and reconstruction, archaeology and historic preservation, sports and entertainment, surveillance, remote tourism and remote sales. We will describe our acquisition system, the necessary processing to merge data from the multiple input devices and positions. We will also describe high quality rendering using the data we have collected. Issues about specific rendering accelerators and algorithms will also be presented. We will conclude by describing future uses and methods of collection for real- world scene data.

  3. Color image processing for date quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah Jye; Archibald, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Many agricultural non-contact visual inspection applications use color image processing techniques because color is often a good indicator of product quality. Color evaluation is an essential step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. Most color spaces such as RGB and HSV represent colors with three-dimensional data, which makes using color image processing a challenging task. Since most agricultural applications only require analysis on a predefined set or range of colors, mapping these relevant colors to a small number of indexes allows simple and efficient color image processing for quality evaluation. This paper presents a simple but efficient color mapping and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time quality evaluation of Medjool dates. In contrast with more complex color image processing techniques, the proposed color mapping method makes it easy for a human operator to specify and adjust color-preference settings for different color groups representing distinct quality levels. Using this color mapping technique, the color image is first converted to a color map that has one color index represents a color value for each pixel. Fruit maturity level is evaluated based on these color indices. A skin lamination threshold is then determined based on the fruit surface characteristics. This adaptive threshold is used to detect delaminated fruit skin and hence determine the fruit quality. The performance of this robust color grading technique has been used for real-time Medjool date grading.

  4. Color uniformity and data simulation in high-power RGB LED modules using different LED-chips arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yan; Jin, Shangzhong; Wang, Yanhua; Dou, Liangliang

    2007-11-01

    The continuing research efforts in white light created by mixing red, green and blue light emitting diodes (RGB LED) will allow their applications in high quality lighting systems in the (near) future. There are still many issues to tackle in this kind of light source, for instance the color uniformity and the change of color-render property owing to the change of LED's temperature. In this paper we simulate the effects on color uniformity of the near-field light distribution due to different LED-chips arrays (at optimum packaging density for uniform irradiance) using High-Power RGB LED-chips. The results showing the color uniformity of near-field which can be achieved with different RGB LED-chips arrays are presented. Several configurations of RGB LED-chips arrays and relevant data for color variation are given respectively. An analysis of luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) and color rendering index (CRI) of this source is performed, which are affected by the peak wavelength, spectral width, and the output peak emission power ratio of LED-chips.

  5. Object-oriented parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Heiland, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    Since many scientific datasets can be visualized using some polygonal representation, a polygon renderer has broad use for scientific visualization. With today`s high performance computing applications producing very large datasets, a parallel polygon renderer is a necessary tool for keeping the compute-visualize cycle at a minimum. This paper presents a DOIV on renderer that combines the shared-memory and message-passing models of parallel programming. It uses the Global Arrays library, a shared-memory programming toolkit for distributed memory machines. The experience of using an object oriented approach for software design and development is also discussed.

  6. High-quality anatomical structure enhancement for cardiac image dynamic volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2008-03-01

    Dynamic volume rendering of the beating heart is an important element in cardiac disease diagnosis and therapy planning, providing the clinician with insight into the internal cardiac structure and functional behavior. Most clinical applications tend to focus upon a particular set of organ structures, and in the case of cardiac imaging, it would be helpful to embed anatomical features into the dynamic volume that are of particular importance to an intervention. A uniform transfer function (TF), such as is generally employed in volume rendering, cannot effectively isolate such structures because of the lack of spatial information and the small intensity differences between adjacent tissues. Explicit segmentation is a powerful way to approach this problem, which usually yields a single binary mask volume (MV), where a unit value in a voxel within the MV acts as a tag label representing the anatomical structure of interest (ASOI). These labels are used to determine the TF employed to adjust the ASOI display. Traditional approaches for rendering such segmented volumetric datasets usually deliver unsatisfactory results, such as noninteractive rendering speed, low image quality, intermixing artifacts along the rendered subvolume boundaries, and speckle noise. In this paper, we introduce a new "color coding" approach, based on the graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated raycasting algorithm and a pre-integrated voxel classification method, to address this problem. The mask tag labels derived from segmentation are first smoothed with a Gaussian filter, and multiple TFs are designed for each of the MVs and the source cardiac volume respectively, mapping the voxel's intensity to color and opacity at each sampling point along the casting ray. The resultant values are composited together using a boundary color adjustment technique, which acts as "coding" the segmented anatomical structure information into the rendered source volume of the beating heart. Our algorithm

  7. Fast volume rendering for medical image.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hu; Xin-He, Xu

    2005-01-01

    In orders to improve the rendering speed of ray casting and make this technique a practical routine in medical applications, two new and improved techniques are described in this paper. First, an integrated method using "proximity clouds" technique is applied to speed up ray casting. The second technique for speeding up the 3D rendering is done through a parallel implementation based on "single computer multi CPU" model Four groups of CT data sets have been used to validate the improvement of the rendering speed. The result shown that the interactive rendering speed is up to 6-10 fps, which is almost real-time making our algorithm practical in medical visualization routine. PMID:17281409

  8. Color blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... have trouble telling the difference between red and green. This is the most common type of color ... color blindness often have problems seeing reds and greens, too. The most severe form of color blindness ...

  9. Color blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider or eye specialist can check your color vision in several ways. Testing for color blindness is ... Adams AJ, Verdon WA, Spivey BE. Color vision. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. ... PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol. 2, chap ...

  10. Foundations for Measuring Volume Rendering Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter L.; Uselton, Samuel P.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a foundation for objectively comparing volume rendered images. The key elements of the foundation are: (1) a rigorous specification of all the parameters that need to be specified to define the conditions under which a volume rendered image is generated; (2) a methodology for difference classification, including a suite of functions or metrics to quantify and classify the difference between two volume rendered images that will support an analysis of the relative importance of particular differences. The results of this method can be used to study the changes caused by modifying particular parameter values, to compare and quantify changes between images of similar data sets rendered in the same way, and even to detect errors in the design, implementation or modification of a volume rendering system. If one has a benchmark image, for example one created by a high accuracy volume rendering system, the method can be used to evaluate the accuracy of a given image.

  11. NASA 1981 photography index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An index of representative photographs is presented. Color transparencies and black and white glossies of major launches, Mariner spacecraft, Pioneer spacecraft, planets and other space phenomena, Skylab, space shuttle, Viking spacecraft, and Voyager spacecraft are included.

  12. Polymeric Inverse Glasses for Development of Noniridescent Structural Colors in Full Visible Range.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Ho; Sim, Jae Young; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2016-05-18

    Amorphous colloidal array with short-range order displays noniridescent structural colors due to the isotropic nature of the colloidal arrangement. The low angle dependence renders the colloidal glasses, which is promising for various coloration applications. Nevertheless, the colloidal glasses are difficult to develop red structural color due to strong cavity-like resonance from individual particles in the blue region. To suppress the cavity mode and develop the colors in the full visible range, we prepare inverse glasses composed of amorphous array of air cavities with short-range order. To produce the structures in a simple and reproducible manner, monodisperse silica particles are dispersed in a photocurable resin of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) at a volume fraction of 0.3. The particles spontaneously form the amorphous array with short-range order, which is rapidly captured in polymeric films by photopolymerization of the resin. Selective removal of silica particles from the polymerized resin leaves behind amorphous array of air cavities. The inverse glasses display structural colors with negligible backscattering in blue due to short optical path and low index in each cavity. Therefore, the colors can be tuned in full visible range by simply controlling the cavity size. The photocurable suspensions of silica particles can be patterned by photolithography, which enables the production of freestanding films containing patterned inverse glasses with noniridescent structural colors. PMID:27124719

  13. Image-based rendering method for mapping endoscopic video onto CT-based endoluminal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Higgins, William E.

    2006-03-01

    One of the indicators of early lung cancer is a color change in airway mucosa. Bronchoscopy of the major airways can provide high-resolution color video of the airway tree's mucosal surfaces. In addition, 3D MDCT chest images provide 3D structural information of the airways. Unfortunately, the bronchoscopic video contains no explicit 3D structural and position information, and the 3D MDCT data captures no color or textural information of the mucosa. A fusion of the topographical information from the 3D CT data and the color information from the bronchoscopic video, however, enables realistic 3D visualization, navigation, localization, and quantitative color-topographic analysis of the airways. This paper presents a method for topographic airway-mucosal surface mapping from bronchoscopic video onto 3D MDCT endoluminal views. The method uses registered video images and CT-based virtual endoscopic renderings of the airways. The visibility and depth data are also generated by the renderings. Uniform sampling and over-scanning of the visible triangles are done before they are packed into a texture space. The texels are then re-projected onto video images and assigned color values based on depth and illumination data obtained from renderings. The texture map is loaded into the rendering engine to enable real-time navigation through the combined 3D CT surface and bronchoscopic video data. Tests were performed on pre-recorded bronchoscopy patient video and associated 3D MDCT scans. Results show that we can effectively accomplish mapping over a continuous sequence of airway images spanning several generations of airways.

  14. Color correction optimization with hue regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Liu, Huaping; Quan, Shuxue

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that observers are capable of judging the quality of an image without any knowledge of the original scene. When no reference is available, observers can extract the apparent objects in an image and compare them with the typical colors of similar objects recalled from their memories. Some generally agreed upon research results indicate that although perfect colorimetric rendering is not conspicuous and color errors can be well tolerated, the appropriate rendition of certain memory colors such as skin, grass, and sky is an important factor in the overall perceived image quality. These colors are appreciated in a fairly consistent manner and are memorized with slightly different hues and higher color saturation. The aim of color correction for a digital color pipeline is to transform the image data from a device dependent color space to a target color space, usually through a color correction matrix which in its most basic form is optimized through linear regressions between the two sets of data in two color spaces in the sense of minimized Euclidean color error. Unfortunately, this method could result in objectionable distortions if the color error biased certain colors undesirably. In this paper, we propose a color correction optimization method with preferred color reproduction in mind through hue regularization and present some experimental results.

  15. Skin Cancer in Skin of Color

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Porcia T.

    2009-01-01

    Skin cancers in skin of color often present atypically or with advanced stage in comparison to Caucasian patients. Health care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion when examining skin lesions in skin of color. PMID:19691228

  16. Standardized rendering from IR surveillance motion imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokoski, F. J.

    2014-06-01

    Government agencies, including defense and law enforcement, increasingly make use of video from surveillance systems and camera phones owned by non-government entities.Making advanced and standardized motion imaging technology available to private and commercial users at cost-effective prices would benefit all parties. In particular, incorporating thermal infrared into commercial surveillance systems offers substantial benefits beyond night vision capability. Face rendering is a process to facilitate exploitation of thermal infrared surveillance imagery from the general area of a crime scene, to assist investigations with and without cooperating eyewitnesses. Face rendering automatically generates greyscale representations similar to police artist sketches for faces in surveillance imagery collected from proximate locations and times to a crime under investigation. Near-realtime generation of face renderings can provide law enforcement with an investigation tool to assess witness memory and credibility, and integrate reports from multiple eyewitnesses, Renderings can be quickly disseminated through social media to warn of a person who may pose an immediate threat, and to solicit the public's help in identifying possible suspects and witnesses. Renderings are pose-standardized so as to not divulge the presence and location of eyewitnesses and surveillance cameras. Incorporation of thermal infrared imaging into commercial surveillance systems will significantly improve system performance, and reduce manual review times, at an incremental cost that will continue to decrease. Benefits to criminal justice would include improved reliability of eyewitness testimony and improved accuracy of distinguishing among minority groups in eyewitness and surveillance identifications.

  17. Colorful Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Described is an color-making activity where students use food coloring, eyedroppers, and water to make various colored solutions. Included are the needed materials and procedures. Students are asked to write up the formulas for making their favorite color. (KR)

  18. Feature-driven data exploration for volumetric rendering.

    PubMed

    Woo, Insoo; Maciejewski, Ross; Gaither, Kelly P; Ebert, David S

    2012-10-01

    We have developed an intuitive method to semiautomatically explore volumetric data in a focus-region-guided or value-driven way using a user-defined ray through the 3D volume and contour lines in the region of interest. After selecting a point of interest from a 2D perspective, which defines a ray through the 3D volume, our method provides analytical tools to assist in narrowing the region of interest to a desired set of features. Feature layers are identified in a 1D scalar value profile with the ray and are used to define default rendering parameters, such as color and opacity mappings, and locate the center of the region of interest. Contour lines are generated based on the feature layer level sets within interactively selected slices of the focus region. Finally, we utilize feature-preserving filters and demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to noisy data. PMID:22291153

  19. Depth remapping using seam carving for depth image based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Ikuko; Iwauchi, Kenichi

    2015-03-01

    Depth remapping is a technique to control depth range of stereo images. Conventional remapping which uses a transform function in the whole image has a stable characteristic, however it sometimes reduces the 3D appearance too much. To cope with this problem, a depth remapping method which preserves the details of depth structure is proposed. We apply seam carving, which is an effective technique for image retargeting, to depth remapping. An extended depth map is defined as a space-depth volume, and a seam surface which is a 2D monotonic and connected manifold is introduced. The depth range is reduced by removing depth values on the seam surface from the space-depth volume. Finally a stereo image pair is synthesized from the corrected depth map and an input color image by depth image based rendering.

  20. Collaborative Graphic Rendering for Improving Visual Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoxin; Pei, Guodong

    Handheld devices such as UMPC, though convenient, bear weakness of size constraint for display. To mitigate such a problem and enhance user experience for owners of small devices, in this paper we design a collaborative rendering platform. When running game graphic applications at a handheld, the generated OpenGL graphic commands are intercepted and then delivered to a device with a larger display. The graphics are rendered and displayed at that device. The performance of the collaborative rendering platform is determined by graphic computing resources and network bandwidth. Analysis and simulation prove that other than providing a better display, the collaborative system can improve game experience also by increasing frame rates. In particular, at a low computing cost, a further collaboration between GPUs of collaborators can improve frame rate by eliminating the negative impact from network delay on applications that require GPU feedback.

  1. Mobile Volume Rendering: Past, Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Noguera, José M; Jiménez, J Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Volume rendering has been a relevant topic in scientific visualization for the last decades. However, the exploration of reasonably big volume datasets requires considerable computing power, which has limited this field to the desktop scenario. But the recent advances in mobile graphics hardware have motivated the research community to overcome these restrictions and to bring volume graphics to these ubiquitous handheld platforms. This survey presents the past and present work on mobile volume rendering, and is meant to serve as an overview and introduction to the field. It proposes a classification of the current efforts and covers aspects such as advantages and issues of the mobile platforms, rendering strategies, performance and user interfaces. The paper ends by highlighting promising research directions to motivate the development of new and interesting mobile volume solutions. PMID:26731459

  2. A Parallel Rendering Algorithm for MIMD Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.; Orloff, Tobias

    1991-01-01

    Applications such as animation and scientific visualization demand high performance rendering of complex three dimensional scenes. To deliver the necessary rendering rates, highly parallel hardware architectures are required. The challenge is then to design algorithms and software which effectively use the hardware parallelism. A rendering algorithm targeted to distributed memory MIMD architectures is described. For maximum performance, the algorithm exploits both object-level and pixel-level parallelism. The behavior of the algorithm is examined both analytically and experimentally. Its performance for large numbers of processors is found to be limited primarily by communication overheads. An experimental implementation for the Intel iPSC/860 shows increasing performance from 1 to 128 processors across a wide range of scene complexities. It is shown that minimal modifications to the algorithm will adapt it for use on shared memory architectures as well.

  3. Smooth transitions between bump rendering algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.G. Max, N.L. |

    1993-01-04

    A method is described for switching smoothly between rendering algorithms as required by the amount of visible surface detail. The result will be more realism with less computation for displaying objects whose surface detail can be described by one or more bump maps. The three rendering algorithms considered are bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF), bump-mapping, and displacement-mapping. The bump-mapping has been modified to make it consistent with the other two. For a given viewpoint, one of these algorithms will show a better trade-off between quality, computation time, and aliasing than the other two. Thus, it needs to be determined for any given viewpoint which regions of the object(s) will be rendered with each algorithm The decision as to which algorithm is appropriate is a function of distance, viewing angle, and the frequency of bumps in the bump map.

  4. Interactive stereoscopic rendering of volumetric environments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ming; Zhang, Nan; Qu, Huamin; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an efficient stereoscopic rendering algorithm supporting interactive navigation through large-scale 3D voxel-based environments. In this algorithm, most of the pixel values of the right image are derived from the left image by a fast 3D warping based on a specific stereoscopic projection geometry. An accelerated volumetric ray casting then fills the remaining gaps in the warped right image. Our algorithm has been parallelized on a multiprocessor by employing effective task partitioning schemes and achieved a high cache coherency and load balancing. We also extend our stereoscopic rendering to include view-dependent shading and transparency effects. We have applied our algorithm in two virtual navigation systems, flythrough over terrain and virtual colonoscopy, and reached interactive stereoscopic rendering rates of more than 10 frames per second on a 16-processor SGI Challenge. PMID:15382695

  5. Color tunable LED spot lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelen, C.; Ansems, J.; Deurenberg, P.; van Duijneveldt, W.; Peeters, M.; Steenbruggen, G.; Treurniet, T.; Valster, A.; ter Weeme, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    A new trend in illumination is to use dynamic light to set or dynamically vary the ambience of a room or office. For this we need color tunable spots that can reliably vary over at least a wide range of color temperatures, and preferably also more saturated colors. LEDs are in principle ideally suited for this application thanks to their nature of emitting light in a relatively narrow band. For color tunable spot lighting based on the concept of mixing RGB LED colors, the key results have been presented before. Limitations of these 3-intrinsic-color mixing systems with high color rendering properties are found in a limited operating temperature range due to wavelength shifts, a limited color temperature range, and a low maximum operating temperature due to a strong flux decrease with increasing temperature. To overcome these limitations, a 3-color R pcGB system with phosphor-converted red (R pc) and a 4-color RAGB system have been investigated. With both systems, a CRI of at least 80 can be maintained over the relevant color temperature range of approximately 2700 K to 6500 K. In this paper we compare these concepts on overall system aspects and report on the performance of prototype spot lamps. The main features of the RAGB and R pcGB spot lamp concepts can be summarized as: 1) The RAGB spot overcomes CRI and gamut shortcomings of RGB light sources and gives much freedom in wavelength selection, but suffers from temperature sensitivity and complex controls; 2) The R pcGB spot overcomes shortcomings concerning CRI and thermal dependence of RGB sources and enables relatively simple controls, but needs an improved overall red efficacy. With both color concepts, prototype spot lamps have been built. The amber to red emitting nitridosilicate-based phosphors can be wavelength-tuned for optimal performance, which is found at a peak emission around 610 nm for high color quality systems. This results in a simple and very robust system with good color consistency. For the

  6. Fast polyhedral cell sorting for interactive rendering of unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Combra, J; Klosowski, J T; Max, N; Silva, C T; Williams, P L

    1998-10-30

    Direct volume rendering based on projective methods works by projecting, in visibility order, the polyhedral cells of a mesh onto the image plane, and incrementally compositing the cell's color and opacity into the final image. Crucial to this method is the computation of a visibility ordering of the cells. If the mesh is ''well-behaved'' (acyclic and convex), then the MPVO method of Williams provides a very fast sorting algorithm; however, this method only computes an approximate ordering in general datasets, resulting in visual artifacts when rendered. A recent method of Silva et al. removed the assumption that the mesh is convex, by means of a sweep algorithm used in conjunction with the MPVO method; their algorithm is substantially faster than previous exact methods for general meshes. In this paper we propose a new technique, which we call BSP-XMPVO, which is based on a fast and simple way of using binary space partitions on the boundary elements of the mesh to augment the ordering produced by MPVO. Our results are shown to be orders of magnitude better than previous exact methods of sorting cells.

  7. Direct Volume Rendering with Shading via Three-Dimensional Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Gelder, Allen; Kim, Kwansik

    1996-01-01

    A new and easy-to-implement method for direct volume rendering that uses 3D texture maps for acceleration, and incorporates directional lighting, is described. The implementation, called Voltx, produces high-quality images at nearly interactive speeds on workstations with hardware support for three-dimensional texture maps. Previously reported methods did not incorporate a light model, and did not address issues of multiple texture maps for large volumes. Our research shows that these extensions impact performance by about a factor of ten. Voltx supports orthographic, perspective, and stereo views. This paper describes the theory and implementation of this technique, and compares it to the shear-warp factorization approach. A rectilinear data set is converted into a three-dimensional texture map containing color and opacity information. Quantized normal vectors and a lookup table provide efficiency. A new tesselation of the sphere is described, which serves as the basis for normal-vector quantization. A new gradient-based shading criterion is described, in which the gradient magnitude is interpreted in the context of the field-data value and the material classification parameters, and not in isolation. In the rendering phase, the texture map is applied to a stack of parallel planes, which effectively cut the texture into many slabs. The slabs are composited to form an image.

  8. Volume Rendering for Curvilinear and Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N; Williams, P; Silva, C; Cook, R

    2003-03-05

    We discuss two volume rendering methods developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first, cell projection, renders the polygons in the projection of each cell. It requires a global visibility sort in order to composite the cells in back to front order, and we discuss several different algorithms for this sort. The second method uses regularly spaced slice planes perpendicular to the X, Y, or Z axes, which slice the cells into polygons. Both methods are supplemented with anti-aliasing techniques to deal with small cells that might fall between pixel samples or slice planes, and both have been parallelized.

  9. Efficient hardware accelerated rendering of multiple volumes by data dependent local render functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Helko; Geller, Dieter; Weese, Jürgen; Kiefer, Gundolf

    2007-03-01

    The inspection of a patient's data for diagnostics, therapy planning or therapy guidance involves an increasing number of 3D data sets, e.g. acquired by different imaging modalities, with different scanner settings or at different times. To enable viewing of the data in one consistent anatomical context fused interactive renderings of multiple 3D data sets are desirable. However, interactive fused rendering of typical medical data sets using standard computing hardware remains a challenge. In this paper we present a method to render multiple 3D data sets. By introducing local rendering functions, i.e. functions that are adapted to the complexity of the visible data contained in the different regions of a scene, we can ensure that the overall performance for fused rendering of multiple data sets depends on the actual amount of visible data. This is in contrast to other approaches where the performance depends mainly on the number of rendered data sets. We integrate the method into a streaming rendering architecture with brick-based data representations of the volume data. This enables efficient handling of data sets that do not fit into the graphics board memory and a good utilization of the texture caches. Furthermore, transfer and rendering of volume data that does not contribute to the final image can be avoided. We illustrate the benefits of our method by experiments with clinical data.

  10. How colorful! A feature it is, isn't it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebowsky, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    A display's color subpixel geometry provides an intriguing opportunity for improving readability of text. True type fonts can be positioned at the precision of subpixel resolution. With such a constraint in mind, how does one need to design font characteristics? On the other hand, display manufactures try hard in addressing the color display's dilemma: smaller pixel pitch and larger display diagonals strongly increase the total number of pixels. Consequently, cost of column and row drivers as well as power consumption increase. Perceptual color subpixel rendering using color component subsampling may save about 1/3 of color subpixels (and reduce power dissipation). This talk will try to elaborate the following questions, based on simulation of several different layouts of subpixel matrices: Up to what level are display device constraints compatible with software specific ideas of rendering text? How much of color contrast will remain? How to best consider preferred viewing distance for readability of text? How much does visual acuity vary at 20/20 vision? Can simplified models of human visual color perception be easily applied to text rendering on displays? How linear is human visual contrast perception around band limit of a display's spatial resolution? How colorful does the rendered text appear on the screen? How much does viewing angle influence the performance of subpixel layouts and color subpixel rendering?

  11. Solid-state lamps with optimized color saturation ability.

    PubMed

    Zukauskas, Artūras; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Shur, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Spectral power distribution of trichromatic clusters of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) was optimized for rendering the highest number of colors with a perceptually noticeable gain in chroma (color saturation) out of 1269 Munsell samples. The basic tradeoffs of the number of colors rendered with increased saturation with the number of colors rendered with high fidelity and with luminous efficacy of radiation were established. High-saturation RGB clusters composed of commercially available AlGaInP and InGaN LEDs were modeled for a standard set of correlated color temperatures and the stability of the color saturation ability of the clusters against the drift of peak wavelengths was investigated. PMID:20174057

  12. Rapid Decimation for Direct Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Jonathan; VanGelder, Allen; Verma, Vivek; Wilhelms, Jane

    1997-01-01

    An approach for eliminating unnecessary portions of a volume when producing a direct volume rendering is described. This reduction in volume size sacrifices some image quality in the interest of rendering speed. Since volume visualization is often used as an exploratory visualization technique, it is important to reduce rendering times, so the user can effectively explore the volume. The methods presented can speed up rendering by factors of 2 to 3 with minor image degradation. A family of decimation algorithms to reduce the number of primitives in the volume without altering the volume's grid in any way is introduced. This allows the decimation to be computed rapidly, making it easier to change decimation levels on the fly. Further, because very little extra space is required, this method is suitable for the very large volumes that are becoming common. The method is also grid-independent, so it is suitable for multiple overlapping curvilinear and unstructured, as well as regular, grids. The decimation process can proceed automatically, or can be guided by the user so that important regions of the volume are decimated less than unimportant regions. A formal error measure is described based on a three-dimensional analog of the Radon transform. Decimation methods are evaluated based on this metric and on direct comparison with reference images.

  13. Text What?! What Is Text Rendering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Haley, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Text rendering is a method of deconstructing text that allows students to make decisions regarding the importance of the text, select the portions that are most meaningful to them, and then share it with classmates--all without fear of being ridiculed. The research on students constructing meaning from text is clear. In order for knowledge to…

  14. 3-D Volume Rendering of Sand Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of resin-impregnated Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) specimens are assembled to provide 3-D volume renderings of density patterns formed by dislocation under the external loading stress profile applied during the experiments. Experiments flown on STS-79 and STS-89. Principal Investigator: Dr. Stein Sture

  15. Rendering Visible: Painting and Sexuate Subjectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I examine Luce Irigaray's aesthetic of sexual difference, which she develops by extrapolating from Paul Klee's idea that the role of painting is to render the non-visible rather than represent the visible. This idea is the premise of her analyses of phenomenology and psychoanalysis and their respective contributions to understanding…

  16. Shapes and textures for rendering coral

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.L. ); Wyvill, G. )

    1990-10-18

    A growth algorithm has been developed to build coral shapes out of a tree of spheres. A volume density defined by the spheres is contoured to give a soft object.'' The resulting contour surfaces are rendered by ray tracing, using a generalized volume texture to produce shading and bump mapped'' normal perturbations. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Uncalibrated color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroney, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Color calibration or the use of color measurement processes to characterize the color properties of a device or workflow is often expected or assumed for many color reproduction applications. However it is interesting to consider applications or situations in which color calibration is not as critical. In the first case it is possible to imagine an implicit color calibration resulting from a standardization or convergence of the colorant and substrate spectrum. In the second case it is possible to imagine cases where the device color variability is significantly less than the user color thresholds or expectations for color consistency. There are still general requirements for this form of pragmatic color but they are generally lower than for the higher end of digital color reproduction. Finally it is possible to imagine an implicit calibration that leverages in some way the highly accurate memory color for the hue of common objects. This scenario culminates with a challenge to create a natural capture calibration standard that does not require individual calibration, is spectrally diverse, is inexpensive and is environmentally friendly.

  18. Color realism and color science.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Alex; Hilbert, David R

    2003-02-01

    The target article is an attempt to make some progress on the problem of color realism. Are objects colored? And what is the nature of the color properties? We defend the view that physical objects (for instance, tomatoes, radishes, and rubies) are colored, and that colors are physical properties, specifically, types of reflectance. This is probably a minority opinion, at least among color scientists. Textbooks frequently claim that physical objects are not colored, and that the colors are "subjective" or "in the mind." The article has two other purposes: First, to introduce an interdisciplinary audience to some distinctively philosophical tools that are useful in tackling the problem of color realism and, second, to clarify the various positions and central arguments in the debate. The first part explains the problem of color realism and makes some useful distinctions. These distinctions are then used to expose various confusions that often prevent people from seeing that the issues are genuine and difficult, and that the problem of color realism ought to be of interest to anyone working in the field of color science. The second part explains the various leading answers to the problem of color realism, and (briefly) argues that all views other than our own have serious difficulties or are unmotivated. The third part explains and motivates our own view, that colors are types of reflectances and defends it against objections made in the recent literature that are often taken as fatal. PMID:14598439

  19. A multi-zoned white organic light-emitting diode with high CRI and low color temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; He, Shou-Jie; Wang, Deng-Ke; Jiang, Nan; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-02-01

    White organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) is becoming a new platform technology for a range of applications such as flat-panel displays, solid-state lightings etc., and are under intensive research. For general solid-state illumination applications, a WOLED’s color rendering index (CRI) and correlated color temperature (CCT) are two crucial parameters. This paper reports that WOLED device structures can be constructed using four stacked emission layers which independently emit lights at blue, green, yellow and red color respectively. The intensity of each emission layer is then engineered by funneling excitons to the targeted emission layer to achieve an ultrahigh 92 CRI at 5000 cd/m2, and to reduce CCT to below 2500 K.

  20. A multi-zoned white organic light-emitting diode with high CRI and low color temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; He, Shou-Jie; Wang, Deng-Ke; Jiang, Nan; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    White organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) is becoming a new platform technology for a range of applications such as flat-panel displays, solid-state lightings etc., and are under intensive research. For general solid-state illumination applications, a WOLED's color rendering index (CRI) and correlated color temperature (CCT) are two crucial parameters. This paper reports that WOLED device structures can be constructed using four stacked emission layers which independently emit lights at blue, green, yellow and red color respectively. The intensity of each emission layer is then engineered by funneling excitons to the targeted emission layer to achieve an ultrahigh 92 CRI at 5000 cd/m(2), and to reduce CCT to below 2500 K. PMID:26842934

  1. A multi-zoned white organic light-emitting diode with high CRI and low color temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; He, Shou-Jie; Wang, Deng-Ke; Jiang, Nan; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    White organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) is becoming a new platform technology for a range of applications such as flat-panel displays, solid-state lightings etc., and are under intensive research. For general solid-state illumination applications, a WOLED’s color rendering index (CRI) and correlated color temperature (CCT) are two crucial parameters. This paper reports that WOLED device structures can be constructed using four stacked emission layers which independently emit lights at blue, green, yellow and red color respectively. The intensity of each emission layer is then engineered by funneling excitons to the targeted emission layer to achieve an ultrahigh 92 CRI at 5000 cd/m2, and to reduce CCT to below 2500 K. PMID:26842934

  2. Color To Colorant Conversions In A Colorimetric Separation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Richard; Kearsley, Wayne

    1990-06-01

    Within several years of establishment of the CIE's Standard Observer, Neugebauer based upon it a device-independent interpretation of ink mixture in halftone color reproduction. Despite limitations of the model, his approach is of fundamental importance at a time in which document preparation in distributed computing environments is coming of age. Fruition of this technology demands a device independent or colorimetric method for representing and rendering color. A commercial, digital system for implementing such an approach (Kodak Designmaster 8000) has been described and will be reviewed here with particular regard to the output of color imagery on four-color printers. Inversion of Neugebauer's model for conversion of color to device specific signals must be constrained by the color gamut of the output medium and the utilization of the black printer (Gray Component Replacement). The interaction of the black printer with the device gamut and its effect on image quality and metamerism will receive detailed consideration. It will be shown that colorimetry is a powerful tool in maintaining accurate color reproduction during substitution of black for chromatic components, but that properties of the colorants must also be considered in order to realize commercially acceptable GCR. Section 7 of the paper is an enumeration of summary conclusions.

  3. Multi-chip color variable LED spot modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelen, C.; Ansems, J.; Deurenberg, P.; Treurniet, T.; van Lier, E.; Chao, O.; Mercier, V.; Calon, G.; van Os, K.; Lijten, G.; Sondag-Huethorst, J.

    2005-09-01

    The unique features of light emitting diodes (LEDs) such as intrinsic color generation and relative low temperature operation enable completely new lighting concepts. The ongoing increase in performance of LEDs reaching efficacy levels of more than 30 lm/W for illumination grade white light with the promise of reaching over 75 lm/W makes them also applicable for higher luminous applications such as spot and flood lighting, accent lighting and architectural lighting. For the new lighting feature of ambiance creation, which requires at least variation of the color temperature of the light and preferably also selection of more saturated colors, LEDs are ideally suited. In this paper we report on the overall system aspects to color variable LED spot lighting and on the performance of prototype spot modules. Mixing of the light is performed within the lighting module by a combination of dense packing of red/amber, green and blue emitting dice, and light collimation with facetted optics and small angle diffusion, resulting in a homogeneous appearance of the light source and a color point inhomogeneity Δu'v' in the beam (>90% of total flux) of less than 0.01. A color rendering index (Ra8) of over 80 can be obtained over a large temperature and color temperature range with the 3-color system for a specific combination of 5 nm wide wavelength bins. In the prototype spot modules, between 9 and 14 dice are mounted on a common substrate and integrated with the primary collimating optics that is based on total internal reflection. Nominal power of the spot module is 10W. The average thermal resistance between the die junctions and the housing is 2 K/W. The optical efficiency of the module is 70%. The maximum luminous flux in the beam, which has a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 20-25°, is about 200 lm. The system has thermal and optical sensors that provide the signals for a closed control loop to compensate for run-up and differential ageing effects. The resulting color

  4. Seeing Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Colors are powerful tools for engaging children, from the youngest years onward. We hang brightly patterned mobiles above their cribs and help them learn the names of colors as they begin to record their own ideas in pictures and words. Colors can also open the door to an invisible world of electromagnetism, even when children can barely imagine…

  5. Remote interactive direct volume rendering of AMR data

    SciTech Connect

    Kreylos, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Shalf, John M.; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2002-03-28

    We describe a framework for direct volume rendering of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) data that operates directly on the hierarchical grid structure, without the need to resample data onto a single, uniform rectilinear grid. The framework can be used for a range of renderers optimized for particular hardware architectures: a hardware-assisted renderer for single-processor graphics workstations, and a massively parallel software-only renderer for supercomputers. It is also possible to use the framework for distributed rendering servers. By exploiting the multiresolution structure of AMR data, the hardware-assisted renderers can render large AMR data sets at interactive rates, even if the data is stored remotely.

  6. Remote rendering using vtk and vic.

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.; Papka, M.E.

    2000-09-19

    This paper presents a remote rendering application that involves the extension of the Visualization Toolkit (vtk) and the Video Conferencing Tool (vie) for use in remote rendering complete with interaction from the remote site using the vie user interface. Vtk is an open source C++ library, with Tel, Python, and Java bindings for computer graphics, image processing, and visualization [3]. Vtk provides a higher level of support, beyond the traditional low-level libraries, for creating visualization applications. Vtk includes algorithms to support the visualization of scalars, vectors, and tensors. Vic is a flexible tool built by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for real-time video conferencing over the Internet [2]. Vie's user interface is built as Tcl/Tk script embedded in the applications. This allows developers to prototype changes to the interface in a simple and straightforward manner.

  7. A rendering approach for stereoscopic web pages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianlong; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang; Chen, Qinshui

    2014-03-01

    Web technology provides a relatively easy way to generate contents for us to recognize the world, and with the development of stereoscopic display technology, the stereoscopic devices will become much more popular. The combination of web technology and stereoscopic display technology will bring revolutionary visual effect. The Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) web pages, in which text, image and video may have different depth, can be displayed on stereoscopic display devices. This paper presents the approach about how to render two viewing S3D web pages including text, images, widgets: first, an algorithm should be developed in order to display stereoscopic elements like text, widgets by using 2D graphic library; second, a method should be presented to render stereoscopic web page based on current framework of the browser; third, a rough solution is invented to fix the problem that comes out in the method.

  8. A Task Adaptive parallel graphics renderer

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, S.

    1992-12-21

    This paper presents a graphics renderer which incorporates new partitioning methodologies of memory and work for efficient execution on a parallel computer. The Task Adaptive domain decomposition scheme is an image space method involving dynamic partitioning of rectangular pixel area tasks. The author shows that this method requires little overhead, allows coherence within a parallel context, handles worst case scenarios effectively, and executes efficiently with little processor synchronization necessary. Previous research in the area of memory and work decompositions for graphics rendering has been primarily limited to simulation studies and little practical experience. The algorithm presented here has been implemented on a scalable distributed memory multiprocessor and tested on a variety of input scenes. The author presents a theoretical and practical analysis in order to contrast its predicted and actual success. The implementation analysis indicates that load imbalance is the major cause of performance degradation at the higher processor counts. Even so, on a variety of test scenes, an average rendering speedup of 79 was achieved utilizing 96 processors on the BBN TC2000 multiprocessor with a processor efficiency range of 66% to 94%.

  9. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  10. Color Terms and Color Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules

    2006-01-01

    In their lead articles, both Kowalski and Zimiles (2006) and O'Hanlon and Roberson (2006) declare a general relation between color term knowledge and the ability to conceptually represent color. Kowalski and Zimiles, in particular, argue for a priority for the conceptual representation in color term acquisition. The complexities of the interaction…

  11. Pet fur color and texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jonathan; Mukherjee, Debarghar; Lim, SukHwan; Tretter, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Object segmentation is important in image analysis for imaging tasks such as image rendering and image retrieval. Pet owners have been known to be quite vocal about how important it is to render their pets perfectly. We present here an algorithm for pet (mammal) fur color classification and an algorithm for pet (animal) fur texture classification. Per fur color classification can be applied as a necessary condition for identifying the regions in an image that may contain pets much like the skin tone classification for human flesh detection. As a result of the evolution, fur coloration of all mammals is caused by a natural organic pigment called Melanin and Melanin has only very limited color ranges. We have conducted a statistical analysis and concluded that mammal fur colors can be only in levels of gray or in two colors after the proper color quantization. This pet fur color classification algorithm has been applied for peteye detection. We also present here an algorithm for animal fur texture classification using the recently developed multi-resolution directional sub-band Contourlet transform. The experimental results are very promising as these transforms can identify regions of an image that may contain fur of mammals, scale of reptiles and feather of birds, etc. Combining the color and texture classification, one can have a set of strong classifiers for identifying possible animals in an image.

  12. Volume rendering segmented data using 3D textures: a practical approach for intra-operative visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Navneeth; Mullick, Rakesh; Vaidya, Vivek

    2006-03-01

    Volume rendering has high utility in visualization of segmented datasets. However, volume rendering of the segmented labels along with the original data causes undesirable intermixing/bleeding artifacts arising from interpolation at the sharp boundaries. This issue is further amplified in 3D textures based volume rendering due to the inaccessibility of the interpolation stage. We present an approach which helps minimize intermixing artifacts while maintaining the high performance of 3D texture based volume rendering - both of which are critical for intra-operative visualization. Our approach uses a 2D transfer function based classification scheme where label distinction is achieved through an encoding that generates unique gradient values for labels. This helps ensure that labelled voxels always map to distinct regions in the 2D transfer function, irrespective of interpolation. In contrast to previously reported algorithms, our algorithm does not require multiple passes for rendering and supports greater than 4 masks. It also allows for real-time modification of the colors/opacities of the segmented structures along with the original data. Additionally, these capabilities are available with minimal texture memory requirements amongst comparable algorithms. Results are presented on clinical and phantom data.

  13. Automatic Perceptual Color Map Generation for Realistic Volume Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Jonathan C.; Parsad, Nigel M.; Tsirline, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Advances in computed tomography imaging technology and inexpensive high performance computer graphics hardware are making high-resolution, full color (24-bit) volume visualizations commonplace. However, many of the color maps used in volume rendering provide questionable value in knowledge representation and are non-perceptual thus biasing data analysis or even obscuring information. These drawbacks, coupled with our need for realistic anatomical volume rendering for teaching and surgical planning, has motivated us to explore the auto-generation of color maps that combine natural colorization with the perceptual discriminating capacity of grayscale. As evidenced by the examples shown that have been created by the algorithm described, the merging of perceptually accurate and realistically colorized virtual anatomy appears to insightfully interpret and impartially enhance volume rendered patient data. PMID:18430609

  14. Does correlated color temperature affect the ability of humans to identify veins?

    PubMed

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we provide empirical evidence and demonstrate statistically that white illumination settings can affect the human ability to identify veins in the inner hand vasculature. A special light-emitting diode lamp with high color rendering index (CRI 84-95) was developed and the effect of correlated color temperature was evaluated, in the range between 2600 and 5700 K at an illuminance of 40±9  lx on the ability of adult humans to identify veins. It is shown that the ability to identify veins can, on average, be increased up to 24% when white illumination settings that do not resemble incandescent light are applied. The illuminance reported together with the effect of white illumination settings on direct visual perception of biosamples are relevant for clinical investigations during the night. PMID:26831595

  15. Very low color-temperature organic light-emitting diodes for lighting at night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Pin-Chu; Chen, Szu-Hao; Shen, Shih-Ming; Chen, Chien-Chih; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Tien

    2011-12-01

    Light sources with low color temperature (CT) are essential for their markedly less suppression effect on the secretion of melatonin, and high power efficiency is crucial for energy-saving. To provide visual comfort, the light source should also have a reasonably high color rendering index (CRI). In this report, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of low CT and high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes. The best resultant device exhibits a CT of 1,880 K, much lower than that of incandescent bulbs (2,000-2,500 K) and even as low as that of candles, (1,800-2,000 K), a beyond theoretical limit external quantum efficiency 22.7 %, and 36.0 lm/W at 100 cd/m 2. The high efficiency of the proposed device may be attributed to its interlayer, which helps effectively distribute the entering carriers into the available recombination zones.

  16. Color Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrolstad, Ronald E.; Smith, Daniel E.

    Color, flavor, and texture are the three principal quality attributes that determine food acceptance, and color has a far greater influence on our judgment than most of us appreciate. We use color to determine if a banana is at our preferred ripeness level, and a discolored meat product can warn us that the product may be spoiled. The marketing departments of our food corporations know that, for their customers, the color must be "right." The University of California Davis scorecard for wine quality designates four points out of 20, or 20% of the total score, for color and appearance (1). Food scientists who establish quality control specifications for their product are very aware of the importance of color and appearance. While subjective visual assessment and use of visual color standards are still used in the food industry, instrumental color measurements are extensively employed. Objective measurement of color is desirable for both research and industrial applications, and the ruggedness, stability, and ease of use of today's color measurement instruments have resulted in their widespread adoption.

  17. Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Tobias; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether color representations are routinely activated when color words are processed. Congruency effects of colors and color words were observed in both directions. Lexical decisions on color words were faster when preceding colors matched the color named by the word. Color-discrimination responses…

  18. a Cache Design Method for Spatial Information Visualization in 3d Real-Time Rendering Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X.; Xiong, H.; Zheng, X.

    2012-07-01

    A well-designed cache system has positive impacts on the 3D real-time rendering engine. As the amount of visualization data getting larger, the effects become more obvious. They are the base of the 3D real-time rendering engine to smoothly browsing through the data, which is out of the core memory, or from the internet. In this article, a new kind of caches which are based on multi threads and large file are introduced. The memory cache consists of three parts, the rendering cache, the pre-rendering cache and the elimination cache. The rendering cache stores the data that is rendering in the engine; the data that is dispatched according to the position of the view point in the horizontal and vertical directions is stored in the pre-rendering cache; the data that is eliminated from the previous cache is stored in the eliminate cache and is going to write to the disk cache. Multi large files are used in the disk cache. When a disk cache file size reaches the limit length(128M is the top in the experiment), no item will be eliminated from the file, but a new large cache file will be created. If the large file number is greater than the maximum number that is pre-set, the earliest file will be deleted from the disk. In this way, only one file is opened for writing and reading, and the rest are read-only so the disk cache can be used in a high asynchronous way. The size of the large file is limited in order to map to the core memory to save loading time. Multi-thread is used to update the cache data. The threads are used to load data to the rendering cache as soon as possible for rendering, to load data to the pre-rendering cache for rendering next few frames, and to load data to the elimination cache which is not necessary for the moment. In our experiment, two threads are designed. The first thread is to organize the memory cache according to the view point, and created two threads: the adding list and the deleting list, the adding list index the data that should be

  19. Biomimetics, color, and the arts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Franziska

    2015-03-01

    Color as dramatic, dynamic and dazzling as the iridescent hues on the wings of certain butterflies has never been encountered in the art world. Unlike and unmatched by the chemical pigments of the artists' palette, this changeable color is created by transparent, colorless nanostructures that, as with prisms, diffract and reflect light to render spectral color visible. Until now, iridescent colors, by their very nature, have defied artists' best efforts to fully capture these rainbow hues. Now, for the first time, the artist and researcher Franziska Schenk employs latest nature-inspired color-shift technology to actually simulate the iridescence of butterflies and beetles on canvas. Crucially, studying the ingenious ways in which a range of such displays are created by insects has provided the artist with vital clues on how to adapt and adopt these challenging optical nano-materials for painting. And indeed, after years of meticulous and painstaking research both in the lab and studio, the desired effect is achieved. The resulting paintings, like an iridescent insect, do in fact fluctuate in perceived color - depending on the light and viewing angle. In tracing the artist's respective biomimetic approach, the paper not only provides an insight into the new color technology's evolution and innovative artistic possibilities, but also suggests what artists can learn from nature.

  20. [Hair colorants].

    PubMed

    Urbanek-Karłowska, B; Luks, E; Jedra, M; Kiss, E; Malanowska, M

    1997-01-01

    The properties, mode of action and its duration of the preparations used for hair dyeing are described, together with their chemical components, and also preparations of herbal origin. The chemical reactions are described in detail which lead the development of a color polymer occurring during hair dyeing. The studies are presented which are used for toxicological assessment of the raw materials which are the components of the colorants, and the list is included of hair colorants permitted for use in Poland. PMID:9562811

  1. Phosphor in glass with Eu3+ and Pr3+-doped silicate glasses for LED color conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun-A.; Lee, Yl Kwon; Im, Won Bin; Heo, Jong; Chung, Woon Jin

    2015-03-01

    Phosphor-in-glasses (PiGs) with rare earth (RE) doped SiO2-B2O3-RO glasses were prepared by embedding YAG:Ce3+ as the yellow phosphor. Eu3+ and Pr3+ were used to dope the glass, varying their concentrations in order to provide red emissions for possible chromaticity-control of white-light emitting diodes (WLEDs). The glass-to-phosphor mixing ratio was also varied to find the proper combination for color-controlled white LEDs. PiGs with RE-doped glasses were sintered at 750 °C and polished to 250 μm in thickness for blue LED color conversion. The photoluminescence spectra of the PiGs were monitored after they were mounted on commercial blue LED chips. Variation of color coordination, color rendering index and correlated color temperature were observed due to red emissions from the doped RE-ions. The spectral contribution of Eu3+ and Pr3+ ions to white LEDs under 450 nm LED excitation was discussed. The spatial distribution of phosphors within the glass matrix, and their possible interaction, was inspected by SEM. The thermal quenching effect was also investigated.

  2. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  3. Quantum Color

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-16

    The idea of electric charges and electricity in general is a familiar one to the science savvy viewer. However, electromagnetism is but one of the four fundamental forces and not the strongest one. The strongest of the fundamental forces is called the strong nuclear force and it has its own associated charge. Physicists call this charge ?color? in analogy with the primary colors, although there is no real connection with actual color. In this video, Fermilab?s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why it is that we live in a colorful world.

  4. The Colors of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVogel, Kayla; Chanover, Nancy; Thelen, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Very little is known about the coloring agents, or chromophores, that color the clouds of Saturn’s belts and zones. Although the clouds of Saturn are more muted in their coloration and do not exhibit the more striking variations seen among Jupiter’s belts, zones, and cyclonic storm features, the physical processes that render Saturn’s clouds a yellowish hue are likely similar to those at work on Jupiter. Thus, a comprehensive color study that includes both Jupiter and Saturn is warranted to advance our understanding of chromophores in the giant planet atmospheres. Here we report on our efforts to characterize the colors of Saturn’s clouds.This study involves the analysis of two imaging data sets: those from Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST data were acquired in 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2004 using eleven different filters spanning 255-973 nm. After the images were photometrically and geometrically calibrated, we used them to create low resolution spectra for six different latitude regions: the Equatorial Zone, the Equatorial Belt, the South Equatorial Belt, the South Temperate Zone, the South Temperate Belt and the South South Temperate Belt. The Cassini ISS images were acquired in 2004 and 2011 using twelve different filters spanning 258-938 nm, and corresponding low resolution spectra of the same latitude regions were generated using the ISS images. We compare these low resolution spectra to Saturn’s full-disk spectrum (Karkoschka, E., 1994, Icarus 111, 174) to examine colors of discrete latitudes versus the full-disk spectrum of Saturn. The extensive temporal coverage afforded by the combination of the HST and ISS images will enable us to explore possible seasonal variations in Saturn’s cloud colors. Finally, we examine the color evolution of the major 2011 storm on Saturn using the ISS data.This work was supported by the Discovery Scholars Program in

  5. Anatomical annotation on vascular structure in volume rendered images.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengang; Nimura, Yukitaka; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    The precise annotation of vascular structure is desired in computer-assisted systems to help surgeons identify each vessel branch. This paper proposes a method that annotates vessels on volume rendered images by rendering their names on them using a two-pass rendering process. In the first rendering pass, vessel surface models are generated using such properties as centerlines, radii, and running directions. Then the vessel names are drawn on the vessel surfaces. Finally, the vessel name images and the corresponding depth buffer are generated by a virtual camera at the viewpoint. In the second rendering pass, volume rendered images are generated by a ray casting volume rendering algorithm that considers the depth buffer generated in the first rendering pass. After the two-pass rendering is finished, an annotated image is generated by blending the volume rendered image with the surface rendered image. To confirm the effectiveness of our proposed method, we performed a computer-assisted system for the automated annotation of abdominal arteries. The experimental results show that vessel names can be drawn on the corresponding vessel surface in the volume rendered images at a computing cost that is nearly the same as that by volume rendering only. The proposed method has enormous potential to be adopted to annotate the vessels in the 3D medical images in clinical applications, such as image-guided surgery. PMID:23562139

  6. Colored Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on May 30, 2002 during the Southern Fall season in Atlantis Chaos.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.5, Longitude 183.6 East (176.4 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  7. A Multiresolution Image Cache for Volume Rendering

    SciTech Connect

    LaMar, E; Pascucci, V

    2003-02-27

    The authors discuss the techniques and implementation details of the shared-memory image caching system for volume visualization and iso-surface rendering. One of the goals of the system is to decouple image generation from image display. This is done by maintaining a set of impostors for interactive display while the production of the impostor imagery is performed by a set of parallel, background processes. The system introduces a caching basis that is free of the gap/overlap artifacts of earlier caching techniques. instead of placing impostors at fixed, pre-defined positions in world space, the technique is to adaptively place impostors relative to the camera viewpoint. The positions translate with the camera but stay aligned to the data; i.e., the positions translate, but do not rotate, with the camera. The viewing transformation is factored into a translation transformation and a rotation transformation. The impostor imagery is generated using just the translation transformation and visible impostors are displayed using just the rotation transformation. Displayed image quality is improved by increasing the number of impostors and the frequency that impostors are re-rendering is improved by decreasing the number of impostors.

  8. Acoustic-tactile rendering of visual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pubudu Madhawa; Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.; Atkins, Joshua; West, James E.; Hartmann, William M.

    2012-03-01

    In previous work, we have proposed a dynamic, interactive system for conveying visual information via hearing and touch. The system is implemented with a touch screen that allows the user to interrogate a two-dimensional (2-D) object layout by active finger scanning while listening to spatialized auditory feedback. Sound is used as the primary source of information for object localization and identification, while touch is used both for pointing and for kinesthetic feedback. Our previous work considered shape and size perception of simple objects via hearing and touch. The focus of this paper is on the perception of a 2-D layout of simple objects with identical size and shape. We consider the selection and rendition of sounds for object identification and localization. We rely on the head-related transfer function for rendering sound directionality, and consider variations of sound intensity and tempo as two alternative approaches for rendering proximity. Subjective experiments with visually-blocked subjects are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. Our results indicate that intensity outperforms tempo as a proximity cue, and that the overall system for conveying a 2-D layout is quite promising.

  9. Volume rendering of segmented image objects.

    PubMed

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Aylward, Stephen R

    2002-08-01

    This paper describes a new method of combining ray-casting with segmentation. Volume rendering is performed at interactive rates on personal computers, and visualizations include both "superficial" ray-casting through a shell at each object's surface and "deep" ray-casting through the confines of each object. A feature of the approach is the option to smoothly and interactively dilate segmentation boundaries along all axes. This ability, when combined with selective "turning off" of extraneous image objects, can help clinicians detect and evaluate segmentation errors that may affect surgical planning. We describe both a method optimized for displaying tubular objects and a more general method applicable to objects of arbitrary geometry. In both cases, select three-dimensional points are projected onto a modified z buffer that records additional information about the projected objects. A subsequent step selectively volume renders only through the object volumes indicated by the z buffer. We describe how our approach differs from other reported methods for combining segmentation with ray-casting, and illustrate how our method can be useful in helping to detect segmentation errors. PMID:12472272

  10. 6. Photocopy of architectural rendering off front facade, circa 1849. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of architectural rendering off front facade, circa 1849. Original rendering at Fair Street Reformed Dutch Church, Kingston, New York. - Second Reformed Dutch Church, 209 Fair Street, Kingston, Ulster County, NY

  11. 7. Photocopy of architectural rendering of side elevation, circa 1849. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of architectural rendering of side elevation, circa 1849. Original rendering at Fair Street Reformed Dutch Church, Kingston, New York. - Second Reformed Dutch Church, 209 Fair Street, Kingston, Ulster County, NY

  12. Color Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This booklet was designed to convey metric information in pictoral form. The use of pictures in the coloring book enables the more mature person to grasp the metric message instantly, whereas the younger person, while coloring the picture, will be exposed to the metric information long enough to make the proper associations. Sheets of the booklet…

  13. Color Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferry, John E.

    1980-01-01

    Elementary students were asked to find 12 colors and 5 sounds in their immediate natural environment and to describe in writing where they saw each color in relationship to themselves. The writings formed a type of poetry which expressed involvement with and observation of the environment. (CM)

  14. Grayscale performance enhancement for time-multiplexing light field rendering.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen; Zhong, Qing; Peng, Yifan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Rui; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2015-12-14

    One of the common approaches to compensate for the grayscale performance limitation in time-multiplexing light field displays is to employ a halftone technique. We propose an ordered-dithering halftone algorithm based on a 3-dimension super-mask to increase the gray levels of the time-multiplexing light field display. Our method makes full use of the overlapping perceived pixels which are caused by the time-multiplexing design, such that effectively trading-off the spatial resolution and color performance. A real-time rendering time-multiplexing display prototype is built to validate the proposed halftone algorithm. We conducted a user study to evaluate the quality of display scenes dithered by different super-mask configuration, which showed the consistency with the parameters we pre-calculated. The 3D ordered-dithering algorithm is able to present better visual perception than the conventional halftone algorithms with respect to grayscale representation, and flexible to be applied in different time-multiplexing light field display systems. PMID:26699051

  15. Novel full color greenish-white-emitting SrBi()3∶Eu phosphor for white light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yufeng; Ding, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    The full color greenish-white-emitting phosphors Eu-doped Sr3Bi( have been successfully synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction, and its photoluminescence properties have been investigated for the first time. The emission spectra of Sr3Bi(∶Eu phosphors exhibit a greenish-white-emitting by combining blue, green, and red emissions, which are originated from the 5d→4f transition of the Eu. The excitation spectra reveal broad strong bands from 300 to 400 nm, which match well with the readily available emissions from near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode (LED) chips. The correlated color temperature, color rendering index (CRI), and Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of the entitled phosphors excited by 330 and 365 nm are also investigated. The experimental results indicate that the Eu-doped Sr3Bi( phosphors are a promising innovative greenish-white-emitting phosphor for white LEDs.

  16. DOE CALiPER Program, Report 20.1 Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Miller, Naomi J.

    2013-10-01

    This report focuses on human-evaluated characteristics, including beam quality, shadow quality, and color quality. Using a questionnaire that included rank ordering, opinions on 27 of the Report 20 PAR38 lamps were gathered during a demonstration event for members of the local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) chapter. This was not a rigorous scientific experiment, and the data should not be extrapolated beyond the scope of the demonstration. The results suggest that many of the LED products compared favorably to halogen PAR38 benchmarks in all attributes considered. LED lamps using a single-emitter design were generally preferred for their beam quality and shadow quality, and the IES members ranking of color quality did not always match the rank according to the color rendering index (CRI).

  17. CALiPER Report 20.1: Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-11-07

    This report focuses on human-evaluated characteristics, including beam quality, shadow quality, and color quality. Using a questionnaire that included rank-ordering, opinions on 27 of the Report 20 PAR38 lamps were gathered during a demonstration event for members of the local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) chapter. This was not a rigorous scientific experiment, and the data should not be extrapolated beyond the scope of the demonstration. The results suggest that many of the LED products compared favorably to halogen PAR38 benchmarks in all attributes considered. LED lamps using a single-emitter design were generally preferred for their beam quality and shadow quality, and the IES members' ranking of color quality did not always match the rank according to the color rendering index (CRI).

  18. Clip art rendering of smooth isosurfaces.

    PubMed

    Stroila, Matei; Eisemann, Elmar; Hart, John

    2008-01-01

    Clip art is a simplified illustration form consisting of layered filled polygons or closed curves used to convey 3D shape information in a 2D vector graphics format. This paper focuses on the problem of direct conversion of smooth surfaces, ranging from the free-form shapes of art and design to the mathematical structures of geometry and topology, into a clip art form suitable for illustration use in books, papers and presentations. We show how to represent silhouette, shadow, gleam and other surface feature curves as the intersection of implicit surfaces, and derive equations for their efficient interrogation via particle chains. We further describe how to sort, orient, identify and fill the closed regions that overlay to form clip art. We demonstrate the results with numerous renderings used to illustrate the paper itself. PMID:17993708

  19. Resolution-independent surface rendering using programmable graphics hardware

    DOEpatents

    Loop, Charles T.; Blinn, James Frederick

    2008-12-16

    Surfaces defined by a Bezier tetrahedron, and in particular quadric surfaces, are rendered on programmable graphics hardware. Pixels are rendered through triangular sides of the tetrahedra and locations on the shapes, as well as surface normals for lighting evaluations, are computed using pixel shader computations. Additionally, vertex shaders are used to aid interpolation over a small number of values as input to the pixel shaders. Through this, rendering of the surfaces is performed independently of viewing resolution, allowing for advanced level-of-detail management. By individually rendering tetrahedrally-defined surfaces which together form complex shapes, the complex shapes can be rendered in their entirety.

  20. Color back projection for fruit maturity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    In general, fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes and dates are harvested before they fully ripen. After harvesting, they continue to ripen and their color changes. Color is a good indicator of fruit maturity. For example, tomatoes change color from dark green to light green and then pink, light red, and dark red. Assessing tomato maturity helps maximize its shelf life. Color is used to determine the length of time the tomatoes can be transported. Medjool dates change color from green to yellow, and the orange, light red and dark red. Assessing date maturity helps determine the length of drying process to help ripen the dates. Color evaluation is an important step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. This paper presents an efficient color back projection and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time maturity evaluation of fruits. This color processing method requires very simple training procedure to obtain the frequencies of colors that appear in each maturity stage. This color statistics is used to back project colors to predefined color indexes. Fruit maturity is then evaluated by analyzing the reprojected color indexes. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production.

  1. Photo-real rendering of bioluminescence and iridescence in creatures from the abyss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prusten, Mark

    2008-08-01

    The generation of photo-real renderings of bioluminescence is developed for creatures from the abyss. Bioluminescence results from a chemical reaction with examples found in deep-sea marine environments including: algae, copepods, jellyfish, squid, and fish. In bioluminescence, the excitation energy is supplied by a chemical reaction, not by a source of light. The greatest transparency window in seawater is in the blue region of the visible spectrum. From small creatures like single-cell algae, to large species of siphonophore Praya dubia (40m), luminescent phenomena can be produced by mechanical excitement from disturbances of objects passing by. Deep sea fish, like the Pacific Black Dragonfish are covered with photophores along the upper and lower surfaces which emits light when disturbed. Other animals like small squids have several different types of light organs oscillating at different rates. Custom shaders and material phenomena incorporate indirect lighting like: global illumination, final gathering, ambient occlusion and subsurface scattering to provide photo real images. Species like the Hydomedusae jellyfish, produce colors that are also generated by iridescence of thin tissues. The modeling and rendering of these tissues requires thin film multilayer stacks. These phenomena are simulated by semi-rigid body dynamics in a procedural animation environment. These techniques have been applied to develop spectral rendering of scenes outside the normal visible window in typical computer animation render engines.

  2. Color Appearance under LED Illumination: The Visual Judgment of Observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viénot, Françoise; Mahler, Elodie; Ezrati, Jean-Jacques; Boust, Clotilde; Rambaud, Ablane; Bricoune, Alain

    The advantages of LED lighting are discussed. We report experiments where observers graded the quality of several light-emitting diode (LED) illuminations. One experiment is based on color discrimination and two experiments are based on the judgement of appearance. We conclude that clusters with red, green, blue, and/or amber LEDs impair color discrimination, although they seem to locally enhance the color gamut. We also conclude that LED clusters that include white LEDs and a few correcting color LED may render colors faithfully.

  3. Rendering Three-Dimensional Solar Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen

    1997-01-01

    An X-ray or EUV image of the corona or chromosphere is a 2D representation of an extended 3D complex for which a general inversion process is impossible. A specific model must be incorporated in order to understand the full 3D structure. We approach this problem by modeling a set of optically-thin 3D plasma flux tubes which we render these as synthetic images. The resulting images allow the interpretation of the X-ray/EUV observations to obtain information on (1) the 3D structure of X-ray images, i.e., the geometric structure of the flux tubes, and on (2) the internal structure using specific plasma characteristics, i.e., the physical structure of the flux tubes. The data-analysis technique uses magnetograms to characterize photospheric magnetic fields and extrapolation techniques to form the field lines. Using a new set of software tools, we have generated 3D flux tube structures around these field lines and integrated the plasma emission along the line of sight to obtain a rendered image. A set of individual flux-tube images is selected by a non-negative least-squares technique to Provide a match with an observed X-ray image. The scheme minimizes the squares of the differences between the synthesized image and the observed image with a non-negative constraint on the coefficients of the brightness of the individual flux-tube loops. The derived images are used to determine the specific photospheric foot points and physical data, i.e., scaling laws for densities and loop lengths. The development has led to Computer efficient integration and display software that is compatible for comparison with observations (e.g., Yohkoh SXT data, NIXT, or EIT). This analysis is important in determining directly the magnetic field configuration, which provides the structure of coronal loops, and indirectly the electric currents or waves, which provide the energy for the heating of the plasma. We have used very simple assumptions (i.e., potential magnetic fields and isothermal

  4. Improved color stability of white organic light-emitting diodes without interlayer between red, orange and blue emission layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kaiwen; Chen, Ping; Duan, Yu; Sheng, Ren; Han, Guangguang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated color stability improved white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on red, orange and blue emission layers. Iridium(III) Bis(3,5-diflouro)-2-(2-pyridyl)phenyl-(2-carboxypyridyl) was doped into red emission layer (R-EML) and orange emission layer (O-EML) to lower the electrons injection barrier and facilitate the ambipolar charge carriers balance. Consequently, the recombination region was extended to the R-EML and O-EML, leading to the excellently stable spectra and the reduction of triplet-triplet annihilation. Then the resulting device with a negligible Commission International de L'Eclairage coordinates shift of (0.003, 0.007) within a wide luminance range as well as a high color rendering index of 90 was gained, which was comparable to the profit caused by the conventional method of introducing the interlayer. And the emission mechanism of the WOLEDs was also discussed.

  5. The general solution to HDR rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John

    2012-03-01

    Our High-Dynamic-Range (HDR) world is the result of nonuniform illumination. We like to believe that 21st century technology makes it possible to accurately reproduce any scene. On further study, we find that scene rendition remains a best compromise. Despite all the remarkable accomplishments in digital imaging, we cannot capture and reproduce the light in the world exactly. With still further study, we find that accurate reproduction is not necessary. We need an interdisciplinary study of image making - painting, photography and image processing - to find the general solution. HDR imaging would be very confusing, without two observations that resolve many paradoxes. First, optical veiling glare, that depends on the scene content, severely limits the range of light on cameras' sensors, and on retinas. Second, the neural spatial image processing in human vision counteracts glare with variable scene dependent responses. The counter actions of these optical and neural processes shape the goals of HDR imaging. Successful HDR increases the apparent contrast of details lost in the shadows and highlights of conventional images. They change the spatial relationships by altering the local contrast of edges and gradients. The goal of HDR imaging is displaying calculated appearance, rather than accurate light reproduction. By using this strategy we can develop universal algorithms that process all images, LDR and HDR, achromatic and color, by mimicking human vision. The study of the general solution for HDR imaging incorporates painting photography, vision research, color constancy and digital image processing.

  6. Direct volume rendering methods for cell structures.

    PubMed

    Martišek, Dalibor; Martišek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The study of the complicated architecture of cell space structures is an important problem in biology and medical research. Optical cuts of cells produced by confocal microscopes enable two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of observed cells. This paper discuses new possibilities for direct volume rendering of these data. We often encounter 16 or more bit images in confocal microscopy of cells. Most of the information contained in these images is unsubstantial for the human vision. Therefore, it is necessary to use mathematical algorithms for visualization of such images. Present software tools as OpenGL or DirectX run quickly in graphic station with special graphic cards, run very unsatisfactory on PC without these cards and outputs are usually poor for real data. These tools are black boxes for a common user and make it impossible to correct and improve them. With the method proposed, more parameters of the environment can be set, making it possible to apply 3D filters to set the output image sharpness in relation to the noise. The quality of the output is incomparable to the earlier described methods and is worth increasing the computing time. We would like to offer mathematical methods of 3D scalar data visualization describing new algorithms that run on standard PCs very well. PMID:22511504

  7. Hybrid Rendering with Scheduling under Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Georg; Krüger, Jens

    2014-05-01

    As scientific data of increasing size is generated by today's simulations and measurements, utilizing dedicated server resources to process the visualization pipeline becomes necessary. In a purely server-based approach, requirements on the client-side are minimal as the client only displays results received from the server. However, the client may have a considerable amount of hardware available, which is left idle. Further, the visualization is put at the whim of possibly unreliable server and network conditions. Server load, bandwidth and latency may substantially affect the response time on the client. In this paper, we describe a hybrid method, where visualization workload is assigned to server and client. A capable client can produce images independently. The goal is to determine a workload schedule that enables a synergy between the two sides to provide rendering results to the user as fast as possible. The schedule is determined based on processing and transfer timings obtained at runtime. Our probabilistic scheduler adapts to changing conditions by shifting workload between server and client, and accounts for the performance variability in the dynamic system. PMID:25309115

  8. Hybrid Rendering with Scheduling under Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Georg; Krüger, Jens

    2014-01-01

    As scientific data of increasing size is generated by today’s simulations and measurements, utilizing dedicated server resources to process the visualization pipeline becomes necessary. In a purely server-based approach, requirements on the client-side are minimal as the client only displays results received from the server. However, the client may have a considerable amount of hardware available, which is left idle. Further, the visualization is put at the whim of possibly unreliable server and network conditions. Server load, bandwidth and latency may substantially affect the response time on the client. In this paper, we describe a hybrid method, where visualization workload is assigned to server and client. A capable client can produce images independently. The goal is to determine a workload schedule that enables a synergy between the two sides to provide rendering results to the user as fast as possible. The schedule is determined based on processing and transfer timings obtained at runtime. Our probabilistic scheduler adapts to changing conditions by shifting workload between server and client, and accounts for the performance variability in the dynamic system. PMID:25309115

  9. Material model for physically based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robart, Mathieu; Paulin, Mathias; Caubet, Rene

    1999-09-01

    In computer graphics, a complete knowledge of the interactions between light and a material is essential to obtain photorealistic pictures. Physical measurements allow us to obtain data on the material response, but are limited to industrial surfaces and depend on measure conditions. Analytic models do exist, but they are often inadequate for common use: the empiric ones are too simple to be realistic, and the physically-based ones are often to complex or too specialized to be generally useful. Therefore, we have developed a multiresolution virtual material model, that not only describes the surface of a material, but also its internal structure thanks to distribution functions of microelements, arranged in layers. Each microelement possesses its own response to an incident light, from an elementary reflection to a complex response provided by its inner structure, taking into account geometry, energy, polarization, . . ., of each light ray. This model is virtually illuminated, in order to compute its response to an incident radiance. This directional response is stored in a compressed data structure using spherical wavelets, and is destined to be used in a rendering model such as directional radiosity.

  10. Bio-inspired color image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meylan, Laurence; Susstrunk, Sabine

    2004-06-01

    Capturing and rendering an image that fulfills the observer's expectations is a difficult task. This is due to the fact that the signal reaching the eye is processed by a complex mechanism before forming a percept, whereas a capturing device only retains the physical value of light intensities. It is especially difficult to render complex scenes with highly varying luminances. For example, a picture taken inside a room where objects are visible through the windows will not be rendered correctly by a global technique. Either details in the dim room will be hidden in shadow or the objects viewed through the window will be too bright. The image has to be treated locally to resemble more closely to what the observer remembers. The purpose of this work is to develop a technique for rendering images based on human local adaptation. We take inspiration from a model of color vision called Retinex. This model determines the perceived color given spatial relationships of the captured signals. Retinex has been used as a computational model for image rendering. In this article, we propose a new solution inspired by Retinex that is based on a single filter applied to the luminance channel. All parameters are image-dependent so that the process requires no parameter tuning. That makes the method more flexible than other existing ones. The presented results show that our method suitably enhances high dynamic range images.

  11. Color vision test

    MedlinePlus

    ... from birth) color vision problems: Achromatopsia -- complete color blindness , seeing only shades of gray Deuteranopia -- difficulty telling ... test -- color; Ishihara color vision test Images Color blindness tests References Adams AJ, Verdon WA, Spivey BE. ...

  12. A few modeling and rendering techniques for computer graphics and their implementation on ultra hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, Hari

    1989-01-01

    Ultra network is a recently installed very high speed graphic hardware at NASA Langley Research Center. The Ultra Network interfaced to Voyager through its HSX channel is capable of transmitting up to 800 million bits of information per second. It is capable of displaying fifteen to twenty frames of precomputed images of size 1024 x 2368 with 24 bits of color information per pixel per second. Modeling and rendering techniques are being developed in computer graphics and implemented on Ultra hardware. A ray tracer is being developed for use at the Flight Software and Graphic branch. Changes were made to make the ray tracer compatible with Voyager.

  13. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  14. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Computer Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This is a computer rendering of the fully developed Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-ray such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  15. Quantifying nonhomogeneous colors in agricultural materials part I: method development.

    PubMed

    Balaban, M O

    2008-11-01

    Measuring the color of food and agricultural materials using machine vision (MV) has advantages not available by other measurement methods such as subjective tests or use of color meters. The perception of consumers may be affected by the nonuniformity of colors. For relatively uniform colors, average color values similar to those given by color meters can be obtained by MV. For nonuniform colors, various image analysis methods (color blocks, contours, and "color change index"[CCI]) can be applied to images obtained by MV. The degree of nonuniformity can be quantified, depending on the level of detail desired. In this article, the development of the CCI concept is presented. For images with a wide range of hue values, the color blocks method quantifies well the nonhomogeneity of colors. For images with a narrow hue range, the CCI method is a better indicator of color nonhomogeneity. PMID:19021817

  16. Beyond the Renderer: Software Architecture for Parallel Graphics and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    As numerous implementations have demonstrated, software-based parallel rendering is an effective way to obtain the needed computational power for a variety of challenging applications in computer graphics and scientific visualization. To fully realize their potential, however, parallel renderers need to be integrated into a complete environment for generating, manipulating, and delivering visual data. We examine the structure and components of such an environment, including the programming and user interfaces, rendering engines, and image delivery systems. We consider some of the constraints imposed by real-world applications and discuss the problems and issues involved in bringing parallel rendering out of the lab and into production.

  17. 13. BUILDING #5, HOSPITAL, RENDERING OF EAST ELEVATION, APPROXIMATELY 1946 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. BUILDING #5, HOSPITAL, RENDERING OF EAST ELEVATION, APPROXIMATELY 1946 - Sioux Falls Veterans Administration Medical & Regional Office Center, 2501 West Twenty-second, Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, SD

  18. 9. RENDERING OF PROPOSED FALLS BRIDGE Photocopy of historic photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. RENDERING OF PROPOSED FALLS BRIDGE Photocopy of historic photograph (photographer unknown, December 1894) - Falls Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, connecting East & West River Drives, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. Boundary emphasis transfer function generation based on HSL color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Wu, Jianhuang; Luo, Shengzhou; Ma, Xin

    2011-10-01

    Direct volume rendering has been received much attention since it need not to extract geometric primitives for visualization and its performance is generally better than surface rendering. Transfer functions, which are used for mapping scalar field to optical properties, are of vital importance in obtaining a sensible rendering result from volume data. Though traditional color transfer functions are in RGB color space, HSL color space that conveys semantic meanings is more intuitive and user-friendly. In this paper, we present a novel approach aims to emphasize and distinguish strong boundaries between different materials. We achieve it by using data value, gradient magnitude and dimension of the volumetric data to set opacity. Then, through a linear map from data value, gradient magnitude and second derivative to hue, saturation and lightness respectively, a color transfer function is obtained in HSL color space. Experimental tests on real-world datasets indicate that our method could achieve desirable rendering results with revealing important boundaries between different structures and indicating data value's distribution in the volume by using different colors.

  20. Color Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heidi S. S.; Maki, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a study conducted by members of the WellU Academic Integration Subcommittee of The College of St. Scholastica's College's Healthy Campus Initiative plan whose purpose was to determine whether changing color in the classroom could have a measurable effect on students. One simple improvement a school can make in a classroom is…

  1. Colorful television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    What are the challenges and rewards for American men and women of color who chose to become scientists? The Public Broadcasting Service intends to show us through an upcoming 6-hour documentary series entitled “Breakthrough: The Changing Face of Science in America.”

  2. Colorful Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, C. Shane

    2006-01-01

    As instructors of accounting, we should take an abstract topic (at least to most students) and connect it to content known by students to help increase the effectiveness of our instruction. In a recent semester, ordinary items such as colors, a basketball, and baseball were used to relate the subject of accounting. The accounting topics of account…

  3. Color measurements based on a color camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalec, Elzbieta A.; Pietikaeinen, Matti

    1997-08-01

    The domain of color camera applications is increasing all time due to recent progress in color machine vision research. Colorimetric measurement tasks are quite complex as the purpose of color measurement is to provide a quantitative evaluation of the phenomenon of colors as perceived by human vision. A proper colorimetric calibration of the color camera system is needed in order to make color a practical tool in machine vision. This paper discuses two approaches to color measurements based on a color camera and includes an overview of practical approaches to color camera calibration under unstable illumination conditions.

  4. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  5. Photorealistic rendering application to the design of LED flash lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jyh-Long

    2012-10-01

    LED flash module becomes popular in current mobile communication devices, such as for the smart phones and tablet. As a lighting apparatus for image taking, photo rendering performance is crucial. We explore the LED flash lens design with a stress of photorealistic rendering application toward a high-performance LED flash illumination.

  6. Government scientists find new uses for rendered fat and protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rendering industry depends heavily on the utilization of their products in formulated animal feed; few other economically significant outlets for rendered fat and protein exist. The Fats Oils and Animal Coproducts Research Unit (FOAC), a group of scientists within the USDA’s Agricultural Resear...

  7. 104. Photocopy of architect's rendering from Renwick's office, signed lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. Photocopy of architect's rendering from Renwick's office, signed lower left 'Painted by Louis R. Townsend July 1848' both renderings displayed in Regents' Room of 'castle.' SOUTH FRONT, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 18 CFR 1308.17 - Failure to render timely decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to render timely decision. 1308.17 Section 1308.17 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY CONTRACT DISPUTES Contracting Officers § 1308.17 Failure to render timely decision. Any failure...

  9. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  10. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    PubMed Central

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  11. Introduction to color facsimile: hardware, software, and standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel T. L.

    1996-03-01

    The design of a color facsimile machine presents a number of unique challenges. From the technical side it requires a very efficient, seamless integration of algorithms and architectures in image scanning, compression, color processing, communications and printing. From the standardization side, it requires that agreements on the color representation space, negotiation protocols and coding methods must be reached through formal international standardization process. This paper presents an introduction to the overall development of color facsimile. An overview of the recent development of the international Color Facsimile Standard is first presented. The standard enables the transmission of continuous-tone colors and gray-scale images in Group 3 (over conventional telephone lines) and Group 4 (over digital lines) facsimile services, with backwards compatibility to current black and white facsimile. The standard provides specifications on color representation and color image encoding methods as well as extensions to current facsimile protocols to enable the transmission of color images. The technical challenges in implementing the color facsimile standard on existing facsimile machines are described next. The integration of algorithms and architectures in color scanning, compression, color processing, transmission and rendering of received hardcopy facsimile in a color imaging pipeline is described. Lastly, the current status on softcopy color facsimile standardization is reported.

  12. Dual-color emitting quantum-dot-quantum-well CdSe-ZnS heteronanocrystals hybridized on InGaN /GaN light emitting diodes for high-quality white light generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamoglu, Sedat; Mutlugun, Evren; Özel, Tuncay; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sapra, Sameer; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2008-03-01

    We report white light generation by hybridizing green-red emitting (CdSe)ZnS/CdSe (core)shell/shell quantum-dot-quantum-well heteronanocrystals on blue InGaN /GaN light emitting diodes with the photometric properties of tristimulus coordinates (x,y)=(0.36,0.30), luminous efficacy of optical radiation LE =278lm/W, correlated color temperature CCT =3929K, and color-rendering index CRI =75.1. We present the photometric analysis and the quantum mechanical design of these dual-color emitting heteronanocrystals synthesized to achieve high-quality white light when hybridized on light emitting diodes. Using such multicolor emitting heteronanocrystals facilitates simple device implementation while providing good photometric properties.

  13. Effects of display rendering on HDR image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerman, Emin; Valenzise, Giuseppe; De Simone, Francesca; Banterle, Francesco; Dufaux, Frederic

    2015-09-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) displays use local backlight modulation to produce both high brightness levels and large contrast ratios. Thus, the display rendering algorithm and its parameters may greatly affect HDR visual experience. In this paper, we analyze the impact of display rendering on perceived quality for a specific display (SIM2 HDR47) and for a popular application scenario, i.e., HDR image compression. To this end, we assess whether significant differences exist between subjective quality of compressed images, when these are displayed using either the built-in rendering of the display, or a rendering algorithm developed by ourselves. As a second contribution of this paper, we investigate whether the possibility to estimate the true pixel-wise luminance emitted by the display, offered by our rendering approach, can improve the performance of HDR objective quality metrics that require true pixel-wise luminance as input.

  14. Local and Global Illumination in the Volume Rendering Integral

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N; Chen, M

    2005-10-21

    This article is intended as an update of the major survey by Max [1] on optical models for direct volume rendering. It provides a brief overview of the subject scope covered by [1], and brings recent developments, such as new shadow algorithms and refraction rendering, into the perspective. In particular, we examine three fundamentals aspects of direct volume rendering, namely the volume rendering integral, local illumination models and global illumination models, in a wavelength-independent manner. We review the developments on spectral volume rendering, in which visible light are considered as a form of electromagnetic radiation, optical models are implemented in conjunction with representations of spectral power distribution. This survey can provide a basis for, and encourage, new efforts for developing and using complex illumination models to achieve better realism and perception through optical correctness.

  15. Interactive pre-integrated volume rendering of medical datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kye, Heewon; Hong, Helen; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2005-04-01

    The pre-integrated volume rendering which produces high-quality images with less sampling has become one of the most efficient and important techniques in volume rendering field. In this paper, we propose an acceleration technique of pre-integrated rendering of dynamically classified volumes. Using the overlapped-min-max block, empty space skipping of ray casting can be applied in pre-integrated volume rendering. In addition, a new pre-integrated lookup table brings much fast rendering of high-precision data without degrading image quality. We have implemented our approaches not only on the consumer graphics hardware but also on CPU, and show the performance gains using several medical data sets.

  16. A fast high accuracy volume renderer for unstructured data.

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Edward S.; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we describe an unstructured mesh volume renderer. Our renderer is interactive and accurately integrates light intensity an order of magnitude faster than previous methods. We employ a projective technique that takes advantage of the expanded programmability of the latest 3D graphics hardware. We also analyze an optical model commonly used for scientific volume rendering and derive a new method to compute it that is very accurate but computationally feasible in real time. We demonstrate a system that can accurately produce a volume rendering of an unstructured mesh with a first-order approximation to any classification method. Furthermore, our system is capable of rendering over 300 thousand tetrahedra per second yet is independent of the classification scheme used.

  17. Retrieval for color artistry concepts.

    PubMed

    Lay, Jose A; Guan, Ling

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents a work on the retrieval of artworks for color artistry concepts. First we affirm the view that the Query-by-Example paradigm fundamental to the current content-based retrieval systems is able to extend only limited usefulness. We then propose a concept-based retrieval engine based on the generative grammar of elemental concepts methodology. In the latter, the language by which color artistry concepts are communicated in artworks is used to operate semantic searches. The color artistry language is explicated into elemental concepts and the associated generative grammar. The elemental concepts are used to index the artworks, while the generative grammar is used to facilitate post-coordinate expression of color artistry concept queries by using the elemental concepts. PMID:15376925

  18. Color constancy - A method for recovering surface spectral reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, L. T.; Wandell, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for estimating the surface reflectance functions of objects in a scene with incomplete knowledge of the spectral power distribution of the ambient light. An image processing system employing this algorithm can assign colors that are constant despite changes in the lighting of the scene; this capability is essential to correct color rendering in photography, TV, and in the construction of artificial visual systems for robotics. Attention is given to the way in which constraints on lights and surfaces in the environment make color-constancy possible for a visual system, and the algorithm's implications for human color vision are discussed.

  19. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  20. Order-of-magnitude faster isosurface rendering in software on a PC than using dedicated general-purpose rendering hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevera, George J.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to compare the speed of isosurface rendering in software with that using dedicated hardware. Input data consists of 10 different objects form various parts of the body and various modalities with a variety of surface sizes and shapes. The software rendering technique consists of a particular method of voxel-based surface rendering, called shell rendering. The hardware method is OpenGL-based and uses the surfaces constructed from our implementation of the 'Marching Cubes' algorithm. The hardware environment consists of a variety of platforms including a Sun Ultra I with a Creator3D graphics card and a Silicon Graphics Reality Engine II, both with polygon rendering hardware, and a 300Mhz Pentium PC. The results indicate that the software method was 18 to 31 times faster than any hardware rendering methods. This work demonstrates that a software implementation of a particular rendering algorithm can outperform dedicated hardware. We conclude that for medical surface visualization, expensive dedicated hardware engines are not required. More importantly, available software algorithms on a 300Mhz Pentium PC outperform the speed of rendering via hardware engines by a factor of 18 to 31.

  1. Fast software-based volume rendering using multimedia instructions on PC platforms and its application to virtual endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes a software-based fast volume rendering (VolR) method on a PC platform by using multimedia instructions, such as SIMD instructions, which are currently available in PCs' CPUs. This method achieves fast rendering speed through highly optimizing software rather than an improved rendering algorithm. In volume rendering using a ray casting method, the system requires fast execution of the following processes: (a) interpolation of voxel or color values at sample points, (b) computation of normal vectors (gray-level gradient vectors), (c) calculation of shaded values obtained by dot-products of normal vectors and light source direction vectors, (d) memory access to a huge area, and (e) efficient ray skipping at translucent regions. The proposed software implements these fundamental processes in volume rending by using special instruction sets for multimedia processing. The proposed software can generate virtual endoscopic images of a 3-D volume of 512x512x489 voxel size by volume rendering with perspective projection, specular reflection, and on-the-fly normal vector computation on a conventional PC without any special hardware at thirteen frames per second. Semi-translucent display is also possible.

  2. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies. PMID:20039220

  3. Colorizing metals with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2008-01-01

    For centuries, it had been the dream of alchemists to turn inexpensive metals into gold. Certainly, it is not enough from an alchemist's point of view to transfer only the appearance of a metal to gold. However, the possibility of rendering a certain metal to a completely different color without coating can be very interesting in its own right. In this work, we demonstrate a femtosecond laser processing technique that allows us to create a variety of colors on a metal that ultimately leads us to control its optical properties from UV to terahertz.

  4. Color considerations in fluorescent solar concentrator stacks.

    PubMed

    Swift, Paul D; Smith, Geoff B

    2003-09-01

    We present modeled results of the luminous and color outputs of a three-layer stack of fluorescent planar concentrators (FPCs). FPCs have the potential to provide sufficient luminous output to illuminate moderate-sized rooms for reasonably-sized collecting areas. It is of course necessary not only that the lumens be sufficient, but also that the light be sufficiently white as to be comfortable. Modeling shows that by use of a stack of three FPCs, one each of violet, green, and red, it is possible to achieve good color rendering and sufficient lighting levels for room illumination. PMID:12962389

  5. Colorizing metals with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo Chunlei

    2008-01-28

    For centuries, it had been the dream of alchemists to turn inexpensive metals into gold. Certainly, it is not enough from an alchemist's point of view to transfer only the appearance of a metal to gold. However, the possibility of rendering a certain metal to a completely different color without coating can be very interesting in its own right. In this work, we demonstrate a femtosecond laser processing technique that allows us to create a variety of colors on a metal that ultimately leads us to control its optical properties from UV to terahertz.

  6. Indexing Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on access to digital image collections by means of manual and automatic indexing. Contains six sections: (1) Studies of Image Systems and their Use; (2) Approaches to Indexing Images; (3) Image Attributes; (4) Concept-Based Indexing; (5) Content-Based Indexing; and (6) Browsing in Image Retrieval. Contains 105 references. (AEF)

  7. Color structured light imaging of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Moy, Austin; Reichenberg, Jason; Sacks, Michael; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-05-01

    We illustrate wide-field imaging of skin using a structured light (SL) approach that highlights the contrast from superficial tissue scattering. Setting the spatial frequency of the SL in a regime that limits the penetration depth effectively gates the image for photons that originate from the skin surface. Further, rendering the SL images in a color format provides an intuitive format for viewing skin pathologies. We demonstrate this approach in skin pathologies using a custom-built handheld SL imaging system.

  8. Dynamic real-time 4D cardiac MDCT image display using GPU-accelerated volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2009-09-01

    Intraoperative cardiac monitoring, accurate preoperative diagnosis, and surgical planning are important components of minimally-invasive cardiac therapy. Retrospective, electrocardiographically (ECG) gated, multidetector computed tomographical (MDCT), four-dimensional (3D + time), real-time, cardiac image visualization is an important tool for the surgeon in such procedure, particularly if the dynamic volumetric image can be registered to, and fused with the actual patient anatomy. The addition of stereoscopic imaging provides a more intuitive environment by adding binocular vision and depth cues to structures within the beating heart. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a comprehensive stereoscopic 4D cardiac image visualization and manipulation platform, based on the opacity density radiation model, which exploits the power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) in the rendering pipeline. In addition, we present a new algorithm to synchronize the phases of the dynamic heart to clinical ECG signals, and to calculate and compensate for latencies in the visualization pipeline. A dynamic multiresolution display is implemented to enable the interactive selection and emphasis of volume of interest (VOI) within the entire contextual cardiac volume and to enhance performance, and a novel color and opacity adjustment algorithm is designed to increase the uniformity of the rendered multiresolution image of heart. Our system provides a visualization environment superior to noninteractive software-based implementations, but with a rendering speed that is comparable to traditional, but inferior quality, volume rendering approaches based on texture mapping. This retrospective ECG-gated dynamic cardiac display system can provide real-time feedback regarding the suspected pathology, function, and structural defects, as well as anatomical information such as chamber volume and morphology. PMID:19467840

  9. Quantization of color histograms using GLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Christopher C.; Yip, Milo K.

    2002-09-01

    Color histogram has been used as one of the most important image descriptor in a wide range of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) projects for color image indexing. It captures the global chromatic distribution of an image. Traditionally, there are two major approaches to quantize the color space: (1) quantize each dimension of a color coordinate system uniformly to generate a fixed number of bins; and (2) quantize a color coordinate system arbitrarily. The first approach works best on cubical color coordinate systems, such as RGB. For other non-cubical color coordinate system, such as CIELAB and CIELUV, some bins may fall out of the gamut (transformed from the RGB cube) of the color space. As a result, it reduces the effectiveness of the color histogram and hence reduces the retrieval performance. The second approach uses arbitrarily quantization. The volume of the bins is not necessary uniform. As a result, it affects the effectiveness of the histogram significantly. In this paper, we propose to develop the color histogram by tessellating the non-cubical color gamut transformed from RGB cube using a vector quantization (VQ) method, the General Loyld Algorithm (GLA) [6]. Using such approach, the problem of empty bins due to the gamut of the color coordinate system can be avoided. Besides, all bins quantized by GLA will occupy the same volume. It guarantees that uniformity of each quantized bins in the histogram. An experiment has been conducted to evaluate the quantitative performance of our approach. The image collection from UC Berkeley's digital library project is used as the test bed. The indexing effectiveness of a histogram space [3] is used as the measurement of the performance. The experimental result shows that using the GLA quantization approach significantly increase the indexing effectiveness.

  10. Color space conversion for linear color grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah-Jye

    2000-10-01

    Color grading is an important process for various industries such as food processing, fruit and vegetable grading, etc. Quality and price are often determined by the color of product. For example, darker red color for apples means higher price. In color machine vision applications, image is acquired with a color CCD camera that outputs color information in three channels, red, gree, and blue. When grading color, these three primary colors must be processed to determine the color level for separation. A very popular color space conversion technique for color image processing is RGB-to-HSI, where HSI represents hue, saturation, and intensity, respectively. However, the conversion result is still 3D information that makes determining color grades very difficult. A new color space conversion technique that can be implemented for high-speed real-time processing for color grading is introduced in this paper. Depending on the application, different color space conversion equations must be used. The result of this technique is a simple one-dimensional array that represents different color levels. This linear array makes linear color grading adjustment possible.

  11. Cross-Modal Associations between Color and Haptics.

    PubMed

    Slobodenyuk, Nadiya; Jraissati, Yasmina; Kanso, Ali; Ghanem, Lama; Elhajj, Imad

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore cross-modal associations between color and tactile sensation while using haptically rendered virtual stimuli with substance properties of roughness/smoothness, hardness/softness, heaviness/lightness, elasticity/inelasticity, and adhesiveness/nonadhesiveness. The stimuli with the indicated properties were rendered with the aid of SensAble PHANTOM OMNI® haptic device. The experimental setup required the participants to use exploratory procedures typical to real object interaction, and select a color from the HSV color space that matched the experienced sensation. The findings of our investigation reveal systematic mapping between color characteristics and intensity of the haptic stimuli. Qualitatively different haptic sensations, however, produced relatively similar patterns of cross-modal associations. PMID:25737254

  12. Inconspicuous structural coloration in the elytra of beetles Chlorophila obscuripennis (Coleoptera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Yin, Haiwei; Dong, Biqin; Qing, Youhua; Zhao, Li; Meyer, Serge; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian; Chen, Bin

    2008-01-01

    The elytra of male beetles Chlorophila obscuripennis (Coleoptera) display an inconspicuous iridescent bluish green color. By structural characterizations we find that the outermost elytral surface comprises a sculpted multilayer, which is the origin of structural coloration. In elytra both structural green and cyan colors are observed which arise from the modulations imposed on the multilayer, leading to a bluish green color by color mixing. The adoption of the sculpted multilayer can render structural coloration inconspicuous, which could be advantageous for camouflage. In addition, it can cause light emergence at nonspecular angles.

  13. Experiencing "Macbeth": From Text Rendering to Multicultural Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisin, Gail

    1993-01-01

    Shows how one teacher used innovative methods in teaching William Shakespeare's "Macbeth." Outlines student assignments including text renderings, rewriting a scene from the play, and creating a multicultural scrapbook for the play. (HB)

  14. 38. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden REAR ELEVATION OF W. C. PRATT'S COUNTRY SEAT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  15. 34. Photocopy of watercolor perspective rendering by N. G. Starkwether ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Photocopy of watercolor perspective rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden VIEW OF CAMDEN FROM THE SOUTHWEST - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  16. 37. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden SIDE ELEVATION OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR W. C. PRATT, ESQr - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  17. 7. Photocopy of circa 1890 architectural rendering of the terminal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of circa 1890 architectural rendering of the terminal station, courtesy of Philadelphia City Archives, City Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Terminal Station, 1115-1141 Market Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. 3. Photocopy of architectural rendering, ca. 1902, from Moses King, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of architectural rendering, ca. 1902, from Moses King, Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians, (1902), page 24 D. - Drexel Institute, Thirty-second & Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. 8. TANKWATER VAT IN RENDERING AREA ON SOUTH SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. TANKWATER VAT IN RENDERING AREA ON SOUTH SIDE OF LEVEL 3; LOOKING WEST - Rath Packing Company, Grease Interceptor Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  20. 24. FET 574343 PHOTOCOPY OF ARTIST'S RENDERING OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. FET 57-4343 PHOTOCOPY OF ARTIST'S RENDERING OF HANGAR, WITH CUTAWAY SHOWING SOME INTERIOR FEATURES. PRODUCED IN 1957. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar No. 629, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Rendering by C. Howard Crane ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Rendering by C. Howard Crane Office, 1919. Courtesy Detroit Historical Society. Photocopy by Jack E. Boucher, 1973 PERSPECTIVE VIEW FROM SOUTH - Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  2. Fast stereoscopic images with ray-traced volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Adelson, S.J.; Hansen, C.D.

    1994-05-01

    One of the drawbacks of standard volume rendering techniques is that is it often difficult to comprehend the three-dimensional structure of the volume from a single frame; this is especially true in cases where there is no solid surface. Generally, several frames must be generated and viewed sequentially, using motion parallax to relay depth. Another option is to generate a single spectroscopic pair, resulting in clear and unambiguous depth information in both static and moving images. Methods have been developed which take advantage of the coherence between the two halves of a stereo pair for polygon rendering and ray-tracing, generating the second half of the pair in significantly less time than that required to completely render a single image. This paper reports the results of implementing these techniques with parallel ray-traced volume rendering. In tests with different data types, the time savings is in the range of 70--80%.

  3. 11. Architect's rendering of the Arcade Building by Furness, Evans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Architect's rendering of the Arcade Building by Furness, Evans and Co., from Moses King's Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians, published 1902 for the City's 220th birthday - Arcade Building, Fifteenth & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Perspective rendering of the competition design for the New Masonic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective rendering of the competition design for the New Masonic Temple, Philadelphia by architects Fraser, Furness, and Hewitt, 1867 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. 1. Photocopy of architect's rendering of approved design, which was ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of architect's rendering of approved design, which was altered in execution Furness, Evans & Co. 1893 General view - Pennsylvania Railroad Station, Broad Street Station, Broad & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. 12. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings in the possession of Potter, Lawson and Pawlowsky, TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN - Manchester's Department Store Building, 2 East Mifflin Street, Madison, Dane County, WI

  7. 9. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings in the possession of Potter, Lawson and Pawlowsky, ELEVATIONS AND TWO SECTIONS - Manchester's Department Store Building, 2 East Mifflin Street, Madison, Dane County, WI

  8. 11. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings in the possession of Potter, Lawson and Pawlowsky, WISCONSIN AVENUE ELEVATION - Manchester's Department Store Building, 2 East Mifflin Street, Madison, Dane County, WI

  9. 10. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photographic copy of architect's rendering, from the pencil tracings in the possession of Potter, Lawson and Pawlowsky, MIFFLIN STREET ELEVATION - Manchester's Department Store Building, 2 East Mifflin Street, Madison, Dane County, WI

  10. Java multi-histogram volume rendering framework for medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senseney, Justin; Bokinsky, Alexandra; Cheng, Ruida; McCreedy, Evan; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2013-03-01

    This work extends the multi-histogram volume rendering framework proposed by Kniss et al. [1] to provide rendering results based on the impression of overlaid triangles on a graph of image intensity versus gradient magnitude. The developed method of volume rendering allows for greater emphasis to boundary visualization while avoiding issues common in medical image acquisition. For example, partial voluming effects in computed tomography and intensity inhomogeneity of similar tissue types in magnetic resonance imaging introduce pixel values that will not reflect differing tissue types when a standard transfer function is applied to an intensity histogram. This new framework uses developing technology to improve upon the Kniss multi-histogram framework by using Java, the GPU, and MIPAV, an open-source medical image processing application, to allow multi-histogram techniques to be widely disseminated. The OpenGL view aligned texture rendering approach suffered from performance setbacks, inaccessibility, and usability problems. Rendering results can now be interactively compared with other rendering frameworks, surfaces can now be extracted for use in other programs, and file formats that are widely used in the field of biomedical imaging can be visualized using this multi-histogram approach. OpenCL and GLSL are used to produce this new multi-histogram approach, leveraging texture memory on the graphics processing unit of desktops to provide a new interactive method for visualizing biomedical images. Performance results for this method are generated and qualitative rendering results are compared. The resulting framework provides the opportunity for further applications in medical imaging, both in volume rendering and in generic image processing.

  11. Real-time volume rendering of MRCP: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Neri, E; Boraschi, P; Caramella, D; Braccini, G; Gigoni, R; Cosottini, M; Lodovigi, S; Bartolozzi, C

    2000-02-01

    MR-cholangiopancreatography (Signa Contour 0.5T; GE/Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) data sets of 156 patients, obtained with a 2D T2-weighted FSE sequence, in the coronal plane, were volume rendered (Advantage Windows 3.1; GEMS) independently by two radiologists, that were asked to define the range of signal intensities in which the signal of the pancreaticobiliary system was included and to rank the quality of native images and volume renderings. Patients had biliary stones (n = 47), inflammatory ampullary stenoses (n = 18), pancreatic tumors (n = 12), surgical bilio-enteric anastomoses (n = 19), ampullary carcinomas (n = 2), pancreatic duct stone (n = 1), cholangiocarcinoma (n = 3) and normal pancreaticobiliary tree (n = 54). Good quality volume renderings of the bile ducts were obtained for at least a maximum diameter of 1.5 mm. The quality rank agreement between volume rendering and native images was excellent (k = 0.94). The correlation between the observers for the setting the signal intensity range was excellent and statistically significant (P < 0.001). The correlation between the observers for the time of volume rendering was not statistically significant. Biliary stones could be displayed in 32/47 (68%) cases. The pancreatic duct stones was displayed as well. Inflammatory ampullary stenoses were detected in all cases (100%). In case of pancreatic tumors, cholangiocarcinomas and ampullary carcinomas volume rendering allowed to identify the site of stenosis. In surgical bilio-enteric anastomoses volume rendering was helpful to display the residual biliary tract, the site of anastomosis and the enteric tract. Volume rendering could be a reliable and efficient tool for the study of the anatomy and pathological changes of the pancreaticobiliary tract. PMID:10697224

  12. 30. Photocopy of photograph of architectural rendering by office of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph of architectural rendering by office of Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., dated 1929; photograph in Clarence H. Johnston Papers, Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota; photographer unknown; location of rendering unknown; delineator unknown; THREE-QUARTER VIEW SHOWING WEST SIDE AND SOUTH FRONT; LOOKING NORTHEAST - Northwest Airways Hangar & Administration Building, 590 Bayfield Street, St. Paul Downtown Airport (Holman), Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  13. Parallel Rendering of Large Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, Alexander E.

    2005-01-01

    Interactive visualization of large time-varying 3D volume datasets has been and still is a great challenge to the modem computational world. It stretches the limits of the memory capacity, the disk space, the network bandwidth and the CPU speed of a conventional computer. In this SURF project, we propose to develop a parallel volume rendering program on SGI's Prism, a cluster computer equipped with state-of-the-art graphic hardware. The proposed program combines both parallel computing and hardware rendering in order to achieve an interactive rendering rate. We use 3D texture mapping and a hardware shader to implement 3D volume rendering on each workstation. We use SGI's VisServer to enable remote rendering using Prism's graphic hardware. And last, we will integrate this new program with ParVox, a parallel distributed visualization system developed at JPL. At the end of the project, we Will demonstrate remote interactive visualization using this new hardware volume renderer on JPL's Prism System using a time-varying dataset from selected JPL applications.

  14. Remote volume rendering pipeline for mHealth applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhao, Xin; Park, Ji Hwan; Kaufman, Arie; Cha, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a novel remote volume rendering pipeline for medical visualization targeted for mHealth (mobile health) applications. The necessity of such a pipeline stems from the large size of the medical imaging data produced by current CT and MRI scanners with respect to the complexity of the volumetric rendering algorithms. For example, the resolution of typical CT Angiography (CTA) data easily reaches 512^3 voxels and can exceed 6 gigabytes in size by spanning over the time domain while capturing a beating heart. This explosion in data size makes data transfers to mobile devices challenging, and even when the transfer problem is resolved the rendering performance of the device still remains a bottleneck. To deal with this issue, we propose a thin-client architecture, where the entirety of the data resides on a remote server where the image is rendered and then streamed to the client mobile device. We utilize the display and interaction capabilities of the mobile device, while performing interactive volume rendering on a server capable of handling large datasets. Specifically, upon user interaction the volume is rendered on the server and encoded into an H.264 video stream. H.264 is ubiquitously hardware accelerated, resulting in faster compression and lower power requirements. The choice of low-latency CPU- and GPU-based encoders is particularly important in enabling the interactive nature of our system. We demonstrate a prototype of our framework using various medical datasets on commodity tablet devices.

  15. Fast DRR splat rendering using common consumer graphics hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Spoerk, Jakob; Bergmann, Helmar; Wanschitz, Felix; Dong, Shuo; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2007-11-15

    Digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) are a vital part of various medical image processing applications such as 2D/3D registration for patient pose determination in image-guided radiotherapy procedures. This paper presents a technique to accelerate DRR creation by using conventional graphics hardware for the rendering process. DRR computation itself is done by an efficient volume rendering method named wobbled splatting. For programming the graphics hardware, NVIDIAs C for Graphics (Cg) is used. The description of an algorithm used for rendering DRRs on the graphics hardware is presented, together with a benchmark comparing this technique to a CPU-based wobbled splatting program. Results show a reduction of rendering time by about 70%-90% depending on the amount of data. For instance, rendering a volume of 2x10{sup 6} voxels is feasible at an update rate of 38 Hz compared to 6 Hz on a common Intel-based PC using the graphics processing unit (GPU) of a conventional graphics adapter. In addition, wobbled splatting using graphics hardware for DRR computation provides higher resolution DRRs with comparable image quality due to special processing characteristics of the GPU. We conclude that DRR generation on common graphics hardware using the freely available Cg environment is a major step toward 2D/3D registration in clinical routine.

  16. High-fidelity real-time maritime scene rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, Hawjye; Taczak, Thomas M.; Cox, Kevin; Gover, Robert; Maraviglia, Carlos; Cahill, Colin

    2011-06-01

    The ability to simulate authentic engagements using real-world hardware is an increasingly important tool. For rendering maritime environments, scene generators must be capable of rendering radiometrically accurate scenes with correct temporal and spatial characteristics. When the simulation is used as input to real-world hardware or human observers, the scene generator must operate in real-time. This paper introduces a novel, real-time scene generation capability for rendering radiometrically accurate scenes of backgrounds and targets in maritime environments. The new model is an optimized and parallelized version of the US Navy CRUISE_Missiles rendering engine. It was designed to accept environmental descriptions and engagement geometry data from external sources, render a scene, transform the radiometric scene using the electro-optical response functions of a sensor under test, and output the resulting signal to real-world hardware. This paper reviews components of the scene rendering algorithm, and details the modifications required to run this code in real-time. A description of the simulation architecture and interfaces to external hardware and models is presented. Performance assessments of the frame rate and radiometric accuracy of the new code are summarized. This work was completed in FY10 under Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD) Central Test and Evaluation Investment Program (CTEIP) funding and will undergo a validation process in FY11.

  17. Desorption of biocides from renders modified with acrylate and silicone.

    PubMed

    Styszko, Katarzyna; Bollmann, Ulla E; Wangler, Timothy P; Bester, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Biocides are used in the building industry to prevent algal, bacterial and fungal growth on polymericrenders and thus to protect buildings. However, these biocides are leached into the environment. To better understand this leaching, the sorption/desorption of biocides in polymeric renders was assessed. In this study the desorption constants of cybutryn, carbendazim, iodocarb, isoproturon, diuron, dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone and tebuconazole towards acrylate and silicone based renders were assessed at different pH values. At pH 9.5 (porewater) the constants for an acrylate based render varied between 8 (isoproturon) and 9634 (iodocarb) and 3750 (dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone), respectively. The values changed drastically with pH value. The results for the silicone based renders were in a similar range and usually the compounds with high sorption constants for one polymer also had high values for the other polymer. Comparison of the octanol water partitioning constants (Kow) with the render/water partitioning constants (Kd) revealed similarities, but no strong correlation. Adding higher amounts of polymer to the render material changed the equilibria for dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone, tebuconazole, cybutryn, carbendazim but not for isoproturon and diuron. PMID:24059976

  18. Cognitive aspects of color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derefeldt, Gunilla A. M.; Menu, Jean-Pierre; Swartling, Tiina

    1995-04-01

    This report surveys cognitive aspects of color in terms of behavioral, neuropsychological, and neurophysiological data. Color is usually defined as psychophysical color or as perceived color. Behavioral data on categorical color perception, absolute judgement of colors, color coding, visual search, and visual awareness refer to the more cognitive aspects of color. These are of major importance in visual synthesis and spatial organization, as already shown by the Gestalt psychologists. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological findings provide evidence for an interrelation between cognitive color and spatial organization. Color also enhances planning strategies, as has been shown by studies on color and eye movements. Memory colors and the color- language connections in the brain also belong among the cognitive aspects of color.

  19. Highly-efficient, tunable green, phosphor-converted LEDs using a long-pass dichroic filter and a series of orthosilicate phosphors for tri-color white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Hye; Oh, Jeong Rok; Park, Hoo Keun; Sung, Yeon-Goog; Do, Young Rag

    2012-01-01

    This study introduces a long-pass dichroic filter (LPDF) on top of a phosphor-converted LED (pc-LED) packing associated with each corresponding tunable orthosilicate ((Ba,Sr)2SiO4:Eu) phosphor in order to fabricate tunable green pc-LEDs. These LPDF-capped green pc-LEDs provide luminous efficacies between 143–173 lm/W at 60 mA in a wavelength range between 515 and 560 nm. These tunable green pc-LEDs can replace green semiconductor-type III-V LEDs, which present challenges with respect to generating high luminous efficacy. We also introduce the highly-efficient tunable green pc-LEDs into tri-color white LED systems that combine an InGaN blue LED and green/red full down-converted pc-LEDs. The effect of peak wavelength in the tunable green pc-LEDs on the optical properties of a tri-color package white LED is analyzed to determine the proper wavelength of green color for tri-color white LEDs. The tri-color white LED provides excellent luminous efficacy (81.5–109 lm/W) and a good color rendering index (64–87) at 6500 K of correlated color temperature (CCT) with the peak wavelength of green pc-LEDs. The luminous efficacy of the LPDF-capped green monochromatic pc-LED and tri-color package with tunable green pc-LEDs can be increased by improving the external quantum efficiency of blue LEDs and the conversion efficiency of green pc-LEDs. PMID:22379669

  20. 'Payson' Panorama in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The panoramic camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired this panorama of the 'Payson' outcrop on the western edge of 'Erebus' Crater during Opportunity's sol 744 (Feb. 26, 2006). From this vicinity at the northern end of the outcrop, layered rocks are observed in the crater wall, which is about 1 meter (3.3 feet) thick. The view also shows rocks disrupted by the crater-forming impact event and subjected to erosion over time.

    To the left of the outcrop, a flat, thin layer of spherule-rich soils overlies more outcrop materials. The rover is currently traveling down this 'road' and observing the approximately 25-meter (82-foot) length of the outcrop prior to departing Erebus crater.

    The panorama camera took 28 separate exposures of this scene, using four different filters. The resulting panorama covers about 90 degrees of terrain around the rover. This false-color rendering was made using the camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 423-nanometer filters. Using false color enhances the subtle color differences between layers of rocks and soils in the scene so that scientists can better analyze them. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

  1. Scanning color optical tomography (SCOT).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Poorya; Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Youngwoon; Lue, Niyom; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2015-07-27

    We have developed an interferometric optical microscope that provides three-dimensional refractive index map of a specimen by scanning the color of three illumination beams. Our design of the interferometer allows for simultaneous measurement of the scattered fields (both amplitude and phase) of such a complex input beam. By obviating the need for mechanical scanning of the illumination beam or detection objective lens; the proposed method can increase the speed of the optical tomography by orders of magnitude. We demonstrate our method using polystyrene beads of known refractive index value and live cells. PMID:26367632

  2. Scanning color optical tomography (SCOT)

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Poorya; Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Youngwoon; Lue, Niyom; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an interferometric optical microscope that provides three-dimensional refractive index map of a specimen by scanning the color of three illumination beams. Our design of the interferometer allows for simultaneous measurement of the scattered fields (both amplitude and phase) of such a complex input beam. By obviating the need for mechanical scanning of the illumination beam or detection objective lens; the proposed method can increase the speed of the optical tomography by orders of magnitude. We demonstrate our method using polystyrene beads of known refractive index value and live cells. PMID:26367632

  3. Architecture for high performance stereoscopic game rendering on Android

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Julien; Sanderson, Hugh; Shetty, Sampath

    2014-03-01

    Stereoscopic gaming is a popular source of content for consumer 3D display systems. There has been a significant shift in the gaming industry towards casual games for mobile devices running on the Android™ Operating System and driven by ARM™ and other low power processors. Such systems are now being integrated directly into the next generation of 3D TVs potentially removing the requirement for an external games console. Although native stereo support has been integrated into some high profile titles on established platforms like Windows PC and PS3 there is a lack of GPU independent 3D support for the emerging Android platform. We describe a framework for enabling stereoscopic 3D gaming on Android for applications on mobile devices, set top boxes and TVs. A core component of the architecture is a 3D game driver, which is integrated into the Android OpenGL™ ES graphics stack to convert existing 2D graphics applications into stereoscopic 3D in real-time. The architecture includes a method of analyzing 2D games and using rule based Artificial Intelligence (AI) to position separate objects in 3D space. We describe an innovative stereo 3D rendering technique to separate the views in the depth domain and render directly into the display buffer. The advantages of the stereo renderer are demonstrated by characterizing the performance in comparison to more traditional render techniques, including depth based image rendering, both in terms of frame rates and impact on battery consumption.

  4. Fast volume rendering algorithm in a virtual endoscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang H.; Kim, Jin K.; Ra, Jong Beom

    2002-05-01

    Recently, 3D virtual endoscopy has been used as an alternative noninvasive procedure for visualization of a hollow organ. In this paper, we propose a fast volume rendering scheme based on perspective ray casting for virtual endoscopy. As a pre-processing step, the algorithm divides a volume into hierarchical blocks and classifies them into opaque or transparent blocks. Then, the rendering procedure is as follows. In the first step, we perform ray casting only for sub-sampled pixels on the image plane, and determine their pixel values and depth information. In the second step, by reducing the sub-sampling factor by half, we repeat ray casting for newly added pixels, and their pixel values and depth information are determined. Here, the previously obtained depth information is utilized to reduce the processing time. This step is performed recursively until the full-size rendering image is acquired. Experiments conducted on a PC shows that the proposed algorithm can reduce the rendering time by 70-80% for the bronchus and colon endoscopy, compared with the brute-force ray casting scheme. Thereby, interactive rendering becomes more realizable in a PC environment without any specific hardware.

  5. 3D virtual colonoscopy with real-time volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ming; Li, Wei J.; Kreeger, Kevin; Bitter, Ingmar; Kaufman, Arie E.; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Dongqing; Wax, Mark R.

    2000-04-01

    In our previous work, we developed a virtual colonoscopy system on a high-end 16-processor SGI Challenge with an expensive hardware graphics accelerator. The goal of this work is to port the system to a low cost PC in order to increase its availability for mass screening. Recently, Mitsubishi Electric has developed a volume-rendering PC board, called VolumePro, which includes 128 MB of RAM and vg500 rendering chip. The vg500 chip, based on Cube-4 technology, can render a 2563 volume at 30 frames per second. High image quality of volume rendering inside the colon is guaranteed by the full lighting model and 3D interpolation supported by the vg500 chip. However, the VolumePro board is lacking some features required by our interactive colon navigation. First, VolumePro currently does not support perspective projection which is paramount for interior colon navigation. Second, the patient colon data is usually much larger than 2563 and cannot be rendered in real-time. In this paper, we present our solutions to these problems, including simulated perspective projection and axis aligned boxing techniques, and demonstrate the high performance of our virtual colonoscopy system on low cost PCs.

  6. Adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm for point-based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaoping; Liu, Xiaoping P.

    2015-03-01

    Surgical simulation is a major application in computer graphics and virtual reality, and most of the existing work indicates that interactive real-time cutting simulation of soft tissue is a fundamental but challenging research problem in virtual surgery simulation systems. More specifically, it is difficult to achieve a fast enough graphic update rate (at least 30 Hz) on commodity PC hardware by utilizing traditional triangle-based rendering algorithms. In recent years, point-based rendering (PBR) has been shown to offer the potential to outperform the traditional triangle-based rendering in speed when it is applied to highly complex soft tissue cutting models. Nevertheless, the PBR algorithms are still limited in visual quality due to inherent contrast distortion. We propose an adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm as a postprocessing module for PBR, providing high visual rendering quality as well as acceptable rendering efficiency. Our approach is based on a perceptible image quality technique with automatic parameter selection, resulting in a visual quality comparable to existing conventional PBR algorithms. Experimental results show that our adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm produces encouraging results both visually and numerically compared to representative algorithms, and experiments conducted on the latest hardware demonstrate that the proposed PBR framework with the postprocessing module is superior to the conventional PBR algorithm and that the proposed contrast enhancement algorithm can be utilized in (or compatible with) various variants of the conventional PBR algorithm.

  7. LED Color Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Color quality is an important consideration when evaluating LED-based products for general illumination. This fact sheet reviews the basics regarding light and color and summarizes the most important color issues related to white-light LED systems.

  8. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  9. Color Blindness Simulations

    MedlinePlus

    ... many disables? The fastest growing segment? Myths of disability The Law The Rules Accessibility Resources Page Updates, additions Contact Us For assistance contact your NOAA Line Office Section 508 Coordinator Color blindness Simulations Normal Color Vision Deuteranopia Color blindness marked ...

  10. Parallel volume rendering on the IBM Blue Gene/P.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterka, T.; Yu, H.; Ross, R.; Ma, K.-L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of California at Davis

    2008-01-01

    Parallel ray casting volume rendering is implemented and tested on an IBM Blue Gene distributed memory parallel architecture. Data are presented from experiments under a number of different conditions, including dataset size, number of processors, low and high quality rendering, offline storage of results, and streaming of images for remote display. Performance is divided into three main sections of the algorithm: disk I/O, rendering, and compositing. The dynamic balance between these tasks varies with the number of processors and other conditions. Lessons learned from the work include understanding the balance between parallel I/O, computation, and communication within the context of visualization on supercomputers, recommendations for tuning and optimization, and opportunities for scaling further in the future. Extrapolating these results to very large data and image sizes suggests that a distributed memory HPC architecture such as the Blue Gene is a viable platform for some types of visualization at very large scales.

  11. [A hybrid volume rendering method using general hardware].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; Mao, Zongyuan

    2008-06-01

    In order to improve the effect and efficiency of the reconstructed image after hybrid volume rendering of different kinds of volume data from medical sequential slices or polygonal models, we propose a hybrid volume rendering method based on Shear-Warp with economical hardware. First, the hybrid volume data are pre-processed by Z-Buffer method and RLE (Run-Length Encoded) data structure. Then, during the process of compositing intermediate image, a resampling method based on the dual-interpolation and the intermediate slice interpolation methods is used to improve the efficiency and the effect. Finally, the reconstructed image is rendered by the texture-mapping technology of OpenGL. Experiments demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method. PMID:18693424

  12. Distributed GPU Volume Rendering of ASKAP Spectral Data Cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. H.; Fluke, C. J.; Barnes, D. G.

    2011-07-01

    The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) will be producing 2.2 terabyte HI spectral-line cubes for each 8 hours of observation by 2013. Global views of spectral data cubes are vital for the detection of instrumentation errors, the identification of data artifacts and noise characteristics, and the discovery of strange phenomena, unexpected relations, or unknown patterns. We have previously presented the first framework that can render ASKAP-sized cubes at interactive frame rates. The framework provides the user with a real-time interactive volume rendering by combining shared and distributed memory architectures, distributed CPUs and graphics processing units (GPUs), using the ray-casting algorithm. In this paper we present two main extensions of this framework which are: using a multi-panel display system to provide a high resolution rendering output, and the ability to integrate automated data analysis tools into the visualization output and to interact with its output in place.

  13. Volume rendering using parallel algebraic logic (PAL) hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongzheng; Shi, Hongchi; Coffield, Patrick C.

    1997-09-01

    In this paper, we present the implementation of a volume graphics rendering algorithm using shift-restoration operations on parallel algebraic logic (PAL) image processor. The algorithm is a parallel ray casting algorithm. In order to eliminate shading artifacts caused by inaccurate estimation of surface normal vectors, we use gray level volume instead of binary volume, and apply a low pass filter to smooth the volume object surfaces. By transforming the volume to an intermediate coordinate system to which there is a simple mapping from the object coordinate system, we solve the data redistribution problem caused by nonregular data access patterns in volume rendering. It has been proved very effective in reducing the data communication cost of the rendering algorithm on the PAL hardware.

  14. Incremental volume reconstruction and rendering for 3-D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohbuchi, Ryutarou; Chen, David; Fuchs, Henry

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, we present approaches toward an interactive visualization of a real time input, applied to 3-D visualizations of 2-D ultrasound echography data. The first, 3 degrees-of- freedom (DOF) incremental system visualizes a 3-D volume acquired as a stream of 2-D slices with location and orientation with 3 DOF. As each slice arrives, the system reconstructs a regular 3-D volume and renders it. Rendering is done by an incremental image-order ray- casting algorithm which stores and reuses the results of expensive resampling along the rays for speed. The second is our first experiment toward real-time 6 DOF acquisition and visualization. Two-dimensional slices with 6 DOF are reconstructed off-line, and visualized at an interactive rate using a parallel volume rendering code running on the graphics multicomputer Pixel-Planes 5.

  15. Remote visualization system based on particle based volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Takuma; Idomura, Yasuhiro; Miyamura, Hiroko; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naohisa; Koyamada, Koji

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel remote visualization system based on particle-based volume rendering (PBVR),1 which enables interactive analyses of extreme scale volume data located on remote computing systems. The re- mote PBVR system consists of Server, which generates particles for rendering, and Client, which processes volume rendering, and the particle data size becomes significantly smaller than the original volume data. Depending on network bandwidth, the level of detail of images is flexibly controlled to attain high frame rates. Server is highly parallelized on various parallel platforms with hybrid programing model. The mapping process is accelerated by two orders of magnitudes compared with a single CPU. The structured and unstructured volume data with ~108 cells is processed within a few seconds. Compared with commodity Client/Server visualization tools, the total processing cost is dramatically reduced by using proposed system.

  16. Algorithms for Haptic Rendering of 3D Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay; Ho, Chih-Hao; Srinavasan, Mandayam

    2003-01-01

    Algorithms have been developed to provide haptic rendering of three-dimensional (3D) objects in virtual (that is, computationally simulated) environments. The goal of haptic rendering is to generate tactual displays of the shapes, hardnesses, surface textures, and frictional properties of 3D objects in real time. Haptic rendering is a major element of the emerging field of computer haptics, which invites comparison with computer graphics. We have already seen various applications of computer haptics in the areas of medicine (surgical simulation, telemedicine, haptic user interfaces for blind people, and rehabilitation of patients with neurological disorders), entertainment (3D painting, character animation, morphing, and sculpting), mechanical design (path planning and assembly sequencing), and scientific visualization (geophysical data analysis and molecular manipulation).

  17. Nonconscious and conscious color priming in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jahshan, Carol; Wynn, Jonathan K; Breitmeyer, Bruno G; Green, Michael F

    2012-10-01

    Deficits in visual processing are well established in schizophrenia. However, there is conflicting evidence about whether these deficits start before the formation of percepts because visual processing studies in schizophrenia have typically examined the processing of consciously registered stimuli. In this study, we used nonconscious color priming to evaluate the very early visual processing stages in schizophrenia. Nonconscious and conscious color priming was assessed in 148 schizophrenia patients and 54 healthy control subjects. In both conditions, subjects identified the color of a ring preceded by a disk (prime) in the same color (congruent) or a different color (incongruent). The ring rendered the disk invisible in the nonconscious condition (SOA of 62.5 ms) or did not mask the disk (SOA of 200 ms) in the conscious condition. Schizophrenia patients exhibited a color priming effect (longer reaction times in the incongruent vs. congruent trials) that was similar to healthy controls in both the nonconscious and conscious priming conditions. Healthy controls had a significantly larger priming effect in the nonconscious vs. conscious condition, but patients did not show a significant difference in priming effects between the two conditions. Our results indicate that schizophrenia patients do not have deficits at the nonconscious, pre-perceptual stages of visual processing, suggesting that the feed forward sweep of information processing (from retina to V1) might be intact in schizophrenia. These results imply that the well-documented visual processing deficits in this illness likely occur at later, percept-dependent stages of processing. PMID:22785333

  18. Stereo vision-based depth of field rendering on a mobile device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiaosong; Yu, Zhan; Rasmussen, Christopher; Yu, Jingyi

    2014-03-01

    The depth of field (DoF) effect is a useful tool in photography and cinematography because of its aesthetic value. However, capturing and displaying dynamic DoF effect were until recently a quality unique to expensive and bulky movie cameras. A computational approach to generate realistic DoF effects for mobile devices such as tablets is proposed. We first calibrate the rear-facing stereo cameras and rectify the stereo image pairs through FCam API, then generate a low-res disparity map using graph cuts stereo matching and subsequently upsample it via joint bilateral upsampling. Next, we generate a synthetic light field by warping the raw color image to nearby viewpoints, according to the corresponding values in the upsampled high-resolution disparity map. Finally, we render dynamic DoF effect on the tablet screen with light field rendering. The user can easily capture and generate desired DoF effects with arbitrary aperture sizes or focal depths using the tablet only, with no additional hardware or software required. The system has been examined in a variety of environments with satisfactory results, according to the subjective evaluation tests.

  19. High quality GPU rendering with displaced pixel shading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Choi, Jae

    2006-03-01

    Direct volume rendering via consumer PC hardware has become an efficient tool for volume visualization. In particular, the volumetric ray casting, the most frequently used volume rendering technique, can be implemented by the shading language integrated with graphical processing units (GPU). However, to produce high-quality images offered by GPU-based volume rendering, a higher sampling rate is usually required. In this paper, we present an algorithm to generate high quality images with a small number of slices by utilizing displaced pixel shading technique. Instead of sampling points along a ray with the regular interval, the actual surface location is calculated by the linear interpolation between the outer and inner points, and this location is used as the displaced pixel for the iso-surface illumination. Multi-pass and early Z-culling techniques are applied to improve the rendering speed. The first pass simply locates and stores the exact surface depth of each ray using a few pixel instructions; then, the second pass uses instructions to shade the surface at the previous position. A new 3D edge detector from our previous research is integrated to provide more realistic rendering results compared with the widely used gradient normal estimator. To implement our algorithm, we have made a program named DirectView based on DirectX 9.0c and Microsoft High Level Shading Language (HLSL) for volume rendering. We tested two data sets and discovered that our algorithm can generate smoother and more accurate shading images with a small number of intermediate slices.

  20. Font rendering on a GPU-based raster image processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recker, John L.; Beretta, Giordano B.; Lin, I.-Jong

    2010-01-01

    Historically, in the 35 years of digital printing research, raster image processing has always lagged behind marking engine technology, i.e., we have never been able to deliver rendered digital pages as fast as digital print engines can consume them. This trend has resulted in products based on throttled digital printers or expensive raster image processors (RIP) with hardware acceleration. The current trend in computer software architecture is to leverage graphic processing units (GPU) for computing tasks whenever appropriate. We discuss the issues for rendering fonts on such an architecture and present an implementation.

  1. Chromium Renderserver: Scalable and Open Source Remote RenderingInfrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook,Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2007-12-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure thatprovides the ability for one or more users to run and view image outputfrom unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote,parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardwareaccelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocolsand clientviewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to theproblem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote deliveryof parallel hardware-accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis ofseveral different optimizations that are generally applicable to avariety of rendering architectures. CRRSis fully operational, Open Sourcesoftware.

  2. 10. Historic photo of rendering of rocket engine test facility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic photo of rendering of rocket engine test facility complex, April 28, 1964. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-69472. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. 11. Historic photo of cutaway rendering of rocket engine test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic photo of cutaway rendering of rocket engine test facility complex, June 11, 1965. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-74433. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. 36. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden ELEVATIONS OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR WILLIAM C. PRATT - CAMDEN PLACE - DRIVE FRONT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  5. 35. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden ELEVATIONS OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR WILLIAM C. PRATT - CAMDEN PLACE - RIVER FRONT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  6. Photographic copy of photograph of the Architect's rendering of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph of the Architect's rendering of the proposed Auditorium Building (1904-05) (original photograph in possession of Brunner and Brunner, Architect and Engineers, Inc., St. Joseph, Missouri) VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER - Old City Auditorium, 404-424 North Fourth Street, Saint Joseph, Buchanan County, MO

  7. 69. PHOTOCOPY OF RENDERING OF PROPOSED OPEN VALLEY TREATMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. PHOTOCOPY OF RENDERING OF PROPOSED OPEN VALLEY TREATMENT OF P STREET BEND, FROM U.S. CONGRESS. HOUSE. REPORT OF THE ROCK CREEK AND POTOMAC PARKWAY COMMISSION, 1916. HOUSE DOC. No. 1114, 64th CONG. 1st SESS. - Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. Perspective rendering of the Masonic Temple by James H. Windrim ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective rendering of the Masonic Temple by James H. Windrim showing the abandoned intermediate design of the Broad Street facade with architectural details and allegorical figures selected to represent symbolic Masonry, 1868 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of ca. 1891 rendering of Receiving Ward, built at west end 1892-94. Designed by George W. Hewitt and his brother, William D. Hewitt of Philadelphia. - Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Front Street & Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  11. ODOR CONTROL BY SCRUBBING IN THE RENDERING INDUSTRY. (ADDENDUM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study extending an earlier project during which an investigation of the performance of packed-bed scrubbers for high-intensity rendering plant odors (5000 to 180,000 odor units) showed that, although in some cases the removal was as high as 99%, the ...

  12. Computer-aided detection of colonic polyps using volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Marino, Joseph; Kaufman, Arie

    2007-03-01

    This work utilizes a novel pipeline for the computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps, assisting radiologists in locating polyps when using a virtual colonoscopy system. Our CAD pipeline automatically detects polyps while reducing the number of false positives (FPs). It integrates volume rendering and conformal colon flattening with texture and shape analysis. The colon is first digitally cleansed, segmented, and extracted from the CT dataset of the abdomen. The colon surface is then mapped to a 2D rectangle using conformal mapping. Using this colon flattening method, the CAD problem is converted from 3D into 2D. The flattened image is rendered using a direct volume rendering of the 3D colon dataset with a translucent transfer function. Suspicious polyps are detected by applying a clustering method on the 2D volume rendered image. The FPs are reduced by analyzing shape and texture features of the suspicious areas detected by the clustering step. Compared with shape-based methods, ours is much faster and much more efficient as it avoids computing curvature and other shape parameters for the whole colon wall. We tested our method with 178 datasets and found it to be 100% sensitive to adenomatous polyps with a low rate of FPs. The CAD results are seamlessly integrated into a virtual colonoscopy system, providing the radiologists with visual cues and likelihood indicators of areas likely to contain polyps, and allowing them to quickly inspect the suspicious areas and further exploit the flattened colon view for easy navigation and bookmark placement.

  13. 103. Photocopy of architect's rendering from Renwick's office, signed lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. Photocopy of architect's rendering from Renwick's office, signed lower right 'H. C. Moore Draughtsman May 1848' & signed lower left 'Louis R. Townsend pinxt. June 1848' NORTH FRONT, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. Efficient space-leaping method for volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungup; Kim, Hyeongdo; Kim, Myeongsun; Jeong, Changsung

    1999-03-01

    Volume rendering is a technique that visualize 2D image of object from 3D volume data on image screen. Ray casting algorithm, one of popular volume rendering techniques, generate image with detail and high quality compared with other volume rendering algorithms but since this is a highly time consuming process given large number of voxels, many acceleration techniques have been developed. Here we introduce new acceleration technique, efficient space leaping method. Our new space leaping method traverse volume data and projects 3D location of voxel onto image screen to find pixels that have non-zero value in final volume image and locations of non-empty voxels that are closest to ray. During this process, adaptive run-length encoding and line drawing algorithm are used to traverse volume data and find pixels with non-zero value efficiently. Then we cast rays not through entire screen pixel but only through projected screen pixels and start rendering process from non-empty voxel location directly. This new method shows significant time savings applied to surface extraction without loss of image quality.

  15. 17 CFR 256.457 - Services rendered to associate companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... companies. 256.457 Section 256.457 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR MUTUAL SERVICE COMPANIES AND SUBSIDIARY SERVICE COMPANIES, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Income and Expense Accounts § 256.457 Services rendered to...

  16. Stellar ultraviolet colors and interstellar extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peytremann, E.; Davis, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A sample of celescope results is studied. Most of the sample stars belong to the Orion and Vela regions. Stars with visual excess E(B-V) less than 0.05 are selected in order to derive relationships of intrinsic color index versus spectral type. The resulting intrinsic color-color relations are compared with existing blanketed and unblanketed model calculations. Finally, the preceding intrinsic relations are utilized to derive some results on interstellar extinction. Owing to the rather large scatter in the celescope data, the Vela stars give the more significant results because their visible excess E(B-V) is, in general, larger than that for the Orion stars.

  17. Color images of Kansas subsurface geology from well logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.R.; Doveton, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Modern wireline log combinations give highly diagnostic information that goes beyond the basic shale content, pore volume, and fluid saturation of older logs. Pattern recognition of geology from logs is made conventionally through either the examination of log overlays or log crossplots. Both methods can be combined through the use of color as a medium of information by setting the three color primaries of blue, green, and red light as axes of three dimensional color space. Multiple log readings of zones are rendered as composite color mixtures which, when plotted sequentially with depth, show lithological successions in a striking manner. The method is extremely simple to program and display on a color monitor. Illustrative examples are described from the Kansas subsurface. ?? 1986.

  18. Study on color-tunable phosphor-coated white light-emitting diodes with high S/P ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ziquan; Shih, Tienmo; Xiao, Jingjing; Lu, Hongli; Lu, Yijun; Wu, Tingzhu; Lin, Yue; Gao, Yulin; Xiao, Hua; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have investigated the trade-off between the color rendering index (CRI, Ra) and the scotopic/photopic ratio (S/P) for color-tunable phosphor-coated white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at two CRI limitations (Ra ≥ 70 and Ra ≥ 96). First, luminescent spectra measurements have been conducted to determine experimental results of Ra and S/P under various correlated color temperatures (CCTs). Then, a nonlinear programming method has been adopted for the optimization of Ra and S/P by varying spectral shapes through adjusting spectral parameters, such as peak wavelengths, full-width at half-maxima, and relative intensities. Therefore, polynomial curves of optimal S/P versus CCT at two Ra limitations have been discovered, enabling users to obtain optimal S/P under arbitrary CCTs within [2700 K, 6500 K]. In addition, a comparison study between the present work and our previous work has also been conducted at Ra = 70, and a fair agreement of optimal S/P has been observed.

  19. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  20. Characterization of four-color multi-package white light-emitting diodes combined with various green monochromatic phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Keyong Nam; Do, Young Rag

    2012-03-01

    In this study, several combinations of multi-package white light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which combine an InGaN blue LED with green, amber, and red phosphor-converted LEDs (pc-LEDs), were characterized by changing the peak wavelength of green pc-LEDs between 515nm and 560nm (515, 521, 530, 540, 550, 560nm) in color temperature of 6,500K and 3,500K. Various green monochromatic pc-LEDs were fabricated by capping a long-wave pass-filter (LWPF) on top of pc-LEDs to improve luminous efficacy and color purity. LWPF-capped green monochromatic pc-LED can address the drawback of green semiconductor-type III-V LED, such as low luminous efficacy in the region of green gap wavelength. Luminous efficacy and color rendering index (CRI) of multi-package white LEDs are compared with changing the driving current of individual LED in various multi-package white LEDs. This study provides a best combination of four-color multi-package white LEDs which has high luminous efficacy and good CRI.

  1. FluoRender: An Application of 2D Image Space Methods for 3D and 4D Confocal Microscopy Data Visualization in Neurobiology Research

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Chien, Chi-Bin; Hansen, Charles

    2013-01-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists’ demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data. PMID:23584131

  2. Chips of many colors

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, M.W.; Dorie, L.A.

    1982-07-01

    A large number of available color display tools generally fall into three categories. Intelligent terminals offer a wide range of color grpahics capability but require extensive software for specific applications. Large turn-key graphics systems, with color display consoles controlled by software, were made for electronic design. In color CAD workstations, color graphics is under hardware control and offers specific features for IC design. The authors look at the various colour graphics systems, and their advantages in VLSI chip design.

  3. Volume rendering of visible human data for an anatomical virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Kerr, J; Ratiu, P; Sellberg, M

    1996-01-01

    of specific anatomical structures. We have the capability to generate images that are both accurate and lifelike, much like photographic anatomical atlases. We can also generate images, models, and textures that have the clarity of medical artwork/illustrations, by highlighting the coloring of the ray traced structures with conventional colors instead of the natural color of the specimen. We are currently in the process of generating a comprehensive reference atlas of volume rendered images of the human body, soon to be published by Mosby-Year Book. The segmentation techniques needed to create this atlas also offer the accuracy and realism needed to create surface models and texture maps for a virtual environment for surgery simulation. PMID:10163767

  4. Appearance can be deceiving: using appearance models in color imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Garrett M.

    2007-01-01

    As color imaging has evolved through the years, our toolset for understanding has similarly evolved. Research in color difference equations and uniform color spaces spawned tools such as CIELAB, which has had tremendous success over the years. Research on chromatic adaptation and other appearance phenomena then extended CIELAB to form the basis of color appearance models, such as CIECAM02. Color difference equations such as CIEDE2000 evolved to reconcile weaknesses in areas of the CIELAB space. Similarly, models such as S-CIELAB were developed to predict more spatially complex color difference calculations between images. Research in all of these fields is still going strong and there seems to be a trend towards unification of some of the tools, such as calculating color differences in a color appearance space. Along such lines, image appearance models have been developed that attempt to combine all of the above models and metric into one common framework. The goal is to allow the color imaging research to pick and choose the appropriate modeling toolset for their needs. Along these lines, the iCAM image appearance model framework was developed to study a variety of color imaging problems. These include image difference and image quality evaluations as well gamut mapping and high-dynamic range (HDR) rendering. It is important to stress that iCAM was not designed to be a complete color imaging solution, but rather a starting point for unifying models of color appearance, color difference, and spatial vision. As such the choice of model components is highly dependent on the problem being addressed. For example, with CIELAB it clearly evident that it is not necessary to use the associated color difference equations to have great success as a deviceindependent color space. Likewise, it may not be necessary to use the spatial filtering components of an image appearance model when performing image rendering. This paper attempts to shed some light on some of the

  5. A model-free method for annotating on vascular structure in volume rendered images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Li, Yanfang; Shi, Weili; Miao, Yu; He, Fei; Yan, Fei; Yang, Huamin; Zhang, Huimao; Mori, Kensaku; Jiang, Zhengang

    2015-03-01

    The precise annotation of vessel is desired in computer-assisted systems to help surgeons identify each vessel branch. A method has been reported that annotates vessels on volume rendered images by rendering their names on them using a two-pass rendering process. In the reported method, however, cylinder surface models of the vessels should be generated for writing vessels names. In fact, vessels are not actual cylinders, so the surfaces of the vessels cannot be simulated by such models accurately. This paper presents a model-free method for annotating vessels on volume rendered images by rendering their names on them using the two-pass rendering process: surface rendering and volume rendering. In the surface rendering process, docking points of vessel names are estimated by using such properties as centerlines, running directions, and vessel regions which are obtained in preprocess. Then the vessel names are pasted on the vessel surfaces at the docking points. In the volume rendering process, volume image is rendered using a fast volume rendering algorithm with depth buffer of image rendered in the surface rendering process. Finally, those rendered images are blended into an image as a result. In order to confirm the proposed method, a visualizing system for the automated annotation of abdominal arteries is performed. The experimental results show that vessel names can be drawn on the corresponding vessel in the volume rendered images correctly. The proposed method has enormous potential to be adopted to annotate other organs which cannot be modeled using regular geometrical surface.

  6. Vibration rendering on a thin plate with actuator array at the periphery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jung-Han; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2015-08-01

    Vibrations are rendered on the display panel of a mobile electronic device to transfer a tactile sensation to users. Because important electronic components are usually positioned in the central part of the devices, the only practical choice for actuator location is the periphery of the panel although the periphery is not the advantageous position for the excitation. As the basic principle to generate a rendered vibration pattern, two methods to determine the contributions of modes, viz., eigenfunction superposition or traveling wave control method, are implemented individually. The purpose is to generate a pattern of vibration amplitudes that can be felt by fingertip in the hot zone but not in the cold zone, which is outside the hot zone. General inverse methods are applied to obtain the actuator weightings for achieving the target pattern. Proper weighting for both amplitude and phase for each actuator in the array is determined by the relationship between modes or velocity responses and input signals of actuators. Two methods are implemented individually on the display panel of a commercial tablet computer using an array of moving-coil actuators, and the responses on the panel are measured. Performance index referred to as success ratio for evaluating satisfaction of target field constraints is proposed considering the different thresholds of vibration sensation. Reasonable fulfillment of achieving the target vibration pattern is observed experimentally. The success ratio is more than 86% by using the eigenfunction superposition, and more than 97% by using the traveling wave control for rendering 2×2 and 3×3 section.

  7. A Watercolor NPR System with Web-Mining 3D Color Charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lieu-Hen; Ho, Yi-Hsin; Liu, Ting-Yu; Hsieh, Wen-Chieh

    In this paper, we propose a watercolor image synthesizing system which integrates the user-personalized color charts based on web-mining technologies with the 3D Watercolor NPR system. Through our system, users can personalize their own color palette by using keywords such as the name of the artist or by choosing color sets on an emotional map. The related images are searched from web by adopting web mining technology, and the appropriate colors are extracted to construct the color chart by analyzing these images. Then, the color chart is rendered in a 3D visualization system which allows users to view and manage the distribution of colors interactively. Then, users can use these colors on our watercolor NPR system with a sketch-based GUI which allows users to manipulate watercolor attributes of object intuitively and directly.

  8. Effects of chromatic image statistics on illumination induced color differences.

    PubMed

    Lucassen, Marcel P; Gevers, Theo; Gijsenij, Arjan; Dekker, Niels

    2013-09-01

    We measure the color fidelity of visual scenes that are rendered under different (simulated) illuminants and shown on a calibrated LCD display. Observers make triad illuminant comparisons involving the renderings from two chromatic test illuminants and one achromatic reference illuminant shown simultaneously. Four chromatic test illuminants are used: two along the daylight locus (yellow and blue), and two perpendicular to it (red and green). The observers select the rendering having the best color fidelity, thereby indirectly judging which of the two test illuminants induces the smallest color differences compared to the reference. Both multicolor test scenes and natural scenes are studied. The multicolor scenes are synthesized and represent ellipsoidal distributions in CIELAB chromaticity space having the same mean chromaticity but different chromatic orientations. We show that, for those distributions, color fidelity is best when the vector of the illuminant change (pointing from neutral to chromatic) is parallel to the major axis of the scene's chromatic distribution. For our selection of natural scenes, which generally have much broader chromatic distributions, we measure a higher color fidelity for the yellow and blue illuminants than for red and green. Scrambled versions of the natural images are also studied to exclude possible semantic effects. We quantitatively predict the average observer response (i.e., the illuminant probability) with four types of models, differing in the extent to which they incorporate information processing by the visual system. Results show different levels of performance for the models, and different levels for the multicolor scenes and the natural scenes. Overall, models based on the scene averaged color difference have the best performance. We discuss how color constancy algorithms may be improved by exploiting knowledge of the chromatic distribution of the visual scene. PMID:24323269

  9. Multiple ray cluster rendering for interactive integral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shaohui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Mingcai; Li, Weiming; Hong, Tao; Nam, Dongkyung; Lee, Jin-Ho; Wu, Enhua; Wang, Haitao; Kim, Ji-Yeun

    2013-04-22

    In this paper, we present an efficient Computer Generated Integral Imaging (CGII) method, called multiple ray cluster rendering (MRCR). Based on the MRCR, an interactive integral imaging system is realized, which provides accurate 3D image satisfying the changeable observers' positions in real time. The MRCR method can generate all the elemental image pixels within only one rendering pass by ray reorganization of multiple ray clusters and 3D content duplication. It is compatible with various graphic contents including mesh, point cloud, and medical data. Moreover, multi-sampling method is embedded in MRCR method for acquiring anti-aliased 3D image result. To our best knowledge, the MRCR method outperforms the existing CGII methods in both the speed performance and the display quality. Experimental results show that the proposed CGII method can achieve real-time computational speed for large-scale 3D data with about 50,000 points. PMID:23609712

  10. Generalized pipeline for preview and rendering of synthetic holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappu, Ravikanth; Sparrell, Carlton J.; Underkoffler, John S.; Kropp, Adam B.; Chen, Benjie; Plesniak, Wendy J.

    1997-04-01

    We describe a general pipeline for the computation and display of either fully-computed holograms or holographic stereograms using the same 3D database. A rendering previewer on a Silicon Graphics Onyx allows a user to specify viewing geometry, database transformations, and scene lighting. The previewer then generates one of two descriptions of the object--a series of perspective views or a polygonal model--which is then used by a fringe rendering engine to compute fringes specific to hologram type. The images are viewed on the second generation MIT Holographic Video System. This allows a viewer to compare holographic stereograms with fully-computed holograms originating from the same database and comes closer to the goal of a single pipeline being able to display the same data in different formats.

  11. Rapid exploration of curvilinear grids using direct volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangelder, Allen; Wilhelms, Jane

    1993-01-01

    Fast techniques for direct volume rendering over curvilinear grids of hexahedral cells are developed. This type of 3D grid is common in computational fluid dynamics and finite element analysis. Four new projection methods are presented and compared with each other and with previous methods for tetrahedral grids and rectilinear grids. All four methods use polygon-rendering hardware for speed. A simplified algorithm for visibility ordering, which is based on a combination of breadth-first and depth-first searches, is described. A new multi-pass blending method is described that reduces visual artifacts that are introduced by linear interpolation in hardware where exponential interpolation is needed. Multi-pass blending is of equal interest to hardware-oriented projection methods used on rectilinear grids. Visualization tools that permit rapid data banding and cycling through transfer functions, as well as region restrictions, are described.

  12. The shock response of a rendered porcine fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilgeroth, J. M.; Hazell, P. J.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.

    2010-11-01

    Characterization of the shock response of biological materials is required in order to develop an understanding of how such materials behave under high strain-rate loading. In this work, a predominately linear Us-up Hugoniot relationship for a rendered porcine fat has been established using the plate-impact technique. This has been shown to take the form Us=1.58+2.47up (ρ0=0.945 g/cc) and comparison has been made between the dynamic behavior of the adipose material and both 20 wt % ballistic gelatin and water. The adipose material has been shown to behave in likeness with simple polymers such as polyethylene and to strengthen under shock loading, unlike ballistic gelatin, which has been shown to behave hydrodynamically. An experimental design incorporating direct insertion of lateral stress gauges within the rendered fat has given insight into both the behavior of lateral gauges and the lateral stress response of the material under dynamic loading.

  13. What color is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbach, Reiner; Sharma, Gaurav; Unal, Gozde B.

    2005-01-01

    Color management allows the deterministic handling of color data from input to output. This, of course, assumes that the first digital representation of our data is the "correct" color. It assumes that we did not make any errors in the input definitions, did not use wrong color input profiles, captured the user's intent, or fell prey to a host of other potential problems. After we have made those assumptions, we now can deterministically transfer the color from one place to another. Note that there is a big difference between "reproducing" one color at a different location and "deterministically transferring one set of color data to another location". The deterministic transfer is limited to the small set of physical metrics we decided to call "color". All other components of color are ignored.

  14. What color is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbach, Reiner; Sharma, Gaurav; Unal, Gozde B.

    2004-12-01

    Color management allows the deterministic handling of color data from input to output. This, of course, assumes that the first digital representation of our data is the "correct" color. It assumes that we did not make any errors in the input definitions, did not use wrong color input profiles, captured the user's intent, or fell prey to a host of other potential problems. After we have made those assumptions, we now can deterministically transfer the color from one place to another. Note that there is a big difference between "reproducing" one color at a different location and "deterministically transferring one set of color data to another location". The deterministic transfer is limited to the small set of physical metrics we decided to call "color". All other components of color are ignored.

  15. Rendering plant emissions in a residential setting: An economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.M.; MacDonald, H.F.

    1992-12-01

    The contingent value method is employed to estimate economic damages to households resulting from rendering plant emissions in a small town. Household WTA and WTP are estimated individually and in aggregate. The influence of Household characteristics is examined with regression models. The perception of health risk is an important determinant of household valuation while income appears insignificant. Results indicate that a potential Pareto-improvement is possible with the incorporation of current abatement technology.

  16. Perspective volume rendering on Parallel Algebraic Logic (PAL) computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongzheng; Shi, Hongchi

    1998-09-01

    We propose a perspective volume graphics rendering algorithm on SIMD mesh-connected computers and implement the algorithm on the Parallel Algebraic Logic computer. The algorithm is a parallel ray casting algorithm. It decomposes the 3D perspective projection into two transformations that can be implemented in the SIMD fashion to solve the data redistribution problem caused by non-regular data access patterns in the perspective projection.

  17. Volume Visual Attention Maps (VVAM) in ray-casting rendering.

    PubMed

    Beristain, Andoni; Congote, John; Ruiz, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extension visual attention maps for volume data visualization, where eye fixation points become rays in the 3D space, and the visual attention map becomes a volume. This Volume Visual Attention Map (VVAM) is used to interactively enhance a ray-casting based direct volume rendering (DVR) visualization. The practical application of this idea into the biomedical image visualization field is explored for interactive visualization. PMID:22356956

  18. Color control of a lighting system using RGBW LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Midori; Horiuchi, Takahiko; Tominaga, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    A lighting system is proposed to render objects under a variety of colored illumination. The proposed system is constructed with a LED unit, white diffusion filters, dimmers, and a personal computer as a controller. The LED unit is composed of four kinds of color LED lamps which are 12 red (R), 14 green (G), 12 blue (B) and 10 white (W) colors. The LED lamps have a linear input-output relationship and a larger color gamut than Adobe RGB. Since the lighting system has an independent white light source, white illumination can be produced using the white light source and a mixture of RGB primary sources. Therefore, to determine illumination color we have to solve a mapping problem from 3D color space to 4D space of RGBW digital values. This paper proposes an effective algorithm for determining the digital control signals of the RGBW lights, so that colored light is generated with arbitrary (x, y) chromaticity and luminance value Y. The performance of proposed method is examined in an experiment, where the accuracy of the colored light is evaluated with regard to the CIE color difference.

  19. Informatics in radiology: Render: an online searchable radiology study repository.

    PubMed

    Dang, Pragya A; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Schultz, Thomas J; Graham, Steven A; Dreyer, Keith J

    2009-01-01

    Radiology departments are a rich source of information in the form of digital radiology reports and images obtained in patients with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. A free text radiology report and image search application known as Render was created to allow users to find pertinent cases for a variety of purposes. Render is a radiology report and image repository that pools researchable information derived from multiple systems in near real time with use of (a) Health Level 7 links for radiology information system data, (b) periodic file transfers from the picture archiving and communication system, and (c) the results of natural language processing (NLP) analysis. Users can perform more structured and detailed searches with this application by combining different imaging and patient characteristics such as examination number; patient age, gender, and medical record number; and imaging modality. Use of NLP analysis allows a more effective search for reports with positive findings, resulting in the retrieval of more cases and terms having greater relevance. From the retrieved results, users can save images, bookmark examinations, and navigate to an external search engine such as Google. Render has applications in the fields of radiology education, research, and clinical decision support. PMID:19564253

  20. Efficient Encoding and Rendering of Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Smith, Diann; Shih, Ming-Yun; Shen, Han-Wei

    1998-01-01

    Visualization of time-varying volumetric data sets, which may be obtained from numerical simulations or sensing instruments, provides scientists insights into the detailed dynamics of the phenomenon under study. This paper describes a coherent solution based on quantization, coupled with octree and difference encoding for visualizing time-varying volumetric data. Quantization is used to attain voxel-level compression and may have a significant influence on the performance of the subsequent encoding and visualization steps. Octree encoding is used for spatial domain compression, and difference encoding for temporal domain compression. In essence, neighboring voxels may be fused into macro voxels if they have similar values, and subtrees at consecutive time steps may be merged if they are identical. The software rendering process is tailored according to the tree structures and the volume visualization process. With the tree representation, selective rendering may be performed very efficiently. Additionally, the I/O costs are reduced. With these combined savings, a higher level of user interactivity is achieved. We have studied a variety of time-varying volume datasets, performed encoding based on data statistics, and optimized the rendering calculations wherever possible. Preliminary tests on workstations have shown in many cases tremendous reduction by as high as 90% in both storage space and inter-frame delay.

  1. High Performance GPU-Based Fourier Volume Rendering.

    PubMed

    Abdellah, Marwan; Eldeib, Ayman; Sharawi, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Fourier volume rendering (FVR) is a significant visualization technique that has been used widely in digital radiography. As a result of its (N (2)log⁡N) time complexity, it provides a faster alternative to spatial domain volume rendering algorithms that are (N (3)) computationally complex. Relying on the Fourier projection-slice theorem, this technique operates on the spectral representation of a 3D volume instead of processing its spatial representation to generate attenuation-only projections that look like X-ray radiographs. Due to the rapid evolution of its underlying architecture, the graphics processing unit (GPU) became an attractive competent platform that can deliver giant computational raw power compared to the central processing unit (CPU) on a per-dollar-basis. The introduction of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) technology enables embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to run efficiently on CUDA-capable GPU architectures. In this work, a high performance GPU-accelerated implementation of the FVR pipeline on CUDA-enabled GPUs is presented. This proposed implementation can achieve a speed-up of 117x compared to a single-threaded hybrid implementation that uses the CPU and GPU together by taking advantage of executing the rendering pipeline entirely on recent GPU architectures. PMID:25866499

  2. Sort-First, Distributed Memory Parallel Visualization and Rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Humphreys, Greg; Paul, Brian; Brederson, J. Dean

    2003-07-15

    While commodity computing and graphics hardware has increased in capacity and dropped in cost, it is still quite difficult to make effective use of such systems for general-purpose parallel visualization and graphics. We describe the results of a recent project that provides a software infrastructure suitable for general-purpose use by parallel visualization and graphics applications. Our work combines and extends two technologies: Chromium, a stream-oriented framework that implements the OpenGL programming interface; and OpenRM Scene Graph, a pipelined-parallel scene graph interface for graphics data management. Using this combination, we implement a sort-first, distributed memory, parallel volume rendering application. We describe the performance characteristics in terms of bandwidth requirements and highlight key algorithmic considerations needed to implement the sort-first system. We characterize system performance using a distributed memory parallel volume rendering application, a nd present performance gains realized by using scene specific knowledge to accelerate rendering through reduced network bandwidth. The contribution of this work is an exploration of general-purpose, sort-first architecture performance characteristics as applied to distributed memory, commodity hardware, along with a description of the algorithmic support needed to realize parallel, sort-first implementations.

  3. From A Physical Color Stimulus To A Psychological Color Percept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan G.; Tonnquist, Gunnar

    1989-08-01

    The paper discusses the complexity of color vision in humans, considering the main aspects involved: the physical aspect, the psychophysical aspect, the physiological aspect and the psychological aspect. The meanings of the term color associated to each such aspect (asfor example, color stimulus, color valence, neural color signal and color percept) are introduced. Some types of color defective vision, relevant for color display users, are indicated. The methods to generate color stimuli in modern display devices, employing different technologies, are compared.

  4. Spatio-temporal visualization of air-sea CO2 flux and carbon budget using volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhong; Fang, Lei; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Renyi

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a novel visualization method to show the spatio-temporal dynamics of carbon sinks and sources, and carbon fluxes in the ocean carbon cycle. The air-sea carbon budget and its process of accumulation are demonstrated in the spatial dimension, while the distribution pattern and variation of CO2 flux are expressed by color changes. In this way, we unite spatial and temporal characteristics of satellite data through visualization. A GPU-based direct volume rendering technique using half-angle slicing is adopted to dynamically visualize the released or absorbed CO2 gas with shadow effects. A data model is designed to generate four-dimensional (4D) data from satellite-derived air-sea CO2 flux products, and an out-of-core scheduling strategy is also proposed for on-the-fly rendering of time series of satellite data. The presented 4D visualization method is implemented on graphics cards with vertex, geometry and fragment shaders. It provides a visually realistic simulation and user interaction for real-time rendering. This approach has been integrated into the Information System of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Air-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2) for the research and assessment of air-sea CO2 flux in the China Seas.

  5. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  6. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  7. Trichromatic opponent color classification.

    PubMed

    Chichilnisky, E J; Wandell, B A

    1999-10-01

    Stimuli varying in intensity and chromaticity, presented on numerous backgrounds, were classified into red/green, blue/yellow and white/black opponent color categories. These measurements revealed the shapes of the boundaries that separate opponent colors in three-dimensional color space. Opponent color classification boundaries were generally not planar, but their shapes could be summarized by a piecewise linear model in which increment and decrement color signals are combined with different weights at two stages to produce opponent color sensations. The effect of background light on classification was largely explained by separate gain changes in increment and decrement cone signals. PMID:10615508

  8. Spirit Beholds Bumpy Boulder (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit began collecting images for a 360-degree panorama of new terrain, the rover captured this view of a dark boulder with an interesting surface texture. The boulder sits about 40 centimeters (16 inches) tall on Martian sand about 5 meters (16 feet) away from Spirit. It is one of many dark, volcanic rock fragments -- many pocked with rounded holes called vesicles -- littering the slope of 'Low Ridge.' The rock surface facing the rover is similar in appearance to the surface texture on the outside of lava flows on Earth.

    Spirit took this false-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 810th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 13, 2006). This image is a false-color rendering using camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

  9. Color and Streptomycetes1

    PubMed Central

    Pridham, Thomas G.

    1965-01-01

    A report summarizing the results of an international workshop on determination of color of streptomycetes is presented. The results suggest that the color systems which seem most practically appealing and effective to specialists on actinomycetes are those embracing a limited number of color names and groups. The broad groupings allow placement of isolates into reasonably well-defined categories based on color of aerial mycelium. Attempts to expand such systems (more color groups) lead to difficulties. It is common knowledge that many, if not all, of the individual groups would in these broad systems contain strains that differ in many other respects, e.g., spore-wall ornamentation, color of vegetative (substratal) mycelium, morphology of chains of spores, and numerous physiological criteria. Also, cultures of intermediate color can be found, which makes placement difficult. As it now stands, color as a criterion for characterization of streptomycetes and streptoverticillia is in questionable status. Although much useful color information can be obtained by an individual, the application of this information to that in the literature or its use in communication with other individuals leaves much to be desired. More objective methods of color determination are needed. At present, the most effective method that could be used internationally is the color-wheel system of Tresner and Backus. Furthermore, the significance of color in speciation of these organisms is an open question. Obviously, more critical work on the color problem is needed. PMID:14264847

  10. Statistical approach to color rendition properties of solid state light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, Artūras; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Tuzikas, Arūnas; Vitta, Pranciškus; Shur, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Versatile spectral power distribution of solid-state light sources offers vast possibilities in color rendition engineering. The optimization of such sources requires the development and psychophysical validation of an advanced metric for assessing their color quality. Here we report on the application and validation of the recently introduced statistical approach to color quality of illumination. This new metric uses the computational grouping of a large number of test color samples depending on the magnitude and direction of color-shift vectors in respect of just perceived differences of chromaticity and luminance. This approach introduces single-format statistical color rendition indices, such as Color Fidelity Index, Color Saturation Index and Color Dulling Index, which are the percentages of test color samples with particular behavior of the color-shift vectors. The new metric has been used for the classification of practical phosphor conversion white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and polychromatic LED clusters into several distinct categories, such as high-fidelity, color saturating, and color dulling light sources. We also report on the development of the tetrachromatic light source with dynamically tailored color rendition properties and using this source for the psychophysical validation of the statistical metric and finding subjective preferences to the color quality of lighting.

  11. Fusion of MDCT-based endoluminal renderings and endoscopic video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Early lung cancer can cause structural and color changes to the airway mucosa. A three-dimensional (3D) multidetector CT (MDCT) chest scan provides 3D structural data for airway walls, but no detailed mucosal information. Conversely, bronchoscopy gives color mucosal information, due to airway-wall inflammation and early cancer formation. Unfortunately, each bronchoscopic video image provides only a limited local view of the airway mucosal surface and no 3D structural/location information. The physician has to mentally correlate the video images with each other and the airway surface data to analyze the airway mucosal structure and color. A fusion of the topographical information from the 3D MDCT data and the color information from the bronchoscopic video enables 3D visualization, navigation, localization, and combined color-topographic analysis of the airways. This paper presents a fast method for topographic airway-mucosal surface fusion of bronchoscopic video with 3D MDCT endoluminal views. Tests were performed on phantom sequences, real bronchoscopy patient video, and associated 3D MDCT scans. Results show that we can effectively accomplish mapping over a continuous sequence of airway images spanning several generations of airways in a few seconds. Real-time navigation and visualization of the combined data was performed. The average surface-point mapping error for a phantom case was estimated to be only on the order of 2 mm for 20 mm diameter airway.

  12. Medical color displays and their color calibration: investigations of various calibration methods, tools, and potential improvement in color difference ΔE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Hashmi, Syed F.; Dallas, William J.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Rehm, Kelly; Fan, Jiahua

    2010-08-01

    Our laboratory has investigated the efficacy of a suite of color calibration and monitor profiling packages which employ a variety of color measurement sensors. Each of the methods computes gamma correction tables for the red, green and blue color channels of a monitor that attempt to: a) match a desired luminance range and tone reproduction curve; and b) maintain a target neutral point across the range of grey values. All of the methods examined here produce International Color Consortium (ICC) profiles that describe the color rendering capabilities of the monitor after calibration. Color profiles incorporate a transfer matrix that establishes the relationship between RGB driving levels and the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) XYZ (tristimulus) values of the resulting on-screen color; the matrix is developed by displaying color patches of known RGB values on the monitor and measuring the tristimulus values with a sensor. The number and chromatic distribution of color patches varies across methods and is usually not under user control. In this work we examine the effect of employing differing calibration and profiling methods on rendition of color images. A series of color patches encoded in sRGB color space were presented on the monitor using color-management software that utilized the ICC profile produced by each method. The patches were displayed on the calibrated monitor and measured with a Minolta CS200 colorimeter. Differences in intended and achieved luminance and chromaticity were computed using the CIE DE2000 color-difference metric, in which a value of ΔE = 1 is generally considered to be approximately one just noticeable difference (JND) in color. We observed between one and 17 JND's for individual colors, depending on calibration method and target. As an extension of this fundamental work1, we further improved our calibration method by defining concrete calibration parameters for the display, using the NEC wide gamut puck, and making sure

  13. Light, Color, and Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiburzi, Brian; Tamborino, Laurie; Parker, Gordon A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which students can use flashlights, mirrors, and colored paper to discover scientific principles regarding optics. Addresses the concepts of angles of incidence and reflection, colored vs. white light, and mirror images. (WRM)

  14. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... things can cause tooth discoloration. The change in color may affect the entire tooth, or appear as spots or ... the tooth enamel. Your genes affect your tooth color. Other things ... include: Congenital diseases Environmental factors Infections ...

  15. INDEXING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Kock, L.J.

    1959-09-22

    A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an Indexing plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an Index pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an index pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the index pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.

  16. Coloring with defect

    SciTech Connect

    Cowen, L.J.; Goddard, W.; Jesurum, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    An (ordinary vertex) coloring is a partition of the vertices of a graph into independent sets. The chromatic number is the minimum number of colors needed to produce such a partition. This paper considers a relaxation of coloring in which the color classes partition the vertices into subgraphs of degree at most d. d is called the defect of the coloring. A graph which admits a vertex coloring into k color classes, where each vertex is adjacent to at most d self-colored neighbors is said to be (k, d) colorable. We consider defective coloring on graphs of bounded degree, bounded genus, and bounded chromatic number, presenting complexity results and algorithms. For bounded degree graphs, a classic result of Lovasz yields a (k, [{Delta}/k]) coloring for graphs with E edges of maximum degree {Delta} in O({Delta}E) time. For graphs of bounded genus, (2, d), for d > 0 and (3,1)-coloring are proved NP-Complete, even for planar graphs. Results of easily can be transformed to (3,2) color any planar graph in linear time. We show that any toroidal graph is (3,2)- and (5, 1)-colorable, and quadratic-time algorithms are presented that find the colorings. For higher surfaces, we give a linear time algorithm to (3, {radical}12{gamma} + 6) color a graph of genus {gamma} > 2. It is also shown that any graph of genus {gamma} is ({radical}12{gamma}/(d + 1) + 6, d) colorable, and an O(d{radical}{gamma}E + V) algorithm is presented that finds the coloring. These bounds are within a constant factor of what is required for the maximum clique embeddable in the surface. Reductions from ordinary vertex coloring show that (k, d) coloring is NP-complete, and there exists an c > 0 such that no polynomial time algorithm can n{sup {epsilon}}-approximate the defective chromatic number unless P = NP. Most approximation algorithms to approximately color 3-colorable graphs can be extend to allow defects.

  17. Inkjet Color Printing by Interference Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Aleksandr V; Milichko, Valentin A; Vinogradov, Vladimir V; Vinogradov, Alexandr V

    2016-03-22

    Color printing technology is developing rapidly; in less than 40 years, it moved from dot matrix printers with an ink-soaked cloth ribbon to 3D printers used to make three-dimensional color objects. Nevertheless, what remained unchanged over this time is the fact that in each case, dye inks (CMYK or RGB color schemes) were exclusively used for coloring, which inevitably limits the technological possibilities and color reproduction. As a next step in printing color images and storing information, we propose the technology of producing optical nanostructures. In this paper, we report use of inkjet technology to create colored interference layers with high accuracy without the need for high-temperature fixing. This was made possible due to using titania-based colloidal ink yielding monolithic coatings with a high refractive index (2.00 ± 0.08 over the entire visible range) when naturally dried. By controlling the film thickness by using inkjet deposition, we produced images based on controlled interference and implementing color printing with one ink. The lack of dyes in the proposed method has good environmental prospects, because applied systems based on a crystalline anatase sol are nontoxic and biologically inert. The paper explains in detail the principle of producing interference images by the classical inkjet method and shows the advantages of this technique in depositing coatings with uniform thickness, which are required for large-scale interference color imaging even on unprepared polymer films. This article demonstrates the possibility of inkjet printing of nanostructures with a precision in thickness of up to 50 nm, we believe that the proposed approach will be the groundwork for developing interference color printing approach and allow to implement new methods of forming optical nano-objects by widely available techniques. PMID:26805775

  18. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  19. Reimagining the Color Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Color wheels are a traditional project for many teachers. The author has used them in art appreciation classes for many years, but one problem she found when her pre-service art education students created colored wheels was that they were boring: simple circles, with pie-shaped pieces, which students either painted or colored in. This article…

  20. Sweetpotato Color Analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Color is an important attribute that contributes to the appearance of a sweetpotato genotype. A consumer uses color, along with geometric attributes (e.g., gloss, luster, sheen, texture, opaqueness, shape), to subjectively evaluate the appearance of a sweetpotato root. Color can be quantified by t...

  1. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  2. Color Discrimination Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's ability to see likenesses or differences in colors or shades, identifying or matching certain colors, and selecting colors that go together. Section 1 describes the assessment and lists related occupations and DOT codes. Instructions to the evaluator are provided in the…

  3. IRAS colors of carbon stars - An optical spectroscopic test

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.; Wainscoat, R.J.; Walker, H.J.; Volk, K.; Schwartz, D.E.; Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute, Los Altos, CA )

    1989-06-01

    Optical spectra are obtained of 57 photographic counterparts to IRAS sources not previously studied spectroscopically, and expected on the basis of their IRAS colors to be M or C type stars. Confirmed carbon stars are found only in a restricted range of 12-25 index, and constitute a striking vertical sequence in the 12-25-60 micron color-color diagram. This sequence is in accord with evolutionary models for AGB stars that convert M into C stars by dredge-up, and follow loops in the color-color plane. Optically visible and optically invisible carbon stars occupy different color-color locations consistent with their representations of different evolutionary states in the life of relatively low-mass stars. 16 refs.

  4. Colorful brains: 14 years of display practice in functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Christen, Markus; Vitacco, Deborah A; Huber, Lara; Harboe, Julie; Fabrikant, Sara I; Brugger, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Neuroimaging results are typically graphically rendered and color-coded, which influences the process of knowledge generation within neuroscience as well as the public perception of brain research. Analyzing these issues requires empirical information on the display practice in neuroimaging. In our study we evaluated more than 9000 functional images (fMRI and PET) published between 1996 and 2009 with respect to the use of color, image structure, image production software and other factors that may determine the display practice. We demonstrate a variety of display styles despite a remarkable dominance of few image production sites and software systems, outline some tendencies of standardization, and identify shortcomings with respect to color scale explication in neuroimages. We discuss the importance of the finding for knowledge production in neuroimaging, and we make suggestions to improve the display practice in neuroimaging, especially on regimes of color coding. PMID:23403183

  5. Color image reproduction: the evolution from print to multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Lindsay W.

    1997-02-01

    The electronic pre-press industry has undergone a very rapid evolution over the past decade, driven by the accelerating performance of desktop computers and affordable application software for image manipulation, page layout and color separation. These have been supported by the steady development of colo scanners, digital cameras, proof printers, RIPs and image setters, all of which make the process of reproducing color images in print easier than ever before. But is color print itself in decline as a medium? New channels of delivery for digital color images include CD-ROM, wideband networks and the Internet, with soft-copy screen display competing with hard-copy print for applications ranging from corporate brochures to home shopping. Present indications are that the most enduring of the graphic arts skills in the new multimedia world will be image rendering and production control rather than those related to photographic film and ink on paper.

  6. PV modules, using color solar cells, designed for building

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, N.; Yamashita, H.; Goda, S.

    1994-12-31

    The designs and structures of a photovoltaic module to be installed in a curtain wall were examined with the object of sharply reducing PV power generation costs. As for the design, solar cells of different colors were produced and an opinion survey of designers and other construction-related persons was conducted. Renderings based on color solar cells were prepared using computer graphics. In general, the output of cells decreases for colors other than shades of dark blue. However, there is a good possibility that greater importance will be put on design, including color and surface condition, than on output. In this case, the market share may expand and as a result, the cost may drop. As for the structure, various materials that can be used for a building-material-integrated-module were investigated and methods to install PV modules into building materials were examined. Moreover, experimental module samples fitted with stainless steel sheets and aluminum-sash frames were made.

  7. Irregular Morphing for Real-Time Rendering of Large Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalem, Sid'Ali; Kourgli, Assia

    2016-06-01

    The following paper proposes an alternative approach to the real-time adaptive triangulation problem. A new region-based multi-resolution approach for terrain rendering is described which improves on-the-fly the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile after selecting appropriate Level-Of-Detail by an adaptive sampling. This proposed approach organizes the heightmap into a QuadTree of tiles that are processed independently. This technique combines the benefits of both Triangular Irregular Network approach and region-based multi-resolution approach by improving the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile. Our technique morphs the initial regular grid of the tile to deformed grid in order to minimize approximation error. The proposed technique strives to combine large tile size and real-time processing while guaranteeing an upper bound on the screen space error. Thus, this approach adapts terrain rendering process to local surface characteristics and enables on-the-fly handling of large amount of terrain data. Morphing is based-on the multi-resolution wavelet analysis. The use of the D2WT multi-resolution analysis of the terrain height-map speeds up processing and permits to satisfy an interactive terrain rendering. Tests and experiments demonstrate that Haar B-Spline wavelet, well known for its properties of localization and its compact support, is suitable for fast and accurate redistribution. Such technique could be exploited in client-server architecture for supporting interactive high-quality remote visualization of very large terrain.

  8. Accelerating fourier volume rendering by polar coordinate data representation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jan-Ray; Lee, Shun-Zhi; Lee, Huai-Che

    2012-12-01

    Volume rendering is an important tool to visualize three-dimensional data in biomedicine by projecting the data to a two-dimensional plane. The projection is done by ray casting and its complexity is proportional to the number of three-dimensional data points. To reduce complexity, Fourier volume rendering (FVR) uses slice projection theorem to facilitate the integration of voxels along the ray casting path. In this paper, we proposed a new method for FVR that stored and processed the frequency domain data in polar coordinate. By exploiting three aspects of data processing which is previously impossible in rectilinear coordinate, our new method is much faster than the previous methods. The first aspect is data regularity. When data are stored in polar coordinate, extracting a slice involves accessing data stored in adjacent memory location. This regularity makes memory access more efficient. The second aspect is to utilize the high data density near the origin in polar coordinate. We can obtain two benefits from this aspect. The first allows us to extract a slice by nearest-neighbor interpolation instead of more complex interpolation but without sacrificing image quality. The second allows us to trade off between image quality and memory storage. The third aspect is to recognize that converting from rectilinear coordinate to polar coordinate is a one-time process. Therefore, we can use a better interpolation kernel with larger support in coordinate conversion. In turn, most of the computation is shifted to the preprocessing stage and interactive rendering can be made very fast. In the experiments, we show that the speed in interactive visualization for our new method is independent of the size of the interpolation kernel, therefore, achieving comparable image quality at a faster rate than previous methods. PMID:22771165

  9. An example of quantum imaging: rendering an object undetectable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose and analyse a Gedankenexperiment involving three non-linear crystals and two objects inserted in the idler beams. We show that, besides the behaviour that can be extrapolated from previous experiments involving two crystals and one object, we are able to predict a new effect: under certain circumstances, one of the objects can be rendered undetectable to any single detection rate on the signal photons with discarded idler photons. This effect could find applications in future developments of quantum imaging techniques.

  10. Enterobacteriaceae as indicators of good manufacturing practices in rendering plants.

    PubMed

    van Schothorst, M; Oosterom, J

    1984-01-01

    Finished products and samples from the environment of the production line in rendering plants were checked for Enterobacteriaceae and salmonellae. Improvements in hygiene and measures taken to limit multiplication of microorganisms in the dry area of the production lines resulted in reduction of both numbers of Enterobacteriaceae in environmental samples and frequency of their occurrence in finished products. Simultaneously, there was an equivalent reduction of salmonellae positives in environmental samples and finished products. Consequently, the determination of Enterobacteriaceae can be used as an effective tool to assess the improvements in good manufacturing practices. PMID:6721473

  11. The Cube Analysis and Rendering Tool for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolowsky, E.; Kern, J.; Federl, P.; Jacobs, J.; Loveland, S.; Taylor, J.; Sivakoff, G.; Taylor, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present the design principles and current status of the Cube Analysis and Rendering Tool for Astronomy (CARTA). The CARTA project is designing a cube visualization tool for the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimeter array. CARTA will join the domain-specific software already developed for millimetre-wave interferometry with sever-side visualization solution. This connection will enable archive-hosted exploration of three-dimensional data cubes. CARTA will also provide an indistinguishable desktop client. While such a goal is ambitious for a short project, the team is focusing on a well-developed framework which can readily accommodate community code development through plugins.

  12. Interactive View-Dependent Rendering of Large Isosurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorski, B; Duchaineau, M; Lindstrom, P; Pascucci, V; Joy, K I

    2002-11-19

    We present an algorithm for interactively extracting and rendering isosurfaces of large volume datasets in a view-dependent fashion. A recursive tetrahedral mesh refinement scheme, based on longest edge bisection, is used to hierarchically decompose the data into a multiresolution structure. This data structure allows fast extraction of arbitrary isosurfaces to within user specified view-dependent error bounds. A data layout scheme based on hierarchical space filling curves provides access to the data in a cache coherent manner that follows the data access pattern indicated by the mesh refinement.

  13. Color science demonstration kit from open source hardware and software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollers, Michael W.

    2014-09-01

    Color science is perhaps the most universally tangible discipline within the optical sciences for people of all ages. Excepting a small and relatively well-understood minority, we can see that the world around us consists of a multitude of colors; yet, describing the "what", "why", and "how" of these colors is not an easy task, especially without some sort of equally colorful visual aids. While static displays (e.g., poster boards, etc.) serve their purpose, there is a growing trend, aided by the recent permeation of small interactive devices into our society, for interactive and immersive learning. However, for the uninitiated, designing software and hardware for this purpose may not be within the purview of all optical scientists and engineers. Enter open source. Open source "anything" are those tools and designs -- hardware or software -- that are available and free to use, often without any restrictive licensing. Open source software may be familiar to some, but the open source hardware movement is relatively new. These are electronic circuit board designs that are provided for free and can be implemented in physical hardware by anyone. This movement has led to the availability of some relatively inexpensive, but quite capable, computing power for the creation of small devices. This paper will showcase the design and implementation of the software and hardware that was used to create an interactive demonstration kit for color. Its purpose is to introduce and demonstrate the concepts of color spectra, additive color, color rendering, and metamers.

  14. Colored 3D surface reconstruction using Kinect sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lian-peng; Chen, Xiang-ning; Chen, Ying; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    A colored 3D surface reconstruction method which effectively fuses the information of both depth and color image using Microsoft Kinect is proposed and demonstrated by experiment. Kinect depth images are processed with the improved joint-bilateral filter based on region segmentation which efficiently combines the depth and color data to improve its quality. The registered depth data are integrated to achieve a surface reconstruction through the colored truncated signed distance fields presented in this paper. Finally, the improved ray casting for rendering full colored surface is implemented to estimate color texture of the reconstruction object. Capturing the depth and color images of a toy car, the improved joint-bilateral filter based on region segmentation is used to improve the quality of depth images and the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) is approximately 4.57 dB, which is better than 1.16 dB of the joint-bilateral filter. The colored construction results of toy car demonstrate the suitability and ability of the proposed method.

  15. Sixty-five thousand shades of gray: importance of color in surgical pathology diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Campbell, W Scott; Talmon, Geoffrey A; Foster, Kirk W; Lele, Subodh M; Kozel, Jessica A; West, William W

    2015-12-01

    Digital whole slide imaging (WSI) is a diagnostic modality that has gained acceptance as a tool for use in some areas of surgical pathology such as remote consultations. Accurate control of color representation of digitally rendered images of histologic sections is considered an important parameter of WSI. Currently, professional societies, physicians, and other stakeholders are in the process of establishing clinical guidelines outlining the use of these devices, which include color integrity and color calibration of scanners and viewing devices. Although color is a component of surgical pathology diagnoses, it was posited that pathologists could accurately diagnose surgical specimens without color. To test this hypothesis, 5 pathologists were presented breast biopsy specimens from 20 patients consisting of 22 separate tissue specimens and WSI of 158 hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides imaged at ×20. No special stains were included. The pathologists reviewed each case using a 16-bit grayscale monitor and rendered a diagnosis for each case. Diagnoses were compared to the original light microscopy diagnoses and scored for concordance. A 92.7% concordance was observed. Discordant diagnoses represented well-known areas of diagnostic disagreement in breast pathology as well as known limitations of WSI. The research demonstrated that surgical pathologists did not rely primarily on color to render accurate diagnoses of breast biopsy cases but rather used architectural features of tissue and cellular morphology to reach a diagnostic conclusion. This research did not suggest that color is an unimportant factor in pathology diagnosis, but its importance may be overstated. PMID:26482606

  16. Color filter array demosaicing: an adaptive progressive interpolation based on the edge type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qiqi; Liu, Zhaohui

    2015-10-01

    Color filter array (CFA) is one of the key points for single-sensor digital cameras to produce color images. Bayer CFA is the most commonly used pattern. In this array structure, the sampling frequency of green is two times of red or blue, which is consistent with the sensitivity of human eyes to colors. However, each sensor pixel only samples one of three primary color values. To render a full-color image, an interpolation process, commonly referred to CFA demosaicing, is required to estimate the other two missing color values at each pixel. In this paper, we explore an adaptive progressive interpolation based on the edge type algorithm. The proposed demosaicing method consists of two successive steps: an interpolation step that estimates missing color values according to various edges and a post-processing step by iterative interpolation.

  17. Mars in True Color (almost)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 14 November 2003

    This spectacular view of the sunlit cliffs and basaltic sand dunes in southern Melas Chasma shows Mars in a way rarely seen: in full, realistic color. The colorization is the result of a collaboration between THEMIS team members at Cornell University and space artist Don Davis, who is an expert on true-color renderings of planetary and astronomical objects. Davis began with calibrated and co-registered THEMIS VIS multi-band radiance files produced by the Cornell group. Using as a guide true-color imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope and his own personal experience at Mt. Wilson and other observatories, he performed a manual color balance to match more closely the colors of previous visual Mars observations. He also did some manual smoothing and other image processing to minimize the effects of residual scattered light in the images. The result is a view of Mars that invites comparisons to Earth; a scene that one might observe out the window on a flight over the southwest United States, but not quite. The basaltic dunes are commonplace on Mars but a rare feature on Earth. The rounded knobs and elongated mesas on the canyon floor show an erosional style as exotic as Utah's Bryce Canyon but wholly familiar on Mars. Although the inhospitable Martian atmosphere cannot be seen, the magnificent Martian landscape on display in this image beckons space-suited human explorers and the sightseers who will follow.

    Initial image processing and calibration by THEMIS team members J. Bell, T. McConnochie, and D. Savransky at Cornell University; additional processing and final color balance by space artist Don Davis.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -12.7, Longitude 288.6 East (71.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed

  18. Web Services for Dynamic Coloring of UAVSAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Pierce, Marlon; Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay

    2015-08-01

    QuakeSim has implemented a service-based Geographic Information System to enable users to access large amounts of Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data through an online interface. The QuakeSim Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) profile tool calculates radar-observed displacement (from an unwrapped interferogram product) along user-specified lines. Pre-rendered thumbnails with InSAR fringe patterns are used to display interferogram and unwrapped phase images on a Google Map in the InSAR profile tool. One challenge with this tool lies in the user visually identifying regions of interest when drawing the profile line. This requires that the user correctly interpret the InSAR imagery, which currently uses fringe patterns. The mapping between pixel color and pixel value is not a one-to-one relationship from the InSAR fringe pattern, and it causes difficulty in understanding general displacement information for QuakeSim users. The goal of this work is to generate color maps that directly reflect the pixel values (displacement) as an addition to the pre-rendered images. Because of an extremely uneven distribution of pixel values on an InSAR image, a histogram-based, nonlinear color template generation algorithm is currently under development. A web service enables on-the-fly coloring of UAVSAR images with dynamically generated color templates.

  19. Industrial Color Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamy, C. S.

    1986-10-01

    Color is a very important property of many products and an essential feature of some. The commercial value of color is evident in the fact that customers reject product that is satisfactory in every other way, but is not the right color. Color isrumerically specified, measured, and controlled just as length or weight are. It has three dimensions: Hue, Value, and Chroma, and may be represented in a three-dimensional space. Colors of objects depend on the illumination and pairs of colors may match in one light but not in another. Controlled illumination is required for color matching. Illuminants were standardized by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE). As a basis for color measurement, the CIE adopted three spectral sensitivity functions representing a standard observer. Color may be measured by instruments using standard illumination and simulating the standard observer. It is better to measure spectral reflectance or transmittance and compute colorimetric quantities. Color may be inspected on a production line and the data obtained can be used to control the process. When production cannot be controlled as precisely as required, product may be sorted by color.

  20. Watermarking spot colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alattar, Osama M.; Reed, Alastair M.

    2003-06-01

    Watermarking of printed materials has usually focused on process inks of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). In packaging, almost three out of four printed materials include spot colors. Spot colors are special premixed inks, which can be produced in a vibrant range of colors, often outside the CMYK color gamut. In embedding a watermark into printed material, a common approach is to modify the luminance value of each pixel in the image. In the case of process color work pieces, the luminance change can be scaled to the C, M, Y and K channels using a weighting function, to produce the desired change in luminance. In the case of spot color art designs, there is only one channel available and the luminance change is applied to this channel. In this paper we develop a weighting function to embed the watermark signal across the range of different spot colors. This weighting function normalizes visibility effect and signal robustness across a wide range of different spot colors. It normalizes the signal robustness level over the range of an individual spot color"s intensity levels. Further, it takes into account the sensitivity of the capturing device to the different spot colors.

  1. True Colors Shining Through

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image mosaic illustrates how scientists use the color calibration targets (upper left) located on both Mars Exploration Rovers to fine-tune the rovers' sense of color. In the center, spectra, or light signatures, acquired in the laboratory of the colored chips on the targets are shown as lines. Actual data from Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera is mapped on top of these lines as dots. The plot demonstrates that the observed colors of Mars match the colors of the chips, and thus approximate the red planet's true colors. This finding is further corroborated by the picture taken on Mars of the calibration target, which shows the colored chips as they would appear on Earth.

  2. Relating color working memory and color perception.

    PubMed

    Allred, Sarah R; Flombaum, Jonathan I

    2014-11-01

    Color is the most frequently studied feature in visual working memory (VWM). Oddly, much of this work de-emphasizes perception, instead making simplifying assumptions about the inputs served to memory. We question these assumptions in light of perception research, and we identify important points of contact between perception and working memory in the case of color. Better characterization of its perceptual inputs will be crucial for elucidating the structure and function of VWM. PMID:25038028

  3. The rendering context for stereoscopic 3D web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qinshui; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang

    2014-03-01

    3D technologies on the Web has been studied for many years, but they are basically monoscopic 3D. With the stereoscopic technology gradually maturing, we are researching to integrate the binocular 3D technology into the Web, creating a stereoscopic 3D browser that will provide users with a brand new experience of human-computer interaction. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to apply stereoscopy technologies to the CSS3 3D Transforms. Under our model, each element can create or participate in a stereoscopic 3D rendering context, in which 3D Transforms such as scaling, translation and rotation, can be applied and be perceived in a truly 3D space. We first discuss the underlying principles of stereoscopy. After that we discuss how these principles can be applied to the Web. A stereoscopic 3D browser with backward compatibility is also created for demonstration purposes. We take advantage of the open-source WebKit project, integrating the 3D display ability into the rendering engine of the web browser. For each 3D web page, our 3D browser will create two slightly different images, each representing the left-eye view and right-eye view, both to be combined on the 3D display to generate the illusion of depth. And as the result turns out, elements can be manipulated in a truly 3D space.

  4. Hardware-accelerated autostereogram rendering for interactive 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petz, Christoph; Goldluecke, Bastian; Magnor, Marcus

    2003-05-01

    Single Image Random Dot Stereograms (SIRDS) are an attractive way of depicting three-dimensional objects using conventional display technology. Once trained in decoupling the eyes' convergence and focusing, autostereograms of this kind are able to convey the three-dimensional impression of a scene. We present in this work an algorithm that generates SIRDS at interactive frame rates on a conventional PC. The presented system allows rotating a 3D geometry model and observing the object from arbitrary positions in real-time. Subjective tests show that the perception of a moving or rotating 3D scene presents no problem: The gaze remains focused onto the object. In contrast to conventional SIRDS algorithms, we render multiple pixels in a single step using a texture-based approach, exploiting the parallel-processing architecture of modern graphics hardware. A vertex program determines the parallax for each vertex of the geometry model, and the graphics hardware's texture unit is used to render the dot pattern. No data has to be transferred between main memory and the graphics card for generating the autostereograms, leaving CPU capacity available for other tasks. Frame rates of 25 fps are attained at a resolution of 1024x512 pixels on a standard PC using a consumer-grade nVidia GeForce4 graphics card, demonstrating the real-time capability of the system.

  5. Rendering energy-conservative scenes in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Eric M.; Garbo, Dennis L.; Crow, Dennis R.; Coker, Charles F.

    1997-07-01

    Real-time infrared (IR) scene generation from HardWare-in- the-Loop (HWIL) testing of IR seeker systems is a complex problem due to the required frame rates and image fidelity. High frame rates are required for current generation seeker systems to perform designation, discrimination, identification, tracking, and aimpoint selection tasks. Computational requirements for IR signature phenomenology and sensor effects have been difficult to perform in real- time to support HWIL testing. Commercial scene generation hardware is rapidly improving and is becoming a viable solution for HWIL testing activities being conducted at the Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulator facility at Eglin AFB, Florida. This paper presents computational techniques performed to overcome IR scene rendering errors incurred with commercially available hardware and software for real-time scene generation in support of HWIL testing. These techniques provide an acceptable solution to real-time IR scene generation that strikes a balance between physical accuracy and image framing rates. The results of these techniques are investigated as they pertain to rendering accuracy and speed for target objects which begin as a point source during acquisition and develop into an extended source representation during aimpoint selection.

  6. Non-photorealistic rendering for minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Jens; Schäfer, Henry; Brost, Alexander; Stamminger, Marc; Pfister, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are a common disease of the aorta which are treated minimally invasive in about 33 % of the cases. Treatment is done by placing a stent graft in the aorta to prevent the aneurysm from growing. Guidance during the procedure is facilitated by fluoroscopic imaging. Unfortunately, due to low soft tissue contrast in X-ray images, the aorta itself is not visible without the application of contrast agent. To overcome this issue, advanced techniques allow to segment the aorta from pre-operative data, such as CT or MRI. Overlay images are then subsequently rendered from a mesh representation of the segmentation and fused to the live fluoroscopic images with the aim of improving the visibility of the aorta during the procedure. The current overlay images typically use forward projections of the mesh representation. This fusion technique shows deficiencies in both the 3-D information of the overlay and the visibility of the fluoroscopic image underneath. We present a novel approach to improve the visualization of the overlay images using non-photorealistic rendering techniques. Our method preserves the visibility of the devices in the fluoroscopic images while, at the same time, providing 3-D information of the fused volume. The evaluation by clinical experts shows that our method is preferred over current state-of-the-art overlay techniques. We compared three visualization techniques to the standard visualization. Our silhouette approach was chosen by clinical experts with 67 %, clearly showing the superiority of our new approach.

  7. Emphatic, interactive volume rendering to support variance in user expertise.

    PubMed

    Stredney, Don; Ebert, David S; Svakhine, Nikolai; Bryan, Jason; Sessanna, Dennis; Wiet, Gregory J

    2005-01-01

    Various levels of representation, from abstract to schematic to realistic, have been exploited for millennia to facilitate the transfer of information from one individual to another. Learning complex information, such as that found in biomedicine, proves specifically problematic to many, and requires incremental, step-wise depictions of the information to clarify structural, functional, and procedural relationships.Emerging volume-rendering technique, such as non-photorealistic representation, coupled with advances in computational speeds, especially new graphical processing units, provide unique capabilities to explore the use of various levels of representation in interactive sessions. We have developed a system that produces images that simulate pictorial representations for both scientific and biomedical visualization. The system combines traditional and novel volume illustration techniques. We present examples from our efforts to distill representational techniques for both creative exploration and emphatic presentation for clarity. More specifically, we present our efforts to adapt these techniques for interactive simulation sessions being developed in a concurrent project for resident training in temporal bone dissection simulation. The goal of this effort is to evaluate the use of emphatic rendering to guide the user in an interactive session and to facilitate the learning of complex biomedical information, including structural, functional, and procedural information. PMID:15718791

  8. Tomographic image reconstruction and rendering with texture-mapping hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Cabral, B.K.; Foran, J.

    1994-07-01

    The image reconstruction problem, also known as the inverse Radon transform, for x-ray computed tomography (CT) is found in numerous applications in medicine and industry. The most common algorithm used in these cases is filtered backprojection (FBP), which, while a simple procedure, is time-consuming for large images on any type of computational engine. Specially-designed, dedicated parallel processors are commonly used in medical CT scanners, whose results are then passed to graphics workstation for rendering and analysis. However, a fast direct FBP algorithm can be implemented on modern texture-mapping hardware in current high-end workstation platforms. This is done by casting the FBP algorithm as an image warping operation with summing. Texture-mapping hardware, such as that on the Silicon Graphics Reality Engine (TM), shows around 600 times speedup of backprojection over a CPU-based implementation (a 100 Mhz R4400 in this case). This technique has the further advantages of flexibility and rapid programming. In addition, the same hardware can be used for both image reconstruction and for volumetric rendering. The techniques can also be used to accelerate iterative reconstruction algorithms. The hardware architecture also allows more complex operations than straight-ray backprojection if they are required, including fan-beam, cone-beam, and curved ray paths, with little or no speed penalties.

  9. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs. PMID:26146475

  10. Physically Based Rendering in the Nightshade NG Visualization Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Karrie; Larey-Williams, Trystan; Spearman, Rob; Bogard, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This poster describes our work on creating a physically based rendering model in Nightshade NG planetarium simulation and visualization software (project website: NightshadeSoftware.org). We discuss techniques used for rendering realistic scenes in the universe and dealing with astronomical distances in real time on consumer hardware. We also discuss some of the challenges of rewriting the software from scratch, a project which began in 2011.Nightshade NG can be a powerful tool for sharing data and visualizations. The desktop version of the software is free for anyone to download, use, and modify; it runs on Windows and Linux (and eventually Mac). If you are looking to disseminate your data or models, please stop by to discuss how we can work together.Nightshade software is used in literally hundreds of digital planetarium systems worldwide. Countless teachers and astronomy education groups run the software on flat screens. This wide use makes Nightshade an effective tool for dissemination to educators and the public.Nightshade NG is an especially powerful visualization tool when projected on a dome. We invite everyone to enter our inflatable dome in the exhibit hall to see this software in a 3D environment.

  11. Dynamic rendering of the heterogeneous cell response to anticancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Falcetta, Francesca; Lupi, Monica; Colombo, Valentina; Ubezio, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The antiproliferative response to anticancer treatment is the result of concurrent responses in all cell cycle phases, extending over several cell generations, whose complexity is not captured by current methods. In the proposed experimental/computational approach, the contemporary use of time-lapse live cell microscopy and flow cytometric data supported the computer rendering of the proliferative process through the cell cycle and subsequent generations during/after treatment. The effects of treatments were modelled with modules describing the functional activity of the main pathways causing arrest, repair and cell death in each phase. A framework modelling environment was created, enabling us to apply different types of modules in each phase and test models at the complexity level justified by the available data. We challenged the method with time-course measures taken in parallel with flow cytometry and time-lapse live cell microscopy in X-ray-treated human ovarian cancer cells, spanning a wide range of doses. The most suitable model of the treatment, including the dose-response of each effect, was progressively built, combining modules with a rational strategy and fitting simultaneously all data of different doses and platforms. The final model gave for the first time the complete rendering in silico of the cycling process following X-ray exposure, providing separate and quantitative measures of the dose-dependence of G1, S and G2M checkpoint activities in subsequent generations, reconciling known effects of ionizing radiations and new insights in a unique scenario. PMID:24146610

  12. Inverse rendering of Lambertian surfaces using subspace methods.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Q; Do, Minh N

    2014-12-01

    We propose a vector space approach for inverse rendering of a Lambertian convex object with distant light sources. In this problem, the texture of the object and arbitrary lightings are both to be recovered from multiple images of the object and its 3D model. Our work is motivated by the observation that all possible images of a Lambertian object lie around a low-dimensional linear subspace spanned by the first few spherical harmonics. The inverse rendering can therefore be formulated as a matrix factorization, in which the basis of the subspace is encoded in a spherical harmonic matrix S associated with the object’s geometry. A necessary and sufficient condition on S for unique factorization is derived with an introduction to a new notion of matrix rank called nonseparable full rank. A singular value decomposition-based algorithm for exact factorization in the noiseless case is introduced. In the presence of noise, two algorithms, namely, alternating and optimization based are proposed to deal with two different types of noise. A random sample consensus-based algorithm is introduced to reduce the size of the optimization problem, which is equal to the number of pixels in each image. Implementations of the proposed algorithms are done on a real data set. PMID:25373083

  13. Tomographic image reconstruction and rendering with texture-mapping hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Stephen G.; Cabral, Brian K.; Foran, Jim

    1994-07-01

    The image reconstruction problem, also known as the inverse Radon transform, for x-ray computed tomography (CT) is found in numerous applications in medicine and industry. The most common algorithm used in these cases is filtered backprojection (FBP), which, while a simple procedure, is time-consuming for large images on any type of computational engine. Specially designed, dedicated parallel processors are commonly used in medical CT scanners, whose results are then passed to a graphics workstation for rendering and analysis. However, a fast direct FBP algorithm can be implemented on modern texture-mapping hardware in current high-end workstation platforms. This is done by casting the FBP algorithm as an image warping operation with summing. Texture- mapping hardware, such as that on the silicon Graphics Reality Engine, shows around 600 times speedup of backprojection over a CPU-based implementation (a 100 Mhz R4400 in our case). This technique has the further advantages of flexibility and rapid programming. In addition, the same hardware can be used for both image reconstruction and for volumetric rendering. Our technique can also be used to accelerate iterative reconstruction algorithms. The hardware architecture also allows more complex operations than straight-ray backprojection if they are required, including fan-beam, cone-beam, and curved ray paths, with little or no speed penalties.

  14. 9. Copy of early 20th century rendering of bird's eye ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Copy of early 20th century rendering of bird's eye view of plant looking north. Rendering owned by the Weatherhead Company. - Cleveland-Chandler Motors Corporation, 300 East 131st Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 3. Copy of early 20th century lithograph, aerial rendering, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Copy of early 20th century lithograph, aerial rendering, looking south. Rendering owned by Baker Materials Handling Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio. - Rauch & Lang Carriage Company, West Twenty-fifth Street & Monroe Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. Colors, colored overlays, and reading skills

    PubMed Central

    Uccula, Arcangelo; Enna, Mauro; Mulatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the role of colors in reading written texts. It has been argued that colored overlays applied above written texts positively influence both reading fluency and reading speed. These effects would be particularly evident for those individuals affected by the so called Meares-Irlen syndrome, i.e., who experience eyestrain and/or visual distortions – e.g., color, shape, or movement illusions – while reading. This condition would interest the 12–14% of the general population and up to the 46% of the dyslexic population. Thus, colored overlays have been largely employed as a remedy for some aspects of the difficulties in reading experienced by dyslexic individuals, as fluency and speed. Despite the wide use of colored overlays, how they exert their effects has not been made clear yet. Also, according to some researchers, the results supporting the efficacy of colored overlays as a tool for helping readers are at least controversial. Furthermore, the very nature of the Meares-Irlen syndrome has been questioned. Here we provide a concise, critical review of the literature. PMID:25120525

  17. Interactive bibliographical database on color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caivano, Jose L.

    2002-06-01

    The paper describes the methodology and results of a project under development, aimed at the elaboration of an interactive bibliographical database on color in all fields of application: philosophy, psychology, semiotics, education, anthropology, physical and natural sciences, biology, medicine, technology, industry, architecture and design, arts, linguistics, geography, history. The project is initially based upon an already developed bibliography, published in different journals, updated in various opportunities, and now available at the Internet, with more than 2,000 entries. The interactive database will amplify that bibliography, incorporating hyperlinks and contents (indexes, abstracts, keywords, introductions, or eventually the complete document), and devising mechanisms for information retrieval. The sources to be included are: books, doctoral dissertations, multimedia publications, reference works. The main arrangement will be chronological, but the design of the database will allow rearrangements or selections by different fields: subject, Decimal Classification System, author, language, country, publisher, etc. A further project is to develop another database, including color-specialized journals or newsletters, and articles on color published in international journals, arranged in this case by journal name and date of publication, but allowing also rearrangements or selections by author, subject and keywords.

  18. Color Reproduction with a Smartphone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoms, Lars-Jochen; Colicchia, Giuseppe; Girwidz, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    The world is full of colors. Most of the colors we see around us can be created on common digital displays simply by superposing light with three different wavelengths. However, no mixture of colors can produce a fully pure color identical to a spectral color. Using a smartphone, students can investigate the main features of primary color addition…

  19. Toward fast color-shaded images of CAD/CAM geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, P.; Wozny, M. J.

    1983-11-01

    It is pointed out that the growing demand for advanced three-dimensional (3-D) geometric modeling capabilities in mechanical CAD/CAM (Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Manufacturing) systems is related to the need to attack complex design problems more directly and automatically. The advantages are being recognized of having an effective human-computer interface for handling complex 3-D geometry with a color-shaded image capability, in addition to a highly interactive line-drawing capability. A description is given of a software processor for rendering high-quality, color-shaded 'snapshots' directly and rapidly from commercial 3-D CAD/CAM systems. Attention is given to the importance of color-shaded images, the software processor architecture, color and illumination attributes, geometry-defining data, display type associativities, viw definition, polygonal approximation, scan conversion, and the Raster 4K rendering algorithm, and Raster4K performance.

  20. Spatial Frequency Or Grey Level Pseudo-Color Coding Using Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courjon, D.; Bulabois, J.; Mered, C.

    1986-07-01

    Pseudo-color techniques involve the introduction of colors in a monochromatic image to increase the ability of the human viewer to analyze and memorize the information. Several quantities can be coded in pseudo-color, for example temperature gradient, index variations of transparent materials, spatial frequencies of periodic objects or densities.

  1. Tunable full-color emitting BaMg2Al6Si9O30:Eu2+, Tb3+, Mn2+ phosphors based on energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei; Hao, Zhendong; Zhang, Xia; Luo, Yongshi; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jiahua

    2011-08-15

    A series of single-phase full-color emitting BaMg(2)Al(6)Si(9)O(30):Eu(2+), Tb(3+), Mn(2+) phosphors has been synthesized by solid-state reaction. Energy transfer from Eu(2+) to Tb(3+) and Eu(2+) to Mn(2+) in BaMg(2)Al(6)Si(9)O(30) host matrix is studied by luminescence spectra and energy-transfer efficiency and lifetimes. The wavelength-tunable white light can be realized by coupling the emission bands centered at 450, 542, and 610 nm ascribed to the contribution from Eu(2+) and Tb(3+) and Mn(2+), respectively. By properly tuning the relative composition of Tb(3+)/Mn(2+), chromaticity coordinates of (0.31, 0.30), high color rendering index R(a) = 90, and correlated color temperature (CCT) = 5374 K can be achieved upon excitation of UV light. Thermal quenching properties reveal that BaMg(2)Al(6)Si(9)O(30): Eu(2+), Tb(3+), Mn(2+) exhibits excellent characteristics even better than that of YAG:Ce. Our results indicate our white BaMg(2)Al(6)Si(9)O(30):Eu(2+), Tb(3+), Mn(2+) can serve as a key material for phosphor-converted light-emitting diode and fluorescent lamps. PMID:21766885

  2. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  3. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  4. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  5. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  6. 9 CFR 314.5 - Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inedible rendered fats prepared at... PRODUCTS AT OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS § 314.5 Inedible rendered fats prepared at official establishments. Except as provided in § 325.11(b) of this subchapter, rendered animal fat derived from condemned or...

  7. 9 CFR 319.703 - Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. 319.703 Section 319.703 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... § 319.703 Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. “Rendered Animal Fat,” or any mixture of...

  8. 9 CFR 319.703 - Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. 319.703 Section 319.703 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... § 319.703 Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. “Rendered Animal Fat,” or any mixture of...

  9. 9 CFR 319.703 - Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. 319.703 Section 319.703 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... § 319.703 Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. “Rendered Animal Fat,” or any mixture of...

  10. The nature of colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Pos, Osvaldo

    2002-06-01

    Color is a visible aspect of objects and lights, and as such is an objective characteristic of our phenomenal world. Correspondingly also objects and lights are objective, although their subjectivity cannot be disregarded since they belong to our phenomenal world. The distinction between perception and sensation deals with colors seen either in complex displays or in isolation. Reality of colors is apparently challenged by virtual reality, while virtual reality is a good example of what colors are. It seems difficult to combine that aspect of reality colors have in our experience and the concept that colors represent something in the external environment: the distinction between stimulation and perceived object is crucial for understanding the relationships between phenomenal world and physical reality. A modern concept of isomorphism seems useful in interpreting the role of colors. The relationship between the psychological structure of colors and the physical stimulation is enlightened by the analysis of pseudocolors. The perceptual, subjective characteristics of colors go along with the subjectivity of scientific concepts. Colors, emotions, and concepts are all in some people's mind: none of them is independent of the subject mind. Nevertheless they can be communicated from person to person by an appropriate scientific terminology.

  11. Noise-based volume rendering for the visualization of multivariate volumetric data.

    PubMed

    Khlebnikov, Rostislav; Kainz, Bernhard; Steinberger, Markus; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of multivariate data is of great importance in many scientific disciplines. However, visualization of 3D spatially-fixed multivariate volumetric data is a very challenging task. In this paper we present a method that allows simultaneous real-time visualization of multivariate data. We redistribute the opacity within a voxel to improve the readability of the color defined by a regular transfer function, and to maintain the see-through capabilities of volume rendering. We use predictable procedural noise--random-phase Gabor noise--to generate a high-frequency redistribution pattern and construct an opacity mapping function, which allows to partition the available space among the displayed data attributes. This mapping function is appropriately filtered to avoid aliasing, while maintaining transparent regions. We show the usefulness of our approach on various data sets and with different example applications. Furthermore, we evaluate our method by comparing it to other visualization techniques in a controlled user study. Overall, the results of our study indicate that users are much more accurate in determining exact data values with our novel 3D volume visualization method. Significantly lower error rates for reading data values and high subjective ranking of our method imply that it has a high chance of being adopted for the purpose of visualization of multivariate 3D data. PMID:24051860

  12. A depth video processing algorithm for high encoding and rendering performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingsong; Chen, Fen; Sheng, Chengkai; Peng, Zongju; Jiang, Gangyi

    2014-11-01

    In free viewpoint video system, the color and the corresponding depth video are utilized to synthesize the virtual views by depth image based rendering (DIBR) technique. Hence, high quality of depth videos is a prerequisite for high quality of virtual views. However, depth variation, caused by scene variance and limited depth capturing technologies, may increase the encoding bitrate of depth videos and decrease the quality of virtual views. To tackle these problems, a depth preprocess method based on smoothing the texture and abrupt changes of depth videos is proposed to increase the accuracy of depth videos in this paper. Firstly, a bilateral filter is adopted to smooth the whole depth videos and protect the edge of depth videos at the same time. Secondly, abrupt variation is detected by a threshold calculated according to the camera parameter of each video sequence. Holes of virtual views occur when the depth values of left view change obviously from low to high in horizontal direction or the depth values of right view change obviously from high to low. So for the left view, depth value difference in left side gradually becomes smaller where it is greater than the thresholds. And then, in right side of right view is processed likewise. Experimental results show that the proposed method can averagely reduce the encoding bitrate by 25% while the quality of the synthesized virtual views can be improve by 0.39dB on average compared with using original depth videos. The subjective quality improvement is also achieved.

  13. Hand-tool-tissue interaction forces in neurosurgery for haptic rendering.

    PubMed

    Aggravi, Marco; De Momi, Elena; DiMeco, Francesco; Cardinale, Francesco; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Riva, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Haptics provides sensory stimuli that represent the interaction with a virtual or tele-manipulated object, and it is considered a valuable navigation and manipulation tool during tele-operated surgical procedures. Haptic feedback can be provided to the user via cutaneous information and kinesthetic feedback. Sensory subtraction removes the kinesthetic component of the haptic feedback, having only the cutaneous component provided to the user. Such a technique guarantees a stable haptic feedback loop, while it keeps the transparency of the tele-operation system high, which means that the system faithfully replicates and render back the user's directives. This work focuses on checking whether the interaction forces during a bench model neurosurgery operation can lie in the solely cutaneous perception of the human finger pads. If this assumption is found true, it would be possible to exploit sensory subtraction techniques for providing surgeons with feedback from neurosurgery. We measured the forces exerted to surgical tools by three neurosurgeons performing typical actions on a brain phantom, using contact force sensors, while the forces exerted by the tools to the phantom tissue were recorded using a load cell placed under the brain phantom box. The measured surgeon-tool contact forces were 0.01-3.49 N for the thumb and 0.01-6.6 N for index and middle finger, whereas the measured tool-tissue interaction forces were from six to 11 times smaller than the contact forces, i.e., 0.01-0.59 N. The measurements for the contact forces fit the range of the cutaneous sensitivity for the human finger pad; thus, we can say that, in a tele-operated robotic neurosurgery scenario, it would possible to render forces at the fingertip level by conveying haptic cues solely through the cutaneous channel of the surgeon's finger pads. This approach would allow high transparency and high stability of the haptic feedback loop in a tele-operation system. PMID:26718558

  14. Colored Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Klein, S.

    1996-03-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences.

  15. Color scene analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes a color scene analysis method for the object surfaces appearing in the noisy and imperfect images of natural scenes. It is developed based on the spatial and spectral grouping property of the human visual system. The uniformly colored surfaces are recognized by their monomodal 3-D color distributions and extracted in the spatial domain using the lightness and chromaticity network of the Munsell system. The textured image regions are identified by their irregular histogram distributions and isolated in the image plane using the Julesz connectivity detection rules. The method is applied to various color images corrupted by noise and degraded heavily by under-sampling and low color-contrast imperfections. The method was able to detect all the uniformly colored and heavily textured object areas in these images.

  16. Digital color representation

    DOEpatents

    White, James M.; Faber, Vance; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1992-01-01

    An image population having a large number of attributes is processed to form a display population with a predetermined smaller number of attributes which represent the larger number of attributes. In a particular application, the color values in an image are compressed for storage in a discrete lookup table (LUT) where an 8-bit data signal is enabled to form a display of 24-bit color values. The LUT is formed in a sampling and averaging process from the image color values with no requirement to define discrete Voronoi regions for color compression. Image color values are assigned 8-bit pointers to their closest LUT value whereby data processing requires only the 8-bit pointer value to provide 24-bit color values from the LUT.

  17. Color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Kimberley A.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1994-03-01

    The most difficult stage of automated target recognition is segmentation. Current segmentation problems include faces and tactical targets; previous efforts to segment these objects have used intensity and motion cues. This paper develops a color preprocessing scheme to be used with the other segmentation techniques. A neural network is trained to identify the color of a desired object, eliminating all but that color from the scene. Gabor correlations and 2D wavelet transformations will be performed on stationary images; and 3D wavelet transforms on multispectral data will incorporate color and motion detection into the machine visual system. The paper will demonstrate that color and motion cues can enhance a computer segmentation system. Results from segmenting faces both from the AFIT data base and from video taped television are presented; results from tactical targets such as tanks and airplanes are also given. Color preprocessing is shown to greatly improve the segmentation in most cases.

  18. Colored diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M V; Klein, S

    1996-01-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:11607642

  19. Predictive rendering of composite materials: a multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T.; Callet, P.; da Graça, F.; Paljic, A.; Porral, P.; Hoarau, R.

    2015-03-01

    Predictive rendering of material appearance means going deep into the understanding of the physical interaction between light and matter and how these interactions are perceived by the human brain. In this paper we describe our approach to predict the appearance of composite materials by relying on the multi-scale nature of the involved phenomena. Using recent works on physical modeling of complex materials, we show how to predict the aspect of a composite material based on its composition and its morphology. Specifically, we focus on the materials whose morphological structures are defined at several embedded scales. We rely on the assumption that when the inclusions in a composite material are smaller than the considered wavelength, the optical constants of the corresponding effective media can be computed by a homogenization process (or analytically for special cases) to be used into the Fresnel formulas.

  20. An artist's rendering of the planned RLV Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be located at the tow-way adjacent to the SLF, the complex will include a multi-purpose RLV hangar and adjacent facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle, the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator, the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34, and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000.

  1. Artist rendering of dust grains colliding at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Clues to the formation of planets and planetary rings -- like Saturn's dazzling ring system -- may be found by studying how dust grains interact as they collide at low speeds. To study the question of low-speed dust collisions, NASA sponsored the COLLisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) at the University of Colorado. It was designed to spring-launch marble-size projectiles into trays of powder similar to space or lunar dust. COLLIDE-1 (1998) discovered that collisions below a certain energy threshold eject no material. COLLIDE-2 was designed to identify where the threshold is. In COLLIDE-2, scientists nudged small projectiles into dust beds and recorded how the dust splashed outward (video frame at top; artist's rendering at bottom). The slowest impactor ejected no material and stuck in the target. The faster impactors produced ejecta; some rebounded while others stuck in the target.

  2. Latency in Distributed Acquisition and Rendering for Telepresence Systems.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Stephan; Willert, Malte; Staadt, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Telepresence systems use 3D techniques to create a more natural human-centered communication over long distances. This work concentrates on the analysis of latency in telepresence systems where acquisition and rendering are distributed. Keeping latency low is important to immerse users in the virtual environment. To better understand latency problems and to identify the source of such latency, we focus on the decomposition of system latency into sub-latencies. We contribute a model of latency and show how it can be used to estimate latencies in a complex telepresence dataflow network. To compare the estimates with real latencies in our prototype, we modify two common latency measurement methods. This presented methodology enables the developer to optimize the design, find implementation issues and gain deeper knowledge about specific sources of latency. PMID:26529463

  3. Volume rendering: application in static field conformal radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, J. Daniel; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    1992-09-01

    Lesions in the head which are large or irregularly shaped present challenges for radiosurgical treatment by linear accelerator or other radiosurgery modalities. To treat these lesions we are developing static field, conformal stereotactic radiosurgery. In this procedure seven to eleven megavoltage x-ray beams are aimed at the target volume. Each beam is designed from the beam's-eye view, and has its own unique geometry: gantry angle, table angle, and shape which conforms to the projected cross-section of the target. A difficulty with this and other 3- D treatment plans is the visualization of the treatment geometry and proposed treatment plan. Is the target volume geometrically covered by the arrangement of beams, and is the dose distribution adequate? To answer these questions we have been investigating the use of ANALYZETM volume rendering to display the target anatomy and the resultant dose distribution.

  4. Thermal behavior of a quantum dot nanocomposite as a color converting material and its application to white LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Kim, Kyung Nam; Jeong, Sohee; Han, Chang-Soo

    2010-12-01

    We present a novel nanocomposite, a mixture of a CdSe/CdS/ZnS red quantum dot (QD), an Sr2SiO4:Eu green phosphor and silicone resin for a color converting material. The temperature rise and the optical characteristics of the nanocomposite due to the addition of the QD have been investigated in terms of QD content ratio and the mixing components. The experimental results suggested that a small addition of QDs generated a large amount of heat during light conversion at the wavelength of QD emission. Considering the temperature rise in a nanocomposite, we applied 0.2 wt% QDs on an InGaN blue LED chip. As a result, we could achieve a white LED device with a high color rendering index of 83.2, a high luminance of 65.86 lm W - 1 and a moderate temperature increase of 94 °C. The white LED converted by the newly developed QD-phosphor nanocomposite has great potential in future illumination.

  5. Thermal behavior of a quantum dot nanocomposite as a color converting material and its application to white LED.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Kim, Kyung Nam; Jeong, Sohee; Han, Chang-Soo

    2010-12-10

    We present a novel nanocomposite, a mixture of a CdSe/CdS/ZnS red quantum dot (QD), an Sr(2)SiO(4):Eu green phosphor and silicone resin for a color converting material. The temperature rise and the optical characteristics of the nanocomposite due to the addition of the QD have been investigated in terms of QD content ratio and the mixing components. The experimental results suggested that a small addition of QDs generated a large amount of heat during light conversion at the wavelength of QD emission. Considering the temperature rise in a nanocomposite, we applied 0.2 wt% QDs on an InGaN blue LED chip. As a result, we could achieve a white LED device with a high color rendering index of 83.2, a high luminance of 65.86 lm W(-1) and a moderate temperature increase of 94 °C. The white LED converted by the newly developed QD-phosphor nanocomposite has great potential in future illumination. PMID:21079287

  6. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  7. Volumetric Rendering of Geophysical Data on Adaptive Wavelet Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezolainen, A.; Erlebacher, G.; Vasilyev, O.; Yuen, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical modeling of geological phenomena frequently involves processes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In the last several years, transport phenomena governed by the Navier-Stokes equations have been simulated in wavelet space using second generation wavelets [1], and most recently on fully adaptive meshes. Our objective is to visualize this time-dependent data using volume rendering while capitalizing on the available sparse data representation. We present a technique for volumetric ray casting of multi-scale datasets in wavelet space. Rather of working with the wavelets at the finest possible resolution, we perform a partial inverse wavelet transform as a preprocessing step to obtain scaling functions on a uniform grid at a user-prescribed resolution. As a result, a function in physical space is represented by a superposition of scaling functions on a coarse regular grid and wavelets on an adaptive mesh. An efficient and accurate ray casting algorithm is based just on these scaling functions. Additional detail is added during the ray tracing by taking an appropriate number of wavelets into account based on support overlap with the interpolation point, wavelet amplitude, and other characteristics, such as opacity accumulation (front to back ordering) and deviation from frontal viewing direction. Strategies for hardware implementation will be presented if available, inspired by the work in [2]. We will pressent error measures as a function of the number of scaling and wavelet functions used for interpolation. Data from mantle convection will be used to illustrate the method. [1] Vasilyev, O.V. and Bowman, C., Second Generation Wavelet Collocation Method for the Solution of Partial Differential Equations. J. Comp. Phys., 165, pp. 660-693, 2000. [2] Guthe, S., Wand, M., Gonser, J., and Straßer, W. Interactive rendering of large volume data sets. In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization '02 (Boston, Massachusetts, October 27 - November

  8. Discrete Modal Decomposition for surface appearance modelling and rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitard, Gilles; Le Goïc, Gaëtan; Favrelière, Hugues; Samper, Serge; Desage, Simon-Frédéric; Pillet, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Controlling surface appearance has become essential in the supplier/customer relationship. In this context, many industries have implemented new methods to improve the sensory inspection, particularly in terms of variability. A trend is to develop both hardware and methods for moving towards the automation of appearance inspection and analysis. If devices inspired from dimensional control solutions generally allow to identify defects far apart the expected quality of products, it do not allow to quantify finely appearance anomalies, and decide on their acceptance. To address this issue, new methods devoted to appearance modelling and rendering have been implemented, such as the Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) technique. By varying the illumination positions, the RTI technique aims at enriching the classical information conveyed by images. Thus each pixel is described by a set of values rather than one value classically; each value corresponding to a specific illumination position. This set of values could be interpolated or approximated by a continuous model (function), associated to the reflectance of the pixel, generally based on a second order polynomial (namely, Polynomial Texture Mapping Technique). This paper presents a new approach to evaluate this information from RTI acquisitions. A modal projection based on dynamics (Discrete Modal Decomposition) is used to estimate surface reflectance on each measurement point. After presenting the acquisition device, an application on an industrial surface is proposed in order to validate the approach, and compare it to the more classical polynomial transformation. Results show that the proposed projection basis not only provides closer assessment of surface reflectance (modelling) but also yields to a more realistic rendering.

  9. Technologies Render Views of Earth for Virtual Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    On a December night in 1995, 159 passengers and crewmembers died when American Airlines Flight 965 flew into the side of a mountain while in route to Cali, Colombia. A key factor in the tragedy: The pilots had lost situational awareness in the dark, unfamiliar terrain. They had no idea the plane was approaching a mountain until the ground proximity warning system sounded an alarm only seconds before impact. The accident was of the kind most common at the time CFIT, or controlled flight into terrain says Trey Arthur, research aerospace engineer in the Crew Systems and Aviation Operations Branch at NASA s Langley Research Center. In situations such as bad weather, fog, or nighttime flights, pilots would rely on airspeed, altitude, and other readings to get an accurate sense of location. Miscalculations and rapidly changing conditions could contribute to a fully functioning, in-control airplane flying into the ground. To improve aviation safety by enhancing pilots situational awareness even in poor visibility, NASA began exploring the possibilities of synthetic vision creating a graphical display of the outside terrain on a screen inside the cockpit. How do you display a mountain in the cockpit? You have to have a graphics-powered computer, a terrain database you can render, and an accurate navigation solution, says Arthur. In the mid-1990s, developing GPS technology offered a means for determining an aircraft s position in space with high accuracy, Arthur explains. As the necessary technologies to enable synthetic vision emerged, NASA turned to an industry partner to develop the terrain graphical engine and database for creating the virtual rendering of the outside environment.

  10. Integration of CuInS2-based nanocrystals for high efficiency and high colour rendering white light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bingkun; Zhong, Haizheng; Wang, Meixu; Liu, Ruibin; Zou, Bingsuo

    2013-03-01

    Here we explored the possibility of using CuInS2-based nanocrystals as colour converting materials for light-emitting applications. Using a mixture of red and green emissive CuInS2-based nanocrystals, we successfully fabricated high colour rendering white light-emitting diodes with surface mounted devices and high-power types. The devices exhibit improved luminous efficiency, high colour rendering index and tunable colour temperature. In particular, the low-power surface mounted devices have a luminous efficiency of ~70 lm W-1, CRI of ~95 and tunable colour temperature of 4600-5600 K, which makes the CuInS2-based nanocrystals promising candidates for commercial applications.Here we explored the possibility of using CuInS2-based nanocrystals as colour converting materials for light-emitting applications. Using a mixture of red and green emissive CuInS2-based nanocrystals, we successfully fabricated high colour rendering white light-emitting diodes with surface mounted devices and high-power types. The devices exhibit improved luminous efficiency, high colour rendering index and tunable colour temperature. In particular, the low-power surface mounted devices have a luminous efficiency of ~70 lm W-1, CRI of ~95 and tunable colour temperature of 4600-5600 K, which makes the CuInS2-based nanocrystals promising candidates for commercial applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33613a

  11. Fingers that change color

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions can cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small blood vessels. Cryoglobulinemia Frostbite Necrotizing vasculitis Peripheral artery disease ...

  12. The Colors of 'Endurance'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image shows visible mineral changes between the materials that make up the rim of the impact crater known as 'Endurance.' The image was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity using all 13 color filters. The cyan blue color denotes basalts, whereas the dark green color denotes a mixture of iron oxide and basaltic materials. Reds and yellows indicate dusty material containing sulfates. Scientists are very interested in exploring the interior and exterior material around the crater's rim for clues to the processes that formed the crater, as well as the rocks and textures that define the crater.

  13. Crater Floor in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on November 18, 2003 during the Southern Summer season in Terra Cimmeria.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -23.7, Longitude 135.6 East (224.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  14. Color mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Steven J.

    1992-05-01

    In black-and-white printing the page image can be represented within a computer as an array of binary values indicating whether or not pixels should be inked. The Boolean operators of AND, OR, and EXCLUSIVE-OR are often used when adding new objects to the image array. For color printing the page may be represented as an array of continuous tone color values, and the generalization of these logic functions to gray-scale or full-color images is, in general, not defined or understood. When incrementally composing a page image new colors can replace old in an image buffer, or new colors and old can be combined according to some mixing function to form a composite color which is stored. This paper examines the properties of the Boolean operations and suggests full-color mixing functions which preserve the desired properties. These functions can be used to combine colored images, giving various transparency effects. The relationships between the mixing functions and physical models of color mixing are also discussed.

  15. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  16. Visual color image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guoping; Schaefer, Gerald

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a color image processing method by combining modern signal processing technique with knowledge about the properties of the human color vision system. Color signals are processed differently according to their visual importance. The emphasis of the technique is on the preservation of total visual quality of the image and simultaneously taking into account computational efficiency. A specific color image enhancement technique, termed Hybrid Vector Median Filtering is presented. Computer simulations have been performed to demonstrate that the new approach is technically sound and results are comparable to or better than traditional methods.

  17. Evaluating Light Source Color Rendition using the IES TM-30-15 Method

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, Kevin W.; Royer, Michael P.; David, Aurelien

    2015-11-30

    A system for evaluating the color rendition of light sources was recently published as IES TM-30-15 IES Method for Evaluating Light Source Color Rendition. The system includes a fidelity index (Rf) to quantify similarity to a reference illuminant, a relative-gamut index (Rg) to quantify saturation relative to a reference illuminant, and a color vector icon that visually presents information about color rendition. The calculation employs CAM02-UCS and uses a newly-developed set of reflectance functions, comprising 99 color evaluation samples (CES). The CES were down-selected from 105,000 real object samples and are uniformly distributed in color space (fairly representing different colors) and wavelength space (avoiding artificial increase of color rendition values by selective optimization).

  18. A Parallel Pipelined Renderer for the Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiueh, Tzi-Cker; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a strategy for efficiently rendering time-varying volume data sets on a distributed-memory parallel computer. Time-varying volume data take large storage space and visualizing them requires reading large files continuously or periodically throughout the course of the visualization process. Instead of using all the processors to collectively render one volume at a time, a pipelined rendering process is formed by partitioning processors into groups to render multiple volumes concurrently. In this way, the overall rendering time may be greatly reduced because the pipelined rendering tasks are overlapped with the I/O required to load each volume into a group of processors; moreover, parallelization overhead may be reduced as a result of partitioning the processors. We modify an existing parallel volume renderer to exploit various levels of rendering parallelism and to study how the partitioning of processors may lead to optimal rendering performance. Two factors which are important to the overall execution time are re-source utilization efficiency and pipeline startup latency. The optimal partitioning configuration is the one that balances these two factors. Tests on Intel Paragon computers show that in general optimal partitionings do exist for a given rendering task and result in 40-50% saving in overall rendering time.

  19. Color reproduction with a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Lars-Jochen; Colicchia, Giuseppe; Girwidz, Raimund

    2013-10-01

    The world is full of colors. Most of the colors we see around us can be created on common digital displays simply by superposing light with three different wavelengths. However, no mixture of colors can produce a fully pure color identical to a spectral color. Using a smartphone, students can investigate the main features of primary color addition and understand how colors are made on digital displays.

  20. Polar Cap Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on June 6, 2003 during the Southern Spring season near the South Polar Cap Edge.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -77.8, Longitude 195 East (165 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA