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  1. Linking patient outcome to high throughput protein expression data identifies novel regulators of colorectal adenocarcinoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    French, Christi L.; Ye, Fei; Revetta, Frank; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J.; Washington, M. Kay; Deane, Natasha G.; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2015-01-01

    A key question in cancer systems biology is how to use molecular data to predict the biological behavior of tumors from individual patients. While genomics data have been heavily used, protein signaling data are more directly connected to biological phenotype and might predict cancer phenotypes such as invasion, metastasis, and patient survival. In this study, we mined publicly available data for colorectal adenocarcinoma from the Cancer Genome Atlas and identified protein expression and signaling changes that are statistically associated with patient outcome. Our analysis identified a number of known and potentially new regulators of colorectal cancer. High levels of insulin growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) were associated with both recurrence and death, and this was validated by immunohistochemical staining of a tissue microarray for a secondary patient dataset. Interestingly, GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) was the protein most frequently associated with death in our analysis, and GATA3 expression was significantly decreased in tumor samples from stage I-II deceased patients. Experimental studies using engineered colon cancer cell lines show that exogenous expression of GATA3 decreases three-dimensional colony growth and invasiveness of colon cancer cells but does not affect two-dimensional proliferation. These findings suggest that protein data are useful for biomarker discovery and identify GATA3 as a regulator of colorectal cancer  aggressiveness. PMID:26097693

  2. Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Metastasis to the Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Kurren S.; Frattali, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    This case presentation examines a rare clinical entity: colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) metastasis to the tongue. CRC is among the least common tumors to metastasize to the oral cavity. Objectives for this case report are to (1) maintain a high index of suspicion for oral cavity tumors representing metastatic disease, (2) consider appropriate surgical and adjunctive interventions, and (3) recognize the significance of identifying the primary tumor via immunohistochemical staining. We present a case of a 57-year-old male with a history of stage IV rectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the lung who presented to our clinic with a painful mass of the right lateral tongue that he noticed one month before. MRI of the neck revealed a mass involving the anterior two-thirds of the right tongue with irregular margins and an ipsilateral enlarged right jugulodigastric lymph node. The patient underwent right partial glossectomy with primary reconstruction and right modified radical neck dissection. Pathology confirmed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma consistent with a colorectal primary with lymphovascular and perineural invasion. The tumor was staged as T2N1, and the patient was referred for chemoradiation. In this report, we discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this uncommon disease, with a thorough review of the world literature. PMID:26759728

  3. Identification of differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Zhang, Yi-Zeng; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Wang, Gang; Yi, Zeng-Ni

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: The integrated approach for gene expression profiling that couples suppression subtractive hybridization, high-throughput cDNA array, sequencing, bioinformatics analysis, and reverse transcriptase real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out. A set of cDNA clones including 1260 SSH inserts amplified by PCR was arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with florescent-labeled probes prepared from RNA of human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HCRAC) and normal colorectal tissues. RESULTS: A total of 86 genes were identified, 16 unknown genes and 70 known genes. The transcription factor Sox9 influencing cell differentiation was downregulated. At the same time, Heat shock protein 10 KDis downregulated and Calmoulin is up-regulated. CONCLUSION: Downregulation of heat shock protein 10 KD lost its inhibition of Ras, and then attenuated the Ras GTPase signaling pathway, increased cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis. Down-regulated transcription factor So x 9 influences cell differentiation and cell-specific gene expression. Down-regulated So x 9 also decreases its binding to calmodulin, accumulates calmodulin as receptor-activated kinase and phosphorylase kinase due to the activation of PhK. PMID:16534841

  4. Micronucleus analysis in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma and colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Ali; Binici, Doğan Nasır; Kabalar, Mehmet Eşref; Çalıkuşu, Züleyha

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine, by counting micronucleus (MN) frequencies, whether chromosomal or DNA damage have an effect on the pathogenesis of early colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC). METHODS: We analyzed MN frequencies in 21 patients with CRC, 24 patients with colon polyps [10 neoplastic polyps (NP) and 14 non-neoplastic polyps (NNP)] and 20 normal controls. RESULTS: MN frequency was significantly increased in CRC patients and in NP patients compared with controls (3.72 ± 1.34, 3.58 ± 1.21 vs 1.97 ± 0.81, P < 0.001). However, there was no difference in the MN frequency between CRC patients and NP patients (P > 0.05). Similarly, there was no difference in the MN frequency between NNP patients (2.06 ± 0.85) and controls (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest increased chromosome/DNA instabilities may be associated with the pathogenesis of early CRC. PMID:19058310

  5. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms. PMID:8731834

  6. Prognostic Significance and Molecular Features of Colorectal Mucinous Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mo-Jin; Ping, Jie; Li, Yuan; Holmqvist, Annica; Adell, Gunnar; Arbman, Gunnar; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MC) is a special histology subtype of colorectal adenocarcinoma. The survival of MC is controversial and the prognostic biomarkers of MC remain unclear. To analyze prognostic significance and molecular features of colorectal MC. This study included 755,682 and 1001 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER, 1973–2011), and Linköping Cancer (LC, 1972–2009) databases. We investigated independently the clinicopathological characteristics, survival, and variety of molecular features from these 2 databases. MC was found in 9.3% and 9.8% patients in SEER and LC, respectively. MC was more frequently localized in the right colon compared with nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMC) in both SEER (57.7% vs 37.2%, P < 0.001) and LC (46.9% vs 27.7%, P < 0.001). Colorectal MC patients had significantly worse cancer-specific survival (CSS) than NMC patients (SEER, P < 0.001; LC, P = 0.026), prominently in stage III (SEER, P < 0.001; LC, P = 0.023). The multivariate survival analysis showed that MC was independently related to poor prognosis in rectal cancer patients (SEER, hazard ratios [HR], 1.076; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.057–1.096; P < 0.001). In LC, the integrated analysis of genetic and epigenetic features showed that that strong expression of PINCH (HR, 3.954; 95% CI, 1.493–10.47; P = 0.013) and weak expression of RAD50 (HR 0.348, 95% CI, 0.106–1.192; P = 0.026) were significantly associated with poor CSS of colorectal MC patients. In conclusion, the colorectal MC patients had significantly worse CSS than NMC patients, prominently in stage III. MC was an independent prognostic factor associated with worse survival in rectal cancer patients. The PINCH and RAD50 were prognostic biomarkers for colorectal MC patients. PMID:26705231

  7. Pair-wise comparison analysis of differential expression of mRNAs in early and advanced stage primary colorectal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tze Pheng; Roslani, April Camilla; Lian, Lay Hoong; Chai, Hwa Chia; Lee, Ping Chin; Hilmi, Ida; Goh, Khean Lee; Chua, Kek Heng

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the mRNA expression patterns of early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas of Malaysian patients. Design Comparative expression analysis. Setting and participants We performed a combination of annealing control primer (ACP)-based PCR and reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR for the identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with early and advanced stage primary colorectal tumours. We recruited four paired samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) of Dukes’ A and B for the preliminary differential expression study, and a total of 27 paired samples, ranging from CRC stages I to IV, for subsequent confirmatory test. The tumouric samples were obtained from the patients with CRC undergoing curative surgical resection without preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The recruited patients with CRC were newly diagnosed with CRC, and were not associated with any hereditary syndromes, previously diagnosed cancer or positive family history of CRC. The paired non-cancerous tissue specimens were excised from macroscopically normal colonic mucosa distally located from the colorectal tumours. Primary and secondary outcome measures The differential mRNA expression patterns of early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas compared with macroscopically normal colonic mucosa were characterised by ACP-based PCR and reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR. Results The RPL35, RPS23 and TIMP1 genes were found to be overexpressed in both early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas (p<0.05). However, the ARPC2 gene was significantly underexpressed in early colorectal adenocarcinomas, while the advanced stage primary colorectal tumours exhibited an additional overexpression of the C6orf173 gene (p<0.05). Conclusions We characterised two distinctive gene expression patterns to aid in the stratification of primary colorectal neoplasms among Malaysian patients with CRC. Further work can be done to

  8. Prognostic comparison between mucinous and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Seob; Huh, Jung Wook; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2015-04-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) is a histological subtype of colorectal cancer. The oncologic behavior of MAC differs from nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (non-MAC). Our aim in this study was to characterize patients with colorectal MAC through evaluation of a large, institutional-based cohort with long-term follow-up. A total of 6475 patients with stages I to III colorectal cancer who underwent radical surgery were enrolled from January 2000 to December 2010. Prognostic comparison between MAC (n = 274, 4.2%) and non-MAC was performed. The median follow-up period was 48.0 months. Patients with MAC were younger than those without MAC (P = 0.012) and had larger tumor size (P < 0.001), higher preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (P < 0.001), higher pathologic T stage (P < 0.001), more right-sided colon cancer (49.3%, P < 0.001), and more frequent high-frequency microsatellite instability (10.2%, P < 0.001). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 76.5% in the MAC group and 83.2% in the non-MAC group (P = 0.008), and 5-year overall survival was 81.4% versus 87.4%, respectively (P = 0.005). Mucinous histology (MAC vs non-MAC) in the entire cohort was not an independent prognostic factor of DFS but had a statistical tendency (P = 0.071). In subgroup analysis of colon cancer without rectal cancer, mucinous histology was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.026). MAC was found at more advanced stage, located mainly at the right side and was an independent factor of survival in colon cancer. Because of the unique biological behavior of MAC, patients with MAC require special consideration during follow-up. PMID:25881840

  9. Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma: Association with clinical stage

    PubMed Central

    LIM, SUNG-CHUL; HONG, RAN

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) in colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRA). Pdcd4 expression was observed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in colorectal adenocarcinoma, whereas Pdcd4 was expressed in the nucleus in normal colonic epithelial cells. Loss or weak expression of Pdcd4 was identified in 44 cases (40.7%) of cancer cells. Pdcd4 expression was associated with an increase in the nodal and clinical stage (p=0.022 and p=0.016, respectively). Nuclear staining was identified in 66 cases (61.15%), with no correlation with clinicopathological factors. Conversely, cytoplasmic staining for Pdcd4 was observed in 45 cases (41.7%), and increased according to nodal and clinical stage (p=0.011 and p=0.009, respectively), indicating that aberrant Pdcd4 expression leads to tumor progression. However, Pdcd4 expression was not correlated to disease-free survival time. This study demonstrated that during the tumorigenesis of CRA, loss of nuclear Pdcd4 expression occurs, and during tumor progression, aberrant cytoplasmic expression is present, suggesting a higher clinical stage. Although loss of Pdcd4 was not significantly correlated with survival time, as the prognosis of colorectal cancer varies depending on clinical stage including invasion depth, nodal status and metastatic status, cytoplasmic Pdcd4 expression may be a favorable prognostic marker in CRA. PMID:23049623

  10. Recognition of Intrabiliary Hepatic Metastases From Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Klimstra, David S.; Brown, Karen T.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Kurtz, Robert C.; Jarnagin, William R.; Fong, Yuman

    2000-01-01

    Intrinsic involvement of bile ducts, by metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma growing from within or invading the lumen of bile ducts, is not a well recognized pattern of tumor growth. Clinical, radiographic, operative, and histopathologic aspects of 15 patients with intrabiliary colorectal metastases were described. Fourteen patients were explored for possible hepatic resection. Two had jaundice, two radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect, 10 intraoperative evidence of intrabiliary tumor, and six microscopic evidence of intrabiliariy tumor. Eleven patients underwent hepatic resection. Five of the resected patients developed hepatic recurrence. Four patients were explored for possible repeat resection. One had jaundice, one radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect, all had intraoperative evidence of intrabiliary tumor, and three microscopic evidence of intrabiliary tumor. Three patients underwent repeat hepatic resection. All patients with preoperative jaundice and radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect were unresectable. Overall, actuarial five-year survival is 33% for those patients resected versus 0% for those not resected. Intraoperative recognition of intrabiliary tumor at exploration for hepatic resection was more common than clinical, radiographic, or histopathologic recognition. More diligent examination of resected liver tissue by the surgeon and pathologist may increase identification of bile duct involvement and aid in achieving adequate tumor clearance. PMID:10977117

  11. Primary Endometrial Yolk Sac Tumor With Endodermal-Intestinal Differentiation Masquerading as Metastatic Colorectal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damato, Stephen; Haldar, Krishnayan; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Yolk sac tumors (YSTs) with a somatic glandular pattern can be difficult to recognize histologically because they reproduce developing intestinal, hepatic, or lung tissue and can express markers such as CDX2 and TTF1. We report an unusual case of a primary endometrial YST showing florid endodermal-intestinal differentiation in a 63-yr-old woman with a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma. Histologically, the tumor exhibited a glandular and papillary architecture and showed widespread immunoreactivity for CDX2 and focal staining for CK20 and CEA, mimicking metastatic colorectal carcinoma on biopsy. The presence of subnuclear cytoplasmic clearing and positive staining for germ cell markers, however, pointed toward a diagnosis of primary endometrial YST, and this was supported by the radiologic and the subsequent pathologic finding of a primary endometrial-based lesion. YSTs in this age group usually arise in association with somatic tumors and in this case a small focus of coexistent endometrioid adenocarcinoma was identified within the uterus. Despite surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient showed disease progression with liver and lung metastases 6 mo postoperatively. PMID:26598980

  12. Prognostic impact of MGMT promoter methylation and MGMT and CD133 expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New biomarkers are needed for the prognosis of advanced colorectal cancer, which remains incurable by conventional treatments. O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation and protein expression have been related to colorectal cancer treatment failure and tumor progression. Moreover, the presence in these tumors of cancer stem cells, which are characterized by CD133 expression, has been associated with chemoresistance, radioresistance, metastasis, and local recurrence. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of CD133 and MGMT and their possible interaction in colorectal cancer patients. Methods MGMT and CD133 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 123 paraffin-embedded colorectal adenocarcinoma samples, obtaining the percentage staining and intensity. MGMT promoter methylation status was obtained by using bisulfite modification and methylation-specific PCR (MSP). These values were correlated with clinical data, including overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), tumor stage, and differentiation grade. Results Low MGMT expression intensity was significantly correlated with shorter OS and was a prognostic factor independently of treatment and histopathological variables. High percentage of CD133 expression was significantly correlated with shorter DFS but was not an independent factor. Patients with low-intensity MGMT expression and ≥50% CD133 expression had the poorest DFS and OS outcomes. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that MGMT expression may be an OS biomarker as useful as tumor stage or differentiation grade and that CD133 expression may be a predictive biomarker of DFS. Thus, MGMT and CD133 may both be useful for determining the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients and to identify those requiring more aggressive adjuvant therapies. Future studies will be necessary to determine its clinical utility. PMID:25015560

  13. Molecular characteristics of colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma; similarities with adenocarcinoma rather than neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Nobuyoshi; Ohishi, Yoshihiro; Hirahashi, Minako; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masao; Oki, Eiji; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2015-12-01

    To further clarify the molecular features of colorectal neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs), we immunohistochemically examined tumor samples from 25 NECs, including 9 small cell NECs (SCNECs) and 16 large cell NECs (LCNECs), 20 neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and 21 poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas (PDCs) for the expression of several biomarkers (p53, β-catenin, Bcl-2, Rb, p16, p21, cyclin D1, and cyclin E) and used sequencing analysis to identify gene alterations of TP53, APC, CTNNB1, KRAS, and BRAF. The frequencies of aberrant p53 expression (88%), β-catenin nuclear expression (48%), and high expression of cyclin E (84%) were significantly higher in NECs than in NETs (0%, 5%, and 5%, P < .01, respectively). The immunohistochemical results of NECs and PDCs were similar. TP53, APC, KRAS, and BRAF gene mutations were variously detected in NECs and PDCs but not in any NETs. The frequencies of decreased expression of Rb (56%) and high expression of p16 (56%) and Bcl-2 (64%) were significantly higher in NECs than in PDCs (5%, 19%, and 5%, P < .05, respectively) or NETs (10%, 5%, and 5%, P < .01, respectively). Such immunohistochemical characteristics of NECs were more evident in SCNECs than in large cell NECs (P < .01). In conclusion, the molecular features of colorectal NECs are similar to those of adenocarcinomas and not to those of NETs. Decreased expression of Rb and high expression of p16 and Bcl-2 are characteristics of NECs, suggesting that Rb-p16 pathway disruption may contribute to the promotion of proliferative activity in colorectal NECs. SCNECs may be a prototype of NECs. PMID:26434631

  14. Interlaboratory Variability in the Histologic Grading of Colorectal Adenocarcinomas in a Nationwide Cohort.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Chantal C H J; Sluijter, Caro E; von der Thüsen, Jan H; Grünberg, Katrien; van Oijen, Martijn G H; van Diest, Paul J; Jiwa, Mehdi; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Overbeek, Lucy I H; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-08-01

    Differentiation grade of colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) is a prognostic factor and important for therapy selection. In patients with stage II colon cancer, poor differentiation is an indication for adjuvant chemotherapy. The variability in daily practice in the grading of CRC was assessed in a nationwide cohort. Using the Dutch Pathology Registry (PALGA), all synoptically reported CRC resections from 2010 to 2013 were identified. Proportions of poorly differentiated (PD) adenocarcinomas were determined and compared between 35 laboratories by univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. In total, 11,719 resections of 11,681 patients were included, of which 1427 (12.2%) were PD (range between 35 laboratories: 5.0% to 33.2%). After adjustment for case mix, 4 (11%) laboratories still reported a significantly lower (n=2) or higher (n=2) proportion of PD adenocarcinoma compared with the reference laboratory. Seven of 8 investigated laboratories showed considerable intralaboratory variation between pathologists as well. In a subgroup of 2812 patients (2813 tumors) who could have been eligible for adjuvant chemotherapy solely on the basis of the differentiation grade (stage II colon cancer patients without other high-risk factors [ie, T4, <10 lymph nodes evaluated, perforation, ileus, or angioinvasion]), 258 (9.2%) were PD (range between laboratories: 0% to 22.7%). In this subgroup, 4 laboratories still diagnosed significantly more PD adenocarcinomas after multivariable logistic regression analysis, increasing the number of colon cancer patients eligible for adjuvant therapy. In conclusion, this large nationwide cohort demonstrates considerable interlaboratory and intralaboratory variation in differentiation grading of CRC. Better standardization of grading criteria is needed for optimal determination of prognosis and treatment selection. PMID:26975039

  15. Role of CDK8 and beta-catenin in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jong-Og; Han, Song Iy; Lim, Sung-Chul

    2010-07-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway plays an important role in colon cancers. However, relatively little is known about the regulatory mechanism of beta-catenin in colon cancers. CDK8 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) member of the mediator complex that couples transcriptional regulators to the basal transcriptional machinery, and is implicated in the transcriptional regulation of key pathways involved in colon cancers. To determine the relationship between CDK8 and beta-catenin expressions, a population-based study was conducted for immunohistochemical staining analysis of tumor tissues, and Western blot analysis and CDK8 interference studies of colon cancer cell lines. The hypothesis that colorectal cancers with CDK8 expression have distinct clinical, prognostic and molecular attributes was tested. Among 127 colorectal cancers, CDK8 expression was detected in 96 (76%) tumors by immunohistochemistry. CDK8 and beta-catenin expression had significant positive correlation with carcinogenesis, tumor progression and patient survival. Immunohistochemically, CDK8 expression in colorectal cancer was independently associated with beta-catenin activation (P=0.0002). However, beta-catenin expression was not completely suppressed by CDK8 interference in the colon cancer cell lines HCT-116, HT-29 and SNU-C5. These data support a potential link between CDK8 and beta-catenin, and suggest that CDK8 may identify a subset of colon cancer patients with a poor prognosis. However, control of CDK8 is not an effective therapeutic strategy through beta-catenin regulation of general colon cancer. PMID:20514474

  16. Analysis of colorectal adenocarcinoma tissue by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric imaging.

    PubMed

    Gerbig, Stefanie; Golf, Ottmar; Balog, Julia; Denes, Julia; Baranyai, Zsolt; Zarand, Attila; Raso, Erzsebet; Timar, Jozsef; Takats, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Negative ion desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was used for the analysis of an ex vivo tissue sample set comprising primary colorectal adenocarcinoma samples and colorectal adenocarcinoma liver metastasis samples. Frozen sections (12 μm thick) were analyzed by means of DESI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) with spatial resolution of 100 μm using a computer-controlled DESI imaging stage mounted on a high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. DESI-IMS data were found to predominantly feature complex lipids, including phosphatidyl-inositols, phophatidyl-ethanolamines, phosphatidyl-serines, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine plasmalogens, phosphatidic acids, phosphatidyl-glycerols, ceramides, sphingolipids, and sulfatides among others. Molecular constituents were identified based on their exact mass and MS/MS fragmentation spectra. An identified set of molecules was found to be in good agreement with previously reported DESI imaging data. Different histological tissue types were found to yield characteristic mass spectrometric data in each individual section. Histological features were identified by comparison to hematoxylin-eosin stained neighboring sections. Ions specific to certain histological tissue types (connective tissue, smooth muscle, healthy mucosa, healthy liver parenchyma, and adenocarcinoma) were identified by semi-automated screening of data. While each section featured a number of tissue-specific species, no potential global biomarker was found in the full sample set for any of the tissue types. As an alternative approach, data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) which resulted in efficient separation of data points based on their histological types. A pixel-by-pixel tissue identification method was developed, featuring the PCA/LDA analysis of authentic data set, and localization of unknowns in the resulting 60D, histologically assigned LDA space. Novel approach was found to yield results which are

  17. Synchronous colorectal adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumor in Meckel's diverticulum; an unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Christopher; Efthimiadis, Christopher; Levva, Sofia; Anthimidis, George; Baka, Sofia; Grigoriou, Marios; Tzeveleki, Ioanna; Masmanidou, Maria; Zaramboukas, Thomas; Basdanis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    Background Coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor with synchronous or metachronous colorectal cancer represents a phenomenon with increasing number of relative reports in the last 5 years. Synchronous occurence of GISTs with other gastrointestinal tumors of different histogenesis presents a special interest. We herein report a case of GIST in Meckel's diverticulum synchronous with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Case presentation A 69 year old man, presented with abdominal distension and anal bleeding on defecation. Colonoscopy revealed colorectal cancer and a low anterior resection was performed, during which a tumor in Meckel's diverticulum was discovered. Histologic examination revealed GIST in Meckel's diverticulum and a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma. Conclusion Whenever GIST is encountered, the surgeon should be alert to recognize a possible coexistent tumor with different histological origin. Correct diagnosis of synchronous tumors of different origin is the cornerstone of treatment. PMID:19309498

  18. Expression of hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met is characteristic of α-fetoprotein-producing colorectal adenocarcinoma: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; LIU, YUE; XU, JING-HONG; XU, ZHENG-PING; ZHENG, SHU; DING, KE-FENG

    2016-01-01

    α-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing colorectal adenocarcinoma is rare and typically not well recognized. In the present study, 3 cases of AFP-producing colorectal cancer are described. All 3 of these cases demonstrated increased levels of blood AFP associated with disease progression. Only case 2 exhibited classical histological hepatoid features. Following immunohistochemical tissue staining, all 3 cases were observed to be positive for AFP expression. In addition, the expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), c-Met receptor and the transcription factor c-Myc were identified to be associated with the expression of AFP. The 3 cases demonstrated resistance to multiple drugs, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, despite the presence of wild-type Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-RAS; codons 12 and 13), neuroblastoma-RAS (codons 12 and 13) and B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (V600E). We propose that hepatoid histological features or a positive AFP finding by immunohistochemistry are sufficient for a diagnosis of AFP-producing colorectal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, we speculates that autocrine HGF/c-Met activation may be capable of inducing the dedifferentiation of common adenocarcinoma cells, reverting them to a cancer stem cell state and producing AFP or hepatoid differentiation. Consequently, therapy targeted to the HGF/c-Met signaling pathway may potentially be effective for the treatment of AFP-producing colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26870275

  19. Case of metachronous bilateral isolated adrenal metastasis from colorectal adenocarcinoma and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Yi; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Zhai, Er-Tao; Yang, Jie; Xu, Jian-Bo; Cai, Shi-Rong; Song, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Rarely has a solitary, metachronous bilateral adrenal metastasis of colorectal cancer been reported. We depict a 41-year-old man who underwent sigmoid colon cancer radical surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy for a locally ulcerative sigmoid adenocarcinoma with metachronous bilateral adrenal metastasis revealed by a computed tomography scan. Histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma, compatible with metastasis from the rectal cancer. The level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen had indicative significance for the presence of adrenal metastasis in the reported series. We performed a literature analysis related to this pathological characteristic and attach importance to consistent, vigilant radiological surveillance of the adrenal glands in the patients’ follow up for colorectal cancer with or without subsequent adrenal metastasis. PMID:27076775

  20. Case of metachronous bilateral isolated adrenal metastasis from colorectal adenocarcinoma and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Yi; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Zhai, Er-Tao; Yang, Jie; Xu, Jian-Bo; Cai, Shi-Rong; Song, Wu

    2016-04-14

    Rarely has a solitary, metachronous bilateral adrenal metastasis of colorectal cancer been reported. We depict a 41-year-old man who underwent sigmoid colon cancer radical surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy for a locally ulcerative sigmoid adenocarcinoma with metachronous bilateral adrenal metastasis revealed by a computed tomography scan. Histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma, compatible with metastasis from the rectal cancer. The level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen had indicative significance for the presence of adrenal metastasis in the reported series. We performed a literature analysis related to this pathological characteristic and attach importance to consistent, vigilant radiological surveillance of the adrenal glands in the patients' follow up for colorectal cancer with or without subsequent adrenal metastasis. PMID:27076775

  1. TP53 status regulates ACSL5-induced expression of mitochondrial mortalin in enterocytes and colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Reinartz, Andrea; Schneider, Ursula; Plum, Patrick; Jeon, Min Kyung; Hose, Josephine; Hartmann, Franziska; Schnölzer, Martina; Wagner, Norbert; Kopitz, Jürgen; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2014-07-01

    Acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5), a mitochondrially localized enzyme, catalyzes the synthesis of long-chain fatty acid thioesters and is physiologically involved in pro-apoptotic sensing of enterocytes. The aim of the present study is to identify an ACSL5-dependent regulation of mitochondrially expressed proteins and the characterization of related pathways in normal and diseased human intestinal mucosa. Proteomics of isolated mitochondria from ACSL5 transfectants and CaCo2 controls were performed. ACSL5-dependent protein synthesis was verified with quantitative reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, short-interfering-RNA-mediated gene silencing and additional cell culture experiments. Lipid changes were analyzed with tandem mass spectrometry. ACSL5-related pathways were characterized in normal mucosa and sporadic adenocarcinomas of the human intestine. In CaCo2 cells transfected with ACSL5, mortalin (HSPA9) was about two-fold increased in mitochondria, whereas cytoplasmic mortalin levels were unchanged. Disturbance of acyl-CoA/sphingolipid metabolism, induced by ACSL5 over-expression, was characterized as crucial. ACSL5-related over-expression of mitochondrial mortalin was found in HEK293 and Lovo (wild-type TP53 [tumor protein p53]) and CaCo2 (p53-negative; TP53 mutated) cells but not in Colo320DM cells (mutated TP53). In normal human intestinal mucosa, an increasing gradient of both ACSL5 and mortalin from bottom to top was observed, whereas p53 (wild-type TP53) decreased. In sporadic intestinal adenocarcinomas with strong p53 immunostaining (mutated TP53), ACSL5-related mortalin expression was heterogeneous. ACSL5-induced mitochondrial mortalin expression is assumed to be a stress response to ACSL5-related changes in lipid metabolism and is regulated by the TP53 status. Uncoupling of ACSL5 and mitochondrial mortalin by mutated TP53 could be important in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:24770931

  2. Immunohistochemical Expression of Dual-Specificity Protein Phosphatase 4 in Patients with Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jongmin; Yi, Kijong; Kim, Hyunsung; Ahn, Hyein; Chung, Yumin; Rehman, Abdul; Jang, Se Min; Lee, Kang Hong; Jang, Kiseok; Paik, Seung Sam

    2015-01-01

    The role of dual-specificity protein phosphatase 4 (DUSP4) appears to vary with the type of malignant tumors and is still controversial. The purpose of our study was to clarify the exact role of DUSP4 expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma. We constructed tissue microarrays and investigated DUSP4 expression by immunohistochemistry. DUSP4 was more frequently expressed in adenocarcinomas and lymph node/distant metastases compared to that in normal colorectal tissues and tubular adenomas (P < 0.001). Mean DUSP4 expression score was significantly higher in malignant tumors than in benign lesions (P < 0.001). DUSP4 expression was significantly correlated with older age (P = 0.017), male gender (P = 0.036), larger tumor size (P = 0.014), nonmucinous tumor type (P = 0.023), and higher T stage (P = 0.040). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant effect of DUSP4 expression on both overall survival and disease-free survival in AJCC stage I (P = 0.008 and P = 0.003, resp., log-rank test) and male gender (P = 0.017 and P = 0.049, resp., log-rank test). DUSP4 protein is frequently upregulated in colorectal adenocarcinoma and may play an important role in carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may be a marker of adverse prognosis. PMID:25688264

  3. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component: relation of MMP-13, EGFR, and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal; Aziz, Azza Abdel

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, ordinary adenocarcinoma (OA) and mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA) regarding clinicopathological parameters, survival, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin. We studied tumor tissue specimens from 28 patients with adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, 47 with OA, and 56 with MA, who underwent radical surgery from January 2007 to January 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. High density manual tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry for EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin was done. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component (AWMC) was significantly associated with more perineural invasion, lower EGFR, and MMP-13 expressions than OA, with no difference in E-cadherin expression. Conversely, only microscopic abscess formation was significantly more with colorectal AWMC than MC with no difference in EGFR, MMP-13 and E-cadherin expression between both groups. Colorectal AWMC showed a better survival than MA with no difference with OA. In a univariate analysis, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin expressions did not show a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival in patients with colorectal AWMC. Colorectal AWMC remains a vague entity that resembles OA in some clinicopathological and molecular respects as well as MA. PMID:25907382

  4. Expression of Lewis antigenic determinants in colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Blasco, E; Torrado, J; Cosme, A; Alvarez, E; Zugasti, A; Gutierrez-Hoyos, A; Arenas, J I

    1989-01-01

    Expression of type 1 and type 2 chain Lewis antigens was studied in 32 rectal adenocarcinoma specimens; the results were correlated with the patients' Lewis phenotype and secretor status. In addition, the pattern of expression of these antigens was analyzed in adjacent and distant normal mucosa. We used an indirect immunofluorescence technique with p-phenylenediamine counterstaining (Oriol technique) and a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against the different antigenic specificities. Normal distal colonic mucosa only expresses monofucosylated structures (Lea and X) arising from activity of the alpha 1-3,4-fucosyltransferase coded by the Le gene. Rectal adenocarcinomas also show Lea and X, but also reexpress blood group antigens ABH and exhibit difucosylated determinants (Leb and Y). The accumulation of mono- and difucosylated type 2 chain in neoplastic processes, independently of the Le and Se genes, could be due to the enzymes coded by reactivation of the H and X genes. Blood group antigens form a complex signal code, genetically regulated, which intervenes in differentiation, growth and cellular recognition processes, and which may undergo important modifications during malignant transformation. These alterations could be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of some types of carcinoma. PMID:2476347

  5. Genetic ancestry is associated with colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas in Latino populations.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Sanabria, Maria Carolina; Serrano, Marta; Herran, Oscar F; Perez, Jesus; Plata, Jose L; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Tenesa, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer rates in Latin American countries are less than half of those observed in the United States. Latin Americans are the resultant of generations of an admixture of Native American, European, and African individuals. The potential role of genetic admixture in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been examined. We evaluate the association of genetic ancestry with colorectal neoplasms in 190 adenocarcinomas, 113 sporadic adenomas and 243 age- and sex-matched controls enrolled in a multicentric case-control study in Colombia. Individual ancestral genetic fractions were estimated using the STRUCTURE software, based on allele frequencies and assuming three distinct population origins. We used the Illumina Cancer Panel to genotype 1,421 sparse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and Northern and Western European ancestry, LWJ and Han Chinese in Beijing, China populations from the HapMap project as references. A total of 678 autosomal SNPs overlapped with the HapMap data set SNPs and were used for ancestry estimations. African mean ancestry fraction was higher in adenomas (0.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=0.11-0.15) and cancer cases (0.14, 95% CI=0.12-0.16) compared with controls (0.11, 95% CI=0.10-0.12). Conditional logistic regression analysis, controlling for known risk factors, showed a positive association of African ancestry per 10% increase with both colorectal adenoma (odds ratio (OR)=1.12, 95% CI=0.97-1.30) and adenocarcinoma (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.05-1.35). In conclusion, increased African ancestry (or variants linked to it) contributes to the increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer in admixed Latin American population. PMID:24518838

  6. A Gene Expression and Pre-mRNA Splicing Signature That Marks the Adenoma-Adenocarcinoma Progression in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pesson, Marine; Volant, Alain; Uguen, Arnaud; Trillet, Kilian; De La Grange, Pierre; Aubry, Marc; Daoulas, Mélanie; Robaszkiewicz, Michel; Le Gac, Gérald; Morel, Alain; Simon, Brigitte; Corcos, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that most colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise from colorectal adenomas (CRAs), but transcriptomic data characterizing the progression from colorectal normal mucosa to adenoma, and then to adenocarcinoma are scarce. These transition steps were investigated using microarrays, both at the level of gene expression and alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Many genes and exons were abnormally expressed in CRAs, even more than in CRCs, as compared to normal mucosae. Known biological pathways involved in CRC were altered in CRA, but several new enriched pathways were also recognized, such as the complement and coagulation cascades. We also identified four intersectional transcriptional signatures that could distinguish CRAs from normal mucosae or CRCs, including a signature of 40 genes differentially deregulated in both CRA and CRC samples. A majority of these genes had been described in different cancers, including FBLN1 or INHBA, but only a few in CRC. Several of these changes were also observed at the protein level. In addition, 20% of these genes (i.e. CFH, CRYAB, DPT, FBLN1, ITIH5, NR3C2, SLIT3 and TIMP1) showed altered pre-mRNA splicing in CRAs. As a global variation occurring since the CRA stage, and maintained in CRC, the expression and splicing changes of this 40-gene set may mark the risk of cancer occurrence from analysis of CRA biopsies. PMID:24516561

  7. A Case of von Hippel–Lindau Disease with Colorectal Adenocarcinoma, Renal Cell Carcinoma and Hemangioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su Jin; Lee, Choong-kun; Hahn, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Gyuri; Hur, Hyuk; Choi, Sung Hoon; Han, Kyung Seok; Cho, Arthur; Jung, Minkyu

    2016-01-01

    von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominant inherited tumor syndrome associated with mutations of the VHL tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 3p25. The loss of functional VHL protein contributes to tumorigenesis. This condition is characterized by development of benign and malignant tumors in the central nervous system (CNS) and the internal organs, including kidney, adrenal gland, and pancreas. We herein describe the case of a 74-year-old man carrying the VHL gene mutation who was affected by simultaneous colorectal adenocarcinoma, renal clear cell carcinoma, and hemangioblastomas of CNS. PMID:25715769

  8. Increased expression of S100A4, a metastasis-associated gene, in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, K; Nakanishi, H; Wada, K; Suzuki, M; Matsuzaki, O; Matsuura, A; Endo, H

    1997-12-01

    The S100A4 gene (also known as pEL98/mts1/p9Ka/18A2/42A/calvasculin /FSP1/CAPL) encoding an S100-related calcium-binding protein is implied to be involved in the invasion and metastasis of murine tumor cells. In the present study, the expression of S100A4 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines (SW837, LoVo, DLD-1, HT-29, SW480, SW620, WiDr, and Colo201) and surgically resected neoplastic tissues was examined to investigate whether S100A4 plays a role in the invasion and metastasis of human tumor cells. Northern blot analysis using total RNA isolated from the adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed that five of the eight cell lines expressed substantial amounts of S100A4 mRNA. Normal colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) expressed little of the RNA. Using surgically resected specimens, it seemed that the amount of S100A4 mRNA in adenomas was nearly equal to that in normal colonic mucosa, whereas adenocarcinomas expressed a significantly higher amount of the RNA than did the adjacent normal colonic mucosa. Immunohistochemical analysis using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded surgical specimens and monoclonal anti-S100A4 antibody demonstrated that none of 12 adenoma specimens were immunopositive, whereas 8 of 18 (44%) focal carcinomas in carcinoma in adenoma specimens and 50 of 53 (94%) adenocarcinoma specimens were immunopositive. Interestingly, the incidence of immunopositive cells increased according to the depth of invasion, and nearly all of the carcinoma cells in 14 metastases in the liver were positive. These results suggest that S100A4 may be involved in the progression and the metastatic process of human colorectal neoplastic cells. PMID:9815629

  9. p, p′-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene Induces Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cell Proliferation through Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Liu, Jianxin; Jin, Xiaoting; Li, Zhuoyu; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    p, p′-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), the major metabolite of Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), is an organochlorine pollutant and associated with cancer progression. The present study investigated the possible effects of p,p′-DDE on colorectal cancer and the involved molecular mechanism. The results indicated that exposure to low concentrations of p,p′-DDE from 10−10 to 10−7 M for 96 h markedly enhanced proliferations of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Moreover, p,p′-DDE exposure could activate Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1 signaling cascades, and the expression level of c-Myc and cyclin D1 was significantly increased. Consistently, p,p′-DDE-induced cell proliferation along with upregulated c-Myc and cyclin D1 were impeded by β-catenin siRNA or Gli1 siRNA. In addition, p,p′-DDE was able to activate NADPH oxidase, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduce GSH content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and calatase (CAT) activities. Treatment with antioxidants prevented p,p′-DDE-induced cell proliferation and signaling pathways of Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1. These results indicated that p,p′-DDE promoted colorectal cancer cell proliferation through Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1 signalings mediated by oxidative stress. The finding suggests an association between p,p′-DDE exposure and the risk of colorectal cancer progression. PMID:25386960

  10. p, p'-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene induces colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Liu, Jianxin; Jin, Xiaoting; Li, Zhuoyu; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    p, p'-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), the major metabolite of Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), is an organochlorine pollutant and associated with cancer progression. The present study investigated the possible effects of p,p'-DDE on colorectal cancer and the involved molecular mechanism. The results indicated that exposure to low concentrations of p,p'-DDE from 10(-10) to 10(-7) M for 96 h markedly enhanced proliferations of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Moreover, p,p'-DDE exposure could activate Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1 signaling cascades, and the expression level of c-Myc and cyclin D1 was significantly increased. Consistently, p,p'-DDE-induced cell proliferation along with upregulated c-Myc and cyclin D1 were impeded by β-catenin siRNA or Gli1 siRNA. In addition, p,p'-DDE was able to activate NADPH oxidase, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduce GSH content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and calatase (CAT) activities. Treatment with antioxidants prevented p,p'-DDE-induced cell proliferation and signaling pathways of Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1. These results indicated that p,p'-DDE promoted colorectal cancer cell proliferation through Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog/Gli1 signalings mediated by oxidative stress. The finding suggests an association between p,p'-DDE exposure and the risk of colorectal cancer progression. PMID:25386960

  11. Clinical significance of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) in colorectal serrated adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hailong; Qin, Huali; Huang, Ziling; Li, Shuai; Zhu, Xuyou; He, Jian; Yang, Jing; Yu, Xiaoting; Yi, Xianghua

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary research results with antibody of the negative costimulatory molecule programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) suggested its expression on tumor cells associated with various tumor grade and postoperative prognosis. However, to date, there is no information of PD-L1 expression in colorectal serrated adenocarcinoma (SAC) and its clinical relevance. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the clinical significance of PD-L1 expression in a large cohort of patients with SAC. Here, we first retrospectively identified all SAC collected at our institution between August 2008 and May 2013. The expression levels of PD-L1 were examined by immunohistochemistry in 120 patients with SAC. We further evaluated the correlation between expression data and clinical parameters, including patient age, sex, tumor size, location, grade, primary tumor classification (pT), lymph node metastasis (pN), distant metastases (pM), and vascular invasion. Strong PD-L1 expression was detected in 25% of SAC. Higher expression of PD-L1 was significantly associated with pN (P=0.003) and pM (P=0.014). Survival analysis showed that patients with higher expression of PD-L1 had a poorer prognosis (P=0.045). However, multivariate regression analysis did not support PD-L1 as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.430). Our data suggest that PD-L1 may represent a new biomarker of metastasis and prognosis for patients with SAC, but as a target in the treatment of SAC is less certain. PMID:26464688

  12. Muir-Torre Syndrome Presenting as Sebaceous Adenocarcinoma and Invasive MSH6-Positive Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tulpule, Sunil; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Osman, Mohamed; Zafar, Shoaib; Kanta, Romana; Shypula, Gregory; Islam, Mohammed A.; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a rare genodermatosis, diagnosed by the presence of sebaceous neoplasms along with an internal malignancy, most commonly colorectal carcinomas. MTS is most commonly caused by microsatellite instabilities of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 mismatch repair genes, and is rarely caused by mutations of the hMSH6 gene. We describe the case of a 56-year-old male who presented with an enlarging mass on his back as well as hematochezia. The back mass was excised, and pathology confirmed microsatellite instability in MSH2 and MSH6. Abdominal CT and colonoscopy confirmed the presence of synchronous masses in the cecum, ascending colon, and the transverse colon. He refused any further workup or treatment, only to return 8 months later complaining of hematochezia and discomfort due to an enlarging mass protruding from the rectum. After consenting to surgical intervention, he agreed to outpatient chemotherapy treatment. The presence of sebaceous neoplasms should raise suspicion for the possibility of an associated internal malignancy. PMID:26933426

  13. Muir-Torre Syndrome Presenting as Sebaceous Adenocarcinoma and Invasive MSH6-Positive Colorectal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tulpule, Sunil; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Osman, Mohamed; Zafar, Shoaib; Kanta, Romana; Shypula, Gregory; Islam, Mohammed A; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a rare genodermatosis, diagnosed by the presence of sebaceous neoplasms along with an internal malignancy, most commonly colorectal carcinomas. MTS is most commonly caused by microsatellite instabilities of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 mismatch repair genes, and is rarely caused by mutations of the hMSH6 gene. We describe the case of a 56-year-old male who presented with an enlarging mass on his back as well as hematochezia. The back mass was excised, and pathology confirmed microsatellite instability in MSH2 and MSH6. Abdominal CT and colonoscopy confirmed the presence of synchronous masses in the cecum, ascending colon, and the transverse colon. He refused any further workup or treatment, only to return 8 months later complaining of hematochezia and discomfort due to an enlarging mass protruding from the rectum. After consenting to surgical intervention, he agreed to outpatient chemotherapy treatment. The presence of sebaceous neoplasms should raise suspicion for the possibility of an associated internal malignancy. PMID:26933426

  14. Mucinous Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Influence of EGFR and E-Cadherin Expression on Clinicopathologic Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd AlRahman M; AbdelAziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira K; Hosni, Ali; Zalata, Khalid R; Gado, Asmaa I

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin expression in colorectal carcinoma and their prognostic significance. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate EGFR and E-cadherin expression, interrelation and relation to clinicopathologic, histologic parameters, and survival in rare colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA). In this study, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal MA and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tips technique, and immunohistochemistry for EGFR and E-cadherin was performed. All relations were analyzed using established statistical methodologies. NMA expressed EGFR and E-cadherin in significantly higher rates with significant heterogenous pattern than MA. EGFR and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in both NMA and MA groups. In the NMA group, high EGFR expression was associated with old age, male sex, multiplicity of tumors, lack of mucinous component, and association with schistosomiasis. However, in the MA group, high EGFR expression was associated only with old age and MA subtype rather than signet ring carcinoma subtype. Conversely, high E-cadherin expression in MA cases was associated with old age, fungating tumor configuration, MA subtype, and negative intratumoral lymphocytic response. However, in the NMA cases, none of these factors was statistically significant. In a univariate analysis, neither EGFR nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival. Targeted therapy against EGFR and E-cadherin may not be useful in patients with MA. Neither EGFR nor E-cadherin is an independent prognostic factor in NMA or MA. PMID:26262813

  15. Clinicopathologic and Molecular Features of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma with Signet-Ring Cell Component

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Li, Jian; Li, Jie; Qi, Changsong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Zhongwu; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background We performed a retrospective study to assess the clinicopathological characters, molecular alterations and multigene mutation profiles in colorectal cancer patients with signet-ring cell component. Methods Between November 2008 and January 2015, 61 consecutive primary colorectal carcinomas with signet-ring cell component were available for pathological confirmation. RAS/BRAF status was performed by direct sequencing. 14 genes associated with hereditary cancer syndromes were analyzed by targeted gene sequencing. Results A slight male predominance was detected in these patients (59.0%). Colorectal carcinomas with signet-ring cell component were well distributed along the large intestine. A frequently higher TNM stage at the time of diagnosis was observed, compared with the conventional adenocarcinoma. Family history of malignant tumor was remarkable with 49.2% in 61 cases. The median OS time of stage IV patients in our study was 14 months. RAS mutations were detected in 22.2% (12/54) cases with KRAS mutations in 16.7% (9/54) cases and Nras mutations in 5.4%(3/54) cases. BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 3.7% (2/54) cases. As an exploration, we analyzed 14 genes by targeted gene sequencing. These genes were selected based on their biological role in association with hereditary cancer syndromes. 79.6% cases carried at least one pathogenic mutation. Finally, the patients were classified by the percentage of signet-ring cell. 39 (63.9%) cases were composed of ≥50% signet-ring cells; 22 (36.1%) cases were composed of <50% signet-ring cells. We compared clinical parameters, molecular and genetic alterations between the two groups and found no significant differences. Conclusions Colorectal adenocarcinoma with signet-ring cell component is characterized by advanced stage at diagnosis with remarkable family history of malignant tumor. It is likely a negative prognostic factor and tends to affect male patients with low rates of RAS /BRAF mutation. Colorectal

  16. Fap2 Mediates Fusobacterium nucleatum Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Enrichment by Binding to Tumor-Expressed Gal-GalNAc.

    PubMed

    Abed, Jawad; Emgård, Johanna E M; Zamir, Gideon; Faroja, Mouhammad; Almogy, Gideon; Grenov, Amalie; Sol, Asaf; Naor, Ronit; Pikarsky, Eli; Atlan, Karine A; Mellul, Anna; Chaushu, Stella; Manson, Abigail L; Earl, Ashlee M; Ou, Nora; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad

    2016-08-10

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with colorectal cancer and promotes colonic tumor formation in preclinical models. However, fusobacteria are core members of the human oral microbiome and less prevalent in the healthy gut, raising questions about how fusobacteria localize to CRC. We identify a host polysaccharide and fusobacterial lectin that explicates fusobacteria abundance in CRC. Gal-GalNAc, which is overexpressed in CRC, is recognized by fusobacterial Fap2, which functions as a Gal-GalNAc lectin. F. nucleatum binding to clinical adenocarcinomas correlates with Gal-GalNAc expression and is reduced upon O-glycanase treatment. Clinical fusobacteria strains naturally lacking Fap2 or inactivated Fap2 mutants show reduced binding to Gal-GalNAc-expressing CRC cells and established CRCs in mice. Additionally, intravenously injected F. nucleatum localizes to mouse tumor tissues in a Fap2-dependent manner, suggesting that fusobacteria use a hematogenous route to reach colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, targeting F. nucleatum Fap2 or host epithelial Gal-GalNAc may reduce fusobacteria potentiation of CRC. PMID:27512904

  17. Growth and Invasion of Sporadic Colorectal Adenocarcinomas in Terms of Genetic Change

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Seon Ae; Choi, Eun Young; Cho, Dong Hyung; Jang, Se Jin; Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Yong Sung

    2010-01-01

    Integrative genetic changes were examined in relation to tumor growth and progression of sporadic colorectal cancers. Ninety-two sporadic colorectal cancer patients and 12 human colorectal cancer cell lines were evaluated. Genetic changes in representative steps of colorectal tumorigenesis were determined. Biological characteristics, i.e., clinicopathologic parameters, expression of invasion-associated molecules, and in vitro invasion and migration, in association with these changes were further analyzed. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and/or Wnt-activated alterations occurred in 66% patients, whereas mismatch repair (MMR) defects and/or RAF-mediated alterations were identified in 47% patients. The crossover rate between these two alterations was 26%. Differential mRNA expression of ARK5 was closely associated with that of MMP2, MMP9, and S100A4 (P≤0.044-0.001). Additionally, enhanced ARK5 mRNA expression was more frequent in tumors displaying RAF-mediated alterations and crossover pathways (P=0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Upregulation of CEA mRNA was more common in the advanced stages (P=0.034), while VEGF expression was greater in poorly differentiated or mucinous tumors (P=0.042). The high expressions of MMP2 and MMP9 were closely associated with invasion and migration of colorectal tumors and cell lines. Our results conclusively show that specific pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis are closely associated with characteristic tumor growth and invasion. PMID:20191032

  18. Survivin isoforms and clinicopathological characteristics in colorectal adenocarcinomas using real-time qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Pavlidou, Anastasia; Dalamaga, Maria; Kroupis, Christos; Konstantoudakis, George; Belimezi, Maria; Athanasas, George; Dimas, Kleanthi

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate three isoforms of survivin in colorectal adenocarcinomas. METHODS: We used the LightCycler Technology (Roche), along with a common forward primer and reverse primers specific for the splice variants and two common hybridization probes labeled with fluorescein and LightCycler-Red fluorophore (LC-Red 640). Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on cDNAs from 52 tumor specimens from colorectal cancer patients and 10 unrelated normal colorectal tissues. In the patients group, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA19-9 tumor markers were also measured immunochemically. RESULTS: Wild type survivin mRNA isoform was expressed in 48% of the 52 tumor samples, survivin-2b in 38% and survivin-ΔΕx3 in 29%, while no expression was found in normal tissues. The mRNA expression of wild type survivin presented a significant correlation with the expression of the ratio of survivin-2b, survivin-ΔΕx3, survivin-2b/wild type survivin and survivin-ΔΕx3/wild type survivin (P < 0.001). The mRNA expression of wild-survivin and survivin-ΔΕx3 was related with tumor size and invasion (P = 0.006 and P < 0.005, respectively). A significant difference was found between survivin-2b and morphologic cancer type. Also, the ratio of survivin-ΔEx3/wild-survivin was significantly associated with prognosis. No association was observed between the three isoforms and grade, metastasis, Dukes stage and gender. The three isoforms were not correlated with CEA and CA19-9. CONCLUSION: Survivin isoforms may play a role in cell apoptosis and their quantification could provide information about clinical management of patients suffering from colorectal cancer. PMID:21472129

  19. Down-regulation of telomerase activity in DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by tocotrienol

    SciTech Connect

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo . E-mail: miyazawa@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    As high telomerase activity is detected in most cancer cells, inhibition of telomerase by drug or dietary food components is a new strategy for cancer prevention. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin E, with particular emphasis on tocotrienol (unsaturated vitamin E), on human telomerase in cell-culture study. As results, tocotrienol inhibited telomerase activity of DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in time- and dose-dependent manner, interestingly, with {delta}-tocotrienol exhibiting the highest inhibitory activity. Tocotrienol inhibited protein kinase C activity, resulting in down-regulation of c-myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, thereby reducing telomerase activity. In contrast to tocotrienol, tocopherol showed very weak telomerase inhibition. These results provide novel evidence for First time indicating that tocotrienol acts as a potent candidate regulator of telomerase and supporting the anti-proliferative function of tocotrienol.

  20. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: Comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goethals, Laurence; Debucquoy, Annelies; Perneel, Christiaan; Geboes, Karel; Ectors, Nadine; De Schutter, Harlinde; Penninckx, Freddy; McBride, William H.; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin M. . E-mail: karin.haustermans@uzleuven.be

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intrinsic markers of hypoxia. Methods and Material: Twenty patients with an adenocarcinoma of the left colon and rectum treated by primary surgery were injected with pimonidazole and IdUrd. Serial sections of tumor biopsies were single stained for VEGF, EGFR, Ki67, and double stained for blood vessels in combination with either pimonidazole, IdUrd, or CA IX. Percentage of expression was scored as well as colocalization of pimonidazole with CA IX. Results: The median percentage of hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole staining, was 16.7% (range, 0-52.4%). The expression of pimonidazole correlated inversely with the total MVD and endothelial cord MVD (R = -0.55, p = 0.01; R = -0.47, p = 0.04). Good colocalization was found between pimonidazole and CA IX in only 30% of tumors, with no correlation overall between pimonidazole and CA IX, VEGF, or EGFR or between the different intrinsic markers. Cells around some vessels (0.08-11%) were negative for IdUrd but positive for Ki 67, which indicated their lack of perfusion at the time of injection. Conclusion: Chronic and acute hypoxic regions are present in colorectal tumors, as shown by pimonidazole and IdUrd staining. Only in a minority of tumors did an association exist between the areas stained by pimonidazole and those positive for CA IX. Pimonidazole also did not correlate with expression of other putative intrinsic hypoxia markers (VEGF, EGFR)

  1. Effects of NVP-BEZ235 on the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Yu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Jianxia; Tong, Yili; Yao, Jianfeng

    2016-07-01

    The phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a significant role in colorectal adenocarcinoma. NVP-BEZ235 (dactolisib) is a novel dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR. The effects of NVP-BEZ235 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma are still unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 3 µM) for 24 and 48 h, respectively. Cells were also treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM), DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM), and NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM) combined with DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM) respectively, and cultured for 24 h after treatment. MTT assay was utilized to evaluate the effects of NVP-BEZ235 alone or NVP-BEZ235 combined with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) on proliferation of HT-29 cells. Cell wound-scratch assay was used detect cell migration. In addition, expression of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (MAP1LC3B and LC3B) in HT-29 cells was detected by immunofluorescence at 48 h after NVP-BEZ235 (1 µM) treatment. Expression of proteins involved in cell cycle and proliferation (p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and autophagy (cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1) were detected by western blot analysis. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited the proliferation and migration of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. NVP-BEZ235 decreased protein expression of p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1, and increased protein expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1 as the concentrations and the incubation time of NVP-BEZ235 increased. In addition, NVP-BEZ235 and DDP had synergic effects in inhibiting cell proliferation and migration. The expression of protein involved in apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) was higher in drug combination group compared to the NVP-BEZ235 single treatment group. NVP-BEZ235

  2. Leptomeningeal metastasis as initial manifestation of signet ring colorectal adenocarcinoma: a case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Rita; Hamieh, Lana; Mukherji, Deborah; Haydar, Ali; Temraz, Sally; El-Dika, Imane

    2015-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is an exceedingly rare event especially as a first manifestation of an occult primary colorectal cancer and even when there is a known history of malignancy. Sensorineural hearing loss is by itself an unusual isolated presentation of LMC with unsolved pathophysiology in this setting. In this paper, we report such a case and review the literature for similar cases, focusing on postulated mechanisms of spread. In view of the poor prognosis they carry, we highly recommend that physicians be aware of the risk of rare metastasis from colorectal adenocarcinoma in order to establish an early confirmative diagnosis. PMID:26697206

  3. Cancer stem cell markers CD133 and CD24 correlate with invasiveness and differentiation in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dongho; Lee, Hyo Won; Hur, Kyung Yul; Kim, Jae Joon; Park, Gyeong-Sin; Jang, Si-Hyong; Song, Young Soo; Jang, Ki-Seok; Paik, Seung Sam

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To verify that CD markers are available for detecting cancer stem cell populations and to evaluate their clinical significance in colon cancer. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry for CD133, CD24 and CD44 was performed on the tissue microarray of 523 colorectal adenocarcinomas. Medical records were reviewed and clinicopathological analysis was performed. RESULTS: In colorectal adenocarcinoma, 128 of 523 cases (24.5%) were positive and 395 cases (75.5%) were negative for CD133 expression. Two hundred and sixty-four of 523 cases (50.5%) were positive and 259 cases (49.5%) were negative for CD24 expression. Five hundred and two of 523 cases (96%) were negative and 21 cases (4%) were positive for CD44 expression. Upon clinicopathological analysis, CD133 expression was present more in male patients (P = 0.002) and in advanced T stage cancer (P = 0.024). Correlation between CD24 expression and clinicopathological factors was seen in the degree of differentiation (P = 0.006). Correlation between CD44 expression and clinicopathological factors was seen in the tumor size (P = 0.001). Survival was not significantly related to CD133, CD24 and CD44 expression. CONCLUSION: CD markers were related to invasiveness and differentiation of colorectal adenocarcinoma. However, CD expression was not closely related to survival. PMID:19437567

  4. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) for liver metastases secondary to colorectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James S. . E-mail: welsh@humonc.wisc.edu; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2006-10-01

    Introduction: Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a relatively new commercially available microbrachytherapy technique for treatment of malignant hepatic lesions using {sup 9}Y embedded in resin microspheres, which are infused directly into the hepatic arterial circulation. It is FDA approved for liver metastases secondary to colorectal carcinoma and is under investigation for treatment of other liver malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine malignancies. Materials/Methods: A modest number of clinical trials, preclinical animal studies, and dosimetric studies have been reported. Here we review several of the more important results. Results: High doses of beta radiation can be selectively delivered to tumors, resulting in impressive local control and survival rates. Ex vivo analyses have shown that microspheres preferentially cluster around the periphery of tumor nodules with a high tumor:normal tissue ratio of up to 200:1. Toxicity is usually mild, featuring fatigue, anorexia, nausea, abdominal discomfort, and slight elevations of liver function tests. Conclusions: Selective internal radiation therapy represents an effective means of controlling liver metastases from colorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinical trials have demonstrated improved local control of disease and survival with relatively low toxicity. Investigations of SIRT for other hepatic malignancies and in combination with newer chemotherapy agents and targeted biologic therapies are under way or in planning. A well-integrated team involving interventional radiology, nuclear medicine, medical oncology, surgical oncology, medical physics, and radiation oncology is essential for a successful program. Careful selection of patients through the combined expertise of the team can maximize therapeutic efficacy and reduce the potential for adverse effects.

  5. Metabolic predispositions and increased risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma by anatomical location: a large population-based cohort study in Norway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunxia; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; Martling, Anna

    2015-11-15

    Whether different definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS) are differently associated with colorectal adenocarcinoma (CA) by anatomical location is unclear. A population-based cohort study, the Cohort of Norway (CONOR) Study, was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 2010. Anthropometric measurements, blood samples, and lifestyle data were collected at recruitment. CAs were identified through linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Register. A composite index of MetS as defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) or/and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and single components of MetS, including anthropometric factors, blood pressure, lipids, triglycerides, and glucose, were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant associations between single MetS components and CA, except for reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and nonfasting glucose levels, were observed. MetS defined by 2 criteria separately showed a similar association with CA in general, and MetS defined by both the IDF and ATP III showed consistent results. Stronger associations were observed in the proximal colon among men (IDF: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24, 1.84; ATP III: HR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.70) and in the rectum among women (IDF: HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.89; ATP III: HR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.90). PMID:26511906

  6. [BRAF mutation in progression and therapy of melanoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Zaleśna, Izabela; Hartman, Mariusz L; Czyż, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    BRAF is mutated at a high frequency in various malignancies, including melanoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma. BRAF is an element of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK (MAPK) pathway, which when constitutively active can lead to increased proliferation rate, enhanced survival, invasion and metastasis. The development of small molecule inhibitors of mutant BRAF kinase has changed the care of patients, especially with melanoma. Despite the success in treating melanoma with inhibitors of mutant BRAF and other elements of RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK (MAPK) pathway, resistance limits the long-term responsiveness to these drugs. The resistance mechanisms to MAPK pathway inhibition are complex, occur at genomic and phenotypic levels, and frequently the same patient can simultaneously develop diverse mechanisms of resistance in different progressive metastases or even in the same lesion. In the current review, we summarize recent research on mutations in BRAF and their importance for the development of tumor. This review will also give an overview on the current knowledge concerning therapies for patients harboring mutation in BRAF and discusses the diverse mechanisms of resistance developed in response to these targeted therapies. PMID:27180965

  7. Reduction in membranous immunohistochemical staining for the intracellular domain of epithelial cell adhesion molecule correlates with poor patient outcome in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A.; Ramjeesingh, R.; Chen, C.H.; Hurlbut, D.; Hammad, N.; Mulligan, L.M.; Nicol, C.; Feilotter, H.E.; Davey, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (epcam) is a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on both normal epithelium and epithelial neoplasms such as gastric, breast, and renal carcinomas. Recent studies have proposed that the proteolytic cleavage of the intracellular domain of epcam (epcam-icd) can trigger signalling cascades leading to aggressive tumour behavior. The expression profile of epcam-icd has not been elucidated for primary colorectal carcinoma. In the present study, we examined epcam-icd immunohistochemical staining in a large cohort of patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and assessed its performance as a potential prognostic marker. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for epcam-icd was assessed on tissue microarrays consisting of 137 primary colorectal adenocarcinoma samples. Intensity of staining for each core was scored by 3 independent pathologists. The membranous epcam-icd staining score was calculated as a weighted average from 3 core samples per tumour. Univariate analysis of the average scores and clinical outcome measures was performed. Results The level of membranous epcam-icd staining was positively associated with well-differentiated tumours (p = 0.01); low preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (p = 0.001); and several measures of survival, including 2-year (p = 0.02) and 5-year survival (p = 0.05), and length of time post-diagnosis (p = 0.03). A number of other variables—including stage, grade, and lymph node status—showed correlations with epcam staining and markers of poor outcome, but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Low membranous epcam-icd staining might be a useful marker to identify tumours with aggressive clinical behavior and potential poor prognosis and might help to select candidates who could potentially benefit from treatment targeting epcam. PMID:27330354

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Cytosolic Sulfotransferase 1C2 by Vitamin D Receptor in LS180 Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kathleen G; Fang, Hailin; Kocarek, Thomas A; Runge-Morris, Melissa

    2016-08-01

    The factors that regulate expression of genes in the 1C family of human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULT1C) are not well understood. In a recent study evaluating the effects of a panel of transcription factor activators on SULT1C family member expression in LS180 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, we found that SULT1C2 expression was significantly increased by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VitD3) treatment. The objective of our current study was to identify the mechanism responsible for VitD3-mediated activation of SULT1C2 transcription. VitD3 treatment of LS180 cells activated transcription of a transfected luciferase reporter plasmid that contained ∼5 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the SULT1C2 gene, which included 402 nucleotides (nt) of the noncoding exon 1, all of intron 1, and 21 nt of exon 2. Although computational analysis of the VitD3-responsive region of the SULT1C2 gene identified a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-binding site within exon 1, the transfected 5 kbp SULT1C2 reporter was not activated by treatment with rifampicin, a prototypical PXR agonist. However, deletion or mutation of the predicted PXR-binding site abolished VitD3-mediated SULT1C2 transcriptional activation, identifying the site as a functional vitamin D response element (VDRE). We further demonstrated that vitamin D receptor (VDR) can interact directly with the SULT1C2 VDRE sequence using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based transcription factor binding assay. In conclusion, VitD3-inducible SULT1C2 transcription is mediated through a VDRE in exon 1. These results suggest a role for SULT1C2 in VitD3-regulated physiologic processes in human intestine. PMID:27130351

  9. An investigation of the rate of cyclooxygenase-2 expression on the surface of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei, Ramin; Beiraghdar, Mozhdeh; Sobhani, Ahmad; Rafei, Rahmatolah; Kolahi, Leila; Foladi, Lotfolah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) (adenomatous, adenocarcinoma) is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in human societies. Considering the importance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the incidence of CRC, in this study, the rate of COX-2 gene expression on polyps and CRCs were addressed. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic study carried out on the blocks of sampled tissue of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps on 68 patients referred to Digestive Clinic in Isfahan Shariati Hospital in 2013. Patients were divided into two groups of polyps (n = 52) and cancer (n = 16). Given the presence of CRC or polyps by colonoscopy, samples were sent to the laboratory to measure the rate of COX-2 gene expression using immunohistochemistry. Results: In polyp group, 41 individuals (78.8%) had two or <2 polyps, 24 cases (46.2%) had a tubular polyp, and about a third of all patients had a big polyp. The most frequency of the polyp site was related to sigmoid with 19 cases (36.54%), in cancer group, it was related to the rectum with 9 cases (56.25%) that there was no significant difference between two groups (P < 0.05). The overall prevalence of COX-2 expression was positive in 51 cases (75%) and negative in 17 cases (25%). COX-2 gene expression was separately observed in 38 individuals (73.10%) in the polyp group and in 13 cases (81.25%) in the cancer group, and no significant difference was found (P > 0.05). Conclusion: There is no relationship between COX-2 gene expression and the surface of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps. PMID:26601088

  10. Expression profiling shows differential molecular pathways and provides potential new diagnostic biomarkers for colorectal serrated adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; García-Solano, José; García-García, Francisco; Turpin, María Del Carmen; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Torres-Moreno, Daniel; Oviedo-Ramírez, Isabel; Carbonell-Muñoz, Rosa; Muñoz-Delgado, Encarnación; Rodriguez-Braun, Edith; Conesa, Ana; Pérez-Guillermo, Miguel

    2013-01-15

    Serrated adenocarcinoma (SAC) is a recently recognized colorectal cancer (CRC) subtype accounting for 7.5 to 8.7% of CRCs. It has been shown that SAC has a poorer prognosis and has different molecular and immunohistochemical features compared with conventional carcinoma (CC) but, to date, only one previous study has analyzed its mRNA expression profile by microarray. Using a different microarray platform, we have studied the molecular signature of 11 SACs and compared it with that of 15 matched CC with the aim of discerning the functions which characterize SAC biology and validating, at the mRNA and protein level, the most differentially expressed genes which were also tested using a validation set of 70 SACs and 70 CCs to assess their diagnostic and prognostic values. Microarray data showed a higher representation of morphogenesis-, hypoxia-, cytoskeleton- and vesicle transport-related functions and also an overexpression of fascin1 (actin-bundling protein associated with invasion) and the antiapoptotic gene hippocalcin in SAC all of which were validated both by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry. Fascin1 expression was statistically associated with KRAS mutation with 88.6% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity for SAC diagnosis and the positivity of fascin1 or hippocalcin was highly suggestive of SAC diagnosis (sensitivity = 100%). Evaluation of these markers in CRCs showing histological and molecular characteristics of high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) also helped to distinguish SACs from MSI-H CRCs. Molecular profiling demonstrates that SAC shows activation of distinct signaling pathways and that immunohistochemical fascin1 and hippocalcin expression can be reliably used for its differentiation from other CRC subtypes. PMID:22696308

  11. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Functional Module Connectivity Map (FMCM): A Framework for Searching Repurposed Drug Compounds for Systems Treatment of Cancer and an Application to Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Feng-Hsiang; Chiang, Yun-Ru; Tseng, Ai-Lun; Sung, Yung-Chuan; Lu, Jean; Huang, Min-Chang; Ma, Nianhan; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Drug repurposing has become an increasingly attractive approach to drug development owing to the ever-growing cost of new drug discovery and frequent withdrawal of successful drugs caused by side effect issues. Here, we devised Functional Module Connectivity Map (FMCM) for the discovery of repurposed drug compounds for systems treatment of complex diseases, and applied it to colorectal adenocarcinoma. FMCM used multiple functional gene modules to query the Connectivity Map (CMap). The functional modules were built around hub genes identified, through a gene selection by trend-of-disease-progression (GSToP) procedure, from condition-specific gene-gene interaction networks constructed from sets of cohort gene expression microarrays. The candidate drug compounds were restricted to drugs exhibiting predicted minimal intracellular harmful side effects. We tested FMCM against the common practice of selecting drugs using a genomic signature represented by a single set of individual genes to query CMap (IGCM), and found FMCM to have higher robustness, accuracy, specificity, and reproducibility in identifying known anti-cancer agents. Among the 46 drug candidates selected by FMCM for colorectal adenocarcinoma treatment, 65% had literature support for association with anti-cancer activities, and 60% of the drugs predicted to have harmful effects on cancer had been reported to be associated with carcinogens/immune suppressors. Compounds were formed from the selected drug candidates where in each compound the component drugs collectively were beneficial to all the functional modules while no single component drug was harmful to any of the modules. In cell viability tests, we identified four candidate drugs: GW-8510, etacrynic acid, ginkgolide A, and 6-azathymine, as having high inhibitory activities against cancer cells. Through microarray experiments we confirmed the novel functional links predicted for three candidate drugs: phenoxybenzamine (broad effects), GW-8510 (cell

  13. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Zöllner, Hannah; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Wos, Alexandra; Mayerle, Julia; Munding, Johanna; Kost, Dennis; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Liffers, Sven; Schroers, Roland; Chromik, Ansgar M; Meyer, Helmut E; Uhl, Waldemar; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Weiss, Frank U; Stephan, Christian; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard; Lerch, Markus M; Tannapfel, Andrea; Schmiegel, Wolff; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Hahn, Stephan A

    2013-01-15

    Improved non-invasive strategies for early cancer detection are urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, have been proposed as biomarkers for non-invasive cancer diagnosis. Analyzing serum derived from nude mice implanted with primary human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we identified 15 diagnostic microRNA candidates. Of those miR-1246 was selected based on its high abundance in serum of tumor carrying mice. Subsequently, we noted a cross reactivity of the established miR-1246 assays with RNA fragments derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2-1). Importantly, we found that the assay signal discriminating tumor from controls was derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) fragments (RNU2-1f) and not from miR-1246. In addition, we observed a remarkable stability of RNU2-1f in serum and provide experimental evidence that hsa-miR-1246 is likely a pseudo microRNA. In a next step, RNU2-1f was measured by qRT-PCR and normalized to cel-54 in 191 serum/plasma samples from PDAC and colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. In comparison to 129 controls, we were able to classify samples as cancerous with a sensitivity and specificity of 97.7% [95% CI = (87.7, 99.9)] and 90.6% [95% CI = (80.7, 96.5)], respectively [area under the ROC curve 0.972]. Of note, patients with CRC were detected with our assay as early as UICC Stage II with a sensitivity of 81%. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that fragments of U2 snRNA are highly stable in serum and plasma and may serve as novel diagnostic biomarker for PDAC and CRC for future prospective screening studies. PMID:22907602

  14. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  15. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Liao, H.-F.; Tsai, T.-H.; Wang, S.-Y.; Shiao, M.-S. . E-mail: msshiao@vghtpe.gov.tw

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a component of propolis, was reported capable of depleting glutathione (GSH). We subsequently examined the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE and its toxicity. Methods and Materials: The effects of CAPE on GSH level, GSH metabolism enzyme activities, NF-{kappa}B activity, and radiosensitivity in mouse CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were determined. BALB/c mouse with CT26 cells implantation was used as a syngeneic in vivo model for evaluation of treatment and toxicity end points. Results: CAPE entered CT26 cells rapidly and depleted intracellular GSH in CT26 cells, but not in bone marrow cells. Pretreatment with nontoxic doses of CAPE significantly enhanced cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR) with sensitizer enhancement ratios up to 2.2. Pretreatment of CT26 cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the GSH depletion activity and partially blocked the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE. CAPE treatment in CT26 cells increased glutathione peroxidase, decreased glutathione reductase, and did not affect glutathione S-transferase or {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Radiation activated NF-{kappa}B was reversed by CAPE pretreatment. In vivo study revealed that pretreatment with CAPE before IR resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in comparison with IR alone. Pretreatment with CAPE neither affected body weights nor produced hepatic, renal, or hematopoietic toxicity. Conclusions: CAPE sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to IR, which may be via depleting GSH and inhibiting NF-{kappa}B activity, without toxicity to bone marrow, liver, and kidney.

  16. ARID1A expression in early stage colorectal adenocarcinoma: an exploration of its prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lik Hang; Sadot, Eran; Ivelja, Sinisa; Vakiani, Efsevia; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Sevinsky, Christopher J; Klimstra, David S; Ginty, Fiona; Shia, Jinru

    2016-07-01

    ARID1A is a chromatin remodeling gene that is mutated in a number of cancers including colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Loss of ARID1A has been associated with an adverse outcome in some types of cancer. However, literature data have not been consistent. Major limitations of some outcome studies include small sample size and heterogeneous patient population. In this study, we evaluated the prognostic value of ARID1A in a homogeneous group of early stage CRC patients, a population where prognostic markers are particularly relevant. We collected a retrospective series of 578 stage I or II CRCs. All patients underwent surgery with curative intent and without neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy. ARID1A expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray. We found ARID1A loss in 49 of 552 analyzable tumors (8.9%). Compared with the ARID1A-retained group, cases with ARID1A loss were associated with female sex (P<.001), mismatch-repair protein deficiency (P<.001), poor differentiation (P<.001), lymphovascular invasion (P=.001), and higher pT stage (P=.047). However, at a median follow-up of 49months, ARID1A loss did not correlate with overall, disease-specific, or recurrence-free survival. This is the first systematic analysis to evaluate the prognostic significance of ARID1A in stage I/II CRCs, and our data indicate that ARID1A loss lacks prognostic significance in this population despite its association with other adverse features. Such data are clinically relevant, as efforts are ongoing in identifying markers that can detect the small but significant subset of early stage CRCs that will have a poor outcome. PMID:26980037

  17. A genome-wide association study for colorectal cancer identifies a risk locus in 14q23.1.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Mathieu; Qu, Conghui; Loo, Lenora W M; Zaidi, Syed H E; Wang, Hansong; Berndt, Sonja I; Bézieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Du, Mengmeng; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hou, Lifang; Hsu, Li; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenkins, Mark A; Jeon, Jihyoun; Küry, Sébastien; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Rennert, Gad; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Woods, Michael O; Cotterchio, Michelle; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B; Peters, Ulrike; Hudson, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Over 50 loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) have been uncovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Identifying additional loci has the potential to help elucidate aspects of the underlying biological processes leading to better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. We re-evaluated a GWAS by excluding controls that have family history of CRC or personal history of colorectal polyps, as we hypothesized that their inclusion reduces power to detect associations. This is supported empirically and through simulations. Two-phase GWAS analysis was performed in a total of 16,517 cases and 14,487 controls. We identified rs17094983, a SNP associated with risk of CRC [p = 2.5 × 10(-10); odds ratio estimated by re-including all controls (OR) = 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.91; minor allele frequency (MAF) = 13%]. Results were replicated in samples of African descent (1894 cases and 4703 controls; p = 0.01; OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.77-0.97; MAF = 16 %). Gene expression data in 195 colon adenocarcinomas and 59 normal colon tissues from two different studies revealed that this locus has genotypes that are associated with RTN1 (Reticulon 1) expression (p = 0.001), a protein-coding gene involved in survival and proliferation of cancer cells which is highly expressed in normal colon tissues but has significantly reduced expression in tumor cells (p = 1.3 × 10(-8)). PMID:26404086

  18. Newly identified biomarkers for detecting circulating tumor cells in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Man, Yingchun; Cao, Jingyan; Jin, Shi; Xu, Gang; Pan, Bo; Shang, Lihua; Che, Dehai; Yu, Qin; Yu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been implicated in cancer prognosis and follow up. Detection of CTCs was considered significant in cancer evaluation. However, due to the heterogeneity and rareness of CTCs, detecting them with a single maker is usually challenged with low specificity and sensitivity. Previous studies concerning CTCs detection in lung cancer mainly focused on non-small cell lung carcinoma. Currently, there is no report yet describing the CTC detection with multiple markers in lung adenocarcinoma. In this study, by employing quantitative real-time PCR, we identified four candidate genes (mRNA) that were significantly elevated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and biopsy tissue samples from patients with lung adenocarcinoma: cytokeratin 7 (CK7), Ca(2+)-activated chloride channel-2 (CLCA2), hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor (HMMR), and human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT). Then, the four markers were used for CTC detection; namely, positive detection was defined if at least one of the four markers was elevated. The positive CTC detection rate was 74.0% in patients with lung adenocarcinoma while 2.2% for healthy controls, 6.3% for benign lung disease, and 48.0% for non-adenocarcinoma non-small cell lung carcinoma. Furthermore, in a three-year follow-up study, patients with an increase in the detection markers of CTCs (CK7, CLCA2, HMMR or hTERT) on day 90 after first detection had shorter survival time compared to those with a decrease. These results demonstrate that the combination of the four markers with specificity and sensitivity is of great value in lung adenocarcinoma prognosis and follow up. PMID:25175030

  19. New Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer Identified - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples

  20. Clinical significance of a novel single nucleotide polymorphism in the 5′ untranslated region of the Rabphillin-3A-Like gene in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Katkoori, Venkat R.; Jia, Xu; Chatla, Chakrapani; Kumar, Sanjay; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Callens, Tom; Messiaen, Ludwine; Grizzle, William E.; Manne, Upender

    2009-01-01

    The recently identified human ortholog of the Rabphillin-3A-Like (RPH3AL) gene, located at the 17p13.3 locus, has been assessed for its mutational status and clinical significance in colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC). Prospectively collected 95 frozen CRCs and their matching benign colonic epithelial tissues were evaluated for mutations and mRNA expression. Since, we observed a higher incidence of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the −25 position in the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR-25) of RPH3AL, we performed the genotyping analysis of this SNP in a retrospective CRC cohort (n=134) to assess their clinical importance. Univariate and multivariate outcome analyses were performed. The cDNA analysis has detected point mutations in 6 CRCs, coding region SNPs in 14 CRCs, and non-coding region SNPs in 38 CRCs. Combined analyses of both cohorts has demonstrated that the incidence of SNP at 5′UTR-25 was 41% (95 of 229), and its A/A genotype (9%, 20 of 229) was observed exclusively in non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 19 of these cases were diagnosed with nodal metastasis. Patients who exhibited homozygous for A or C alleles had a significantly decreased levels of mRNA expression, increased risk of CRC recurrence and mortality. Therefore, these findings have significant clinical implications in assessing the aggressiveness of CRC. PMID:17981610

  1. Clinical significance of a novel single nucleotide polymorphism in the 5' untranslated region of the Rabphillin-3A-Like gene in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Katkoori, Venkat R; Jia, Xu; Chatla, Chakrapani; Kumar, Sanjay; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Callens, Tom; Messiaen, Ludwine; Grizzle, William E; Manne, Upender

    2008-01-01

    The recently identified human ortholog of the Rabphillin-3A-Like (RPH3AL) gene, located at the 17p13.3 locus, has been assessed for its mutational status and clinical significance in colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC). Prospectively collected 95 frozen CRCs and their matching benign colonic epithelial tissues were evaluated for mutations and mRNA expression. Since, we observed a higher incidence of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the -25 position in the 5'untranslated region (5'UTR-25) of RPH3AL, we performed the genotyping analysis of this SNP in a retrospective CRC cohort (n=134) to assess their clinical importance. Univariate and multivariate outcome analyses were performed. The cDNA analysis has detected point mutations in 6 CRCs, coding region SNPs in 14 CRCs, and non-coding region SNPs in 38 CRCs. Combined analyses of both cohorts has demonstrated that the incidence of SNP at 5'UTR-25 was 41% (95 of 229), and its A/A genotype (9%, 20 of 229) was observed exclusively in non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 19 of these cases were diagnosed with nodal metastasis. Patients who exhibited homozygous for A or C alleles had a significantly decreased levels of mRNA expression, increased risk of CRC recurrence and mortality. Therefore, these findings have significant clinical implications in assessing the aggressiveness of CRC. PMID:17981610

  2. Cuminaldehyde from Cinnamomum verum Induces Cell Death through Targeting Topoisomerase 1 and 2 in Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma COLO 205 Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuen-Daw; Liu, Yi-Heng; Chen, Ta-Wei; Yang, Shu-Mei; Wong, Ho-Yiu; Cherng, Jonathan; Chou, Kuo-Shen; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum, also called true cinnamon tree, is employed to make the seasoning cinnamon. Furthermore, the plant has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medication. We explored the anticancer effect of cuminaldehyde, an ingredient of the cortex of the plant, as well as the molecular biomarkers associated with carcinogenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells. The results show that cuminaldehyde suppressed growth and induced apoptosis, as proved by depletion of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of both caspase-3 and -9, and morphological features of apoptosis. Moreover, cuminaldehyde also led to lysosomal vacuolation with an upregulated volume of acidic compartment and cytotoxicity, together with inhibitions of both topoisomerase I and II activities. Additional study shows that the anticancer activity of cuminaldehyde was observed in the model of nude mice. Our results suggest that the anticancer activity of cuminaldehyde in vitro involved the suppression of cell proliferative markers, topoisomerase I as well as II, together with increase of pro-apoptotic molecules, associated with upregulated lysosomal vacuolation. On the other hand, in vivo, cuminaldehyde diminished the tumor burden that would have a significant clinical impact. Furthermore, similar effects were observed in other tested cell lines. In short, our data suggest that cuminaldehyde could be a drug for chemopreventive or anticancer therapy. PMID:27231935

  3. Cuminaldehyde from Cinnamomum verum Induces Cell Death through Targeting Topoisomerase 1 and 2 in Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma COLO 205 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kuen-daw; Liu, Yi-Heng; Chen, Ta-Wei; Yang, Shu-Mei; Wong, Ho-Yiu; Cherng, Jonathan; Chou, Kuo-Shen; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum, also called true cinnamon tree, is employed to make the seasoning cinnamon. Furthermore, the plant has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medication. We explored the anticancer effect of cuminaldehyde, an ingredient of the cortex of the plant, as well as the molecular biomarkers associated with carcinogenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells. The results show that cuminaldehyde suppressed growth and induced apoptosis, as proved by depletion of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of both caspase-3 and -9, and morphological features of apoptosis. Moreover, cuminaldehyde also led to lysosomal vacuolation with an upregulated volume of acidic compartment and cytotoxicity, together with inhibitions of both topoisomerase I and II activities. Additional study shows that the anticancer activity of cuminaldehyde was observed in the model of nude mice. Our results suggest that the anticancer activity of cuminaldehyde in vitro involved the suppression of cell proliferative markers, topoisomerase I as well as II, together with increase of pro-apoptotic molecules, associated with upregulated lysosomal vacuolation. On the other hand, in vivo, cuminaldehyde diminished the tumor burden that would have a significant clinical impact. Furthermore, similar effects were observed in other tested cell lines. In short, our data suggest that cuminaldehyde could be a drug for chemopreventive or anticancer therapy. PMID:27231935

  4. C-kit signaling promotes proliferation and invasion of colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jun; Yang, Shu; Shen, Ping; Sun, Haimei; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Yaxi; Wu, Bo; Ji, Fengqing; Yan, Jihong; Xue, Hong; Zhou, Deshan

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family often highly expressed in several mucinous carcinomas. In the present study, we established a murine model of colorectal mucinous adenocardinoma (CRMAC) by treating C57 mice [both wild type (WT) and loss-of-function c-kit mutant type (Wads−/−)] with AOM+DSS for 37 weeks and found that c-kit, a member of RTK family, clearly enhanced the tumor cell proliferation by decreasing p53 and increasing cyclin D1 through AKT pathway. Significantly, c-kit strongly promoted tumor cell invasiveness by increasing ETV4, which induced MMP7 expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via ERK pathway. In vitro up- or down-regulating c-kit activation in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells further consolidated these results. In conclusion, our data suggested that the c-kit signaling obviously promoted proliferation and invasion of CRMAC. Therefore, targeting the c-kit signaling and its downstream molecules might provide the potential strategies for treatment of patients suffering from CRMAC in the future. PMID:26356816

  5. Circulating miR-182 is a biomarker of colorectal adenocarcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Marco; Pizzini, Silvia; Pizzi, Marco; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Mammano, Enzo; Rugge, Massimo; Nitti, Donato; Scarpa, Aldo; Fassan, Matteo; Zanovello, Paola

    2014-01-01

    MiR-182 expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization in 20 tubular adenomas, 50 colorectal carcinoma (CRC), and 40 CRC liver metastases. Control samples obtained from patients with irritable bowel syndrome, or tumor-matched normal colon mucosa were analyzed (n=50). MiR-182 expression increased progressively and significantly along with the colorectal carcinogenesis cascade, and in CRC liver metastases. The inverse relation between miR-182 and the expression of its target gene ENTPD5 was investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. We observed that normal colocytes featured a strong ENTPD5 cytoplasmic expression whereas a significantly and progressively lower expression was present along with dedifferentiation of the histologic phenotype. Plasma samples from 51 CRC patients and controls were tested for miR-182 expression. Plasma miR-182 concentrations were significantly higher in CRC patients than in healthy controls or patients with colon polyps at endoscopy. Moreover, miR-182 plasma levels were significantly reduced in post-operative samples after radical hepatic metastasectomy compared to preoperative samples. Our results strengthen the hypothesis of a central role of miR-182 dysregulation in colon mucosa transformation, demonstrate the concomitant progressive down-regulation of ENTPD5 levels during colon carcinogenesis, and indicate the potential of circulating miR-182 as blood based biomarker for screening and monitoring CRC during the follow-up. PMID:25115394

  6. Circulating miR-182 is a biomarker of colorectal adenocarcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Perilli, Lisa; Vicentini, Caterina; Agostini, Marco; Pizzini, Silvia; Pizzi, Marco; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Mammano, Enzo; Rugge, Massimo; Nitti, Donato; Scarpa, Aldo; Fassan, Matteo; Zanovello, Paola

    2014-08-30

    MiR-182 expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization in 20 tubular adenomas, 50 colorectal carcinoma (CRC), and 40 CRC liver metastases. Control samples obtained from patients with irritable bowel syndrome, or tumor-matched normal colon mucosa were analyzed (n=50). MiR-182 expression increased progressively and significantly along with the colorectal carcinogenesis cascade, and in CRC liver metastases. The inverse relation between miR-182 and the expression of its target gene ENTPD5 was investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. We observed that normal colocytes featured a strong ENTPD5 cytoplasmic expression whereas a significantly and progressively lower expression was present along with dedifferentiation of the histologic phenotype. Plasma samples from 51 CRC patients and controls were tested for miR-182 expression. Plasma miR-182 concentrations were significantly higher in CRC patients than in healthy controls or patients with colon polyps at endoscopy. Moreover, miR-182 plasma levels were significantly reduced in post-operative samples after radical hepatic metastasectomy compared to preoperative samples. Our results strengthen the hypothesis of a central role of miR-182 dysregulation in colon mucosa transformation, demonstrate the concomitant progressive down-regulation of ENTPD5 levels during colon carcinogenesis, and indicate the potential of circulating miR-182 as blood based biomarker for screening and monitoring CRC during the follow-up. PMID:25115394

  7. Antisense treatment directed against mutated Ki-ras in human colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andreyev, H; Ross, P; Cunningham, D; Clarke, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Kirsten ras (Ki-ras) mutations are common in gastrointestinal cancer and one codon 12 mutation, glycine to valine, is particularly aggressive in colorectal cancer.
AIMS—To investigate if this valine point mutation could be targeted with antisense oligonucleotides and to determine the efficacy of any antisense/mRNA interaction.
METHODS—Twenty nine antisense oligonucleotides were screened against target and control Ki-ras RNA in a cell free system and against target and control cell lines in culture.
RESULTS—The activity and specificity of the oligonucleotides varied. Results for the individual oligonucleotides were consistent in a cell free model and in cell culture using two different uptake promoters. Only one oligonucleotide was specific in its cleavage of target Ki-ras mRNA in the cell free system and appeared specific in cell culture, although changes in Ki-ras mRNA and protein expression following a single treatment could not be detected. Experiments in the cell free system showed that the point mutation is relatively inaccessible to oligonucleotides. Other sites on the Ki-ras RNA molecule, away from the point mutation, can be targeted more effectively.
CONCLUSIONS—Successful targeting of the clinically relevant Ki-ras point mutation with antisense oligonucleotides is difficult because of RNA structure at the mutated site and is inefficient compared with other sites on the Ki-ras mRNA.


Keywords: Ki-ras mutation; antisense treatment; colorectal carcinoma PMID:11156646

  8. Computer Aided Diagnosis for Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Advanced Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ştefănescu, Daniela; Streba, Costin; Cârţână, Elena Tatiana; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel; Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is becoming a popular method for optical biopsy of digestive mucosa for both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Computer aided diagnosis of CLE images, using image processing and fractal analysis can be used to quantify the histological structures in the CLE generated images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic diagnosis algorithm of colorectal cancer (CRC), based on fractal analysis and neural network modeling of the CLE-generated colon mucosa images. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed a series of 1035 artifact-free endomicroscopy images, obtained during CLE examinations from normal mucosa (356 images) and tumor regions (679 images). The images were processed using a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) medical imaging system in order to obtain an automatic diagnosis. The CAD application includes image reading and processing functions, a module for fractal analysis, grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) computation module, and a feature identification module based on the Marching Squares and linear interpolation methods. A two-layer neural network was trained to automatically interpret the imaging data and diagnose the pathological samples based on the fractal dimension and the characteristic features of the biological tissues. Results Normal colon mucosa is characterized by regular polyhedral crypt structures whereas malignant colon mucosa is characterized by irregular and interrupted crypts, which can be diagnosed by CAD. For this purpose, seven geometric parameters were defined for each image: fractal dimension, lacunarity, contrast correlation, energy, homogeneity, and feature number. Of the seven parameters only contrast, homogeneity and feature number were significantly different between normal and cancer samples. Next, a two-layer feed forward neural network was used to train and automatically diagnose the malignant samples, based on the seven parameters tested. The neural network

  9. Chlorpyrifos promotes colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth through the activation of EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway.

    PubMed

    Suriyo, Tawit; Tachachartvanich, Phum; Visitnonthachai, Daranee; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-12-01

    Aside from the effects on neuronal cholinergic system, epidemiological studies suggest an association between chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure and cancer risk. This in vitro study examined the effects of CPF and its toxic metabolite, chlorpyrifos oxon (CPF-O), on the growth of human colorectal adenocarcinoma H508, colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29, normal colon epithelial CCD841, liver hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and normal liver hepatocyte THLE-3 cells. The results showed that CPF (5-100 μM) concentration-dependently increased viability of H508 and CCD841 cells in serum-free conditions. This increasing trend was not found in HT-29, HepG2 and THLE-3 cells. In contrast, CPF-O (50-100 μM) reduced the viability of all cell lines. Cell cycle analysis showed the induction of cells in the S phase, and EdU incorporation assay revealed the induction of DNA synthesis in CPF-treated H508 cells indicating that CPF promotes cell cycle progression. Despite the observation of acetylcholinesterase activity inhibition and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, atropine (a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and N-acetylcysteine (a potent antioxidant) failed to inhibit the growth-promoting effect of CPF. CPF increased the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream effector, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2), in H508 cells. AG-1478 (a specific EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) and U0126 (a specific MEK inhibitor) completely mitigated the growth promoting effect of CPF. Altogether, these results suggest that EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway involves in CPF-induced colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth. PMID:26514924

  10. Clinicopathogenomic analysis of mismatch repair proficient colorectal adenocarcinoma uncovers novel prognostic subgroups with differing patterns of genetic evolution.

    PubMed

    Braxton, David R; Zhang, Ray; Morrissette, Jennifer D; Loaiza-Bonilla, Arturo; Furth, Emma E

    2016-10-01

    Cancer somatic genetic evolution is a direct contributor to heterogeneity at the clonal and molecular level in colorectal adenocarcinoma (COAD). We sought to determine the extent to which genetic evolution may be detected in COAD in routinely obtained single clinical specimens and establish clinical significance with regard to clinicopathologic and outcome data. One hundred and twenty three cases of routinely collected mismatch repair proficient COAD were sequenced on the Illumina Truseq Amplicon assay. Measures of intratumoral heterogeneity and the preferential timing of mutational events were assessed and compared to clinicopathologic data. Survival subanalysis was performed on 55 patients. Patient age (p = 0.013) and specimen percent tumor (p = 0.033) was associated with clonal diversity, and biopsy (p = 0.044) and metastasis (p = 0.044) returned fewer mutations per case. APC and TP53 mutations preferentially occurred early while alterations in FBXW7, FLT3, SMAD4, GNAS and PTEN preferentially occurred as late events. Temporal heterogeneity was evident in KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Hierarchical clustering revealed a TP53 mutant subtype and a MAPK-PIK3CA subtype with differing patterns of late mutational events. Survival subanalysis showed a decreased median progression free survival for the MAPK-PIK3CA subtype (8 months vs. 13 months; univariate logrank p = 0.0380, cox model p= 0.018). Neoadjuvant therapy associated mutations were found for ERBB2 (p = 0.0481) and FBXW7 (p = 0.015). Our data indicate novel molecular subtypes of mismatch repair proficient COAD display differing patterns of genetic evolution which correlate with clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we report treatment acquired and/or selected mutations in ERBB2 and FBXW7. PMID:27194209

  11. Inhibitory effects of tetrandrine on epidermal growth factor-induced invasion and migration in HT29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Lee, Chiu-Fang; Chiang, Ni-Na; Chen, Fu-An

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine has been shown to reduce cancer cell proliferation and to inhibit metastatic effects in multiple cancer models in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of tetrandrine on the underlying mechanism of HT29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was focused on tetrandrine‑treated HT29 cells following epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment, and Transwell, gelatin zymography, gene expression and immunoblotting assays were performed to investigate metastatic effects in vitro. Tetrandrine was observed to dose‑dependently inhibit EGF‑induced HT29 cell invasion and migration, however, no effect on cell viability occurred following exposure to tetradrine between 0.5 and 2 µM. Tetrandrine treatment inhibited the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 in a concentration‑dependent manner. The present study also found a reduction in the mRNA expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 in the tetrandrine‑treated HT29 cells. Tetrandrine also suppressed the phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream pathway, including phosphoinositide‑dependent kinase 1, phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase and phosphorylated AKT, suppressing the gene expression of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9. Furthermore, tetrandrine triggered mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling through the suppressing the activation of phosphorylated extracellular signal‑regulated protein kinase. These data suggested that targeting EGFR signaling and its downstream molecules contributed to the inhibition of EGF‑induced HT29 cell metastasis caused by tetrandrine, eventually leading to a reduction in the mRNA and gelatinase activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively. PMID:26648313

  12. MicroSPECT/CT imaging and pharmacokinetics of 188Re-(DXR)-liposome in human colorectal adenocarcinoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hua; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Ya-Jen; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Yu, Chia-Yu; Wu, Yu-Hsien; Lee, Wan-Chi; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lee, Te-Wei; Yang, Chung-Shi; Ting, Gann

    2010-01-01

    Nanoliposome can be designed as a drug delivery carrier to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of drug administration. (188)Re-labeled nanoliposomes are useful for diagnostic imaging as well as for targeted radionuclide therapy. In this study, the in vivo nuclear imaging, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of administered nanoliposomes were investigated as drug and radionuclide carriers for targeting solid tumor via intravenous (i.v.) administration. The radiotherapeutics ((188)Re-liposome) and radiochemotherapeutics ((188)Re-DXR-liposome) were i.v. administered to nude mice bearing human HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposomes show similar biodistribution profile; both have higher tumor uptake, higher blood retention time, and lower excretion rate than (188)Re-N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylenediamine (BMEDA). In contrast to tumor uptake, the area under the curve (AUC) value of tumor for (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposome was 16.5- and 11.5-fold higher than that of free (188)Re-BMEDA, respectively. Additionally, (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposome had a higher tumor-to-muscle ratio at 24 h (14.4+/-2 .7 and 17.14+/-4.1, respectively) than (188)Re-BMEDA (1.6+/-0.1). The tumor targeting and distribution of (188)Re-(DXR)-liposome (representing (188)Re-DXR-liposome and (188)Re-liposome) can also be acquired by signal photon-emission computed tomography/computed tomography images as well as whole body autoradiograph. These results suggest that (188)Re-(DXR)-liposomes are potentially promising agents for passive targeting treatment of malignant disease. PMID:20150618

  13. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  14. A metastatic colon adenocarcinoma harboring BRAF V600E has a durable major response to dabrafenib/trametinib and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Casey B; McMahon, Caitlin; Ali, Siraj M; Abramovitz, Mark; Williams, Kirstin A; Klein, Jessica; McKean, Heidi; Yelensky, Roman; George, Thomas J; Elvin, Julia A; Soman, Salil; Lipson, Doron; Chmielecki, Juliann; Morosini, Deborah; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey S; Leyland-Jones, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The subset of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas that harbor BRAF V600E mutations are aggressive tumors with significantly shortened survival and limited treatment options. Here we present a colorectal cancer patient whose disease progressed through standard chemotherapy and who developed liver metastasis. Comprehensive genomic profiling (FoundationOne(®)) identified a BRAF V600E mutation in the liver lesion, as well as other genomic alterations consistent with colorectal cancers. Combination therapy of dabrafenib and trametinib with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy resulted in a durable major ongoing response for the patient. This report illustrates the utility of comprehensive genomic profiling with personalized targeted therapy for aggressive metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:26664139

  15. A metastatic colon adenocarcinoma harboring BRAF V600E has a durable major response to dabrafenib/trametinib and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Casey B; McMahon, Caitlin; Ali, Siraj M; Abramovitz, Mark; Williams, Kirstin A; Klein, Jessica; McKean, Heidi; Yelensky, Roman; George, Thomas J; Elvin, Julia A; Soman, Salil; Lipson, Doron; Chmielecki, Juliann; Morosini, Deborah; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey S; Leyland-Jones, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The subset of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas that harbor BRAF V600E mutations are aggressive tumors with significantly shortened survival and limited treatment options. Here we present a colorectal cancer patient whose disease progressed through standard chemotherapy and who developed liver metastasis. Comprehensive genomic profiling (FoundationOne®) identified a BRAF V600E mutation in the liver lesion, as well as other genomic alterations consistent with colorectal cancers. Combination therapy of dabrafenib and trametinib with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy resulted in a durable major ongoing response for the patient. This report illustrates the utility of comprehensive genomic profiling with personalized targeted therapy for aggressive metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:26664139

  16. Virtual microdissection identifies distinct tumor- and stroma-specific subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Marayati, Raoud; Flate, Elizabeth L.; Volmar, Keith E.; Loeza, S. Gabriela Herrera; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Rashid, Naim U.; Williams, Lindsay A.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Chung, Alexander H.; Smyla, Jadwiga K.; Anderson, Judy M.; Kim, Hong Jin; Bentrem, David J.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a lethal disease with a 5-year survival of 4%. A key hallmark of PDAC is extensive stromal involvement, which makes capturing precise tumor-specific molecular information difficult. Here, we have overcome this problem by applying blind source separation to a diverse collection of PDAC gene expression microarray data, which includes primary, metastatic, and normal samples. By digitally separating tumor, stroma, and normal gene expression, we have identified and validated two tumor-specific subtypes including a “basal-like” subtype which has worse outcome, and is molecularly similar to basal tumors in bladder and breast cancer. Furthermore, we define “normal” and “activated” stromal subtypes which are independently prognostic. Our results provide new insight into the molecular composition of PDAC which may be used to tailor therapies or provide decision support in a clinical setting where the choice and timing of therapies is critical. PMID:26343385

  17. A Pilot Proteogenomic Study with Data Integration Identifies MCT1 and GLUT1 as Prognostic Markers in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Paul A.; Parapatics, Katja; Welsh, Eric A.; Müller, André C.; Cao, Haoyun; Fang, Bin; Koomen, John M.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Haura, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a pilot proteogenomic study to compare lung adenocarcinoma to lung squamous cell carcinoma using quantitative proteomics (6-plex TMT) combined with a customized Affymetrix GeneChip. Using MaxQuant software, we identified 51,001 unique peptides that mapped to 7,241 unique proteins and from these identified 6,373 genes with matching protein expression for further analysis. We found a minor correlation between gene expression and protein expression; both datasets were able to independently recapitulate known differences between the adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma subtypes. We found 565 proteins and 629 genes to be differentially expressed between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, with 113 of these consistently differentially expressed at both the gene and protein levels. We then compared our results to published adenocarcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma proteomic data that we also processed with MaxQuant. We selected two proteins consistently overexpressed in squamous cell carcinoma in all studies, MCT1 (SLC16A1) and GLUT1 (SLC2A1), for further investigation. We found differential expression of these same proteins at the gene level in our study as well as in other public gene expression datasets. These findings combined with survival analysis of public datasets suggest that MCT1 and GLUT1 may be potential prognostic markers in adenocarcinoma and druggable targets in squamous cell carcinoma. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002622. PMID:26539827

  18. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity.

    PubMed

    Dulak, Austin M; Stojanov, Petar; Peng, Shouyong; Lawrence, Michael S; Fox, Cameron; Stewart, Chip; Bandla, Santhoshi; Imamura, Yu; Schumacher, Steven E; Shefler, Erica; McKenna, Aaron; Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Ramos, Alex H; Auclair, Daniel; Thompson, Kristin; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Guiducci, Candace; Beroukhim, Rameen; Zhou, Zhongren; Lin, Lin; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra; Chang, Andrew; Landrenau, Rodney; Pennathur, Arjun; Ogino, Shuji; Luketich, James D; Golub, Todd R; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Beer, David G; Godfrey, Tony E; Getz, Gad; Bass, Adam J

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a 5-year survival rate of ~15%, the identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation spectra from whole-exome sequencing of 149 EAC tumor-normal pairs, 15 of which have also been subjected to whole-genome sequencing. We identify a mutational signature defined by a high prevalence of A>C transversions at AA dinucleotides. Statistical analysis of exome data identified 26 significantly mutated genes. Of these genes, five (TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, ARID1A and PIK3CA) have previously been implicated in EAC. The new significantly mutated genes include chromatin-modifying factors and candidate contributors SPG20, TLR4, ELMO1 and DOCK2. Functional analyses of EAC-derived mutations in ELMO1 identifies increased cellular invasion. Therefore, we suggest the potential activation of the RAC1 pathway as a contributor to EAC tumorigenesis. PMID:23525077

  19. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24591829

  20. Antiproliferative activity of New Zealand propolis and phenolic compounds vs human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Owen; Mitchell, Kevin; Bloor, Stephen; Davis, Paul; Suddes, Amanda

    2015-10-01

    New Zealand propolis is a "European" type propolis obtained by honey bees mainly from exudates of poplar. European type propolis is known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties and this activity has been attributed to some of the main constituents such as chrysin and CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester). As part of our studies on how New Zealand propolis might benefit gastro-intestinal health, we carried out in vitro bioactivity-guided fractionation of "Bio30™" propolis using both anti-inflammatory (TNF-α, COX-1, COX-2) and anti-colon cancer (DLD-1 colon cancer cell viability) assays; and determined the phenolic compounds responsible for the activity. The New Zealand wax-free Bio30™ propolis tincture solids had very high levels of the dihydroflavonoids pinocembrin and pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, and high levels of the dimethylallyl, benzyl and 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeates relative to CAPE. The DLD-1 assays identified strong anti-proliferative activity associated with these components as well as chrysin, galangin and CAPE and a number of lesser known or lower concentration compounds including benzyl ferulate, benzyl isoferulate, pinostrobin, 5-phenylpenta-2,4-dienoic acid and tectochrysin. The phenolic compounds pinocembrin, pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, tectochrysin, dimethylallyl caffeate, 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeate, benzyl ferulate and benzyl isoferulate also showed good broad spectrum activity in anti-proliferative assays against three other gastro-intestinal cancer cell lines; HCT-116 colon carcinoma, KYSE-30 oesophageal squamous cancer, and NCI-N87 gastric carcinoma. Activity is also observed in anti-inflammatory assays although it appears to be limited to one of the first cytokines in the inflammatory cascade, TNF-α. PMID:26347954

  1. Exome Sequencing Identifies Biallelic MSH3 Germline Mutations as a Recessive Subtype of Colorectal Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ronja; Spier, Isabel; Zhao, Bixiao; Kloth, Michael; Marquez, Jonathan; Hinrichsen, Inga; Kirfel, Jutta; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Uhlhaas, Siegfried; Stienen, Dietlinde; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Kayser, Katrin; Thiele, Holger; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Marra, Giancarlo; Kristiansen, Glen; Nöthen, Markus M; Büttner, Reinhard; Möslein, Gabriela; Betz, Regina C; Brieger, Angela; Lifton, Richard P; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    In ∼30% of families affected by colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutations have been identified in the previously implicated genes APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, and NTHL1, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover further genes with high-penetrance causative mutations, we performed exome sequencing of leukocyte DNA from 102 unrelated individuals with unexplained adenomatous polyposis. We identified two unrelated individuals with differing compound-heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) germline mutations in the mismatch-repair gene MSH3. The impact of the MSH3 mutations (c.1148delA, c.2319-1G>A, c.2760delC, and c.3001-2A>C) was indicated at the RNA and protein levels. Analysis of the diseased individuals' tumor tissue demonstrated high microsatellite instability of di- and tetranucleotides (EMAST), and immunohistochemical staining illustrated a complete loss of nuclear MSH3 in normal and tumor tissue, confirming the LoF effect and causal relevance of the mutations. The pedigrees, genotypes, and frequency of MSH3 mutations in the general population are consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Both index persons have an affected sibling carrying the same mutations. The tumor spectrum in these four persons comprised colorectal and duodenal adenomas, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and an early-onset astrocytoma. Additionally, we detected one unrelated individual with biallelic PMS2 germline mutations, representing constitutional mismatch-repair deficiency. Potentially causative variants in 14 more candidate genes identified in 26 other individuals require further workup. In the present study, we identified biallelic germline MSH3 mutations in individuals with a suspected hereditary tumor syndrome. Our data suggest that MSH3 mutations represent an additional recessive subtype of colorectal adenomatous polyposis. PMID:27476653

  2. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  3. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Jiao, Shuo; Bien, Stephanie A; Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V; Curtis, Keith R; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hayes, Richard B; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jenkins, Mark A; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M; Newcomb, Polly A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Potter, John D; Schoen, Robert E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  4. Exome sequencing identifies potential novel candidate genes in patients with unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Spier, Isabel; Kerick, Martin; Drichel, Dmitriy; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Perner, Sven; Thiele, Holger; Nöthen, Markus M; Hoffmann, Per; Timmermann, Bernd; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In up to 30% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, and POLE or POLD1, causing Polymerase-Proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover new causative genes, exome sequencing was performed using DNA from leukocytes and a total of 12 colorectal adenomas from seven unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. For data analysis and variant filtering, an established bioinformatics pipeline including in-house tools was applied. Variants were filtered for rare truncating point mutations and copy-number variants assuming a dominant, recessive, or tumor suppressor model of inheritance. Subsequently, targeted sequence analysis of the most promising candidate genes was performed in a validation cohort of 191 unrelated patients. All relevant variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of exome sequencing data resulted in the identification of rare loss-of-function germline mutations in three promising candidate genes (DSC2, PIEZO1, ZSWIM7). In the validation cohort, further variants predicted to be pathogenic were identified in DSC2 and PIEZO1. According to the somatic mutation spectra, the adenomas in this patient cohort follow the classical pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. The present study identified three candidate genes which might represent rare causes for a predisposition to colorectal adenoma formation. Especially PIEZO1 (FAM38A) and ZSWIM7 (SWS1) warrant further exploration. To evaluate the clinical relevance of these genes, investigation of larger patient cohorts and functional studies are required. PMID:26780541

  5. Mutation of the nm23-H1 gene has a non-dominant role in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    JIN, YUELING; DAI, ZHENSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Nm23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor gene, which is has a reduced expression in patients with digestive system cancer. However, the mechanistic basis for the genetic instability remains unknown. To study the expression of the nm23-H1 gene in patients with colorectal cancer, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism was used to analyze any point mutation, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of nm23-H1. Results revealed that all 63 specimens of Chinese human colorectal cancer tissues exhibit no point mutation. Among those 63 specimens, 19 (30%) exhibited positive immunostaining for the nm23-H1 protein and 44 (70%) exhibited negative immunostaining. These observations suggested that the protein and gene expression levels of nm23-H1 are reduced in colorectal cancer compared with the adjacent normal tissues, and the point mutation in the nm23-H1 gene is not the dominant cause of metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27330777

  6. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  7. Mismatch repair mRNA and protein expression in intestinal adenocarcinoma in sika deer (Cervus nippon) resembling heritable non-polyposis colorectal cancer in man.

    PubMed

    Jahns, H; Browne, J A

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal adenocarcinomas seen in an inbred herd of farmed sika deer (Cervus nippon) morphologically resembled human hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Features common to both included multiple de novo sites of tumourigenesis in the proximal colon, sessile and non-polyposis mucosal changes, the frequent finding of mucinous type adenocarcinoma, lymphocyte infiltration into the neoplastic tubules and Crohn's-like lymphoid follicles at the deep margin of the tumour. HNPCC is defined by a germline mutation of mismatch repair (MMR) genes resulting in their inactivation and loss of expression. To test the hypothesis that similar MMR gene inactivation occurs in the deer tumours, the expression of the four most important MMR genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2, was examined at the mRNA level by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (n = 12) and at the protein level by immunohistochemistry (n = 40) in tumour and control tissues. All four genes were expressed equally in normal and neoplastic tissues, so MMR gene inactivation could not be implicated in the carcinogenesis of this tumour in sika deer. PMID:25678423

  8. Dysbindin as a novel biomarker for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma identified by proteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Lv, Xiaohui; Fang, Cheng; Lv, Xing; Wang, Fengsong; Wang, Dongmei; Zhao, Jun; Ma, Yueyun; Xue, Yu; Bai, Quan; Yao, Xuebiao; Chen, Yong

    2016-10-15

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is known to have a poor prognosis partly because of lack of effective biomarkers. In the test set, we investigated dysbindin (DTNBP1) as a potential biomarker for PDAC by comparing preoperative and postoperative serum mass spectrometry (MS) proteomic profilings. Of the included 50 PDAC patients, 42 (positivity of 84.0%) detected a lower MS peak in postoperative serums than preoperative ones which was then identified as dysbindin. In the verification set, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were used to assess diagnostic efficiency. 550 participants were included in the verification set [250 with PDAC, 80 with benign biliary obstruction (BBO), 70 with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and 150 healthy donors (HD)]. Dysbindin was increased in PDAC patient sera than in all controls. ROC curves revealed the optimum diagnostic cutoff for dysbindin was 699.16 pg/ml [area under curve (AUC) 0.849 (95% CI 0.812-0.885), sensitivity 81.9% and specificity 84.7%]. Raised concentration of dysbindin in sera could differentiate PDAC from BBO, CP and HD. Moreover, dysbindin maintained its diagnostic accuracy for PDAC patients who were CA19-9 negative [AUC 0.875 (95% CI 0.804-0.945), sensitivity 83.0%, specificity 89.0%] and for patients with benign biliary obstruction [AUC 0.849 (95% CI 0.803-0.894), sensitivity 82.3%, specificity 84.0%].Our discovery of dysbindin may complement measurement of CA19-9 in the diagnosis of PDAC and help to discriminate PDAC from other pancreatic diseases or begin biliary obstruction. PMID:27281120

  9. Functional signaling pathway analysis of lung adenocarcinomas identifies novel therapeutic targets for KRAS mutant tumors.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Elisa; Bellezza, Guido; Haura, Eric B; Crinó, Lucio; Cress, W Douglas; Deng, Jianghong; Ludovini, Vienna; Sidoni, Angelo; Schabath, Matthew B; Puma, Francesco; Vannucci, Jacopo; Siggillino, Annamaria; Liotta, Lance A; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2015-10-20

    Little is known about the complex signaling architecture of KRAS and the interconnected RAS-driven protein-protein interactions, especially as it occurs in human clinical specimens. This study explored the activated and interconnected signaling network of KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinomas (AD) to identify novel therapeutic targets.Thirty-four KRAS mutant (MT) and twenty-four KRAS wild-type (WT) frozen biospecimens were obtained from surgically treated lung ADs. Samples were subjected to Laser Capture Microdissection and Reverse Phase Protein Microarray analysis to explore the expression/activation levels of 150 signaling proteins along with co-activation concordance mapping. An independent set of 90 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was used to validate selected findings by immunohistochemistry (IHC).Compared to KRAS WT tumors, the signaling architecture of KRAS MT ADs revealed significant interactions between KRAS downstream substrates, the AKT/mTOR pathway, and a number of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). Approximately one-third of the KRAS MT tumors had ERK activation greater than the WT counterpart (p<0.01). Notably 18% of the KRAS MT tumors had elevated activation of the Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α) (p=0.02).This finding was verified in an independent population by IHC (p=0.03).KRAS MT lung ADs appear to have a more intricate RAS linked signaling network than WT tumors with linkage to many RTKs and to the AKT-mTOR pathway. Combination therapy targeting different nodes of this network may be necessary to treat this group of patients. In addition, for patients with KRAS MT tumors and activation of the ER-α, anti-estrogen therapy may have important clinical implications. PMID:26468985

  10. Functional signaling pathway analysis of lung adenocarcinomas identifies novel therapeutic targets for KRAS mutant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Baldelli, Elisa; Bellezza, Guido; Haura, Eric B.; Crinó, Lucio; Cress, W. Douglas; Deng, Jianghong; Ludovini, Vienna; Sidoni, Angelo; Schabath, Matthew B.; Puma, Francesco; Vannucci, Jacopo; Siggillino, Annamaria; Liotta, Lance A.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the complex signaling architecture of KRAS and the interconnected RAS-driven protein-protein interactions, especially as it occurs in human clinical specimens. This study explored the activated and interconnected signaling network of KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinomas (AD) to identify novel therapeutic targets. Thirty-four KRAS mutant (MT) and twenty-four KRAS wild-type (WT) frozen biospecimens were obtained from surgically treated lung ADs. Samples were subjected to laser capture microdissection and reverse phase protein microarray analysis to explore the expression/activation levels of 150 signaling proteins along with co-activation concordance mapping. An independent set of 90 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was used to validate selected findings by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Compared to KRAS WT tumors, the signaling architecture of KRAS MT ADs revealed significant interactions between KRAS downstream substrates, the AKT/mTOR pathway, and a number of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). Approximately one-third of the KRAS MT tumors had ERK activation greater than the WT counterpart (p<0.01). Notably 18% of the KRAS MT tumors had elevated activation of the Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α) (p=0.02). This finding was verified in an independent population by IHC (p=0.03). KRAS MT lung ADs appear to have a more intricate RAS linked signaling network than WT tumors with linkage to many RTKs and to the AKT-mTOR pathway. Combination therapy targeting different nodes of this network may be necessary to treat this group of patients. In addition, for patients with KRAS MT tumors and activation of the ER-α, anti-estrogen therapy may have important clinical implications. PMID:26468985

  11. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  12. Relation of glypican-3 and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis of mucinous and non-mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohammad, Mie Ali; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal

    2015-06-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a member of the membrane-bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans. E-cadherin is an adhesive receptor that is believed to act as a tumor suppressor gene. Many studies had investigated E-cadherin expressions in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) while only one study had investigated GPC3 expression in CRC. This study aims to investigate expression of GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal mucinous carcinoma (MA) and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA) using manual tissue microarray technique. Tumor tissue specimens are collected from 75 cases of MC and 75 cases of NMA who underwent radical surgery from Jan 2007 to Jan 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. Their clinicopathological parameters and survival data were revised and analyzed using established statistical methodologies. High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique and immunohistochemistry for GPC3 and E-cadherin was done. NMA showed higher expression of GPC3 than MA with no statistically significant relation. NMA showed a significantly higher E-cadherin expression than MA. GPC3 and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in NMA, but not in MA, group. In NMA group, there was no significant relation between either GPC3 or E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features. In a univariate analysis, neither GPC3 nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS). GPC3 and E-cadherin expressions are not independent prognostic factors in CRC. However, expressions of both are significantly interrelated in NMA patients, suggesting an excellent interplay between both, in contrast to MA. Further molecular studies are needed to further explore the relationship between GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25619476

  13. Post-discharge surveillance to identify colorectal surgical site infection rates and related costs.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J; Khan, D; Aplin, C; Ball, J; Thomas, M; Bankart, J

    2009-07-01

    A growing number of surveillance studies have highlighted concerns with relying only on data from inpatients. Without post-discharge surveillance (PDS) data, the rate and burden of surgical site infections (SSIs) are underestimated. PDS data for colorectal surgery in the UK remains to be published. This is an important specialty to study since it is considered to have the highest SSI rate and is among the most expensive to treat. This study of colorectal SSI used a 30 day surveillance programme with telephone interviews and home visits. Each additional healthcare resource used by patients with SSI was documented and costed. Of the 105 patients who met the inclusion criteria and completed the 30 day follow-up, 29 (27%) developed SSI, of which 12 were diagnosed after discharge. The mean number of days to presentation of SSI was 13. Multivariable logistic analysis identified body mass index as the only significant risk factor. The additional cost of treating each infected patient was pound sterling 10,523, although 15% of these additional costs were met by primary care. The 5 month surveillance programme cost pound sterling 5,200 to run. An analysis of the surveillance nurse's workload showed that the nurse could be replaced by a healthcare assistant. PDS to detect SSI after colorectal surgery is necessary to provide complete data with accurate additional costs. PMID:19446918

  14. Chicken egg yolk anti-asialoGM1 immunoglobulin (IgY): an inexpensive glycohistochemical probe for localization of T-antigen in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sriram, V; Jebaraj, C E; Yogeeswaran, G

    1999-07-01

    A egg yolk polyclonal IgY has been prepared by immunization of white leghorn chickens with small unilamellar liposomal asialoGM1. The newly prepared anti-asialoGM1 IgY has been characterized to be specific toward the terminal carbohydrate moiety of asialoGM1, and has no cross reactivity to its sialylated counterpart (ganglioside, GM1) as evidenced by immunochromatographic studies. General glycohistochemical methods along with antigen specific lectin and immunohistochemical staining using anti-asialoGM1 IgY were used to study the expression of Thomsen-Friedenreich (T-) disaccharide antigen in human colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues. The expression of T-antigen in colon cancer tissue was detected by two T-disaccharide specific probes, chicken anti-T-yolk antibody (IgY) and Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (AIL) and was found to be more pronounced in both the secreted mucin as well as the cytoplasmic mucin deposits. These immunochemical detection methods for T-antigen showed a weaker correlation with other glycostaining methods using, alcian-blue/periodic acid-Schiff (AB-PAS) and high iron diamine (HID). However, a general enzymatic staining for galactose and galactosamine containing glycoconjugates, by galactose oxidase-Schiff method, showed a good correlation with T-antigen detection. While the T-beta specific anti-asialoGM1 could localize T-antigen in 11 of 13 (84%) human colorectal adenocarcinoma tissue sections tested, the T-alpha specific AIL could localize the T-antigen in only 6 of the tissues (46%). These observations confirm previously reported findings, of the prevalence of T-beta conformation in colon cancer, that binds significantly more with the anti-asialoGM1 IgY than with the T-alpha specific AIL. Hence, both anti-T IgY and the AIL immunohistochemical probes may have useful diagnostic value because of the ease of preparation and cost effectiveness, but the T-beta specific anti-asialoGM1 probe (IgY) would have a better prognostic value in colon

  15. Reduced E-cadherin expression as a cause of distinctive signet-ring cell variant in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Ho Jeong; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare type of adenocarcinoma and presents with distinctive clinicopathological features. This study was performed to assess the biological characteristics of colorectal SRCC regarding the E-cadherin expression. Seventeen patients with primary colorectal SRCC were identified and their clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. The mean age of the 17 patients was 45.3 yr (14-68). Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and beta-catenin were performed in ten colorectal SRCCs and in 30 ordinary colorectal adenocarcinomas as control. Primary colorectal SRCC occurred in 0.7% of 2,388 colorectal adenocarcinomas. Most patients had advanced stage tumor at surgery (stage III and IV, AJCC: 82%). Five-year survival rate was 16%. Peritoneal seeding was the most common recurrence pattern (41%) and liver metastasis was not identified. All SRCCs showed a markedly reduced or absent expression of E-cadherin on immunohistochemical staining, whereas seven (23.3%) of ordinary carcinomas showed reduced expression, thereby indicating a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.005). In immunohistochemical staining for beta-catenin, eight of ten SRCCs showed reduced membrane expression that did not attain statistical significance compared to ordinary adenocarcinomas. It is suggested that aberrant E-cadherin expression may explain the distinct clinicopathological features in primary colorectal SRCC. PMID:11850584

  16. Cinnamomum verum component 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde: a novel antiproliferative drug inducing cell death through targeting both topoisomerase I and II in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kuen-daw; Cherng, Jonathan; Liu, Yi-Heng; Chen, Ta-Wei; Wong, Ho-Yiu; Yang, Shu-mei; Chou, Kuo-Shen; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Cinnamomum verum is used to manufacture the spice cinnamon. In addition, the plant has been used as a Chinese herbal medication. Methods We investigated the antiproliferative effect of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA), a constituent of the cortex of the plant, and the molecular biomarkers associated with tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells. Specifically, cell viability was evaluated by colorimetric assay; apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and morphological analysis with bright field, acridine orange, and neutral red stainings, as well as comet assay; topoisomerase I activity was determined by assay based upon DNA relaxation and topoisomerase II by DNA relaxation plus decatentation of kinetoplast DNA; lysosomal vacuolation and volume of acidic compartments (VACs) were determined by neutral red staining. Results The results demonstrate that 2-MCA inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis as implicated by mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) loss, activation of both caspase-3 and -9, increase of annexin V+PI+ cells, as well as morphological characteristics of apoptosis. Furthermore, 2-MCA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with elevated VAC, cytotoxicity, and inhibitions of topoisomerase I as well as II activities. Additional study demonstrated the antiproliferative effect of 2-MCA found in a nude mice model. Conclusions Our data implicate that the antiproliferative activity of 2-MCA in vitro involved downregulation of cell growth markers, both topoisomerase I and II, and upregulation of pro-apoptotic molecules, associated with increased lysosomal vacuolation. In vivo 2-MCA reduced the tumor burden that could have significant clinical impact. Indeed, similar effects were found in other tested cell lines, including human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 and Hep 3B, lung adenocarcinoma A549 and squamous cell carcinoma NCI-H520, and T-lymphoblastic MOLT-3 (results not shown). Our data implicate that 2-MCA could be a

  17. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on staging, see “ Colorectal cancer stages ” The normal colon and rectum The colon and rectum are parts ... through the anus . Types of cancer in the colon and rectum Adenocarcinomas make up more than 95% ...

  18. Regulation of tumor necrosis factor gene expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma: in vivo analysis by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Beissert, S; Bergholz, M; Waase, I; Lepsien, G; Schauer, A; Pfizenmaier, K; Krönke, M

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced by macrophages is thought to contribute to the host defense against development of cancer. However, since tumor cells themselves are able to produce TNF, it is conceivable that TNF may also play an adverse pathological role in carcinogenesis. To better understand the functional significance of TNF in neoplastic disease, we have determined the cellular source of TNF activity produced in 10 patients with colorectal cancer. Northern blot analysis of RNAs extracted from fresh biopsy specimens revealed detectable TNF mRNA levels in all instances. By using in situ hybridization of frozen sections, scattered cells expressing TNF mRNA could be discerned. Based on morphological criteria, these TNF-positive cells most likely belong to the macrophage lineage. Macrophages in normal tissue surrounding the tumor did not express TNF mRNA, suggesting that macrophage activation occurs locally at the site of neoplastic transformation. Immunohistochemistry using anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies revealed that less than 1% of tumor-infiltrating macrophages synthesize TNF protein. Thus we present evidence that in colorectal cancer only a small proportion of tumor-infiltrating macrophages produces TNF, indicating that the microenvironment of the tumor provides adequate, yet suboptimal, conditions for macrophage activation. Images PMID:2662193

  19. Image segmentation of pyramid style identifier based on Support Vector Machine for colorectal endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takumi; Koide, Tetsushi; Sugi, Koki; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Anh-Tuan Hoang; Tamaki, Toru; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi; Kominami, Yoko; Yoshida, Shigeto; Mieno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    With the increase of colorectal cancer patients in recent years, the needs of quantitative evaluation of colorectal cancer are increased, and the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system which supports doctor's diagnosis is essential. In this paper, a hardware design of type identification module in CAD system for colorectal endoscopic images with narrow band imaging (NBI) magnification is proposed for real-time processing of full high definition image (1920 × 1080 pixel). A pyramid style image segmentation with SVMs for multi-size scan windows, which can be implemented on an FPGA with small circuit area and achieve high accuracy, is proposed for actual complex colorectal endoscopic images. PMID:26736922

  20. Downregulation of MDM2 expression by RNAi inhibits LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells growth and the treatment of LoVo cells with mdm2siRNA3 enhances the sensitivity to cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yan . E-mail: gyfyuyan@hotmail.com; Sun Ping . E-mail: sunny19750502@hotmail.com; Sun Lichun; Liu Guoyi; Chen Guohua . E-mail: olivebranch_82@hotmail.com; Shang Lihua . E-mail: leval1000@sina.com; Wu Hongbo . E-mail: whpwl@sina.com; Hu Jing; Li Yue; Mao Yinling; Sui Guangjie; Sun Xiwen

    2006-01-06

    To investigate the biological effect of mdm2 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells, three mdm2siRNA constructions were recombinated and transient transfected into human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells with low differentiation character in vitro. The results showed that mdm2siRNA3 reduced mRNA level of mdm2 and protein level of mdm2, leading to proliferation inhibition on LoVo cells, and reduced tumor growth in nude mice. It was found that depletion of MDM2 in this pattern promoted apoptosis of LoVo cells and Cisplatin (DDP) treated in the mdm2siRNA3 transfected cell population would result in a substantial decrease by MTT colorimetry. Decreasing the MDM2 protein level in LoVo cells by RNAi could significantly inhibit tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that mdm2 gene played a definite role in the development and aggressiveness of human colon carcinoma. It also could be a therapeutic target in colorectal carcinoma. The synergistic activation of RNAi and cell toxicity agents indicated that the combination of chemotherapy and gene therapy will be a promising approach in the future.

  1. Expression Profiling Identifies Bezafibrate as Potential Therapeutic Drug for Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Yang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Xinmei; Zhang, Yantao; Pan, Xuebin; Wang, Guiping; Ye, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced gene expression patterns that invert disease profiles have recently been illustrated to be a new strategy for drug-repositioning. In the present study, we validated this approach and focused on prediction of novel drugs for lung adenocarcinoma (AC), for which there is a pressing need to find novel therapeutic compounds. Firstly, connectivity map (CMap) analysis computationally predicted bezafibrate as a putative compound against lung AC. Then this hypothesis was verified by in vitro assays of anti-proliferation and cell cycle arrest. In silico docking evidence indicated that bezafibrate could target cyclin dependent kinase 2(CDK2), which regulates progression through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we found that bezafibrate can significantly down-regulate the expression of CDK2 mRNA and p-CDK2. Using a nude mice xenograft model, we also found that bezafibrate could inhibit tumor growth of lung AC in vivo. In conclusion, this study proposed bezafibrate as a potential therapeutic option for lung AC patients, illustrating the potential of in silico drug screening. PMID:26535062

  2. DNA methylome profiling identifies novel methylated genes in African American patients with colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Daremipouran, M; Goel, Ajay; Varma, Sudhir; Leavitt, R; Sun, Xueguang; Brim, Hassan

    2014-04-01

    The identification of genes that are differentially methylated in colorectal cancer (CRC) has potential value for both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions specifically in high-risk populations such as African Americans (AAs). However, DNA methylation patterns in CRC, especially in AAs, have not been systematically explored and remain poorly understood. Here, we performed DNA methylome profiling to identify the methylation status of CpG islands within candidate genes involved in critical pathways important in the initiation and development of CRC. We used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) in colorectal cancer and adenoma tissues that were compared with DNA methylome from a healthy AA subject's colon tissue and peripheral blood DNA. The identified methylation markers were validated in fresh frozen CRC tissues and corresponding normal tissues from AA patients diagnosed with CRC at Howard University Hospital. We identified and validated the methylation status of 355 CpG sites located within 16 gene promoter regions associated with CpG islands. Fifty CpG sites located within CpG islands-in genes ATXN7L1 (2), BMP3 (7), EID3 (15), GAS7 (1), GPR75 (24), and TNFAIP2 (1)-were significantly hypermethylated in tumor vs. normal tissues (P<0.05). The methylation status of BMP3, EID3, GAS7, and GPR75 was confirmed in an independent, validation cohort. Ingenuity pathway analysis mapped three of these markers (GAS7, BMP3 and GPR) in the insulin and TGF-β1 network-the two key pathways in CRC. In addition to hypermethylated genes, our analysis also revealed that LINE-1 repeat elements were progressively hypomethylated in the normal-adenoma-cancer sequence. We conclude that DNA methylome profiling based on RRBS is an effective method for screening aberrantly methylated genes in CRC. While previous studies focused on the limited identification of hypermethylated genes, ours is the first study to systematically and comprehensively identify novel hypermethylated

  3. Genome-wide association analyses in East Asians identify new susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Ben; Matsuo, Keitaro; Shin, Aesun; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ren, Zefang; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Shi, Jiajun; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Delahanty, Ryan J.; Ji, Bu-Tian; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Gao, Yu-Tang; Oh, Jae Hwan; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Park, Eun Jung; Li, Hong-Lan; Park, Ji Won; Jo, Jaeseong; Jeong, Jin-Young; Hosono, Satoyo; Casey, Graham; Peters, Ulrike; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    To identify novel genetic factors for colorectal cancer (CRC), we conducted a genome-wide association study in East Asians. By analyzing genome-wide data in 2,098 cases and 5,749 controls, we selected 64 promising SNPs for replication in an independent set of samples including up to 5,358 cases and 5,922 controls. We identified four SNPs with a P-value of 8.58 × 10−7 to 3.77 × 10−10 in the combined analysis of all East Asian samples. Three of the four SNPs were replicated in a study conducted among 26,060 European descendants with a combined P-value of 1.22 × 10−10 for rs647161 (5q31.1), 6.64 × 10−9 for rs2423279 (20p12.3), and 3.06 × 10−8 for rs10774214 (12p13.32 near the CCND2 gene), respectively, derived from the meta-analysis of data from both East Asian and European populations. This study identified three new CRC susceptibility loci and provides additional insight into the genetics and biology of CRC. PMID:23263487

  4. Novel MEK1 Mutation Identified by Mutational Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Pathway Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Jenifer L.; Gong, Yixuan; Chitale, Dhananjay; Golas, Ben; McLellan, Michael D.; Kasai, Yumi; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Solit, David; Levine, Ross; Michel, Kathrin; Thomas, Roman K.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2008-01-01

    Genetic lesions affecting a number of kinases and other elements within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed mutational profiling of a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas to uncover other potential somatic mutations in genes of this pathway that could contribute to lung tumorigenesis. We have identified in 2 of 207 primary lung tumors a somatic activating mutation in exon 2 of MEK1 (i.e., mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 or MAP2K1) that substitutes asparagine for lysine at amino acid 57 (K57N) in the nonkinase portion of the kinase. Neither of these two tumors harbored known mutations in other genes encoding components of the EGFR signaling pathway (i.e., EGFR, HER2, KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF). Expression of mutant, but not wild-type, MEK1 leads to constitutive activity of extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 in human 293T cells and to growth factor–independent proliferation of murine Ba/F3 cells. A selective MEK inhibitor, AZD6244, inhibits mutant-induced ERK activity in 293T cells and growth of mutant-bearing Ba/F3 cells. We also screened 85 NSCLC cell lines for MEK1 exon 2 mutations; one line (NCI-H1437) harbors a Q56P substitution, a known transformation-competent allele of MEK1 originally identified in rat fibroblasts, and is sensitive to treatment with AZD6244. MEK1 mutants have not previously been reported in lung cancer and may provide a target for effective therapy in a small subset of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:18632602

  5. Brachyury identifies a class of enteroendocrine cells in normal human intestinal crypts and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Filipe; Sammut, Stephen J.; Williams, Geraint T.; Gollins, Simon; McFarlane, Ramsay J.; Reis, Rui Manuel; Wakeman, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Normal homeostasis of adult intestinal epithelium and repair following tissue damage is maintained by a balance of stem and differentiated cells, many of which are still only poorly characterised. Enteroendocrine cells of the gut are a small population of differentiated, secretory cells that are critical for integrating nutrient sensing with metabolic responses, dispersed amongst other epithelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that sub-sets of secretory enteroendocrine cells can act as reserve stem cells. Given the link between cells with stem-like properties and cancer, it is important that we identify factors that might provide a bridge between the two. Here, we identify a sub-set of chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells that are positive for the developmental and cancer-associated transcription factor Brachyury in normal human small intestinal and colonic crypts. Whilst chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells are also Brachyury-positive in colorectal tumours, expression of Brachyury becomes more diffuse in these samples, suggesting a more widespread function in cancer. The finding of the developmental transcription factor Brachyury in normal adult human intestinal crypts may extend the functional complexity of enteroendocrine cells and serves as a platform for assessment of the molecular processes of intestinal homeostasis that underpins our understanding of human health, cancer and aging. PMID:26862851

  6. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiang; Liu, Xingang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  7. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  8. Identifying miRNA/mRNA negative regulation pairs in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xile; Xu, Xiangming; Wang, Jinhai; Lin, Jianjiang; Chen, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in the molecular biology of Colorectal cancer (CRC), novel approaches are still required to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism of CRC. We aim to explore the potential negatively regulated miRNA-mRNA pairs and investigate their regulatory roles so as to elaborate the potential roles of the critical proteins in the signaling pathways enriched by the differential target genes of negatively regulated miRNA in CRC. Firstly, the differential miRNA-mRNA pairs were selected, followed by pairs of miRNA and their target genes. The obtained relationships were subjected to do functional enrichment analysis and those enriched in CRC pathways were chose to further construct a protein interaction network. Finally, we analyzed the regulatory roles of these relationships and constructed a regulatory network of negatively regulated miRNA and mRNA relationships. A total of 372 pairs of miRNA-mRNA were found and 108 target genes of miRNA were obtained. Three miRNAs including hsa-mir-23b, hsa-mir-365-1 and hsa-mir-365-2 showed significant influence on prognosis of CRC patients. To conclude, the miRNA/mRNA deregulations pairs identified in this study have high potentials to be further applied in diagnosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:26269151

  9. Integration of genome scale data for identifying new players in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Viktorija; Crippa, Elisabetta; Gariboldi, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) display a wide variety of genomic aberrations that may be either causally linked to their development and progression, or might serve as biomarkers for their presence. Recent advances in rapid high-throughput genetic and genomic analysis have helped to identify a plethora of alterations that can potentially serve as new cancer biomarkers, and thus help to improve CRC diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Each distinct data type (copy number variations, gene and microRNAs expression, CpG island methylation) provides an investigator with a different, partially independent, and complementary view of the entire genome. However, elucidation of gene function will require more information than can be provided by analyzing a single type of data. The integration of knowledge obtained from different sources is becoming increasingly essential for obtaining an interdisciplinary view of large amounts of information, and also for cross-validating experimental results. The integration of numerous types of genetic and genomic data derived from public sources, and via the use of ad-hoc bioinformatics tools and statistical methods facilitates the discovery and validation of novel, informative biomarkers. This combinatory approach will also enable researchers to more accurately and comprehensively understand the associations between different biologic pathways, mechanisms, and phenomena, and gain new insights into the etiology of CRC. PMID:26811605

  10. Exome capture sequencing of adenoma reveals genetic alterations in multiple cellular pathways at the early stage of colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Donger; Yang, Liu; Zheng, Liangtao; Ge, Weiting; Li, Dan; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Xueda; Gao, Zhibo; Xu, Jinghong; Huang, Yanqin; Hu, Hanguang; Zhang, Hang; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Mingming; Yang, Huanming; Zheng, Lei; Zheng, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Most of colorectal adenocarcinomas are believed to arise from adenomas, which are premalignant lesions. Sequencing the whole exome of the adenoma will help identifying molecular biomarkers that can predict the occurrence of adenocarcinoma more precisely and help understanding the molecular pathways underlying the initial stage of colorectal tumorigenesis. We performed the exome capture sequencing of the normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues from the same patient and sequenced the identified mutations in additional 73 adenomas and 288 adenocarcinomas. Somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were identified in both the adenoma and adenocarcinoma by comparing with the normal control from the same patient. We identified 12 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenoma and 42 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenocarcinoma. Most of these mutations including OR6X1, SLC15A3, KRTHB4, RBFOX1, LAMA3, CDH20, BIRC6, NMBR, GLCCI1, EFR3A, and FTHL17 were newly reported in colorectal adenomas. Functional annotation of these mutated genes showed that multiple cellular pathways including Wnt, cell adhesion and ubiquitin mediated proteolysis pathways were altered genetically in the adenoma and that the genetic alterations in the same pathways persist in the adenocarcinoma. CDH20 and LAMA3 were mutated in the adenoma while NRXN3 and COL4A6 were mutated in the adenocarcinoma from the same patient, suggesting for the first time that genetic alterations in the cell adhesion pathway occur as early as in the adenoma. Thus, the comparison of genomic mutations between adenoma and adenocarcinoma provides us a new insight into the molecular events governing the early step of colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:23301059

  11. Adenocarcinoma of the anal canal: A report of two cases with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Medha Pradip; Momin, Yasmin Altaf; Pandav, Amitkumar Bapuso; Sulhyan, Kalpana Ranjitsingh

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the anal canal accounts for about 20% of all anal canal cancers. It is subclassified into two types. (1) Colorectal type, which arises from the mucosa above dentate line and (2) extramucosal type, which includes adenocarcinoma arising in anorectal fistulae and adenocarcinoma arising from anal glands. Anal gland adenocarcinomas are extremely rare. In this article, we present two cases of anal adenocarcinoma, one colorectal type, and other anal gland carcinoma along with review of literature. PMID:27510691

  12. Genomic Aberrations in Crizotinib Resistant Lung Adenocarcinoma Samples Identified by Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Ali; van der Wekken, Anthonie J.; Kok, Klaas; Terpstra, M. Martijn; Bosman, Lisette J.; Mastik, Mirjam F.; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Hiltermann, T. Jeroen N.; Groen, Harry J. M.; van den Berg, Anke

    2016-01-01

    ALK-break positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients initially respond to crizotinib, but resistance occurs inevitably. In this study we aimed to identify fusion genes in crizotinib resistant tumor samples. Re-biopsies of three patients were subjected to paired-end RNA sequencing to identify fusion genes using deFuse and EricScript. The IGV browser was used to determine presence of known resistance-associated mutations. Sanger sequencing was used to validate fusion genes and digital droplet PCR to validate mutations. ALK fusion genes were detected in all three patients with EML4 being the fusion partner. One patient had no additional fusion genes. Another patient had one additional fusion gene, but without a predicted open reading frame (ORF). The third patient had three additional fusion genes, of which two were derived from the same chromosomal region as the EML4-ALK. A predicted ORF was identified only in the CLIP4-VSNL1 fusion product. The fusion genes validated in the post-treatment sample were also present in the biopsy before crizotinib. ALK mutations (p.C1156Y and p.G1269A) detected in the re-biopsies of two patients, were not detected in pre-treatment biopsies. In conclusion, fusion genes identified in our study are unlikely to be involved in crizotinib resistance based on presence in pre-treatment biopsies. The detection of ALK mutations in post-treatment tumor samples of two patients underlines their role in crizotinib resistance. PMID:27045755

  13. Functional Screening Identifies miRNAs Influencing Apoptosis and Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Juha; Kallioniemi, Olli; Rasmussen, Mads H.; Ostenfeld, Marie S.; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Øster, Bodil; Schepeler, Troels; Tobiasen, Heidi; Thorsen, Kasper; Sieber, Oliver M.; Gibbs, Peter; Lamy, Philippe; Hansen, Torben F.; Jakobsen, Anders; Riising, Eva M.; Helin, Kristian; Lubinski, Jan; Hagemann-Madsen, Rikke; Laurberg, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Andersen, Claus L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in many biological processes and are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. Particular miRNAs function either as tumor suppressors or oncogenes and appear to have diagnostic and prognostic significance. Although numerous miRNAs are dys-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) only a small fraction has been characterized functionally. Using high-throughput functional screening and miRNA profiling of clinical samples the present study aims at identifying miRNAs important for the control of cellular growth and/or apoptosis in CRC. The high-throughput functional screening was carried out in six CRC cell lines transfected with a pre-miR library including 319 synthetic human pre-miRs. Phenotypic alterations were evaluated by immunostaining of cleaved cPARP (apoptosis) or MKI67 (proliferation). Additionally, TaqMan Human MicroRNA Array Set v2.0 was used to profile the expression of 667 miRNAs in 14 normal colon mucosa and 46 microsatellite stable stage II CRC patients. Among the miRNAs that induced growth arrest and apoptosis in the CRC cell lines, and at same time were dys-regulated in the clinical samples, miR-375 was selected for further analysis. Independent in vitro analysis of transient and stable transfected CRC cell lines confirmed that miR-375 reduces cell viability through the induction of apoptotic death. We identified YAP1 as a direct miR-375 target in CRC and show that HELLS and NOLC1 are down-stream targets. Knock-down of YAP1 mimicked the phenotype induced by miR-375 over-expression indicating that miR-375 most likely exerts its pro-apoptotic role through YAP1 and its anti-apoptotic down-stream targets BIRC5 and BCL2L1. Finally, in vivo analysis of mouse xenograft tumors showed that miR-375 expression significantly reduced tumor growth. We conclude that the high-throughput screening successfully identified miRNAs that induce apoptosis and/or inhibit proliferation in CRC cells. Finally, combining the functional screening

  14. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schmit, Stephanie L; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P; Harju, John F; Idos, Gregory E; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C; Van Den Berg, David J; Hutter, Carolyn M; Aragaki, Aaron K; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Chanock, Stephen J; Curtis, Keith R; Fuchs, Charles S; Gala, Manish; Giovannucc, Edward L; Giocannucci, Edward L; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Hayes, Richard B; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; Kury, Sebastian; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Lemire, Mathieu; Lemire, Mathiew; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W; Berndt, Sonja I; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C; Fortini, Barbara K; Gallinger, Steven J; Gauderman, W James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B; Peters, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:26151821

  15. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K.; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P.; Harju, John F.; Idos, Gregory E.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J.; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E.; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S.; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Aragaki, Aaron K.; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Curtis, Keith R.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gala, Manish; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Lemire, Mathieu; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W.; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T.; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Conti, David V.; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Fortini, Barbara K.; Gallinger, Steven J.; Gauderman, W. James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W.; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:26151821

  16. Human SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 Proteins Acting on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reduce Proliferation of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HT-29 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shulepko, M A; Bychkov, M L; Shenkarev, Z O; Paramonov, A S; Chugunov, A O; Arseniev, A S; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2014-10-01

    Human secreted Ly-6/uPAR related proteins (SLURP-1 and SLURP-2) are produced by various cells, including the epithelium and immune system. These proteins act as autocrine/paracrine hormones regulating the growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and are also involved in the control of inflammation and malignant cell transformation. These effects are assumed to be mediated by the interactions of SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 with the α7 and α3β2 subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), respectively. Available knowledge about the molecular mechanism underling the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 effects is very limited. SLURP-2 remains one of the most poorly studied proteins of the Ly-6/uPAR family. In this study, we designed for the first time a bacterial system for SLURP-2 expression and a protocol for refolding of the protein from cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Milligram quantities of recombinant SLURP-2 and its 13C-15N-labeled analog were obtained. The recombinant protein was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and a structural model was developed. A comparative study of the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 effects on the epithelial cell growth was conducted using human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells, which express only α7-nAChRs. A pronounced antiproliferative effect of both proteins was observed. Incubation of cells with 1 μM SLURP-1 and 1 μM SLURP-2 during 48 h led to a reduction in the cell number down to ~ 54 and 63% relative to the control, respectively. Fluorescent microscopy did not reveal either apoptotic or necrotic cell death. An analysis of the dose-response curve revealed the concentration-dependent mode of the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 action with EC50 ~ 0.1 and 0.2 nM, respectively. These findings suggest that the α7-nAChR is the main receptor responsible for the antiproliferative effect of SLURP proteins in epithelial cells. PMID:25558396

  17. Regulation of Human Cytosolic Sulfotransferases 1C2 and 1C3 by Nuclear Signaling Pathways in LS180 Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rondini, Elizabeth A.; Fang, Hailin; Runge-Morris, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) catalyze the sulfate conjugation of a myriad of endogenous and xenobiotic substrates. Among the 13 human SULTs, little is known regarding regulation of the SULT1C subfamily. We evaluated the effects of a panel of transcription factor activators on levels of SULT1C mRNA (1C2 and 1C3) and protein (1C2) in LS180 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Treatment with 3-[3-[N-(2-chloro-3-trifluoromethylbenzyl)-(2,2-diphenylethyl)amino]propyloxy]phenylacetic acid hydrochloride [GW3965, liver X receptor (LXR) activator], 3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-4-(3′-carboxy-2-chlorostilben-4-yl)oxymethyl-5-isopropylisoxazole [GW4064, farnesoid X receptor (FXR)], or rifampicin [pregnane X receptor (PXR)] moderately (≤2-fold) increased both SULT1C2 and SULT1C3 mRNA levels. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3, vitamin D receptor (VDR)] selectively upregulated SULT1C2, whereas ciprofibrate [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)], rosiglitazone (PPARγ), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)] selectively increased SULT1C3 mRNA levels. SULT1C2 protein content was strongly increased by 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment and moderately increased by GW3965, GW4064, and rifampicin. To evaluate SULT1C2 transcriptional regulation, treatment effects were determined on reporter activity from transfected constructs containing ∼10 kb of the SULT1C2 gene. Treatment with GW3965, GW4064, or 1,25(OH)2D3 increased reporter activity ∼2-, 5-, and 5.5-fold, respectively, from a construct containing mostly intron 1 of the SULT1C2 gene. Expression of AhR, LXRα, LXRβ, PPARα, PPARγ, PXR, and VDR was confirmed in LS180 cells using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction; however, FXR expression was negligible, suggesting that GW4064 increased SULT1C expression through an FXR-independent mechanism. Collectively, our findings are the first to characterize the regulation of human SULT1C2 and SULT1C3 expression by

  18. A meta-analysis of lung cancer gene expression identifies PTK7 as a survival gene in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ron; Khatri, Purvesh; Mazur, Pawel K.; Polin, Melanie; Zheng, Yanyan; Vaka, Dedeepya; Hoang, Chuong D.; Shrager, Joseph; Xu, Yue; Vicent, Silvestre; Butte, Atul; Sweet-Cordero, E. Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and it continues to lack effective treatment. The increasingly large and diverse public databases of lung cancer gene expression constitute a rich source of candidate oncogenic drivers and therapeutic targets. To define novel targets for lung adenocarcinoma (ADC), we conducted a large scale meta-analysis of genes specifically overexpressed in ADC. We identified an eleven-gene signature that was overexpressed consistently in ADC specimens relative to normal lung tissue. Six genes in this signature were specifically overexpressed in ADC relative to other subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Among these genes was the little studied protein tyrosine kinase PTK7. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that PTK7 is highly expressed in primary ADC patient samples. RNAi-mediated attenuation of PTK7 decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis in a subset of ADC cell lines. Further, loss of PTK7 activated the MKK7-JNK stress response pathway and impaired tumor growth in xenotransplantation assays. Our work defines PTK7 as a highly and specifically expressed gene in ADC and a potential therapeutic target in this subset of NSCLC. PMID:24654231

  19. A targeted next-generation sequencing method for identifying clinically relevant mutation profiles in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Di; Lin, Yongping; Liu, Jilong; Wan, Liang; Liu, Zu; Cheng, Shaomin; Fei, Lingna; Deng, Rongqing; Wang, Jian; Chen, Xi; Liu, Liping; Gu, Xia; Liang, Wenhua; He, Ping; Wang, Jun; Ye, Mingzhi; He, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Molecular profiling of lung cancer has become essential for prediction of an individual’s response to targeted therapies. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a promising technique for routine diagnostics, but has not been sufficiently evaluated in terms of feasibility, reliability, cost and capacity with routine diagnostic formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) materials. Here, we report the validation and application of a test based on Ion Proton technology for the rapid characterisation of single nucleotide variations (SNVs), short insertions and deletions (InDels), copy number variations (CNVs), and gene rearrangements in 145 genes with FFPE clinical specimens. The validation study, using 61 previously profiled clinical tumour samples, showed a concordance rate of 100% between results obtained by NGS and conventional test platforms. Analysis of tumour cell lines indicated reliable mutation detection in samples with 5% tumour content. Furthermore, application of the panel to 58 clinical cases, identified at least one actionable mutation in 43 cases, 1.4 times the number of actionable alterations detected by current diagnostic tests. We demonstrated that targeted NGS is a cost-effective and rapid platform to detect multiple mutations simultaneously in various genes with high reproducibility and sensitivity. PMID:26936516

  20. Colorectal poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas frequently exhibit BRAF mutations and are associated with poor overall survival.

    PubMed

    Olevian, Dane C; Nikiforova, Marina N; Chiosea, Simon; Sun, Weijing; Bahary, Nathan; Kuan, Shih-Fan; Pai, Reetesh K

    2016-03-01

    The molecular alterations in colorectal poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma remain incompletely characterized, particularly with respect to mutations in BRAF and KRAS. We analyzed 32 colorectal poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas and 40 colorectal poorly differentiated conventional adenocarcinomas for mutations in KRAS and BRAF and for DNA mismatch repair protein abnormalities to correlate histopathology with molecular alterations and survival. Compared with poorly differentiated conventional adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma frequently harbored BRAF mutations (59% versus 5%; P < .001) and less frequently demonstrated KRAS codon 12 or 13 mutations (17% versus 43%; P = .03). BRAF mutations were identified in both pure poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (60%) and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma associated with a signet ring cell adenocarcinoma component (82%). Most (93%) poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas demonstrated proficient DNA mismatch repair by either microsatellite instability polymerase chain reaction or DNA mismatch repair immunohistochemistry. Patients with poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma had a significantly worse overall survival compared with patients with poorly differentiated conventional adenocarcinoma (P < .001). There was no significant difference in overall survival between patients with pure poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma and patients with both poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma and adenocarcinoma components (P = .5). In conclusion, colorectal poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas frequently harbor BRAF mutations and are associated with poor overall survival. PMID:26826419

  1. Identifying and quantifying the stromal fibrosis in muscularis propria of colorectal carcinoma by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    The examination of stromal fibrosis within colorectal cancer is overlooked, not only because the routine pathological examinations seem to focus more on tumour staging and precise surgical margins, but also because of the lack of efficient diagnostic methods. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to study the muscularis stroma of normal and colorectal carcinoma tissue at the molecular level. In this work, we attempt to show the feasibility of MPM for discerning the microstructure of the normal human rectal muscle layer and fibrosis colorectal carcinoma tissue practicably. Three types of muscularis propria stromal fibrosis beneath the colorectal cancer infiltration were first observed through the MPM imaging system by providing intercellular microstructural details in fresh, unstained tissue samples. Our approach also presents the capability of quantifying the extent of stromal fibrosis from both amount and orientation of collagen, which may further characterize the severity of fibrosis. By comparing with the pathology analysis, these results show that the MPM has potential advantages in becoming a histological tool for detecting the stromal fibrosis and collecting prognosis evidence, which may guide subsequent therapy procedures for patients into good prognosis.

  2. Hop proanthocyanidins induce apoptosis, protein carbonylation, and cytoskeleton disorganization in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2009-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PCs) have been shown to suppress the growth of diverse human cancer cells and are considered as promising additions to the arsenal of chemopreventive phytochemicals. An oligomeric mixture of PCs from hops (Humulus lupulus) significantly decreased cell viability of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Hop PCs, at 50 or 100 μg/ml, exhibited apoptosis-inducing properties as shown by the increase in caspase-3 activity. Increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was accompanied by an augmented accumulation of protein carbonyls. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis in combination with 2-alkenal-specific immunochemical detection identified β-actin and protein disulfide isomerase as major putative targets of acrolein adduction. Incubation of HT-29 cells with hop PCs resulted in morphological changes that indicated disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. PC-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation in the cell culture media was also quantified; but, the measured H2O2 levels would not explain the observed changes in the oxidative modifications of actin. These findings suggest new modes of action for proanthocyandins as antitumorgenic agents in human colon cancer cells, namely, promotion of protein oxidative modifications and cytoskeleton derangement. PMID:19271284

  3. Proteomic screening identifies calreticulin as a miR-27a direct target repressing MHC class I cell surface exposure in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Pucci, B; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Fucci, A; Milone, M R; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Votino, C; Pancione, M; Piepoli, A; Mazzoccoli, G; Binaschi, M; Bigioni, M; Maggi, C A; Fassan, M; Laudanna, C; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the immune response and aberrant expression of microRNAs are emerging hallmarks of tumour initiation/progression, in addition to driver gene mutations and epigenetic modifications. We performed a preliminary survey of independent adenoma and colorectal cancer (CRC) miRnoma data sets and, among the most dysregulated miRNAs, we selected miR-27a and disclosed that it is already upregulated in adenoma and further increases during the evolution to adenocarcinoma. To identify novel genes and pathways regulated by this miRNA, we employed a differential 2DE-DIGE proteome analysis. We showed that miR-27a modulates a group of proteins involved in MHC class I cell surface exposure and, mechanistically, demonstrated that calreticulin is a miR-27a direct target responsible for most downstream effects in epistasis experiments. In vitro miR-27a affected cell proliferation and angiogenesis; mouse xenografts of human CRC cell lines expressing different miR-27a levels confirmed the protein variations and recapitulated the cell growth and apoptosis effects. In vivo miR-27a inversely correlated with MHC class I molecules and calreticulin expression, CD8+ T cells infiltration and cytotoxic activity (LAMP-1 exposure and perforin release). Tumours with high miR-27a, low calreticulin and CD8+ T cells' infiltration were associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis. Our data demonstrate that miR-27a acts as an oncomiRNA, represses MHC class I expression through calreticulin downregulation and affects tumour progression. These results may pave the way for better diagnosis, patient stratification and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26913609

  4. Metastatic behaviour of sinonasal adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type (ITAC).

    PubMed

    Donhuijsen, K; Kollecker, I; Petersen, P; Gaßler, N; Schulze, J; Schroeder, H-G

    2016-03-01

    The relative frequency of regional lymphogenic versus distant hematogenic metastases was evaluated in 369 patients with sinonasal adenocarcinoma of the intestinal type (ITAC). We assessed the results of neck dissections for a limited number of patients undergoing this surgical intervention. 117 ITAC patients were followed up for at least 5 years. Neck dissections were performed in 18 cases (15 primary and 3 secondary operations), 4 of which revealed carcinoma-positive lymph nodes. Metastases in lymph nodes were also diagnosed clinically in three other patients adding up to a total of seven individuals (6 % of 117) with lymphogenic metastases. In comparison, distant hematogenic metastases were identified in 15.4 % of these 117 patients. In the second group of 252 patients, the occurrence of distant hematogenic metastases and colorectal adenocarcinomas was registered but no formal follow-up procedure was applied. 50 neck dissections were performed in this group, 46 of which exhibited no histological evidence for metastases in lymph nodes, while in 1 case they were carcinoma-positive. Three additional cases showed clinical signs of metastases in regional lymph nodes. Taken together, our observations indicate that regional lymphogenic metastases are rather rare (about 2 %) in patients with sinonasal adenocarcinoma of the intestinal type. Therefore, the surgery of neck dissection appears not advised as routine intervention in these cases. ITAC patients show a normal prevalence of colorectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:25753257

  5. Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical profile of ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Gozde; Gurbuz, Ayse; Karateke, Ates; Kir, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinoma of the ovary is not an uncommon occurrence and ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma frequently mimic endometrioid and mucinous primary ovarian carcinoma. The clinical and pathologic features of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma involving the ovary is reviewed with particular focus on the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasm. Immunohistochemical stains that may be useful in the differential diagnosis of metastatic colorectal tumors to the ovary and primary ovarian tumors are detailed. PMID:21160859

  6. In Vivo Selection Against Human Colorectal Cancer Xenografts Identifies an Aptamer That Targets RNA Helicase Protein DHX9.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jing; Ray, Partha; Liu, Jenny; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Xu, Jennifer; Hsu, David; Sullenger, Bruce A; White, Rebekah R; Clary, Bryan M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to selectively target disease-related tissues with molecules is critical to the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic reagents. Recognizing the differences between the in vivo environment and in vitro conditions, we employed an in vivo selection strategy to identify RNA aptamers (targeting motifs) that could localize to tumor in situ. One of the selected molecules is an aptamer that binds to the protein DHX9, an RNA helicase that is known to be upregulated in colorectal cancer. Upon systemic administration, the aptamer preferentially localized to the nucleus of cancer cells in vivo and thus has the potential to be used for targeted delivery. PMID:27115840

  7. Network-based approach identified cell cycle genes as predictor of overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafei; Tang, Hui; Sun, Zhifu; Bungum, Aaron O; Edell, Eric S; Lingle, Wilma L; Stoddard, Shawn M; Zhang, Mingrui; Jen, Jin; Yang, Ping; Wang, Liang

    2013-04-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is the most common type of primary lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to delineate gene expression patterns for survival prediction in lung adenocarcinoma. Gene expression profiles of 82 (discovery set) and 442 (validation set 1) lung adenocarcinoma tumor tissues were analyzed using a systems biology-based network approach. We also examined the expression profiles of 78 adjacent normal lung tissues from 82 patients. We found a significant correlation of an expression module with overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio or HR=1.71; 95% CI=1.06-2.74 in discovery set; adjusted HR=1.26; 95% CI=1.08-1.49 in validation set 1). This expression module contained genes enriched in the biological process of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the cell cycle gene module and overall survival association were also significant in normal lung tissues (adjusted HR=1.91; 95% CI, 1.32-2.75). From these survival-related modules, we further defined three hub genes (UBE2C, TPX2, and MELK) whose expression-based risk indices were more strongly associated with poor 5-year survival (HR=3.85, 95% CI=1.34-11.05 in discovery set; HR=1.72, 95% CI=1.21-2.46 in validation set 1; and HR=3.35, 95% CI=1.08-10.04 in normal lung set). The 3-gene prognostic result was further validated using 92 adenocarcinoma tumor samples (validation set 2); patients with a high-risk gene signature have a 1.52-fold increased risk (95% CI, 1.02-2.24) of death than patients with a low-risk gene signature. These results suggest that a network-based approach may facilitate discovery of key genes that are closely linked to survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23357462

  8. Gene-dosage dependent overexpression at the 13q amplicon identifies DIS3 as candidate oncogene in colorectal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    de Groen, Florence L M; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tijssen, Marianne; Vriend, Lianne E M; Ylstra, Bauke; Hooijberg, Erik; Meijer, Gerrit A; Steenbergen, Renske D M; Carvalho, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development is in most cases marked by the accumulation of genomic alterations including gain of the entire q-arm of chromosome 13. This aberration occurs in 40%-60% of all CRC and is associated with progression from adenoma to carcinoma. To date, little is known about the effect of the 13q amplicon on the expression of the therein located genes and their functional relevance. We therefore aimed to identify candidate genes at the 13q amplicon that contribute to colorectal adenoma to carcinoma progression in a gene dosage-dependent manner. Integrative analysis of whole genome expression and DNA copy number signatures resulted in the identification of 36 genes on 13q of which significant overexpression in carcinomas compared with adenomas was linked to a copy number gain. Five genes showing high levels of overexpression in carcinomas versus adenomas were further tested by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in two independent sample sets of colorectal tumors (n = 40 and n = 47). DIS3 and LRCH1 revealed significant overexpression in carcinomas compared with adenomas in a 13q gain dependent manner. Silencing of DIS3 affected important tumorigenic characteristics such as viability, migration, and invasion. In conclusion, significant overexpression of DIS3 and LRCH1 associated with adenoma to carcinoma progression is linked to the CRC specific gain of 13q. The functional relevance of this copy number aberration was corroborated for DIS3, thereby identifying this gene as novel candidate oncogene contributing to the 13q-driven adenoma to carcinoma progression. PMID:24478024

  9. miR-625-3p regulates oxaliplatin resistance by targeting MAP2K6-p38 signalling in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Mads Heilskov; Lyskjær, Iben; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow; Tarpgaard, Line Schmidt; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hansen, Flemming; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Pfeiffer, Per; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin resistance in colorectal cancers (CRC) is a major medical problem, and predictive markers are urgently needed. Recently, miR-625-3p was reported as a promising predictive marker. Herein, we show that miR-625-3p functionally induces oxaliplatin resistance in CRC cells, and identify the signalling networks affected by miR-625-3p. We show that the p38 MAPK activator MAP2K6 is a direct target of miR-625-3p, and, accordingly, is downregulated in non-responder patients of oxaliplatin therapy. miR-625-3p-mediated resistance is reversed by anti-miR-625-3p treatment and ectopic expression of a miR-625-3p insensitive MAP2K6 variant. In addition, reduction of p38 signalling by using siRNAs, chemical inhibitors or expression of a dominant-negative MAP2K6 protein induces resistance to oxaliplatin. Transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome profiles confirm inactivation of MAP2K6-p38 signalling as one likely mechanism of oxaliplatin resistance. Our study shows that miR-625-3p induces oxaliplatin resistance by abrogating MAP2K6-p38-regulated apoptosis and cell cycle control networks, and corroborates the predictive power of miR-625-3p. PMID:27526785

  10. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Datta, Arindam; Dey, Sanjib; Das, Pijush; Alam, Sk Kayum; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2016-06-01

    Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF) properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC) harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR) treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53(R273H) (GEO#: GSE77533). We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53. PMID:27114909

  11. Label-free monitoring of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. X.; Li, H. S.; Chen, Z. F.; Feng, C. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. Z.; Guan, G. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Xu, J.

    2014-06-01

    The monitoring and evaluation of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy are important for endoscopic resection of precursor lesions to disrupt the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and halt progression to invasive neoplastic disease. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to identify different stages during the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma including adenoma with low-grade and high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma invading the submucosa. It was found that by combining two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, MPM can reveal the morphological changes of the epithelial cells and glands, identify the invasive position and depth of atypical glands and quantitatively describe the change of the cellular nucleus and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio during the stepwise progression of colorectal adenocarcinoma. These are important pathological findings for pathologists when diagnosing colorectal lesions. With the advancement of a compact and flexible multiphoton endoscope for in vivo imaging and clinical applications, MPM has the potential to provide immediate histological diagnosis for the monitoring and evaluation of the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy.

  12. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J Keith; Meltzer, Paul S; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs. PMID:26243311

  13. Connectivity mapping using a combined gene signature from multiple colorectal cancer datasets identified candidate drugs including existing chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While the discovery of new drugs is a complex, lengthy and costly process, identifying new uses for existing drugs is a cost-effective approach to therapeutic discovery. Connectivity mapping integrates gene expression profiling with advanced algorithms to connect genes, diseases and small molecule compounds and has been applied in a large number of studies to identify potential drugs, particularly to facilitate drug repurposing. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a commonly diagnosed cancer with high mortality rates, presenting a worldwide health problem. With the advancement of high throughput omics technologies, a number of large scale gene expression profiling studies have been conducted on CRCs, providing multiple datasets in gene expression data repositories. In this work, we systematically apply gene expression connectivity mapping to multiple CRC datasets to identify candidate therapeutics to this disease. Results We developed a robust method to compile a combined gene signature for colorectal cancer across multiple datasets. Connectivity mapping analysis with this signature of 148 genes identified 10 candidate compounds, including irinotecan and etoposide, which are chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat CRCs. These results indicate that we have discovered high quality connections between the CRC disease state and the candidate compounds, and that the gene signature we created may be used as a potential therapeutic target in treating the disease. The method we proposed is highly effective in generating quality gene signature through multiple datasets; the publication of the combined CRC gene signature and the list of candidate compounds from this work will benefit both cancer and systems biology research communities for further development and investigations. PMID:26356760

  14. A colorectal cancer genome-wide association study in a Spanish cohort identifies two variants associated with colorectal cancer risk at 1p33 and 8p12

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a disease of complex aetiology, with much of the expected inherited risk being due to several common low risk variants. Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified 20 CRC risk variants. Nevertheless, these have only been able to explain part of the missing heritability. Moreover, these signals have only been inspected in populations of Northern European origin. Results Thus, we followed the same approach in a Spanish cohort of 881 cases and 667 controls. Sixty-four variants at 24 loci were found to be associated with CRC at p-values <10-5. We therefore evaluated the 24 loci in another Spanish replication cohort (1481 cases and 1850 controls). Two of these SNPs, rs12080929 at 1p33 (Preplication=0.042; Ppooled=5.523x10-03; OR (CI95%)=0.866(0.782-0.959)) and rs11987193 at 8p12 (Preplication=0.039; Ppooled=6.985x10-5; OR (CI95%)=0.786(0.705-0.878)) were replicated in the second Phase, although they did not reach genome-wide statistical significance. Conclusions We have performed the first CRC GWAS in a Southern European population and by these means we were able to identify two new susceptibility variants at 1p33 and 8p12 loci. These two SNPs are located near the SLC5A9 and DUSP4 loci, respectively, which could be good functional candidates for the association signals. We therefore believe that these two markers constitute good candidates for CRC susceptibility loci and should be further evaluated in other larger datasets. Moreover, we highlight that were these two SNPs true susceptibility variants, they would constitute a decrease in the CRC missing heritability fraction. PMID:23350875

  15. Facial Paralysis Secondary to Extensive Perineural Spread of Adenocarcinoma of the Parotid Gland Identified by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Achong, Dwight M; Zloty, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Brain MRI in an 82-year-old man with presumed Bell's palsy revealed a clinically unsuspected right parotid gland mass but no other acute findings. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Staging F-FDG PET/CT revealed an FDG-avid parotid mass, abnormal FDG uptake along the course of the facial nerve from mass to skull base, and multiple FDG-avid right level II neck lymph nodes and hepatic metastases. The PET/CT findings and prolonged clinical course suggest that diffuse perineural spread of tumor from a smoldering parotid neoplasm, and not idiopathic Bell's palsy, was responsible for the patient's facial paralysis. PMID:26825200

  16. Peritoneal expression of matrilysin helps identify early post-operative recurrence of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Giuseppe S.; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Monteleone, Giovanni; Candi, Eleonora; Amelio, Ivano; Catani, Valeria; Sibio, Simone; Divizia, Andrea; Tema, Giorgia; Iaculli, Edoardo; Gaspari, Achille L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) following a potentially curative resection is a challenging clinical problem. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is over-expressed by CRC cells and supposed to play a major role in CRC cell diffusion and metastasis. MMP-7 RNA expression was assessed by real-time PCR using specific primers in peritoneal washing fluid obtained during surgical procedure. After surgery, patients underwent a regular follow up for assessing recurrence. transcripts for MMP-7 were detected in 31/57 samples (54%). Patients were followed-up (range 20–48 months) for recurrence prevention. Recurrence was diagnosed in 6 out of 55 patients (11%) and two patients eventually died because of this. Notably, all the six patients who had relapsed were positive for MMP-7. Sensitivity and specificity of the test were 100% and 49% respectively. Data from patients have also been corroborated by computational approaches. Public available coloncarcinoma datasets have been employed to confirm MMP7 clinical impact on the disease. Interestingly, MMP-7 expression appeared correlated to Tgfb-1, and correlation of the two factors represented a poor prognostic factor. This study proposes positivity of MMP-7 in peritoneal cavity as a novel biomarker for predicting disease recurrence in patients with CRC. PMID:25596746

  17. Comprehensive genetic testing identifies targetable genomic alterations in most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, single institute investigation

    PubMed Central

    Won, Brian M.; Patton, Kathryn Alexa; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Hoffman, Philip C.; Hensing, Thomas; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Malik, Renuka; MacMahon, Heber; Mueller, Jeffrey; Simon, Cassie A.; Vigneswaran, Wickii T.; Wigfield, Christopher H.; Ferguson, Mark K.; Husain, Aliya N.; Vokes, Everett E.; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This study reviews extensive genetic analysis in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in order to: describe how targetable mutation genes interrelate with the genes identified as variants of unknown significance; assess the percentage of patients with a potentially targetable genetic alterations; evaluate the percentage of patients who had concurrent alterations, previously considered to be mutually exclusive; and characterize the molecular subset of KRAS. Thoracic Oncology Research Program Databases at the University of Chicago provided patient demographics, pathology, and results of genetic testing. 364 patients including 289 adenocarcinoma underwent genotype testing by various platforms such as FoundationOne, Caris Molecular Intelligence, and Response Genetics Inc. For the entire adenocarcinoma cohort, 25% of patients were African Americans; 90% of KRAS mutations were detected in smokers, including current and former smokers; 46% of EGFR and 61% of ALK alterations were detected in never smokers. 99.4% of patients, whose samples were analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS), had genetic alterations identified with an average of 10.8 alterations/tumor throughout different tumor subtypes. However, mutations were not mutually exclusive. NGS in this study identified potentially targetable genetic alterations in the majority of patients tested, detected concurrent alterations and provided information on variants of unknown significance at this time but potentially targetable in the future. PMID:26934441

  18. Candidate Serum Biomarkers for Prostate Adenocarcinoma Identified by mRNA Differences in Prostate Tissue and Verified with Protein Measurements in Tissue and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Klee, Eric W.; Bondar, Olga P.; Goodmanson, Marcia K.; Dyer, Roy B.; Erdogan, Sibel; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Bergen, H. Robert; Sebo, Thomas J.; Klee, George G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improved tests are needed for detection and management of prostate cancer. We hypothesized that differential gene expression in prostate tissue could help identify candidate blood biomarkers for prostate cancer and that blood from men with advanced prostate disease could be used to verify their presence in circulation. METHODS Candidate markers were identified using mRNA expression patterns from laser-capture microdissected prostate tissue. Tissue expression was confirmed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the subset of candidates having commercial antisera. Tissue extracts were analyzed with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Blood concentrations were measured using immunoassays and MS/MS of trypsin-digested, immuno-extracted peptides. RESULTS Thirty-five novel candidate prostate adenocarcinoma biomarkers were selected. Tissue expression was confirmed for all of the 13 markers having commercial antisera for IHC and six of these markers showed statistical discrimination between normal and malignant tissue. Only 5 of these markers were detected in tissue extracts using MS/MS. Sixteen of the 35 candidate markers were successfully assayed in blood. Four of eight biomarkers measured with ELISA and 3 of 10 biomarkers measured by targeted MS showed statistically significant increases in blood concentrations of advanced prostate cancer cases, compared to controls. CONCLUSION Seven novel biomarkers identified by gene expression profiles in prostate tissue were shown to have statistically significant increased levels in blood from men with advanced prostate adenocarcinoma compared to controls: APOC1, ASPN, COMP, CXCL11, CXCL9, F5, and PCSK6. PMID:22247499

  19. Effects of cellular redox balance on induction of apoptosis by eicosapentaenoic acid in HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and rat colon in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Latham, P; Lund, E; Brown, J; Johnson, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Epidemiological evidence suggests n-3 polyunsaturated lipids may protect against colorectal neoplasia. Consumption of fish oil modulates crypt cytokinetics in humans, and crypt apoptosis in animal models. To explore these effects, we investigated involvement of caspase enzymes and cellular redox balance in the induction of apoptosis by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in HT29 cells, and in rat colon in vivo.
METHODS—Survival of HT29 cells grown with EPA in the presence of caspase inhibitors, antioxidants, or buthionine sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione neosynthesis, was determined. The effects of EPA enriched fish oil and glutathione depletion on apoptosis in rat colon were assessed using microdissected crypts.
RESULTS—Treatment of HT29 cells with EPA reduced viable cell number and activated caspase 3, prior to cell detachment. Antioxidants and caspase inhibitors blocked HT29 cell death whereas glutathione depletion increased it. Rats fed fish oil had higher crypt cell apoptosis than those fed corn oil, and glutathione depletion enhanced this effect.
CONCLUSIONS—Incorporation of EPA into colonic epithelial cell lipids increases apoptosis. The results of this study, using both an animal and cell line model, support the hypothesis that this effect is mediated via cellular redox tone, and is sensitive to glutathione metabolism. The data suggest a mechanism whereby polyunsaturated fatty acids may influence the susceptibility of colorectal crypt cells to induction or progression of neoplasia.


Keywords: eicosapentaenoic acid; apoptosis; glutathione; caspase; redox; colorectal cancer; rat PMID:11413117

  20. Elevated urinary levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma identify a clinically high-risk group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is highly expressed and its gene is amplified in about 50% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas; this last feature is associated with worse prognosis. It is unknown whether the level of its soluble form (suPAR) in urine may be a diagnostic-prognostic marker in these patients. Methods The urinary level of suPAR was measured in 146 patients, 94 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and 52 chronic pancreatitis. Urine from 104 healthy subjects with similar age and gender distribution served as controls. suPAR levels were normalized with creatinine levels (suPAR/creatinine, ng/mg) to remove urine dilution effect. Results Urinary suPAR/creatinine values of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients were significantly higher (median 9.8; 25th-75th percentiles 5.3-20.7) than those of either healthy donors (median 0; 0-0.5) or chronic pancreatitis patients (median 2.7; 0.9-4.7). The distribution of values among cancer patients was widespread and asymmetric, 53% subjects having values beyond the 95th percentile of healthy donors. The values of suPAR/creatinine did not correlate with tumour stage, Ca19-9 or CEA levels. Higher values correlated with poor prognosis among non-resected patients at univariate analysis; multivariate Cox regression identified high urinary suPAR/creatinine as an independent predictor of poor survival among all cancer patients (odds ratio 2.10, p = 0.0023), together with tumour stage (stage III odds ratio 2.65, p = 0.0017; stage IV odds ratio 4.61, p < 0.0001) and female gender (odds ratio 1.85, p = 0.01). Conclusions A high urinary suPAR/creatinine ratio represents a useful marker for the identification of a subset of patients with poorer outcome. PMID:21999221

  1. Dehydroglyasperin D Inhibits the Proliferation of HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Direct Interaction With Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Keun; Jeong, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite recent advances in therapy, colorectal cancer still has a grim prognosis. Although licorice has been used in East Asian traditional medicine, the molecular properties of its constituents including dehydroglyasperin D (DHGA-D) remain unknown. We sought to evaluate the inhibitory effect of DHGA-D on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and identify the primary signaling molecule targeted by DHGA-D. Methods: We evaluated anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The target protein of DHGA-D was identified by Western blot analysis with a specific antibody, and direct interaction between DHGA-D and the target protein was confirmed by kinase and pull-down assays. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and further Western blot analysis was performed to identify the signaling pathway involved. Results: DHGA-D significantly suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent HT-29 colorectal cancer cell proliferation. DHGA-D directly suppressed phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity and subsequent Akt phosphorylation and bound to the p110 subunit of PI3K. DHGA-D also significantly induced G1 cell cycle arrest, together with the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and retinoblastoma phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression. Conclusions: DHGA-D has potent anticancer activity and targets PI3K in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report to detail the molecular basis of DHGA-D in suppressing colorectal cancer cell growth. PMID:27051646

  2. A novel colorectal cancer risk locus at 4q32.2 identified from an international genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Stephanie L.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Conti, David V.; Raskin, Leon; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Pinchev, Mila; Rennert, Hedy S.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Le Marchand, Loic; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Huang, Shu-Chen; Rennert, Gad; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Only a fraction of colorectal cancer heritability is explained by known risk-conferring genetic variation. This study was designed to identify novel risk alleles in Europeans. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of colorectal cancer in participants from a population-based case–control study in Israel (n = 1616 cases, 1329 controls) and a consortium study from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (n = 1977 cases, 999 controls). We used a two-stage (discovery–replication) GWAS design, followed by a joint meta-analysis. A combined analysis identified a novel susceptibility locus that reached genome-wide significance on chromosome 4q32.2 [rs35509282, risk allele = A (minor allele frequency = 0.09); odds ratio (OR) per risk allele = 1.53; P value = 8.2 × 10−9; nearest gene = FSTL5]. The direction of the association was consistent across studies. In addition, we confirmed that 14 of 29 previously identified susceptibility variants were significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer in this study. Genetic variation on chromosome 4q32.2 is significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer in Ashkenazi Jews and Europeans in this study. PMID:25023989

  3. Genome-wide multi-omics profiling of colorectal cancer identifies immune determinants strongly associated with relapse

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Subha; Gusev, Yuriy; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G.; Song, Lei; Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Gauba, Robinder; Pandey, Abhishek; Haddad, Bassem R.; Goerlitz, David; Cheema, Amrita K.; Juhl, Hartmut; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Marshall, John L.; Byers, Stephen W.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The use and benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy to treat stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is not well understood since the majority of these patients are cured by surgery alone. Identification of biological markers of relapse is a critical challenge to effectively target treatments to the ~20% of patients destined to relapse. We have integrated molecular profiling results of several “omics” data types to determine the most reliable prognostic biomarkers for relapse in CRC using data from 40 stage I and II CRC patients. We identified 31 multi-omics features that highly correlate with relapse. The data types were integrated using multi-step analytical approach with consecutive elimination of redundant molecular features. For each data type a systems biology analysis was performed to identify pathways biological processes and disease categories most affected in relapse. The biomarkers detected in tumors urine and blood of patients indicated a strong association with immune processes including aberrant regulation of T-cell and B-cell activation that could lead to overall differences in lymphocyte recruitment for tumor infiltration and markers indicating likelihood of future relapse. The immune response was the biologically most coherent signature that emerged from our analyses among several other biological processes and corroborates other studies showing a strong immune response in patients less likely to relapse. PMID:24312117

  4. A new GWAS and meta-analysis with 1000Genomes imputation identifies novel risk variants for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Tassan, Nada A; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Palles, Claire; Farrington, Susan M; Dobbins, Sara E; Harris, Rebecca; Gorman, Maggie; Tenesa, Albert; Meyer, Brian F; Wakil, Salma M; Kinnersley, Ben; Campbell, Harry; Martin, Lynn; Smith, Christopher G; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Barclay, Ella; Maughan, Timothy S; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchanan, Daniel D; Buchannan, Daniel D; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tomlinson, Ian P; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) have identified 23 susceptibility loci thus far. Analyses of previously conducted GWAS indicate additional risk loci are yet to be discovered. To identify novel CRC susceptibility loci, we conducted a new GWAS and performed a meta-analysis with five published GWAS (totalling 7,577 cases and 9,979 controls of European ancestry), imputing genotypes utilising the 1000 Genomes Project. The combined analysis identified new, significant associations with CRC at 1p36.2 marked by rs72647484 (minor allele frequency [MAF] = 0.09) near CDC42 and WNT4 (P = 1.21 × 10(-8), odds ratio [OR] = 1.21 ) and at 16q24.1 marked by rs16941835 (MAF = 0.21, P = 5.06 × 10(-8); OR = 1.15) within the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) RP11-58A18.1 and ~500 kb from the nearest coding gene FOXL1. Additionally we identified a promising association at 10p13 with rs10904849 intronic to CUBN (MAF = 0.32, P = 7.01 × 10(-8); OR = 1.14). These findings provide further insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CRC. Additionally, our analysis further demonstrates that imputation can be used to exploit GWAS data to identify novel disease-causing variants. PMID:25990418

  5. Deciphering the cellular source of tumor relapse identifies CD44 as a major therapeutic target in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Molejon, Maria Inés; Tellechea, Juan Ignacio; Loncle, Celine; Gayet, Odile; Gilabert, Marine; Duconseil, Pauline; Lopez-Millan, Maria Belen; Moutardier, Vincent; Gasmi, Mohamed; Garcia, Stephane; Turrini, Olivier; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Poizat, Flora; Dusetti, Nelson; Iovanna, Juan

    2015-01-01

    It has been commonly found that in patients presenting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC), after a period of satisfactory response to standard treatments, the tumor becomes non-responsive and patient death quickly follows. This phenomenon is mainly due to the rapid and uncontrolled development of the residual tumor. The origin and biological characteristics of residual tumor cells in PDAC still remain unclear. In this work, using PDACs from patients, preserved as xenografts in nude mice, we demonstrated that a residual PDAC tumor originated from a small number of CD44+ cells present in the tumor. During PDAC relapse, proliferating CD44+ cells decrease expression of ZEB1, while overexpressing the MUC1 protein, and gain morphological and biological characteristics of differentiation. Also, we report that CD44+ cells, in primary and residual PDAC tumors, are part of a heterogeneous population, which includes variable numbers of CD133+ and EpCAM+ cells. We confirmed the propagation of CD44+ cells in samples from cases of human relapse, following standard PDAC treatment. Finally, using systemic administration of anti-CD44 antibodies in vivo, we demonstrated that CD44 is an efficient therapeutic target for treating tumor relapse, but not primary PDAC tumors. We conclude that CD44+ cells generate the relapsing tumor and, as such, are themselves promising therapeutic targets for treating patients with recurrent PDAC. PMID:25797268

  6. Durable clinical benefit to trastuzumab and chemotherapy in a patient with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma harboring ERBB2 amplification

    PubMed Central

    Disel, Umut; Germain, Alexis; Yilmazel, Bahar; Abali, Huseyin; Bolat, Filiz Aka; Yelensky, Roman; Elvin, Julia A.; Lipson, Doron; Chmielecki, Juliann; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Miller, Vincent A.; Ali, Siraj M.; George, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic ERBB2 amplification or activating mutations occur in approximately 2–5% of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas and are presumed to be oncogenic drivers, but limited evidence exists to suggest these lesions are sensitive to targeted monotherapy in patients. Here we present the case of a patient with advanced CRC with pulmonary metastases, who had progressed on both standard of care cytotoxic chemotherapy and anti-EGFR targeted therapy. Comprehensive genomic profiling (FoundationOne®) identified amplification of ERBB2 and a TP53 mutation in the metastatic lesion. Treatment with trastuzumab with a chemotherapy backbone elicited stable disease/minor response in the patient over a one year course of therapy, reducing tumor burden and significantly improving quality of life. This report demonstrates the application of personalized targeted therapy guided by comprehensive genomic profiling in metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26244165

  7. Durable clinical benefit to trastuzumab and chemotherapy in a patient with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma harboring ERBB2 amplification.

    PubMed

    Disel, Umut; Germain, Alexis; Yilmazel, Bahar; Abali, Huseyin; Bolat, Filiz Aka; Yelensky, Roman; Elvin, Julia A; Lipson, Doron; Chmielecki, Juliann; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey S; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; George, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Somatic ERBB2 amplification or activating mutations occur in approximately 2-5% of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas and are presumed to be oncogenic drivers, but limited evidence exists to suggest these lesions are sensitive to targeted monotherapy in patients. Here we present the case of a patient with advanced CRC with pulmonary metastases, who had progressed on both standard of care cytotoxic chemotherapy and anti-EGFR targeted therapy. Comprehensive genomic profiling (FoundationOne(®)) identified amplification of ERBB2 and a TP53 mutation in the metastatic lesion. Treatment with trastuzumab with a chemotherapy backbone elicited stable disease/minor response in the patient over a one year course of therapy, reducing tumor burden and significantly improving quality of life. This report demonstrates the application of personalized targeted therapy guided by comprehensive genomic profiling in metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26244165

  8. ATAD2 Overexpression Identifies Colorectal Cancer Patients with Poor Prognosis and Drives Proliferation of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Ye, Guang-Yao; Qin, Shao-Lan; Yu, Min-Hao; Mu, Yi-Fei; Zhong, Ming

    2015-01-01

    ATPase family AAA domain-containing 2 (ATAD2) has been identified as a critical modulator involved in cell proliferation and invasion. The purpose of this study was to explore the expression of ATAD2 in CRC tissues as well as its relationship with degree of malignancy. Data containing three independent investigations from Oncomine database demonstrated that ATAD2 is overexpressed in CRC compared with normal tissue, and similar result was also found in 32 pairs of CRC tissues by qPCR. The protein expression of ATAD2 was examined in six CRC cell lines and 300 CRC specimens. The results showed that high expression of ATAD2 was significantly correlated with tumor size (P < 0.001), serum CEA (P = 0.012), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.018), liver metastasis (P = 0.025), and clinical stage (P = 0.004). Kaplan-Meier method suggested that higher ATAD2 protein expression significantly associated with the overall survival (OS) of CRC patients (P < 0.001) and was an independent predictor of poor OS. Functional studies showed that suppression of ATAD2 expression with siRNA could significantly inhibit the growth in SW480 and HCT116 cells. These results indicated that ATAD2 could serve as a prognostic marker and a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:26697062

  9. [Urachal adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Dakir, M; Dahami, Z; Sarf, I; Tahri, A; Elmrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-09-01

    Cancer of the urachus is very unusual. The lesion is a mucosecretory adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis is usually established late, and has a serious prognosis because of a long clinical latency. We report a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the urachus revealed by hematuria. A review of the literature allows us to demonstrate the rarity of this tumour and to demonstrate its various clinical, histological, radiological and therapeutical aspects. PMID:11761694

  10. Toxicity and early outcomes of regorafenib in multiply pre-treated metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma-experience from a tertiary cancer centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Zanwar, Saurabh; Gupta, Sudeep; Sirohi, Bhawna; Toshniwal, Anup; Shetty, Nitin; Banavali, Shripad

    2016-01-01

    Background Regorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor (MKI) approved for use in multiply pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of regorafenib from India. Materials and methods Records of 23 cases treated with regorafenib at our centre between June 2013 till September 2015 were reviewed. All had received at least two non cross resistant lines of therapy prior to regorafenib. Toxicity was recorded using CTCAE version 4.03. Responses were assessed using RECIST 1.1 criteria. Response evaluation was done every three months or earlier if clinically indicated. Five patients were still on therapy at the time of this report. Results The median age was 50 years. Thirty-nine percent (9/23) had upfront metastatic disease. Twenty-six percent (6/23) and 39% (9/23) patients had received prior treatment with cetuximab and bevacizumab respectively. Mean duration of regorafenib treatment was 3.8 months. At least one grade III/IV toxicity was noted in 65% (15/23) cases. The most common were handfoot syndrome (HFS) and fatigue seen in 86.9% (20/23) patients. Grade II and III HFS was seen in 65% patients. One patient required stoppage of treatment due to grade III hepatotoxicity. Dose reduction was required for 86.9% (20/23) patients. Best response noted was stable disease in 34.8% (8/23), partial response in 8.7% (2/23) patients and progression in 56.5% (13/23). Median progression free survival was 3 months and median follow-up was 4.5 months. Conclusions Regorafenib, although an effective treatment strategy in multiply pre-treated mCRC, is associated with significant side effects. PMID:27004221

  11. N-Hydroxycinnamide derivatives of osthole inhibit cell migration and invasion by suppressing Smad2 and Akt pathways in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling-Yu; Huang, Wei-Jan; Ho, Feng-Ming; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Suk, Fat-Moon; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2014-06-25

    WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 are new synthetic compounds developed based on the structure of the Chinese herbal medicine osthole. Previously, we reported that WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 can induce cell-cycle arrest by activating ATR kinase (ataxia telangiectasia and rad3 related kinase) and inhibiting the phosphorylation of Aurora A kinase. In this study, we determined that WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 strongly inhibited the migration and invasion in human colorectal cancer cells at concentrations as low as 1μM. In the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition model, WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 potently downregulated the transcription factor Snail1, the mesenchymal protein vimentin, and matrix metalloprotease-9, but upregulated the epithelial protein E-cadherin. WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 also inhibited the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2 and of Akt at Ser 473, and the nuclear translocation of Smad2 was substantially lower in WJ1376-1- and WJ1398-1-treated cells than it was in control cells. In transient transfection experiments, we observed that WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 strongly inhibited TGF-β-stimulated activity of a Smad reporter. Finally, WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 blocked TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of the TGF-β Type I receptor (TGF-βRI). These results suggest that WJ1376-1 and WJ1398-1 inhibit cell migration and invasion by suppressing TGF-βRI phosphorylation and subsequently hindering both Smad2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways. PMID:24727557

  12. High-frequency aberrantly methylated targets in pancreatic adenocarcinoma identified via global DNA methylation analysis using methylCap-seq

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive reprogramming and dysregulation of DNA methylation is an important characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PC). Our study aimed to characterize the genomic methylation patterns in various genomic contexts of PC. The methyl capture sequencing (methylCap-seq) method was used to map differently methylated regions (DMRs) in pooled samples from ten PC tissues and ten adjacent non-tumor (PN) tissues. A selection of DMRs was validated in an independent set of PC and PN samples using methylation-specific PCR (MSP), bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP), and methylation sensitive restriction enzyme-based qPCR (MSRE-qPCR). The mRNA and expressed sequence tag (EST) expression of the corresponding genes was investigated using RT-qPCR. Results A total of 1,131 PC-specific and 727 PN-specific hypermethylated DMRs were identified in association with CpG islands (CGIs), including gene-associated CGIs and orphan CGIs; 2,955 PC-specific and 2,386 PN-specific hypermethylated DMRs were associated with gene promoters, including promoters containing or lacking CGIs. Moreover, 1,744 PC-specific and 1,488 PN-specific hypermethylated DMRs were found to be associated with CGIs or CGI shores. These results suggested that aberrant hypermethylation in PC typically occurs in regions surrounding the transcription start site (TSS). The BSP, MSP, MSRE-qPCR, and RT-qPCR data indicated that the aberrant DNA methylation in PC tissue and in PC cell lines was associated with gene (or corresponding EST) expression. Conclusions Our study characterized the genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in PC and identified DMRs that were distributed among various genomic contexts that might influence the expression of corresponding genes or transcripts to promote PC. These DMRs might serve as diagnostic biomarkers or therapeutic targets for PC. PMID:25276247

  13. Multi-Scale Genomic, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines to Identify Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, Romina; Um, Inhwa; Faratian, Dana; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Selecting colorectal cancer (CRC) patients likely to respond to therapy remains a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were to establish which genes were differentially expressed with respect to treatment sensitivity and relate this to copy number in a panel of 15 CRC cell lines. Copy number variations of the identified genes were assessed in a cohort of CRCs. IC50’s were measured for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ-235, a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Cell lines were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridisation, Illumina gene expression analysis, reverse phase protein arrays, and targeted sequencing of KRAS hotspot mutations. Frequent gains were observed at 2p, 3q, 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, 13q, 14q, and 17q and losses at 2q, 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 14q, 18q, and 20p. Frequently gained regions contained EGFR, PIK3CA, MYC, SMO, TRIB1, FZD1, and BRCA2, while frequently lost regions contained FHIT and MACROD2. TRIB1 was selected for further study. Gene enrichment analysis showed that differentially expressed genes with respect to treatment response were involved in Wnt signalling, EGF receptor signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Stepwise integration of copy number and gene expression data yielded 47 candidate genes that were significantly correlated. PDCD6 was differentially expressed in all three treatment responses. Tissue microarrays were constructed for a cohort of 118 CRC patients and TRIB1 and MYC amplifications were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. TRIB1 and MYC were amplified in 14.5% and 7.4% of the cohort, respectively, and these amplifications were significantly correlated (p≤0.0001). TRIB1 protein expression in the patient cohort was significantly correlated with pERK, Akt, and Caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, a set of candidate predictive biomarkers for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ235 are described that warrant further study. Amplification of the putative oncogene TRIB1 has been described for

  14. Adenoma-Like Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Raul S.; Cates, Justin M.M.; Washington, M. Kay; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Coffey, Robert J.; Shi, Chanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Aims A subset of colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) architecturally and cytologically resembles adenomatous change, making them difficult to diagnose on biopsy. This subset has not been well-characterized to date. Methods and results For 35 carcinomas with adenomatous-like areas (cytologic and surface architectural appearance that would be insufficient to warrant a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma if evaluated on biopsy), we recorded staging information, molecular data, clinical outcome, whether precursor adenoma was present, and whether prior biopsy had been diagnosed as malignant. Despite advanced T-category in 23 (66%) tumors, only 7 (20%) had nodal metastases, and only 5 patients (15%) developed distant metastases. Fifteen cases (43%) had been diagnosed as adenoma on biopsy. Twenty-one resections (60%) showed no residual associated adenoma, including 9 called adenoma on biopsy. Median follow-up was 44 months. Four patients (12%) died of disease; 22 were alive at last follow-up. KRAS mutation was seen in 14/24 (58%), and 4/17 (24%) were microsatellite-unstable. Patients had significantly improved survival compared to a cohort of patients with conventional well-differentiated CRC after controlling for age and stage (p=0.011). Conclusions Adenoma-like adenocarcinoma is an uncommon variant of CRC with a low rate of metastasis and good prognosis. Biopsy diagnosis of this lesion may be challenging. PMID:25913616

  15. The CHEK2 1100delC Mutation Identifies Families with a Hereditary Breast and Colorectal Cancer Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Wijnen, Juul; Vasen, Hans; Wasielewski, Marijke; Wagner, Anja; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Elstrodt, Fons; van den Bos, Renate; de Snoo, Anja; Tjon A Fat, Grace; Brekelmans, Cecile; Jagmohan, Shantie; Franken, Patrick; Verkuijlen, Paul; van den Ouweland, Ans; Chapman, Pamela; Tops, Carli; Möslein, Gabriela; Burn, John; Lynch, Henry; Klijn, Jan; Fodde, Riccardo; Schutte, Mieke

    2003-01-01

    Because of genetic heterogeneity, the identification of breast cancer–susceptibility genes has proven to be exceedingly difficult. Here, we define a new subset of families with breast cancer characterized by the presence of colorectal cancer cases. The 1100delC variant of the cell cycle checkpoint kinase CHEK2 gene was present in 18% of 55 families with hereditary breast and colorectal cancer (HBCC) as compared with 4% of 380 families with non-HBCC (P<.001), thus providing genetic evidence for the HBCC phenotype. The CHEK2 1100delC mutation was, however, not the major predisposing factor for the HBCC phenotype but appeared to act in synergy with another, as-yet-unknown susceptibility gene(s). The unequivocal definition of the HBCC phenotype opens new avenues to search for this putative HBCC-susceptibility gene. PMID:12690581

  16. Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Compared to adenomas, adenocarcinomas show greater cytological atypia, increased frequency of mitoses, regional variation in growth pattern, more papillary structures, have size over 5 mm in diameter, show invasion of vessels, large airways or pleura, as well as lymphatic and hematogenous metastases.

  17. c-MET expression in colorectal adenomas and primary carcinomas with its corresponding metastases

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Maqsoud, Nehad M. R.; El-Hameed El-Heeny, Amr Abd; Mohammed, Mostafa Fuad

    2015-01-01

    Background c-MET plays an important role in tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. In this study we examined the expression of c-MET in colorectal adenomas, primary adenocarcinomas and their corresponding lymph node, peritoneal and liver metastases. We correlated our findings with clinicopathological features. Methods Twenty three cases of colorectal adenoma and 102 cases of primary colorectal carcinoma and their corresponding metastases (44 lymph nodes, 21 peritoneal deposits and 16 liver metastases) were studied to evaluate c-MET expression by immunohistochemistry. For comparison, 12 sections of adjacent healthy colorectal mucosa were examined. Results Statistically significant differences were present among normal tissues, colorectal adenomas and primary colorectal carcinomas (P=0.011). Normal tissues showed a negative or weak reaction in 66.67% and 33.33% of cases respectively. Expression of c-MET was positive in 47.8% of adenomas. A significant positive association was identified between c-MET high expression and degree of dysplasia (P=0.024). c-MET was highly expressed in 66.7% of primary colorectal carcinoma. Significant positive correlations were detected between c-MET expression and TNM stage (P=0.036), lymph node metastasis (LNM), peritoneal deposits and liver metastasis (P=0.038, P=0.094 and P=0.045, respectively). c-MET expression in metastatic tissues was significantly higher than that of the primary tumor. Conclusions c-MET expression is gradually up-regulated in the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) from normal epithelium to adenoma to colorectal carcinoma to metastases. PMID:26697193

  18. Solitary Psoas Muscle Metastasis of Gastroesphageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh, Payam; Yaghobi Joybari, Ali; Sarbaz, Samaneh; Ghiasi, Hosein Ali; Farasatinasab, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of gastroesphageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma in skeletal muscle is rare and primary sites for skeletal muscle metastases are usually lung, renal and colorectal cancer. We have encountered with the first case report of solitary psoas muscle metastasis of GEJ adenocarcinoma. Here we describe a 65 years old man was diagnosed with GEJ adenocarcinoma in Gastroenterology Department, Imam Hussein Hospital, Tehran, Iran in February 2014. We were not able to use PET techniques due to lack of access. Staging CT scans demonstrated a small mass lateral to right psoas muscle. A CT-guided core needle biopsy of right psoas muscle was performed that supported a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma consistent with primary adenocarcinoma of the GEJ. Distant metastasis to skeletal muscle rarely occurs in patients with GEJ adenocarcinoma, but heightened awareness to these soft tissue lesions is warranted. CT or MR imaging could show findings suggestive of metastatic disease, although PET is preferable modality. PMID:26870148

  19. A rare case of extensive skeletal muscle metastases in adenocarcinoma cervix identified by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Vishnoi, Madan Gopal; Jain, Anurag; John, Arun Ravi; Paliwal, Dharmesh

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma cervix is an uncommon histological subtype of carcinoma cervix; further incidence of skeletal muscle metastases is even rarer. We report the identification of extensive fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avid metastatic skeletal muscle deposits in a known case of adenocarcinoma cervix. The largest lesion representative of muscle deposit in the right deltoid was histopathologically confirmed to be metastatic poorly differentiated carcinoma. This report also serves to highlight the importance of 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) as compared to conventional imaging modalities such as CT and ultrasonography and comments better over the description of invasiveness as well as the extent of disease in carcinoma cervix. PMID:27385895

  20. Cimetidine and Clobenpropit Attenuate Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei; Mori, Takayuki; Kurata, Ayumi; Watanabe, Naoki; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors (Hrhs) have been identified as critical molecules during inflammation and carcinogenesis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Hrh1-Hrh3 antagonists on inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Male ICR mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and 1.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, drinking water for 7 days) to induce colorectal carcinogenesis. The mice were then fed diets containing test chemical (500 ppm terfenadine, 500 ppm cimetidine or 10 ppm clobenpropit) for 15 weeks. At week 18, feeding with the diets containing cimetidine (Hrh2 antagonist) and clobenpropit (Hrh3 antagonist/inverse agonist) significantly lowered the multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma. Terfenadine (Hrh1 antagonist) did not affect AOM-DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Adenocarcinoma cells immunohistochemically expressed Hrh1, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 with varied intensities. Because clobenpropit is also known to be a Hrh4 receptor agonist, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 may be involved in inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis. Additional data, including the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible inflammatory enzymes in the colonic mucosa, are also presented. PMID:26907350

  1. Colorectal surgery in Italy. Criteria to identify the hospital units and the tertiary referral centers entitled to perform it.

    PubMed

    Ruffo, Giacomo; Barugola, Giuliano; Rossini, Roberto; Sartori, Carlo Augusto

    2016-06-01

    Improving the quality and effectiveness of care is a key priority of any health policy. The outcomes of health care can be considered as indicators of effectiveness or quality. The scientific literature that evaluates the association between the volume of activity and the outcome of health interventions has greatly developed over the past decade, but, for practical reasons, ethical and social issues, a few randomized controlled studies were made to evaluate this association, although there are numerous observational studies of outcome and systematic reviews of the studies themselves. The colorectal surgery is the most studied area and it represents the ideal testing ground to determine the effectiveness of the quality indicators because of the high incidence of the disease and the wide spread in the territory of the structures that aim to tackle these issues. Numerous studies have documented an association between the large number of colo-rectal surgical procedures and the quality of results. In particular, the volume of activity is one of the characteristics of measurable process that can have a significant impact on the outcome of health care. In conclusion, the ability to use volume thresholds as a proxy for quality is very tempting but it is only part of reality. Infact, the volume-outcome relationship strictly depends on the type of cancer (colon vs rectum) and it appears somehow stronger for the individual surgeon than for the hospital; especially for the 5-year overall survival, operative mortality and number of permanent stoma. PMID:27278551

  2. KAG-308, a newly-identified EP4-selective agonist shows efficacy for treating ulcerative colitis and can bring about lower risk of colorectal carcinogenesis by oral administration.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Murata, Takahiko; Amakawa, Masahiro; Miyake, Yoshihide; Handa, Tango; Konishi, Katsuhiko; Matsumura, Yasushi; Tanaka, Takuji; Takeuchi, Koji

    2015-05-01

    Agonists for EP4 receptor, a prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype, appear to be a promising therapeutic strategy for ulcerative colitis (UC) due to their anti-inflammatory and epithelial regeneration activities. However, the clinical development of orally-available EP4 agonists for mild to moderate UC has not yet been reported. Furthermore, the possibility of an increased risk of colitis-associated cancer (CAC) through direct proliferative effects on epithelial cells via EP4 signaling has not been ruled out. Recently, we identified KAG-308 as an orally-available EP4-selective agonist. Here, we investigated the pharmacological and pharmacokinetic profiles of KAG-308. Then, we compared KAG-308 and sulfasalazine (SASP) for their abilities to prevent colitis and promote mucosal healing in a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Finally, the effect of KAG-308 treatment on CAC was evaluated in an azoxymethane (AOM)/DSS-induced CAC mouse model. KAG-308 selectively activated EP4 and potently inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α production in peripheral whole blood and T cells. Oral administration of KAG-308, which showed relatively high bioavailability, suppressed the onset of DSS-induced colitis and promoted histological mucosal healing, while SASP did not. KAG-308 also prevented colorectal carcinogenesis by inhibiting colitis development and consequently decreasing mortality in a CAC model, whereas SASP had marginal effects. In contrast, MF-482, an EP4 antagonist, increased mortality. These results indicated that orally-administered KAG-308 suppressed colitis development and promoted mucosal healing. Moreover, it exhibited preventive effects on colorectal carcinogenesis, and thus may be a new therapeutic strategy for the management of UC that confers a reduced risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25704618

  3. Synchronous ovarian metastasis from colorectal cancer: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    SHIMAZAKI, JIRO; TABUCHI, TAKANOBU; NISHIDA, KIYOTAKA; TAKEMURA, AKIRA; MOTOHASHI, GYO; KAJIYAMA, HIDEKI; SUZUKI, SHUJI

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian metastasis of colorectal cancer is relatively rare. The present study reports two cases of synchronous ovarian metastasis from colorectal cancer, which were managed by cytoreductive surgery. In case one, a 60-year-old female patient presented with a multilocular pelvic tumor and ascites. Virtual colonoscopy revealed a mass in the sigmoid colon; however, no tumor cells were identified on histological examination. Ovarian metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer was suspected and adnexectomy was subsequently performed. Histological examination of the excised tumor revealed adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor revealed positive staining for cytokeratin (CK)20 and caudal-type homeobox 2 (CDX2), and negative staining for CK7, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and inhibin. The immunohistological results supported the diagnosis of ovarian metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. In case two, a 56-year-old female patient presented with a multilocular pelvic tumor and ascites. Colonoscopy identified a rectal tumor, and histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was confirmed by cytological analysis of ascites. Subsequently, ovarian metastasis from rectal cancer with peritoneal dissemination was diagnosed, and left ovariectomy and transverse colostomy were performed. Histological examination of the excised tumor revealed moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma, and immunohistochemical investigation revealed positive staining for CK20 and CDX2, but negative staining for CK7. These immunohistological results indicated ovarian metastasis from rectal cancer. Both patients recovered well and are currently undergoing regular follow-up examinations. The observations from the two cases indicate that ovarian metastases of primary colorectal cancer may present as pelvic tumors and, thus, preoperative examination of the gastrointestinal tract is required. Furthermore, even in cases of widespread colorectal

  4. A rank-based transcriptional signature for predicting relapse risk of stage II colorectal cancer identified with proper data sources

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenyuan; Chen, Beibei; Guo, Xin; Wang, Ruiping; Chang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Yu; Song, Kai; Wang, Wen; Qi, Lishuang; Gu, Yunyan; Wang, Chenguang; Yang, Da; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The irreproducibility problem seriously hinders the studies on transcriptional signatures for predicting relapse risk of early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Through reviewing recently published 34 literatures for the development of CRC prognostic signatures based on gene expression profiles, we revealed a surprising phenomenon that 33 of these studies analyzed CRC samples with and without adjuvant chemotherapy together in the training and/or validation datasets. This data misuse problem could be partially attributed to the unclear and incomplete data annotation in public data sources. Furthermore, all the signatures proposed by these studies were based on risk scores summarized from gene expression levels, which are sensitive to experimental batch effects and risk compositions of the samples analyzed together. To avoid the above-mentioned problems, we carefully selected three qualified large datasets to develop and validate a signature consisting of three pairs of genes. The within-sample relative expression orderings of these gene pairs could robustly predict relapse risk of stage II CRC samples assessed in different laboratories. The transcriptional and functional analyses provided clear evidence that the high risk patients predicted by the proposed signature represent patients with micro-metastases. PMID:26967049

  5. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  6. Colorectal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... SJ, et al. United States Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after ... consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Gastroenterology . 2012;143:844-857. ...

  7. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  8. Array CGH identifies distinct DNA copy number profiles of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in chromosomal- and microsatellite-unstable sporadic colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, Silke; Weis, Roland; Makowiec, Frank; Roth, Jasmine; Danciu, Mihai; Hopt, Ulrich; Werner, Martin

    2007-03-01

    DNA copy number changes represent molecular fingerprints of solid tumors and are as such relevant for better understanding of tumor development and progression. In this study, we applied genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify gene-specific DNA copy number changes in chromosomal (CIN)- and microsatellite (MIN)-unstable sporadic colorectal cancers (sCRC). Genomic DNA was extracted from microdissected, matching normal colorectal epithelium and invasive tumor cells of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues of 22 cases with colorectal cancer (CIN = 11, MIN = 11). DNA copy number changes were determined by aCGH for 287 target sequences in tumor cell DNAs, using pooled normal DNAs as reference. aCGH data of tumor cell DNAs was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for three genes on serial tissues as those used for aCGH. aCGH revealed DNA copy number changes previously described by metaphase CGH (gains 7, 8q, 13q, and 20q; losses 8p, 15q, 18q, and 17p). However, chromosomal regions 20q, 13q, 7, and 17p were preferentially altered in CIN-type tumors and included DNA amplifications of eight genes on chromosome 20q (TOP1, AIB1, MYBL2, CAS, PTPN1, STK15, ZNF217, and CYP24), two genes on chromosome 13q (BRCA2 and D13S25), and three genes on chromosome 7 (IL6, CYLN2, and MET) as well as DNA deletions of two genes on chromosome 17p (HIC1 and LLGL1). Finally, additional CIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were identified for EXT1 (8q24.11) and MYC (8q24.12) as well as DNA deletions for MAP2K5 (15q23) and LAMA3 (18q11.2). In contrast, distinct MIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were detected for E2F5 (8p22-q21.3), GARP (11q13.5-q14), ATM (11q22.3), KAL (Xp22.3), and XIST (Xq13.2) as well as DNA deletions for RAF1 (3p25), DCC (18q21.3), and KEN (21q tel). aCGH revealed distinct DNA copy number changes of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in CIN- and MIN-type sporadic colorectal carcinomas. The identified candidate

  9. Rectal mucosal endometriosis primarily misinterpreted as adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Qiuping; Liu, Shaoyan; Xiong, Hanzhen; Jiang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis involving intestinal mucosa is relatively uncommon. It poses a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and pathologists. We herein report a case of colonoscopic specimen revealing rectal mucosal endometriosis. A 39-year-old woman complained of red rectal bleeding and intermittent abdominal pain. Colonoscopic examination showed a rectal mass with ulceration and circum wall involvement. Biopsy was processed in the suspicious of carcinoma. Morphologically, irregular glands replaced residual colorectal ones, displayed mucin depletion, nuclear stratification and subtile subnuclear vacuoles. The stroma was full of spindle cells with abundant pink cytoplasm and unclear boundary. Due to subjectively interpreting as dysplastic glands in desmoplastic setting, primary rectal adenocarcinoma was firstly raised. Immunohistochemically, CK7, ER and CD10 identified the essence of ectopic endometrium. CK20 and CDX2 highlighted residual glands. In case of misdiagnosis, any pathologists should be aware of intestinal endometriosis for each female’s colorectal biopsy, especially for that morphology not typical for primary adenocarcinoma or endometriosis. Reading slides carefully combined with a panel of immunomarkers would solve the pitfall. PMID:26191316

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies two new susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer at 5q23.3 and 17q12 in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Liang; Guo, Yong; Guo, Sutang; Li, Hai; Zhang, Lianhai; Zhou, Yanbing; Jiang, Bo; Ren, Yonghong; Xu, Youchun; Yang, Xiongfei; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Yirui; Shen, Zhanlong; Qin, Wenyan; Guo, Peng; Jiang, Yuyang; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Cheng, Jing; Yang, Yinxue; Wang, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have reported a number of loci harboring common variants that influence risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in European descent. But all the SNPs identified explained a small fraction of total heritability. To identify more genetic factors that modify the risk of CRC, especially Chinese Han specific, we conducted a three-stage GWAS including a screening stage (932 CRC cases and 966 controls) and two independent validations (Stage 2: 1,759 CRC cases and 1,875 controls; Stage 3: 943 CRC cases and 1,838 controls). In the combined analyses, we discovered two novel loci associated with CRC: rs12522693 at 5q23.3 (CDC42SE2-CHSY3, OR = 1.31, P = 2.08 × 10−8) and rs17836917 at 17q12 (ASIC2-CCL2, OR = 0.75, P = 4.55 × 10−8). Additionally, we confirmed two previously reported risk loci, rs6983267 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.17, P = 7.17 × 10−7) and rs10795668 at 10p14 (OR = 0.86, P = 2.96 × 10−6) in our cohorts. These results bring further insights into the CRC susceptibility and advance our understanding on etiology of CRC. PMID:26515597

  11. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test. PMID:21954677

  12. The potential of carcinoembryonic antigen, p53, Ki-67 and glutathion Stransferase-π as clinico-histopathological markers for colorectal cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhenyu; Shi, Chuanbing; Wen, Hao; Li, Fanglong; Wang, Baolin; Wang, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer is one of the major contributors to cancer death worldwide. Lack of reliable colorectal cancer markers has hampered the management of these cancer patients. Our main purpose was to study the correlation between histopathological variables of colorectal adenocarcinomas and identify histopathological markers that are of prognostic value in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods In the present study, we examined the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), p53, Ki-67 and glutathion Stransferase (GST) -π by using immunohistochemical staining methods in 126 colorectal carcinoma patients and evaluated the lymph node metastasis status in these patients by histopathological examination. Results The positive rates of CEA, p53, Ki-67 and GST-π expression in the colorectal cancer tissue specimens examined were 95.23%, 55.56%, 53.38% and 82.30%, respectively. Expression of p53 and Ki-67 was significantly correlated with the Dukes stages of the tumor, with higher levels of these proteins in Dukes'C and D tumors than those in Dukes' A and B tumors. Furthermore, the expression of p53, GST-π and Ki-67 correlated with prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. Additionally, the expression of p53 in colorectal cancer was closely related to the expression of Ki-67 and the expression of GST-π was directly correlated with that of p53. Conclusion The expression of CEA, p53, Ki-67 and GST-π was correlated with various clinical features of patients with colorectal cancer. The combined use of these histopathological markers appeared to be a promising tool in predicting the prognosis of patients with this type of cancer. PMID:23554611

  13. A gene browser of colorectal cancer with literature evidence and pre-computed regulatory information to identify key tumor suppressors and oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Huang, Fuda; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cancer of growing incidence that associates with a high mortality rate worldwide. There is a poor understanding of the heterogeneity of CRC with regard to causative genetic mutations and gene regulatory mechanisms. Previous studies have identified several susceptibility genes in small-scale experiments. However, the information has not been comprehensively and systematically compiled and interpreted. In this study, we constructed the gbCRC, the first literature-based gene resource for investigating CRC-related human genes. The features of our database include: (i) manual curation of experimentally-verified genes reported in the literature; (ii) comprehensive integration of five reliable data sources; and (iii) pre-computed regulatory patterns involving transcription factors, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. In total, 2067 genes associating with 2819 PubMed abstracts were compiled. Comprehensive functional annotations associated with all the genes, including gene expression profiles, homologous genes in other model species, protein-protein interactions, somatic mutations, and potential methylation sites. These comprehensive annotations and this pre-computed regulatory information highlighted the importance of the gbCRC with regard to the unexplored regulatory network of CRC. This information is available in a plain text format that is free to download. PMID:27477450

  14. A genome-wide association study on copy-number variation identifies a 11q11 loss as a candidate susceptibility variant for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rozadilla, C; Cazier, J B; Tomlinson, I; Brea-Fernández, A; Lamas, M J; Baiget, M; López-Fernández, L A; Clofent, J; Bujanda, L; Gonzalez, D; de Castro, L; Hemminki, K; Bessa, X; Andreu, M; Jover, R; Xicola, R; Llor, X; Moreno, V; Castells, A; Castellví-Bel, S; Carracedo, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C

    2014-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease, and therefore its development is determined by the combination of both environmental factors and genetic variants. Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of SNP variation have conveniently identified 20 genetic variants so far, a significant proportion of the observed heritability is yet to be explained. Common copy-number variants (CNVs) are one of the most important genomic sources of variability, and hence a potential source to explain part of this missing genetic fraction. Therefore, we have performed a GWAS on CNVs to explore the relationship between common structural variation and CRC development. Phase 1 of the GWAS consisted of 881 cases and 667 controls from a Spanish cohort. Copy-number status was validated by quantitative PCR for each of those common CNVs potentially associated with CRC in phase I. Subsequently, SNPs were chosen as proxies for the validated CNVs for phase II replication (1,342 Spanish cases and 1,874 Spanish controls). Four common CNVs were found to be associated with CRC and were further replicated in Phase II. Finally, we found that SNP rs1944682, tagging a 11q11 CNV, was nominally associated with CRC susceptibility (p value = 0.039; OR = 1.122). This locus has been previously related to extreme obesity phenotypes, which could suggest a relationship between body weight and CRC susceptibility. PMID:24218287

  15. A gene browser of colorectal cancer with literature evidence and pre-computed regulatory information to identify key tumor suppressors and oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Huang, Fuda; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cancer of growing incidence that associates with a high mortality rate worldwide. There is a poor understanding of the heterogeneity of CRC with regard to causative genetic mutations and gene regulatory mechanisms. Previous studies have identified several susceptibility genes in small-scale experiments. However, the information has not been comprehensively and systematically compiled and interpreted. In this study, we constructed the gbCRC, the first literature-based gene resource for investigating CRC-related human genes. The features of our database include: (i) manual curation of experimentally-verified genes reported in the literature; (ii) comprehensive integration of five reliable data sources; and (iii) pre-computed regulatory patterns involving transcription factors, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. In total, 2067 genes associating with 2819 PubMed abstracts were compiled. Comprehensive functional annotations associated with all the genes, including gene expression profiles, homologous genes in other model species, protein-protein interactions, somatic mutations, and potential methylation sites. These comprehensive annotations and this pre-computed regulatory information highlighted the importance of the gbCRC with regard to the unexplored regulatory network of CRC. This information is available in a plain text format that is free to download. PMID:27477450

  16. High-throughput RNAi screening of human kinases identifies predictors of clinical outcome in colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ajian; Tang, Erjiang; Peng, Jian; Tang, Wenxian; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Liang; Xiao, Yihua; Wei, Qing; Yin, Lu; Li, Huaguang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify protein kinase genes that modulate oxaliplatin cytotoxicity in vitro and evaluate the roles of these genes in predicting clinical outcomes in CRC patients receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. A high-throughput RNAi screening targeting 626 human kinase genes was performed to identify kinase genes whose inhibition potentiates oxaliplatin sensitivity in CRC cells. The associations between copy numbers of the candidate genes and recurrence-free survival and overall survival were analyzed in 142 stage III CRC patients receiving first-line oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy who were enrolled from two independent hospitals. HT-RNAi screening identified 40 kinase genes whose inhibition potentiated oxaliplatin cytotoxicity in DLD1 cells. The relative copy number (RCN) of MAP4K1 and CDKL4 were associated with increased risks of both recurrence and death. Moreover, significant genes-based risk score and the ratios of RCN of different genes can further categorize patients into subgroups with distinctly differing outcomes. The estimated AUC for the prediction models including clinical variables plus kinase biomarkers was 0.77 for the recurrence and 0.82 for the survival models. The copy numbers of MAP4K1 and CDKL4 can predict clinical outcomes in CRC patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:25904054

  17. Cervical adenocarcinoma identification by testing for chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Dittus, Janet L; Dudley, Bunyan S; Upender, Madhvi; Endress, Gregory A

    2013-12-01

    We report on a case of cervical adenocarcinoma in situ in a 42-year-old woman with a history of human papillomavirus infection. Repeat cytology, human papillomavirus testing, and colposcopy failed to identify the lesion. Testing of the cervical cell DNA identified chromosomal abnormalities, prompting a cervical cone biopsy, which identified adenocarcinoma in situ. PMID:24283864

  18. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Timothy HT; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O’Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B.; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica MJ; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F.; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W.; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10−9) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10−8), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers. PMID:26621817

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O'Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica M J; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10(-9)) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10(-8)), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers. PMID:26621817

  20. A Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility New Variant at 4q26 in the Spanish Population Identified by Genome-Wide Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Real, Luis M.; Ruiz, Agustín; Gayán, Javier; González-Pérez, Antonio; Sáez, María E.; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Morón, Francisco J.; Velasco, Juan; Marginet-Flinch, Ruth; Musulén, Eva; Carrasco, José M.; Moreno-Rey, Concha; Vázquez, Enrique; Chaves-Conde, Manuel; Moreno-Nogueira, Jose A.; Hidalgo-Pascual, Manuel; Ferrero-Herrero, Eduardo; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Castells, Antoni; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Carracedo, Angel; González, Beatriz; Alonso, Sergio; Perucho, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disorder resulting from the combination of genetic and non-genetic factors. Genome–wide association studies (GWAS) are useful for identifying such genetic susceptibility factors. However, the single loci so far associated with CRC only represent a fraction of the genetic risk for CRC development in the general population. Therefore, many other genetic risk variants alone and in combination must still remain to be discovered. The aim of this work was to search for genetic risk factors for CRC, by performing single-locus and two-locus GWAS in the Spanish population. Results A total of 801 controls and 500 CRC cases were included in the discovery GWAS dataset. 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)s from single-locus and 243 SNPs from two-locus association analyses were selected for replication in 423 additional CRC cases and 1382 controls. In the meta-analysis, one SNP, rs3987 at 4q26, reached GWAS significant p-value (p = 4.02×10−8), and one SNP pair, rs1100508 CG and rs8111948 AA, showed a trend for two-locus association (p = 4.35×10−11). Additionally, our GWAS confirmed the previously reported association with CRC of five SNPs located at 3q36.2 (rs10936599), 8q24 (rs10505477), 8q24.21(rs6983267), 11q13.4 (rs3824999) and 14q22.2 (rs4444235). Conclusions Our GWAS for CRC patients from Spain confirmed some previously reported associations for CRC and yielded a novel candidate risk SNP, located at 4q26. Epistasis analyses also yielded several novel candidate susceptibility pairs that need to be validated in independent analyses. PMID:24978480

  1. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics of colonic adenocarcinoma using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nenrong; Chen, Rong; Li, Hongsheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), a noninvasive optical method with high resolution and high sensitivity, can obtain detailed microstructures of biotissues at submolecular level. In this study, MPM is used to image microstructure varieties of human colonic mucosa and submucosa with adenocarcinoma. Some parameters, such as gland configuration, SHG/TPEF intensity ratio, and collagen orientation and so on, should serve the indicators of early colorectal cancer. The exploratory results show that it's potential for the development of multiphoton mini-endoscopy in real-time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  2. Prognostic and predictive markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Le, Nha; Sund, Malin; Vinci, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by a poor prognosis and a low median survival, despite improvements observed for many other solid tumours. Intensive research efforts have been undertaken during the last decades to discover new prognostic and treatment predictive biomarkers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The mainstay of medical treatment for the disease has been the well-tolerated nucleoside analogue, gemcitabine. The only targeted agent currently used in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients is the epithelial growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine. Recently, treatment regimens such as a combination of fluorouracil-leucovorin-irinotecan-oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and the combination of nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine have been introduced for metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Although these treatment regimens significantly improve survival of patients, there are no good predictive biomarkers available that can be used to identify who would benefit most from them. Therefore, the search for predictive biomarkers that would facilitate personalization of chemotherapy is highly relevant. PMID:26769569

  3. Antimicrobial peptide m2163 or m2386 identified from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 can trigger apoptosis in the human colorectal cancer cell line SW480.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Li, An-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Liao, Yi-Shun; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2015-05-01

    Ribosomal synthesized antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are widely distributed in nature and are toxic to certain microorganisms. Some of these AMPs are found to exhibit cytotoxic activity against the growth of cancer cells and thus have obvious anticancer potential. Here, we have studied the antiproliferation on the human colorectal cancer cell line SW480 of two AMPs, namely m2163 and m2386, identified by us from a lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 previously. A half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 40 μg/ml is determined first using the MTT (3-(4, 5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay for either peptide m2163 or m2386. The apoptosis in treated SW480 cells by either peptide m2163 or m2386 is analyzed using flow cytometry with annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and propidium iodide double staining. These analyses show that a substantial population of treated SW480 cells can undergo apoptosis by either peptide m2163 or m2386. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot analyses are subsequently used to study how the apoptosis is induced in the treated SW480 cells by either peptide m2163 or m2386. While m2163 is found to induce the expression of Fas and TRAILR1, the expression of Fas, TNFR1, and TRAILR1 death receptors on the cell surface of treated SW480 cells is found to be induced by m2386. Further, the expression of some mitochondria-related apoptosis proteins such as Smac is found to be also induced, suggesting that either peptide m2163 or m2386 can trigger both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. The cell membrane permeability is greatly enhanced upon treatment with either peptide m2163 or m2386 as analyzed by the flow cytometry using both FITC-labeled peptides. The flow cytometry is also used to analyze the fluorescence intensity given by FITC-m2163 in either the mitochondria or cytoplasm fraction of the treated and fractionated SW480 cells. It is found that

  4. Synchronous Primary Anorectal Melanoma and Sigmoid Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Aaron; Grant, Benjamin; Avramovic, John; Ho, Yik-Hong; Wallace, Corrine

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous primary anorectal melanoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma is extremely rare, with only 5 cases reported in the literature. Here, a case is reported and the currently available literature is summarized. A 72-year-old white male presented with changes in his bowel habits and unintentional weight loss. Colonoscopy revealed a polypoid mass in the distal rectum extending to the anal verge anteriorly and a circumferential polypoid mass in the distal sigmoid colon. Biopsies were taken, which revealed poorly differentiated melanoma of the anorectal mass and moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid mass with nodal involvement. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed liver metastasis. An extended abdominoperineal resection was undertaken for palliation, relief of symptoms, and definitive histology to guide further management. Consequently, a resection of the hepatic metastasis was attempted; however, macroscopic deposits were discovered on 7 of 8 liver segments perioperatively. He was subsequently referred to medical oncology for palliative chemotherapy. Synchronous primary anorectal melanoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma is rare, this being the sixth report found in the literature. In summary of the available cases, all synchronous cancers were located in the rectosigmoid and had very similar presentations. Most presented relatively late and were generally treated with abdominoperineal resection, which appears to be the best treatment option. Overall, prognosis appears to be dismal. General and colorectal surgeons should always be aware of the possibilities of simultaneous primary cancers because this can affect treatment modalities and prognosis for the patient. PMID:26011200

  5. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  6. Lung adenocarcinoma and human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ching; Chen, Jen-Hau; Richard, Kradin; Chen, Pao-Yang; Christiani, David C

    2004-09-15

    Over the past three decades, the incidence of lung adenocarcinoma has increased worldwide. Most individuals with lung adenocarcinoma (especially women) are nonsmokers. Reported risk factors for the development of lung adenocarcinoma include cigarette smoking; exposure to cooking fumes, air pollution, second-hand smoke, asbestos, and radon; nutritional status; genetic susceptibility; immunologic dysfunction; tuberculosis infection; and asthma. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a known risk factor for the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), but it has not been thoroughly assessed as a potential risk factor for the development of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. More than 50% of people are infected with HPV during their lifetimes, either via intrauterine or postnatal infection. Recent studies involving Taiwanese patients have demonstrated a possible association between HPV infection and the risk of developing pulmonary adenocarcinoma. HPV transmission pathways have not yet been conclusively identified. The observation of certain types of HPV in association with cervical and oral SCC raises the possibility of sexual transmission of HPV from the cervix to the oral cavity, with subsequent transmission to the larynx and then to the lung. HPV infection and metaplasia in lung tissue may increase an individual's susceptibility to the tumorigenesis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Further epidemiologic and pathologic investigations will be necessary to establish a causal relation. PMID:15368331

  7. Molecular pathogenesis of sporadic colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hidetsugu; Kuroda, Hajime; Imai, Yasuo; Hiraishi, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classified into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identified by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the first half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a limited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research field and discuss its prospects. PMID:26738600

  8. Characterization and Prognostic Value of Mutations in Exons 5 and 6 of the p53 Gene in Patients with Colorectal Cancers in Central Iran

    PubMed Central

    Golmohammadi, Rahim; Namazi, Mohammad J.; Nikbakht, Mehdi; Salehi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims We aimed to investigate the relation-ships among various mutations of the p53 gene and their protein products, histological characteristics, and disease prognosis of primary colorectal cancer in Isfahan, central Iran. Methods Sixty-one patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled in the study. Mutations of the p53 gene were detected by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The protein stability was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Patients were followed up to 48 months. Results Twenty-one point mutations in exons 5 and 6 were detected in the tumor specimens of 14 patients (23%). Of those, 81% and 9.5% were missense and nonsense mutations, respectively. There were also two novel mutations in the intronic region between exons 5 and 6. In 11 mutated specimens, protein stability and protein accumulation were identified. There was a relationship between the type of mutation and protein accumulation in exons 5 and 6 of the p53 gene. The presence of the mutation was associated with an advanced stage of cancer (trend, p<0.009). Patients with mutated p53 genes had significantly lower survival rates than those with wild type p53 genes (p<0.01). Conclusions Mutations in exons 5 and 6 of the p53 gene are common genetic alterations in colorectal adenocarcinoma in central Iran and are associated with a poor prognosis of the disease. PMID:23710310

  9. SATB2 Expression Distinguishes Ovarian Metastases of Colorectal and Appendiceal Origin From Primary Ovarian Tumors of Mucinous or Endometrioid Type.

    PubMed

    Moh, Michelle; Krings, Gregor; Ates, Deniz; Aysal, Anil; Kim, Grace E; Rabban, Joseph T

    2016-03-01

    The primary origin of some ovarian mucinous tumors may be challenging to determine, because some metastases of extraovarian origin may exhibit gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical features that are shared by some primary ovarian mucinous tumors. Metastases of primary colorectal, appendiceal, gastric, pancreatic, and endocervical adenocarcinomas may simulate primary ovarian mucinous cystadenoma, mucinous borderline tumor, or mucinous adenocarcinoma. Recently, immunohistochemical expression of SATB2, a transcriptional regulator involved in osteoblastic and neuronal differentiation, has been shown to be a highly sensitive marker of normal colorectal epithelium and of colorectal adenocarcinoma. SATB2 expression has not been reported in normal epithelium of the female reproductive tract. Therefore, we hypothesized that SATB2 may be of value in distinguishing ovarian metastases of colorectal adenocarcinoma from primary ovarian mucinous tumors and from primary ovarian endometrioid tumors. Among primary ovarian tumors, SATB2 staining was observed in 0/22 mucinous cystadenomas that lacked a component of mature teratoma, 4/12 mucinous cystadenomas with mature teratoma, 1/60 mucinous borderline tumors, 0/17 mucinous adenocarcinomas, 0/3 endometrioid borderline tumors, and 0/72 endometrioid adenocarcinomas. Among ovarian metastases, SATB2 staining was observed in 24/32 (75%) colorectal adenocarcinomas; 8/10 (80%) low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms; and 4/4 (100%) high-grade appendiceal adenocarcinomas. No SATB2 staining was observed in any ovarian metastasis of pancreatic, gastric, gallbladder, or endocervical origin. Evaluation of primary extraovarian tumors showed the highest incidences of SATB2 staining among primary colorectal adenocarcinomas (71%), primary appendiceal low-grade mucinous neoplasms (100%), and primary appendiceal high-grade adenocarcinomas (100%). Similar to their metastatic counterparts, none of the primary pancreatic or gastric

  10. Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Presenting as a Rectal Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Erin; Chen, Lilian; Guelrud, Moises; Allison, Harmony; Zuo, Tao; Suarez, Yvelisse; Yoo, James

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal adenocarcinoma typically presents as an incidentally noted appendiceal mass, or with symptoms of right lower quadrant pain that can mimic appendicitis, but local involvement of adjacent organs is uncommon, particularly as the presenting sign. We report on a case of a primary appendiceal cancer initially diagnosed as a rectal polyp based on its appearance in the rectal lumen. The management of the patient was in keeping with standard practice for a rectal polyp, and the diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma was made intraoperatively. The operative strategy had to be adjusted due to this unexpected finding. Although there are published cases of appendiceal adenocarcinoma inducing intussusception and thus mimicking a cecal polyp, there are no reports in the literature describing invasion of the appendix through the rectal wall and thus mimicking a rectal polyp. The patient is a 75-year-old female who presented with spontaneous hematochezia and, on colonoscopy, was noted to have a rectal polyp that appeared to be located within a diverticulum. When endoscopic mucosal resection was not successful, she was referred to colorectal surgery for a low anterior resection. Preoperative imaging was notable for an enlarged appendix adjacent to the rectum. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be densely adherent to the right lateral rectal wall. An en bloc resection of the distal sigmoid colon, proximal rectum and appendix was performed, with pathology demonstrating appendiceal adenocarcinoma that invaded through the rectal wall. The prognosis in this type of malignancy weighs heavily on whether or not perforation and spread throughout the peritoneal cavity have occurred. In this unusual presentation, an en bloc resection is required for a complete resection and to minimize the risk of peritoneal spread. Unusual appearing polyps do not always originate from the bowel wall. Abnormal radiographic findings adjacent to an area of gastrointestinal pathology may

  11. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Julie; Prenen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of colorectal cancer cases are sporadic without family history or genetic predisposition, while in less than 10% a causative genetic event has been identified. Historically, colorectal cancer classification was only based on clinical and pathological features. Many efforts have been made to discover the genetic and molecular features of colorectal cancer, and there is more and more evidence that these features determine the prognosis and response to (targeted) treatment. Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with three known major molecular groups. The most common is the chromosomal instable group, characterized by an accumulation of mutations in specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The second is the microsatellite instable group, caused by dysfunction of DNA mismatch repair genes leading to genetic hypermutability. The CpG Island Methylation phenotype is the third group, distinguished by hypermethylation. Colorectal cancer subtyping has also been addressed using genome-wide gene expression profiling in large patient cohorts and recently several molecular classification systems have been proposed. In this review we would like to provide an up-to-date overview of the genetic aspects of colorectal cancer. PMID:24714764

  12. IGF2 is an actionable target that identifies a distinct subpopulation of colorectal cancer patients with marginal response to anti-EGFR therapies.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Eugenia R; Galimi, Francesco; Sassi, Francesco; Migliardi, Giorgia; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M; Lupo, Barbara; Erriquez, Jessica; Isella, Claudio; Comoglio, Paolo M; Medico, Enzo; Tejpar, Sabine; Budinská, Eva; Trusolino, Livio; Bertotti, Andrea

    2015-01-28

    Among patients with colorectal cancer who benefit from therapy targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), stable disease (SD) occurs more frequently than massive regressions. Exploring the mechanisms of this incomplete sensitivity to devise more efficacious treatments will likely improve patients' outcomes. We tested therapies tailored around hypothesis-generating molecular features in patient-derived xenografts ("xenopatients"), which originated from 125 independent samples that did not harbor established resistance-conferring mutations. Samples from xenopatients that responded to cetuximab, an anti-EGFR agent, with disease stabilization displayed high levels of EGFR family ligands and receptors, indicating high EGFR pathway activity. Five of 21 SD models (23.8%) characterized by particularly high expression of EGFR and EGFR family members regressed after intensified EGFR blockade by cetuximab and a small-molecule inhibitor. In addition, a subset of cases in which enhanced EGFR inhibition was unproductive (6 of 16, 37.5%) exhibited marked overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2). Enrichment of IGF2 overexpressors among cases with SD was demonstrated in the entire xenopatient collection and was confirmed in patients by mining clinical gene expression data sets. In functional studies, IGF2 overproduction attenuated the efficacy of cetuximab. Conversely, interception of IGF2-dependent signaling in IGF2-overexpressing xenopatients potentiated the effects of cetuximab. The clinical implementation of IGF inhibitors awaits reliable predictors of response, but the results of this study suggest rational combination therapies for colorectal cancer and provide evidence for IGF2 as a biomarker of reduced tumor sensitivity to anti-EGFR therapy and a determinant of response to combined IGF2/EGFR targeting. PMID:25632036

  13. Tomato powder impedes the development of azoxymethane-induced colorectal cancer in rats through suppression of COX-2 expression via NF-κB and regulating Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Tuzcu, Mehmet; Aslan, Abdullah; Tuzcu, Zeynep; Yabas, Mehmet; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Kucuk, Omer; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-09-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Since dietary factors have been connected to a reduced risk of a diversity of human cancers, in this study we investigated the effects of tomato powder (TP) on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal cancer in Wistar rats, and possible mechanism(s) by which TP shows its chemopreventive activity. Here we show that TP added to feed at 5% rate decreases the rate of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and reduces the development of adenocarcinoma and growth of AOM-induced colorectal cancer in rats. In addition, we demonstrate that TP supplementation shows its chemopreventive activities through inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression via NF-κB pathway and promotion of apoptosis, as well as regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway in colorectal tissue of AOM-treated rats. Our findings identify an intimate connection between dietary supplementation of TP and the decreased risk of colorectal cancer in rats, and suggest that consumption of TP would be a natural candidate for the prevention of colorectal cancer in men. PMID:22859375

  14. Anal adenocarcinoma complicating chronic Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Mantzos, Dionysios S.; Kondi-Pafiti, Agathi; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal adenocarcinoma and Crohn’s disease are known to be associated entities. However, a carcinoma arising within a chronic perianal fistulous tract in a patient with Crohn’s disease is a rare complication. Presentation of case We present a case of a 40-year-old male patient with a long-standing perianal Crohn’s disease who developed an anal mucinous adenocarcinoma within the fistulous tracts. Discussion Although, Crohn’s disease and colorectal carcinoma association is well established, few cases have been reported where the cancer has originated within a perianal fistula. Constant mucosal regeneration occurring within a fistula seems to be the predominant pathogenetic mechanism, while immunosuppressants and anti-TNF agents may also contribute to the malignant transformation. Unfortunately, the lack of suspicion and the inadequate physical examination or colonoscopy due to exacerbation of the perianal symptoms could lead to delayed diagnosis; and thus, a poor prognosis. Conclusion Albeit a rare complication, clinicians should maintain a high degree of vigilance about the possible development of adenocarcinoma in patients with long-standing perianal Crohn’s disease. Thus, these patients should be kept under regular surveillance with examination under anaesthesia and biopsies or curettage of the tracts. PMID:25884608

  15. Pathologic Features of Colorectal Inflammatory Polyps in Miniature Dachshunds.

    PubMed

    Uchida, E; Chambers, J K; Nakashima, K; Saito, T; Ohno, K; Tsujimoto, H; Nakayama, H; Uchida, K

    2016-07-01

    The histopathologic characteristics of colorectal inflammatory polyps that formed in Miniature Dachshunds were compared with those of other colorectal proliferative lesions, including adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Fifty-three colorectal polypoid lesions were histopathologically classified into inflammatory polyps (26 cases), adenoma (18 cases), and adenocarcinoma (9 cases). All 26 dogs that were diagnosed with inflammatory polyps were Miniature Dachshunds, indicating that colorectal inflammatory polyps exhibit a marked predilection for this breed. The inflammatory polyps had complex histopathologic features and were classified into 3 stages based on their epithelial composition. In early stage (stage 1), the polyps tended to exhibit a thickened mucosa containing hyperplastic goblet cells, dilated crypts filled with a large amount of mucus, and mild lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration. In later stages (stages 2 and 3), more severe neutrophil infiltration, interstitial mucus accumulation, granulation tissue, and occasional osteoid tissue were seen. Also, a few small foci of dysplastic epithelial cells were detected. The hyperplastic goblet cells, which were a major component of the epithelium of the inflammatory polyps, were positive for cytokeratin 20 (CK20), while the dysplastic epithelial cells found in inflammatory polyps (stage 3) and the tumor cells of the adenomas and adenocarcinomas were negative for CK20. These CK20-negative epithelial cells exhibited cytoplasmic and nuclear immunoreactivity for beta-catenin. In addition, the epithelial cells in the inflammatory polyps demonstrated significantly higher cyclooxygenase 2 and fibroblast growth factor 2 expression than did those of the adenomas and adenocarcinomas, suggesting that the arachidonate cascade is involved in the development of colorectal inflammatory polyps in miniature dachshunds. PMID:26792840

  16. Predictive cytogenetic biomarkers for colorectal neoplasia in medium risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, EM; Nicolaie, T; Ionescu, MA; Becheanu, G; Andrei, F; Diculescu, M; Ciocirlan, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: DNA damage and chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes parallels DNA mutations in tumor tissues. Objective: The aim of our study was to predict the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions by specific biomarkers in “medium risk” individuals (age 50 to 75, with no personal or family of any colorectal neoplasia). Methods and Results: We designed a prospective cohort observational study including patients undergoing diagnostic or opportunistic screening colonoscopy. Specific biomarkers were analyzed for each patient in peripheral lymphocytes - presence of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and the Nuclear Division Index (NDI) by the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN). Of 98 patients included, 57 were “medium risk” individuals. MN frequency and NPB presence were not significantly different in patients with neoplastic lesions compared to controls. In “medium risk” individuals, mean NDI was significantly lower for patients with any neoplastic lesions (adenomas and adenocarcinomas, AUROC 0.668, p 00.5), for patients with advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma and adenocarcinoma, AUROC 0.636 p 0.029) as well as for patients with adenocarcinoma (AUROC 0.650, p 0.048), for each comparison with the rest of the population. For a cut-off of 1.8, in “medium risk” individuals, an NDI inferior to that value may predict any neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97.7%, an advanced neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97% and adenocarcinoma with a sensitivity of 94.4%. Discussion: NDI score may have a role as a colorectal cancer-screening test in “medium risk” individuals. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid; CRC = colorectal cancer; EU = European Union; WHO = World Health Organization; FOBT = fecal occult blood test; CBMN = cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay; MN = micronuclei; NPB = nucleoplasmic bridges; NDI = Nuclear Division Index; FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis; HNPCC = hereditary non

  17. Aberrant expressions of c-KIT and DOG-1 in mucinous and nonmucinous colorectal carcinomas and relation to clinicopathologic features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohamed, Mie Ali

    2015-10-01

    c-KIT and DOG-1 are 2 highly expressed proteins in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Few studies had investigated c-KIT, but not DOG-1, expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). This study aims to investigate expressions of c-KIT and DOG-1 in colorectal mucinous carcinoma and nonmucinous carcinoma using manual tissue microarray technique. In this work, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal mucinous (MA) and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique, and immunohistochemistry for c-KIT and DOG-1 was done. We found that aberrant c-KIT expression was detected in 12 cases (8%); 6 cases (4%) showed strong expression. Aberrant DOG-1 expression was detected in 15 cases (10%); among them, only 4 cases (2.7%) showed strong expression. Nonmucinous adenocarcinoma showed a significantly high expression of c-KIT, but not DOG-1, than MA. Aberrant c-KIT and DOG-1 expressions were significantly unrelated but were associated with excessive microscopic abscess formation. Neither c-KIT nor DOG-1 expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival or overall survival. In conclusion, aberrant c-KIT and DOG-1 expressions in CRC are rare events, either in NMA or MA. Nonmucinous adenocarcinoma showed a significantly higher expression of c-KIT, but not DOG-1, than MA. The expressions of both in CRC are significantly unrelated but are associated with microscopic abscess formation. Neither c-KIT nor DOG-1 expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival or overall survival. So, c-KIT and DOG-1 immunostaining is not a cost-effective method of identifying patients with CRC who may benefit from treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:26272691

  18. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Stark, Valerie E.; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC. PMID:26894861

  19. Chemoradiation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajarshi; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreas has an annual incidence of 7,400 cases in the U.K. In comparison with other common cancers of solid organs, namely, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer has a high morbidity and mortality. Radical resection is possible in only 15%-20% of patients, and only 3%-4% of all patients presenting with this condition achieve long-term control and cure. Various strategies in the form of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment have been employed over the years to improve outcome, with limited success. Systemic chemotherapy remains the gold standard in the metastatic setting in good performance status patients, and adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of localized and locally advanced cancer has been found to improve outcome. The role of radiotherapy, however, remains controversial and is an area that merits further investigation in well-conducted multicenter trials at various stages of the disease in combination with systemic agents and exploiting recent advances in the delivery of radiotherapy. In this article, we review the published literature on the use of chemoradiation as a modality in various stages of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and highlight areas that future trials in this field should target for a way forward in this malignancy. PMID:20203172

  20. P53 expression in invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma and precursor lesions.

    PubMed

    Norfadzilah, M Y; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Retneswari, M; Chinna, K; Noor, Laili M M

    2011-12-01

    Patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma are known to have a high mortality rate. The 5-year survival rate still remains low even now compared to that of the 1960's despite new advances in management including surgery, chemotherapy, pathological classification and molecular diagnostic technologies. Precursors to invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified in the last ten years that include mucinous cystic neoplasm, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. p53 protein accumulation in the nuclei is a common molecular event in most human neoplasms. Our objective is to investigate p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and precursor lesions and their significance. The selected study material encompassed 31 invasive ductal adenocarcinoma, 15 mucinous cystic neoplasm and papillary mucinous neoplasm, and 27 cases of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia including grade 1, 2 and 3. Immunoscore was given for each case based on intensity of staining and percentage of cells positive and compared between precursor lesions and invasive adenocarcinoma. A score of 50 and above was considered significant. The results showed that p53 expression increased progressively and significantly with the grade of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma (p-value < 0.001). These findings support the concept of multistep carcinogenesis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and suggest that p53 inactivation occurs in the progression of precursors to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:22299208

  1. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 promotes tumor angiogenesis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Toshihiro; Iyama, Shinji; Toshima, Shotaro; Sakata, Akiko; Usui, Shingo; Minami, Yuko; Sato, Yukio; Hizawa, Nobuyuki; Noguchi, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    Although embryonal proteins have been used as tumor marker, most are not useful for detection of early malignancy. In the present study, we developed mouse monoclonal antibodies against fetal lung of miniature swine, and screened them to find an embryonal protein that is produced at the early stage of malignancy, focusing on lung adenocarcinoma. We found an antibody clone that specifically stained stroma of lung adenocarcinoma. LC-MS/MS identified the protein recognized by this clone as dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 (DDAH2), an enzyme known for antiatherosclerotic activity. DDAH2 was found to be expressed in fibroblasts of stroma of malignancies, with higher expression in minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) and invasive adenocarcinoma than in adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS). Moreover, tumors with high stromal expression of DDAH2 had a poorer prognosis than those without. In vitro analysis showed that DDAH2 increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducing proliferation and capillary-like tube formation of vascular endothelial cells. In resected human tissues, eNOS also showed higher expression in invasive adenocarcinoma than in AIS and normal lung, similarly to DDAH2. Our data indicate that expression of DDAH2 is associated with invasiveness of lung adenocarcinoma via tumor angiogenesis. DDAH2 expression might be a prognostic factor in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26515557

  2. Solid adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Uniformly solid character of the lesions is usually indicative of a well differentiated tumor. No solid adenocarcinomas have observed in our series. However, rare cases have been described by others. In human pathology this diagnosis is usually based on detection of mucin after periodic acid-Schiff reaction with diastase (α-amylase) digestion.

  3. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for detecting colorectal cancer: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Wheeler, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the theoretical potential to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. To date, these techniques have not been able to be effectively translated to endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents a new technology that may be well-suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in the fluorescence excitation spectrum of resected specimen pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa. Patients being treated for colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled. Representative adenocarcinoma and normal colonic mucosa specimens were collected from each case. Specimens were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of H&E permanent sections. Hyperspectral image data of the fluorescence excitation of adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal tissue were acquired using a custom microscope configuration previously developed in our lab. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation spectral range of 390-450 nm. We conclude that fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for differentiating adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal mucosa of the colon. Future work will focus on expanding the number of specimen pairs analyzed and will utilize fresh tissues where possible, as flash freezing and reconstituting tissues may have altered the autofluorescence properties.

  4. Colorectal cancer implant in an external hemorrhoidal skin tag

    PubMed Central

    Liasis, Lampros

    2016-01-01

    External hemorrhoidal skin tags are generally benign. Colorectal cancer metastases to the squamous epithelium of perianal skin tags without other evidence of disseminated disease is a very rare finding. We present the case of a 61-year-old man with metastasis to an external hemorrhoidal skin tag from a midrectal primary adenocarcinoma. This case report highlights the importance of close examination of the anus during surgical planning for colorectal cancers. Abnormal findings of the perianal skin suggesting an implant or metastatic disease warrant biopsy, as distal spread and seeding can occur. In our patient, this finding appropriately changed surgical management. PMID:27034567

  5. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  6. Clinicopathologic Features of Colorectal Carcinoma in HIV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, Carlie; Cavalcanti, Marcela S.; Daniel, Tanisha; Vakiani, Efsevia; Shia, Jinru; Sigel, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests differences in colo-rectal cancer in HIV-infected patients (HIV+) compared with HIV− patients. Microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in a subset of colorectal cancer, is present at a higher rate in certain cancers in HIV+ patients. Colorectal cancer with MSI share some characteristics with those reported for HIV+ colorectal cancer. On this premise, we studied clinical and pathologic features of HIV+ colorectal cancer and evaluated for MSI using matched HIV− colorectal cancer controls. Methods Two nested, matched cohorts were identified from a hospital-based cohort of colorectal cancer patients. HIV+ colo-rectal cancers were identified and random control patients were matched for selected characteristics. Mismatch repair protein (MMR) IHC was performed as the detection method for MSI. Variables were compared between cases and controls using fixed-effects logit modeling to account for matching. Results We included 184 colorectal cancer samples (38 HIV+, 146 HIV− control). Median patient age at colorectal cancer onset was 55. When compared with HIV− colorectal cancer, HIV+patients were more likely to have smoked (P = 0.001), have right-sided colorectal cancer (37% vs. 14%; P = 0.003), and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) above 50/10 high-power fields (21% vs. 7%). There was no difference in MMR protein expression (P = 0.6). HIV+ colorectal cancer patients had reduced overall survival (P = 0.02) but no difference in progression-free survival. Conclusions HIV+ patients developed colorectal cancer at a lower median age than population estimates, had a higher frequency of right-sided disease, and increased TILs, suggesting potential biologic differences compared with uninfected patients. Impact Clinicopathologic differences in colorectal cancer of HIV+ persons may have implications for tumor pathogenesis. PMID:27197294

  7. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  8. Correlation of Histologic Subtypes and Molecular Alterations in Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma: Therapeutic and Prognostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Chang Min; Ro, Jae Y

    2016-09-01

    Major driver mutations of pulmonary adenocarcinomas have been identified and highlighted as actionable targets for precision cancer medicine. As phenotype is largely determined by genotype, genetic changes associated with morphologic features have recently received more attention from both pathologists and clinicians. The morphologic features of adenocarcinomas with mutations in EGFR or KRAS, or translocated ALK, have rarely been described. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations, the most common driver mutation encountered in Asian patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma, show lepidic or papillary organotypic growth patterns. KRAS-mutated adenocarcinomas demonstrate nonorganotypic growth patterns, especially mucin-containing cells. P53 mutations are associated with aggressiveness rather than growth patterns. HER2 mutations are observed in mucinous adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with micropapillary features. The histologic features of BRAF-mutated adenocarcinomas have not yet been established, but papillary, lepidic, solid, and acinar patterns have been observed. Adenocarcinomas with rearrangement of ALK, ROS1, and RET genes share similar histologic features, such as solid signet-ring cells and cribriform formation. However, adenocarcinomas with NRG1 rearrangements frequently show mucinous morphology. The histologic features and related mutations of adenocarcinomas with expression of programmed cell death-1 and programmed cell death ligands-1 may be helpful in guiding immunotherapeutic treatment. This review describes histopathologic features of adenocarcinomas and their correlation with molecular alterations. PMID:27403614

  9. The efficacy of diffusion weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficients mapping for liver metastasis of colonic adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Metin, Melike R.; Aydın, Hasan; Çetin, Hüseyin; Özmen, Evrim; Kayaçetin, Serra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To establish retrospectively the relation between the histopathologic grade of colorectal liver metastasis and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of hepatic metastases of colorectal adenocarcinomas. Methods: The diagnoses of liver metastases were confirmed with biopsy, surgery, and follow-up imaging findings. Twenty-six patients with 94 liver metastasis were included in the study. Of 94 masses, 59 were poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma, 18 were moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma, and 17 were well-differentiated regarding the diameters, ADC values, and ratio index (RI) values. Kolmogorov-smirnov normality test, Kruskal-wallis analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction, Spearman correlation analysis, and receiver operating characteristics curve methods were applied to evaluate the statistical relations. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in terms of ADC values and RI between poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma and moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma plus well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. Poorly-differentiated adenocarcinomas have the lowest ADC values and highest RI values among other groups. Conclusion: Use of ADC values alone can be executed for the diagnosis of focal hepatic masses and also can aid in the differentiation of benign and malignant hepatic lesions. PMID:27052280

  10. BK polyomavirus association with colorectal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Khabaz, M N; Nedjadi, T; Gari, M A; Al-Maghrabi, J A; Atta, H M; Basuni, A A; Elderwi, D A

    2016-01-01

    The development of human neoplasms can be provoked by exposure to one of several viruses. Burkitt lymphoma, cervical carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma are associated with Epstein-Barr, human papilloma, and hepatitis B virus infections, respectively. Over the past three decades, many studies have attempted to establish an association between colorectal cancer and viruses, with debatable results. The aim of the present research was to assess the presence of BK polyomavirus (BKV) DNA and protein in colorectal cancer samples from patients in the Western Province of Saudi Arabia. DNA extracted from archival samples of colorectal cancer tissues was analyzed for BKV sequences using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. In addition, expression of a BKV protein was assessed using immunohistochemical staining. None of the tumor and control samples examined tested positive for BKV DNA in PCR assays. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining failed to detect viral proteins in both cancer and control specimens. These results may indicate that BKV is not associated with the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma in patients in the Western Province of Saudi Arabia. PMID:27173319

  11. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  12. Apigenin up-regulates transgelin and inhibits invasion and migration of colorectal cancer through decreased phosphorylation of AKT.

    PubMed

    Chunhua, Li; Donglan, Lin; Xiuqiong, Fu; Lihua, Zhang; Qin, Fan; Yawei, Liu; Liang, Zhao; Ge, Wen; Linlin, Jing; Ping, Zeng; Kun, Li; Xuegang, Sun

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Apigenin is a flavonoid that possesses various clinically relevant properties such as anti-tumour, anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory activities. Our results showed that apigenin has anti-proliferation, anti-invasion and anti-migration effects in three kinds of colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely SW480, DLD-1 and LS174T. Proteomic analysis with SW480 indicated that apigenin up-regulated the expression of transgelin (TAGLN) in mitochondria to exert its anti-tumour growth and anti-metastasis effects. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) and western blot confirm the up-regulation in all the three colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. An inverse correlation was observed between TAGLN expression and CRC metastasis in tissue microarray staining. TAGLN siRNA increased the viability of SW480. Apigenin decreased the expression of MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of three truncated forms of TAGLN and wild type has identified TAGLN as a repressor of MMP-9 expression. A synergetic effect was observed in overexpression of TAGLN wild type and apigenin treatment which manifested as lowered phosphorylation of AKT Ser473 and ATK Thr308. In an orthotopic CRC model, apigenin inhibited tumour growth and metastasis to liver and lung. In conclusion, our research provided direct evidence that apigenin inhibited tumour growth and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. Apigenin up-regulated TAGLN and hence down-regulated MMP-9 expression through decreasing phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and in particular Thr308 to prevent cell proliferation and migration. PMID:23773626

  13. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. PMID:25955461

  14. KRAS mutation positive mucinous adenocarcinoma originating in mature ovarian teratoma: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Dov; Vlodavsky, Euvgeni; Simon, Einav; Ben-Izhak, Ofer

    2013-12-01

    Mature ovarian teratomas rarely undergo transformation into malignancy. Carcinomas, mostly squamous cell carcinoma, are the most common malignancy arising in mature cystic teratoma. In the present report we describe a 13-year-old girl who developed a large mass in her ovary. Fine needle biopsy identified intestinal type mucinous adenocarcinoma, which was also identified in the full surgical specimen. Extensive sampling of the surgical specimen also identified areas of mature cystic teratoma. Interestingly, molecular analysis of DNA extracted from various components of the lesion identified KRAS mutation in the carcinoma, borderline mucinous tumor and benign intestinal-type epithelium but not in the epidermal component of the teratoma. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of KRAS mutation in mucinous carcinoma originating in mature cystic teratoma. We discuss the importance of extensive tissue sampling to differentiate between carcinoma originating in teratoma and metastatic colorectal carcinoma to the ovary. Additionally, the identification of KRAS mutation in the morphologically benign intestinal-type epithelium indicated that it is an early event in the carcinogenic sequence and that the molecular pathway of carcinogenesis in teratoma is similar to that in the carcinogenic process of somatic tissue. PMID:24422958

  15. Heterogeneous expression of A33 in colorectal cancer: possible explanation for A33 antibody treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Baptistella, Antuani R; Salles Dias, Marcos Vinicios; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D; Martins, Vilma R

    2016-09-01

    The A33 protein, expressed in colorectal tumors, is a target for improving treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Over the last decade, studies have tested anti-A33 antibody as a therapeutic agent for these patients. Preclinical results were promising, but clinical trials did not confirm positive results. Here, immunohistochemistry in colorectal cancer tissue showed that samples from well-differentiated tumors presented a strong A33 membrane staining, whereas poorly differentiated tumors and mucinous adenocarcinomas showed weak cytoplasmic and nuclear staining. Moderately differentiated tumors presented variable staining. We suggest that in future clinical trials, patients should be selected on the basis of membrane expression of A33. PMID:27272411

  16. FRY site-specific methylation differentiates pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from other adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Ota, Jun; Muangsub, Tachapol; Keelawat, Somboon; Trirattanachat, Surang; Kitkumthorn, Nakarin; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2016-06-01

    Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that occurs in the glandular cells throughout the body. There are several metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin. Currently, there is no highly effective method to differentiate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from other adenocarcinomas. Here, we identified pancreas tissue by site-specific methylation at FRY and found that it can also detect PDAC. The establishment of Combined Bisulphite Restriction Analysis (COBRA) and quantitative real-time PCR techniques of FRY revealed FRY hypermethylation in 21 out of 24 normal pancreatic tissue samples, whereas all other normal tissue samples from thirteen other organs (80 samples) remained totally unmethylated. Similarly in application to PDAC, this marker effectively indicated 25 PDAC among 151 other common adenocarcinomas with values of 100%, 98.7%, 92.6%, and 100% in sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value, respectively. In summary, we have demonstrated that this epigenetic site-specific marker has high potential for pancreatic tissue identification and can be applied in PDAC diagnosis. PMID:26990916

  17. Gene expression profiling analysis of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H.; Ma, J.; Wu, J.; Chen, L.; Sun, F.; Qu, C.; Zheng, D.; Xu, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study screened potential genes related to lung adenocarcinoma, with the aim of further understanding disease pathogenesis. The GSE2514 dataset including 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 19 adjacent normal tissue samples from 10 patients with lung adenocarcinoma aged 45-73 years was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two groups were screened using the t-test. Potential gene functions were predicted using functional and pathway enrichment analysis, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks obtained from the STRING database were constructed with Cytoscape. Module analysis of PPI networks was performed through MCODE in Cytoscape. In total, 535 upregulated and 465 downregulated DEGs were identified. These included ATP5D, UQCRC2, UQCR11 and genes encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which are mainly associated with mitochondrial ATP synthesis coupled electron transport, and which were enriched in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Other DEGs were associated with DNA replication (PRIM1, MCM3, and RNASEH2A), cell surface receptor-linked signal transduction and the enzyme-linked receptor protein signaling pathway (MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1), and regulation of the cytoskeleton and phosphatidylinositol signaling system (PIP5K1B, PIP5K1C, and PIP4K2B). Our findings suggest that DEGs encoding subunits of NADH, PRIM1, MCM3, MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1 might be associated with the development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26840709

  18. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  19. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varma, Krishnendra; Singh, Ujjwal Kumar; Jain, Mansi; Dhand, P L

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum) of a metastatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26009722

  20. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Krishnendra; Singh, Ujjwal Kumar; Jain, Mansi; Dhand, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum) of a metastatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26009722

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening in Vietnamese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bang H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Rates of colorectal cancer screening in Vietnamese Americans are lower than those in non-Hispanic whites. This paper describes rates of colorectal screening, identifies determinants, and recommends educational strategies to improve screening. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 867 Vietnamese aged 50 to 74 drawn from a sampling frame of individuals in the Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California and Harris County, Texas area telephone directories with Vietnamese surnames were interviewed in 2004. Results Colorectal screening recognition, receipt, currency, and intention rates were low. Conclusions: While the screening rates are low, Vietnamese are receptive to screening if providers recommend it. PMID:18444045

  2. Advanced colorectal adenoma related gene expression signature may predict prognostic for colorectal cancer patients with adenoma-carcinoma sequence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Shi, Xiao-Yu; Liao, Dai-Xiang; Cao, Bang-Rong; Luo, Cheng-Hua; Cheng, Shu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are still no absolute parameters predicting progression of adenoma into cancer. The present study aimed to characterize functional differences on the multistep carcinogenetic process from the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Methods: All samples were collected and mRNA expression profiling was performed by using Agilent Microarray high-throughput gene-chip technology. Then, the characteristics of mRNA expression profiles of adenoma-carcinoma sequence were described with bioinformatics software, and we analyzed the relationship between gene expression profiles of adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence and clinical prognosis of colorectal cancer. Results: The mRNA expressions of adenoma-carcinoma sequence were significantly different between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group. The biological process of gene ontology function enrichment analysis on differentially expressed genes between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group showed that genes enriched in the extracellular structure organization, skeletal system development, biological adhesion and itself regulated growth regulation, with the P value after FDR correction of less than 0.05. In addition, IPR-related protein mainly focused on the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. Conclusion: The variable trends of gene expression profiles for adenoma-carcinoma sequence were mainly concentrated in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma. The differentially expressed genes are significantly correlated between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group. Bioinformatics analysis is an effective way to study the gene expression profiles in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, and may provide an effective tool to involve colorectal cancer research strategy into colorectal adenoma or advanced adenoma. PMID:26131062

  3. Isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 is mutated in inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma with low-grade tubuloglandular histology but not in sporadic intestinal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Douglas J; Binion, David; Regueiro, Miguel; Schraut, Wolfgang; Bahary, Nathan; Sun, Weijing; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2014-08-01

    The underlying molecular alterations in chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma remain largely unknown. Somatic IDH mutations are often seen in gliomas and myeloid leukemia but have also been recently reported in a subset of other neoplasms. We analyzed a series of intestinal adenocarcinomas with (n=23) and without (n=39) associated chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease treated at our institution for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations and correlated the clinicopathologic findings with mutation status. Compared with intestinal adenocarcinomas not associated with inflammatory bowel disease, adenocarcinomas associated with inflammatory bowel disease more frequently demonstrated IDH mutations (13% vs. 0%, P=0.047). All IDH mutations were identified in IDH1 and resulted in substitution of arginine by cysteine at position 132 (p.R132C, c.394C>T). IDH1 mutations were frequently (66%) associated with concurrent KRAS mutations (p.G12D, c.35G>A). IDH1-mutated intestinal adenocarcinomas were seen in the setting of both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis and were located in both the ileum and colon. Compared with IDH1-negative inflammatory bowel disease-associated adenocarcinoma, IDH1-positive adenocarcinomas more frequently demonstrated tubuloglandular histology (100% vs. 25%, P=0.032) and were more frequently associated with precursor lesions exhibiting serrated morphology (66% vs. 6%, P=0.034). IDH1 mutations were also identified in the precursor dysplastic lesions associated with IDH1-positive adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, we demonstrate that IDH1 mutations are occasionally identified in inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma but not in intestinal adenocarcinoma not associated with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, IDH1-mutated intestinal adenocarcinoma is associated with a characteristic low-grade tubuloglandular histology and often harbors concurrent KRAS mutations. Identification of patients

  4. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine adenocarcinoma, by stage How is small intestine adenocarcinoma staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  5. Dynamic Tumor Growth Patterns in a Novel Murine Model of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Terrah J. Paul; Hadac, Jamie N.; Sievers, Chelsie K.; Leystra, Alyssa A.; Deming, Dustin A.; Zahm, Christopher D.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Nomura, Alice; Nettekoven, Laura A.; Plesh, Lauren K.; Clipson, Linda; Sullivan, Ruth; Newton, Michael A.; Schelman, William R.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) often arises from adenomatous colonic polyps. Polyps can grow and progress to cancer, but may also remain static in size, regress, or resolve. Predicting which progress and which remain benign is difficult. We developed a novel long-lived murine model of CRC with tumors that can be followed by colonoscopy. Our aim was to assess whether these tumors have similar growth patterns and histologic fates to human colorectal polyps to identify features to aid in risk-stratification of colonic tumors. Long-lived ApcMin/+ mice were treated with dextran sodium sulfate to promote colonic tumorigenesis. Tumor growth patterns were characterized by serial colonoscopy with biopsies obtained for immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling. Tumors grew, remained static, regressed, or resolved over time with different relative frequencies. Newly developed tumors demonstrated higher rates of growth and resolution than more established tumors that tended to remain static in size. Colonic tumors were hyperplastic lesions (3%), adenomas (73%), intramucosal carcinomas (20%), or adenocarcinomas (3%). Interestingly, the level of β-catenin was higher in adenomas that became intratumoral carcinomas as compared to those that failed to progress. In addition, differentially expressed genes between adenomas and intramucosal carcinomas were identified. This novel murine model of intestinal tumorigenesis develops colonic tumors that can be monitored by serial colonoscopy, mirror growth patterns seen in human colorectal polyps, and progress to CRC. Further characterization of cellular and molecular features are needed to determine which features can be used to risk-stratify polyps for progression to CRC and potentially guide prevention strategies. PMID:24196829

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase CB association with preoperative radiotherapy response in rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Dong; Peng, Yi-Fan; Pan, Hong-Da; Wang, Lin; Li, Kun; Gu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the correlation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PIK3) CB expression with preoperative radiotherapy response in patients with stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: PIK3CB immunoexpression was retrospectively assessed in pretreatment biopsies from 208 patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma, who underwent radical surgery after 30-Gy/10-fraction preoperative radiotherapy. The relation between PIK3CB expression and tumor regression grade, clinicopathological characteristics, and survival time was statistically analyzed. Western blotting and in vitro clonogenic formation assay were used to detect PIK3CB expression in four colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT116, HT29, LoVo, and LS174T) treated with 6-Gy ionizing radiation. Pharmacological assays were used to evaluate the therapeutic relevance of TGX-221 (a PIK3CB-specific inhibitor) in the four colorectal cancer cell lines. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical staining indicated that PIK3CB was more abundant in rectal adenocarcinoma tissues with poor response to preoperative radiotherapy. High expression of PIK3CB was closely correlated with tumor height (P < 0.05), ypT stage (P < 0.05), and high-degree tumor regression grade (P < 0.001). High expression of PIK3CB was a potential prognostic factor for local recurrence-free survival (P < 0.05) and metastasis-free survival (P < 0.05). High expression of PIK3CB was also associated with poor therapeutic response and adverse outcomes in rectal adenocarcinoma patients treated with 30-Gy/10-fraction preoperative radiotherapy. In vitro, PIK3CB expression was upregulated in all four colorectal cancer cell lines concurrently treated with 6-Gy ionizing radiation, and the PIK3CB-specific inhibitor TGX-221 effectively inhibited the clonogenic formation of these four colorectal cancer cell lines. CONCLUSION: PIK3CB is critically involved in response to preoperative radiotherapy and may serve as a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25473181

  7. Ectopic expression of guanylyl cyclase C in adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason; Schulz, Stephanie; Haaf, Janis; Kairys, John C; Waldman, Scott A

    2002-08-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), a receptor specifically expressed in cells originating from differentiated intestinal epithelium, is a marker and therapeutic target for colorectal cancer metastases. Intestinal metaplasia, in which epithelial cells assume histological and molecular characteristics of differentiated intestinal enterocytes, is a common precursor to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach. Thus, those tumors, tissues adjacent to them, and their associated regional lymph nodes were assessed for GC-C expression by reverse transcription coupled with the PCR. GC-C mRNA was detected in five of five and eight of nine esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas, respectively. Also, GC-C mRNA was detected in three of five and six of seven tissues adjacent to, but not histologically involved in, esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas, respectively, reflecting molecular changes associated with neoplastic transformation preceding histopathological changes. In contrast, three normal gastric specimens did not express GC-C. Furthermore, GC-C mRNA was detected in 1 of 1 lymph node containing tumor cells by histopathology from a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma and in 3 of 11 lymph nodes, all of which were free of tumor cells by histopathology, from a patient with a gastroesophageal junction tumor. This is the first demonstration that GC-C is ectopically expressed by primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach and suggests that GC-C may be a sensitive and specific clinical marker and target for adenocarcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:12163327

  8. Gut Microbiome and Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Santosh; Keku, Temitope O.

    2015-01-01

    The trillions of bacteria that naturally reside in the human gut collectively constitute the complex system known the gut microbiome, a vital player for the host’s homeostasis and health. However, there is mounting evidence that dysbiosis, a state of pathological imbalance in the gut microbiome is present in many disease states. In this review, we present recent insights concerning the gut microbiome’s contribution to the development of colorectal adenomas and the subsequent progression to colorectal cancer (CRC). In the United States alone, CRC is the second leading cause of cancer deaths. As a result, there is a high interest in identifying risk factors for adenomas, which are intermediate precursors to CRC. Recent research on CRC and the microbiome suggest that modulation of the gut bacterial composition and structure may be useful in preventing adenomas and CRC. We highlight the known risk factors for colorectal adenomas and the potential mechanisms by which microbial dysbiosis may contribute to the etiology of CRC. We also underscore novel findings from recent studies on the gut microbiota and colorectal adenomas along with current knowledge gaps. Understanding the microbiome may provide promising new directions towards novel diagnostic tools, biomarkers, and therapeutic interventions for CRC. PMID:24855012

  9. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  10. Changing rates of adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Burns, David M

    2014-08-18

    Over the past several decades, adenocarcinoma of the lung has been increasing as a fraction of all lung cancer. Examination of the available evidence led the 2014 Report of the Surgeon General to conclude that the increases in the rates of adenocarcinoma among smokers in the U.S. were a result of changes in cigarette design and composition over the past 6 decades. While a causal link to design and composition changes as a whole is clear, the changes that have been implemented over the past several decades are not uniformly applied across all cigarette brands in the current market, raising questions about differences in risks among users of different cigarette brands. Recognition of the increased risks resulting from design and composition changes offers a corollary opportunity to reduce current disease risks by identifying and regulating the specific compositional and design changes that produced the increase in risk. PMID:25036935

  11. Predictors of Survival in Sinonasal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michelle M; Roman, Sanziana A; Sosa, Julie A; Judson, Benjamin L

    2015-06-01

    Objectives To identify factors associated with disease-specific survival (DSS) in intestinal and nonintestinal sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Design Retrospective review. Setting Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database. Participants Adult patients with sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Main Outcome Measures DSS. Results We identified 325 patients; of these, 300 had the nonintestinal type and 25 had intestinal type histologies. The 5-year DSS rates for patients who had no treatment, radiation (RT), surgery, and surgery and postoperative RT were 42.5, 46.1, 85.6, and 72.6%, respectively (log-rank test; p < 0.001). Black race, age ≥ 75 years, paranasal sinus involvement, and high grade were independently associated with decreased DSS. Compared with RT, surgery (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.15-0.77), and adjuvant RT (HR: 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26-0.86) were associated with improved DSS. Conclusions There is no difference in prognosis between intestinal and nonintestinal subtypes of sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Treatment with surgery alone or adjuvant RT is associated with a more favorable prognosis. PMID:26225303

  12. Gene expression profiling in sinonasal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sinonasal adenocarcinomas are uncommon tumors which develop in the ethmoid sinus after exposure to wood dust. Although the etiology of these tumors is well defined, very little is known about their molecular basis and no diagnostic tool exists for their early detection in high-risk workers. Methods To identify genes involved in this disease, we performed gene expression profiling using cancer-dedicated microarrays, on nine matched samples of sinonasal adenocarcinomas and non-tumor sinusal tissue. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on two additional sets of tumors. Results Among the genes with significant differential expression we selected LGALS4, ACS5, CLU, SRI and CCT5 for further exploration. The overexpression of LGALS4, ACS5, SRI, CCT5 and the downregulation of CLU were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed for LGALS4 (Galectin 4), ACS5 (Acyl-CoA synthetase) and CLU (Clusterin) proteins: LGALS4 was highly up-regulated, particularly in the most differentiated tumors, while CLU was lost in all tumors. The expression of ACS5, was more heterogeneous and no correlation was observed with the tumor type. Conclusion Within our microarray study in sinonasal adenocarcinoma we identified two proteins, LGALS4 and CLU, that were significantly differentially expressed in tumors compared to normal tissue. A further evaluation on a new set of tissues, including precancerous stages and low grade tumors, is necessary to evaluate the possibility of using them as diagnostic markers. PMID:19903339

  13. Predictors of Survival in Sinonasal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michelle M.; Roman, Sanziana A.; Sosa, Julie A.; Judson, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify factors associated with disease-specific survival (DSS) in intestinal and nonintestinal sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Design Retrospective review. Setting Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database. Participants Adult patients with sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Main Outcome Measures DSS. Results We identified 325 patients; of these, 300 had the nonintestinal type and 25 had intestinal type histologies. The 5-year DSS rates for patients who had no treatment, radiation (RT), surgery, and surgery and postoperative RT were 42.5, 46.1, 85.6, and 72.6%, respectively (log-rank test; p < 0.001). Black race, age ≥ 75 years, paranasal sinus involvement, and high grade were independently associated with decreased DSS. Compared with RT, surgery (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.15–0.77), and adjuvant RT (HR: 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26–0.86) were associated with improved DSS. Conclusions There is no difference in prognosis between intestinal and nonintestinal subtypes of sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Treatment with surgery alone or adjuvant RT is associated with a more favorable prognosis. PMID:26225303

  14. Quantitative PCR marker genes for endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kölbl, Alexandra C; Victor, Lisa-Marie; Birk, Amelie E; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinoma is a common malignancy in women worldwide, with formation of remote metastasis occurring following oncological treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are regarded to be the origin of haematogenous metastasis formation. The present study aimed to identify suitable marker genes using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) approach to detect CTCs from blood samples of patients with endometrial carcinoma. Therefore, RNA was isolated from endometrial adenocarcinoma cell lines and from healthy endometrial tissue and reverse transcribed to cDNA, which was then used in qPCR on a number of marker genes. Cytokeratin 19 and claudin 4 were identified as suitable marker genes for CTCs in endometrial adenocarcinoma, due to their high expression in the majority of the cell lines investigated. The expression values of the genes examined varied widely between the different cell lines, which is similar to the variation in the patient samples. Therefore, the necessity for a set of genes for CTC detection and not one single marker gene is demonstrated. qPCR is a fast, cost‑efficient and easy to perform technique, which may be used in the detection of CTCs. Investigation of the occurrence of CTCs in cancer patients would aid in the prevention of metastasis and thereby refine treatment. PMID:27431566

  15. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  16. Histological subtypes of solitary pulmonary nodules of adenocarcinoma and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui-Di; Wan, Ming-Yue; Xu, Chun-Hua; Zhan, Ping; Zou, Jue; Zhang, Qian-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the histological subtypes of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) of invasive adenocarcinoma and their clinical relevance. Methods A total of 188 patients with pathologically confirmed invasive adenocarcinoma in our hospital from January 2007 to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. In accordance with the new classification of lung adenocarcinoma, all the histological sections were reviewed and classified, and the clinical data were collected and analyzed. Results Of these 188 patients who had been initially diagnosed as SPNs of adenocarcinoma, there were 6 cases of lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma (LPA), 71 cases of acinar predominant adenocarcinoma (APA), 74 cases of papillary predominant adenocarcinoma (PPA), 15 cases of micorpapillary predominant adenocarcinoma (MPA), and 22 cases of solid predominant adenocarcinoma (SPA) with mucin production. The incidence of lymph node metastasis was 80.0% and 81.8% in MPA and SPA, respectively, which was significantly higher than those in LPA, APA, and PPA (all P<0.01). The incidence of LPA was 83.3% (5/6) in women, which was significantly higher than that in men (P=0.037). Conclusions According to the new classification, MPA and SPA have high incidence of lymph node metastasis. LPA is more likely to occur in women. Sub-typing of the lung adenocarcinoma based on the newest international classification criteria is helpful to identify the clinical features of this disease. PMID:24409363

  17. Small bowel adenocarcinoma in Lynch syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke-Kang; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma is part of the tumor spectrum of Lynch syndrome, which is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The present study describes the case of a 51-year-old man fulfilling the Amsterdam II criteria for Lynch syndrome, who had a 15-mm early-stage colorectal cancer resected endoscopically from the ascending colon. Due to upper abdominal discomfort after eating and consequent anorexia, a computed tomography scan performed 1 month later showed a tumoral mass of the upper jejunum with local lymphadenopathy. The laparotomy revealed a completely obstructing mass. Intraoperative frozen section showed a small bowel adenocarcinoma. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the germline mutation of mutL homolog 1. The patient received 6 cycles of an adjuvant folinic acid, fluorouracil and ocaliplatin chemotherapy regimen. The latest CT scan, 16 months after the chemotherapy, did not show any recurrence. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with upper bowel obstruction, particularly for patients with Lynch syndrome. PMID:27446478

  18. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Nicole R.; Hauch, Adam T.; Hu, Tian; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Robotic approaches have become increasingly used for colorectal surgery. The aim of this study is to examine the safety and efficacy of robotic colorectal procedures in an adult population. Study Design: A systematic review of articles in both PubMed and Embase comparing laparoscopic and robotic colorectal procedures was performed. Clinical trials and observational studies in an adult population were included. Approaches were evaluated in terms of operative time, length of stay, estimated blood loss, number of lymph nodes harvested, and perioperative complications. Mean net differences and odds ratios were calculated to examine treatment effect of each group. Results: Two hundred eighteen articles were identified, and 17 met the inclusion criteria, representing 4,342 patients: 920 robotic and 3,422 in the laparoscopic group. Operative time for the robotic approach was 38.849 minutes longer (95% confidence interval: 17.944 to 59.755). The robotic group had lower estimated blood loss (14.17 mL; 95% confidence interval: –27.63 to –1.60), and patients were 1.78 times more likely to be converted to an open procedure (95% confidence interval: 1.24 to 2.55). There was no difference between groups with respect to number of lymph nodes harvested, length of stay, readmission rate, or perioperative complication rate. Conclusions: The robotic approach to colorectal surgery is as safe and efficacious as conventional laparoscopic surgery. However, it is associated with longer operative time and an increased rate of conversion to laparotomy. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are warranted to examine the cost-effectiveness of robotic colorectal surgery before it can be adopted as the new standard of care. PMID:25489216

  19. In Vitro Adenosine Triphosphate-Based Chemotherapy Response Assay as a Predictor of Clinical Response to Fluorouracil-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye Youn; Kim, Im-kyung; Kang, Jeonghyun; Sohn, Seung-Kook; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the usefulness of the in vitro adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA) for prediction of clinical response to fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods Tumor specimens of 86 patients with pathologically confirmed stage II colorectal adenocarcinoma were tested for chemosensitivity to fluorouracil. Chemosensitivity was determined by cell death rate (CDR) of drug-exposed cells, calculated by comparing the intracellular ATP level with that of untreated controls. Results Among the 86 enrolled patients who underwent radical surgery followed by fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy, recurrence was found in 11 patients (12.7%). The CDR ≥ 20% group was associated with better disease-free survival than the CDR < 20% group (89.4% vs. 70.1%, p=0.027). Multivariate analysis showed that CDR < 20% and T4 stage were poor prognostic factors for disease-free survival after fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusion In stage II colorectal cancer, the in vitro ATP-CRA may be useful in identifying patients likely to benefit from fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26511802

  20. Stromal expression of SPARC in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Cros, Jérôme; Faivre, Sandrine; Hammel, Pascal; Raymond, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) stands as the poorest prognostic tumor of the digestive tract, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Therapeutic options for unresectable PDAC are extremely limited and there is a pressing need for expanded therapeutic approaches to improve current options available with gemcitabine-based regimens. With PDAC displaying one of the most prominent desmoplastic stromal reactions of all carcinomas, recent research has focused on the microenvironment surrounding PDAC cells. Secreted protein acid and rich in cysteine (SPARC), which is overexpressed in PDAC, may display tumor suppressor functions in several cancers (e.g., in colorectal, ovarian, prostate cancers, and acute myelogenous leukemia) but also appears to be overexpressed in other tumor types (e.g., breast cancer, melanoma, and glioblastoma). The apparent contradictory functions of SPARC may yield inhibition of angiogenesis via inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor, while promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion through matrix metalloprotease expression. This feature is of particular interest in PDAC where SPARC overexpression in the stroma stands along with inhibition of angiogenesis and promotion of cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Several therapeutic strategies to deplete stromal tissue have been developed. In this review, we focused on key preclinical and clinical data describing the role of SPARC in PDAC biology, the properties, and mechanisms of delivery of drugs that interact with SPARC and discuss the proof-of-concept clinical trials using nab-paclitaxel. PMID:23690170

  1. Immunohistochemical Profile for Unknown Primary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Sasajima, Yuko; Ando, Masashi; Yonemori, Kan; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of tailored treatment based on immunohistochemical profiles (IPs) of tumors for cancers of unknown primary is needed. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed an algorithm based on primary known adenocarcinoma for testing sensitivity and specificity. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 71 patients of unfavorable subsets of unknown primary adenocarcinoma were obtained. We examined 15 molecular markers using the algorithm incorporating these IPs and classified the tumours into 9 subsets based on the primary tumour site. The sensitivity and specificity of this algorithm were 80.3% and 97.6%, respectively. Apparent primary sites were lung in 17 patients, digestive organs in 13, gynecological organs in 9, prostate in 7, liver or kidney in 6, breast in 4, urothelial organ in 2, biliary tract and pancreatic profile in none, and unclassified in 13. The response rate to chemotherapy was highest for the gynecological IPs. Patients with gynecological or lung cancer IPs had longer median progression-free survival than those with others: 11.2 months for gynecological IPs (p<0.001) and 6.8 months for lung IPs (p = 0.05). Lung, digestive, prostate, and gynecological profiles were associated with significantly longer median survival time than the other profiles. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the IPs were independent prognostic factors for survival. Conclusions/Significance The IPs identified in this study can be used to further stratify patient prognosis for unfavorable subsets of unknown primary adenocarcinoma. PMID:22299055

  2. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Wang, Min; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Gao, Lang; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yin, Teng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia. METHODS: Patients included in this study underwent a colonoscopy and esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) along with histopathological measurement between March 2012 and March 2015 at Qi-Lu Hospital of Shandong University, who also had results of H. pylori detection. A total of 233 cases were selected. Demographic data, H. pylori infection status (including results of rapid urease tests and gastric mucosa pathological examinations) and histopathological examination results of gastric and colorectal mucosa were gathered and analyzed. The statistical analysis focused on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms among patients with various histopathological categories of the stomach. ORs and their 95%CI were calculated to describe the strengths of the associations. RESULTS: The incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) (OR = 2.400, 95%CI: 0.969-5.941), adenoma with HGIEN (5.333, 1.025-27.758) and adenocarcinoma (1.455, 0.382-5.543) were all higher for patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis than for those in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma with HGIEN (3.218, 0.767-13.509) was higher in patients with intestinal metaplasia than in the control group, while the incidence rates of adenoma without HGIEN (0.874, 0.414-1.845) and adenocarcinoma (0.376, 0.096-1.470) were lower in the intestinal metaplasia group than in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (3.111, 1.248-7.753) was significantly higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group than in the control group, while the rates of adenoma with HGIEN (1.481, 0.138-15.941) and adenocarcinoma (2.020, 0.561-7.272) were higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group. Incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (1.067, 0.264-4.314), adenoma with HGIEN (2.667, 0

  3. Oxaliplatin induces different cellular and molecular chemoresistance patterns in colorectal cancer cell lines of identical origins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer cells frequently adopt cellular and molecular alterations and acquire resistance to cytostatic drugs. Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin is among the leading treatments for colorectal cancer with a response rate of 50%, inducing intrastrand cross-links on the DNA. Despite of this drug’s efficiency, resistance develops in nearly all metastatic patients. Chemoresistance being of crucial importance for the drug’s clinical efficiency this study aimed to contribute to the identification and description of some cellular and molecular alterations induced by prolonged oxaliplatin therapy. Resistance to oxaliplatin was induced in Colo320 (Colo320R) and HT-29 (HT-29R) colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines by exposing the cells to increasing concentrations of the drug. Alterations in morphology, cytotoxicity, DNA cross-links formation and gene expression profiles were assessed in the parental and resistant variants with microscopy, MTT, alkaline comet and pangenomic microarray assays, respectively. Results Morphology analysis revealed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the resistant vs parental cells suggesting alterations of the cells’ adhesion complexes, through which they acquire increased invasiveness and adherence. Cytotoxicity measurements demonstrated resistance to oxaliplatin in both cell lines; Colo320 being more sensitive than HT-29 to this drug (P < 0.001). The treatment with oxaliplatin caused major DNA cross-links in both parental cell lines; in Colo320R small amounts of DNA cross-links were still detectable, while in HT-29R not. We identified 441 differentially expressed genes in Colo320R and 613 in HT-29R as compared to their parental counterparts (at least 1.5 -fold up- or down- regulation, p < 0.05). More disrupted functions and pathways were detected in HT-29R cell line than in Colo320R, involving genes responsible for apoptosis inhibition, cellular proliferation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Several upstream

  4. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  5. Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection in Octogenarian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Minghao; Qin, Huabo; Luo, Qianxin; He, Xiaosheng; Lan, Ping; Lian, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The population older than 80 years has been increasing. A significant proportion of colorectal diseases that require colorectal resection occur in very elderly patients. However, the benefits of laparoscopy remain controversial in octogenarians. A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational study was performed to compare clinical outcomes between laparoscopic versus open colorectal resection in octogenarians. The PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases from the years 1990 to 2015 were searched for studies that compare surgical outcomes between laparoscopic and open colorectal resection in octogenarians (≥80 years old). Seven eligible studies including 528 laparoscopic and 484 open colorectal resections were identified. Laparoscopic approach was associated with lower rate of mortality (odds ratio [OR] 0.48, P = 0.03), overall complications (OR 0.54, P < 0.001), and prolonged ileus (OR 0.56, P = 0.009), quicker bowel function return (standardized mean difference [SMD] −0.50, P < 0.001), and shorter length of hospital stay (SMD −0.47, P = 0.007). No differences were found in anastomotic leak (OR 1.16, P = 0.72), respiratory complication (OR 0.60, P = 0.07), and reoperation (OR 0.85, P = 0.69). Laparoscopic colorectal resection is as safe as open approach, and the short-term outcomes appear to be more favorable in octogenarians. PMID:26496302

  6. Mapping the hallmarks of lung adenocarcinoma with massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Imielinski, Marcin; Berger, Alice H.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Hernandez, Bryan; Pugh, Trevor J.; Hodis, Eran; Cho, Jeonghee; Suh, James; Capelletti, Marzia; Sivachenko, Andrey; Sougnez, Carrie; Auclair, Daniel; Lawrence, Michael; Stojanov, Petar; Cibulskis, Kristian; Choi, Kyusam; de Waal, Luc; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Brooks, Angela; Greulich, Heidi; Banerji, Shantanu; Zander, Thomas; Seidel, Danila; Leenders, Frauke; Ansén, Sascha; Ludwig, Corinna; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Jürgen; Goparju, Chandra; Thompson, Kristin; Winckler, Wendy; Kwiatkowski, David; Johnson, Bruce E.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Miller, Vincent A.; Pao, William; Travis, William D.; Pass, Harvey; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric; Thomas, Roman K.; Garraway, Levi A.; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, is responsible for over 500,000 deaths per year worldwide. Here, we report exome and genome sequences of 183 lung adenocarcinoma tumor/normal DNA pairs. These analyses revealed a mean exonic somatic mutation rate of 12.0 events/megabase and identified the majority of genes previously reported as significantly mutated in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, we identified statistically recurrent somatic mutations in the splicing factor gene U2AF1 and truncating mutations affecting RBM10 and ARID1A. Analysis of nucleotide context-specific mutation signatures grouped the sample set into distinct clusters that correlated with smoking history and alterations of reported lung adenocarcinoma genes. Whole genome sequence analysis revealed frequent structural re-arrangements, including in-frame exonic alterations within EGFR and SIK2 kinases. The candidate genes identified in this study are attractive targets for biological characterization and therapeutic targeting of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:22980975

  7. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Samalin, Emmanuelle; Ychou, Marc

    2016-06-10

    Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide. While the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma is decreasing, the incidence of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in Western countries. Considering that surgical resection is currently the major curative treatment, and that the 5-year survival rate highly depends on the pTNM stage at diagnosis, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma management is very challenging for oncologists. Several treatment strategies are being evaluated, and among them systemic chemotherapy, to decrease recurrences and improve overall survival. The MAGIC and FNCLCC-FFCD trials showed a survival benefit of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with operable gastric and lower esophageal cancer, and these results had an impact on the European clinical practice. New strategies, including induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative chemoradiotherapy, targeted therapies in combination with perioperative chemotherapy and the new cytotoxic regimens, are currently assessed to improve current standards and help developing patient-tailored therapeutic interventions. PMID:27298768

  8. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samalin, Emmanuelle; Ychou, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide. While the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma is decreasing, the incidence of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in Western countries. Considering that surgical resection is currently the major curative treatment, and that the 5-year survival rate highly depends on the pTNM stage at diagnosis, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma management is very challenging for oncologists. Several treatment strategies are being evaluated, and among them systemic chemotherapy, to decrease recurrences and improve overall survival. The MAGIC and FNCLCC-FFCD trials showed a survival benefit of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with operable gastric and lower esophageal cancer, and these results had an impact on the European clinical practice. New strategies, including induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative chemoradiotherapy, targeted therapies in combination with perioperative chemotherapy and the new cytotoxic regimens, are currently assessed to improve current standards and help developing patient-tailored therapeutic interventions. PMID:27298768

  9. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, H.M.; Niloff, J.M.; Buttlar, C.A.; Welch, W.R.; Marck, A.; Feuer, E.J.; Lahman, E.A.; Jenison, E.; Knapp, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Sixteen women with adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump were treated over a 15-year period. The median survivals of 40 months for stage IB and 17 months for stages II and III were significantly worse compared with those for patients treated for cervical adenocarcinoma of the intact uterus or squamous carcinoma of the cervical stump. The poor results were due to both local and distant failure. Implications regarding tumor radiosensitivity and adjuvant therapy in these high-risk patients are discussed.

  10. Subnuclear Proteomics in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Pham, Thang V.; de Wit, Meike; Mongera, Sandra; Carvalho, Beatriz; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we established the reproducibility of the entire work flow. In a reproducibility analysis of three nuclear matrix fractions independently isolated from the same colon tumor homogenate, 889 of 1,047 proteins (85%) were reproducibly identified at high confidence (minimally two peptides per protein at 99% confidence interval at the protein level) with an average coefficient of variance for the number of normalized spectral counts per protein of 30%. This indicates a good reproducibility of the entire work flow from biochemical isolation to nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. Second, using spectral counting combined with statistics, we identified proteins that are significantly enriched in the nuclear matrix fraction relative to two earlier fractions (the chromatin-binding and intermediate filament fractions) isolated from six colorectal tissue samples. The total data set contained 2,059 non-redundant proteins. Gene ontology mining and protein network analysis of nuclear matrix-enriched proteins revealed enrichment for proteins implicated in “RNA processing” and “mRNA metabolic process.” Finally, an explorative comparison of the nuclear matrix proteome in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissues revealed many proteins previously implicated in oncogenesis as well as new candidates. A subset of these differentially expressed proteins also exhibited a corresponding change at the mRNA level