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Sample records for colorectal neoplasm screening

  1. Characteristics of and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in young adults in a screening population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Jo, Hee Bum; Kwack, Won Gun; Jeong, Yun Jin; Yoon, Yeo-Jin; Kang, Hyoun Woo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate prevalence and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in adults aged < 50 years, for whom screening is not recommended. METHODS: This cross-sectional study compared prevalence and characteristics of colorectal and advanced adenomas in patients aged < 50 years who underwent colonoscopy screening with subjects aged ≥ 50 years. To evaluate risk factors for colorectal and advanced adenoma in young adults, we used multivariable logistic regression models. Colorectal neoplasm characteristics were evaluated and compared with those in older patients. RESULTS: Among 2819 patients included, prevalences of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma were 19.7% and 1.5%, respectively. As patient age increased, so did the prevalence of colorectal neoplasm. However, prevalence of advanced adenoma did not differ between age-groups 45-49 years and ≥ 50 years (OR = 0.43, 95%CI: 0.17-1.07, P = 0.070). In younger age-group (< 50 years), colorectal adenoma was significantly associated with older age, waist circumference (OR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.15-2.55, P = 0.008), and current smoking (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.07-2.41, P = 0.023). Alcohol consumption was an independent risk factor for colorectal advanced adenoma (OR = 3.69, 95%CI: 1.08-12.54, P = 0.037). Multiple neoplasms and large neoplasms (≥ 1 cm) were more prevalent in subjects ≥ 50 years. CONCLUSION: Current screening strategies for colorectal cancer may need to be amended to account for patient age, especially in young subjects with abdominal obesity, current smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:26973394

  2. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. METHODS: Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. RESULTS: There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ2 test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSION: There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population. PMID:25083084

  3. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an established therapeutic technique for the treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. Because it is typically completed as en bloc resection, this technique provides a complete specimen for precise pathological evaluation. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in treating colorectal neoplasms as with gastric cancers, due to its technical difficulty, longer procedure time, and increased risk of perforation. However, some devices that facilitate ESD and improve the safety of the procedure have been recently reported, and the use of the technique has gradually spread worldwide. Endoscopists who begin to perform ESD need to recognize the indications of ESD, the technical issue involved in this procedure, and its associated complications. This review outlines the methods and certain types of devices used for colorectal ESD. PMID:25333002

  4. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test. PMID:21954677

  5. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, W. J.; Moorehead, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma represents a major cause of cancer deaths in the United Kingdom. Tumours detected at an early or even premalignant stage have a better prognosis. In this review we consider the argument for screening for colorectal carcinomas and discuss the means available and the implications of implementing screening programmes using some of these methods. A suggestion is made for the more rational use of limited resources to target those at greatest risk. PMID:9185482

  6. The importance of the macroscopic classification of colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasushi; Iwadate, Mineo

    2010-07-01

    The importance and prevalence of the superficial lesions in the colon and rectum caught worldwide public attention in 2008 when Soetikno and colleagues reported the prevalence of non-polypoid (flat and depressed) colorectal neoplasms in asymptomatic and symptomatic adults in North America and the public media disseminated their findings. The publication put to rest the question of whether or not the flat and depressed colorectal neoplasms exist in Western countries; flat and depressed colorectal neoplasms can be found throughout the world. In this article, the author highlights the importance of the macroscopic classification of the colorectal neoplasm and emphasizes the distinction between so-called flat lesions (IIa and IIb) and 0-IIc (superficial depressed) neoplastic colorectal lesions. PMID:20656244

  7. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. Asad Umar, ... know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  8. Colonoscopy as a screening test for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schapira, M; Adler, M

    2005-01-01

    Colonoscopy is the current gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal neoplasms. Several gastroenterological and/or endoscopical societies recommend screening by colonoscopy in high risk patients for colorectal cancer whilst for average risk patients colonoscopy remains a valid option. In some countries screening colonoscopy is now covered by medical insurance. It is also the final common pathway of all colorectal cancer screening methods. This paper addresses the advantages and also limitations of colonoscopy as the first procedure for colorectal screening and emphasizes the importance of organized training and continuous assessment of competence of gastroenterologists and the necessity to have quality control audits of the endoscopy units. PMID:16013645

  9. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Castells, Antoni

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the paradigm of tumoral growth that is susceptible to preventive measures, especially screening. Various screening strategies with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency are currently available, notable examples being the fecal occult blood test and endoscopic tests. In addition, new modalities have appeared in the last few years that could become viable alternatives in the near future. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Orlando in May 2013, with special emphasis on the medium- and long-term results of strategies using the fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy, as well as initial experiences with the use of new biomarkers. PMID:24160954

  10. Bowel preparation and colonoscopy technique to detect non-polypoid colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kim, H N; Raju, G S

    2010-07-01

    Colonoscopy is considered the gold standard for colon cancer screening. In a recent study, however, 0.3% to 0.9% patients developed colorectal cancer within 3 years after removal of adenomas. Some reasons for the development of interval colorectal cancers include missed or incompletely removed lesions during the initial colonoscopy. Non-polypoid colorectal neoplasms are a potential contributor to the pool of missed lesions because they can be easily missed as a result of inadequate colon preparation or examination technique. This article discusses the methods that are useful to improve the quality of bowel preparation and examination technique. PMID:20656242

  11. Automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Matorin, Oleg V.; Reshetov, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed the clinical symptoms and the malignization signs of pigmented skin neoplasms. We have estimated the complex of clinical parameters which could be measured for the purpose of skin screening diagnostic via digital image processing. Allowable errors of clinical parameter characterization have been calculated, and the origin of these errors has been discussed. Proposed technique for automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms should become an effective tool for early skin diagnostics.

  12. Different risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasm in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Yong; Park, Dong Il

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the risk of developing advanced colorectal neoplasm (ACRN) according to age in Koreans. METHODS: A total of 70428 Koreans from an occupational cohort who underwent a colonoscopy between 2003 and 2012 at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital were retrospectively selected. We evaluated and compared odds ratios (OR) for ACRN between the young-adults (YA < 50 years) and in the older-adults (OA ≥ 50 years). ACRN was defined as an adenoma ≥ 10 mm in diameter, adenoma with any component of villous histology, high-grade dysplasia, or invasive cancer. RESULTS: In the YA group, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.09), male sex (OR = 1.26, 95%CI: 1.02-1.55), current smoking (OR = 1.37, 95%CI: 1.15-1.63), family history of colorectal cancer (OR = 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.10), diabetes mellitus related factors (OR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.06-1.54), obesity (OR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.03-1.47), CEA (OR = 1.04, 95%CI: 1.01-1.09) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (OR = 1.01, 95%CI: 1.01-1.02) were related with an increased risk of ACRN. However, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.09), male sex (OR = 2.12, 95%CI: 1.68-2.68), current smoking (OR = 1.38, 95%CI: 1.12-1.71), obesity (OR = 1.34, 95%CI: 1.09-1.65) and CEA (OR = 1.05, 95%CI: 1.01-1.09) also increased the risk of ACRN in the OA group. CONCLUSION: The risks of ACRN differed based on age group. Different colonoscopic screening strategies are appropriate for particular subjects with risk factors for ACRN, even in subjects younger than 50 years. PMID:27053853

  13. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Taku; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has expanded the application of endoscopic treatment, which can be used for lesions with a low metastatic potential regardless of their size. ESD has the advantage of achieving en bloc resection with a lower local recurrence rate compared with that of piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection. Moreover, in the past, surgery was indicated in patients with large lesions spreading to almost the entire circumference of the rectum, regardless of the depth of invasion, as endoscopic resection of these lesions was technically difficult. Therefore, a prime benefit of ESD is significant improvement in the quality of life for patients who have large rectal lesions. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in the treatment of colorectal neoplasms as it is in gastric cancers owing to the associated technical difficulty, longer procedural duration, and increased risk of perforation. To diversify the available endoscopic treatment strategies for superficial colorectal neoplasms, endoscopists performing ESD need to recognize its indications, the technical issues involved in its application, and the associated complications. This review outlines the methods and type of devices used for colorectal ESD, and the training required by endoscopists to perform this procedure. PMID:25473168

  14. Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minhhuyen T; Weinberg, David S

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The main goals of screening are to prevent carcinogenesis (via adenoma detection and removal) and detect cancer at an early, curable stage. CRC mortality is steadily dropping in the United States, partly because of greater screening utilization. However, nearly 1 in 3 average-risk people are not up to date with standard CRC screening recommendations. This review surveys a wide range of CRC biomarkers in various stages of development, which may offer attractive risk stratification tools; a few have reached the commercial stage. If widely accepted, these tools may contribute to shift CRC screening practices away from 1-step colonoscopy to a 2-step risk stratification process of predictive biomarker measurements followed by colonoscopy for lower-risk patients with a positive result. Such strategies could potentially increase the rate of CRC screening. PMID:27496118

  15. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... screening tests are being studied in clinical trials. Virtual colonoscopy Virtual colonoscopy is a procedure that uses ... complications may occur more often in older patients. Virtual colonoscopy Virtual colonoscopy often finds problems with organs ...

  16. Colorectal Cancer Screening in Vietnamese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bang H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Rates of colorectal cancer screening in Vietnamese Americans are lower than those in non-Hispanic whites. This paper describes rates of colorectal screening, identifies determinants, and recommends educational strategies to improve screening. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 867 Vietnamese aged 50 to 74 drawn from a sampling frame of individuals in the Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California and Harris County, Texas area telephone directories with Vietnamese surnames were interviewed in 2004. Results Colorectal screening recognition, receipt, currency, and intention rates were low. Conclusions: While the screening rates are low, Vietnamese are receptive to screening if providers recommend it. PMID:18444045

  17. Promoting Colorectal Cancer Screening Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Christy, Shannon M.; Perkins, Susan M.; Tong, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Springston, Jeffrey K.; Imperiale, Thomas F.; Rawl, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Provider recommendation is a predictor of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Purpose To compare the effects of two clinic-based interventions on patient–provider discussions about CRC screening. Design Two-group RCT with data collected at baseline and 1 week post-intervention. Participants/setting African-American patients that were non-adherent to CRC screening recommendations (n=693) with a primary care visit between 2008 and 2010 in one of 11 urban primary care clinics. Intervention Participants received either a computer-delivered tailored CRC screening intervention or a nontailored informational brochure about CRC screening immediately prior to their primary care visit. Main outcome measures Between-group differences in odds of having had a CRC screening discussion about a colon test, with and without adjusting for demographic, clinic, health literacy, health belief, and social support variables, were examined as predictors of a CRC screening discussion using logistic regression. Intervention effects on CRC screening test order by PCPs were examined using logistic regression. Analyses were conducted in 2011 and 2012. Results Compared to the brochure group, a greater proportions of those in the computer-delivered tailored intervention group reported having had a discussion with their provider about CRC screening (63% vs 48%, OR=1.81, p<0.001). Predictors of a discussion about CRC screening included computer group participation, younger age, reason for visit, being unmarried, colonoscopy self-efficacy, and family member/friend recommendation (all p-values <0.05). Conclusions The computer-delivered tailored intervention was more effective than a nontailored brochure at stimulating patient–provider discussions about CRC screening. Those who received the computer-delivered intervention also were more likely to have a CRC screening test (fecal occult blood test or colonoscopy) ordered by their PCP. Trial registration This study is registered at www

  18. Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 1.2015.

    PubMed

    Provenzale, Dawn; Jasperson, Kory; Ahnen, Dennis J; Aslanian, Harry; Bray, Travis; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Erwin, Deborah; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Gupta, Samir; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Klapman, Jason B; Larson, David W; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Rao, M Sambasiva; Regenbogen, Scott E; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary A; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A; Darlow, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Colorectal Cancer Screening provide recommendations for selecting individuals for colorectal cancer screening, and for evaluation and follow-up of colon polyps. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2015 NCCN Colorectal Cancer Screening panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were the state of evidence for CT colonography and stool DNA testing, bowel preparation procedures for colonoscopy, and guidelines for patients with a positive family history of colorectal cancer. PMID:26285241

  19. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  20. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  1. Implementation Intentions and Colorectal Screening

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, K. Allen; Daley, Christine M.; Epp, Aaron; James, Aimee; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Geana, Mugur; Born, Wendi; Engelman, Kimberly K.; Shellhorn, Jeremy; Hester, Christina M.; LeMaster, Joseph; Buckles, Daniel; Ellerbeck, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations experience disproportionate colorectal cancer (CRC) burden and poorer survival. Novel behavioral strategies are needed to improve screening rates in these groups. Purpose To test a theoretically based “implementation intentions” intervention for improving CRC screening among unscreened adults in urban safety-net clinics. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting/participants Adults (N=470) aged ≥50 years, due for CRC screening, from urban safety-net clinics were recruited. Intervention The intervention (conducted in 2009–2011) was delivered via touchscreen computers that tailored informational messages to decisional stage and screening barriers. The computer then randomized participants to generic health information on diet and exercise (Comparison group) or “implementation intentions” questions and planning (Experimental group) specific to the CRC screening test chosen (fecal immunochemical test or colonoscopy). Main outcome measures The primary study outcome was completion of CRC screening at 26 weeks based on test reports (analysis conducted in 2012–2013). Results The study population had a mean age of 57 years, and was 42% non-Hispanic African American, 28% non-Hispanic white, and 27% Hispanic. Those receiving the implementation intentions–based intervention had higher odds (AOR=1.83, 95% CI=1.23, 2.73) of completing CRC screening than the Comparison group. Those with higher self-efficacy for screening (AOR=1.57, 95% CI=1.03, 2.39), history of asthma (AOR=2.20, 95% CI=1.26, 3.84), no history of diabetes (AOR=1.86, 95% CI=1.21, 2.86), and reporting they had never heard that “cutting on cancer” makes it spread (AOR=1.78, 95% CI=1.16, 2.72) were more likely to complete CRC screening. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that programs incorporating an implementation intentions approach can contribute to successful completion of CRC screening even among very low-income and

  2. Perendoscopic Nd:YAG laser therapy of colorectal neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberto, Lorenzo; Ranzato, R.; Marino, S.; Erroi, F.; Angriman, I.; Donadi, M.; Paratore, S.; Scuderi, G.; D'Amico, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The range of application of Nd:YAG laser is now wide and of particular interest in the treatment of neoplastic lesions of the large bowel, both benign and malignant, which, besides the debilitating of vegetative lesions, may also provide a good hemostasis of the bleeding ones. Yag laser treatment of malignancies is indicated in patients not suitable for surgery due to the extent of the disease or to the high anesthesiologic/surgical risk. The treatment of choice for benign neoplasms is represented by endoscopic polypectomy, being Yag laser therapy reserved to patients with very large polyps and with a high anesthesiologic risk. Yag laser therapy is also recommended in teleangiectasies with active or previous bleeding, since it allows the complete ablation of such lesions with subsequent outstanding hemostasis. Furthermore this treatment may be advantageously associated to other operative endoscopic procedures, such as diatermotherapy, dilatation and injection therapy. It is also to be outlined that Yag laser therapy is currently used to cure benign diseases and for the palliation of advanced cancer in inoperable patients. Our laser instrument is an Nd:Yag laser MBB Medilas 2 with maximum power of 100 watts at the tip, with 'non-contact' laser fibers. We use flexible optic fiberendoscopes of several sizes, according to the type of lesion to be treated. Moreover we have employed both Savary dilators of progressive caliber from 5 to 15 mm and Rigiflex pneumatic balloons. Adequate bowel preparation by means of isosmotic solution was achieved in patients with non stenotic neoplasm, or evacuative enemas and fluid diet in patients with bowel neoplastic stenoses. The patients were premedicated with benzodiazepines. Stenotic malignant lesions have been treated with endoscopic dilatation before laser treatment. At each session 4,000 - 8,000 joules of energy were administered; all patients received an average of 5 - 6 laser sessions. Followup laser sessions have then been

  3. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  4. [Current strategy in colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Lefter, L P; Dajbog, Elena; Scripcariu, V; Dragomir, Cr

    2005-01-01

    Screening programs should begin by classifying the individual patient's level of risk based on personal, family, and medical history, which will determine the appropriate approach for each subject. The individual's risk status determines when screening should be initiated and what tests and frequency are appropriate. To achieve these aims, care systems should establish standards and operating procedures. This review focuses on colorectal cancer screening methodology highlighting the latest available strategies. PMID:16610172

  5. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  6. Colorectal cancer screening: The role of the noninvasive options.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Lisa; Varcak, Susan Combs

    2016-09-01

    Recommended screening options for colorectal cancer are divided into noninvasive stool-based options, and invasive procedure-based options. Because multiple screening strategies are effective, efforts to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer should focus on maximizing the number of patients who are screened. This article reviews noninvasive stool-based screening options. PMID:27575898

  7. Cruciferous vegetables and risk of colorectal neoplasms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tse, Genevieve; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-01-01

    Evidence shows cruciferous vegetables exhibit chemoprotective properties, commonly attributed to their rich source of isothiocyanates. However, epidemiological data examining the association between cruciferous vegetable intake and colorectal neoplasms have been inconclusive. This meta-analysis examines the epidemiological evidence to characterize the association between cruciferous vegetable intake and risk of developing colorectal neoplasms. Thirty-three articles were included in the meta-analysis after a literature search of electronic databases. Subgroup analysis for individual cruciferae types (n = 8 studies) and GST polymorphism (n = 8 studies) were performed. Pooled adjusted odds ratios (ORs) comparing highest and lowest categories of dietary pattern scores were calculated. Results show a statistically significant inverse association between cruciferous vegetable intake and colon cancer [OR = 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.72-0.98; P value heterogeneity < 0.001]. Broccoli in particular exhibited protective benefits against colorectal (CRC) neoplasms (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.65-0.99; P value heterogeneity = 0.02). Stratification by GST genotype reveals that the GSTT1 null genotype confers a reduction in CRC risk (OR = 0.78; 95% CI: 0.64-0.95; P value heterogeneity = 0.32). This study provides support to the hypothesis that cruciferous vegetable intake protects against cancer of the colon. This study also demonstrates the significance of gene-diet interactions and the importance of assessing individual cruciferous vegetables. PMID:24341734

  8. Study of Superficial Type Colorectal Neoplasms With Central Depression

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yoshihiro

    2000-01-01

    Superficial lesion with central depression obtained by endoscopic resection (23 carcinomas limited in the mucosa and 40 adenomas) were studied morphologically and histologically. These lesions were calculated concerning the height from the muscularis mucosa, depth of depressed central portions and the height of circumferential mucosa. Then, using the image analyzer, followings were determined with two-dimensional analysis: (1) the size of neoplasms and also (2) the size of whole mucosal lesions which was calculated by drawing a perpendicular from the border of the neoplasms; and thus, the ratio of each area was calculated. Little difference was found between the adenomas and carcinomas. The sizes of carcinomas were found to be of 8.8 ± 4.7 mm and the adenomas of 5.1 ± 2.3 mm (p < 0.01). As for the depth of depression, it was found to be of 352 ± 147 μm in the carcinomas and 277 ± 93 μm in the adenomas (p < 0.05). Concerning the ratio of carcinomatous area in the mucosa, it was found to be 78 ± 10% in the carcinomas, while in the adenomas, it was found to be 70 ± 10% (p < 0.05). Accordingly, it was found that compared with the adenomas, carcinomas showed significantly larger in size, deeper depression in configuration and the ratio of their size in the mucosa is rather high. PMID:18493535

  9. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  10. Colorectal Cancer Screening in 3 Racial Groups

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.; DeGraffinreid, Cecilia R.; Tatum, Cathy M.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in African Americans, European Americans, and Native Americans as these groups differ in CRC incidence and mortality. Methods Participants were surveyed for knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors related to CRC. Results Predictive regression modeling found, after adjusting for race, CRC risk, and CRC worry, the odds of screening within guidelines were increased for men, those receiving doctor’s recommendation, those with polyp/tumor history, those under 70, those with more knowledge about CRC, and those with fewer barriers to screening. CRC screening rates did not differ by race. Conclusions These results reiterate the importance of knowledge, barriers, and physician recommendation for CRC screening in all racial groups. PMID:17555381

  11. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  12. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Tests, Strategies, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Stracci, Fabrizio; Zorzi, Manuel; Grazzini, Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Screening has a central role in colorectal cancer (CRC) control. Different screening tests are effective in reducing CRC-specific mortality. Influence on cancer incidence depends on test sensitivity for pre-malignant lesions, ranging from almost no influence for guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) to an estimated reduction of 66–90% for colonoscopy. Screening tests detect lesions indirectly in the stool [gFOBT, fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), and fecal DNA] or directly by colonic inspection [flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography (CTC), and capsule endoscopy]. CRC screening is cost-effective compared to no screening but no screening strategy is clearly better than the others. Stool tests are the most widely used in worldwide screening interventions. FIT will soon replace gFOBT. The use of colonoscopy as a screening test is increasing and this strategy has superseded all alternatives in the US and Germany. Despite its undisputed importance, CRC screening is under-used and participation rarely reaches 70% of target population. Strategies to increase participation include ensuring recommendation by physicians, introducing organized screening and developing new, more acceptable tests. Available evidence for DNA fecal testing, CTC, and capsule endoscopy is reviewed. PMID:25386553

  13. Screening for colorectal cancer: spoiled for choice?

    PubMed

    Sarfati, Diana; Shaw, Caroline; McLeod, Melissa; Blakely, Tony; Bissett, Ian

    2016-01-01

    There are many different potential screening strategies for colorectal cancer (CRC) that vary both in the likely magnitude of their benefits on CRC mortality and their impact on health services. Many approaches to CRC screening are cost-effective, but there is substantial uncertainty about the optimal approach. Decision models using Markov or microsimulation modelling that compare the cost-effectiveness of different screening strategies are useful in this regard. We have reviewed recent decision models that compare the cost-effectiveness of one-off flexible sigmoidoscopy screening with immunochemical faecal occult blood (FIT) based screening. Models consistently show that any population-based screening is cost-effective compared with no screening, and that FIT-based screening is more effective than one-off sigmoidoscopy screening. The combination of one-off sigmoidoscopy with FIT is more effective in saving lives than either modality alone, but has the greatest impact on health service resources. The recent decision to proceed with biennial FIT-based screening is consistent with current evidence. PMID:27538046

  14. Simultaneous Minimally Invasive Treatment of Colorectal Neoplasm with Synchronous Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Garritano, Stefano; Selvaggi, Federico; Spampinato, Marcello Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To analyse perioperative and oncological outcomes of minimally invasive simultaneous resection of primary colorectal neoplasm with synchronous liver metastases. Methods. A Medline revision of the current published literature on laparoscopic and robotic-assisted combined colectomy with hepatectomy for synchronous liver metastatic colorectal neoplasm was performed until February 2015. The specific search terms were “liver metastases”, “hepatic metastases”, “colorectal”, “colon”, “rectal”, “minimally invasive”, “laparoscopy”, “robotic-assisted”, “robotic colorectal and liver resection”, “synchronous”, and “simultaneous”. Results. 20 clinical reports including 150 patients who underwent minimally invasive one-stage procedure were retrospectively analysed. No randomized trials were found. The approach was laparoscopic in 139 patients (92.7%) and robotic in 11 cases (7.3%). The rectum was the most resected site of primary neoplasm (52.7%) and combined liver procedure was in 89% of cases a minor liver resection. One patient (0.7%) required conversion to open surgery. The overall morbidity and mortality rate were 18% and 1.3%, respectively. The most common complication was colorectal anastomotic leakage. Data concerning oncologic outcomes were too heterogeneous in order to gather definitive results. Conclusion. Although no prospective randomized trials are available, one-stage minimally invasive approach seems to show advantages over conventional surgery in terms of postoperative short-term course. On the contrary, more studies are required to define the oncologic values of the minimally invasive combined treatment. PMID:27294144

  15. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  16. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-In; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Se Hyung; Hong, Sung Noh; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Suck-Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Hyo Jong; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Now colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in males and the fourth most common cancer in females in Korea. Since most of colorectal cancers occur after the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are one of the most effective methods to prevent colorectal cancer. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish Korean guideline for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The guideline was developed by the Korean Multi-Society Take Force and we tried to establish the guideline by evidence-based methods. Parts of the statements were draw by systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Herein we discussed epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea and optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations. PMID:22741131

  17. Colorectal cancer screening awareness among physicians in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Xilomenos, Apostolos; Mauri, Davide; Kamposioras, Konstantinos; Gkinosati, Athanasia; Zacharias, Georgios; Sidiropoulou, Varvara; Papadopoulos, Panagiotis; Chatzimichalis, Georgios; Golfinopoulos, Vassilis; Peponi, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Background Data comparison between SEER and EUROCARE database provided evidence that colorectal cancer survival in USA is higher than in European countries. Since adjustment for stage at diagnosis markedly reduces the survival differences, a screening bias was hypothesized. Considering the important role of primary care in screening activities, the purpose of the study was to investigate the colorectal cancer screening awareness among Hellenic physicians. Methods 211 primary care physicians were surveyed by mean of a self-reported prescription-habits questionnaire. Both physicians' colorectal cancer screening behaviors and colorectal cancer screening recommendations during usual check-up visits were analyzed. Results Only 50% of physicians were found to recommend screening for colorectal cancer during usual check-up visits, and only 25% prescribed cost-effective procedures. The percentage of physicians recommending stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy was 24% and 4% respectively. Only 48% and 23% of physicians recognized a cancer screening value for stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy. Colorectal screening recommendations were statistically lower among physicians aged 30 or less (p = 0.012). No differences were found when gender, level and type of specialization were analyzed, even though specialists in general practice showed a trend for better prescription (p = 0.054). Conclusion Contemporary recommendations for colorectal cancer screening are not followed by implementation in primary care setting. Education on presymptomatic control and screening practice monitoring are required if primary care is to make a major impact on colorectal cancer mortality. PMID:16756674

  18. The role of virtual colonoscopy in colorectal screening.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay D; Chang, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. The earlier colorectal cancer is detected, the better chance a person has of surviving 5 years after being diagnosed, emphasizing the need for effective and regular colorectal screening. Computed tomographic colonography has repeatedly demonstrated sensitivities equivalent to the current gold standard, optical colonoscopy, in the detection of clinically relevant polyps. It is an accurate, safe, affordable, available, reproducible, quick, and cost-effective option for colorectal screening and should be considered for mass screening. PMID:26298421

  19. Temporal Trends in Colorectal Cancer Screening among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Fedewa, Stacey A; Sauer, Ann Goding; Siegel, Rebecca L; Smith, Robert A; Torre, Lindsey A; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-06-01

    Asian Americans (AA) are less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), with a widening disparity for some AA subgroups in the early 2000s. Whether these patterns have continued in more recent years is unknown. We examined temporal trends in colorectal cancer screening among AA overall compared with NHWs and by AA subgroup (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian, Vietnamese) using data from the 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009 California Health Interview Surveys. Unadjusted (PR) and adjusted (aPR) prevalence ratios for colorectal cancer screening, accounting for sociodemographic, health care, and acculturation factors, were calculated for respondents ages 50 to 75 years (NHW n = 60,125; AA n = 6,630). Between 2003 and 2009, colorectal cancer screening prevalence increased from 43.3% to 64.6% in AA (P ≤ 0.001) and from 58.1% to 71.4% in NHW (P ≤ 0.001). Unadjusted colorectal cancer screening was significantly lower among AA compared with NHW in 2003 [PR = 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-0.82], 2005 (PR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.72-0.84), 2007 (PR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96), and 2009 (PR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.84-0.97), though disparities narrowed over time. After adjustment, there were no significant differences in colorectal cancer screening between the two groups, except in 2003. In subgroup analyses, between 2003 and 2009, colorectal cancer screening significantly increased by 22% in Japanese, 56% in Chinese, 47% in Filipino, and 94% in Koreans. In our study of California residents, colorectal cancer screening disparities between AA and NHW narrowed, but were not eliminated and screening prevalence among AA remains below nationwide goals, including the Healthy People 2020 goal of increasing colorectal cancer screening prevalence to 70.5%. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(6); 995-1000. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197273

  20. New era of colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    El Zoghbi, Maysaa; Cummings, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 2nd most common cancer in women and 3rd most common cancer in men worldwide. Most CRCs develop from adenomatous polyps arising from glandular epithelium. Tumor growth is initiated by mutation of the tumor suppressor gene APC and involves other genetic mutations in a stepwise process over years. Both hereditary and environmental factors contribute to the development of CRC. Screening has been proven to reduce the incidence of CRC. Screening has also contributed to the decrease in CRC mortality in the United States. However, CRC incidence and/or mortality remain on the rise in some parts of the world (Eastern Europe, Asia, and South America), likely due to factors including westernized diet, lifestyle, and lack of healthcare infrastructure. Multiple screening options are available, ranging from direct radiologic or endoscopic visualization tests that primarily detect premalignant or malignant lesions such as flexible sigmoidoscopy, optical colonoscopy, colon capsule endoscopy, computed tomographic colonography, and double contrast barium enema - to stool based tests which primarily detect cancers, including fecal DNA, fecal immunochemical test, and fecal occult blood test. The availability of some of these tests is limited to areas with high economic resources. This article will discuss CRC epidemiology, pathogenesis, risk factors, and screening modalities with a particular focus on new technologies. PMID:26981176

  1. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yan; Lv, Liyang; Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao; Cao, Lili

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Stool DNA and Other Noninvasive Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, James R.; Aggarwal, Ashish; Imperiale, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening dates to the discovery of pre-cancerous adenomatous tissue. Screening modalities and guidelines directed at prevention and early detection have evolved and resulted in a significant decrease in the prevalence and mortality of colorectal cancer via direct visualization or using specific markers. Despite continued efforts and an overall reduction in deaths attributed to colorectal cancer over the last 25 years, colorectal cancer remains one of the most common causes of malignancy-associated deaths. In attempt to further reduce the prevalence of colorectal cancer and associated deaths, continued improvement in screening quality and adherence remains key. Noninvasive screening modalities are actively being explored. Identification of specific genetic alterations in the adenoma-cancer sequence allow for the study and development of noninvasive screening modalities beyond guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing which target specific alterations or a panel of alterations. The stool DNA test is the first noninvasive screening tool that targets both human hemoglobin and specific genetic alterations. In this review we discuss stool DNA and other commercially available noninvasive colorectal cancer screening modalities in addition to other targets which previously have been or are currently under study. PMID:26934885

  3. Public Awareness of Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interventions for Increasing Screening Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno Garcia, Antonio Z.; Hernandez Alvarez Buylla, Noemi; Nicolas-Perez, David; Quintero, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer ranks as one of the most incidental and death malignancies worldwide. Colorectal cancer screening has proven its benefit in terms of incidence and mortality reduction in randomized controlled trials. In fact, it has been recommended by medical organizations either in average-risk or family-risk populations. Success of a screening campaign highly depends on how compliant the target population is. Several factors influence colorectal cancer screening uptake including sociodemographics, provider and healthcare system factors, and psychosocial factors. Awareness of the target population of colorectal cancer and screening is crucial in order to increase screening participation rates. Knowledge about this disease and its prevention has been used across studies as a measurement of public awareness. Some studies found a positive relationship between knowledge about colorectal cancer, risk perception, and attitudes (perceived benefits and barriers against screening) and willingness to participate in a colorectal cancer screening campaign. The mentioned factors are modifiable and therefore susceptible of intervention. In fact, interventional studies focused on average-risk population have tried to increase colorectal cancer screening uptake by improving public knowledge and modifying attitudes. In the present paper, we reviewed the factors impacting adherence to colorectal cancer screening and interventions targeting participants for increasing screening uptake. PMID:24729896

  4. [Progress of endoscopic screening and differentiation of colorectal polyps].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xianchun; Liu, Jun; Ren, Hongyu

    2016-04-25

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is rising year by year, thus screening of neoplastic colorectal polyps is very important for the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. In recent years, endoscopic techniques have advanced dramatically, such as high definition endoscopy, magnified endoscopy, conventional or virtual chromoendoscopy. Some of these technologies not only can improve the adenoma detection rate, but also may help to enable real-time endoscopic diagnosis and thereby guide decisions about endoscopic resection. The second generation colon capsule endoscopy provides a new and relative reliable noninvasive tool for colorectal diseases screening and diagnosis. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of advanced imaging techniques available for the detection and differentiation of colorectal polyps. PMID:27112483

  5. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in young, average risk individuals: A turning tide between East and West

    PubMed Central

    Leshno, Ari; Moshkowitz, Menachem; David, Maayan; Galazan, Lior; Neugut, Alfred I; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in average risk persons 40-59 years of age in Israel and to compare the results with other populations. METHODS We reviewed the results of asymptomatic average-risk subjects, aged 40 to 59 years, undergoing their first screening colonoscopy between April 1994 and January 2014. The detection rates of adenoma, advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal cancer (CRC) were determined in the 40’s and 50’s age groups by gender. The prevalence of lesions was compared between age groups. After meticulous review of the literature, these results were compared to published studies addressing the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in similar patient groups, in a variety of geographical locations. RESULTS We included first screening colonoscopy results of 1750 individuals. The prevalence of adenomas, AA and CRC was 8.3%, 1.0% and 0.2% in the 40-49 age group and 13.7%, 2.4% and 0.2% in the 50-59 age group, respectively. Age-dependent differences in adenoma and AA rates were significant only among men (P < 0.005). Literature review disclosed 17 relevant studies. As expected, in both Asian and Western populations, the risks for overall adenoma and advanced adenoma was significantly higher in the 50's age group as compared to the 40's age group in a similar fashion. The result of the current study were similar to previous studies on Western populations. A substantially higher rate of adenoma, was observed in studies conducted among Asian populations in both age groups. CONCLUSION The higher rate of colorectal neoplasia in Asian populations requires further investigation and reconsideration as to the starting age of screening in that population. PMID:27621582

  6. The Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Colorectal Neoplasm: Systemic review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jinjuvadia, Raxitkumar; Lohia, Prateek; Jinjuvadia, Chetna; Montoya, Sergio; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been constant speculation about the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and colorectal neoplasia (CN); however, the published results are conflicting. The aims of this study are to systematic search, and assess literature to determine the available evidence on the association between these two conditions. Methods Meta-analysis was conducted based on relevant studies identified through a systematic literature review from PubMed, OvidSP and Cochrane database during January 1980 to July 2011. A combined analysis was performed, followed by a subgroup analyses stratified by the study design, type of colorectal lesions and gender. Publication bias was assessed using the Begg’s and Egger’s tests and visual inspection of funnel plot. Results Eighteen studies were included in the final analysis. Overall, MetS was associated with 34% increase in the risk of CN (summary RR - 1.34, 95% CI 1.24–1.44). The association between MetS and CN was found to be statistically significant in separate analysis for both case-control studies (summary RR -1.58, 95% CI 1.44–1.79) and cohort studies (summary RR – 1.21, 95% CI 1.13–1.29). The association remained significant when analyses were restricted by type of colorectal lesions (colorectal cancer: RR – 1.30, 95% CI 1.18–1.43; colorectal adenoma: RR – 1.37, 95% CI 1.26–1.49). Further subgroup analysis by gender showed significant association between MetS and CN in both male and female population. Conclusion Our meta-analysis showed significant association between presence of MetS and CN. These results may help in identifying high risk individuals at early stage that might benefit from targeted CRC screening intervention. PMID:23090040

  7. Clinical Practice of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Colorectal Neoplasms by a Colonoscopist with Limited Gastric Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Hoi-Wan; Tsai, Ching-Yang; Tsai, Yu-Jou

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early colorectal neoplasms is regarded as a difficult technique and should commence after receiving the experiences of ESD in the stomach. The implementation of colorectal ESD in countries where early gastric cancer is uncommon might therefore be difficult. The aim is to delineate the feasibility and the learning curve of colorectal ESD performed by a colonoscopist with limited experience of gastric ESD. Methods. The first fifty cases of colorectal ESD, which were performed by a single colonoscopist between July 2010 and April 2013, were enrolled. Results. The mean of age was 64 (±9.204) years with mean size of neoplasm at 33 (±12.63) mm. The mean of procedure time was 70.5 (±48.9) min. The rates of en bloc resection, R0 resection, and curative resection were 86%, 86%, and 82%, respectively. Three patients had immediate perforation, but no patient developed delayed perforation or delayed bleeding. Conclusion. Our result disclosed that it is feasible for colorectal ESD to be performed by a colonoscopist with little experience of gastric ESD through satisfactory training and adequate case selection. PMID:24391666

  8. Colorectal cancer screening among Chinese American immigrants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Karen; Chapman, Christopher; Vallina, Helen

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors determining fecal occult blood test (FOBT) uptake in Chinese American immigrants. This study used a prospective, cross-sectional design with convenience sampling. An educational session on colorectal cancer screening (CRS) was provided to the participants during a health fair, and each participant was offered a no-cost FOBT kit. Data was collected over two consecutive years during three different health fairs. A questionnaire was used to collect demographic data. A total of 113 participants were recruited and 72% of them returned the FOBT kit. There was a significant association between having a primary-care physician (PCP) and having CRS in the past, even after controlling for age, gender and the length of time in the US (P = .009). Participants who visited a doctor for health maintenance were less likely to participate in the FOBT, compared to participants who never visited a doctor or who only visited a doctor when they were sick (P = .001). The length of time in the US had a significant effect on having a PCP (P = .002). However, having a PCP or having CRS in the past was not associated with participating in the screening and so was feeling at risk for CRC. In fact, 49% of Chinese women and 45% of Chinese men felt no risk of CRC. Future research and interventions that address knowledge deficits and focus on recent immigrants and their access to health care may have the potential to increase CRS among Chinese American immigrants. PMID:22187109

  9. Participation and barriers to colorectal cancer screening in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Harmy Mohamed; Daud, Norwati; Noor, Norhayati Mohd; Rahim, Amry Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia, colorectal cancer is the most common cancer in males and the third most common in females. Mortality due to colorectal cancer can be effectively reduced with early diagnosis. This study was designed to look into colorectal cancer screening participation and its barriers among average risk individuals in Malaysia. A cross sectional study was conducted from August 2009 till April 2010 involving average risk individuals from 44 primary care clinics in West Malaysia. Each individual was asked whether they have performed any of the colorectal cancer screening methods in the past five years. The barrier questions had three domains: patient factors, test factors and health care provider factors. Descriptive analysis was achieved using Statistical Program for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12.0. A total of 1,905 average risk individuals responded making a response rate of 93.8%. Only 13 (0.7%) respondents had undergone any of the colorectal cancer screening methods in the past five years. The main patient and test factors for not participating were embarrassment (35.2%) and feeling uncomfortable (30.0%), respectively. There were 11.2% of respondents who never received any advice to do screening. The main reason for them to undergo screening was being advised by health care providers (84.6%). The study showed that participation in colorectal cancer screening in Malaysia is extremely low and multiple factors contribute to this situation. Given the importance of the disease, efforts should be made to increase colorectal cancer screening activities in Malaysia. PMID:23098504

  10. Early Detection of and Screening for Colorectal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There are approximately one million new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) per year worldwide, with substantial associated morbidity and mortality. The long natural history of colorectal neoplasia affords the opportunity to use preventive measures to improve survival in this disease. Currently screening for adenomatous polyps and early-stage cancers is the best methodology for improving survival. The increasing knowledge of CRC pathogenesis and its natural history is allowing the development of new tools to identify patients who will benefit most from colon cancer screening and the defining of appropriate surveillance intervals. The guidelines for screening for colorectal neoplasia have recently been substantially revised by several organizations based on developing technologies and a growing body of data on the efficacy of CRC screening. PMID:20431727

  11. Celebrity Appeal: Reaching Women to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A.; Lobb, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign works with the Entertainment Industry Foundation’s National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance to develop public service announcements (PSAs) featuring celebrities. Selection of Screen for Life celebrity spokespersons is based on a variety of factors, including their general appeal and personal connection to colorectal cancer. Screen for Life PSAs featuring celebrities have been disseminated exclusively through donated media placements and have been formatted for television, radio, print, and out-of-home displays such as dioramas in airports, other transit stations, and shopping malls. A 2012 national survey with women aged 50–75 years (n = 772) investigated reported exposure to Screen for Life PSAs featuring actor Terrence Howard. In total, 8.3% of women recalled exposure to the PSAs. Celebrity spokespersons can attract the attention of both target audiences and media gatekeepers who decide which PSAs will receive donated placements. PMID:25521047

  12. Effects of Supplemental Vitamin D and Calcium on Normal Colon Tissue and Circulating Biomarkers of Risk for Colorectal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Bostick, Roberd M.

    2015-01-01

    This brief review, based on an invited presentation at the 17th Workshop on Vitamin D, is to summarize a line of the author’s research that has been directed at the intertwined missions of clarifying and/or developing vitamin D and calcium and as preventive agents against colorectal cancer in humans, understanding the mechanisms by which these agents may reduce risk for the disease, and developing ‘treatable’ biomarkers of risk for colorectal cancer. The biological plausibility and observational and clinical trial evidence for vitamin D and calcium in reducing risk for colorectal neoplasms, the development of pre-neoplastic biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms, and the clinical trial findings from the author’s research group on the efficacy of vitamin D and calcium in modulating these biomarkers are summarized. Regarding the latter, we tested the efficacy of 800 IU (20 µg) of vitamin D3 and 2.0g of calcium daily, alone and combined vs. placebo over 6 months on modulating normal colon tissue and circulating hypothesis-based biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial design clinical trial (n = 92). The tissue-based biomarkers were measured in biopsies of normal-appearing rectal mucosa using immunohistochemistry with quantitative image analysis, and a panel of circulating inflammation markers was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA). Statistically significant proportional tissue increases in the vitamin D group relative to the placebo group were found in bax (51%), p21 (141%), APC (48%), E-cadherin (78%), MSH2 (179%), the CaSR (39%), and CYP27B1 (159%). In blood, there was a 77% statistically significant decrease in a summary inflammation z-score. The findings for calcium were similar to those for vitamin D. These findings indicate that supplemental vitamin D3 or calcium can favorably modulate multiple normal colon tissue and circulating hypothesis-based biomarkers of risk

  13. Endoscopic treatment of superficial colorectal neoplasms. Retrospective analysis of a single center technique and results

    PubMed Central

    ACQUISTAPACE, G.; MATERNINI, F.; SNIDER, L.; BELLINI, O.; MOGLIA, P.; CAPRETTI, P.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection (ESD) is a technique developed in Japan for “en bloc” resection of larger superficial neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract as an alternative to the traditional Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR), with removal of the lesion in multiple fragments (“piecemeal”). ESD offers a lower recurrence rate and allows a more accurate histopathological examination. This procedure is however considered technically difficult and therefore requires an adequate learning curve, it is time consuming with more discomfort for the patient, it has a higher complication rate, it is more expensive. To overcome these disadvantages, in the Western countries a hybrid technique called Circumferential Submucosal Incision - Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (CSI-EMR) has been developed and is especially employed for colonic lesions. This article analyzes retrospectively the results obtained in a single centre by a single operator in the treatment of 23 patients (12 men and 11 women, average age 65,6 years), all suffering from superficial, larger than ≥ 20 mm colorectal neoplasms: 9 were treated with ESD for rectal lesions and 14 were treated with CSI-EMR for colonic lesions. Findings show a technical success rate of 66,6% for ESD and 78,5% for CSI-EM, and a 0% recurrence rate during follow-up, 4,3% bleeding and 13% perforation complications. The histology of the removed lesions showed 13 (56,5%) low grade dysplasia adenomas, 8 (34,7%) high grade dysplasia adenomas, one grade 1 sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma infiltrating the submucosal layer without lymphovascular invasion, with free margins (R0), treated conservatively, and one grade 1 cecum adenocarcinoma, infiltrating the submucosal layer, with lymphovascular invasion and involved excision margin, treated surgically with no residual neoplastic disease in the surgical specimen. These data are in line with the most significant ones in literature, except for the higher complication rate, which the authors

  14. Risk factors for bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection of colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sho; Chino, Akiko; Kishihara, Teruhito; Uragami, Naoyuki; Tamegai, Yoshiro; Suganuma, Takanori; Fujisaki, Junko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Itoi, Takao; Gotoda, Takuji; Igarashi, Masahiro; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors for delayed bleeding following endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) treatment for colorectal neoplasms. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 317 consecutive patients with 325 lesions who underwent ESD for superficial colorectal neoplasms at our hospital from January 2009 to June 2013. Delayed post-ESD bleeding was defined as bleeding that resulted in overt hematochezia 6 h to 30 d after ESD and the observation of bleeding spots as confirmed by repeat colonoscopy or a required blood transfusion. We analyzed the relationship between risk factors for delayed bleeding following ESD and the following factors using univariate and multivariate analyses: age, gender, presence of comorbidities, use of antithrombotic drugs, use of intravenous heparin, resected specimen size, lesion size, lesion location, lesion morphology, lesion histology, the device used, procedure time, and the presence of significant bleeding during ESD. RESULTS: Delayed post-ESD bleeding was found in 14 lesions from 14 patients (4.3% of all specimens, 4.4% patients). Patients with episodes of delayed post-ESD bleeding had a mean hemoglobin decrease of 2.35 g/dL. All episodes were treated successfully using endoscopic hemostatic clips. Emergency surgery was not required in any of the cases. Blood transfusion was needed in 1 patient (0.3%). Univariate analysis revealed that lesions located in the cecum (P = 0.012) and the presence of significant bleeding during ESD (P = 0.024) were significantly associated with delayed post-ESD bleeding. The risk of delayed bleeding was higher for larger lesion sizes, but this trend was not statistically significant. Multivariate analysis revealed that lesions located in the cecum (OR = 7.26, 95%CI: 1.99-26.55, P = 0.003) and the presence of significant bleeding during ESD (OR = 16.41, 95%CI: 2.60-103.68, P = 0.003) were independent risk factors for delayed post-ESD bleeding. CONCLUSION: Location in the cecum

  15. Immunohistochemical detection of the BRAF V600E mutant protein in colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Vakiani, Efsevia; Yaeger, Rona; Brooke, Sylvester; Zhou, Yi; Klimstra, David S.; Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    Reliable assessment of the BRAF mutation status is becoming increasingly important in the clinical management of colorectal carcinomas (CRC). The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a recently developed mutation-specific antibody (VE1, SpringBio, Pleasanton, CA) to detect the BRAF V600E protein in paraffin tissue. We analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) 117 cases that had been evaluated for BRAF mutation using a MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry based assay. IHC staining was evaluated without the knowledge of the genetic data and was considered positive when there was distinct homogeneous cytoplasmic staining in the tumor cells. The analyzed cases included 4 polyps, 63 primary and 50 metastatic CRC. Forty-five of the 46 (97.8%) cases that were positive by IHC had a BRAF V600E mutation by genetic analysis; the 1 discordant case was notably of signet ring cell type. Similarly, 66 of the 67 (98.5%) cases that were negative by IHC were also negative by genetic analysis. Four cases that showed weak cytoplasmic staining and/or nuclear staining in the tumor cells were considered to be IHC equivocal; by genetic analysis, 2 of the 4 were positive and 2 were negative. The overall sensitivity and specificity of IHC for the detection of a BRAF V600E mutant tumor was 93.7% and 95.6%, respectively. Our results support the use of VE1 IHC for identification of colorectal neoplasms harboring the BRAF V600E mutation. Difficulties in IHC interpretation may arise in a small number of cases, and in those cases molecular testing is required. PMID:25517872

  16. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  17. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  18. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  19. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  20. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening in an Equal Access Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    DeBarros, Mia; Steele, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The military health system (MHS) a unique setting to analyze implementation programs as well as outcomes for colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we look at the efficacy of different CRC screening methods, attributes and results within the MHS, and current barriers to increase compliance. Materials and Methods: A literature search was conducted utilizing PubMed and the Cochrane library. Key-word combinations included colorectal cancer screening, racial disparity, risk factors, colorectal cancer, screening modalities, and randomized control trials. Directed searches were also performed of embedded references. Results: Despite screening guidelines from several national organizations, extensive barriers to widespread screening remain, especially for minority populations. These barriers are diverse, ranging from education and access problems to personal beliefs. Screening rates in MHS have been reported to be generally higher at 71% compared to national averages of 50-65%. Conclusion: CRC screening can be highly effective at improving detection of both pre-malignant and early cancers. Improved patient education and directed efforts are needed to improve CRC screening both nationally and within the MHS. PMID:23459768

  2. Non-polypoid colorectal neoplasms: Classification, therapy and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Antonino, Matteo; Di Maso, Marianna; Barone, Michele; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2015-05-01

    In the last years, an increasing interest has been raised on non-polypoid colorectal tumors (NPT) and in particular on large flat neoplastic lesions beyond 10 mm tending to grow laterally, called laterally spreading tumors (LST). LSTs and large sessile polyps have a greater frequency of high-grade dysplasia and local invasiveness as compared to pedunculated lesions of the same size and usually represent a technical challenge for the endoscopist in terms of either diagnosis and resection. According to the Paris classification, NPTs are distinguished in slightly elevated (0-IIa, less than 2.5 mm), flat (0-IIb) or slightly depressed (0-IIc). NPTs are usually flat or slightly elevated and tend to spread laterally while in case of depressed lesions, cell proliferation growth progresses in depth in the colonic wall, thus leading to an increased risk of submucosal invasion (SMI) even for smaller neoplasms. NPTs may be frequently missed by inexperienced endoscopists, thus a careful training and precise assessment of all suspected mucosal areas should be performed. Chromoendoscopy or, if possible, narrow-band imaging technique should be considered for the estimation of SMI risk of NPTs, and the characterization of pit pattern and vascular pattern may be useful to predict the risk of SMI and, therefore, to guide the therapeutic decision. Lesions suitable to endoscopic resection are those confined to the mucosa (or superficial layer of submucosa in selected cases) whereas deeper invasion makes endoscopic therapy infeasible. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR, piecemeal for LSTs > 20 mm, en bloc for smaller neoplasms) remains the first-line therapy for NPTs, whereas endoscopic submucosal dissection in high-volume centers or surgery should be considered for large LSTs for which en bloc resection is mandatory and cannot be achieved by means of EMR. After piecemeal EMR, follow-up colonoscopy should be performed at 3 mo to assess resection completeness. In case of en bloc resection

  3. Non-polypoid colorectal neoplasms: Classification, therapy and follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Antonino, Matteo; Di Maso, Marianna; Barone, Michele; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, an increasing interest has been raised on non-polypoid colorectal tumors (NPT) and in particular on large flat neoplastic lesions beyond 10 mm tending to grow laterally, called laterally spreading tumors (LST). LSTs and large sessile polyps have a greater frequency of high-grade dysplasia and local invasiveness as compared to pedunculated lesions of the same size and usually represent a technical challenge for the endoscopist in terms of either diagnosis and resection. According to the Paris classification, NPTs are distinguished in slightly elevated (0-IIa, less than 2.5 mm), flat (0-IIb) or slightly depressed (0-IIc). NPTs are usually flat or slightly elevated and tend to spread laterally while in case of depressed lesions, cell proliferation growth progresses in depth in the colonic wall, thus leading to an increased risk of submucosal invasion (SMI) even for smaller neoplasms. NPTs may be frequently missed by inexperienced endoscopists, thus a careful training and precise assessment of all suspected mucosal areas should be performed. Chromoendoscopy or, if possible, narrow-band imaging technique should be considered for the estimation of SMI risk of NPTs, and the characterization of pit pattern and vascular pattern may be useful to predict the risk of SMI and, therefore, to guide the therapeutic decision. Lesions suitable to endoscopic resection are those confined to the mucosa (or superficial layer of submucosa in selected cases) whereas deeper invasion makes endoscopic therapy infeasible. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR, piecemeal for LSTs > 20 mm, en bloc for smaller neoplasms) remains the first-line therapy for NPTs, whereas endoscopic submucosal dissection in high-volume centers or surgery should be considered for large LSTs for which en bloc resection is mandatory and cannot be achieved by means of EMR. After piecemeal EMR, follow-up colonoscopy should be performed at 3 mo to assess resection completeness. In case of en bloc resection

  4. Using Elderly Educators to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinrich, Sally P.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used elderly educator method for increasing rate of return of fecal occult blood sampling in colorectal screening among 171 socioeconomically disadvantaged older persons. Two methods using elderly educators had overall response rate of more than 60%. Found statistically significant difference between two methods that used elderly educators and two…

  5. Telenovela: an innovative colorectal cancer screening health messaging tool

    PubMed Central

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Slatton, Jozieta; Dignan, Mark; Underwood, Emily; Landis, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background Alaska Native people have nearly twice the rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality as the US White population. Objective Building upon storytelling as a culturally respectful way to share information among Alaska Native people, a 25-minute telenovela-style movie, What's the Big Deal?, was developed to increase CRC screening awareness and knowledge, role-model CRC conversations, and support wellness choices. Design Alaska Native cultural values of family, community, storytelling, and humor were woven into seven, 3–4 minute movie vignettes. Written post-movie viewing evaluations completed by 71.3% of viewers (305/428) were collected at several venues, including the premiere of the movie in the urban city of Anchorage at a local movie theater, seven rural Alaska community movie nights, and five cancer education trainings with Community Health Workers. Paper and pencil evaluations included check box and open-ended questions to learn participants' response to a telenovela-style movie. Results On written-post movie viewing evaluations, viewers reported an increase in CRC knowledge and comfort with talking about recommended CRC screening exams. Notably, 81.6% of respondents (249/305) wrote positive intent to change behavior. Multiple responses included: 65% talking with family and friends about colon screening (162), 24% talking with their provider about colon screening (59), 31% having a colon screening (76), and 44% increasing physical activity (110). Conclusions Written evaluations revealed the telenovela genre to be an innovative way to communicate colorectal cancer health messages with Alaska Native, American Indian, and Caucasian people both in an urban and rural setting to empower conversations and action related to colorectal cancer screening. Telenovela is a promising health communication tool to shift community norms by generating enthusiasm and conversations about the importance of having recommended colorectal cancer screening

  6. Targeted screening for colorectal cancer in high-risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-12-01

    The idea of targeted screening for colorectal cancer based on risk profiles originates from its benefits to improve detection yield and optimize screening efficiency. Clinically, it allows individuals to be more aware of their own risk and make informed decisions on screening choice. From a public health perspective, the implementation of risk stratification strategies may better justify utilization of colonoscopic resources, and facilitate resource-planning in the formulation of population-based screening programmes. There are several at-risk groups who should receive earlier screening, and colonoscopy is more preferred. This review summarizes the currently recommended CRC screening strategies among subjects with different risk factors, and introduces existing risk scoring systems. Additional genetic, epidemiological, and clinical parameters may be needed to enhance their performance to risk-stratify screening participants. Future research studies should refine these scoring systems, and explore the adaptability, feasibility, acceptability, and user-friendliness of their use in clinical practice among different population groups. PMID:26651255

  7. Colorectal cancer screening: a global overview of existing programmes.

    PubMed

    Schreuders, Eline H; Ruco, Arlinda; Rabeneck, Linda; Schoen, Robert E; Sung, Joseph J Y; Young, Graeme P; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks third among the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide, with wide geographical variation in incidence and mortality across the world. Despite proof that screening can decrease CRC incidence and mortality, CRC screening is only offered to a small proportion of the target population worldwide. Throughout the world there are widespread differences in CRC screening implementation status and strategy. Differences can be attributed to geographical variation in CRC incidence, economic resources, healthcare structure and infrastructure to support screening such as the ability to identify the target population at risk and cancer registry availability. This review highlights issues to consider when implementing a CRC screening programme and gives a worldwide overview of CRC burden and the current status of screening programmes, with focus on international differences. PMID:26041752

  8. Colorectal neoplasm characterization based on swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chih-Wei; Chiu, Han-Mo; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2009-07-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer has grown from the adenomatous polyp. Adenomatous lesions have a well-documented relationship to colorectal cancer in previous studies. Thus, to detect the morphological changes between polyp and tumor can allow early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and simultaneous removal of lesions. In this paper, the various adenoma/carcinoma in-vitro samples are monitored by our swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. The significant results indicate a great potential for early detection of colorectal adenomas based on the SS-OCT imaging.

  9. Psychological Barriers and Facilitators of Colorectal Cancer Screening: A French Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bridou, Morgiane; Aguerre, Colette; Gimenes, Guillaume; Kubiszewski, Violaine; Le Gall, Armel; Potard, Catherine; Sorel, Olivier; Reveillere, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the psychological barriers to and facilitators of undergoing the Hemoccult-II® colorectal cancer screening test in France. Sixty-nine French people aged 50 to 74 years were divided into seven qualitative focus groups. Three issues were discussed with participants: knowledge and beliefs about colorectal cancer screening; facilitators of colorectal cancer screening by Hemoccult-II®; barriers to colorectal cancer screening by Hemoccult-II®. All the discussions were led by two psychologists and were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Correspondence factor analyses identified three dimensions for each topic. The main psychological facilitators of colorectal cancer screening were: information about colorectal cancer screening, perceived simplicity of using Hemoccult-II®, and perception of risk. Uncertainty about the reliability of Hemoccult-II®, health anxiety, and embarrassment emerged as the main barriers to colorectal cancer screening. Cross-sectional analyses identified the differences between the views expressed by women and men. Women appeared more embarrassed about Hemoccult-II® and men seemed to be more worried about colorectal cancer. This preliminary study suggests that psychological factors play an important role in colorectal cancer screening by Hemoccult-II®. This finding may help health organizations to conceive better awareness campaigns to promote colorectal cancer screening in order to reduce the related mortality rate by taking into account psychological determinants. PMID:26973907

  10. Perspectives of colorectal cancer screening in Germany 2009.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Andreas; Friedrich, Kilian

    2009-10-15

    Adequate screening methods can decrease colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality. The guaiac test for fecal occult-blood (FOBT) is part of the German CRC Screening Program since 1970 and has evidence level Ia. In randomized multicenter-studies FOBT has an average sensitivity of 24% and decreases CRC mortality up to 30%. Immunological tests for human haemoglobin (iFOBT) show better performance characteristics than guaiac FOBT, with augmented sensitivity and specificity. However, the single tests show wide differences in diagnostic performance and iFOBT is not yet covered by insurance companies although it should replace the guaiac test for CRC screening. Visual colonoscopy, which was introduced to the German National Cancer Screening Program in 2002, is the gold standard for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia. From 2003 to 2007 more than 2.8 million examinations have been documented in Germany. The prevalence of adenomas is around 20% and of CRC about 0.7% to 1.0% of the screenings. Seventy percent of the carcinomas detected during screening are in an early stage (UICC I and II). Furthermore, screening colonoscopy is a cost saving procedure with a low complication rate (0.25% overall). Insurance companies save 216€ for each screening colonoscopy mainly by prevention of neoplasia due to polypectomy. In Germany, virtual colonography by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging still lacks standardization of the hard and software. In experienced centres the sensitivity for CRC and large polyps of CT colonography is comparable to colonoscopy but in meta-analyses the ranking is lower. New technologies like computer-aided colonoscopies with sheath or double balloon techniques are coming up as well as capsule colonoscopy, which sensitivity for large polyps is about 70%. Advised by his physician, the patient can choose his most acceptable examination method from this whole set of screening tools. PMID:21160645

  11. Colorectal Cancer in Iran: Molecular Epidemiology and Screening Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Bonyadi, Mortaza Jabbarpour; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Farassati, Faris; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the past three decades in Iran has made it a major public health burden. This study aimed to report its epidemiologic features, molecular genetic aspects, survival, heredity, and screening pattern in Iran. Methods. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to identify the relevant published articles. We used medical subject headings, including colorectal cancer, molecular genetics, KRAS and BRAF mutations, screening, survival, epidemiologic study, and Iran. Results. Age standardized incidence rate of Iranian CRCs was 11.6 and 10.5 for men and women, respectively. Overall five-year survival rate was 41%, and the proportion of CRC among the younger age group was higher than that of western countries. Depending on ethnicity, geographical region, dietary, and genetic predisposition, mutation genes were considerably diverse and distinct among CRCs across Iran. The high occurrence of CRC in records of relatives of CRC patients showed that family history of CRC was more common among young CRCs. Conclusion. Appropriate screening strategies for CRC which is amenable to early detection through screening, especially in relatives of CRCs, should be considered as the first step in CRC screening programs. PMID:25685149

  12. Developing Screening Services for Colorectal Cancer on Android Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Ching; Chang, Chiao-Jung; Lin, Chun-Che; Tsai, Ming-Chang; Chang, Che-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important health problem in Western countries and also in Asia. It is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in Taiwan. According to the well-known adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence, the majority of CRC develops from colorectal adenomatous polyps. This concept provides the rationale for screening and prevention of CRC. Removal of colorectal adenoma could reduce the mortality and incidence of CRC. Mobile phones are now playing an ever more crucial role in people's daily lives. The latest generation of smartphones is increasingly viewed as hand-held computers rather than as phones, because of their powerful on-board computing capability, capacious memories, large screens, and open operating systems that encourage development of applications (apps). Subjects and Methods: If we can detect the potential CRC patients early and offer them appropriate treatments and services, this would not only promote the quality of life, but also reduce the possible serious complications and medical costs. In this study, an intelligent CRC screening app on Android™ (Google™, Mountain View, CA) smartphones has been developed based on a data mining approach using decision tree algorithms. For comparison, the stepwise backward multivariate logistic regression model and the fecal occult blood test were also used. Results: Compared with the stepwise backward multivariate logistic regression model and the fecal occult blood test, the proposed app system not only provides an easy and efficient way to quickly detect high-risk groups of potential CRC patients, but also brings more information about CRC to customer-oriented services. Conclusions: We developed and implemented an app system on Android platforms for ubiquitous healthcare services for CRC screening. It can assist people in achieving early screening, diagnosis, and treatment purposes, prevent the occurrence of complications, and thus reach the goal of

  13. Colorectal cancer screening of the general population in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasushi; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Li, Xiao-Bo; Wong, Martin C S; Chiu, Han-Mo; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Utsumi, Takahiro; Hattori, Santa; Sano, Wataru; Iwatate, Mineo; Chiu, Philip; Sung, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been increasing, and CRC has been becoming the major cause of cancer deaths in Asian countries. Therefore, an organized screening program to reduce CRC incidence and mortality is currently implemented in each country. In the present review, we summarize the current status and future perspectives of CRC screening of the general population in East Asian and South-East Asian countries. The fecal occult blood test is widely used for CRC screening in these countries, and its effectiveness in reducing CRC incidence and mortality has been demonstrated; however, the low participation rate in CRC screening programs is a problem to be solved in every country. Improvement in the public awareness of CRC and promotion of CRC screening by physicians will help to raise the participation rate and reduce the number of deaths caused by CRC. Regarding screening colonoscopy, several studies have recently demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing CRC incidence and mortality. However, at present, CRC screening colonoscopy is not adopted as a primary population-based screening tool because of staffing constraints in relation to large population sizes, increased medical costs, and potential adverse events (e.g. perforation and drug-induced anaphylaxis). Further study is required to consider colonoscopy as CRC screening that is established in Western countries. PMID:26595883

  14. Preferences for colorectal cancer screening strategies: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Hol, L; de Bekker-Grob, E W; van Dam, L; Donkers, B; Kuipers, E J; Habbema, J D F; Steyerberg, E W; van Leerdam, M E; Essink-Bot, M L

    2010-01-01

    Background: Guidelines underline the role of individual preferences in the selection of a screening test, as insufficient evidence is available to recommend one screening test over another. We conducted a study to determine the preferences of individuals and to predict uptake for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programmes using various screening tests. Methods: A discrete choice experiment (DCE) questionnaire was distributed among naive subjects, yet to be screened, and previously screened subjects, aged 50–75 years. Subjects were asked to choose between scenarios on the basis of faecal occult blood test (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS), total colonoscopy (TC) with various test-specific screening intervals and mortality reductions, and no screening (opt-out). Results: In total, 489 out of 1498 (33%) screening-naïve subjects (52% male; mean age±s.d. 61±7 years) and 545 out of 769 (71%) previously screened subjects (52% male; mean age±s.d. 61±6 years) returned the questionnaire. The type of screening test, screening interval, and risk reduction of CRC-related mortality influenced subjects' preferences (all P<0.05). Screening-naive and previously screened subjects equally preferred 5-yearly FS and 10-yearly TC (P=0.24; P=0.11), but favoured both strategies to annual FOBT screening (all P-values <0.001) if, based on the literature, realistic risk reduction of CRC-related mortality was applied. Screening-naive and previously screened subjects were willing to undergo a 10-yearly TC instead of a 5-yearly FS to obtain an additional risk reduction of CRC-related mortality of 45% (P<0.001). Conclusion: These data provide insight into the extent by which interval and risk reduction of CRC-related mortality affect preferences for CRC screening tests. Assuming realistic test characteristics, subjects in the target population preferred endoscopic screening over FOBT screening, partly, due to the more favourable risk reduction of CRC-related mortality by endoscopy

  15. Equity and practice issues in colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Buchman, Sandy; Rozmovits, Linda; Glazier, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate overall colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates, patterns in the use of types of CRC screening, and sociodemographic characteristics associated with CRC screening; and to gain insight into physicians’ perceptions about and use of fecal occult blood testing [FOBT] and colonoscopy for patients at average risk of CRC. Design Mixed-methods study using cross-sectional administrative data on patient sociodemographic characteristics and semistructured telephone interviews with physicians. Setting Toronto, Ont. Participants Patients aged 50 to 74 years and physicians in family health teams in the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network. Main outcome measures Rates of CRC screening by type; sociodemographic characteristics associated with CRC screening; thematic analysis using constant comparative method for semistructured interviews. Main findings Ontario administrative data on CRC screening showed lower overall screening rates among those who were younger, male patients, those who had lower income, and recent immigrants. Colonoscopy rates were especially low among those with lower income and those who were recent immigrants. Semistructured interviews revealed that physician opinions about CRC screening for average-risk patients were divided: one group of physicians accepted the evidence and recommendations for FOBT and the other group of physicians strongly supported colonoscopy for these patients, believing that the FOBT was an inferior screening method. Physicians identified specialist recommendations and patient expectations as factors that influenced their decisions regarding CRC screening type. Conclusion There was considerable variation in CRC screening by sociodemographic characteristics. A key theme that emerged from the interviews was that physicians were divided in their preference for FOBT or colonoscopy; factors that influenced physician preference included the health care system, recommendations by other

  16. Comparison of screen-detected and interval colorectal cancers in the Bowel Cancer Screening Programme

    PubMed Central

    Gill, M D; Bramble, M G; Rees, C J; Lee, T J W; Bradburn, D M; Mills, S J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP) offers biennial faecal occult blood testing (FOBt) followed by colonoscopy after positive results. Colorectal cancers (CRCs) registered with the Northern Colorectal Cancer Audit Group database were cross-referenced with the BCSP database to analyse their screening history. Methods: The CRCs in the screening population between April 2007 and March 2010 were identified and classified into four groups: control (diagnosed before first screening invite), screen-detected, interval (diagnosed between screening rounds after a negative FOBt), and non-uptake (declined screening). Patient demographics, tumour characteristics and survival were compared between groups. Results: In all, 511 out of 1336 (38.2%) CRCs were controls; 825 (61.8%) were in individuals invited for screening of which 322 (39.0%) were screen detected, 311 (37.7%) were in the non-uptake group, and 192 (23.3%) were interval cancers. Compared with the control and interval cancer group, the screen-detected group had a higher proportion of men (P=0.002, P=0.003 respectively), left colon tumours (P=0.007, P=0.003), and superior survival (both P<0.001). There was no difference in demographics, tumour location/stage, or survival between control and interval groups. Conclusion: The FOBt is better at detecting cancers in the left colon and in men. The significant numbers of interval cancers weren't found to have an improved outcome compared with the non-screened population. PMID:22782347

  17. Determinants of colorectal cancer screening behavior among Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ellen J; Friedman, Lois C; Green, Charles E

    2006-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Chinese Americans and is the third leading cause of cancer death in this population. The objectives of this study were to determine the rates of CRC screening (via fecal occult blood test (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSIG), and colonoscopy) among Chinese Americans and predictors of utilizing these screening procedures. Participants (N = 206) completed a self-administered questionnaire assessing cancer screening behaviors and beliefs about perceived risk of developing cancer and treatment efficacy. A series of logistic regressions indicated that physician recommendation to obtain CRC screening significantly predicted whether Chinese Americans undergo FOBT, FSIG, or colonoscopy screening (p < 0.001). Acculturation and perceived risk of developing CRC did not predict obtaining any of the screening procedures. FOBT was the most commonly reported screening method used by respondents (65%), followed by FSIG (54%) and colonoscopy (49%). These findings highlight the need to make physicians more aware of the impact their recommendations have in determining CRC screening behavior among Chinese Americans. PMID:16143960

  18. Intraurban influences on physician colorectal cancer screening practices.

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Sherri Sheinfeld; Ashford, Alfred R.; Lantigua, Rafael; Hajiani, Farida; Franco, Rebeca; Heck, Julia E.; Gemson, Donald

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community social and economic resources influence colorectal (CRC) screening decisions by physicians and patients. The aim of this study is to systematically assess the differences in screening recommendations of primary care physicians within two urban communities that are distinct in socioeconomic characteristics. METHODS: Two-hundred-sixty-four primary care community (i.e., not hospital-based) physicians were stratified by community. Using self-report questionnaires, we examined primary care physicians' CRC screening practices, knowledge of risk factors and perceived physician and patient barriers to screening, Physicians practicing in upper-socioeconomic status (SES) communities were compared with those of participants practicing in lower SES communities. RESULTS: Physicians practicing in low-SES urban communities were significantly more likely to screen with fecal occult blood test than were physicians in upper-SES areas. Alternatively, upper-SES physicians were significantly more likely to recommend screening colonoscopy than were lower-SES physicians. The number of physicians (N=11) who screened for CRC using the double-contrast barium enema were few. CONCLUSIONS: Community-level SES influences physician cancer screening practices. Further understanding of these relationships may guide the development of interventions targeted to specific neighborhoods within urban areas. PMID:18229773

  19. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Knudsen, Amy; Brenner, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    There are several modalities available for a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program. When determining which CRC screening program to implement, the costs of such programs should be considered in comparison to the health benefits they are expected to provide. Cost-effectiveness analysis provides a tool to do this. In this paper we review the evidence on the cost-effectiveness of CRC screening. Published studies universally indicate that when compared with no CRC screening, all screening modalities provide additional years of life at a cost that is deemed acceptable by most industrialized nations. Many recent studies even find CRC screening to be cost-saving. However, when the alternative CRC screening strategies are compared against each other in an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis, no single optimal strategy emerges across the studies. There is consensus that the new technologies of stool DNA testing, computed tomographic colonography and capsule endoscopy are not yet cost-effective compared with the established CRC screening tests. PMID:20833348

  20. Interval cancers in a national colorectal cancer screening programme

    PubMed Central

    Stanners, Greig; Lang, Jaroslaw; Brewster, David H; Carey, Francis A; Fraser, Callum G

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about interval cancers (ICs) in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify IC characteristics and compare these with screen-detected cancers (SCs) and cancers in non-participants (NPCs) over the same time period. Design This was an observational study done in the first round of the Scottish Bowel Screening Programme. All individuals (772,790), aged 50–74 years, invited to participate between 1 January 2007 and 31 May 2009 were studied by linking their screening records with confirmed CRC records in the Scottish Cancer Registry (SCR). Characteristics of SC, IC and NPC were determined. Results There were 555 SCs, 502 ICs and 922 NPCs. SCs were at an earlier stage than ICs and NPCs (33.9% Dukes’ A as against 18.7% in IC and 11.3% in NPC), screening preferentially detected cancers in males (64.7% as against 52.8% in IC and 59.7% in NPC): this was independent of a different cancer site distribution in males and females. SC in the colon were less advanced than IC, but not in the rectum. Conclusion ICs account for 47.5% of the CRCs in the screened population, indicating approximately 50% screening test sensitivity: guaiac faecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) sensitivity is less for women than for men and gFOBT screening may not be effective for rectal cancer.

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening and State Health Insurance Mandates.

    PubMed

    Hamman, Mary K; Kapinos, Kandice A

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most deadly cancer in the USA. CRC screening is the most effective way to prevent CRC death, but compliance with recommended screenings is very low. In this study, we investigate whether CRC screening behavior changed under state mandated private insurance coverage of CRC screening in a sample of insured adults from the 1997 to 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS). We present difference-in-difference-in-differences (DDD) estimates that compare insured individuals age 51 to 64 to Medicare age-eligible individuals (ages 66 to 75) in mandate and non-mandate states over time. Our DDD estimates suggest endoscopic screening among men increased by 2 to 3 percentage points under mandated coverage among 51 to 64 year olds relative to their Medicare age-eligible counterparts. We find no clear evidence of changes in screening behavior among women. DD estimates suggest no evidence of a mandate effect on either type of CRC screening for men or women. PMID:25521438

  2. Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening by Using Community Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Mira L.; Tatum, Cathy; Dickinson, Stephanie L.; Murray, David M.; Long-Foley, Kristie; Cooper, M. Robert; Daven, Morgan; Paskett, Electra D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The goal of the Carolinas Cancer Education and Screening (CARES) Project was to improve colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among low-income women in subsidized housing communities in 11 cities in North and South Carolina who were traditionally underserved by cancer control efforts. METHODS Cross-sectional samples were randomly selected from housing authority lists at 5 timepoints in this nonrandomized community-based intervention study. Face-to-face interviews focused on CRC knowledge, beliefs, barriers to screening, and screening behaviors. The intervention components were based on a previous evidence-based program. RESULTS A total of 2098 surveys were completed. Seventy-eight percent of the respondents were African American, 62% were 65+ years, and 4% were married. At baseline, the rate of CRC screening within guidelines was 49.3% and physician recommendation was the strongest predictor (odds ratio [OR] = 21.9) of being within guidelines. There was an increase in positive beliefs about CRC screening (P =.010) and in the intention to complete CRC screening in the next 12 months (P =.053) after the intervention. The odds of being within CRC screening guidelines for women living in a city that had received the intervention were not significantly different from women living in a city that had not received the intervention (P =.496). CONCLUSIONS Although CRC screening rates were not significantly better after the intervention, there was a positive change in beliefs about screening and intention to be screened. The results suggest that the dissemination of an evidence-based behavioral intervention may require a longer duration to engage hard-to-reach populations and change behaviors. PMID:17665496

  3. Capsule endoscopy compared with conventional colonoscopy for detection of colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Andreas

    2011-05-16

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) may be a means to overcome the low adherence to colorectal cancer screening. The device is an ingestible capsule with a video camera at both ends that can take photographs as it progresses through the gastrointestinal tract. PillCam colon (PCC1) may be used for structural evaluation of the large bowel following an adequate cleaning procedure. PCC1 measures 11 mm × 31 mm and has dual cameras that enable the device to acquire video images from both ends with a wide coverage area, automatic light control and a frame rate of four frames per second. The system includes a sensor array and data recorder connected to the patient during the procedure. The recorded data are downloaded to the Given Imaging Rapid workstation for review of the colon video. The second generation of PillCam Colon (PCC2) is similar to PCC1 and incorporates new developments. The angle of view has been increased to 172 degrees. It has an adaptive frame rate, alternating from 35 frames per second while in motion to 4 images when virtually stationary. The new RAPID(®) software now includes a simple graphic interface tool for polyp size estimation. The procedure of bowel cleansing until capsule ingestion is similar to that used for traditional colonoscopy. However it is more rigorous as the bowel cleanliness for capsule colonoscopy has to be excellent or at least good to result in an adequate sensitivity of the method. Briefly, it consists of 3.5-4 L of split dose polyethylene glycol. Oral NaP boosters are administered after 1-2 h if the capsule has entered the small bowel. Sodium phosphate (NaP) seems to be a necessary adjunct to the regimen because the total transit time is doubled without NaP. The cleansing level was considered to be good to excellent in 72%-88% in studies with PCC1. The sensitivity for significant polyps (> 6 mm or more than 3 polyps >3 mm) ranged from 63%-88% with specificities between 64%-94%. PCC2 showed an improved sensitivity of 89% and a

  4. Screening for colorectal cancer in Italy: 2011-2012 survey.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Manuel; Mangone, Lucia; Sassatelli, Romano; Baracco, Susanna; Budroni, Mario; Castaing, Marine; Cirilli, Claudia; Cusimano, Rosanna; Fusco, Mario; Giacomin, Adriano; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Naldoni, Carlo; Pannozzo, Fabio; Piffer, Silvano; Puppo, Antonella; Tisano, Francesco; Zappa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We utilised the IMPATTO study's archives to describe the 2000-2008 colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rate trends in Italy, once screening programmes based on the faecal immunochemical test were implemented in different areas. Data on CRCs diagnosed in Italy from 2000 to 2008 in subjects aged 40-79 years were collected by 23 cancer registries. Incidence rate trends were evaluated as a whole and by macro-area (North-Centre and South-Islands), presence of a screening programme, sex, ten-year age class, anatomic site, stage at diagnosis, and pattern of diagnosis (screen-detected, non-screen-detected). The annual percent change (APC) of incidence rate trends, with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), were computed. The study included 46,857 CRCs diagnosed in subjects aged 40-79 years, of which 2,806 were screen-detected. The incidence rates in the North-Centre were higher than in the South and on the Islands. During the study period, screening programmes had been implemented only in the North-Centre and had a significant effect on incidence rates, with an initial sharp increase in incidence, followed by a decrease that started in the 3rd-4th years of screening. These incidence rate trends were exclusively due to modifications in the rates of stage I cases. After screening programmes started, incidence increased in all anatomic sites, particularly in the distal colon. The differential figures introduced by the implementation of screening programmes warrant a continuous surveillance of CRC incidence and mortality trends to monitor the impact of screening at a national level. PMID:26405783

  5. The Association of Perceived Provider-Patient Communication and Relationship Quality with Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two-thirds of adults aged 50 years and older are adherent to recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Provider-patient communication and characteristics of the patient-provider relationship may relate to screening behavior. Methods: The association of provider communication quality, relationship, and colorectal cancer screening…

  6. Clinical Perspectives on Colorectal Cancer Screening at Latino-Serving Federally Qualified Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Petrik, Amanda F.; Spofford, Mark; Talbot, Jocelyn; Do, Huyen Hoai; Taylor, Victoria M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States, and rates of screening for colorectal cancer are low. We sought to gather the perceptions of clinic personnel at Latino-serving Federally Qualified Health Centers (operating 17 clinics) about barriers to utilization of screening services for colorectal…

  7. Understanding Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening in Kentucky

    PubMed Central

    Kanotra, Sarojini; Siameh, Seth; Jones, Jessica; Thompson, Becki; Thomas-Cox, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer screening rates have increased significantly in Kentucky, from 35% in 1999 to 66% in 2012. A continued improvement in screening requires identification of existing barriers and implementation of interventions to address barriers. Methods The state of Kentucky added a question to the 2012 Kentucky Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey for respondents aged 50 years or older who answered no to ever having been screened for colorectal cancer by colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy to assess the reasons why respondents had not been screened. Combined responses constituted 4 categories: attitudes and beliefs, health care provider and health care systems barriers, cost, and other. Prevalence estimates for barriers were calculated by using raking weights and were stratified by race/ethnicity, sex, education, income, and health insurance coverage. Logistic regression estimated odds ratios for barriers to screening. Results The most common barriers in all areas were related to attitudes and beliefs, followed by health care provider and systems, and cost. Non-Hispanic whites and respondents with more than a high school education were more likely to choose attitudes and beliefs as a barrier than were non-Hispanic blacks and those with less than a high school education. Respondents with low incomes and with no insurance were significantly more likely to select cost as a barrier. No significant associations were observed between demographic variables and the selection of a health care provider and a health care system. Conclusion Barriers related to education, race/ethnicity, income, and insurance coverage should be considered when designing interventions. Expansion of Medicaid and implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Kentucky could have an impact on reducing these barriers. PMID:26086608

  8. Developments in Screening Tests and Strategies for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sovich, Justin L.; Sartor, Zachary; Misra, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    Background. Worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and second most common in women. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer mortality. In the United States, CRC is the third most common cause of cancer and second most common cause of cancer mortality. Incidence and mortality rates have steadily fallen, primarily due to widespread screening. Methods. We conducted keyword searches on PubMed in four categories of CRC screening: stool, endoscopic, radiologic, and serum, as well as news searches in Medscape and Google News. Results. Colonoscopy is the gold standard for CRC screening and the most common method in the United States. Technological improvements continue to be made, including the promising “third-eye retroscope.” Fecal occult blood remains widely used, particularly outside the United States. The first at-home screen, a fecal DNA screen, has also recently been approved. Radiological methods are effective but seldom used due to cost and other factors. Serum tests are largely experimental, although at least one is moving closer to market. Conclusions. Colonoscopy is likely to remain the most popular screening modality for the immediate future, although its shortcomings will continue to spur innovation in a variety of modalities. PMID:26504799

  9. Preferences and acceptance of colorectal cancer screening in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Saengow, Udomsak; Chongsuwiwatvong, Virasakdi; Geater, Alan; Birch, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is now common in Thailand with an increase in incidence over time. Health authorities are planning to implement a nationwide CRC screening program using fecal immunochemical test (FIT) as a primary screening tool. This study aimed to estimate preferences and acceptance of FIT and colonoscopy, explore factors influencing the acceptance, and investigate reasons behind choosing and rejecting to screen before the program was implemented. Patients aged 50-69, visiting the primary care unit during the study period, were invited to join this study. Patients with a history of cancer or past CRC screening were excluded. Face-to-face interviews were conducted. Subjects were informed about CRC and the screening tests: FIT and colonoscopy. Then, they were asked for their opinions regarding the screening. The total number of subjects was 437 (86.7% response rate). Fifty-eight percent were females. The median age was 58 years. FIT was accepted by 74.1% of subjects compared to 55.6% for colonoscopy. The acceptance of colonoscopy was associated with perceived susceptibility to CRC and family history of cancer. No symptoms, unwilling to screen, healthy, too busy and anxious about diagnosis were reasons for refusing to screen. FIT was preferred for its simplicity and non-invasiveness compared with colonoscopy. Those rejecting FIT expressed a strong preference for colonoscopy. Subjects chose colonoscopy because of its accuracy; it was refused for the process and complications. If the screening program is implemented for the entire target population in Thailand, we estimate that 106,546 will have a positive FIT, between 8,618 and 12,749 identified with advanced adenoma and between 2,645 and 3,912 identified with CRC in the first round of the program. PMID:25824749

  10. Screening for colorectal cancer in Italy: 2011-2012 survey.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Manuel; Da Re, Filippo; Mantellini, Paola; Naldoni, Carlo; Sassoli De'Bianchi, Priscilla; Senore, Carlo; Turrin, Anna; Visioli, Carmen Beatriz; Zappa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present the main results of the 2011-2012 survey of the Italian screening programmes for colorectal cancer carried out by the National centre for screening monitoring (Osservatorio nazionale screening, ONS) on behalf of the Ministry of Health. By the end of 2012, 112 programmes were active, of which 11 had been activated during 2012 and 4 during 2011. The national theoretical extension increased from 66% of Italians aged 50-69 years residing in areas covered by organized screening programmes in 2010 to 73.7% in 2012. The majority of programmes employ the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), while some have adopted flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) once in a lifetime and FIT for non-responders to FS. Overall, about 7,744,000 subjects were invited to undergo FIT, 53.1% of those to be invited within the two years. The adjusted attendance rate was 47.1%and 3,531,937 subjects were screened. Large differences in the attendance rate were observed among regions. Positivity rate of FIT programmes was 5.2% at first screening (range: 1.0-12.4%) and 4.0% at repeat screening (range: 3.4-6.4%). The average attendance rate to total colonoscopy (TC) was 81.2% and in two regions (Molise and Campania) it was lower than 70%. Completion rate for total colonoscopy (TC) was 91%. Among the 1,316,327 subjects attending screening for the first time, the detection rate (DR) per 1,000 screened subjects was 2.0 for invasive cancer and 9.1 ‰ for advanced adenomas (AA, adenomas with a diameter ≥1 cm, with villous/tubulo-villous type or high-grade dysplasia). As expected, the corresponding figures in the 2,215,610 subjects at repeat screening were lower (1.0‰ and 6.8‰ for invasive cancer and AA, respectively). Many programmes reported some difficulties in guaranteeing TC in the appropriate time frame to FIT+ subjects: in 15% of cases the waiting time was longer than two months. Ten programmes in 2011 and eight in 2012 employed FS as the screening test: 24,549 subjects were screened in the two

  11. MicroRNAs as non-invasive screening biomarkers of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SAPLACAN, ROBERTA MARIA MANZAT; MIRCEA, PETRU ADRIAN; BALACESCU, LOREDANA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated deaths in the world. Early detection would be greatly enhanced if accurate and cost-effective diagnostic biomarkers for this disease were accessible. The development of such a blood test will evidently lower the screening costs in regards of colorectal cancer detection. Lately, it has been suggested that microRNA diagnostic biomarkers are feasible new screening methods for colorectal cancer. This review summarizes the diagnostic potential of circulating microRNA biomarkers in relation with colorectal cancer, as well as current methods to detect them. PMID:26733742

  12. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and retinoid X receptor expression in human colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, K F; Langman, M J; Williams, G R

    1995-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (D3) protects against colorectal carcinogenesis. Animal and in vitro studies show an antiproliferative effect of D3 in a variety of tumours including those of large bowel origin. D3 actions are mediated by D3 receptors (VDR) alone or by VDR in conjunction with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) in all D3 responsive tissues. The expression of mRNAs encoding VDR and RXRs in normal and malignant human colorectum was determined. Full length VDR (4.6 kB), RXR alpha (5.5 kB), and RXR gamma (3.5 and 7 kB) mRNAs were expressed in all tissues, but RXR beta mRNA was not expressed in any. VDR expression was reduced in 12 carcinomas relative to paired normal mucosa, and RXR alpha expression was reduced in nine. There was no correlation between VDR or RXR alpha expression and the site, grade of differentiation, or Dukes's staging of the tumour. The finding of persistent VDR and RXR coexpression in all colorectal tumours provides a rational basis for exploring a role for D3 in the treatment of colorectal malignancy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7883226

  13. Colorectal cancer screening with odour material by canine scent detection

    PubMed Central

    Kohnoe, Shunji; Yamazato, Tetsuro; Satoh, Yuji; Morizono, Gouki; Shikata, Kentaro; Morita, Makoto; Watanabe, Akihiro; Morita, Masaru; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Fumio; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Objective Early detection and early treatment are of vital importance to the successful treatment of various cancers. The development of a novel screening method that is as economical and non-invasive as the faecal occult blood test (FOBT) for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed. A study was undertaken using canine scent detection to determine whether odour material can become an effective tool in CRC screening. Design Exhaled breath and watery stool samples were obtained from patients with CRC and from healthy controls prior to colonoscopy. Each test group consisted of one sample from a patient with CRC and four control samples from volunteers without cancer. These five samples were randomly and separately placed into five boxes. A Labrador retriever specially trained in scent detection of cancer and a handler cooperated in the tests. The dog first smelled a standard breath sample from a patient with CRC, then smelled each sample station and sat down in front of the station in which a cancer scent was detected. Results 33 and 37 groups of breath and watery stool samples, respectively, were tested. Among patients with CRC and controls, the sensitivity of canine scent detection of breath samples compared with conventional diagnosis by colonoscopy was 0.91 and the specificity was 0.99. The sensitivity of canine scent detection of stool samples was 0.97 and the specificity was 0.99. The accuracy of canine scent detection was high even for early cancer. Canine scent detection was not confounded by current smoking, benign colorectal disease or inflammatory disease. Conclusions This study shows that a specific cancer scent does indeed exist and that cancer-specific chemical compounds may be circulating throughout the body. These odour materials may become effective tools in CRC screening. In the future, studies designed to identify cancer-specific volatile organic compounds will be important for the development of new methods for early detection of CRC

  14. Designing Colorectal Cancer Screening Decision Support: A Cognitive Engineering Enterprise

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Laura G.; Saleem, Jason J.; Borders, Morgan R.; Sushereba, Christen E.; Haverkamp, Donald; Wolf, Steven P.; Doebbeling, Bradley N.

    2016-01-01

    Adoption of clinical decision support has been limited. Important barriers include an emphasis on algorithmic approaches to decision support that do not align well with clinical work flow and human decision strategies, and the expense and challenge of developing, implementing, and refining decision support features in existing electronic health records (EHRs). We applied decision-centered design to create a modular software application to support physicians in managing and tracking colorectal cancer screening. Using decision-centered design facilitates a thorough understanding of cognitive support requirements from an end user perspective as a foundation for design. In this project, we used an iterative design process, including ethnographic observation and cognitive task analysis, to move from an initial design concept to a working modular software application called the Screening & Surveillance App. The beta version is tailored to work with the Veterans Health Administration’s EHR Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS). Primary care providers using the beta version Screening & Surveillance App more accurately answered questions about patients and found relevant information more quickly compared to those using CPRS alone. Primary care providers also reported reduced mental effort and rated the Screening & Surveillance App positively for usability. PMID:26973441

  15. The history of colorectal cancer screening: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Sidney J

    2015-03-01

    The present explosive interest in screening for colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most prevalent and preventable cancers, had its beginnings at a hospital in London and an Internist's office in Ohio. Demonstrated there were the concepts that CRC did not occur de-novo but arose from a premalignant polyp, that detection of the resultant cancer at an earlier stage was associated with better survival and that cancer could be detected at an early presymptomatic stage by screening. Many years later, the introduction of colonoscopy and colonoscopic polypectomy provided the opportunity for randomized trials to prove that these concepts were true. The sequence of rigorous science followed by guidelines consensus and then multilevel national efforts of screening implementation has resulted in a decline in the CRC incidence and mortality worldwide, most significantly in the USA. Campaigns have been initiated to maximize population screening and further investigate its optimal approach. Some historical details of this success story and many of the key participants are presented in this paper. PMID:25599958

  16. Iron homeostasis and distal colorectal adenoma risk in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Sinha, Rashmi; Wood, Richard J; Xue, Xiaonan; Huang, Wen-Yi; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B; Gunter, Marc J

    2011-09-01

    Red meat consumption has been positively associated with colorectal cancer; however, the biological mechanism underlying this relationship is not understood. Red meat is a major source of iron, which may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis via increased crypt cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, and endogenous N-nitrosation. In a nested case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, we prospectively evaluated multiple iron exposure parameters, including dietary intake and serum measures of iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) in relation to incident colorectal adenoma in 356 cases and 396 matched polyp-free controls. We also investigated variation in eight key genes involved in iron homeostasis in relation to colorectal adenoma in an additional series totaling 1,126 cases and 1,173 matched controls. We observed a positive association between red meat intake and colorectal adenoma [OR comparing extreme quartiles (OR(q4-q1)) = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.02-2.49, P(trend) = 0.03]. Serum TIBC and UIBC were inversely associated with colorectal adenoma (OR(q4-q1) = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.37-0.88, P(trend) = 0.03; and OR(q4-q1) = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.40-0.95, P(trend) = 0.04, respectively). Colorectal adenoma was not associated with serum ferritin, iron, or transferrin saturation or with polymorphisms in genes involved in iron homeostasis. Serum TIBC and UIBC, parameters that have a reciprocal relationship with overall iron load, were inversely related to colorectal adenoma, suggesting that individuals with lower iron status have a reduced risk of developing colorectal adenoma. PMID:21685236

  17. Gender and race/ethnicity affect the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Theuer, Charles P.; Taylor, Thomas H.; Brewster, Wendy R.; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Colorectal cancer screening beginning at age 50 is recommended for all Americans considered at average risk for the development of colorectal cancer regardless of gender or race/ethnicity. We determined the influence of gender and race/ethnicity on the cost-effectiveness of recommended colorectal cancer screening regimens. METHODS: We determined age-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates; the proportion of left-sided cancers; and the proportion of localized cancers in Asian, black, Latino and white men and women using the California Cancer Registry. We incorporated these data and available data for life expectancy and colorectal cancer survival to model the cost-effectiveness of two 35-year colorectal cancer-screening interventions. RESULTS: Age-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates were highest in black men and lowest in Latino women. Screening beginning at age 50 was most cost-effective in black men and least cost-effective in Latino women (measured as dollars spent per year of life saved) using annual fecal occult blood testing combined with flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years and using colonoscopy every 10 years. The cost-effectiveness of a 35-year screening program in black men beginning at age 45 was similar to the cost-effectiveness of screening white men and black women beginning at age 50 and more cost-effective than screening nonblack women as well as Asian and Latino men beginning at age 50. CONCLUSIONS: Screening is most cost-effective in black men because of high age-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates. Initiation of colorectal cancer screening in this high-risk group prior to age 50 should be strongly considered. PMID:16532978

  18. Patient Test Preference for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Screening Uptake in an Insured Urban Minority Population.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Randi L; Basch, Charles E; Zybert, Patricia; Basch, Corey H; Ullman, Ralph; Shmukler, Celia; King, Fionnuala; Neugut, Alfred I

    2016-06-01

    The study examines the role of patient colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test preference and CRC screening uptake in an insured, urban minority population. Study subjects were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to promote CRC screening. The interventions were educational, with an emphasis on colonoscopy screening. Subjects were 50+ years of age, fully insured for CRC screening, and out of compliance with current CRC screening recommendations. This paper includes those who answered a question about CRC screening test preference and indicated that they intended to receive such a test in the coming year (n = 453). CRC screening uptake was ascertained from medical claims data. Regardless of test preference, few received CRC screening (22.3 %). Those preferring the home stool test (HST) were less likely to get tested than those preferring a colonoscopy (16.6 vs 29.9 %, χ(2) = 9.9, p = .002). Preference for HST was more strongly associated with beliefs about colonoscopy than with knowledge about colonoscopy. In the context of an RCT emphasizing colonoscopy screening for CRC, patients expressing a preference for HST are at heightened risk of remaining unscreened. Colonoscopy should be recommended as the preferred CRC test, but HSTs should be accessible and encouraged for patients who are averse to colonoscopy.Clinical trials.gov: Identifier: NCT02392143. PMID:26585609

  19. [Participation factors in a occupational health colorectal cancer screening program].

    PubMed

    Fabre, D; Faliu, B; Grosclaude, P; Gaston-Jeanzac, F; Couaillac, J P; Machelard-Sauvage, M

    1999-12-01

    A colorectal cancer screening campaign by Hemoccult test was carried out from January 1993 to December 1994 in collaboration with the company doctors of employees ages 45 and older in the companies of the Lot department of France. Of the 1311 employees to whom the test was offered, 811 actually had the test done, representing a rate of participation of 61.9%. Participation varied from 48.1% to 72.7% depending on the company doctor, and was higher for large companies. Managers participated less than other employees. People who never visit a dentist, who had not seen their doctor for over a year or who never give blood participated less than others. Thus, even though company doctors can play a true role by favouring the participation of general employees, their action is limited by the weak participation of people who already have little contact with the health care system. PMID:10798178

  20. [Device for intraarterial access for locoregional chemotherapy in hepatic metastasis from colorectal neoplasms (technical note)].

    PubMed

    Piccinini, E E; Ugolini, G; Rosati, G; Conti, A

    1994-01-01

    Metastasis are the most common malignant lesions of the liver. Liver is the most common site of visceral metastasis from colo-rectal carcinoma. Only in few patients are the lesions surgically resectable for cure and standard intravenous chemotherapy produces a low response rate. An intrahepatic arterial device for regional chemotherapy is an effective and safe alternative for unresectable liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma, with a significant improvement on response rates compared with conventional i.v. chemotherapy; a longer survival is also reported in patients receiving intrahepatic therapy, even if the difference is not statistically significant. The catheter is inserted through the gastro-duodenal artery and the reservoir is placed in a subcutaneous pocket on the anterior thoracic wall. The Authors discuss indications, implantation technique and complications. Intra-arterial chemotherapy is administered in ambulatorial regimen and scintigraphic scanning and/or epatic ultrasonography are performed every three months to evaluate response rate. Median survival is variable from 12 to 17 months in the different series with response rates (disappeared metastases or tumor-mass reduction over 50%) of 48%-62%. The increased tumor responses reported together with a lower systemic toxicity (compared with systemic therapy) suggest that intra-arterial chemotherapy is a reliable and well tolerated treatment. PMID:7887590

  1. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics. PMID:24761922

  2. Outreach and Inreach Organized Service Screening Programs for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chu-Kuang; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Chiu, Han-Mo; Chuang, Shu-Lin; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wu, Chien-Yuan; Chia, Shu-Li; Lee, Yi-Chia; Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Background Outreach (i.e., to invite those who do not use, or who under use screening services) and inreach (i.e., to invite an existing population who have already accessed the medical system) approaches may influence people to increase their use of screening test; however, whether their outcomes would be equivalent remains unclear. Methods A total of 3,363,896 subjects, 50–69 years of age, participated in a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program using biennial fecal immunochemical tests; 34.5% participated during 2004–2009 when the outreach approach alone was used, and 65.5% participated from 2010–2013 when outreach was integrated with an inreach approach. We compared the outcomes of the two approaches in delivery of screening services. Results Coverage rates increased from 21.4% to 36.9% and the positivity rate increased from 4.0% to 7.9%, while referral for confirmatory diagnostic examinations declined from 80.0% to 53.3%. The first period detected CRC in 0.20% of subjects screened, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 6.1%, and the second detected CRC in 0.34% of subjects, with a PPV of 8.0%. After adjusting for confounders, differences were observed in the PPV for CRC (adjusted relative risk, 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41–1.60), cancer detection rate (1.20; 95% CI, 1.13–1.27), and interval cancer rate (0.72; 95% CI, 0.65–0.80). When we focused on the comparison between two approaches during the same study period of 2010–2013, the positivity rate of fecal testing (8.2% vs. 7.6%) and the PPV for CRC detection remained higher (1.07; 95% CI, 1.01–1.12) in subjects who were recruited from the inreach approach. Conclusions Outcomes of screening were equivalent or better after integration of outreach and inreach approaches. Impact The results will encourage makers of health-care policy to adopt the integration approach to deliver screening services. PMID:27171410

  3. Colorectal Cancer Screening Based on Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C.S.; Ching, Jessica Y.L.; Chan, Victor C.W.; Lam, Thomas Y.T.; Luk, Arthur K.C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S.M.; Wu, Justin C.Y.; Chan, Francis K.L.; Sung, Joseph J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated whether age- and gender-based colorectal cancer screening is cost-effective. Recent studies in the United States identified age and gender as 2 important variables predicting advanced proximal neoplasia, and that women aged <60 to 70 years were more suited for sigmoidoscopy screening due to their low risk of proximal neoplasia. Yet, quantitative assessment of the incremental benefits, risks, and cost remains to be performed. Primary care screening practice (2008–2015). A Markov modeling was constructed using data from a screening cohort. The following strategies were compared according to the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) for 1 life-year saved: flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) 5 yearly; colonoscopy 10 yearly; FS for each woman at 50- and 55-year old followed by colonoscopy at 60- and 70-year old; FS for each woman at 50-, 55-, 60-, and 65-year old followed by colonoscopy at 70-year old; FS for each woman at 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, and 70-year old. All male subjects received colonoscopy at 50-, 60-, and 70-year old under strategies 3 to 5. From a hypothetical population of 100,000 asymptomatic subjects, strategy 2 could save the largest number of life-years (4226 vs 2268 to 3841 by other strategies). When compared with no screening, strategy 5 had the lowest ICER (US$42,515), followed by strategy 3 (US$43,517), strategy 2 (US$43,739), strategy 4 (US$47,710), and strategy 1 (US$56,510). Strategy 2 leads to the highest number of bleeding and perforations, and required a prohibitive number of colonoscopy procedures. Strategy 5 remains the most cost-effective when assessed with a wide range of deterministic sensitivity analyses around the base case. From the cost effectiveness analysis, FS for women and colonoscopy for men represent an economically favorable screening strategy. These findings could inform physicians and policy-makers in triaging eligible subjects for risk-based screening, especially in countries with limited colonoscopic

  4. Time to benefit for colorectal cancer screening: survival meta-analysis of flexible sigmoidoscopy trials

    PubMed Central

    Boscardin, W John; Stijacic-Cenzer, Irena; Lee, Sei J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the time to benefit of using flexible sigmoidoscopy for colorectal cancer screening. Design Survival meta-analysis. Data sources A Cochrane Collaboration systematic review published in 2013, Medline, and Cochrane Library databases. Eligibility criteria Randomized controlled trials comparing screening flexible sigmoidoscopy with no screening. Trials with fewer than 100 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings were excluded. Results Four studies were eligible (total n=459 814). They were similar for patients’ age (50-74 years), length of follow-up (11.2-11.9 years), and relative risk for colorectal cancer related mortality (0.69-0.78 with flexible sigmoidoscopy screening). For every 1000 people screened at five and 10 years, 0.3 and 1.2 colorectal cancer related deaths, respectively, were prevented. It took 4.3 years (95% confidence interval 2.8 to 5.8) to observe an absolute risk reduction of 0.0002 (one colorectal cancer related death prevented for every 5000 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings). It took 9.4 years (7.6 to 11.3) to observe an absolute risk reduction of 0.001 (one colorectal cancer related death prevented for every 1000 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings). Conclusion Our findings suggest that screening flexible sigmoidoscopy is most appropriate for older adults with a life expectancy greater than approximately 10 years. PMID:25881903

  5. Systematic Review and Meta-study Synthesis of Qualitative Studies Evaluating Facilitators and Barriers to Participation in Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Honein-AbouHaidar, Gladys N; Kastner, Monika; Vuong, Vincent; Perrier, Laure; Daly, Corinne; Rabeneck, Linda; Straus, Sharon; Baxter, Nancy N

    2016-06-01

    Screening reduces the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of colorectal cancer, yet participation tends to be low. We undertook a systematic review and meta-study synthesis of qualitative studies to identify facilitators and barriers to colorectal cancer screening participation. We searched major bibliographic databases for records published in all languages from inception to February 2015. Included primary studies that elicited views and perceptions towards colorectal cancer screening were appraised for relevance and quality. We used a two-stage synthesis to create an interpretation of colorectal cancer screening decisions grounded in primary studies; a thematic analysis to group themes and systematically compare studies and a meta-synthesis to generate an expanded theory of colorectal cancer screening participation. Ninety-four studies were included. The decision to participate in colorectal cancer screening depended on an individual's awareness of colorectal cancer screening. Awareness affected views of cancer, attitudes towards colorectal cancer screening modalities, and motivation for screening. Factors mediating awareness included public education to address misconceptions, primary care physician efforts to recommend screening, and the influence of friends and family. Specific barriers to participation in populations with lower participation rates included language barriers, logistical challenges to attending screening tests, and cultural beliefs. This study identifies key barriers, facilitators, and mediators to colorectal cancer screening participation. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(6); 907-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197277

  6. Decisional Stage Distribution for Colorectal Cancer Screening among Diverse, Low-Income Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, C. M.; Born, W. K.; Yeh, H. W.; Young, K. L.; James, A. S.; Daley, C. M.; Greiner, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening uptake among minorities and those with lower incomes is suboptimal. Behavioral interventions specifically tailored to these populations can increase screening rates and save lives. The Precaution Adoption Process Model (PAPM) allows assignment of a decisional stage for adoption of a behavior such as CRC screening.…

  7. Cognitive mediators linking social support networks to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiko; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    This paper argues that normative considerations are more important than attitudinal factors in engaging colorectal cancer screening, and tests a model explaining how unique cultural expressions of social networks influence screening adherence. Structural equation modeling was used to understand colorectal cancer screening in a population-based sample of 341 Japanese Americans aged 50 and over. The model accounted for 25% of the variance in screening adherence. Adherence was most strongly associated with family/friend subjective norms about colorectal cancer screening use. Emotional family support, but not the size of the networks, was indirectly related to adherence via increased family/friend subjective norms, while emotional friend support was directly related to adherence. While usual source of care was directly associated with adherence, better provider-patient communication was directly and indirectly associated with adherence via increased perceived benefits. The findings of this study support strengthening informal support networks to enhance adherence among Japanese Americans at risk. PMID:16958004

  8. Characteristics of colorectal cancer diagnosed with screening abdominal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; HASEGAWA, RUMIKO; FUGO, KAZUNORI; SHIRAI, YOSHINORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; KISHIMOTO, TAKASHI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Patient records were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the characteristics of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosed with screening abdominal ultrasound (US). Patients diagnosed with CRC using abdominal US [localized irregular wall thickening (W) or a hypoechoic mass with a hyperechoic mass (M)] were enrolled. The patients were subjected to colonoscopy and treated surgically between March, 2010 and January, 2015. A total of 5 men (aged 74.0±0.8 years) and 10 women (aged 73.0±12.0 years) were analyzed. Stratification was analyzed with abdominal US. The threshold value of wall thickness to diagnose CRC was investigated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The average wall thickness was 2.8±0.4 mm in the surrounding normal tissue and 12.7±5.2 mm in CRC (one-way analysis of variance, P<0.0001). The wall was significantly thicker in CRC compared with the normal colonic wall. The calculated threshold value was 4.3 mm for the diagnosis of CRC. Stratification was preserved in W, while it was lost in M (Chi-squared test, P=0.0196). The hemoglobin concentration was lower, while the C-reactive protein, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were elevated above normal values. The threshold value was 4.3 mm for the diagnosis of CRC with abdominal US. PMID:27330768

  9. Sociopsychological Tailoring to Address Colorectal Cancer Screening Disparities: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jerant, Anthony; Kravitz, Richard L.; Sohler, Nancy; Fiscella, Kevin; Romero, Raquel L.; Parnes, Bennett; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Slee, Christina; Dvorak, Simon; Turner, Charles; Hudnut, Andrew; Prieto, Francisco; Franks, Peter

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Interventions tailored to sociopsychological factors associated with health behaviors have promise for reducing colorectal cancer screening disparities, but limited research has assessed their impact in multiethnic populations. We examined whether an interactive multimedia computer program (IMCP) tailored to expanded health belief model sociopsychological factors could promote colorectal cancer screening in a multiethnic sample. METHODS We undertook a randomized controlled trial, comparing an IMCP tailored to colorectal cancer screening self-efficacy, knowledge, barriers, readiness, test preference, and experiences with a nontailored informational program, both delivered before office visits. The primary outcome was record-documented colorectal cancer screening during a 12-month follow-up period. Secondary outcomes included postvisit sociopsychological factor status and discussion, as well as clinician recommendation of screening during office visits. We enrolled 1,164 patients stratified by ethnicity and language (49.3% non-Hispanic, 27.2% Hispanic/English, 23.4% Hispanic/Spanish) from 26 offices around 5 centers (Sacramento, California; Rochester and the Bronx, New York; Denver, Colorado; and San Antonio, Texas). RESULTS Adjusting for ethnicity/language, study center, and the previsit value of the dependent variable, compared with control patients, the IMCP led to significantly greater colorectal cancer screening knowledge, self-efficacy, readiness, test preference specificity, discussion, and recommendation. During the followup period, 132 (23%) IMCP and 123 (22%) control patients received screening (adjusted difference = 0.5 percentage points, 95% CI −4.3 to 5.3). IMCP effects did not differ significantly by ethnicity/language. CONCLUSIONS Sociopsychological factor tailoring was no more effective than nontailored information in encouraging colorectal cancer screening in a multiethnic sample, despite enhancing sociopsychological factors and visit

  10. Population Screening for Colorectal Cancer Means Getting FIT: The Past, Present, and Future of Colorectal Cancer Screening Using the Fecal Immunochemical Test for Hemoglobin (FIT)

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Callum G.; Halloran, Stephen P.; Young, Graeme P.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal immunochemical tests for hemoglobin (FIT) are changing the manner in which colorectal cancer (CRC) is screened. Although these tests are being performed worldwide, why is this test different from its predecessors? What evidence supports its adoption? How can this evidence best be used? This review addresses these questions and provides an understanding of FIT theory and practices to expedite international efforts to implement the use of FIT in CRC screening. PMID:24672652

  11. Fecal DNA testing for colorectal cancer screening: Molecular targets and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Amaninder; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J; Oikonomou, Katerina G; Moshenyat, Yitzchak

    2015-01-01

    The early detection of colorectal cancer with effective screening is essential for reduction of cancer-specific mortality. The addition of fecal DNA testing in the armamentarium of screening methods already in clinical use launches a new era in the noninvasive part of colorectal cancer screening and emanates from a large number of previous and ongoing clinical investigations and technological advancements. In this review, we discuss the molecular rational and most important genetic alterations hallmarking the early colorectal carcinogenesis process. Also, representative DNA targets-markers and key aspects of their testing at the clinical level in comparison or/and association with other screening methods are described. Finally, a critical view of the strengths and limitations of fecal DNA tests is provided, along with anticipated barriers and suggestions for further exploitation of their use. PMID:26483873

  12. [Colorectal cancer screening programs in the population at average risk in the European Union and Spain].

    PubMed

    Grau, Jaume; Serradesanferm, Anna; Polbach, Sandra; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Trilla, Antoni; Castells, Antoni

    2010-02-01

    There is broad international consensus on the need for colorectal cancer screening in men and women aged 50 years old or older with no personal or familial history of adenoma or colorectal cancer. The main problem is the disagreement among the various screening guidelines on the best screening method. The European Union (2003) extended the recommendation of implanting colorectal cancer screening using the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the population aged between 50 and 74 years. Seventy percent of the member states are introducing a program but there is wide heterogeneity. In Spain, 2-yearly FOBT is recommended in the target population aged 50 to 69 years. Currently, three autonomous communities have developed pilot programs and are extending the program to the entire population. Many other communities have announced they will commence programs shortly. PMID:19523716

  13. Cross-Cultural Validation of the Preventive Health Model for Colorectal Cancer Screening: An Australian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flight, Ingrid H.; Wilson, Carlene J.; McGillivray, Jane; Myers, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether the five-factor structure of the Preventive Health Model for colorectal cancer screening, developed in the United States, has validity in Australia. We also tested extending the model with the addition of the factor Self-Efficacy to Screen using Fecal Occult Blood Test (SESFOBT). Randomly selected men and women aged between…

  14. Nanoscale/Molecular analysis of Fecal Colonocytes for Colorectal Cancer Screening | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Existing guidelines recommend colorectal cancer (CRC) screening for all patients over age 50. However, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer death among Americans largely because colonoscopic screening of all the >100 million Americans over age 50 is unfeasible for both patient-related (non-compliance) and societal (inadequate endoscopic capacity and funding) reasons. |

  15. Colorectal Cancer Screening at the Nexus of HIV, Minority Statuses, and Cultural Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Diaz, Tressa P.; Park, Soon H.; Bowen, Talita; Patrick, Kevin; Tamang, Suresh; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased significantly among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Screening education is recommended. Purpose: Social learning, minority stress, and cultural safety theories informed this pilot to assess the feasibility of a colorectal cancer screening intervention targeted to PLHIV, with…

  16. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Perceived Benefits and Barriers, and Intentions among College and University Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajracharya, Srijana M.; Wigglesworth, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early detection through routine screening is critical in reducing the incidence rate of colorectal cancer (CRC). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine college and university employees' knowledge of CRC issues, their perceptions of the benefits of and barriers to CRC screening, and their intentions toward it. Methods: This…

  17. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence. PMID:27075165

  18. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence. PMID:27075165

  19. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  20. Crafting Appealing Text Messages to Encourage Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Completion: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D; Denizard-Thompson, Nancy; Kronner, Donna; Miller, David P

    2015-01-01

    Background mHealth interventions that incorporate text messages have great potential to increase receipt of preventive health services such as colorectal cancer screening. However, little is known about older adult perspectives regarding the receipt of text messages from their health care providers. Objective To assess whether older adults would value and access text messages from their physician’s practice regarding colorectal cancer screening. Methods We conducted four focus groups with 26 adults, aged 50 to 75 years, who had either recently completed or were overdue for colorectal cancer screening. A trained moderator followed a semistructured interview guide covering participant knowledge and attitudes regarding colorectal cancer screening, potential barriers to colorectal cancer screening, attitudes about receiving electronic communications from a doctor’s office, and reactions to sample text messages. Results Participant responses to three primary research questions were examined: (1) facilitators and barriers to colorectal cancer screening, (2) attitudes toward receiving text messages from providers, and (3) characteristics of appealing text messages. Two themes related to facilitators of colorectal cancer screening were perceived benefits/need and family experiences and encouragement. Themes related to barriers included unpleasantness, discomfort, knowledge gaps, fear of complications, and system factors. Four themes emerged regarding receipt of text messages from health care providers: (1) comfort and familiarity with technology, (2) privacy concerns/potential for errors, (3) impact on patient-provider relationship, and (4) perceived helpfulness. Many participants expressed initial reluctance to receiving text messages but responded favorably when shown sample messages. Participants preferred messages that contained content that was important to them and were positive and reassuring, personalized, and friendly to novice texters (eg, avoided the use of

  1. A Randomized Trial of Generic versus Tailored Interventions to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Intermediate Risk Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon L.; Coups, Elliot J.; Markowitz, Arnold; Meropol, Neal J.; Haller, Daniel; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Jandorf, Lina; Peterson, Susan K.; Lesko, Samuel; Philipshen, Steven; Winkel, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with a sibling who has had colorectal cancer diagnosed before age 61 are at increased risk for colorectal cancer and may derive particular benefit from screening. Tailored interventions may increase participation in appropriate colorectal cancer screening. This study evaluated the efficacy of two tailored interventions and a generic print intervention. Participant siblings (N = 412) who were not up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening were randomly assigned to receive either a generic print pamphlet, a tailored print pamphlet, or a tailored print pamphlet and tailored counseling call. Colorectal cancer screening six months after the baseline interview was the outcome measure. Results indicated that colorectal cancer screening adherence increased among intermediate risk siblings enrolled in all three intervention groups. Participants in both tailored intervention groups reported having colorectal cancer screening at significantly higher rates than participants in the generic print group. The increase in colorectal cancer screening in the tailored print and counseling call group was not significantly higher than that achieved by the tailored print alone. Decisional balance partially mediated treatment effects. Tailored behavioral interventions are an effective method for increasing screening adherence but telephone counseling did not add significantly to treatment effects. PMID:19418107

  2. Using focus groups to develop interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening among Vietnamese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bang H.; Vo, Phuong H.; Doan, Hiep T.; McPhee, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in Vietnamese Americans. Their colorectal screening rates are lower than the rates of whites. Methods Four focus groups were conducted to identify Vietnamese American sources and credibility of health information, media utilization, and intervention approaches. Results Vietnamese Americans trusted doctors and patient testimonials, and had access to, and received most of their health information from, Vietnamese-language print and electronic media. Recommended intervention approaches include promoting doctors' recommendation of screening and using Vietnamese-language mass media, print materials, and oral presentations. Conclusions Focus groups are useful in determining communication channels and intervention approaches. PMID:17020518

  3. Developing English and Spanish television public service announcements to promote colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Jameson, Heather; Macario, Everly; Jorgensen, Cynthia M; Seeff, Laura

    2005-10-01

    Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) is a federally funded campaign to promote understanding of colorectal cancer and the importance of regular screening for adults aged 50 years and older. SFL uses a variety of communication strategies, including television public service announcements (PSAs). SFL materials are developed using the Health Communication Process endorsed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which has four stages: (a) planning and strategy development; (b) developing and pretesting concepts, messages, and materials; (c) implementing the program; and (d) assessing effectiveness and making refinements. This article describes SFL's application of this process to develop television PSAs in English and Spanish. PMID:16210680

  4. Flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy as a screening modality for colorectal adenomas in older age groups? Findings in a cohort of the normal population aged 63-72 years

    PubMed Central

    Thiis-Evensen, E; Hoff, G; Sauar, J; Majak, B; Vatn, M

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Most cases of colorectal cancer originate from adenomas. Removing adenomas has been shown to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer. The design of cost effective endoscopic screening programmes requires a knowledge of the distribution of adenomas in different age groups.
AIM—To investigate the distribution of colorectal adenomas in older age groups in the normal population.
METHOD—A total of 356 men and women selected randomly from the population register were offered a colonoscopic screening examination to detect and remove polyps.
RESULTS—In all, 241(68%) subjects, mean age 67.4 years (range 62-73), attended. The caecum was intubated in 193 (80%), and in this group 32 (38%) women and 51 (47%) men had adenomas. One hundred and ten (54%) of the adenomas and 11 (39%) of the "high risk adenomas" (adenomas larger than 10 mm in diameter, adenomas containing villous components, and adenomas with severe dysplasia) were found proximal to the sigmoid colon. In 36 (43%) of the subjects with adenomas, the adenomas were only found proximal to the sigmoid colon. Twenty two (11%) subjects had more than two adenomas. Of 203 adenomas discovered, 189 (93%) were less than 10 mm in diameter.
CONCLUSION—More than half of the adenomas were localised proximal to the sigmoid colon, and, in nearly half of the adenoma bearing subjects examined, the adenoma was proximal to the descending colon. This indicates that a sigmoidoscopic screening examination in this age group would miss a substantial number of adenomas, but this may be acceptable as the vast majority of proximal adenomas do not progress to clinical cancer within the life expectancy of this age group.


Keywords: adenoma; colon; colorectal neoplasms; endoscopy; epidemiology; polyps PMID:10562581

  5. E-mail to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening Within Social Networks: Acceptability and Content.

    PubMed

    Cutrona, Sarah L; Wagner, Joann; Roblin, Douglas W; Gaglio, Bridget; Williams, Andrew; Torres-Stone, Rosalie; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Effective techniques to encourage colorectal cancer screening in underscreened populations have included social support interventions and e-mail reminders from physicians. Personalized e-mail messages to promote colorectal cancer screening within social networks could be even more effective but have not been studied. The authors interviewed 387 e-mail users, aged 42-73 years in Georgia, Hawaii, and Massachusetts. Participants were asked to edit a sample message in which the sender shares a recent colonoscopy experience and urges the recipient to discuss colorectal cancer screening with a doctor. For those reporting willingness to send this message, changes to the message and suggested subject lines were recorded. Edited text was analyzed for content and concordance with original message. The majority of participants (74.4%) were willing to e-mail a modifiable message. Of those willing, 63.5% edited the message. Common edits included deletion (17.7%) or modification (17.4%) of a negatively framed sentence on colon cancer risks and addition or modification of personalizing words (15.6%). Few edits changed the meaning of the message (5.6%), and even fewer introduced factual inaccuracies (1.7%). Modifiable e-mail messages offer a way for screened individuals to promote colorectal cancer screening to social network members. The accuracy and effects of such messages should be further studied. PMID:25839968

  6. Patient and provider characteristics associated with colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer screening among Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Caroline A.; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Chan, Albert; Chan, John K.; McClellan, Sean R.; Chung, Sukyung; Olson, Cliff; Nimbal, Vani; Palaniappan, Latha P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Routinely recommended screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers can significantly reduce mortality from these types of cancer, yet screening is underutilized among Asians. Surveys rely on self-report and often are underpowered for analysis by Asian ethnicities. Electronic health records include validated (as opposed to recall-based) rates of cancer screening. In this paper we seek to better understand cancer screening patterns in a population of insured Asian Americans. METHODS We calculated rates of compliance with cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening among Asians from an EHR population, and compared them to non-Hispanic whites. We performed multivariable modeling to evaluate potential predictors (at the provider- and patient- level) of screening completion among Asian patients. RESULTS Aggregation of Asian subgroups masked heterogeneity in screening rates. Asian Indians and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders had the lowest rates of screening in our sample, well below that of non-Hispanic whites. In multivariable analyses, screening completion was negatively associated with patient-physician language discordance for mammography (OR:0.81 95% CI:0.71–0.92) and colorectal cancer screening (OR:0.79 CI:0.72–0.87) and positively associated with patient-provider gender concordance for mammography (OR:1.16 CI:1.00–1.34) and cervical cancer screening (OR:1.66 CI:1.51–1.82). Additionally, patient enrollment in online health services increased mammography (OR:1.32 CI:1.20–1.46) and cervical cancer screening (OR:1.31 CI:1.24–1.37). CONCLUSIONS Language- and gender- concordant primary care providers, and culturally tailored online health resources may help improve preventive cancer screening in Asian patient populations. IMPACT This study demonstrates how use of EHR data can inform investigations of primary prevention practices within the healthcare delivery setting. PMID:25368396

  7. Colorectal cancer screening in African Americans: practice patterns in the United States. Are we doing enough?

    PubMed Central

    Waghray, Abhijeet; Jain, Alok; Waghray, Nisheet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common form of malignancy and a leading cause of death in the United States. Screening decreases CRC incidence and mortality. African Americans are at an increased risk of developing CRC, and recommendations are to initiate screening at the age of 45. This study aims to assess the rate of screening for colorectal cancer in African Americans between the ages of 45–49. Methods: African Americans between the ages of 45–49 were identified in the Explorys national database. Patients who completed a colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy or fecal occult blood test were identified and stratified by sex and insurance status. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 181 200 African Americans were identified as eligible for screening. Only 31 480 patients (17.4%) received at least one screening procedure for CRC. The majority of patients (66.7%) were screened via colonoscopy. African American females were more likely to complete a screening test (17.8% vs 16.7%; P < 0.01). The majority of patients (66.0%) who completed a screening test had private insurance. Conclusion: Race, gender and barriers to medical care contribute to disparities in CRC screening rates. Among African Americans, CRC screening remains suboptimal. Tailored public health initiatives, medical record alerts and improved communication between providers and patients are fundamental to addressing issues that impact poor adherence to CRC screening in African Americans. PMID:27071411

  8. Effect of flexible sigmoidoscopy screening on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Holme, Øyvind; Løberg, Magnus; Kalager, Mette; Bretthauer, Michael; Hernán, Miguel A.; Aas, Eline; Eide, Tor J; Skovlund, Eva; Schneede, Jørn; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Hoff, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Importance Colorectal cancer is a major health burden. Screening is recommended in many countries. Objective Estimate the effectiveness of flexible sigmoidoscopy screening on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in a population-based trial. Design Randomized controlled trial in individuals aged 50–64 years. Screening was performed in 1999–2000 (55–64 year age-group) and 2001 (50–54 year age-group). End of follow-up: Dec 31st 2011. Setting Population of Oslo city and Telemark County, Norway. Participants 100,210 individuals were identified in the screening areas. 1,415 individuals were excluded due to prior colorectal cancer, emigration, or death. Three individuals could not be traced in the population registry. Intervention Individuals randomized to the screening group were invited to screening. Within the screening group, individuals were randomized 1:1 to once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy or combination of once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy and fecal occult blood-testing (FOBT). Individuals with positive screening test (cancer, adenoma, polyp ≥10 mm, or positive FOBT) were offered colonoscopy. The control group received no intervention. Main outcome measures Colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Results 98,792 individuals were included in the intention to screen analyses; 78,220 in the control group and 20,572 in the screening group (10,283 randomized to flexible sigmoidoscopy and 10,289 to flexible sigmoidoscopy and FOBT). Compliance with screening was 63%. After median 10.9 years, 71 individuals had died from colorectal cancer in the screening group, and 330 in the control group (31.4 vs. 43.1 deaths, absolute rate difference 11.7 (95% CI 3.0–20.4) per 100,000 person-years); hazard ratio [HR] 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56–0.94). Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 253 individuals in the screening group, and 1,086 in the control group (112.6 vs. 141.0 cases, absolute rate difference: 28.4 (95% CI 12.1–44.7) per 100,000 person

  9. Should all colorectal cancer patients over age 60 be screened for prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Aizer, Ayal A; D'Amico, Anthony V

    2013-10-01

    Two large, randomized studies have demonstrated a prostate cancer-specific survival benefit to prostate cancer screening using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay. Yet, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended against PSA-based screening for prostate cancer, claiming it results in more harm than good, given concerns regarding overtreatment. The purpose of this article is to characterize the patients with colorectal cancer who are most likely to benefit from PSA-based screening for prostate cancer. Because the survival benefit due to PSA-based screening does not manifest until 7 years after screening is initiated, we conclude that PSA screening is most appropriate for men with a remaining life expectancy of at least 10 years. Accordingly, younger men with stage I-II colorectal cancers at diagnosis (or stage III colorectal cancer that has not recurred 5 years after treatment) who have no or minimal comorbidities and who are at increased risk for either a diagnosis of prostate cancer or mortality secondary to prostate cancer (patients who have a positive family history or are African-American, respectively) are most likely to experience more good outcomes than harmful ones as a result of undergoing PSA-based screening. PMID:24367864

  10. Recommendations From the International Colorectal Cancer Screening Network on the Evaluation of the Cost of Screening Programs.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sujha; Tangka, Florence K L; Hoover, Sonja; Nadel, Marion; Smith, Robert; Atkin, Wendy; Patnick, Julietta

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of death from cancer and the incidence is projected to increase. Many countries are exploring the introduction of organized screening programs, but there is limited information on the resources required and guidance for cost-effective implementation. To facilitate the generating of the economics evidence base for program implementation, we collected and analyzed detailed program cost data from 5 European members of the International Colorectal Cancer Screening Network. The cost per person screened estimates, often used to compare across programs as an overall measure, varied significantly across the programs. In addition, there were substantial differences in the programmatic and clinical cost incurred, even when the same type of screening test was used. Based on these findings, several recommendations are provided to enhance the underlying methodology and validity of the comparative economic assessments. The recommendations include the need for detailed activity-based cost information, the use of a comprehensive set of effectiveness measures to adequately capture differences between programs, and the incorporation of data from multiple programs in cost-effectiveness models to increase generalizability. Economic evaluation of real-world colorectal cancer-screening programs is essential to derive valuable insights to improve program operations and ensure optimal use of available resources. PMID:27479308

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Computed Tomographic Colonography Screening for Colorectal Cancer in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Savarino, James E.; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Kuntz, Karen M.; Zauber, Ann G.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) considered whether to reimburse computed tomographic colonography (CTC) for colorectal cancer screening of Medicare enrollees. To help inform its decision, we evaluated the reimbursement rate at which CTC screening could be cost-effective compared with the colorectal cancer screening tests that are currently reimbursed by CMS and are included in most colorectal cancer screening guidelines, namely annual fecal occult blood test (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years, flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years in conjunction with annual FOBT, and colonoscopy every 10 years. Methods We used three independently developed microsimulation models to assess the health outcomes and costs associated with CTC screening and with currently reimbursed colorectal cancer screening tests among the average-risk Medicare population. We assumed that CTC was performed every 5 years (using test characteristics from either a Department of Defense CTC study or the National CTC Trial) and that individuals with findings of 6 mm or larger were referred to colonoscopy. We computed incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the currently reimbursed screening tests and calculated the maximum cost per scan (ie, the threshold cost) for the CTC strategy to lie on the efficient frontier. Sensitivity analyses were performed on key parameters and assumptions. Results Assuming perfect adherence with all tests, the undiscounted number life-years gained from CTC screening ranged from 143 to 178 per 1000 65-year-olds, which was slightly less than the number of life-years gained from 10-yearly colonoscopy (152–185 per 1000 65-year-olds) and comparable to that from 5-yearly sigmoidoscopy with annual FOBT (149–177 per 1000 65-year-olds). If CTC screening was reimbursed at $488 per scan (slightly less than the reimbursement for a colonoscopy without polypectomy), it would be the most costly strategy. CTC screening could be cost-effective at

  12. Colorectal Cancer Screening among Latinos in Three Communities on the Texas-Mexico Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández, María E.; Savas, Lara S.; Wilson, Katherine M.; Byrd, Theresa L.; Atkinson, John; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Vernon, Sally W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) prevalence and psychosocial correlates of CRCS among Latinos in South Texas. Method: Using multivariable analyses, we examined the association of perceived susceptibility, self-efficacy, pros and cons, subjective norms, knowledge and fatalism on CRCS among 544 Latinos (50 years and older).…

  13. Understanding the Barriers and Facilitators of Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Low Income Immigrant Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Jennie; Villagra, Cristina; Winkel, Gary; Varela, Alejandro; Quintero-Canetti, Zeida; Castillo, Anabella; Thélémaque, Linda; King, Sheba; DuHamel, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are low among Hispanics; thus understanding screening barriers and facilitators is essential. A survey, based on blended health promotion theories, was conducted with low income, mostly immigrant, Hispanics at community based organizations and health clinics in New York City. Correlates of undergoing colonoscopy screening were examined. Four hundred men (28%) and women were interviewed. Older age, longer US residence, having a regular health care provider and provider recommendation predicted colonoscopy receipt (P values <0.01). Greater fear and worry concerning colonoscopy and fewer perceived screening benefits were associated with reduced screening likelihood (P values <0.05). In a multivariate model, colonoscopy receipt was negatively associated with Medicaid and positively associated with English preference, physician recommendation for and encouragement of screening and less fear. Interventions that educate physicians and patients regarding colonoscopy screening guidelines, increase physicians' screening referrals, and reduce patients' fear are needed. PMID:19621259

  14. [Shared decision making in the colorectal cancer screening program in the canton of Vaud].

    PubMed

    Auer, Reto; Selby, Kevin; Bulliard, Jean-Luc; Nichita, Christina; Dorta, Gian; Ducros, Cyril; Cornuz, Jacques

    2015-11-25

    The colorectal cancer screening program of the canton of Vaud aims to facilitate screening for this cancer for the population aged 50 to 69 years old. The two screening modalities offered are fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and colonoscopy. The decision to undergo screening and the screening modality is based on an individual medical encounter with a primary care physician. Both screening modalities are reimbursed through basic health coverage in Switzerland. The participation to the screening program allows the exemption of the deductible for the medical encounter and the chosen screening modality. A copay of 10% is maintained for all costs. Communication tools were developed on the basis of recommendations in the literature to facilitate shared decision-making in a medical encounter. PMID:26742350

  15. COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING PRACTICES AMONG THREE AMERICAN INDIAN COMMUNITIES IN MINNESOTA.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Melissa K; Perdue, David G; Hester, Christina; Cully, Angelia; Cully, Lance; Greiner, K Allen; Daley, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. Effective prevention and early detection may be achieved through screening, but screening rates are low, especially in American Indian (AI) populations. We wanted to understand perceptions of CRC screening among AI located in the Great Lakes region. Focus groups were recorded and transcribed verbatim (N = 45). Data were analyzed using qualitative text analysis. Themes that deterred CRC screening were low CRC knowledge, fear of the procedure and results, cost and transportation issues, and a lack of quality and competent care. Suggestions for improvement included outreach efforts and culturally-tailored teaching materials. PMID:27188017

  16. An intervention study to increase colorectal cancer knowledge and screening among community elders.

    PubMed

    Powe, Barbara D; Ntekop, Emmanuel; Barron, Mia

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of a culturally relevant intervention, delivered over 12 months on knowledge of colorectal cancer and participation in fecal occult blood testing. An experimental, repeated measures design was used. Free fecal occult blood testing was offered to the participants. Fifteen senior centers were randomly selected and assigned to the Cultural and Self-Empowerment Group, the Modified Cultural Group, or the Traditional Group. Their mean age was 73.83 years, and their average educational level was 8.8 years. The majority was African American, female, and reported annual incomes < or = 10,000 dollars. Data were collected at baseline, at 6 months, and at 12 months. Participants in the Cultural and Self-Empowerment Group had a significantly greater increase in their knowledge of colorectal cancer over time. Group membership and knowledge of colorectal cancer were significant predictors of participation in colorectal cancer screening. Participants in the Cultural and Self-Empowerment Group and those with greater knowledge of colorectal cancer were more likely to participate in fecal occult blood testing at the end of the 12-month period. Similar strategies may be implemented in community settings and health care agencies to inform elders about colorectal cancer. PMID:15363024

  17. Guidelines on the use of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in patients with peritoneal surface malignancy arising from colorectal or appendiceal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, P.; Sideris, L.; Law, C.; Mack, L.; Haase, E.; Giacomantonio, C.; Govindarajan, A.; Krzyzanowska, M.K.; Major, P.; McConnell, Y.; Temple, W.; Younan, R.; McCart, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    To meet the needs of patients, Canadian surgical and medical oncology leaders in the treatment of peritoneal surface malignancies (psms), together with patient representatives, formed the Canadian HIPEC Collaborative Group (chicg). The group is dedicated to standardizing and improving the treatment of psm in Canada so that access to treatment and, ultimately, the prognosis of Canadian patients with psm are improved. Patients with resectable psm arising from colorectal or appendiceal neoplasms should be reviewed by a multidisciplinary team including surgeons and medical oncologists with experience in treating patients with psm. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy should be offered to appropriately selected patients and performed at experienced centres. The aim of this publication is to present guidelines that we recommend be applied across the country for the treatment of psm. PMID:25908915

  18. Colorectal cancer screening programme by faecal occult blood test in Tuscany: first round results.

    PubMed

    Grazzini, G; Castiglione, G; Ciabattoni, C; Franceschini, F; Giorgi, D; Gozzi, S; Mantellini, P; Lopane, P; Perco, M; Rubeca, T; Salvadori, P; Visioli, C B; Zappa, M

    2004-02-01

    Screening with faecal occult blood test (FOBT) has been shown to be effective in reducing mortality from colorectal cancer. Tuscany was the first region in Italy in which a screening programme for colorectal cancer by FOBT was initiated region-wide. The aim of the paper was to describe organizational aspects, a quality control model and the results of this experience. From June 2000 to December 2001, 192583 subjects aged 50-70 were invited to undergo a 1-day immunochemical test without any dietary restriction. A total of 78505 subjects (41%) performed the screening test, of whom 4537 responders had a positive test result (5.8%). Among them, 1122 refused any form of assessment or underwent a colonoscopy outside the screening referral centres, with an overall assessment compliance of 75.3%. Malignancies were found in 193 patients and at least a high-risk adenomatous polyp in 692 patients. In about a quarter of the positive subjects who underwent assessment, cancer or high-risk adenoma was detected. In conclusion, data from this experience supported the feasibility of biennial colorectal screening programme by FOBT, particularly regarding invitation compliance and positivity rate. Further efforts are necessary to implement screening extension and to improve data collection. PMID:15075784

  19. A Trial of Three Interventions to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Selina A.; Majett, Charlye D.; Alema-Mensah, Ernest

    2009-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. CRC incidence and mortality rates are higher in blacks than in whites and screening rates are lower in blacks than in whites. We tested three interventions intended to increase the rate of colorectal cancer screening among African Americans. Methods The interventions were chosen to address evidence gaps in the Guide to Community Preventive Services: one-on-one education, group education, and reducing out-of-pocket costs. Three hundred sixty-nine African American men and women aged ≥50 years were enrolled in this randomized controlled community intervention trial. The main outcome measures were post-intervention increase in colorectal cancer knowledge and obtaining a screening test within six months. Results There was substantial attrition: 257 participants completed the intervention and were available for follow-up 3–6 months later. Among completers, there were significant increases in knowledge in both educational cohorts but in neither of the other two. By the 6 month follow-up, 17.7% (11/62) of control group members reported having undergone screening, as compared to 33.9% (22/65) of the group education cohort (p = 0.039). Screening rate increases in the other 2 cohorts were not statistically significant. Conclusions Group education can increase colorectal cancer screening rates among African Americans. The screening rate of less than 35% in a group of people who participated in an educational program through multiple sessions over a period of several weeks indicates that there are still barriers to overcome. PMID:20052732

  20. Using lessons from breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening to inform the development of lung cancer screening programs.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Katrina; Kim, Jane J; Halm, Ethan A; Ballard, Rachel M; Schnall, Mitchell D

    2016-05-01

    Multiple advisory groups now recommend that high-risk smokers be screened for lung cancer by low-dose computed tomography. Given that the development of lung cancer screening programs will face many of the same issues that have challenged other cancer screening programs, the National Cancer Institute-funded Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium was used to identify lessons learned from the implementation of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening that should inform the introduction of lung cancer screening. These lessons include the importance of developing systems for identifying and recruiting eligible individuals in primary care, ensuring that screening centers are qualified and performance is monitored, creating clear communication standards for reporting screening results to referring physicians and patients, ensuring follow-up is available for individuals with abnormal test results, avoiding overscreening, remembering primary prevention, and leveraging advances in cancer genetics and immunology. Overall, this experience emphasizes that effective cancer screening is a multistep activity that requires robust strategies to initiate, report, follow up, and track each step as well as a dynamic and ongoing oversight process to revise current screening practices as new evidence regarding screening is created, new screening technologies are developed, new biological markers are identified, and new approaches to health care delivery are disseminated. Cancer 2016;122:1338-1342. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26929386

  1. Choosing the optimal method in programmatic colorectal cancer screening: current evidence and controversies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important health problem all over the world, being the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. The most important strategy for CRC prevention is screening (i.e. secondary prevention). Since it is widely accepted that adenomas and serrated polyps are the precursors of the vast majority of CRC, early detection and removal of these lesions is associated with a reduction of CRC incidence and, consequently, mortality. Moreover, cancers detected by screening are usually diagnosed at early stages and, therefore, curable by endoscopic or surgical procedures. This review will be address CRC screening strategies in average-risk population, which is defined by those individuals, men and women, 50 years of age or older, without any additional personal or familial predisposing risk factor. In order to maximize the impact of screening and ensure high coverage and equity of access, only organized screening programs (i.e. programmatic screening) should be implemented, as opposed to case-finding or opportunistic screening. For that reason and considering that the optimal approach for colorectal screening may differ depending on the scenario, this review will be focused on the advantages and limitations of each screening strategy in an organized setting. PMID:26136839

  2. Unifying Screening Processes Within the PROSPR Consortium: A Conceptual Model for Breast, Cervical, and Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane J.; Schapira, Marilyn M.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Zauber, Ann G.; Geiger, Ann M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Weaver, Donald L.; Tiro, Jasmin A.

    2015-01-01

    General frameworks of the cancer screening process are available, but none directly compare the process in detail across different organ sites. This limits the ability of medical and public health professionals to develop and evaluate coordinated screening programs that apply resources and population management strategies available for one cancer site to other sites. We present a trans-organ conceptual model that incorporates a single screening episode for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers into a unified framework based on clinical guidelines and protocols; the model concepts could be expanded to other organ sites. The model covers four types of care in the screening process: risk assessment, detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Interfaces between different provider teams (eg, primary care and specialty care), including communication and transfer of responsibility, may occur when transitioning between types of care. Our model highlights across each organ site similarities and differences in steps, interfaces, and transitions in the screening process and documents the conclusion of a screening episode. This model was developed within the National Cancer Institute–funded consortium Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR). PROSPR aims to optimize the screening process for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer and includes seven research centers and a statistical coordinating center. Given current health care reform initiatives in the United States, this conceptual model can facilitate the development of comprehensive quality metrics for cancer screening and promote trans-organ comparative cancer screening research. PROSPR findings will support the design of interventions that improve screening outcomes across multiple cancer sites. PMID:25957378

  3. Spiritually Based Intervention to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening among African Americans: Screening and Theory-Based Outcomes from a Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Litaker, Mark S.; Scarinci, Isabel C.; Debnam, Katrina J.; McDavid, Chastity; McNeal, Sandre F.; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A.; Crowther, Martha; Bolland, John; Martin, Michelle Y.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has clear benefits in terms of mortality reduction; however, it is still underutilized and especially among medically underserved populations, including African Americans, who also suffer a disproportionate colorectal cancer burden. This study consisted of a theory-driven (health belief model) spiritually based…

  4. 75 FR 2552 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ..., particularly breast and cervical cancer. Reasons for this disparity are complex. Unlike most other preventive... Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal...

  5. Use of Evidence-Based Interventions to Address Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Djenaba A; Redwood, Diana; DeGroff, Amy; Butler, Emily L

    2016-02-12

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death among cancers that affect both men and women. Despite strong evidence of their effectiveness, CRC screening tests are underused. Racial/ethnic minority groups, persons without insurance, those with lower educational attainment, and those with lower household income levels have lower rates of CRC screening. Since 2009, CDC's Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) has supported state health departments and tribal organizations in implementing evidence-based interventions (EBIs) to increase use of CRC screening tests among their populations. This report highlights the successful implementation of EBIs to address disparities by two CRCCP grantees: the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and Washington State's Breast, Cervical, and Colon Health Program (BCCHP). ANTHC partnered with regional tribal health organizations in the Alaska Tribal Health System to implement provider and client reminders and use patient navigators to increase CRC screening rates among Alaska Native populations. BCCHP identified patient care coordinators in each clinic who coordinated staff training on CRC screening and integrated client and provider reminder systems. In both the Alaska and Washington programs, instituting provider reminder systems, client reminder systems, or both was facilitated by use of electronic health record systems. Using multicomponent interventions in a single clinical site or facility can support more organized screening programs and potentially result in greater increases in screening rates than relying on a single strategy. Organized screening systems have an explicit policy for screening, a defined target population, a team responsible for implementation of the screening program, and a quality assurance structure. Although CRC screening rates in the United States have increased steadily over the past decade, this increase has not been seen equally across all populations. Increasing the

  6. Role of micro-RNA in colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio; Menéndez Sánchez, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in carcinogenesis through postranscriptional gene regulatory activity. These molecules are involved in various physiological and pathological functions, such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation, which indicates their functionality in carcinogenesis as tumour suppressor genes or oncogenes. Several studies have determined the presence of microRNAs in different neoplastic diseases such as colon, prostate, breast, stomach, pancreas, and lung cancer. There are promising data on the usefulness of quantifying microRNAs in different organic fluids and tissues. We have conducted a review of the determinations of microRNAs in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. PMID:25088411

  7. Diabetes Status and Being Up-to-Date on Colorectal Cancer Screening, 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Nancy R.; Samson, Marsha E.; Garcia-Dominic, Oralia; Lengerich, Eugene J.; Schootman, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although screening rates for colorectal cancer are increasing, 22 million Americans are not up-to-date with recommendations. People with diabetes are an important and rapidly growing group at increased risk for colorectal cancer. Screening status and predictors of being up-to-date on screening are largely unknown in this population. Methods This study used logistic regression modeling and data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to examine the association between diabetes and colorectal cancer screening predictors with being up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening according to criteria of the US Preventive Services Task Force for adults aged 50 or older. State prevalence rates of up-to-date colorectal cancer screening were also calculated and mapped. Results The prevalence of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening for all respondents aged 50 or older was 65.6%; for respondents with diabetes, the rate was 69.2%. Respondents with diabetes were 22% more likely to be up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening than those without diabetes. Among those with diabetes, having a routine checkup within the previous year significantly increased the odds of being up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening (odds ratio, 1.90). Other factors such as age, income, education, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and history of cancer were also associated with up-to-date status. Conclusion Regardless of diabetes status, people who had a routine checkup within the past year were more likely to be up-to-date than people who had not. Among people with diabetes, the duration between routine checkups may be of greater importance than the frequency of diabetes-related doctor visits. Continued efforts should be made to ensure that routine care visits occur regularly to address the preventive health needs of patients with and patients without diabetes. PMID:26851338

  8. Colorectal cancer screening among Korean American immigrants: unraveling the influence of culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yun; Im, Hyojin

    2013-05-01

    Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) is underutilized among ethnic minority groups, particularly among Korean American immigrants. To explore the role of cultural and health beliefs in CRC screening, a structured questionnaire was administered to 281 Korean American immigrants aged between 50 and 88 in the New York metropolitan area. Results showed that 20% of the sample had undergone a fecal occult blood test within the past year, and 35% of the respondents had received a sigmoidoscopy and/or colonoscopy within the previous five years. Binary logistic regression analyses revealed significant predictors including health belief constructs, such as perceived seriousness of cancer and confidence in screening uptake, and gender-specific cultural beliefs and attitudes about CRC screening. Perceived helplessness lowered CRC screening among the women, while fatalism lowered it among the men. The findings reinforce a need for cultural-and gender-specific intervention strategies to increase CRC screening in this particularly vulnerable population. PMID:23728030

  9. Colorectal Cancer Screening in Average Risk Populations: Evidence Summary.

    PubMed

    Tinmouth, Jill; Vella, Emily T; Baxter, Nancy N; Dubé, Catherine; Gould, Michael; Hey, Amanda; Ismaila, Nofisat; McCurdy, Bronwen R; Paszat, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The objectives of this systematic review were to evaluate the evidence for different CRC screening tests and to determine the most appropriate ages of initiation and cessation for CRC screening and the most appropriate screening intervals for selected CRC screening tests in people at average risk for CRC. Methods. Electronic databases were searched for studies that addressed the research objectives. Meta-analyses were conducted with clinically homogenous trials. A working group reviewed the evidence to develop conclusions. Results. Thirty RCTs and 29 observational studies were included. Flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) prevented CRC and led to the largest reduction in CRC mortality with a smaller but significant reduction in CRC mortality with the use of guaiac fecal occult blood tests (gFOBTs). There was insufficient or low quality evidence to support the use of other screening tests, including colonoscopy, as well as changing the ages of initiation and cessation for CRC screening with gFOBTs in Ontario. Either annual or biennial screening using gFOBT reduces CRC-related mortality. Conclusion. The evidentiary base supports the use of FS or FOBT (either annual or biennial) to screen patients at average risk for CRC. This work will guide the development of the provincial CRC screening program. PMID:27597935

  10. Colorectal Cancer Screening in Average Risk Populations: Evidence Summary

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Nancy N.; Dubé, Catherine; Hey, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The objectives of this systematic review were to evaluate the evidence for different CRC screening tests and to determine the most appropriate ages of initiation and cessation for CRC screening and the most appropriate screening intervals for selected CRC screening tests in people at average risk for CRC. Methods. Electronic databases were searched for studies that addressed the research objectives. Meta-analyses were conducted with clinically homogenous trials. A working group reviewed the evidence to develop conclusions. Results. Thirty RCTs and 29 observational studies were included. Flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) prevented CRC and led to the largest reduction in CRC mortality with a smaller but significant reduction in CRC mortality with the use of guaiac fecal occult blood tests (gFOBTs). There was insufficient or low quality evidence to support the use of other screening tests, including colonoscopy, as well as changing the ages of initiation and cessation for CRC screening with gFOBTs in Ontario. Either annual or biennial screening using gFOBT reduces CRC-related mortality. Conclusion. The evidentiary base supports the use of FS or FOBT (either annual or biennial) to screen patients at average risk for CRC. This work will guide the development of the provincial CRC screening program. PMID:27597935

  11. Development and validation of an instrument to measure factors related to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Vernon, S W; Myers, R E; Tilley, B C

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the development and refinement of a set of scales for use in research on predictors of colorectal cancer screening adherence. The study population included 2693 of 4490 eligible white male automotive employees who answered a mailed questionnaire (60% response rate) on beliefs and attitudes related to colorectal cancer and screening. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and multitrait scaling analysis were used to evaluate the construct validity of a priori scales developed to measure salience and coherence, perceived susceptibility, worries about screening, screening efficacy, social influence, and intention. Analyses supported the construct validity of scales for salience and coherence, perceived susceptibility, and worries about screening. Four items originally assigned to the salience and coherence construct loaded on a separate factor that appeared to measure self-efficacy. There was no empirical support for scales measuring screening efficacy and social influence, and there was limited empirical support for a scale measuring intention. Confirmatory factor analysis of the scales measuring salience and coherence, self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and worries about screening showed a similar factor structure in white men with and without a personal history of polyps, indicating that the scales may be useful for studies of both colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. Multitrait scaling analysis showed some support for internal consistency reliability of those scales in women (n = 42) and in African-American men (n = 56), and there was some support for the factor structure in those two subgroups. Future studies should evaluate the psychometric properties of these and similar scales in diverse population subgroups. PMID:9332766

  12. Colorectal Cancer Screening among Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese Immigrants in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Kim, Karen; Chandrasekar, Edwin; Lam, Helen

    2015-12-01

    Asian Americans are now the most rapidly growing minority group in the USA. Over 60 % of Asian Americans in the USA are immigrants. Cancer has been the leading cause of death among Asian Americans since 1980. Understanding the barriers to screening is essential to reduce the unnecessary burden of cancer. Little is known about colorectal cancer screening behavior among foreign-born Asian Americans and how socio-demographic factors may influence the behavior. Even less is known about disaggregated Asian subgroups. Using data from the Chicago Asian Community Survey, a local health assessment survey of three Asian subgroups in Chicago, Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese, this study found that the colorectal cancer screening rate were much lower among foreign-born Asian Americans in Chicago (30 %) than the national rate for the general population (59 %). Furthermore, we studied disaggregated data to determine colorectal cancer screening differences between communities. Findings from this study provide a critical evidence base to inform future research and intervention designs. PMID:26863553

  13. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, vitamin D binding protein, and risk of colorectal cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Purdue, Mark P.; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.; Mondul, Alison M.; Black, Amanda; Ahn, Jiyoung; Huang, Wen-Yi; Horst, Ronald L.; Kopp, William; Rager, Helen; Ziegler, Regina G.; Albanes, Demetrius

    2014-01-01

    The potential role of vitamin D in cancer prevention has generated substantial interest, and laboratory experiments indicate several anti-cancer properties for vitamin D compounds. Prospective studies of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the accepted biomarker of vitamin D status, suggest an inverse association with colorectal cancer risk, but with some inconsistencies. Furthermore, the direct or indirect impact of the key transport protein, vitamin D binding protein (DBP), has not been examined. We conducted a prospective study of serum 25(OH)D and DBP concentrations and colorectal cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, based on 476 colorectal cancer cases and 476 controls, matched on age, sex, race, and date of serum collection. All subjects underwent sigmoidoscopic screening at baseline and once during follow-up. Conditional logistic regression estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Circulating 25(OH)D was inversely associated with colorectal cancer (OR=0.60, 95% CI 0.38-0.94 for highest versus lowest quintile, p-trend 0.01). Adjusting for recognized colorectal cancer risk factors and accounting for seasonal vitamin D variation did not alter the findings. Neither circulating DBP nor the 25(OH)D:DBP molar ratio, a proxy for free circulating 25(OH)D, was associated with risk (OR=0.82, 95% CI 0.54-1.26, and OR=0.79, 95% CI 0.52-1.21, respectively), and DBP did not modify the 25(OH)D association. The current study eliminated confounding by colorectal cancer screening behavior, and supports an association between higher vitamin D status and substantially lower colorectal cancer risk, but does not indicate a direct or modifying role for DBP. PMID:25156182

  14. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, vitamin D binding protein and risk of colorectal cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Stephanie J; Purdue, Mark P; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Mondul, Alison M; Black, Amanda; Ahn, Jiyoung; Huang, Wen-Yi; Horst, Ronald L; Kopp, William; Rager, Helen; Ziegler, Regina G; Albanes, Demetrius

    2015-03-15

    The potential role of vitamin D in cancer prevention has generated substantial interest, and laboratory experiments indicate several anti-cancer properties for vitamin D compounds. Prospective studies of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the accepted biomarker of vitamin D status, suggest an inverse association with colorectal cancer risk, but with some inconsistencies. Furthermore, the direct or indirect impact of the key transport protein, vitamin D binding protein (DBP), has not been examined. We conducted a prospective study of serum 25(OH)D and DBP concentrations and colorectal cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, based on 476 colorectal cancer cases and 476 controls, matched on age, sex, race and date of serum collection. All subjects underwent sigmoidoscopic screening at baseline and once during follow-up. Conditional logistic regression estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Circulating 25(OH)D was inversely associated with colorectal cancer (OR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.38-0.94 for highest versus lowest quintile, p trend 0.01). Adjusting for recognized colorectal cancer risk factors and accounting for seasonal vitamin D variation did not alter the findings. Neither circulating DBP nor the 25(OH)D:DBP molar ratio, a proxy for free circulating 25(OH)D, was associated with risk (OR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.54-1.26, and OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.52-1.21, respectively), and DBP did not modify the 25(OH)D association. The current study eliminated confounding by colorectal cancer screening behavior, and supports an association between higher vitamin D status and substantially lower colorectal cancer risk, but does not indicate a direct or modifying role for DBP. PMID:25156182

  15. Fecal-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Among the Uninsured in Northern Manhattan

    PubMed Central

    Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Schmitt, Karen M.; Freedberg, Daniel E.; Kramer, Rachel A.; Su, Yin; Rosenberg, Richard M.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces CRC mortality; however, for many reasons, uninsured individuals are less likely to utilize CRC screening tests. Purpose To compare CRC screening behaviors and outcomes with guaiac fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) from 1998 to 2006 and fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) from 2006 to 2010 in a community-based program serving uninsured patients in northern Manhattan. Methods In 2013, we conducted a retrospective record review of individuals aged ≥50 years who received fecal-based CRC screening at the Northern Manhattan Cancer Screening Partnership between 1998 and 2010. Included were those with household income ≤250% of the federal poverty level, no medical insurance coverage, and who were not up to date with CRC screening. We assessed screening positivity rate, positive predictive value, differences in the use of diagnostic colonoscopy, colonoscopic findings, and adenoma detection rates for gFOBT versus FIT. Results In total, 7,710 patients completed CRC screenings (4,951 gFOBT and 2,759 FIT). The majority were female, Hispanic, foreign born, and young at age of first screening. Compared to gFOBT, FIT detected twice as many positive tests (3.2% vs 1.5%, p≤0.001) and had a higher adenoma detection rate (18.2 vs 11.8, p=0.002). Conclusions The improved positivity and adenoma detection rates with greater number of screening tests over time favor the use of FIT over gFOBT for colorectal screening among uninsured populations in northern Manhattan. PMID:24951037

  16. Joint breast and colorectal cancer screenings in medically underserved women

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Terry C; Arnold, Connie L; Wolf, Michael S; Bennett, Charles L; Liu, Dachao; Rademaker, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast and colon cancer screening in rural community clinics is underused. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions designed to promote simultaneous screening for breast and colon cancer in community clinics. Methods A 3-arm, quasi-experimental evaluation was conducted during May 2008-August 2011 in 8 federally qualifed health clinics in predominately rural Louisiana. Baseline screening rates reported by the clinics was <10% for breast cancer (using mammography) and 1%-2% for colon cancer (using the fecal occult blood test [FOBT]). 744 women aged 50 years or older who were eligible for routine mammography and an FOBT were recruited. The combined screening efforts included: enhanced care; health literacy-informed education (education alone), or health literacy-informed education with nurse support (nurse support). Results Postintervention screening rates for completing both tests were 28.1% with enhanced care, 23.7% with education alone, and 38.7% with nurse support. After adjusting for age, race, and literacy, patients who received nurse support were 2.21 times more likely to complete both screenings than were those who received the education alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-4.38; P = .023). The incremental cost per additional woman completing both screenings was $3,987 for education with nurse support over education alone, and $5,987 over enhanced care. Limitations There were differences between the 3 arms in sociodemographic characteristics, literacy, and previous screening history. Not all variables that were significantly different between arms were adjusted for, therefore adjustments for key variables (age, race, literacy) were made in statistical analyses. Other limitations related generalizability of results. Conclusions Although joint breast and colon cancer screening rates were increased substantially over existing baseline rates in all 3 arms, the completion rate for both tests was

  17. Barriers to colorectal cancer screening in the developing world: The view from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Furqaan

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has become a defining concern of current gastroenterological practice in many Western nations. This same focus does not exist in many developing countries, including Pakistan. There is a need to develop a model for the developing world. Here are several areas that need to be pursued: (1) epidemiological research; (2) physician and public education; (3) training of gastroenterologists, especially female ones; (4) less expensive and more culturally acceptable screening options (fecal occult blood testing); and (5) cost-effectiveness analyses. Gastroenterologists in developing countries need to step up to educate people and promote, where possible and in keeping with local conditions, the prevention and early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. PMID:24199023

  18. Expressions of Machismo in Colorectal Cancer Screening Among New Mexico Hispanic Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Getrich, Christina M.; Sussman, Andrew L.; Helitzer, Deborah L.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Warner, Teddy D.; Sánchez, Victoria; Solares, Angélica; Rhyne, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Although national colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates have steadily decreased, the rate for New Mexico Hispanics has been increasing and screening rates are low. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to determine barriers to CRC screening for New Mexico Hispanics. We found that machismo served as a dynamic influence on men’s health seeking behaviors; however, it was conceptualized differently by two distinct Hispanic subpopulations and therefore appeared to play a different role in shaping their screening attitudes and behaviors. Machismo emerged as more of an influence for Mexican men, who expressed concern over colonoscopies being potentially transformative and/or stigmatizing, but was not as salient for Hispanos, who viewed the colonoscopy as “strictly medical” and were more concerned with discomfort and pain. This study highlights the importance of identifying varying characteristics among subpopulations to better understand screening barriers and provide optimal CRC screening counseling in primary care settings. PMID:22138258

  19. Colorectal Cancer Deaths Attributable to Nonuse of Screening in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Meester, Reinier G.S.; Doubeni, Chyke A.; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Goede, S.L.; Levin, Theodore R.; Quinn, Virginia P.; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Corley, Douglas A.; Zauber, Ann G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Screening is a major contributor to colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality reductions in the U.S., but is underutilized. We estimated the fraction of CRC deaths attributable to nonuse of screening to demonstrate the potential benefits from targeted interventions. Methods The established MISCAN-colon microsimulation model was used to estimate the population attributable fraction (PAF) in people aged ≥50 years. The model incorporates long-term patterns and effects of screening by age and type of screening test. PAF for 2010 was estimated using currently available data on screening uptake; PAF was also projected assuming constant future screening rates to incorporate lagged effects from past increases in screening uptake. We also computed PAF using Levin's formula to gauge how this simpler approach differs from the model-based approach. Results There were an estimated 51,500 CRC deaths in 2010, about 63% (N∼32,200) of which were attributable to non-screening. The PAF decreases slightly to 58% in 2020. Levin's approach yielded a considerably more conservative PAF of 46% (N∼23,600) for 2010. Conclusions The majority of current U.S. CRC deaths are attributable to non-screening. This underscores the potential benefits of increasing screening uptake in the population. Traditional methods of estimating PAF underestimated screening effects compared with model-based approaches. PMID:25721748

  20. Demographic, social cognitive and social ecological predictors of intention and participation in screening for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research points to differences between predictors of intention to screen for colorectal cancer (CRC) and screening behavior, and suggests social ecological factors may influence screening behavior. The aim of this study was to compare the social cognitive and social ecological predictors of intention to screen with predictors of participation. Methods People aged 50 to 74 years recruited from the electoral roll completed a baseline survey (n = 376) and were subsequently invited to complete an immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT). Results Multivariate analyses revealed five predictors of intention to screen and two predictors of participation. Perceived barriers to CRC screening and perceived benefits of CRC screening were the only predictor of both outcomes. There was little support for social ecological factors, but measurement problems may have impacted this finding. Conclusions This study has confirmed that the predictors of intention to screen for CRC and screening behaviour, although overlapping, are not the same. Research should focus predominantly on those factors shown to predict participation. Perceptions about the barriers to screening and benefits of screening are key predictors of participation, and provide a focus for intervention programs. PMID:21232156

  1. The effects of tailoring knowledge acquisition on colorectal cancer screening self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jerant, Anthony; To, Patricia; Franks, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Interventions tailored to psychological factors such as personal and vicarious behavioral experiences can enhance behavioral self-efficacy but are complex to develop and implement. Information seeking theory suggests tailoring acquisition of health knowledge (without concurrent psychological factor tailoring) could enhance self-efficacy, simplifying the design of tailored behavior change interventions. To begin to examine this issue, the authors conducted exploratory analyses of data from a randomized controlled trial, comparing the effects of an experimental colorectal cancer screening intervention tailoring knowledge acquisition with the effects of a nontailored control on colorectal cancer screening knowledge and self-efficacy in 1159 patients comprising three ethnicity/language strata (Hispanic/Spanish, 23.4%, Hispanic/English, 27.2%, non-Hispanic/English, 49.3%) and 5 recruitment center strata. Adjusted for study strata, the mean postintervention knowledge score was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Adjusted experimental intervention exposure (B = 0.22, 95% CI [0.14, 0.30]), preintervention knowledge (B = 0.11, 95% CI [0.05, 0.16]), and postintervention knowledge (B = 0.03, 95% CI [0.01, 0.05]) were independently associated with subsequent colorectal cancer screening self-efficacy (p < .001 all associations). These exploratory findings suggest that tailoring knowledge acquisition may enhance self-efficacy, with potential implications for tailored intervention design, but this implication requires confirmation in studies specifically designed to examine this issue. PMID:25928315

  2. Chemical and immunological testing for faecal occult blood in screening subjects at risk of familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, L M; Rooney, P S; Bostock, K; Robinson, M H; Hardcastle, J D; Armitage, N C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People with a family history of colorectal cancer have an increased risk of the disease themselves. Many centres are advocating family history screening by endoscopy. AIMS: The performance of chemical and immunological faecal occult blood tests (Haemoccult and Hemeselect) in 212 subjects with a family history of colorectal cancer was assessed. RESULTS: Both Hemeselect and Haemoccult were positive in the only patient with colorectal cancer. Hemeselect was more sensitive than Haemoccult for adenomas (40% compared with 20%) (adenomas larger than 1 cm 75% compared with 50%). No additional abnormality was detected by the addition of Haemoccult or Hemeselect to 60 cm flexible sigmoidoscopy in screening people at lower levels of familial risk. A false positive rate of 16% for Hemeselect resulted in a high proportion of additional colonoscopies in this group. CONCLUSIONS: At present faecal occult blood tests are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to replace endoscopy in screening people at risk of familial colorectal cancer. PMID:9155586

  3. Small Media and Client Reminders for Colorectal Cancer Screening: Current Use and Gap Areas in CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program

    PubMed Central

    Garibay, Lori B.; Pfeiffer, Debbie J.; Morgan, Jennifer C.; Thomas, Melonie; Wilson, Katherine M.; Pieters, Jennifer; Szczepaniec, Kellie; Scott, Amy; Poor, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) funds 25 states and 4 tribal organizations to promote and increase colorectal cancer screening population-wide. The CRCCP grantees must use evidence-based strategies from the Guide to Community Preventive Services, including small media and client reminders. Methods To assess the existing resources and needs to promote colorectal cancer screening, we conducted 2 web-based surveys of CRCCP grantees and their community partners. Survey 1 sought to identify priority populations, the number and quality of existing colorectal cancer resources for different population subgroups, and the types of small media and client reminder they were most interested in using. Survey 2 assessed screening messages that were used in the past or might be used in the future, needs for non-English–language information, and preferences for screening-related terminology. Results In survey 1 (n = 125 from 26 CRCCPs), most respondents (83%) indicated they currently had some information resources for promoting screening but were widely dissatisfied with the quality and number of these resources. They reported the greatest need for resources targeting rural populations (62% of respondents), men (53%), and Hispanics (45%). In survey 2 (n = 57 from 25 CRCCPs), respondents indicated they were most likely to promote colorectal cancer screening using messages that emphasized family (95%), role models (85%), or busy lives (83%), and least likely to use messages based on faith (26%), embarrassment (25%), or fear (22%). Nearly all (85%) indicated a need for resources in languages other than English; 16 different languages were mentioned, most commonly Spanish. Conclusion These findings provide the first picture of CRCCP information resources and interests, and point to specific gaps that must be addressed to help increase screening. PMID:22814237

  4. Structuring Health in Colorectal Cancer Screening Conversations: An Analysis of Intersecting Activity Systems

    PubMed Central

    Canary, Heather; Bullis, Connie; Cummings, Jennifer; Kinney, Anita Y.

    2016-01-01

    This study used structurating activity theory to analyze 21 conversations between genetic counselors and individuals at increased risk for familial colorectal cancer (CRC). The qualitative analysis revealed ways elements of family, primary healthcare, cancer prevention and treatment, and other systems emerged in intervention conversations as shaping CRC screening attitudes and behaviors. Results indicate that family stories, norms, and roles are resources for enacting health practices in families and that the authority of healthcare providers is a resource for making screening decisions. Conclusions include practical implications for using findings in clinical applications as well as future research directions to build on this exploratory study. PMID:27182185

  5. Colorectal cancer screening awareness and intentions among low income, sociodemographically diverse adults under age 50.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Karen; Puleo, Elaine; McNeill, Lorna H; Bennett, Gary; Chan, Sophia; Syngal, Sapna

    2008-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates in the US are suboptimal, particularly among lower income and racial/ethnically diverse groups. If specific populations have limited awareness of screening when they reach age 50, there may be delays in screening adoption. This study investigated sociodemographic and social contextual factors associated with awareness of CRC and intentions to be screened at age 50 among 692 low income, racial, and ethnic minority adults living in low income housing. The majority of respondents (62%) were between ages 30 and 49, and 94% had some form of health insurance (e.g., Medicaid). About 70% reported having heard about CRC screening; 66% reported intentions to be screened at age 50. In multivariable analyses, screening awareness was associated with age and education. Immigrants who had English as a second language had lower awareness. Females tended to have higher awareness if they had private insurance; there were no differences among males. Multivariable analyses found that screening intentions were higher among men, those with more role responsibilities, more role conflicts, and higher levels of social cohesion. It is important to identify opportunities for maximizing screening uptake among those who become age-eligible for screening if we are to make a significant impact on CRC disparities. PMID:18478340

  6. Effect of rehydration on guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing in colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Castiglione, G.; Biagini, M.; Barchielli, A.; Grazzini, G.; Mazzotta, A.; Salvadori, P.; Scillone, L.; Ciatto, S.

    1993-01-01

    Screening for colorectal cancer by means of unhydrated Hemoccult (HO) is in progress in the Province of Florence since 1982. In 1990 rehydrated HO was introduced in the town of Empoli. Five adjacent municipalities where screening had started in 1987 were selected for comparison. In both areas subjects aged 40-70 were invited by mail to undergo the screening protocol. HO-positive subjects were invited to undergo either pancolonoscopy or a combination of left colonoscopy and double contrast barium enema. HO-negative subjects were invited to repeat screening 2 years later. The positivity rate of HO was significantly higher (P < 0.001) for rehydrated (5%) as compared to unhydrated (3.1%) HO. The positive predictive values for cancer (unhydrated: 5.8%; rehydrated: 8.9%) and for adenomas (unhydrated: 26.7%; rehydrated: 25.5%) did not significantly differ. The detection rates of rehydrated HO were significantly higher as compared to unhydrated HO both for cancer (0.37% vs 0.15%; P < 0.05) and adenomas (1.06% vs 0.72%; P < 0.05%). In the present experience rehydration doesn't produce any decrease in the positive predictive value for cancer or adenomas and the increase in the positivity rate appears quite acceptable when considering the significant increase in the detection rates of cancer and adenomas. We conclude that rehydrated HO should be introduced as the standard test for screening in order to increase sensitivity for colorectal cancer and adenomas. PMID:8494714

  7. Physician colorectal cancer screening recommendations: An examination based on informed decision making☆

    PubMed Central

    Wackerbarth, Sarah B.; Tarasenko, Yelena N.; Joyce, Jennifer M.; Haist, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this research was to examine the content of physicians’ colorectal cancer screening recommendations. More specifically, using the framework of informed decision making synthesized by Braddock and colleagues, we conducted a qualitative study of the content of recommendations to describe how physicians are currently presenting this information to patients. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 65 primary care physicians. We analyzed responses to a question designed to elicit how the physicians typically communicate their recommendation. Results Almost all of the physicians (98.5%) addressed the “nature of decision” element. A majority of physicians discussed “uncertainties associated with the decision” (67.7%). Fewer physicians covered “the patient’s role in decision making” (33.8%), “risks and benefits” (16.9%), “alternatives” (10.8%), “assessment of patient understanding” (6.2%), or “exploration of patient’s preferences” (1.5%). Conclusion We propose that the content of the colorectal screening recommendation is a critical determinant to whether a patient undergoes screening. Our examination of physician recommendations yielded mixed results, and the deficiencies identified opportunities for improvement. Practice implications We suggest primary care physicians clarify that screening is meant for those who are asymptotic, present tangible and intangible benefits and risks, as well as make a primary recommendation, and, if needed, a “compromise” recommendation, in order to increase screening utilization. PMID:17098393

  8. A Media and Clinic Intervention to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening in Ohio Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Krok-Schoen, Jessica L.; Katz, Mira L.; Oliveri, Jill M.; Young, Gregory S.; Pennell, Michael L.; Reiter, Paul L.; Plascak, Jesse J.; Slater, Michael D.; Krieger, Janice L.; Tatum, Cathy M.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the effectiveness of a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening intervention among adults living in Ohio Appalachia. Methods. We conducted a group-randomized trial of a county-level intervention among adults living in 12 Ohio Appalachian counties who received a media campaign and clinic intervention focused on either CRC screening or fruits and vegetables. Participants' percentage within CRC screening guidelines was assessed with cross-sectional surveys conducted annually for four years, and validated with medical record review of screening. Results. On average, screening data were obtained on 564 intervention and 559 comparison participants per year. There was no difference in the Wave 4 CRC screening rates of intervention and comparison counties (35.2% versus 31.4%). Multivariate analyses found that high perceived risk of CRC, willingness to have a CRC test if recommended by a doctor, doctor recommendation of a CRC screening test, and patient-physician communication about changes in bowel habits, family history of CRC, and eating fruits and vegetables were significant (p < 0.05) predictors of being within CRC screening guidelines. Conclusions. The intervention was not effective in increasing CRC rates among Ohio Appalachian adults. Future research should determine how media and clinic-based interventions can be modified to improve CRC screening rates among this underserved population. PMID:26509172

  9. Colorectal cancer screening in the familial risk population: Is colonoscopy still the strategy of choice?

    PubMed

    Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Hernández-Álvarez-de-Buylla, Noemi; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Carrillo, Marta; Hernández, Goretti; Quintero, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    First-degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at high risk of this disease. For this reason, medical organizations and clinical guidelines recommend more intensive screening and surveillance for such first-degree relatives than for the average-risk population. Colonoscopy has been the cornerstone of CRC screening in this setting. Although colonoscopy is the most sensitive technique for the detection of neoplastic lesions (especially non-advanced adenomas), its role is less clear for CRC. In addition, screening colonoscopy has several limitations that may affect the success of a screening campaign, such as poor participant acceptance, the need for skilled endoscopists, participant access to screening colonoscopy, overburdened endoscopy units, potential complications, and procedure-related costs. In addition, recent evidence has cast doubt on the advantage of colonoscopy over other strategies for the detection of advanced neoplastic lesions. Despite being less sensitive in general, other screening methods frequently recommended in the average-risk population may be more acceptable and thus help increase CRC screening uptake. This review discusses recent evidence on the risk of CRC in first-degree relatives, the advantages and disadvantages of each screening technique, participation rates depending on the technique, patient preferences, and barriers to screening. PMID:26547615

  10. Determinants of participation in colonoscopic screening by siblings of colorectal cancer patients in France

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Targeted colonosocopic screening is recommended for first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients diagnosed before the age of 60 and offers the possibility of reducing morbidity and mortality, but participation remains too low. The objective of this study was to determine in a French population the factors that affect siblings' participation in screening, notably those relating to the individuals, their medical care, their family and their social network. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted in siblings of index patients having undergone surgery for colorectal cancer between 1999 and 2002 in two French counties. Siblings were contacted during 2007 and 2008 through the index patient. The factors affecting participation in colonoscopic screening were studied by logistic regression taking into account family cluster effect. Results 172 siblings of 74 index cases were included. The declared rate of undergoing at least one colonoscopy among siblings was 66%; 95%CI 59-73%. Five variables were independently associated with colonoscopic screening: perceiving fewer barriers to screening (OR = 3.2; 95%CI 1.2-8.5), having received the recommendation to undergo screening from a physician (OR = 4.9; 1.7-13.7), perceiving centres practising colonoscopy as more accessible (OR = 3.2, 1.3-7.8), having discussed screening with all siblings (OR = 3.9; 1.6-9.6) and being a member of an association (OR = 2.6; 1.0-6.6). Conclusions The factors independently associated with participation in CRC screening by an individual at increased risk belonged to each of four dimensions relating to his individual psychosocial characteristics, to his relationship with a physician, within the family and social environment. The relevance of these results to clinical practice may help to improve compliance to recommendations in a global preventive strategy including all stages of the information pathway from the physician to the index patient and his relatives. PMID:20602807

  11. Cost Effectiveness of Colorectal Cancer Screening Interventions with Their Effects on Health Disparity Being Considered

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang-Sig; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening interventions with their effects on health disparity being considered. Materials and Methods Markov cohort simulation was conducted with the cycle/duration of 1/40 year(s). Data came from the results of randomized trials and others. Participants were hypothetical cohorts aged 50 years as of year 2013 in 16 Korean provinces. The interventions until the age of 80 were annual organized fecal occult blood test (FOBT) (standard screening), annual FOBT with basic reminders for provinces with higher mortalities than the national average (targeted reminder) and annual FOBT with basic/enhanced reminders for all provinces (universal reminder 1 and 2). The comparison was non-screening, the outcome was quality-adjusted life years, and only medical costs for screening and treatment were considered from a societal perspective. The Atkinson incremental cost effectiveness ratio (Atkinson ICER), the incremental cost effectiveness ratio adjusted by the Atkinson Inequality Index, was used to evaluate the cost effectiveness of the four interventions with their impacts on regional health disparity being considered. Results Health disparity was smallest (or greatest) in non-screening (or the standard screening). The targeted reminder had smaller health disparity, and smaller Atkinson ICER with respect to standard screening, than did the universal reminder 1 and 2. Conclusion The targeted reminder might be more cost effective than the universal reminders with their effects on health disparity being considered. This study helps to develop promotional effort for colorectal cancer screening with both the greatest cost effectiveness and the smallest health disparity PMID:26727714

  12. Disparities in colorectal cancer screening behaviors: implications for African American men.

    PubMed

    Oliver, JoAnn S; Worley, Courtney B; DeCoster, Jamie; Palardy, Leslie; Kim, Giyeon; Reddy, Adisesha; Allen, Rebecca S

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines published by the American College of Gastroenterologists suggest that African Americans (AA) begin preventive screening at the age of 45 years due to increased risk of colorectal cancer. This study examines characteristics associated with having fecal occult blood tests (FOBT), sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy among adults aged 45-75 years. Using cross-sectional data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey, the sample included 3,725 participants (mean age = 59.01 ± 8.41), with 59.8% female, 88.8% Caucasian, and 11.2% AA. Binary logistic regression with interactions between race, gender, and age entered in block 2 revealed that odds of having FOBT, colonoscopy, or sigmoidoscopy were increased among older individuals with higher education. Fecal occult blood test was higher among women and those with insurance. Colonoscopy was higher among those with insurance and higher income. Having a sigmoidoscopy was more likely among those with higher income but was lower among AA men. Understanding the characteristics of individuals who participate in colorectal cancer screenings may contribute to the development of interventions geared toward those who do not, particularly AA men who are at greatest risk for colorectal morbidity and mortality. PMID:22472668

  13. Older adults’ preferences for colorectal cancer-screening test attributes and test choice

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, Christine E; Hess, Thomas M; Howard, Kirsten; Pignone, Michael P; Crutchfield, Trisha M; Hawley, Sarah T; Brenner, Alison T; Ward, Kimberly T; Lewis, Carmen L

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding which attributes of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening tests drive older adults’ test preferences and choices may help improve decision making surrounding CRC screening in older adults. Materials and methods To explore older adults’ preferences for CRC-screening test attributes and screening tests, we conducted a survey with a discrete choice experiment (DCE), a directly selected preferred attribute question, and an unlabeled screening test-choice question in 116 cognitively intact adults aged 70–90 years, without a history of CRC or inflammatory bowel disease. Each participant answered ten discrete choice questions presenting two hypothetical tests comprised of four attributes: testing procedure, mortality reduction, test frequency, and complications. DCE responses were used to estimate each participant’s most important attribute and to simulate their preferred test among three existing CRC-screening tests. For each individual, we compared the DCE-derived attributes to directly selected attributes, and the DCE-derived preferred test to a directly selected unlabeled test. Results Older adults do not overwhelmingly value any one CRC-screening test attribute or prefer one type of CRC-screening test over other tests. However, small absolute DCE-derived preferences for the testing procedure attribute and for sigmoidoscopy-equivalent screening tests were revealed. Neither general health, functional, nor cognitive health status were associated with either an individual’s most important attribute or most preferred test choice. The DCE-derived most important attribute was associated with each participant’s directly selected unlabeled test choice. Conclusion Older adults’ preferences for CRC-screening tests are not easily predicted. Medical providers should actively explore older adults’ preferences for CRC screening, so that they can order a screening test that is concordant with their patients’ values. Effective interventions are

  14. Anticipated regret to increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening in Scotland (ARTICS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the UK. Screening is key to early detection. The Scottish programme of colorectal cancer screening is running successfully, and involves all adults aged between 50 and 74 years being invited to post back a faecal sample for testing every 2 years. However, screening uptake is sub-optimal: for example rates for the period November 2009 to October 2011 ranged from just 39% for males living in the most deprived areas to 67% for least deprived females. Recent research has shown that asking people to consider the emotional consequences of not participating in screening (anticipated regret) can lead to a significant increase in screening uptake. Methods/Design We will test a simple anticipated regret manipulation, in a large randomised controlled trial with 60,000 members of the general public. They will be randomly allocated to one of 3 arms, no questionnaire, control questionnaire or anticipated regret questionnaire. The primary outcome will be screening test kit return. Results will also be examined by demographic variables (age, gender, deprivation) as these are currently related to screening kit return. Discussion If this anticipated regret intervention leads to a significant increase in colorectal cancer screening kit returns, this would represent a rare example of a theoretically-driven, simple intervention that could result in earlier detection of colorectal cancer and many more lives saved. Trial registration Current Controlled trials: ISRCTN74986452 PMID:24041309

  15. Effectively Communicating Colorectal Cancer Screening Information to Primary Care Providers: Application for State, Tribe or Territory Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Jennifer; Vanderpool, Robin; McClung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients are more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer if it is recommended by a health care provider. Therefore, it is imperative that providers have access to the latest screening guidelines. Purpose: This practice-based project sought to identify Kentucky primary care providers' preferred sources and methods of receiving…

  16. The Green Acres Effect: The Need for a New Colorectal Cancer Screening Campaign Tailored to Rural Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, Shelly; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Routsong, Tracy; Graaf, Lorrie J.; Losch, Mary; Smith, Holly

    2008-01-01

    National health communication campaign developers have ignored rural audiences in campaign development and testing, despite the health disparities that exist for this group. Researchers in a rural Midwestern state tested the appropriateness of CDC's national colorectal cancer screening campaign, Screen for Life. Based on focus groups and a…

  17. Colorectal Cancer Screening Practices Among Men and Women in Rural and Nonrural Areas of the United States, 1999

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, Steven S.; Thompson, Trevor D.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that men and women in rural areas are less likely than those in urban areas to receive routine cancer screening. Methods: We examined the colorectal cancer screening practices of men (n = 23,565) and women (n = 37,847) aged >50 years living in rural areas and other areas of the United States using data from the 1999…

  18. Development of an Educational Video to Improve Patient Knowledge and Communication with Their Healthcare Providers about Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Mira L.; Heaner, Sarah; Reiter, Paul; van Putten, Julie; Murray, Lee; McDougle, Leon; Cegala, Donald J.; Post, Douglas; David, Prabu; Slater, Michael; Paskett, Electra D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening persist due to individual, provider, and system level barriers. Purpose: To develop and obtain initial feedback about a CRC screening educational video from community members and medical professionals. Methods: Focus groups of patients were conducted prior to the development of the CRC…

  19. Colorectal cancer screening knowledge, attitudes and behavioural intention among Indigenous Western Australians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Indigenous Australians are significantly less likely to participate in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening compared to non-Indigenous people. This study aimed to identify important factors influencing the decision to undertake screening using Faecal Occult Blood Testing (FOBT) among Indigenous Australians. Very little evidence exists to guide interventions and programmatic approaches for facilitating screening uptake in this population in order to reduce the disparity in colorectal cancer outcomes. Methods Interviewer-administered surveys were carried out with a convenience sample (n = 93) of Indigenous Western Australians between November 2009-March 2010 to assess knowledge, awareness, attitudes and behavioural intent in regard to CRC and CRC screening. Results Awareness and knowledge of CRC and screening were low, although both were significantly associated with exposure to media advertising (p = 0.008; p < 0.0001). Nearly two-thirds (63%; 58/92) of respondents reported intending to participate in screening, while a greater proportion (84%; 77/92) said they would participate on a doctor’s recommendation. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression demonstrated that independent predictors of screening intention were, greater perceived self-efficacy (OR = 19.8, 95% CI = 5.5-71.8), a history of cancer screening participation (OR = 6.8, 95% CI = 2.0-23.3) and being aged 45 years or more (OR = 4.5, 95% CI = 1.2-16.5). A higher CRC knowledge score (medium vs. low: OR = 9.9, 95% CI = 2.4-41.3; high vs. low: 13.6, 95% CI = 3.4-54.0) and being married or in a de-facto relationship (OR = 6.9, 95% CI = 2.1-22.5) were also identified as predictors of intention to screen with FOBT. Conclusions Improving CRC related knowledge and confidence to carry out the FOBT self-screening test through education and greater promotion of screening has the potential to enhance Indigenous participation in CRC screening

  20. Contributing Factors to Colorectal Cancer Screening among Chinese People: A Review of Quantitative Studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Doris Y P; Chow, Ka Ming; Lo, Sally W S; So, Winnie K W; Chan, Carmen W H

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem in Asia. It has been reported that the Chinese are more susceptible to CRC than many other ethnic groups. Screening for CRC is a cost-effective prevention and control strategy; however, the screening rates among the Chinese are sub-optimal. We conducted a review to identify the factors associated with CRC screening participation among Chinese people. Twenty-two studies that examined the factors related to CRC screening behaviors among the Chinese were identified through five databases. Seven factors were consistently reported to influence CRC screening behaviors in at least one of the studies: socio-demographic characteristics (educational level, health insurance, and knowledge about CRC and its screening); psychological factors (perceived severity of CRC, susceptibility of having CRC, and barriers to screening); and contact with medical provider (physician recommendation). The evidence base for many of these relationships is quite limited. Furthermore, the associations of many factors, including age, gender, income, cancer worry/fear, and self-efficacy with CRC screening behaviors, were mixed or inconsistent across these studies, thereby indicating that more studies are needed in this area. PMID:27196920

  1. Contributing Factors to Colorectal Cancer Screening among Chinese People: A Review of Quantitative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Doris Y. P.; Chow, Ka Ming; Lo, Sally W. S.; So, Winnie K. W.; Chan, Carmen W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem in Asia. It has been reported that the Chinese are more susceptible to CRC than many other ethnic groups. Screening for CRC is a cost-effective prevention and control strategy; however, the screening rates among the Chinese are sub-optimal. We conducted a review to identify the factors associated with CRC screening participation among Chinese people. Twenty-two studies that examined the factors related to CRC screening behaviors among the Chinese were identified through five databases. Seven factors were consistently reported to influence CRC screening behaviors in at least one of the studies: socio-demographic characteristics (educational level, health insurance, and knowledge about CRC and its screening); psychological factors (perceived severity of CRC, susceptibility of having CRC, and barriers to screening); and contact with medical provider (physician recommendation). The evidence base for many of these relationships is quite limited. Furthermore, the associations of many factors, including age, gender, income, cancer worry/fear, and self-efficacy with CRC screening behaviors, were mixed or inconsistent across these studies, thereby indicating that more studies are needed in this area. PMID:27196920

  2. The influence of health literacy on colorectal cancer screening knowledge, beliefs and behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Neeraja B.; Dwyer, Kathleen A.; Mulvaney, Shelagh A.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Rothman, Russell L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if health literacy is associated with knowledge of colorectal cancer (CRC) and CRC screening tests, with perceived benefits and barriers to CRC screening, with perceived risk of CRC, with reported self-efficacy for completing CRC screening and with receipt of CRC tests. METHODS: A convenience sample of 99 subjects completed a health literacy assessment, the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and a structured interview. RESULTS: Limited or inadequate health literacy was significantly associated with less knowledge about CRC and CRC screening and with more reported barriers to completing fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy in multivariate analysis. Health literacy was not associated with perceived benefits or reported self-efficacy for completing FOBT or colonoscopy, with perceived risk of developing CRC or with completing CRC tests. However, our small sample size limited our power to detect differences. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with limited health literacy have less knowledge about CRC and CRC screening and report more barriers to completing FOBT and colonoscopy. Interventions to improve CRC screening should consider the health literacy of patients, especially when addressing barriers to screening. Future studies are needed to better define the role of health literacy in CRC screening. PMID:17987913

  3. Decisional stage distribution for colorectal cancer screening among diverse, low-income study participants

    PubMed Central

    Hester, C. M.; Born, W. K.; Yeh, H. W.; Young, K. L.; James, A. S.; Daley, C. M.; Greiner, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening uptake among minorities and those with lower incomes is suboptimal. Behavioral interventions specifically tailored to these populations can increase screening rates and save lives. The Precaution Adoption Process Model (PAPM) allows assignment of a decisional stage for adoption of a behavior such as CRC screening. Here, we characterize the PAPM decisional stage distribution among 470 low income, racially and ethnically diverse study participants at intake into a behavioral intervention study designed to increase CRC screening uptake. We staged participants for stool blood test (SBT) and colonoscopy separately and used the highest stage for the two tests as the ‘overall’ stage for CRC screening. For SBT, sex, language (English versus Spanish) and doctor recommendation were significantly related to PAPM stage for CRC screening. For colonoscopy, language, education level, doctor recommendation and self-efficacy were related to stage. For overall CRC screening stage, all the variables associated with either SBT or colonoscopy, with the exception of language were significant. This study suggests attending to these key variables in designing interventions to promote CRC screening, particularly with respect to medically underserved populations. PMID:25721254

  4. Recruitment methods employed in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial

    PubMed Central

    Gren, Lisa; Broski, Karen; Childs, Jeffery; Cordes, Jill; Engelhard, Deborah; Gahagan, Betsy; Gamito, Eduard; Gardner, Vivien; Geisser, Mindy; Higgins, Darlene; Jenkins, Victoria; Lamerato, Lois; Lappe, Karen; Lowery, Heidi; McGuire, Colleen; Miedzinski, Mollie; Ogden, Sheryl; Tenorio, Sally; Watt, Gavin; Wohlers, Bonita; Marcus, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Background The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) is a US National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate whether certain screening tests reduce mortality from prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer. To obtain adequate statistical power, it was necessary to enroll over 150,000 healthy volunteers. Recruitment began in 1993 and ended in 2001. Purpose Our goal is to evaluate the success of recruitment methods employed by the 10 PLCO screening centers. We also provide estimates of recruitment yield and cost for our most successful strategy, direct mail. Methods Each screening center selected its own methods of recruitment. Methods changed throughout the recruitment period as needed. For this manuscript, representatives from each screening center provided information on methods utilized and their success. Results In the United States between 1993 and 2001, ten screening centers enrolled 154,934 study participants. Based on participant self-report, an estimated 95% of individuals were recruited by direct mail. Overall, enrollment yield for direct mail was 1.0%. Individual center enrollment yield ranged from 0.7% to 3.8%. Cost per enrolled participant was $9.64–35.38 for direct mail, excluding personnel costs. Limitations Numeric data on recruitment processes were not kept consistently at individual screening centers. Numeric data in this manuscript are based on the experiences of 5 of the 10 centers. Conclusions Direct mail, using rosters of names and addresses from profit and not-for-profit (including government) organizations, was the most successful and most often used recruitment method. Other recruitment strategies, such as community outreach and use of mass media, can be an important adjunct to direct mail in recruiting minority populations. PMID:19254935

  5. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  6. Randomization to Screening for Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancers and Thyroid Cancer Incidence in Two Large Cancer Screening Trials

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, Thomas J.; Kitahara, Cari M.; DiRienzo, A. Gregory; Boscoe, Francis P.; Gates, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer incidence has increased significantly over the past three decades due, in part, to incidental detection. We examined the association between randomization to screening for lung, prostate, colorectal and/or ovarian cancers and thyroid cancer incidence in two large prospective randomized screening trials. Methods We assessed the association between randomization to low-dose helical CT scan versus chest x-ray for lung cancer screening and risk of thyroid cancer in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). In the Prostate Lung Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO), we assessed the association between randomization to regular screening for said cancers versus usual medical care and thyroid cancer risk. Over a median 6 and 11 years of follow-up in NLST and PLCO, respectively, we identified 60 incident and 234 incident thyroid cancer cases. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the cause specific hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for thyroid cancer. Results In NLST, randomization to lung CT scan was associated with a non-significant increase in thyroid cancer risk (HR  = 1.61; 95% CI: 0.96–2.71). This association was stronger during the first 3 years of follow-up, during which participants were actively screened (HR  = 2.19; 95% CI: 1.07–4.47), but not subsequently (HR  = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.49–2.37). In PLCO, randomization to cancer screening compared with usual care was associated with a significant decrease in thyroid cancer risk for men (HR  = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.49–0.95) but not women (HR  = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.66–1.26). Similar results were observed when restricting to papillary thyroid cancer in both NLST and PLCO. Conclusion Our study suggests that certain medical encounters, such as those using low-dose helical CT scan for lung cancer screening, may increase the detection of incidental thyroid cancer. PMID:25192282

  7. Improving colorectal cancer screening in primary care practice: innovative strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Lanier, David; Breslau, Erica S; Zapka, Jane G; Fletcher, Robert H; Ransohoff, David F; Winawer, Sidney J

    2007-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been supported by strong research evidence and recommended in clinical practice guidelines for more than a decade. Yet screening rates in the United States remain low, especially relative to other preventable diseases such as breast and cervical cancer. To understand the reasons, the National Cancer Institute and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality sponsored a review of CRC screening implementation in primary care and a program of research funded by these organizations. The evidence base for improving CRC screening supports the value of a New Model of Primary Care Delivery: 1. a team approach, in which responsibility for screening tasks is shared among other members of the practice, would help address physicians' lack of time for preventive care; 2. information systems can identify eligible patients and remind them when screening is due; 3. involving patients in decisions about their own care may enhance screening participation; 4. monitoring practice performance, supported by information systems, can help target patients at increased risk because of family history or social disadvantage; 5. reimbursement for services outside the traditional provider-patient encounter, such as telephone and e-mail contacts, may foster enhanced screening delivery; 6. training opportunities in communication, cultural competence, and use of information technologies would improve provider competence in core elements of screening programs. Improvement in CRC screening rates largely depends on the efforts of primary care practices to implement effective systems and procedures for screening delivery. Active engagement and support of practices are essential for the enormous potential of CRC screening to be realized. PMID:17534688

  8. Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening in Primary Care Practice: Innovative Strategies and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, David; Breslau, Erica S.; Zapka, Jane G.; Fletcher, Robert H.; Ransohoff, David F.; Winawer, Sidney J.

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been supported by strong research evidence and recommended in clinical practice guidelines for more than a decade. Yet screening rates in the United States remain low, especially relative to other preventable diseases such as breast and cervical cancer. To understand the reasons, the National Cancer Institute and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality sponsored a review of CRC screening implementation in primary care and a program of research funded by these organizations. The evidence base for improving CRC screening supports the value of a New Model of Primary Care Delivery: 1. a team approach, in which responsibility for screening tasks is shared among other members of the practice, would help address physicians’ lack of time for preventive care; 2. information systems can identify eligible patients and remind them when screening is due; 3. involving patients in decisions about their own care may enhance screening participation; 4. monitoring practice performance, supported by information systems, can help target patients at increased risk because of family history or social disadvantage; 5. reimbursement for services outside the traditional provider—patient encounter, such as telephone and e-mail contacts, may foster enhanced screening delivery; 6. training opportunities in communication, cultural competence, and use of information technologies would improve provider competence in core elements of screening programs. Improvement in CRC screening rates largely depends on the efforts of primary care practices to implement effective systems and procedures for screening delivery. Active engagement and support of practices are essential for the enormous potential of CRC screening to be realized. PMID:17534688

  9. Fruit and vegetable intakes and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenomas in the PLCO cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Kunzmann, Andrew T; Coleman, Helen G; Huang, Wen-Yi; Cantwell, Marie M; Kitahara, Cari M; Berndt, Sonja I

    2016-04-15

    The roles of fruits and vegetables in colorectal cancer development are unclear. Few prospective studies have assessed the association with adenoma, a known precursor to colorectal cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the association between fruit and vegetable intake and colorectal cancer development by evaluating the risk of incident and recurrent colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer. Study participants were identified from the intervention arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Fruit and vegetable intake was measured using a self-reported dietary questionnaire. Total fruit and vegetable intake was not associated with reduced incident or recurrent adenoma risk overall, but a protective association was observed for multiple adenomas (Odds ratio 3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38, 1.00). Higher fruit and vegetable intakes were associated with a borderline reduced risk of colorectal cancer (Hazard ratio (HR) 3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.67, 1.01), which reached significance amongst individuals with high processed meat intakes (HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55, 0.99). Our results suggest that increased fruit and vegetable intake may protect against multiple adenoma development and may reduce the detrimental effects of high processed meat intakes on colorectal cancer risk. PMID:26559156

  10. Influence of a screening navigation program on social inequalities in health beliefs about colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Fanny; Guillaume, Elodie; Dejardin, Olivier; Guittet, Lydia; Bouvier, Véronique; Mignon, Astrid; Berchi, Célia; Salinas, Agnès; Launoy, Guy; Christophe, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to test whether a screening navigation program leads to more favorable health beliefs and decreases social inequalities in them. The selected 261 noncompliant participants in a screening navigation versus a usual screening program arm had to respond to health belief measures inspired by the Protection Motivation Theory. Regression analyses showed that social inequalities in perceived efficacy of screening, favorable attitude, and perceived facility were reduced in the screening navigation compared to the usual screening program. These results highlight the importance of health beliefs to understand the mechanism of screening navigation programs in reducing social inequalities. PMID:25549659

  11. Navigating the murky waters of colorectal cancer screening and health reform.

    PubMed

    Green, Beverly B; Coronado, Gloria D; Devoe, Jennifer E; Allison, James

    2014-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates that both Medicaid and insurance plans cover life-saving preventive services recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force, including colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and choice between colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and fecal occult blood testing (FOBT). People who choose FOBT or sigmoidoscopy as their initial test could face high, unexpected, out-of-pocket costs because the mandate does not cover needed follow-up colonoscopies after positive tests. Some people will have no coverage for any CRC screening because of lack of state participation in the ACA or because they do not qualify (e.g., immigrant workers). Existing disparities in CRC screening and mortality will worsen if policies are not corrected to fully cover both initial and follow-up testing. PMID:24825195

  12. Using the transtheoretical model to stage screening behavior for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Trauth, Jeanette M; Ling, Bruce S; Weissfeld, Joel L; Schoen, Robert E; Hayran, Mutlu

    2003-06-01

    This study sought to describe the colorectal cancer (CRC)-screening behavior of a population of two lower income communities near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The transtheoretical model was used to characterize individuals according to their stage of readiness to engage in one of two recommended CRC screening tests--the Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) or Flexible Sigmoidoscopy (FSG) test. A telephone survey was conducted of 50- to 79-year-old men and women in Aliquippa and Clairton in the spring of 1999. Analyses based on 414 survey respondents showed associations between FOBT or FSG behavioral stage and factors including gender, age, recent doctor checkup, chronic need for prescription medications, history of cervical Pap smear testing, history of prostate-specific antigen blood testing, and prior doctor recommendation in favor of FOBT or FSG testing. This study appears to be one of the first applications of this theory to understanding CRC screening behavior in a community intervention. PMID:19731499

  13. Effect of Tribal Language Use on Colorectal Cancer Screening among American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Angela A.; Garroutte, Eva; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-01-01

    American Indians have one of the lowest colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates for any racial/ethnic group in the U.S., yet reasons for their low screening participation are poorly understood. Limited English language use may create barriers to cancer screening in Hispanic and other ethnic minority immigrant populations; the extent to which this hypothesis is generalizable to American Indians is unknown. We examine whether tribal (indigenous) language use is associated with knowledge and use of CRC screening in a community-based sample of American Indians. Using logistic regression to estimate the association between tribal language use and CRC test knowledge and receipt we found participants speaking primarily English were no more aware of CRC screening tests than those speaking primarily a tribal language (OR=1.16 [0.29, 4.63]). Participants who spoke only a tribal language at home (OR=1.09 [0.30, 4.00]) and those who spoke both a tribal language and English (OR=1.74 [0.62, 4.88]) also showed comparable rates of knowledge and receipt of CRC screening. Study findings failed to support the concept that primary use of a tribal language is a barrier to CRC screening among American Indians. PMID:22402926

  14. Neighborhood Satisfaction and Colorectal Cancer Screening in a Community Sample of African Americans.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Melvin, Cathy; Briggs, Vanessa; Delmoor, Ernestine; Rice, LaShanta J; Lynch, Cheryl; Jefferson, Melanie; Johnson, Jerry C

    2016-02-01

    Social determinants are important to cancer screening among African Americans. To evaluate the association between social determinants (e.g., psychological characteristics, perceived social environment, cultural beliefs such as present temporal orientation) and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among African Americans. African American adults (n = 262) ages 50-75 completed a telephone interview. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors having significant independent associations with CRC screening. Only 57% of respondents reported having CRC screening. The likelihood of screening increased with greater neighborhood satisfaction (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.90, p = 0.04), older age (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.24, 2.48, p = 0.002), greater self-efficacy (OR = 2.73, 95% CI = 1.40, 5.35, p = 0.003), and health care provider communication (OR = 10.78, 95% CI = 4.85, 29.94, p = 0.0001). Community resources are important precursors to CRC screening and outcomes among African Americans. In addition to addressing psychological factors and patient-provider communication, efforts to ensure the availability of quality health care facilities that provide CRC screening in the neighborhoods where African Americans live are needed. PMID:26184107

  15. Neighborhood Satisfaction and Colorectal Cancer Screening in a Community Sample of African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Melvin, Cathy; Briggs, Vanessa; Delmoor, Ernestine; Rice, LaShanta J.; Lynch, Cheryl; Jefferson, Melanie; Johnson, Jerry C.

    2016-01-01

    Social determinants are important to cancer screening among African Americans. To evaluate the association between social determinants (e.g., psychological characteristics, perceived social environment, cultural beliefs such as present temporal orientation) and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among African Americans. African American adults (n = 262) ages 50–75 completed a telephone interview. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors having significant independent associations with CRC screening. Only 57 % of respondents reported having CRC screening. The likelihood of screening increased with greater neighborhood satisfaction (OR = 1.38, 95 % CI = 1.01, 1.90, p = 0.04), older age (OR = 1.75, 95 % CI = 1.24, 2.48, p = 0.002), greater self-efficacy (OR = 2.73, 95 % CI = 1.40, 5.35, p = 0.003), and health care provider communication (OR = 10.78, 95 % CI = 4.85, 29.94, p = 0.0001). Community resources are important precursors to CRC screening and outcomes among African Americans. In addition to addressing psychological factors and patient– provider communication, efforts to ensure the availability of quality health care facilities that provide CRC screening in the neighborhoods where African Americans live are needed. PMID:26184107

  16. The Association of Area Socioeconomic Status and Breast, Cervical, and Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Shim, Matthew J.; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Vernon, Sally W.; Amick, Benjamin C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although numerous studies have examined the association of area socioeconomic status (SES) and cancer screening after controlling for individual SES, findings have been inconsistent. A systematic review of existing studies is timely in order to identify conceptual and methodologic limitations and to provide a basis for future research directions and policy. Objective The objectives were to: 1) describe the study designs, constructs, methods, and measures; 2) describe the independent association of area SES and cancer screening; and 3) identify neglected areas of research. Methods We searched 6 electronic databases and manually searched cited and citing articles. Eligible studies were published before 2008 in peer-reviewed journals in English, represented primary data on individuals aged ≥18 years from developed countries, and measured the association of area and individual SES with breast, cervical, or colorectal cancer screening. Results Of 19 eligible studies, most measured breast cancer screening. Studies varied widely in research design, definitions and measures of SES, cancer screening behaviors, and covariates. Eight employed multilevel logistic regression, the remainder analyzed data with standard single level logistic regression. The majority measured 1 or 2 indicators of area and individual SES; common indicators at both levels were poverty, income, and education. There was no consistent pattern in the association between area SES and cancer screening. Discussion The gaps and conceptual and methodologic heterogeneity in the literature to date limit definitive conclusions about an underlying association between area SES and cancer screening. We identify five areas of research deserving greater attention in the literature. PMID:19815634

  17. Initial results of the National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Poskus, Tomas; Strupas, Kestutis; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Bitinaitė, Dominyka; Kavaliauskas, Augustas; Samalavicius, Narimantas E; Saladzinskas, Zilvinas

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program (the Program) in Lithuania according to the criteria set by the European Union. In Lithuania, screening services are provided free of charge to the population. The National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) reimburses the institutions for performing each service; each procedure within the Program has its own administrative code. All the information about the performance of the Program is collected in one institution - the NHIF. The results of the Program were retrieved from the database of NHIF from the start of the Program from 1 July 2009 to 1 July 2012. Descriptive analysis of epidemiological indicators was carried out. Results were compared with the references in the guidelines of the European Union for quality assurance in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and diagnosis. Information service [which involves fecal immunochemical test (FIT)] was provided to 271,396 of 890,309 50-74-year-old residents. The screening uptake was 46.0% over 3 years. During this period, 19,455 (7.2%) FITs were positive and 251,941 (92.8%) FITs were negative. Referral for colonoscopy was performed in 10,190 (52.4%) patients. Colonoscopy was performed in 12,864 (66.1%) patients. Colonoscopy did not indicate any pathological findings in 8613 (67.0%) patients. Biopsies were performed in 4251 (33.0%) patients. The rate of high-grade neoplasia reported by pathologists was 3.9%; the rate of cancer was 3.1% of all colonoscopies. The rate of CRC detected by the Program was 0.2%. The CRC screening program in Lithuania meets most of the requirements for standardized CRC screening programs. The invitation coverage and rate of referral for colonoscopy after positive FIT should be improved. PMID:25370682

  18. Colorectal Cancer in the Arab World--Screening Practices and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Mostafa A; Farhat, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates have dropped 30% in the US in the last 10 years among adults ages 50 and older due to the widespread uptake of colonoscopy, yet incidences in the Arab countries have been increasing in the past ten years, albeit with lower figures when compared with developed countries. Lifestyle changes, food consumption patterns and obesity have been observed during the past years where the regular consumption of traditional foods is being replaced with more Western-style and ready-made foods. Most high income countries have implemented population based colorectal cancer screening programs, which aid in decreasing the incidence and mortality of cancer, while these are lacking in most of the Arab world countries due to many cultural and religious barriers to CRC screening as well as lack of high education or familiarity. What is needed is health education to modify risky lifestyle, and to increase motives and enhance positive attitudes towards early screening especially amongst high risk groups in addition to policy designed to encourage healthier living. PMID:26625738

  19. An Examination of Sexual Orientation Group Patterns in Mammographic and Colorectal Screening in a Cohort of U.S. Women

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S. Bryn; Pazaris, Mathew J.; Nichols, Lauren P.; Bowen, Deborah; Wei, Esther K.; Spiegelman, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Underutilization of cancer screening has been found especially to affect socially marginalized groups. We investigated sexual orientation group patterns in breast and colorectal cancer screening adherence. Methods Data on breast and colorectal cancer screening, sexual orientation, and sociodemographics were gathered prospectively from 1989 through 2005 from 85,759 U.S. women in the Nurses' Health Study II. Publicly available data on state-level health care quality and sexual orientation-related legal protections were also gathered. Multivariable models were used to estimate sexual orientation-group differences in breast and colorectal cancer screening, controlling for sociodemographics and state-level health care quality and legal protections for sexual minorities. Results Receipt of a mammogram in the past two years was common though not universal and differed only slightly by sexual orientation: heterosexual 84%; bisexual 79%; lesbian 82%. Fewer than half of eligible women had ever received a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, and rates did not differ by sexual orientation: heterosexual 39%; bisexual 39%; lesbian 42%. In fully adjusted models, state-level health care quality score, though not state-level legal protections for sexual minorities, was positively associated with likelihood of being screened for all women regardless of sexual orientation. Conclusions Concerns have been raised that unequal health care access for sexual orientation minorities may adversely affect cancer screening. We found small disparities in mammography and none in colorectal screening, though adherence to colorectal screening recommendations was uniformly very low. Interventions are needed to increase screening in women of all sexual orientation groups, particularly in areas with poor health care policies. PMID:22729931

  20. Patients' perceptions of colorectal cancer screening tests and preparatory education in federally qualified health centers.

    PubMed

    Gwede, Clement K; Koskan, Alexis M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Davis, Stacy N; Ealey, Jamila; Abdulla, Rania; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Elliott, Gloria; Lopez, Diana; Shibata, David; Roetzheim, Richard G; Meade, Cathy D

    2015-06-01

    This study explored federally qualified health center (FQHC) patients' perceptions about colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) tests, including immunochemical fecal occult blood tests (iFOBT), as well as preferences for receiving in-clinic education about CRCS. Eight mixed gender focus groups were conducted with 53 patients. Findings centered on three thematic factors: (1) motivators and impediments to CRCS, (2) test-specific preferences and receptivity to iFOBTs, and (3) preferences for entertaining and engaging plain language materials. Results informed the development of educational priming materials to increase CRCS using iFOBT in FQHCs. PMID:25249181

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening in Switzerland: Cross-Sectional Trends (2007-2012) in Socioeconomic Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Fedewa, Stacey A.; Cullati, Stéphane; Bouchardy, Christine; Welle, Ida; Burton-Jeangros, Claudine; Manor, Orly; Courvoisier, Delphine S.; Guessous, Idris

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite universal health care coverage, disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by income in Switzerland have been reported. However, it is not known if these disparities have changed over time. This study examines the association between socioeconomic position and CRC screening in Switzerland between 2007 and 2012. Methods Data from the 2007 (n = 5,946) and 2012 (n = 7,224) population-based Swiss Health Interview Survey data (SHIS) were used to evaluate the association between monthly household income, education, and employment with CRC screening, defined as endoscopy in the past 10 years or fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the past 2 years. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) adjusting for demographics, health status, and health utilization. Results CRC screening increased from 18.9% in 2007 to 22.2% in 2012 (padjusted: = 0.036). During the corresponding time period, endoscopy increased (8.2% vs. 15.0%, padjusted:<0.001) and FOBT decreased (13.0% vs. 9.8%, padjusted:0.002). CRC screening prevalence was greater in the highest income (>$6,000) vs. lowest income (≤$2,000) group in 2007 (24.5% vs. 10.5%, PR:1.37, 95%CI: 0.96-1.96) and in 2012 (28.6% vs. 16.0%, PR:1.45, 95%CI: 1.09-1.92); this disparity did not significantly change over time. Conclusions While CRC screening prevalence in Switzerland increased from 2007 to 2012, CRC screening coverage remains low and disparities in CRC screening by income persisted over time. These findings highlight the need for increased access to CRC screening as well as enhanced awareness of the benefits of CRC screening in the Swiss population, particularly among low-income residents. PMID:26147803

  2. Automated Telephone Calls To Enhance Colorectal Cancer Screening: An Economic Analysis from a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David H.; Feldstein, Adrianne C.; Perrin, Nancy; Rosales, A. Gabriela; Mosen, David M.; Liles, Elizabeth G.; Schneider, Jennifer L.; Lafata, Jennifer E.; Myers, Ronald E.; Glasgow, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has been shown to be a cost-effective intervention, but uncertainty remains over the most cost-effective methods for increasing screening rates. We used data from a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to estimate the cost-effectiveness of an automated telephone intervention from a managed care perspective. Intervention group patients received calls for fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) screening. Electronic medical records confirmed whether a patient had completed screening. We searched patient’s electronic medical record for any screening (defined as FOBT, flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema, or colonoscopy) during follow-up. Intervention costs included project implementation and management, telephone calls, patient identification and tracking. Costs of screening included FOBT (kits, mailing and processing) and any completed screening tests during follow-up. We estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the cost per additional screen. Results At 6 months average costs per patient in the intervention group were $37 (25% screened) and $34 (19% screened) in the control groups. The ICER at 6 months was $40 per additional screen. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 0.49, 0.84 and 0.99 for willingness to pay thresholds of $40, $100 and $200, respectively. Similar results were seen at 9 months. Screening rates and cost-effectiveness differed by age. A greater increase in FOBT testing was seen for patients aged 70 years and over (45 per 100 intervention, 33 per 100 control) compared with younger patients (25 per 100 intervention, 21 per 100 control). The intervention was dominant (lower costs and greater proportion of patients screened) for patients aged 70 years and over and was $73 per additional screen for younger patients. Discussion A patient-directed, automated phone calling increased screening rates by about 6% and costs by $3 per patient. The ICER we report is less than half what other

  3. The comparative cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening using faecal immunochemical test vs. colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) and colonoscopy are two common screening tools for colorectal cancer(CRC). Most cost-effectiveness studies focused on survival as the outcome, and were based on modeling techniques instead of real world observational data. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these two tests to detect colorectal neoplastic lesions based on data from a 5-year community screening service. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was assessed based on the detection rates of neoplastic lesions, and costs including screening compliance, polypectomy, colonoscopy complications, and staging of CRC detected. A total of 5,863 patients received yearly FIT and 4,869 received colonoscopy. Compared with FIT, colonoscopy detected notably more adenomas (23.6% vs. 1.6%) and advanced lesions or cancer (4.2% vs. 1.2%). Using FIT as control, the ICER of screening colonoscopy in detecting adenoma, advanced adenoma, CRC and a composite endpoint of either advanced adenoma or stage I CRC was US$3,489, US$27,962, US$922,762 and US$23,981 respectively. The respective ICER was US$3,597, US$439,513, -US$2,765,876 and US$32,297 among lower-risk subjects; whilst the corresponding figure was US$3,153, US$14,852, US$184,162 and US$13,919 among higher-risk subjects. When compared to FIT, colonoscopy is considered cost-effective for screening adenoma, advanced neoplasia, and a composite endpoint of advanced neoplasia or stage I CRC. PMID:26338314

  4. The comparative cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening using faecal immunochemical test vs. colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin CS; Ching, Jessica YL; Chan, Victor CW; Sung, Joseph JY

    2015-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) and colonoscopy are two common screening tools for colorectal cancer(CRC). Most cost-effectiveness studies focused on survival as the outcome, and were based on modeling techniques instead of real world observational data. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these two tests to detect colorectal neoplastic lesions based on data from a 5-year community screening service. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was assessed based on the detection rates of neoplastic lesions, and costs including screening compliance, polypectomy, colonoscopy complications, and staging of CRC detected. A total of 5,863 patients received yearly FIT and 4,869 received colonoscopy. Compared with FIT, colonoscopy detected notably more adenomas (23.6% vs. 1.6%) and advanced lesions or cancer (4.2% vs. 1.2%). Using FIT as control, the ICER of screening colonoscopy in detecting adenoma, advanced adenoma, CRC and a composite endpoint of either advanced adenoma or stage I CRC was US$3,489, US$27,962, US$922,762 and US$23,981 respectively. The respective ICER was US$3,597, US$439,513, -US$2,765,876 and US$32,297 among lower-risk subjects; whilst the corresponding figure was US$3,153, US$14,852, US$184,162 and US$13,919 among higher-risk subjects. When compared to FIT, colonoscopy is considered cost-effective for screening adenoma, advanced neoplasia, and a composite endpoint of advanced neoplasia or stage I CRC. PMID:26338314

  5. Favorable lifestyle before diagnosis associated with lower risk of screen-detected advanced colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Markus D; de Lange, Thomas; Botteri, Edoardo; Nguyen, Dung-Hong; Evensen, Helge; Steen, Chloé B; Hoff, Geir; Bernklev, Tomm; Hjartåker, Anette; Berstad, Paula

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between adherence to health recommendations and detection of advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. METHODS: A total of 14832 women and men were invited to CRC screening, 6959 in the fecal immunochemical test arm and 7873 in the flexible sigmoidoscopy arm. These were also sent a self-reported lifestyle questionnaire to be completed prior to their first CRC screening. A lifestyle score was created to reflect current adherence to healthy behaviors in regard to smoking, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol consumption and food consumption, and ranged from zero (poorest) to six (best). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95%CIs were calculated using multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between the single lifestyle variables and the lifestyle score and the probability of detecting ACN. RESULTS: In all 6315 women and men completed the lifestyle questionnaire, 3323 (53%) in the FIT arm and 2992 (47%) in the FS arm. This was 89% of those who participated in screening. ACN was diagnosed in 311 (5%) participants of which 25 (8%) were diagnosed with CRC. For individuals with a lifestyle score of two, three, four, and five-six, the ORs (95%CI) for the probability of ACN detection were 0.82 (0.45-1.16), 0.43 (0.28-0.73), 0.41 (0.23-0.64), and 0.41 (0.22-0.73), respectively compared to individuals with a lifestyle score of zero-one. Of the single lifestyle factors, adherence to non-smoking and moderate alcohol intake were associated with a decreased probability of ACN detection compared to being a smoker or having a high alcohol intake 0.53 (0.42-0.68) and 0.63 (0.43-0.93) respectively. CONCLUSION: Adopted healthy behaviors were inversely associated with the probability of ACN detection. Lifestyle assessment might be useful for risk stratification in CRC screening. PMID:27468217

  6. Broadening the examination of socio-cultural constructs relevant to African American colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Sanders Thompson, V. L.; Harris, J.; Clark, E.M.; Purnell, J.; Deshpande, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of socio-cultural constructs as influences on cancer attitudes and screening has been established in the literature. This paper reports on efforts to explore alternatives to constructs previously associated with African American cancer screening, but with low acceptance among community members or incomplete measurement (empowerment and collectivism) and develop a measure for a recently identified construct of interest (privacy). We report preliminary psychometric data on these socio-cultural scales and their associations with cancer attitudes. African Americans (N=1021), 50 to 75 years of age participated in this study. Participants were identified via a listed sample and completed a telephone survey administered via call center. Socio-cultural attitudes were assessed using items identified through computerized database searches, reviewed by advisory panels, edited and tested using cognitive response strategies. Cancer screening pros and cons, cancer worry, perceived cancer risk, colorectal cancer screening subjective norms, and perceived self-efficacy for colorectal cancer screening were also assessed. Confirmatory factor analyses and multivariate analyses were conducted to provide support for the validity of the constructs and to understand the associations among the selected socio-cultural constructs (empowerment, collectivism and empowerment) and cancer beliefs and attitudes (CRC perceived benefits and barriers, perceived risks, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control/self-efficacy). Consistent with the literature, the factor analytic model (RMSEA for the model was 0.062; 90% CI: 0.060-0.065) provided support for the empowerment, collectivism and privacy constructs. The modified collectivism and privacy scales had acceptable reliability. The privacy scale demonstrated the strongest associations with measures of cancer beliefs and attitudes. The implication of the findings and need for further scale development activities is discussed

  7. Health literacy and informed decision making regarding colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Iris; Uiters, Ellen; Jantine Schuit, A; Rademakers, Jany; Fransen, Mirjam

    2015-08-01

    Making an informed decision about participation in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening may be challenging for invitees with lower health literacy skills. The aim of this systematic review is to explore to what extent the level of a person's health literacy is related to their informed decision making concerning CRC screening. We searched for peer-reviewed studies published between 1950 and May 2013 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciSearch and PsycINFO. Studies were included when health literacy was studied in relation to concepts underpinning informed decision making (awareness, risk perception, perceived barriers and benefits, knowledge, attitude, deliberation). The quality of the studies was determined and related to the study results. The search returned 2254 papers. Eight studies in total were included, among which seven focused on knowledge, four focused on attitudes or beliefs concerning CRC screening, and one focused on risk perception. The studies found either no association or a positive association between health literacy and concepts underpinning informed decision making. Some studies showed that higher health literacy was associated with more CRC screening knowledge and a more positive attitude toward CRC screening. The results of studies that obtained a lower quality score were no different than studies that obtained a higher quality score. In order to obtain more insight into the association between health literacy and informed decision making in CRC cancer screening, future research should study the multiple aspects of informed decision making in conjunction instead of single aspects. PMID:25733553

  8. Social Cognitive Mediators of Sociodemographic Differences in Colorectal Cancer Screening Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Siu Hing; Waller, Jo; Vrinten, Charlotte; Kobayashi, Lindsay; von Wagner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study examined if and how sociodemographic differences in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening uptake can be explained by social cognitive factors. Methods. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with individuals aged 60–70 years (n = 1309) living in England as part of a population-based omnibus survey. Results. There were differences in screening uptake by SES, marital status, ethnicity, and age but not by gender. Perceived barriers (stand. b = −0.40, p < 0.001), social norms (stand. b = 0.33, p < 0.001), and screening knowledge (stand. b = 0.17, p < 0.001) had independent associations with uptake. SES differences in uptake were mediated through knowledge, social norms, and perceived barriers. Ethnic differences were mediated through knowledge. Differences in uptake by marital status were primarily mediated through social norms and to a lesser extent through knowledge. Age differences were largely unmediated, except for a small mediated effect via social norms. Conclusions. Sociodemographic differences in CRC screening uptake were largely mediated through social cognitive factors. Impact. Our findings suggest that multifaceted interventions might be needed to reduce socioeconomic inequalities. Ethnic differences might be reduced through improved screening knowledge. Normative interventions could emphasise screening as an activity endorsed by important others outside the immediate family to appeal to a wider audience. PMID:26504782

  9. [Leaflets and websites on colorectal cancer screening and their quality assessment from experts' views].

    PubMed

    Dreier, M; Borutta, B; Seidel, G; Münch, I; Töppich, J; Bitzer, E-M; Dierks, M-L; Walter, U

    2014-03-01

    In Germany, individuals who have statutory health insurance have free access to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening tests, and can choose between a fecal occult blood test and a screening colonoscopy. Evidence-based health information may support informed choices regarding whether or not to undergo CRC screening. The aim of this study was to assess whether the available German information materials on CRC screening meet evidence-based health information standards. A systematic search was made for print media and websites on CRC screening addressed to German people with average CRC risk (search period for print media August 2010, for websites January-March 2012). The identified information was assessed with a newly developed comprehensive list of criteria. In all, 41 print media, including 28 flyers and 13 brochures, and 36 websites were identified and assessed. These materials reported more often the benefits than the risks of CRC screening, and quantified presentations of benefits and risks were less frequently given. Most of the materials called for participation and did not indicate the option to decide whether or not to attend CRC screening. This bias in favor of screening was increased by fear-provoking or downplayed wording. Most materials included false and misleading information. The requirements for evidence-based patient information were currently not met by most of the leaflets and websites in Germany. Feedback was given to the producers of the leaflets including a discussion of the findings. The results may be used to revise existing leaflets or to develop new health information on CRC screening. PMID:24562712

  10. Colorectal Cancer Screening in US Seniors Ages 76-84 Years.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Shapiro, Jean A; Kobrin, Sarah; Nadel, Marion R; Zapka, Jane M

    2015-08-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends patient-physician discussions about the appropriateness of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among adults ages 76-84 years who have never been screened. In this study, we used data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine patterns of CRC screening and provider recommendation among seniors ages 76-84 years, and made some comparisons to younger adults. Nationally-representative samples of 1379 adults ages 76-84 years and 8797 adults ages 50-75 years responded to questions about CRC screening status, receipt of provider recommendation, and discussion of test options; 22.7% (95% CI 20.1-25.3) of seniors ages 76-84 had never been tested for CRC and therefore were not up-to-date with guidelines; 3.9% (95% CI 2.0-7.6) of these individuals reported a recent provider recommendation for screening. In multivariate analyses, the likelihood of never having been tested was significantly greater for seniors of other/multiple race or Hispanic ethnicity; with high school or less education; without private health insurance coverage; who had ≤ 1 doctor visit in the past year; without recent screening for breast, cervical, or prostate cancer; with no or unknown CRC family history; or with ≤ 1 chronic disease. Among the minority of respondents ages 50-75 and 76-84 reporting a provider recommendation, 73.2% indicated that the provider recommended particular tests, which was overwhelmingly colonoscopy (≥ 89 %). Nearly one-quarter of adults 76-84 have never been screened for CRC, and rates of provider recommendation in this group are very low. Greater attention to informed CRC screening discussions with screening-eligible seniors is needed. PMID:25716518

  11. Adherence to Competing Strategies for Colorectal Cancer Screening Over 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Peter S.; Wheat, Chelle L.; Abhat, Anshu; Brenner, Alison T.; Fagerlin, Angela; Hayward, Rodney A.; Thomas, Jennifer P.; Vijan, Sandeep; Inadomi, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We have shown that, in a randomized trial comparing adherence to different colorectal cancer (CRC) screening strategies, participants assigned to either fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) or given a choice between FOBT and colonoscopy had significantly higher adherence than those assigned to colonoscopy during the first year. However, how adherence to screening changes over time is unknown. Methods In this trial, 997 participants were cluster randomized to one of the three screening strategies: (i) FOBT, (ii) colonoscopy, or (iii) a choice between FOBT and colonoscopy. Research assistants helped participants to complete testing only in the first year. Adherence to screening was defined as completion of three FOBT cards in each of 3 years after enrollment or completion of colonoscopy within the first year of enrollment. The primary outcome was adherence to assigned strategy over 3 years. Additional outcomes included identification of sociodemographic factors associated with adherence. Results Participants assigned to annual FOBT completed screening at a significantly lower rate over 3 years (14%) than those assigned to colonoscopy (38%, P<0.001) or choice (42%, P<0.001); however, completion of any screening test fell precipitously, indicating the strong effect of patient navigation. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, being randomized to the choice or colonoscopy group, Chinese language, homosexuality, being married/partnered, and having a non-nurse practitioner primary care provider were independently associated with greater adherence to screening (P<0.01). Conclusions In a 3-year follow-up of a randomized trial comparing competing CRC screening strategies, participants offered a choice between FOBT and colonoscopy continued to have relatively high adherence, whereas adherence in the FOBT group fell significantly below that of the choice and colonoscopy groups. Patient navigation is crucial to achieving adherence to CRC screening, and FOBT is

  12. The associations between objective numeracy and colorectal cancer screening knowledge, attitudes and defensive processing in a deprived community sample.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samuel G; Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Wolf, Michael S; Raine, Rosalind; Wardle, Jane; von Wagner, Christian

    2016-08-01

    We examined associations between numeracy and sociocognitive factors associated with colorectal cancer screening uptake (n = 964). Nearly half (45.7%) of the respondents incorrectly answered a numeracy question (low numeracy). Low numeracy respondents were less knowledgeable about colorectal cancer (p < .001), less positive towards screening (emotional, p < .001 and practical, p = .001) and less likely to intend to participate in screening (p = .001). They also reported greater defensive processing of cancer information (p = .001). Sociocognitive factors fully mediated the relationship between numeracy and screening intention. Addressing numeracy issues may reduce inequalities in CRC screening participation, but communication strategies could be limited by the tendency process cancer information defensively. PMID:25512199

  13. [Current principles in the screening, diagnosis, and therapy of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Khatkov, I E; Kagramanova, A V; Zakharzhevskaya, N B; Babikova, E A; Generozov, E V; Shcherbakov, P L; Parfenov, A I

    2016-01-01

    The data available in the literature on the prevalence of colorectal cancer (CRC), its risk factors and genetic aspects are analyzed. Basic screening tests and their diagnostic value are described. The paper indicates the importance of methods (colonoscopy, occult blood feces analysis, fecal immunochemical test, determination of molecular genetic profile of fecal enterocytes) for the early primary diagnosis of colonic epithelial tumors and techniques (echography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography) that are required to specify clinical TNM staging and enable one to choose an optimal treatment policy for CRC patients owing to the estimation of tumor volume and to the diagnosis of reginal and distant metastases. It also shows that new screening methods based on the detection of molecular markers for early (premorphological) tumor stages are promising. The role of primary CRC prevention aimed at molding and maintaining a healthy lifestyle in the population is demonstrated. PMID:27135106

  14. Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates Increased after Exposure to the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH)

    PubMed Central

    Green, Beverly B.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Chubak, Jessica; Baldwin, Laura Mae; Tuzzio, Leah; Catz, Sheryl; Cole, Alison; Vernon, Sally W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) includes comprehensive chronic illness and preventive services, including identifying patients who are overdue for colorectal cancer screening (CRCS). The association between PCMH implementation and CRCS during the Systems of Support to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Trial (SOS) is described. Methods The SOS enrolled 4664 patients from 21 clinics from August 2008 to November 2009. Patients were randomized to usual care, mailed fecal kits, kits plus brief assistance, or kits plus assistance and navigation. A PCMH model that included a workflow for facilitating CRCS was implemented at all study clinics in late 2009. Patients enrolled early had little exposure to the PCMH, whereas patients enrolled later were exposed during most of their first year in the trial. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between PCMH exposure and CRCS. Results Usual care patients with ≥8 months in the PCMH had higher CRCS rates than those with ≤4 months in the PCMH (adjusted difference, 10.1%; 95% confidence interval, 5.7–14.6). SOS interventions led to significant increases in CRCS, but the magnitude of effect was attenuated by exposure to the PCMH (P for interaction = .01). Conclusion Exposure to a PCMH was associated with higher CRCS rates. Automated mailed and centrally delivered stepped interventions increased CRCS rates, even in the presence of a PCMH. (J Am Board Fam Med 2016;29:191–200.) PMID:26957375

  15. Applying public health screening criteria: how does universal newborn screening compare to universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome in adults with colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Cragun, Deborah; DeBate, Rita D; Pal, Tuya

    2015-06-01

    Institutions have increasingly begun to adopt universal tumor screening (UTS) programs whereby tumors from all newly diagnosed patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) are screened to identify who should be offered germline testing for Lynch syndrome (the most common cause of hereditary CRC). Given limited information about the impact of universal screening programs to detect hereditary disease in adults, we apply criteria used to evaluate public health screening programs and compare and contrast UTS with universal newborn screening (NBS) for the purpose of examining ethical implications and anticipating potential outcomes of UTS. Both UTS and a core set of NBS conditions clearly meet most of the Wilson and Jungner screening criteria. However, many state NBS panels include additional conditions that do not meet several of these criteria, and there is currently insufficient data to confirm that UTS meets some of these criteria. Comparing UTS and NBS with regard to newer screening criteria raises additional issues that require attention for both UTS and NBS. Comparisons also highlight the importance of evaluating the implementation of genomic tests to ensure or improve their effectiveness at reducing morbidity and mortality while minimizing potential harms. PMID:25323653

  16. Factors Associated with Colorectal Cancer Screening among Younger African American Men: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, Patricia; Foster, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Of cancers affecting both men and women, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cancer killer among African Americans in the U.S. Compared to White men, African American men have incidence and mortality rates 25% and 50% higher from CRC. Despite the benefits of early detection and the availability of effective screening, most adults over age 50 have not undergone testing, and disparities in colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) persist. Owing to CRC’s high incidence and younger age at presentation among African American men, CRCS is warranted at age 45 rather than 50. However, the factors influencing young adult (i.e., age < 50) African American men’s intention to screen and/or their CRCS behaviors has not been systematically assessed. To assess whether the factors influencing young adult African American men’s screening intentions and behaviors are changeable through structured health education interventions, we conducted a systematic review, with the two-fold purpose of: (1) synthesizing studies examining African American men's knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors regarding CRCS; and (2) assessing these studies’ methodological quality. Utilizing Garrard’s Matrix Method, a total of 28 manuscripts met our inclusion/exclusion criteria: 20 studies followed a non-experimental research design, 4 comprised a quasi-experimental design, and 4, an experimental design. Studies were published between 2002 and 2012; the majority, between 2007 and 2011. The factors most frequently assessed were behaviors (79%), beliefs (68%), and knowledge (61%) of CRC and CRCS. Six factors associated with CRC and CRCS emerged: previous CRCS, CRC test preference, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, CRC/CRCS knowledge, and physician support/recommendation. Studies were assigned a methodological quality score (MQS – ranging from 0 to 21). The mean MQS of 10.9 indicated these studies were, overall, of medium quality and suffered from specific flaws. Alongside a call for more

  17. Population-based colorectal cancer screening: comparison of two fecal occult blood test

    PubMed Central

    Zubero, Miren B.; Arana-Arri, Eunate; Pijoan, José I.; Portillo, Isabel; Idigoras, Isabel; López-Urrutia, Antonio; Samper, Ana; Uranga, Begoña; Rodríguez, Carmen; Bujanda, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of screening for colorectal cancer is to improve prognosis by the detection of cancer at its early stages. In order to inform the decision on the specific test to be used in the population-based program in the Basque Autonomous Region (Spain), we compared two immunochemical fecal occult blood quantitative tests (I-FOBT). Methods: Residents of selected study areas, aged 50–69 years, were invited to participate in the screening. Two tests based on latex agglutination (OC-Sensor and FOB Gold) were randomly assigned to different study areas. A colonoscopy was offered to patients with a positive test result. The cut-off point used to classify a result as positive, according to manufacturer’s recommendations, was 100 ng/ml for both tests. Results: The invited population included 37,999 individuals. Participation rates were 61.8% (n = 11,162) for OC-Sensor and 59.1% (n = 11,786) for FOB Gold (p = 0.008). Positive rate for OC-Sensor was 6.6% (n = 737) and 8.5% (n = 1,002) for FOB Gold (p < 0.0001). Error rates were higher for FOB gold (2.3%) than for OC-Sensor (0.2%; p < 0.0001). Predictive positive value (PPV) for total malignant and premalignant lesions was 62.4% for OC-Sensor and 58.9% for FOB Gold (p = 0.137), respectively. Conclusion: OC-Sensor test appears to be superior for I-FOBT-based colorectal cancer screening, given its acceptance, ease of use, associated small number of errors and its screening accuracy. FOB Gold on the other hand, has higher rate of positive values, with more colonoscopies performed, it shows higher detection incidence rates, but involves more false positives. PMID:24454288

  18. Colorectal Cancer Screening at the Nexus of HIV, Minority Statuses, and Cultural Safety

    PubMed Central

    Ka‘opua, Lana Sue I.; Diaz, Tressa P.; Park, Soon H.; Bowen, Talita; Patrick, Kevin; Tamang, Suresh; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased significantly among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Screening education is recommended. Purpose Social learning, minority stress, and cultural safety theories informed this pilot to assess the feasibility of a colorectal cancer screening intervention targeted to PLHIV, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians, a group with low participation in cancer screening. Method The targeted education included behavioral modeling and barriers counseling in a culturally safe environment. Using a 2-group, pre/posttest design, AIDS service organizations were randomized to culturally responsive or standard education. AIDS service organizations consumers recruited through venue-based promotions were the unit of analysis. Knowledge–attitudes–practices, fecal occult blood test screening completion, and intervention feasibility were measured. Results Treatment arm participants, regardless of ethnicity, adhered to fecal occult blood test instructions and achieved increases in screening knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Relevance and acceptability of the educational intervention were endorsed. Discussion The culturally responsive intervention was successful in this group of PLHIV. Additional tailoring may be needed to reach PLHIV who do not participate in organizational activities. Conclusion/Translation to Health Education Practice This culturally responsive intervention shows promise for efficacy testing in a broader PLHIV population. Constituent-involving strategies were central to its development and delivery. PMID:24653993

  19. E-mail to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening Within Social Networks: Acceptability and Content

    PubMed Central

    CUTRONA, SARAH L.; WAGNER, JOANN; ROBLIN, DOUGLAS W.; GAGLIO, BRIDGET; WILLIAMS, ANDREW; TORRES-STONE, ROSALIE; MAZOR, KATHLEEN M.

    2016-01-01

    Effective techniques to encourage colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in underscreened populations have included social support interventions and email reminders from physicians. Personalized email messages to promote CRC screening within social networks could be even more effective, but have not been studied. We interviewed 387 email users, aged 42-73 years in Massachusetts, Hawaii, and Georgia. Participants were asked to edit a sample message in which the sender shares a recent colonoscopy experience and urges the recipient to discuss CRC screening with a doctor. For those reporting willingness to send this message, changes to the message and suggested subject lines were recorded. Edited text was analyzed for content and concordance with original message. The majority of participants (74.4%) were willing to email a modifiable message. Of those willing, 63.5% edited the message. Common edits included deletion (17.7%) or modification (17.4%) of a negatively framed sentence on colon cancer risks and addition or modification of personalizing words (15.6%). Few edits changed the meaning of the message (5.6%) and even fewer introduced factual inaccuracies (1.7%). Modifiable email messages offer a way for screened individuals to promote CRC screening to social network members. Accuracy and impact of such messages should be further studied. PMID:25839968

  20. Mandated Coverage of Preventive Care and Reduction in Disparities: Evidence From Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kapinos, Kandice A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We identified correlates of racial/ethnic disparities in colorectal cancer screening and changes in disparities under state-mandated insurance coverage. Methods. Using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, we estimated a Fairlie decomposition in the insured population aged 50 to 64 years and a regression-adjusted difference-in-difference-in-difference model of changes in screening attributable to mandates. Results. Under mandated coverage, blood stool test (BST) rates increased among Black, Asian, and Native American men, but rates among Whites also increased, so disparities did not change. Endoscopic screening rates increased by 10 percentage points for Hispanic men and 3 percentage points for non-Hispanic men. BST rates fell among Hispanic relative to non-Hispanic men. We found no changes for women. However, endoscopic screening rates improved among lower income individuals across all races and ethnicities. Conclusions. Mandates were associated with a reduction in endoscopic screening disparities only for Hispanic men but may indirectly reduce racial/ethnic disparities by increasing rates among lower income individuals. Findings imply that systematic differences in insurance coverage, or health plan fragmentation, likely existed without mandates. These findings underscore the need to research disparities within insured populations. PMID:25905835

  1. Community-based Preferences for Stool Cards versus Colonoscopy in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    DeBourcy, Ann C.; Lichtenberger, Scott; Felton, Susanne; Butterfield, Kiel T.; Ahnen, Dennis J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Background In the United States, compliance with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening recommendations remains suboptimal. Professional organizations advocate use of shared decision making in screening test discussions, but strategies to facilitate informed choice in CRC screening have not been well elucidated. Objective The objectives of the study were to determine screening test preference among colonoscopy-naïve adults after considering a detailed, written presentation of fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy and to assess whether their preferences are associated with demographic characteristics, attitudes, and knowledge. Design The design of the study was a cross-sectional survey. Participants Colonoscopy-naïve supermarket shoppers age 40–79 in low- and middle-income, multiethnic neighborhoods in Denver, CO, reviewed a detailed, side-by-side description of FOBT and colonoscopy and answered questions about test preference, strength of preference, influence of physician recommendation, basic knowledge of CRC, and demographic characteristics. Measurements and Main Results Descriptive statistics characterized the sample, and bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses identified correlates of screening test preference. In a diverse sample of 323 colonoscopy-naïve adults, 53% preferred FOBT, and 47% preferred colonoscopy for CRC screening. Individuals of Latino ethnicity and those with lower educational attainment were more likely to prefer FOBT than non-Latino whites and those with at least some college. Almost half of the respondents felt “very strongly” about their preferences, and one third said they would adhere to their choice regardless of physician recommendation. Conclusion After considering a detailed, side-by-side comparison of the FOBT and colonoscopy, a large proportion of community-dwelling, colonoscopy-naïve adults prefer FOBT over colonoscopy for CRC screening. In light of professional guidelines and time

  2. Disparities in Cancer Screening in Individuals with a Family History of Breast or Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Ninez A.; Tsui, Jennifer; Knight, Sara J.; Afable-Munsuz, Aimee; Ladabaum, Uri; Hiatt, Robert A.; Haas, Jennifer S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding racial/ethnic disparities in cancer screening by family history risk could identify critical opportunities for patient and provider interventions tailored to specific racial/ethnic groups. We evaluated whether breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) disparities varied by family history risk using a large, multiethnic population-based survey. Methods Using the 2005 California Health Interview Survey, BC and CRC screening were evaluated separately with weighted multivariate regression analyses, and stratified by family history risk. Screening was defined for BC as mammogram within the past 2 years for women aged 40 to 64 years; for CRC, as annual fecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy within the past 5 years, or colonoscopy within the past 10 years for adults aged 50 to 64 years. Results We found no significant BC screening disparities by race/ethnicity or income in both the family history risk groups. Racial/ethnic disparities were more evident in CRC screening, and the Latino-white gap widened among individuals with family history risk. Among adults with a family history for CRC, magnitude of the Latino-white difference in CRC screening (OR 0.28; 95%CI: 0.11 -0.60) was more substantial than that for individuals with no family history (OR 0.74; 95%CI: 0.59 -0.92). Conclusions Knowledge of their family history widened the Latino-white gap in CRC screening among adults. More aggressive interventions that enhance the communication between Latinos and their doctors about family history and cancer risk could reduce the substantial Latino-white screening disparity in Latinos most susceptible to CRC. PMID:22009719

  3. Racial and Ethnic Trends of Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Medicare Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    Doubeni, Chyke A.; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Klabunde, Carrie N.; Young, Angela C.; Field, Terry S.; Fletcher, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates have remained lower than the Healthy People 2010 goal particularly among minority populations. This study examined racial–ethnic trends in CRC screening and the continued impact of healthcare access indicators on screening differences after Medicare expanded coverage. Methods The study used data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey for 2000, 2003 and 2005. The sample was restricted to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics. The primary outcome was the proportion of enrollees who underwent lower-gastrointestinal endoscopy within 5 years and/or home fecal occult blood test within 1 year. Results Over the 6-year period under study, the proportion screened increased among each of the 3 racial–ethnic groups, but lower proportions of blacks and Hispanics underwent screening compared with whites at each time point. Hispanic–white differences persisted but black–white differences narrowed in 2003 and widened in 2005. In each survey year, racial differences attenuated after adjustment for type of supplemental health insurance, and disappeared after further adjustment for educational and income levels. Conclusions Despite expanding benefits for CRC screening, which would be expected to disproportionally benefit racial and ethnic minorities, racial disparities in use of screening persist due in part to differences in the types of health insurance coverage, education and income. There was a slight reversal of the initial attenuation of the black–white difference after the Medicare policy change. Efforts are needed to increase the reach of CRC screening to minority populations, particularly those lacking adequate health insurance coverage or with less education or income. PMID:20117575

  4. Giant Inflatable Colon and Community Knowledge, Intention, and Social Support for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Ellen; Asay, Elvin; Ferguson, Janie; Muller, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second-leading cause of deaths from cancer in the United States. Screening decreases CRC deaths through early cancer detection and through removal of precancerous lesions. We investigated whether a health exhibit consisting of a giant inflatable colon was an effective educational tool to increase community members’ knowledge, intention, and social support for CRC screening and prevention. Methods Alaska adults (N = 880) attending community events statewide from March 2011 through March 2012 completed a short survey to assess knowledge about CRC, intention to get screened, and level of social support before and after walking through a giant interactive model of a human colon. The survey used a combination of open-ended questions and a Likert scale, where 1 was “very unlikely,” 2 was “somewhat unlikely,” 3 was “neutral,” 4 was “somewhat likely,” and 5 was “very likely.” The model depicted CRC stages from normal tissue to advanced adenocarcinoma and displayed signs with CRC prevention tips. We used the McNemar test and paired sample t tests for univariate analyses. Results Respondents significantly improved their CRC knowledge (P < .05), intention to get screened (mean score increased from 4.3 to 4.5, P < .001), and comfort with talking to others about CRC screening (mean level of comfort increased from 3.8 to 3.9, P < .001). Multivariate analysis showed no significant differences by sex, age, or race for improvements in CRC screening knowledge, intention, or comfort. Conclusion Interactive exhibits can improve public knowledge and interest in CRC screening, which may lead to increased CRC screening rates and decreased CRC incidence and deaths. PMID:23517583

  5. Evaluating an Electronic Measure of Colorectal Cancer Screening at Indian Health Service Facilities, 2008-2010

    PubMed Central

    Redwood, Diana; Suryaprasad, Anil; Haverkamp, Donald; Wong, Charlene; Provost, Ellen; Espey, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) people, and incidence rates vary considerably among AIAN populations throughout the United States. Screening has the potential to prevent CRC deaths by detection and treatment of early disease or removal of precancerous polyps. Surveillance of CRC screening is critical to efforts to improve delivery of this preventive service, but existing CRC screening surveillance methods for AIAN are limited. The Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) CRC screening clinical care measure provides data on CRC screening among AIAN populations. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the GPRA measure for CRC screening (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value), determine reasons for CRC screening misclassification (procedures noted as screening when they were actually diagnostic exams), and to suggest opportunities for improving surveillance for CRC screening nationwide for AIAN populations. Methods Medical record reviews (paper and electronic) were compared to the GPRA-reported CRC screening status for 1,071 patients receiving care at tribal health facilities. A total of 8 tribal health facilities (2 small, 3 medium, and 3 large) participated in the study from the Pacific Coast, the Southwest, the Southern Plains, and Alaska IHS regions. Screening-eligible patients were identified using queries of the local electronic health record from January 2007 to December 2008, and medical chart reviews were completed at participating facilities from September 2008 to June 2010. Results Among 545 patients classified as screened by the GPRA measure, 305 (56%, CI: 52%-60%) had a false positive for screening as compared with medical record review. The overall sensitivity of the GPRA measure for CRC screening was 93% (CI=89%-95%) while specificity was 62% (CI: 59%-66%). The most common reasons for

  6. Screening for Colorectal Cancer in African Americans: Determinants and Rationale for an Earlier Age to Commence Screening

    PubMed Central

    Carethers, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is a highly cost-effective approach to reduce morbidity and mortality of patients, as well as reduce the prevalence of CRC in populations. Current recommendations for CRC screening for the asymptomatic general population begin at age 50 years, an age after which ~95% of cancers occur. Determinants that modify the timing and frequency for screening include a personal or family history of adenomatous polyps or CRC, the age of onset of these colonic lesions, and the presence or potential for a patient to harbor a higher-risk syndrome such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), or Lynch syndrome.. Although race, like family history, is a heritable factor, it has not engendered inclusion in the same broad systematic screening recommendations despite multiple studies demonstrating a disparity in the incidence and mortality from CRC, and the potential for targeted screening to reduce the disparity. In particular, African Americans, when compared to Caucasians, (a) have lower CRC screening utilization rates, (b) have an earlier presentation of CRC (0-8 years younger than Caucasians) and, more often have aggressive biological features more prone to metastasis, (c) have a higher CRC prevalence at all ages and a higher proportion of CRCs before 50 years of age (~11% vs 5% in Caucasians), (d) are less likely to know or transmit personal or family history of adenomas or CRC that might change their screening to an earlier age, (e) present with 7-15% excess right-sided CRCs that are not microsatellite unstable, (f) show higher frequencies of high-risk adenomas at every decile of age, and an excess of high-risk proximal adenomas that mirror the excess of proximal CRCs, (g) have cancers that demonstrate lower proportions of good prognostic biomarkers such as MSI and higher proportions of bad prognosticators such as EMAST, (h) may possess gut microbiota more conducive to initiating and/or propagating colonic

  7. Cost-Effectiveness between Double and Single Fecal Immunochemical Test(s) in a Mass Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shan-Rong; Zhu, Hong-Hong; Huang, Yan-Qin; Li, Qi-Long; Ma, Xin-Yuan; Zhang, Su-Zhan; Zheng, Shu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the cost-effectiveness between double and single Fecal Immunochemical Test(s) (FIT) in a mass CRC screening. A two-stage sequential screening was conducted. FIT was used as a primary screening test and recommended twice by an interval of one week at the first screening stage. We defined the first-time FIT as FIT1 and the second-time FIT as FIT2. If either FIT1 or FIT2 was positive (+), then a colonoscopy was recommended at the second stage. Costs were recorded and analyzed. A total of 24,419 participants completed either FIT1 or FIT2. The detection rate of advanced neoplasm was 19.2% among both FIT1+ and FIT2+, especially high among men with age ≥55 (27.4%). About 15.4% CRC, 18.9% advanced neoplasm, and 29.9% adenoma missed by FIT1 were detected by FIT2 alone. Average cost was $2,935 for double FITs and $2,121 for FIT1 to detect each CRC and $901 for double FITs and $680 for FIT1 to detect each advanced neoplasm. Double FITs are overall more cost-effective, having significantly higher positive and detection rates with an acceptable higher cost, than single FIT. Double FITs should be encouraged for the first screening in a mass CRC screening, especially in economically and medically underserved populations/areas/countries. PMID:27144171

  8. Race and colorectal cancer screening compliance among persons with a family history of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Thompson, Nicole; Williams, Carla D; Idowu, Kolapo A; Bull-Henry, Kathy; Sherif, Zaki A; Lee, Edward L; Brim, Hassan; Ashktorab, Hassan; Platz, Elizabeth A; Smoot, Duane T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine compliance to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines among persons with a family history of any type of cancer and investigate racial differences in screening compliance. METHODS: We used the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey and identified 1094 (27.4%) respondents (weighted population size = 21959672) without a family history of cancer and 3138 (72.6%) respondents (weighted population size = 58201479) with a family history of cancer who were 50 years and older. We defined compliance with CRC screening as the use of fecal occult blood testing within 1 year, sigmoidoscopy within 5 years, or colonoscopy within 10 years. We compared compliance with CRC screening among those with and without a family member with a history of cancer. RESULTS: Overall, those with a family member with cancer were more likely to be compliant with CRC screening (64.9% vs 55.1%; OR = 1.45; 95%CI: 1.20-1.74). The absolute increase in screening rates associated with family history of cancer was 8.2% among whites. Hispanics had lowest screening rates among those without family history of cancer 41.9% but had highest absolute increase (14.7%) in CRC screening rate when they have a family member with cancer. Blacks had the lowest absolute increase in CRC screening (5.3%) when a family member has a known history of cancer. However, the noted increase in screening rates among blacks and Hispanics when they have a family member with cancer were not higher than whites without a family history of cancer: (54.5% vs 58.7%; OR = 1.16; 95%CI: 0.72-1.88) for blacks and (56.7% vs 58.7%; OR = 1.25; 95%CI: 0.72-2.18) for Hispanics. CONCLUSION: While adults with a family history of any cancer were more likely to be compliant with CRC screening guidelines irrespective of race/ethnicity, blacks and Hispanics with a family history of cancer were less likely to be compliant than whites without a family history. Increased burden from CRC among blacks may be related to poor

  9. Use of hospital resources in the Finnish colorectal cancer screening programme: a randomised health services study

    PubMed Central

    Mäklin, Suvi; Hakama, Matti; Rissanen, Pekka; Malila, Nea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the difference in use of hospital resources in the Finnish Colorectal Cancer (CRC) screening programme between those invited and controls, within the year of randomisation and the next year. Design CRC screening was implemented in Finland in 2004 as a population-based randomised design using biennial faecal occult blood test (FOBT) for men and women aged 60–69 years. Those randomised to screening and control groups during years 2004–2009 were included in this analysis and use of hospital resources was estimated. Data were collected from the national register on hospital discharges. Outpatient visits, inpatient episodes and colonoscopies were compared between the two groups. Results The screening group comprised of 123 149 and control group of 122 930 people. Most people in both groups had not used hospital resources at all. More people in the screening group than in the control group had at least one hospital-based outpatient visit (7.8% vs 7.4%), inpatient episode (3.9% vs 3.8%) and colonoscopy (1.5% vs 1.3%). In total, the screening group had 31 975 and control group 27 061 cumulative outpatient visits, 9260 and 7903 inpatient episodes, and 2686 and 1756 hospital colonoscopies, respectively. The proportion of those with a positive FOBT result with at least one outpatient visit, one inpatient episode or one colonoscopy, was 3.7 times, 2.5 times or 9 times that of those with a negative FOBT result, respectively. Conclusions CRC screening using the FOBT slightly increased the volume of hospital outpatient visits, inpatient episodes and hospital colonoscopies in Finland. PMID:26719814

  10. Colorectal cancer screening at community health centers: A survey of clinicians' attitudes, practices, and perceived barriers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Jessica; Nelson, Christine A.; McBurnie, Mary Ann; Liss, David T.; Kaleba, Erin O.; Henley, Eric; Harigopal, Padmini; Grant, Laura; Crawford, Phil; Carroll, Joseph E.; Alperovitz-Bichell, Kari; Baker, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain lower among some racial/ethnic groups and individuals with low income or educational attainment who are often cared for within community health centers (CHCs). We surveyed clinicians in a network of CHCs to understand their attitudes, practice patterns, and perceived barriers to CRC screening. Methods A clinician survey was conducted in 2013 within the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN). Results 180 clinicians completed the survey (47.9% response rate). Participants had an average of 11.5 (SD: 9.8) years in practice, 62% were female, and 57% were physicians. The majority of respondents somewhat agreed (30.2%) or strongly agreed (57.5%) that colonoscopy was the best screening test. However, only 15.8% of respondents strongly agreed and 32.2% somewhat agreed that colonoscopy was readily available for their patients. Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), a type of fecal occult blood test (FOBT), was viewed less favorably; 24.6% rated FIT as very effective. Conclusions Although there are no data showing that screening colonoscopy is superior to FIT, CHC clinicians believe colonoscopy is the best CRC screening test for their patients, despite the high prevalence of financial barriers to colonoscopy. These attitudes could be due to lack of knowledge about the evidence supporting long-term benefits of fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), lack of awareness about the improved test characteristics of FIT compared to older guaiac-based FOBT, or the absence of systems to ensure adherence to regular FOBT screening. Interventions to improve CRC screening at CHCs must address clinicians' negative attitudes towards FIT. PMID:26844165

  11. Implications of New Colorectal Cancer Screening Technologies for Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Ann G.; Levin, Theodore R; Jaffe, C. Carl; Galen, Barbara A.; Ransohoff, David F.; Brown, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces the risk of CRC mortality but is currently not well utilized, with adherence only 50% in the eligible U.S. population and rates that lag behind those for breast and cervical cancer. The primary care physician has the pivotal role of facilitating patient adherence to CRC screening by informed choice of the screening tests, follow up of positive tests, and coordination of medical resources when diagnostic intervention is required. Consequently, the primary care setting is where significant improvements can be made in CRC screening adherence. This article provides a summary of the newer CRC screening technologies that can be used by primary care physicians in shared decision making with their patients. There are now multiple CRC screening tests which vary in their ability to detect the different stages in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence. Current guidelines of the Multi-Society (Gastroenterology) Task Force (1997, 2003, 2006, 2008), the American Cancer Society (2001, 2003, 2007, 2008), and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (2002) recommend a menu of CRC screening options, including fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) (Hemoccult II, Hemoccult SENSA, fecal immunochemical tests (FIT)), double contrast barium enema (DCBE), flexible sigmoidoscopy with or without annual FOBT’s, and colonoscopy. In this report, we assess the options of fecal immunochemical tests, colonoscopy, CT-colonography (CTC or virtual colonoscopy), and fecal DNA tests. The tests are discussed with respect to the evidence in support of their use and within the context of how they could be managed and implemented in primary care practice. Primary care physicians will want to understand the tradeoffs among accuracy, costs, and patient preferences for the current and emerging CRC tests. PMID:18725826

  12. Cancer fear: facilitator and deterrent to participation in colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Vrinten, Charlotte; Waller, Jo; von Wagner, Christian; Wardle, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer fear has been associated with higher and lower screening uptake across different studies, possibly because different aspects of cancer fear have different effects on intentions versus behaviour. The present study examined associations of three aspects of cancer fear with intention and uptake of endoscopic screening for colorectal cancer. Methods A sub-sample of UK Flexible Sigmoidoscopy (FS) Trial participants received a baseline questionnaire that included three cancer fear items from a standard measure asking if: i) cancer was feared more than other diseases, ii) cancer worry was experienced frequently, and iii) thoughts about cancer caused discomfort. Screening intention was assessed by asking participants whether, if invited, they would accept an invitation for FS screening. Positive responders were randomised to be invited or not in a 1:2 ratio. The behavioural outcome was clinic-recorded uptake. Control variables were age, gender, ethnicity, education, and marital status. Results The questionnaire return rate was 60% (7,971/13,351). The majority (82%) intended to attend screening; 1,920 were randomised to receive an invitation, and 71% attended. Fearing cancer more than other diseases (OR=2.32, p<.01) and worrying a lot about cancer (OR=2.34, p<.01) increased intentions to attend screening, but not uptake. Finding thoughts about cancer uncomfortable did not influence intention, but predicted lower uptake (OR=0.72, p<.01). Conclusions Different aspects of cancer fear have different effects on the decision and action processes leading to screening participation. Impact Knowledge of the different behavioural effects of cancer fear may aid the design of effective public health messages. PMID:25634890

  13. Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Foreign-born South Asians in the Metropolitan New York/New Jersey Region.

    PubMed

    Manne, Sharon; Steinberg, Michael B; Delnevo, Cristine; Ulpe, Rajiv; Sorice, Kristen

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine colorectal cancer (CRC) screening practices and factors associated with CRC screening among foreign-born South Asians living in the metropolitan New York-New Jersey area. Two hundred and eight men and women recruited from community settings in the New York and New Jersey metropolitan area completed a questionnaire that included demographics, CRC screening practices, health care access and practices, attitudes about the health care system, primary care physician support for CRC screening, cultural factors, and attitudes about CRC screening and CRC worry. Almost a third of the sample had not heard of any of CRC screening tests. Approximately 62 % of the sample had never had a CRC screening test and approximately 69 % of the sample was not currently on schedule with regard to CRC screening. When the relative contribution of significant correlates were evaluated, participants who had lived in the US for a longer time, who endorsed more CRC screening benefits, and who endorsed fewer CRC screening barriers were significantly more likely to have had CRC screening in the past. Participants who were more likely to use English in their daily life, who endorsed more CRC screening benefits, and endorsed fewer CRC screening barriers were more likely to be on schedule with regard to CRC screening. In conclusion, awareness of CRC screening and uptake of screening was low in this population of foreign-born South Asians. Interventions to promote CRC screening may benefit from targeting this subgroup of Asian Americans. PMID:26072261

  14. Predictors of Colorectal Screening in Rural Colorado: Testing to Prevent Colon Cancer in the High Plains Research Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Walter F.; McGloin, Joe; Zittleman, Linda; West, David R.; Westfall, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, yet screening rates are well below target levels. Rural communities may face common and unique barriers to health care, particularly preventive health care. Purpose: To establish baseline attitudinal, knowledge, belief, and behavior measures on colorectal…

  15. Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Personal Practices regarding Colorectal Cancer Screening among Health Care Professionals in Rural Colorado: A Pilot Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rim, Sun Hee; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M.; Overholser, Linda; Froshaug, Desiree; Coughlin, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study reports the baseline knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and personal practices of health care professionals regarding colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in the High Plains Research Network (HPRN) of rural Colorado prior to a community-based educational intervention. It also examines the association between health care staff members'…

  16. Anticipated regret to increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening (ARTICS): A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Ronan E; Chambers, Julie A; Brownlee, Linda; Libby, Gillian; Steele, Robert J C

    2015-10-01

    Screening is important for early detection of colorectal cancer. Our aim was to determine whether a simple anticipated regret (AR) intervention could increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening. A randomised controlled trial of a simple, questionnaire-based AR intervention, delivered alongside existing pre-notification letters, was conducted. A total of 60,000 adults aged 50-74 years from the Scottish National Screening programme were randomised into the following groups: (1) no questionnaire (control), (2) Health Locus of Control questionnaire (HLOC) or (3) HLOC plus AR questionnaire. The primary outcome was return of the guaiac faecal occult blood test (FOBT). The secondary outcomes included intention to return test kit and perceived disgust (ICK). A total of 59,366 people were analysed as allocated (intention-to-treat (ITT)); no overall differences were seen between the treatment groups on FOBT uptake (control: 57.3%, HLOC: 56.9%, AR: 57.4%). In total, 13,645 (34.2%) individuals returned the questionnaires. Analysis of the secondary questionnaire measures showed that AR indirectly affected FOBT uptake via intention, whilst ICK directly affected FOBT uptake over and above intention. The effect of AR on FOBT uptake was also moderated by intention strength: for less-than-strong intenders only, uptake was 4.2% higher in the AR (84.6%) versus the HLOC group (80.4%) (95% CI for difference (2.0, 6.5)). The findings show that psychological concepts including AR and perceived disgust (ICK) are important factors in determining FOBT uptake. However, the AR intervention had no simple effect in the ITT analysis. It can be concluded that, in those with low intentions, exposure to AR may be required to increase FOBT uptake. The current controlled trials are presented at the website www.controlled-trials.com (number: ISRCTN74986452). PMID:26301484

  17. Anticipated regret to increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening (ARTICS): A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    O'Carroll, Ronan E.; Chambers, Julie A.; Brownlee, Linda; Libby, Gillian; Steele, Robert J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Screening is important for early detection of colorectal cancer. Our aim was to determine whether a simple anticipated regret (AR) intervention could increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening. A randomised controlled trial of a simple, questionnaire-based AR intervention, delivered alongside existing pre-notification letters, was conducted. A total of 60,000 adults aged 50–74 years from the Scottish National Screening programme were randomised into the following groups: (1) no questionnaire (control), (2) Health Locus of Control questionnaire (HLOC) or (3) HLOC plus AR questionnaire. The primary outcome was return of the guaiac faecal occult blood test (FOBT). The secondary outcomes included intention to return test kit and perceived disgust (ICK). A total of 59,366 people were analysed as allocated (intention-to-treat (ITT)); no overall differences were seen between the treatment groups on FOBT uptake (control: 57.3%, HLOC: 56.9%, AR: 57.4%). In total, 13,645 (34.2%) individuals returned the questionnaires. Analysis of the secondary questionnaire measures showed that AR indirectly affected FOBT uptake via intention, whilst ICK directly affected FOBT uptake over and above intention. The effect of AR on FOBT uptake was also moderated by intention strength: for less-than-strong intenders only, uptake was 4.2% higher in the AR (84.6%) versus the HLOC group (80.4%) (95% CI for difference (2.0, 6.5)). The findings show that psychological concepts including AR and perceived disgust (ICK) are important factors in determining FOBT uptake. However, the AR intervention had no simple effect in the ITT analysis. It can be concluded that, in those with low intentions, exposure to AR may be required to increase FOBT uptake. The current controlled trials are presented at the website www.controlled-trials.com (number: ISRCTN74986452). PMID:26301484

  18. Trust, choice and obligation: a qualitative study of enablers of colorectal cancer screening in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Paul R; Coffey, Cushla; Meyer, Samantha

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has the second highest cancer prevalence and mortality rates in Australia. The Australian National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) aims to increase early detection of CRC by offering free faecal occult blood testing. The NBCSP aims to offer choice to consumers about whether or not to participate in screening. This article presents data on trust, choice and perceived obligation to participate in the NBCSP by population groups with low uptake. A qualitative study was undertaken in South Australia. We interviewed 94 people from four culturally distinct groups: Greek, Iranian, Anglo-Australian and Indigenous peoples. This article demonstrates the complexity of factors shaping the choice, or lack thereof, to participate in the NBCSP. Informed choice is based on adequate knowledge, although this varied among our participants, highlighting the need for more health education in appropriate languages. An obligation to participate was found in the Iranian and Anglo-Australian groups and resulted from an established personal relationship with the doctor, a sense of duty, the acknowledgement of government investment and appreciation. Overall, this article makes a link between trust, choice and obligation, adding to literature on the sociology of trust and medical screening and highlighting important issues in the need of a policy and practice to improve CRC screening rates. PMID:25912247

  19. Assessing Colorectal Cancer Screening Behaviors and Knowledge among At-Risk Hispanics in Southern New Mexico*

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Janeth I.; Palacios, Rebecca; Thompson, Beti; Martinez, Vanessa; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality rates in New Mexico (NM) continue to be higher than national rates. Hispanic CRC mortality rates in NM surpass those of overall Hispanics in the US. This study was designed to characterize and understand factors contributing to low CRC screening rates in this border region. Methods A CRC Knowledge Assessment Survey (KAS) was administered in either English or Spanish to 247 individuals attending community events throughout southern NM. A subset of these individuals completed an online CRC risk assessment survey managed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Data analysis tested for significant differences in knowledge, physician-patient CRC interactions, CRC risk level perception, and screening rates across diverse ethnic and age groups. Results Both CRC knowledge and physician-patient CRC interactions were positively associated with participant screening history. Significant age and ethnic differences for CRC knowledge, physician-patient CRC interactions, and screening history in the NM border sample were also seen. Age-eligible Hispanics (50+) as well as those less than 50 years of age had lower CRC knowledge and were less likely to engage in physician-patient CRC interactions than non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). The age-eligible Hispanics also reported lower CRC screening rates than their NHW counterparts. Conclusions Low CRC knowledge and limited physician-patient CRC interactions appear to contribute to low screening rates in this NM population. Expanding education and outreach efforts for this border population are essential to promote early CRC detection and thereby decrease overall CRC mortality rates. PMID:25621179

  20. Cost-effectiveness of family history-based colorectal cancer screening in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With 14.234 diagnoses and over 4047 deaths reported in 2007, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer and second most common cause of cancer-related mortality in Australia. The direct treatment cost has recently been estimated to be around AU$1.2 billion for the year 2011, which corresponds to a four-fold increase, compared the cost reported in 2001. Excluding CRCs due to known rare genetic disorders, 20% to 25% of all CRCs occur in a familial aggregation setting due to genetic variants or shared environmental risk factors that are yet to be characterised. A targeted screening strategy addressed to this segment of the population is a potentially valuable tool for reducing the overall burden of CRC. Methods We developed a Markov model to assess the cost-effectiveness of three screening strategies offered to people at increased risk due to a strong family history of CRC. The model simulated the evolution of a cohort of 10,000 individuals from age 50 to 90 years. We compared screening with biennial iFOBT, five-yearly colonoscopy and ten-yearly colonoscopy versus the current strategy of the Australian National Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (i.e. base case). Results Under the NBCSP scenario, 6,491 persons developed CRC with an average screening lifetime cost of AU$3,441 per person. In comparison, screening with biennial iFOBT, colonoscopy every ten years, and colonoscopy every five years reduced CRC incidence by 27%, 35% and 60%, and mortality by 15%, 26% and 46% respectively. All three screening strategies had a cost under AU$50,000 per life year gained, which is regarded as the upper limit of acceptable cost-effectiveness in the Australian health system. At AU$12,405 per life year gained and an average lifetime expectancy of 16.084 years, five-yearly colonoscopy screening was the most cost-effective strategy. Conclusion The model demonstrates that intensive CRC screening strategies targeting people at increased risk would be cost

  1. Colorectal cancer screening in an academic center compared to the national average

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Manuel O; Sadri, Lilly M; Leong, Alfred B; Mohanty, Smruti R; Mehta, Parag

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if the increased emphases on training and education on current colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines has resulted in improved national CRC screening rates in an internal medicine training program, and to determine if the doctor’s post graduate year (PGY) level of training affected CRC screening rates. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional study of every patient who presented to the outpatient clinic of New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, over the span of six continuous weeks in 2011. A questionnaire was integrated into every patient’s medical interview that helped determine that patient’s current CRC screening status, screening mammography status if applicable, Papanicolaou smear status if applicable, and current pneumococcal vaccination status. At the same time, patient demographics were also obtained. All of the questionnaire data was collected at the end of each medical visit and was compiled by a designated researcher. After all the data points were collected, it was ensured that the patient has been seen by his or her continuity care resident at least twice in the past. Data was then compiled into a secure, encrypted database to then be analyzed by our statistician. RESULTS: Data from 547 consecutive clinic visits were obtained. Of these, we reviewed 483 charts that met all of the inclusion criteria and did not meet the exclusion criteria. The data was then analyzed for differences between PGY levels, patient’s sex, race, and educational level. The study population consisted of 138 men and 345 women. 35 patients were white (7.40%), 174 were black (39.79%) and 264 were Hispanic (55.81%). Our CRC screening rates were: 66% for PGY-1’s, 72% for PGY-2’s and 77% for PGY-3’s. There was no statistical difference noted between the three groups (P ≤ 0.05) or was there any difference sex, insurance status or educational level. Overall CRC screening rate was 72% which was not different from the New York State average (P

  2. Population-based programs for increasing colorectal cancer screening in the United States.

    PubMed

    Verma, Manisha; Sarfaty, Mona; Brooks, Durado; Wender, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Screening to detect polyps or cancer at an early stage has been shown to produce better outcomes in colorectal cancer (CRC). Programs with a population-based approach can reach a large majority of the eligible population and can offer cost-effective interventions with the potential benefit of maximizing early cancer detection and prevention using a complete follow-up plan. The purpose of this review was to summarize the key features of population-based programs to increase CRC screening in the United States. A search was conducted in the SCOPUS, OvidSP, and PubMed databases. The authors selected published reports of population-based programs that met at least 5 of the 6 International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) criteria for cancer prevention and were known to the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. Interventions at the level of individual practices were not included in this review. IARC cancer prevention criteria served as a framework to assess the effective processes and elements of a population-based program. Eight programs were included in this review. Half of the programs met all IARC criteria, and all programs led to improvements in screening rates. The rate of colonoscopy after a positive stool test was heterogeneous among programs. Different population-based strategies were used to promote these screening programs, including system-based, provider-based, patient-based, and media-based strategies. Treatment of identified cancer cases was not included explicitly in 4 programs but was offered through routine medical care. Evidence-based methods for promoting CRC screening at a population level can guide the development of future approaches in health care prevention. The key elements of a successful population-based approach include adherence to the 6 IARC criteria and 4 additional elements (an identified external funding source, a structured policy for positive fecal occult blood test results and confirmed cancer

  3. Focused Decision Support: a Data Mining Tool to Query the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Dataset and Guide Screening Management for the Individual Patient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arjun; Hostetter, Jason; Morrison, James; Wang, Kenneth; Siegel, Eliot

    2016-04-01

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer (PLCO) Screening Trial enrolled ~155,000 participants to determine whether certain screening exams reduced mortality from prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer. Repurposing the data provides an unparalleled resource for matching patients with the outcomes of demographically or diagnostically comparable patients. A web-based application was developed to query this subset of patient information against a given patient's demographics and risk factors. Analysis of the matched data yields outcome information which can then be used to guide management decisions and imaging software. Prognostic information is also estimated via the proportion of matched patients that progress to cancer. The US Preventative Services Task Force provides screening recommendations for cancers of the breast, colorectal tract, and lungs. There is wide variability in adherence of clinicians to these guidelines and others published by the Fleischner Society and various cancer organizations. Data mining the PLCO dataset for clinical decision support can optimize the use of limited healthcare resources, focusing screening on patients for whom the benefit to risk ratio is the greatest and most efficacious. A data driven, personalized approach to cancer screening maximizes the economic and clinical efficacy and enables early identification of patients in which the course of disease can be improved. Our dynamic decision support system utilizes a subset of the PLCO dataset as a reference model to determine imaging and testing appropriateness while offering prognostic information for various cancers. PMID:26385814

  4. Effectiveness of a Controlled Trial to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening in Vietnamese Americans

    PubMed Central

    McPhee, Stephen J.; Stewart, Susan L.; Doan, Hiep T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted a controlled trial of a public education and provider intervention to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates among Vietnamese Americans, who typically have lower rates than non-Hispanic Whites. Methods. The public education intervention included a Vietnamese-language CRC screening media campaign, distribution of health educational material, and a hotline. The provider intervention consisted of continuing medical education seminars, newsletters, and DVDs. Vietnamese in Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California, received the intervention from 2004 to 2006; Vietnamese in Harris County, Texas, were controls and received no intervention. A quasi-experimental study design with pre- and postintervention surveys of the same 533 participants was used to evaluate the combined intervention. Results. The postintervention-to-preintervention odds ratio for having ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy was 1.4 times greater in the intervention community than in the control community. Knowledge and attitudes mediated the effect of the intervention on CRC screening behavior. Media exposure mediated the effect of the intervention on knowledge. Conclusions. Improving CRC knowledge through the media contributed to the effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:20299659

  5. The Effects of Tailoring Knowledge Acquisition on Colorectal Cancer Screening Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jerant, Anthony; To, Patricia; Franks, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Interventions tailored to psychological factors such as personal and vicarious behavioral experiences can enhance behavioral self-efficacy, but are complex to develop and implement. Information seeking theory suggests tailoring acquisition of health knowledge (without concurrent psychological factor tailoring) could enhance self-efficacy, simplifying the design of tailored behavior change interventions. To begin to examine this issue, the authors conducted exploratory analyses of data from a randomized controlled trial, comparing the effects of an experimental colorectal cancer (CRC) screening intervention tailoring knowledge acquisition with the effects of a non-tailored control on CRC screening knowledge and self-efficacy in 1159 patients comprising three ethnicity/language strata (Hispanic/Spanish 23.4%, Hispanic/English 27.2%, non-Hispanic/English 49.3%) and five recruitment center strata. Adjusted for study strata, the mean post-intervention knowledge score was significantly higher in the experimental group versus control. Adjusted experimental intervention exposure (B = 0.22, 95% CI [0.14, 0.30]), pre-intervention knowledge (B = 0.11, 95% CI [0.05, 0.16]), and post-intervention knowledge (B = 0.03, 95% CI [0.01, 0.05]) were independently associated with subsequent CRC screening self-efficacy (p < .001 all associations). These exploratory findings suggest tailoring knowledge acquisition may enhance self-efficacy, with potential implications for tailored intervention design, but require confirmation in studies specifically designed to examine this issue. PMID:25928315

  6. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS) learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs) used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice. PMID:22126324

  7. Effects of Tailored Knowledge Enhancement on Colorectal Cancer Screening Preference across Ethnic and Language Groups

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Richard L.; Fiscella, Kevin; Sohler, Nancy; Romero, Raquel Lozano; Parnes, Bennett; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Turner, Charles; Dvorak, Simon; Franks, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective Tailoring to psychological constructs (e.g. self-efficacy, readiness) motivates behavior change, but whether knowledge tailoring alone changes healthcare preferences - a precursor of behavior change in some studies - is unknown. We examined this issue in secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial of a tailored colorectal cancer (CRC) screening intervention, stratified by ethnicity/language subgroups (Hispanic/Spanish, Hispanic/English, non-Hispanic/English). Methods Logistic regressions compared effects of a CRC screening knowledge-tailored intervention versus a non-tailored control on preferences for specific test options (fecal occult blood or colonoscopy), in the entire sample (N = 1164) and the three ethnicity/language subgroups. Results Pre-intervention, preferences for specific tests did not differ significantly between study groups (experimental, 64.5%; control 62.6%). Post-intervention, more experimental participants (78.6%) than control participants (67.7%) preferred specific tests (P <0.001). Adjusting for pre-intervention preferences, more experimental group participants than control group participants preferred specific tests post-intervention [average marginal effect (AME) = 9.5%, 95% CI 5.3-13.6; P <0.001]. AMEs were similar across ethnicity/language subgroups. Conclusion Knowledge tailoring increased preferences for specific CRC screening tests across ethnic and language groups. Practice Implications If the observed preference changes are found to translate into behavior changes, then knowledge tailoring alone may enhance healthy behaviors. PMID:22985627

  8. A comparison of self-reported colorectal cancer screening with medical records.

    PubMed

    Madlensky, Lisa; McLaughlin, John; Goel, Vivek

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare self-reports of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by fecal occult blood test (FOBT), sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy with medical records in a multiprovider health care setting. Relatives of CRC patients residing in Ontario, Canada completed a questionnaire indicating whether or not they had ever had any CRC screening tests. Medical records from physician's offices and hospitals were compared with the self reports, and where possible, reasons were obtained for nonmatching reports. Medical records for colonoscopies were readily available from various sources, and self-reports of this procedure were very accurate (kappa statistic for agreement beyond chance = 0.87). For sigmoidoscopy and FOBT, the agreement was poorer (kappa = 0.29 and 0.32, respectively); however, there were difficulties in obtaining records for these two procedures. Sigmoidoscopy procedures that took place many years ago were difficult to document, and physician's offices were unable to provide FOBT reports in many cases. Self-reports of colonoscopy were very accurate in this population, whereas self-reports of sigmoidoscopy and FOBT are somewhat less accurate, although this is likely due to challenges in obtaining a confirmatory record rather than an overreporting of tests. In a multiprovider publicly insured health care setting such as Canada, using self-reported information is likely to provide sufficiently accurate information for colonoscopy, but for other CRC screening tests, there may be difficulty in obtaining true estimates of the frequencies of these procedures. PMID:12869407

  9. Using the Cancer Risk Management Model to evaluate colorectal cancer screening options for Canada

    PubMed Central

    Coldman, A.J.; Phillips, N.; Brisson, J.; Flanagan, W.; Wolfson, M.; Nadeau, C.; Fitzgerald, N.; Miller, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several screening methods for colorectal cancer (crc) are available, and some have been shown by randomized trials to be effective. In the present study, we used a well-developed population health simulation model to compare the risks and benefits of a variety of screening scenarios. Tests considered were the fecal occult blood test (fobt), the fecal immunochemical test (fit), flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy. Outcomes considered included years of life gained, crc cases and deaths prevented, and direct health system costs. Methods A natural history model of crc was implemented and calibrated to specified targets within the framework of the Cancer Risk Management Model (crmm) from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. The crmm-crc permits users to enter their own parameter values or to use program-specified base values. For each of 23 screening scenarios, we used the crmm-crc to run 10 million replicate simulations. Results Using base parameter values and some user-specified values in the crmm-crc, and comparing our screening scenarios with no screening, all screening scenarios were found to reduce the incidence of and mortality from crc. The fobt was the least effective test; it was not associated with lower net cost. Colonoscopy screening was the most effective test; it had net costs comparable to those for several other strategies considered, but required more than 3 times the colonoscopy resources needed by other approaches. After colonoscopy, strategies based on the fit were predicted to be the most effective. In sensitivity analyses performed for the fobt and fit screening strategies, fobt parameter values associated with high-sensitivity formulations were associated with a substantial increase in test effectiveness. The fit was more cost-effective at the 50 ng/mL threshold than at the 100 ng/mL threshold. Conclusions The crmm-crc provides a sophisticated and flexible environment in which to evaluate crc control options. All screening

  10. Black participation in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Stallings, F L; Ford, M E; Simpson, N K; Fouad, M; Jernigan, J C; Trauth, J M; Miller, D S

    2000-12-01

    The primary goal of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial is to learn whether widespread use of screening tests to detect these cancers will reduce associated mortality. Blacks have the highest age-adjusted cancer incidence and mortality rates of any population group in the United States, but several barriers to their participation in clinical research such as the PLCO trial exist. These barriers involve sociocultural, economic, and individual factors, as well as factors inherent in trial designs. Population diversity in the PLCO trial is necessary to preserve scientific validity and generalizability of trial results. Therefore, the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are collaborating to ensure adequate representation of blacks in the PLCO trial. For example, the agencies have funded several new activities designed to better understand and overcome barriers to participation in the trial. These activities include the African American Men Project, a randomized trial designed to evaluate the efficacy of three increasingly intensive recruitment interventions in recruiting black men; the establishment of a minority-focused PLCO trial screening center, a study to identify factors that influenced the decisions of black women recruited to participate in the PLCO trial; and a study to examine the psychosocial factors that influence blacks' decision making to engage in cancer screening and participation in research similar to the PLCO trial. The results of these activities will allow for a more thorough examination of cancer-related issues of importance to blacks and will help shed light on factors that influence their decisions to participate in cancer screening and prevention clinical trials. PMID:11189689

  11. The effectiveness of FOBT vs. FIT: A meta-analysis on colorectal cancer screening test

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinezhad, Maryam; Majdzadeh, Reza; Akbari Sari, Ali; Delavari, Alireza; Mohtasham, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: After lung and prostate cancers, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer worldwide. Every year, more than one million people are diagnosed with colorectal cancer worldwide and half of these patients die from this disease, making it the fourth leading cause of death in the world. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of the two colorectal diagnostic tests of FOBT (fecal occult blood test) and FIT (fecal immunochemical test)) in terms of technical performance. Methods: To retrieve the relevant evidence, appropriate medical databases such as Cochrane library, NHSEED, Scopus and Google scholar were searched from February 2013 to July 2014, using free-texts and Mesh. In this study, inclusion/exclusion criteria of the papers, randomized controlled trials, economic evaluations, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and meta-syntheses of the effectiveness of FIT versus FOBT tests in moderate-risk populations (age: 50 to 70 years), which had reported the least of such outcomes as sensitivity, specificity and clinical outcomes were reviewed. The analyses of the effectiveness outcomes were performed in the form of meta-analysis. Results: Five papers were eligible to be included in the final phase of the study for synthesis. FIT showed a better performance in participation and positivity rate. Moreover, in terms of false positive and negative rate, FIT showed fewer rates compared to FOBT (RR:-4.06; 95% CI (-7.89-0.24), and NN-scope (Number need to scope) (2.2% vs. 1.6%), and NN-screen (Number need to screen) (84% vs. 31-49% in different cut off levels) showed significant differences in FOBT vs. FIT, respectively. Conclusion: In the five included studies (3, 11-14), the acceptability of FIT was more than FOBT. However, in our meta-analysis, no difference was found between the two tests. FIT was significant in positivity rate and had a better performance in

  12. Clarifying differences in natural history between models of screening: The case of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Knudsen, Amy B.; Zauber, Ann G.; Savarino, James; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Boer, Rob; Feuer, Eric J.; Habbema, J. Dik F.; Kuntz, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Microsimulation models are important decision support tools for screening. However, their complexity creates a barrier, making it difficult to understand models and, as a result, limiting realization of their full potential. Therefore, it is important to develop documentation that clarifies assumptions. We demonstrate this problem and explore a solution for the natural history, using three independently developed colorectal cancer screening models. Methods We begin by projecting the cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy screening for the three microsimulation models. Next, we provide a conventional presentation of each of them, including information that would usually be published with a decision analysis. Finally, for the three models, we provide the simulated reduction in clinical cancer incidence following a one-time complete removal of adenomas and preclinical cancers. We denote this measure as maximum clinical incidence reduction (MCLIR). Results There are considerable between-model differences in projected effectiveness. Conventional documentation describes model structure and associated parameter values. Given only this information, it is very difficult to compare models, largely because differences in structure make parameter values incomparable. In contrast, the MCLIR clearly shows the differences in assumptions on the key issue of the natural history: the dwell time of progressive preclinical disease, explaining between-model differences in projected effectiveness. Conclusions The simulated “maximum clinical incidence reduction” adds to the insight in dwell time, the critical characteristic of the natural history of disease, and how it differs between models. Inclusion of the MCLIR as a standard description would clarify the implications of assumptions for models applied to screening questions. PMID:21673187

  13. An innovative strategy to reach the underserved for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Katherine Josa; Espinoza, Noah; Galvan, Avigail; Carosso, Elizabeth; Marchello, Nathan; Linde, Sandra; Copeland, Wade; Thompson, Beti

    2014-01-01

    Hispanics are an underserved population in terms of colorectal cancer (CRC). CRC is the second leading cause of cancer incidence among Hispanic men and women and Hispanics have lower screening rates than non-Hispanic whites. The overall purpose of this project was to provide CRC information, education, and fecal occult blood test (FOBT) kits to Hispanics in a rural three-county region of Washington State. We held a series of 47 community health fair events that incorporated the use of a giant inflatable, walk-through colon model with physical depictions of healthy tissue, polyps, and CRC. We used a pre/post-design to look for changes in familiarity with CRC before and after walking through the colon among adults 18 and older (n=947). McNemar's test analysis indicated significant differences in the distribution of the percentage of correct participant responses to CRC-related questions from pre- to post-test after an educational tour of the colon. Results from logistic regression analysis identified multiple participant characteristics associated with self-reported likelihood of being screened for CRC in the three months following post-test. We distributed 300 free FOBT kits to be analyzed at no charge to the end-user to attendees aged 50 and older who toured the inflatable colon; 226 FOBT kits (75.3%) were returned for analysis. The use of the inflatable colon was an innovative way to attract people to learn about CRC and CRC screening modalities. Furthermore, the response to our distribution of FOBT kits indicates that if given the opportunity for education and access to services, this underserved population will comply with CRC screening. PMID:25002255

  14. Pioneering Annual Colorectal Cancer Screening and Treatment Targeting Low Income Communities in Malaysia (20102015).

    PubMed

    Tze, Christina Ng Van; Fitzgerald, Henry; Qureshi, Akhtar; Tan, Huck Joo; Low, May Lee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the rate of uptake of a customised annual Colorectal Cancer Awareness, Screening and Treatment Project (CCASTP) using faecal immunohistochemical test (FIT) kits in low income communities in Malaysia. The immediate objectives were (1) to evaluate the level of adherence of CRC screening among lowincome groups, (2) to assess the knowledge and awareness of the screened population and (3) to assess the accuracy of FIT kits. A total of 1,581 FIT kits were distributed between years 2010 to 2015 to healthy asymptomatic participants of the annual CCASTP organized by Empowered the Cancer Advocacy Society of Malaysia. Data for sociodemographic characteristics, critical health and lifestyle information of the registered subjects were collected. Findings for use of the FIT kits were collected when they were returned for stool analyses. Those testingd positive were invited to undergo a colonoscopy examination. A total of 1,436 (90.8%) of the subjects retuned the FITkits, showing high compliance. Among the 129 subjects with positive FIT results, 92 (71.3%) underwent colonoscopy. Six cases (6.5%) of CRC were found. Based on the data collected, the level of awareness of stool examination and knowledge about CRC was poor amongst the participants. Gender, age group, ethnicity and risk factors (i.e. smoking, lack of exercise and low consumption of fresh fruits) were associated with positive FITkit results. In conclusion, CRC screening can be performed in the community with a single FITkit. Although CRC knowledge and awareness is poor in lowincome communities, the average return rate of the FIT kits and rate of colonoscopy examination were 91.2% and 70.3%, respectively. PMID:27509948

  15. Screening strategies for colorectal cancer among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and family history.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Lam, Thomas Y T; Luk, Arthur K C; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Wong, Vincent W S; Ng, Simon S M; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2016-02-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) are at higher risks but how they should be screened remains uncertain. Hence, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of CRC screening among patients with NAFLD and family history by different strategies. A hypothetical population of 100,000 subjects aged 40-75 years receive: (i) yearly fecal immunochemical test (FIT) at 50 years; (ii) flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) every 5 years at 50 years; (iii) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years; (iv) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years among those with family history/NAFLD and yearly FIT at 50 years among those without; (v) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 40 years among those with family history/NAFLD and yearly FIT at 50 years among those without and (vi) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 40 years among those with family history/NAFLD and colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years among those without. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was studied by Markov modeling. It was found that colonoscopy, FS and FIT reduced incidence of CRC by 49.5, 26.3 and 23.6%, respectively. Using strategies 4, 5 and 6, the corresponding reduction in CRC incidence was 29.9, 30.9 and 69.3% for family history, and 33.2, 34.7 and 69.8% for NAFLD. Compared with no screening, strategies 4 (US$1,018/life-year saved) and 5 (US$7,485) for family history offered the lowest ICER, whilst strategy 4 (US$5,877) for NAFLD was the most cost-effective. These findings were robust when assessed with a wide range of deterministic sensitivity analyses around the base case. These indicated that screening patients with family history or NAFLD by colonoscopy at 50 years was economically favorable. PMID:26289421

  16. Academic hospital staff compliance with a fecal immunochemical test-based colorectal cancer screening program

    PubMed Central

    Vlachonikolou, Georgia; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Melissaratou, Anastasia; Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Tsironi, Ioanna; Filippidis, Paraskevas; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To measure the compliance of an Academic Hospital staff with a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program using fecal immunochemical test (FIT). METHODS All employees of “Attikon” University General Hospital aged over 50 years were thoroughly informed by a team of physicians and medical students about the study aims and they were invited to undergo CRC screening using two rounds of FIT (DyoniFOB® Combo H, DyonMed SA, Athens, Greece). The tests were provided for free and subjects tested positive were subsequently referred for colonoscopy. One year after completing the two rounds, participants were asked to be re-screened by means of the same test. RESULTS Among our target population consisted of 211 employees, 59 (27.9%) consented to participate, but only 41 (19.4%) and 24 (11.4%) completed the first and the second FIT round, respectively. Female gender was significantly associated with higher initial participation (P = 0.005) and test completion - first and second round - (P = 0.004 and P = 0.05) rates, respectively. Physician’s (13.5% vs 70.2%, P < 0.0001) participation and test completion rates (7.5% vs 57.6%, P < 0.0001 for the first and 2.3% vs 34%, P < 0.0001 for the second round) were significantly lower compared to those of the administrative/technical staff. Similarly, nurses participated (25.8% vs 70.2%, P = 0.0002) and completed the first test round (19.3% vs 57.6%, P = 0.004) in a significant lower rate than the administrative/technical staff. One test proved false positive. No participant repeated the test one year later. CONCLUSION Despite the well-organized, guided and supervised provision of the service, the compliance of the Academic Hospital personnel with a FIT-based CRC screening program was suboptimal, especially among physicians. PMID:27574556

  17. Polyethylene glycol versus sodium picosulfalte bowel preparation in the setting of a colorectal cancer screening program

    PubMed Central

    Kherad, Omar; Restellini, Sophie; Martel, Myriam; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adequate bowel preparation for colonoscopy is an important predictor of colonoscopy quality. OBJECTIVE: To determine the difference in terms of effectiveness between different existing colon cleansing products in the setting of a colorectal cancer screening program. METHODS: The records of consecutive patients who underwent colonoscopy at the Montreal General Hospital (Montreal, Quebec) between April 2013 and April 2014 were retrospectively extracted from a dedicated electronic digestive endoscopic institutional database. RESULTS: Overall, 2867 charts of patients undergoing colonoscopy were assessed, of which 1130 colonoscopies were performed in a screening setting; patients had adequate bowel preparation in 90%. Quality of preparation was documented in only 61%. Bowel preparation was worse in patients receiving sodium picosulfate (PICO) alone compared with polyethylene glycol, in a screening setting (OR 0.3 [95% CI 0.2 to 0.6]). Regardless of the preparation type, the odds of achieving adequate quality cleansing was 6.6 for patients receiving a split-dose regimen (OR 6.6 [95% CI 2.1 to 21.1]). In multivariable analyses, clinical variables associated with inadequate bowel preparation in combined population were use of PICO, a nonsplit regimen and inpatient status. The polyp detection rate was very high (45.6%) and was correlated with withdrawal time. CONCLUSION: Preparation quality needs to be more consistently included in the colonoscopy report. Split-dose regimens increased the quality of colon cleansing across all types of preparations and should be the preferred method of administration. Polyethylene glycol alone provided better bowel cleansing efficacy than PICO in a screening setting but PICO remains an alternative in association with an adjuvant. PMID:26301330

  18. Reduced incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer with flexible-sigmoidoscopy screening: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Jennifer; Thosani, Nirav; Batra, Sachin; Singh, Harminder; Guha, Sushovan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of published population-based randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: RCTs evaluating the difference in mortality and incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) between a screening flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) group and control group (not assigned to screening FS) with a minimum 5 years median follow-up were identified by a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials through August 2013. Random effects model was used for meta-analysis. RESULTS: Four RCTs with a total of 165659 patients in the FS group and 249707 patients in the control group were included in meta-analysis. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that there was a 22% risk reduction in total incidence of CRC (RR = 0.78, 95%CI: 0.74-0.83), 31% in distal CRC incidence (RR = 0.69, 95%CI: 0.63-0.75), and 9% in proximal CRC incidence (RR = 0.91, 95%CI: 0.83-0.99). Those who underwent screening FS were 18% less likely to be diagnosed with advanced CRC (OR = 0.82, 95%CI: 0.71-0.94). There was a 28% risk reduction in overall CRC mortality (RR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.65-0.80) and 43% in distal CRC mortality (RR = 0.57, 95%CI: 0.45-0.72). CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that screening FS can reduce the incidence of proximal and distal CRC and mortality from distal CRC along with reduction in diagnosis of advanced CRC. PMID:25561818

  19. Increased Detection of Colorectal Polyps in Screening Colonoscopy Using High Definition i-SCAN Compared with Standard White Light

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jung; Park, Sang Young; Park, Iksoo; Lee, Wook Jin; Park, Jaechan; Chon, Nuri; Oh, Tak Geun; Kim, Kwang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high definition (HD) i-SCAN for colorectal polyp detection in screening colonoscopy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 501 patients who had undergone screening colonoscopy performed by three endoscopists with either HD i-SCAN (n=149) or standard white light (n=352) from January 2, 2014 through June 30, 2014. Patient information and inter-endoscopist variation as well as polyp number, endoscopic findings, and pathologic characteristics were reviewed. Results: The detection rates of colorectal and neoplastic polyps were significantly higher using HD i-SCAN than standard white light colonoscopy (52% vs. 38.1%, p=0.004 for colorectal polyps; and 37.2% vs. 27.9%, p=0.041 for neoplastic polyps). Analysis of endoscopic findings revealed no difference in detected polyp size between HD i-SCAN and standard white light colonoscopy (4.59±2.35 mm vs. 4.82±2.81 mm, p=0.739), but non-protruding polyps were more commonly detected by i-SCAN than by standard white light colonoscopy (24.6% vs. 13.5%, p=0.007). Conclusions: Colonoscopy using HD i-SCAN had a significantly higher detection rate of colorectal polyps, including neoplastic polyps, because of improved sensitivity for detecting non-protruding lesions. PMID:26855927

  20. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Performance in Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Daniel W.; Bast, Robert C.; Berg, Christine D.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hartge, Patricia; Lokshin, Anna E.; Lu, Karen H.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Mor, Gil; Patriotis, Christos; Pinsky, Paul F.; Thornquist, Mark D.; Scholler, Nathalie; Skates, Steven J.; Sluss, Patrick M.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Ward, David C.; Zhang, Zhen; Zhu, Claire S.; Urban, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Establishing a cancer screening biomarker’s intended performance requires “phase III” specimens obtained in asymptomatic individuals before clinical diagnosis rather than “phase II” specimens obtained from symptomatic individuals at diagnosis. We used specimens from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial to evaluate ovarian cancer biomarkers previously assessed in phase II sets. Phase II specimens from 180 ovarian cancer cases and 660 benign disease or general population controls were assembled from four Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) or Ovarian Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) sites and used to rank 49 biomarkers. Thirty-five markers, including 6 additional markers from a fifth site, were then evaluated in PLCO proximate specimens from 118 women with ovarian cancer and 474 matched controls. Top markers in phase II specimens included CA125, HE4, transthyretin, CA15.3, and CA72.4 with sensitivity at 95% specificity ranging from 0.73 to 0.40. Except for transthyretin, these markers had similar or better sensitivity when moving to phase III specimens that had been drawn within six months of the clinical diagnosis. Performance of all markers declined in phase III specimens more remote than 6 months from diagnosis. Despite many promising new markers for ovarian cancer, CA125 remains the single-best biomarker in the phase II and phase III specimens tested in this study. PMID:21372036

  1. Cultural and Linguistic Adaptation of a Multimedia Colorectal Cancer Screening Decision Aid for Spanish Speaking Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Linda K.; Reuland, Daniel; Jolles, Monica; Clay, Rebecca; Pignone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the United States becomes more linguistically and culturally diverse, there is a need for effective health communication interventions that target diverse and most vulnerable populations. Latinos also have the lowest colorectal (CRC) screening rates of any ethnic group in the U.S. To address such disparities, health communication interventionists are often faced with the challenge to adapt existing interventions from English into Spanish in a way that retains essential elements of the original intervention while also addressing the linguistic needs and cultural perspectives of the target population. We describe the conceptual framework, context, rationale, methods, and findings of a formative research process used in creating a Spanish language version of an evidenced-based (English language) multimedia CRC screening decision aid. Our multi-step process included identification of essential elements of the existing intervention, literature review, assessment of the regional context and engagement of key stakeholders, and solicitation of direct input from target population. We integrated these findings in the creation of the new adapted intervention. We describe how we used this process to identify and integrate socio-cultural themes such as personalism (personalismo), familism (familismo), fear (miedo), embarrassment (verguenza), power distance (respeto), machismo, and trust (confianza) into the Spanish language decision aid. PMID:24328496

  2. Glycoprotein screening in colorectal cancer based on differentially expressed Tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyun; Cheng, Zongyong; Ouyang, Chunhui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yanyan; Chen, Shuijiao; Wang, Chunlian; Lu, Fanggen; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and the identification of new biomarkers for CRC is valuable for its diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to screen differentially expressed glycoproteins (especially O-glycoproteins) and to identify diagnostic or therapeutic candidates for colorectal cancer (CRC) based on different Tn antigen expression levels. Fresh cancer tissues and adjacent healthy tissues were obtained from CRC patients and classified into three groups based on their Tn antigen expression: CRC with negative Tn expression (CRC Tn‑), CRC with positive Tn expression (CRC Tn+) and normal control without Tn expression (NC). Protein extractions were separated and identified by iTRAQ technology. Glycoproteins and O-glycoproteins were selected using UniProt and DAVID. Deep bioinformatic analysis, including Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KO), was used to annotate this O-glycoprotein interaction network. Subsequently, two O‑glycoproteins were verified by western blotting and immunohistochemistry in either LS174T cells or CRC tissues. We found that 330 differentially expressed proteins were identified by iTRAQ between CRC Tn‑ and NC tissues, 317 between CRC Tn+ and NC tissues, and 316 between CRC Tn‑ and Tn+ tissues. Of the 316 proteins, 55 glycoproteins and 19 O‑glycoproteins were identified and analyzed via deep informatics. Namely, different Tn antigen expression levels in CRC led to differential protein expression patterns, especially for glycoproteins and O‑glycoproteins. Decorin and SORBS1, two representative functional O-glycoproteins, were significantly downregulated in the CRC Tn+ tissues compared with the level in the CRC Tn‑ or NC tissues. Based on this deep bioinformatic analysis, Decorin and SORBS1 are hypothesized to be involved in the TGF‑β and PPAR‑γ signaling pathways, respectively. PMID:27432485

  3. Screening of lymph nodes metastasis associated lncRNAs in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Rong, Long-Fei; Shi, Chuan-Bin; Dong, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Jie; Wang, Bao-Lin; Wen, Hao; He, Zhen-Yu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To screen lymph nodes metastasis associated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in colorectal cancer through microarray analysis. METHODS: Metastatic lymph node (MLN), normal lymph node (NLN) and tumor tissues of 3 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were collected during the operation and validated by pathological examinations. RNAs were extracted from MLN, NLN, and cancer tissues separately. RNA quantity and quality were measured with a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and RNA integrity was assessed by standard denaturing agarose electrophoresis. Agilent Feature Extraction Software (Version 11.0.1.1) was used to analyze acquired array images. Four differently expressed lncRNAs were confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in 26 subsets of MLN, NLN, and tumor tissues. RESULTS: Of 33045 lncRNAs, 1133 were differentially expressed in MLN compared with NLN, of which 260 were up-regulated and 873 down-regulated (≥ 2 fold-change). Five hundred and forty-five lncRNAs were differentially expressed in MLN compared with tumor tissues, of which 460 were up-regulated and 85 down-regulated (≥ 2 fold-change). Compared with NLN and cancer tissues, 14 lncRNAs were specifically up-regulated and 5 specifically down-regulated in MLN. AK307796, ENST00000425785, and AK021444 were confirmed to be specifically up-regulated in MLN and ENST00000465846 specifically down-regulated in MLN by qRT-PCR in 26 CRC patients. CONCLUSION: The specifically expressed lncRNAs in MLN may exert a partial or key role in the progress of lymph nodes metastasis of CRC. PMID:25009386

  4. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  5. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  6. Development of a comprehensive list of criteria for evaluating consumer education materials on colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Appropriate patient information materials may support the consumer’s decision to attend or not to attend colorectal cancer (CRC) screening tests (fecal occult blood test and screening colonoscopy). The aim of this study was to develop a list of criteria to assess whether written health information materials on CRC screening provide balanced, unbiased, quantified, understandable, and evidence-based health information (EBHI) about CRC and CRC screening. Methods The list of criteria was developed based on recommendations and assessment tools for health information in the following steps: (1) Systematic literature search in 13 electronic databases (search period: 2000–2010) and completed by an Internet search (2) Extraction of identified criteria (3) Grouping of criteria into categories and domains (4) Compilation of a manual of adequate answers derived from systematic reviews and S3 guidelines (5) Review by external experts (6) Modification (7) Final discussion with external experts. Results Thirty-one publications on health information tools and recommendations were identified. The final list of criteria includes a total of 230 single criteria in three generic domains (formal issues, presentation and understandability, and neutrality and balance) and one CRC-specific domain. A multi-dimensional rating approach was used whenever appropriate (e.g., rating for the presence, correctness, presentation and level of evidence of information). Free text input was allowed to ensure the transparency of assessment. The answer manual proved to be essential to the rating process. Quantitative analyses can be made depending on the level and dimensions of criteria. Conclusions This comprehensive list of criteria clearly has a wider range of evaluation than previous assessment tools. It is not intended as a final quality assessment tool, but as a first step toward thorough evaluation of specific information materials for their adherence to EBHI requirements. This

  7. Knowledge and practice of colorectal screening in a suburban group of Iraqi American women.

    PubMed

    Jillson, Irene; Faeq, Zainab; Kabbara, Khaled W; Cousin, Carolyn; Mumford, William; Blancato, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) was the second most common cancer among women in 2008, accounting for 571,000 cases, and 9.4% of all cancer cases afflicting women worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Iraqi National Cancer Registry (INCR), Iraq has seen a steady rise in CRC rates among its general population over the past several decades. Despite Iraq's increasing national incidence of CRC and the growth of the US' Iraqi immigrant population over the last 10 years, little remains known about the prevalence of CRC among the latter population, their knowledge of CRC and associated risk factors, or their behavioral intent and practices regarding CRC screening. The aims of this study were to (1) examine the knowledge of and adherence to National Cancer Institute screening recommendations for CRC among a population of Iraqi women living in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Area and (2) test the efficacy of a one-time educational intervention conducted using linguistically and culturally appropriate materials to raise awareness of, and promote future adherence to, CRC screening methods. This descriptive study used a pre/post design with a 12-month follow-up. Following extensive dissemination of information regarding the study in the Iraqi American community in the study location, 50 women were initially recruited, of whom 32 participated in the study. The study's findings revealed that the participants generally had low baseline levels of CRC screening adherence and preventive knowledge that significantly improved after the intervention as demonstrated by pre- and post-assessments of knowledge and behavior. These findings could be used to raise awareness (1) among clinicians regarding the need for early detection and screening of and referral for CRC treatment among Iraqi American women and (2) among Iraqi American women about risk factors for this disease and the importance of early detection and screening. The study also highlights the need for a

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of fecal immunochemical test in average- and familial-risk colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Inés; Hernandez, Vicent; González-Mao, Carmen; Rivera, Concepción; Iglesias, Felipe; Alves, María Teresa; Cid, Lucía; Soto, Santiago; De-Castro, Luisa; Vega, Pablo; Hermo, Jose Antonio; Macenlle, Ramiro; Martínez, Alfonso; Estevez, Pamela; Cid, Estela; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Portillo, Isabel; Bujanda, Luis; Fernández-Seara, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background There is little information about the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in familial-risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Objectives The objective of this article is to investigate whether FIT diagnostic accuracy for advanced neoplasia (AN) differs between average and familial-risk (first-degree relative) patients. Methods A total of 1317 consecutive participants (595 familial) who collected one stool sample before performing a colonoscopy as a CRC screening test were included. FIT diagnostic accuracy for AN was evaluated with Chi-square test at a 20 µg hemoglobin/g of feces cut-off value. Finally, we determined which variables were independently related to AN. Results An AN was found in 151 (11.5%) patients. The overall accuracy was not statistically different between both cohorts for AN (88.4%, 91.7%; p = 0.051). At the cut-off stablished, differences in FIT sensitivity (31.1%, 40.6%; p = 0.2) or specificity (96.5%, 97.3%; p = 0.1) were not statistically significant. Finally, independent variables such as sex (male) (odds ratio (OR) 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–3.1), age (50–65, >65 years) (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.3; OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–6.1), previous colonoscopy (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.9) and FIT ≥20 µg/g feces (OR 17.7, 95% CI 10.8–29.1) were associated with AN diagnosis. Conclusions FIT accuracy for AN detection is equivalent in average and familial-risk CRC screening cohorts. PMID:25452848

  9. Colorectal cancer risk perceptions and screening intentions in a minority population.

    PubMed Central

    Lipkus, I. M.; Lyna, P. R.; Rimer, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    This is a 2-year follow-up to a previously reported baseline paper. We focused on a predominantly low-income African-American population from a community health center and investigated the relationships among perceptions of perceived risks for colorectal cancer (CRC), concerns about getting CRC, screening intentions, and whether participants had a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) on schedule at follow-up. Baseline absolute risk did not predict screening intentions or being on schedule (15% of sample), nor did it predict follow-up perceived absolute risk, comparative risk, or CRC concerns. Participants who expressed greater perceived absolute risk, comparative risk, and concerns at follow-up were more likely to report thinking about or definitely planning to get an FOBT within the next 2 years (49% of the sample). In addition, baseline absolute risk and whether or not a person had an FOBT on schedule at baseline did not predict being on schedule at follow-up. A significant percentage of the population (20%) were not able to state whether their CRC risk was below average, average, or above average. In addition, 44% of the population viewed their risks as lower than their peers, and 58% reported being not at all or slightly concerned about getting CRC. These results suggest that educational efforts are needed especially for low-income minority populations to enhance knowledge and accuracy of risk perceptions for CRC and interventions that explicitly manipulate risk are needed to assess to what extent risk perceptions can be modified and subsequently affect screening. PMID:11105730

  10. A systematic review of special events to promote breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Special events are common community-based strategies for health promotion. This paper presents findings from a systematic literature review on the impact of special events to promote breast, cervical or colorectal cancer education and screening. Methods Articles in English that focused on special events involving breast, cervical, and/or colorectal cancer conducted in the U.S. and published between January 1990 and December 2011 were identified from seven databases: Ovid, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstract, Cochrane Libraries, and EconLit. Study inclusion and data extraction were independently validated by two researchers. Results Of the 20 articles selected for screening out of 1,409, ten articles on special events reported outcome data. Five types of special events were found: health fairs, parties, cultural events, special days, and plays. Many focused on breast cancer only, or in combination with other cancers. Reach ranged from 50–1732 participants. All special events used at least one evidence-based strategy suggested by the Community Guide to Preventive Services, such as small media, one-on-one education, and reducing structural barriers. For cancer screening as an outcome of the events, mammography screening rates ranged from 4.8% to 88%, Pap testing was 3.9%, and clinical breast exams ranged from 9.1% to 100%. For colorectal screening, FOBT ranged from 29.4% to 76%, and sigmoidoscopy was 100% at one event. Outcome measures included intentions to get screened, scheduled appointments, uptake of clinical exams, and participation in cancer screening. Conclusions Special events found in the review varied and used evidence-based strategies. Screening data suggest that some special events can lead to increases in cancer screening, especially if they provide onsite screening services. However, there is insufficient evidence to demonstrate that special events are effective in increasing cancer screening. The heterogeneity of

  11. The role of health literacy and communication habits on previous colorectal cancer screening among low-income and uninsured patients

    PubMed Central

    Ojinnaka, Chinedum O.; Bolin, Jane N.; McClellan, David A.; Helduser, Janet W.; Nash, Philip; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between health literacy, communication habits and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among low-income patients. Methods Survey responses of patients who received financial assistance for colonoscopy between 2011 and 2014 at a family medicine residency clinic were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression (n = 456). There were two dependent variables: (1) previous CRC screening and (2) CRC screening adherence. Our independent variables of interest were health literacy and communication habits. Results Over two-thirds (67.13%) of respondents had not been previously screened for CRC. Multivariate analysis showed a decreased likelihood of previous CRC screening among those who had marginal (OR = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.29–0.92) or inadequate health literacy (OR = 0.49; 95% CI = 0.27–0.87) compared to those with adequate health literacy. Controlling for health literacy, the significant association between educational attainment and previous CRC screening was eliminated. Thus, health literacy mediated the relationship between educational attainment and previous CRC screening. There was no significant association between communication habits and previous CRC screening. There was no significant association between screening guideline adherence, and health literacy or communication. Conclusion Limited health literacy is a potential barrier to CRC screening. Suboptimal CRC screening rates reported among those with lower educational attainment may be mediated by limited health literacy. PMID:26844065

  12. A multivariate cure model for left-censored and right-censored data with application to colorectal cancer screening patterns.

    PubMed

    Hagar, Yolanda C; Harvey, Danielle J; Beckett, Laurel A

    2016-08-30

    We develop a multivariate cure survival model to estimate lifetime patterns of colorectal cancer screening. Screening data cover long periods of time, with sparse observations for each person. Some events may occur before the study begins or after the study ends, so the data are both left-censored and right-censored, and some individuals are never screened (the 'cured' population). We propose a multivariate parametric cure model that can be used with left-censored and right-censored data. Our model allows for the estimation of the time to screening as well as the average number of times individuals will be screened. We calculate likelihood functions based on the observations for each subject using a distribution that accounts for within-subject correlation and estimate parameters using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We apply our methods to the estimation of lifetime colorectal cancer screening behavior in the SEER-Medicare data set. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26990553

  13. Development of new non-invasive tests for colorectal cancer screening: The relevance of information on adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Ulrike; Knudsen, Amy B.; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Kuntz, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers are actively pursuing the development of a new non-invasive test (NIT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening as an alternative to fecal occult blood tests (FOBTs). The majority of pilot studies focus on the detection of invasive CRC rather than precursor lesions (i.e., adenomas). We aimed to explore the relevance of adenoma detection for the viability of an NIT for CRC screening by considering a hypothetical test that does not detect adenomas beyond chance. We used the Simulation Model of Colorectal Cancer (SimCRC) to estimate the effectiveness of CRC screening and the lifetime costs (payers’ perspective) for a cohort of US 50-year-olds to whom CRC screening is offered from age 50–75. We compared annual screening with guaiac and immunochemical FOBTs (with sensitivities up to 70% and 24% for CRC and adenomas, respectively) to annual screening with a hypothetical NIT (sensitivity of 90% for CRC, no detection of adenomas beyond chance, specificity and cost similar to FOBTs). Screening with the NIT was not more effective, but was 29–44% more costly than screening with FOBTs. The findings were robust to varying the screening interval, the NIT’s sensitivity for CRC, adherence rates favoring the NIT, and the NIT’s unit cost. A comparative modelling approach using a model that assumes a shorter adenoma dwell time (MISCAN-COLON) confirmed the superiority of the immunochemical FOBT over a NIT with no ability to detect adenomas. Information on adenoma detection is crucial to determine whether a new NIT is a viable alternative to FOBTs for CRC screening. Current evidence thus lacks an important piece of information to identify marker candidates that hold real promise and deserve further (large-scale) evaluation. PMID:25403937

  14. Validation of nutritional risk index method against patient-generated subjective global assessment in screening malnutrition in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Elnaz; Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad; Nasirimotlagh, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    Objective To validate malnutrition screening tool of nutrition risk index (NRI) against patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) as a gold standard tool in colorectal cancer patients before radiotherapy. Methods Nutritional status of 52 volunteer colorectal cancer patients with a mean age of 54.1±16.8 years who referred to radiotherapy center were assessed by PG-SGA (gold standard method) and NRI. Serum albumin levels of patients were determined by colorimetric method. A contingency table was used to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the NRI in screening patients at risk of malnutrition, in comparison with the PG-SGA in patients before radiotherapy. Results The findings of PG-SGA and NRI showed that 52% and 45% of patients in our study were moderately or severely malnourished respectively. The NRI had a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 60% against PG-SGA. The positive predictive value was 64% and the negative predicative value was 62%. The agreement between NRI and PG-SGA was statistically insignificant (kappa =0.267; P>0.05). Conclusions The findings of present study showed that the prevalence of malnutrition was high in patients with colorectal cancer. Moreover, NRI method had low sensitivity and specificity in assessing nutritional status of patients with cancer. It seems that the combination of anthropometric, laboratory parameters and a subjective scoring system may be helpful tools in screening of malnutrition in cancer patients. PMID:24255578

  15. Colorectal cancer screening in countries of European Council outside of the EU-28

    PubMed Central

    Altobelli, Emma; D’Aloisio, Francesco; Angeletti, Paolo Matteo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provide an update on colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programmes in non-European Union (EU)-28 Council of Europe member states as of December 2015. METHODS: The mission of the Council of Europe is to protect and promote human rights in its 47 member countries. Its 19 non-EU member states are Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Georgia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Republic of Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Norway, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Switzerland, FYR of Macedonia, Turkey, and Ukraine (EU-19). The main data source were GLOBOCAN, IARC, WHO, EUCAN, NORDCAN, ENCR, volume X of the CI5, the ministerial and Public Health Agency websites of the individual countries, PubMed, EMBASE, registries of some websites and the www.cochranelibrary.com, Scopus, www.clinicaltrials.gov, www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, Research gate, Google and data extracted from screening programme results. RESULTS: Our results show that epidemiological data quality varies broadly between EU-28 and EU-19 countries. In terms of incidence, only 30% of EU-19 countries rank high in data quality as opposed to 86% of EU-28 states. The same applies to mortality data, since 52% of EU-19 countries as against all EU-28 countries are found in the high ranks. Assessment of the method of collection of incidence data showed that only 32% of EU-19 countries are found in the top three quality classes as against 89% of EU-28 countries. For the mortality data, 63% of EU-19 countries are found in the highest ranks as opposed to all EU-28 member states. Interestingly, comparison of neighbouring countries offering regional screening shows, for instance, that incidence and mortality rates are respectively 38.9 and 13.0 in Norway and 29.2 and 10.9 in Sweden, whereas in Finland, where a national organised programme is available, they are respectively 23.5 and 9.3. CONCLUSION: Cancer screening should be viewed as a key health care tool, also because investing in

  16. How to improve colon cancer screening rates

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Coelho, Debora Lucciola; De Lima, David Correa Alves; Petroianu, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates. PMID:26688708

  17. Knowledge and attitudes of primary health care physicians and nurses with regard to population screening for colorectal cancer in Balearic Islands and Barcelona

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Primary health care (PHC) professionals play a key role in population screening of colorectal cancer. The purposes of the study are: to assess knowledge and attitudes among PHC professionals with regard to colorectal cancer screening, as well as the factors that determine their support for such screening. Methods Questionnaire-based survey of PHC physicians and nurses in the Balearic Islands and in a part of the metropolitan area of Barcelona. Results We collected 1,219 questionnaires. About 84% of all professionals believe that screening for colorectal cancer by fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is effective. Around 68% would recommend to their clients a colorectal cancer screening program based on FOBT and colonoscopy. About 31% are reluctant or do not know. Professionals perceive the fear of undergoing a colonoscopy as the main obstacle in getting patients to participate, and the invasive nature of this test is the main reason behind their resistance to this program. The main barriers to support the screening program among PHC professionals are lack of knowledge (nurses) and lack of time (physicians). On multivariate analysis, the factors associated with reluctance to recommend colorectal cancer screening were: believing that FOBT has poor sensitivity and is complicated; that colonoscopy is an invasive procedure; that a lack of perceived benefit could discourage client participation; that only a minority of clients would participate; thinking that clients are fed up with screening tests and being unaware if they should be offered something to ensure their participation in the programme. Conclusions Two in every three PHC professionals would support a population screening program for colorectal cancer screening. Factors associated with reluctance to recommend it were related with screening tests characteristics as sensitivity and complexity of FOBT, and also invasive feature of colonoscopy. Other factors were related with patients' believes. PMID:20854679

  18. Screen-detected colorectal cancers are associated with an improved outcome compared with stage-matched interval cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gill, M D; Bramble, M G; Hull, M A; Mills, S J; Morris, E; Bradburn, D M; Bury, Y; Parker, C E; Lee, T J W; Rees, C J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancers (CRCs) detected through the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP) have been shown to have a more favourable outcome compared to non-screen-detected cancers. The aim was to identify whether this was solely due to the earlier stage shift of these cancers, or whether other factors were involved. Methods: A combination of a regional CRC registry (Northern Colorectal Cancer Audit Group) and the BCSP database were used to identify screen-detected and interval cancers (diagnosed after a negative faecal occult blood test, before the next screening round), diagnosed between April 2007 and March 2010, within the North East of England. For each Dukes' stage, patient demographics, tumour characteristics, and survival rates were compared between these two groups. Results: Overall, 322 screen-detected cancers were compared against 192 interval cancers. Screen-detected Dukes' C and D CRCs had a superior survival rate compared with interval cancers (P=0.014 and P=0.04, respectively). Cox proportional hazards regression showed that Dukes' stage, tumour location, and diagnostic group (HR 0.45, 95% CI 0.29–0.69, P<0.001 for screen-detected CRCs) were all found to have a significant impact on the survival of patients. Conclusions: The improved survival of screen-detected over interval cancers for stages C and D suggest that there may be a biological difference in the cancers in each group. Although lead-time bias may have a role, this may be related to a tumour's propensity to bleed and therefore may reflect detection through current screening tests. PMID:25247322

  19. Variations in Colorectal Cancer Screening of Medicare Beneficiaries Served by Rural Health Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Thomas T. H.; Ortiz, Judith; Berzon, Rick; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    This study aims (1) to examine the trends and patterns of colorectal cancer screening (CCS) of Medicare beneficiaries in rural areas by state and year (before and after Affordable Care Act [ACA] enactment) and (2) to investigate the contextual, organizational, and aggregated patient characteristics influencing variations in care received by patients of rural health clinics (RHCs). The following 2 hypotheses were formulated: (1) CCS rates are higher in the post-ACA period than in the pre-ACA period, irrespective of the factors rurality, poverty, dually eligible status, and the organizational characteristics of RHCs and (2) the contextual and organizational factors of RHCs exert more influence on the variation in CCS rates of RHC patients than do aggregated personal factors. We used administrative data on CCS rates (2007 through 2012) for rural Medicare beneficiaries. Autoregressive growth curve modeling of the CCS rates was performed. A generalized estimating equation of selected predictors was analyzed. Of the 9 predictors, 5 were statistically significant: The ACA and the percentage of female patients had a positive effect on the CCS rate, whereas regional location, years of RHC certification, and average age of patients had a negative effect on the CCS rate. The predictors accounted for 40.2% of the total variance in CCS. Results show that in rural areas of 9 states, the enactment of ACA improved CCS rates, contextual, organizational, and patient characteristics being considered. Improvement in preventive care will be expected, as the ACA is implemented in the United States. PMID:27088120

  20. Estimating development cost for a tailored interactive computer program to enhance colorectal cancer screening compliance.

    PubMed

    Lairson, David R; Chang, Yu-Chia; Bettencourt, Judith L; Vernon, Sally W; Greisinger, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The authors used an actual-work estimate method to estimate the cost of developing a tailored interactive computer education program to improve compliance with colorectal cancer screening guidelines in a large multi-specialty group medical practice. Resource use was prospectively collected from time logs, administrative records, and a design and computing subcontract. Sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the uncertainty of the overhead cost rate and other parameters. The cost of developing the system was Dollars 328,866. The development cost was Dollars 52.79 per patient when amortized over a 7-year period with a cohort of 1,000 persons. About 20% of the cost was incurred in defining the theoretic framework and supporting literature, constructing the variables and survey, and conducting focus groups. About 41% of the cost was for developing the messages, algorithms, and constructing program elements, and the remaining cost was to create and test the computer education program. About 69% of the cost was attributable to personnel expenses. Development cost is rarely estimated but is important for feasibility studies and ex-ante economic evaluations of alternative interventions. The findings from this study may aid decision makers in planning, assessing, budgeting, and pricing development of tailored interactive computer-based interventions. PMID:16799126

  1. Serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 in colorectal cancer family-risk population screening

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Chiara, Loretta De; Rodríguez-Girondo, Mar; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Castro, Inés; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is related to tumour development and progression in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its utility as biomarker has been suggested. The aim of our study was to measure serum MMP-9 in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients, and to analyse its diagnostic accuracy for the detection of advanced neoplasia (AN: advanced adenomas and CRC). Additionally, we compared its diagnostic capability with the most used non-invasive faecal immunochemical test (FIT). Serum MMP-9 was quantified by ELISA in 516 asymptomatic individuals that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT. MMP-9 levels were significantly related to age and gender and therefore the concentration was corrected by these confounders. Corrected MMP-9 (cMMP-9) levels were higher in individuals with advanced adenomas (AA; p-value = 0.029) and AN (p-value = 0.056) compared to individuals with no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated cMMP-9 concentration was associated with more severe characteristics of adenomas (number of lesions, size and histology). Nevertheless, the diagnostic accuracy of cMMP-9 was considerably lower than that of FIT for identifying AA (22.64% vs. 47.17% sensitivity, 90% specificity) or AN (19.30% vs. 52.63% sensitivity, 90% specificity). According to our results, serum MMP-9 cannot be considered of utility for the diagnosis of AN in CRC family-risk population screening. PMID:26264519

  2. Barriers for Compliance to Breast, Colorectal, and Cervical Screening Cancer Tests among Hispanic Patients.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Diaz, Christine; Betancourt, Elba; Ruiz-Candelaria, Yelitza; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics are less likely to undergo screening tests for colorectal cancer and cervical cancer than non-Hispanic whites. Compliance with mammography, fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), colonoscopy, and cervical smears (PAP) and barriers for compliance were studied. A descriptive study was performed with 194 ambulatory patients while they attended routine medical visits. Women are more likely than men to undergo a colonoscopy. Conversely, FOBT was most likely reported by men. Reasons for compliance with FOBT differed by gender. Men were most likely to avoid FOBT due to lack of knowledge whereas women reported that physicians do not recommend the procedure. Both men and women reported that lack of physician's recommendation was their primary reason for not undergoing a colonoscopy. Men tend to report lack of knowledge about colonoscopy procedure. A higher mammogram utilization rate was reported by women older than 40 years. PAP smears were reported by 74% of women older than 21 years. The major reasons for avoiding mammography and PAP tests were having a busy schedule, fear, and feeling uncomfortable during the procedure. In a multivariate regression analysis, occupational status was found to be a predictor for compliance with FOBT and colonoscopy. PMID:26703676

  3. Estimating Development Cost for a Tailored Interactive Computer Program to Enhance Colorectal Cancer Screening Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Lairson, David R.; Chang, Yu-Chia; Bettencourt, Judith L.; Vernon, Sally W.; Greisinger, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The authors used an actual-work estimate method to estimate the cost of developing a tailored interactive computer education program to improve compliance with colorectal cancer screening guidelines in a large multi-specialty group medical practice. Resource use was prospectively collected from time logs, administrative records, and a design and computing subcontract. Sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the uncertainty of the overhead cost rate and other parameters. The cost of developing the system was $328,866. The development cost was $52.79 per patient when amortized over a 7-year period with a cohort of 1,000 persons. About 20% of the cost was incurred in defining the theoretic framework and supporting literature, constructing the variables and survey, and conducting focus groups. About 41% of the cost was for developing the messages, algorithms, and constructing program elements, and the remaining cost was to create and test the computer education program. About 69% of the cost was attributable to personnel expenses. Development cost is rarely estimated but is important for feasibility studies and ex-ante economic evaluations of alternative interventions. The findings from this study may aid decision makers in planning, assessing, budgeting, and pricing development of tailored interactive computer-based interventions. PMID:16799126

  4. Racial differences in obesity measures and risk of colorectal adenomas in a large screening population.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Martin, Christopher F; Sandler, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for colorectal neoplasia; however, little research exists on racial differences in obesity measures [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-hip-ratio (WHR)] associated with adenoma. We used data from the Diet and Health Studies, Phases III-V to examine differences in the contribution of obesity measures to adenoma risk by race. The sample consisted of 2184 patients (1806 white, 378 African American) undergoing outpatient colonoscopy for average risk screening. Covariates included demographics, health history, and validated measures of diet and physical activity. Among whites, BMI [overweight: odds ratio (OR) = 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-1.71; obese: OR = 1.89, 95% CI, 1.41-2.56), WC (OR = 1.47, 95% CI, 1.09-1.99), and WHR (OR = 1.60, 95% CI, 1.24-2.06) were associated with adenomas. BMI was not associated with adenomas in African Americans. Although the CIs were wide, the point estimates for WHR (OR = 1.07, 95% CI, 0.51-2.22) and WC (OR = 1.04, 95% CI, 0.56-1.92) were slightly elevated above the null. BMI was associated with adenomas only among whites, whereas WHR and WC appeared to be important risk factors among both races. Racial differences in adenoma risk may be due to differences in body shape and weight and/or fat distribution. PMID:25425186

  5. Colorectal Cancer Screening in the Elderly Population: Disparities by Dual Medicare–Medicaid Enrollment Status

    PubMed Central

    Koroukian, Siran M; Xu, Fang; Dor, Avi; Cooper, Gregory S

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess the disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening between elderly dual Medicare–Medicaid enrollees (or duals), the most vulnerable subgroup of the Medicare population, and nonduals. Data Sources/Study Setting The 1999 Medicare Denominator File, the Medicare Outpatient Standard Analytic Files, and Physician Supplier Part B files. In addition, the 1998 Area Resource File was used as a source for county-level attributes. Data Collection/Extraction Methods CRC screening procedures for 1999—fecal occult blood test (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy (FLEX), colonoscopy with FOBT and/or FLEX (COL-WFF), and colonoscopy only (COL-ONLY)—were extracted from claim records, using diagnostic and procedure codes. Duals (n =2.5 million) and nonduals (n =20.2 million) receiving their care through the fee-for-service system were identified from the Denominator file. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was conducted to adjust for individual- and county-level characteristics. Principal Findings Compared with nonduals, duals were disproportionately represented by female, older-old, and minority individuals (respectively 74.4 versus 58.5 percent; 19.3 versus 10.8 percent; 35.7 versus 8.0 percent), and CRC screening was significantly lower in duals than in nonduals (5.1 versus 12.2 percent for FOBT adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 0.48, 95 percent confidence interval [CI]: 0.45–0.51); 0.7 versus 1.9 percent for FLEX, (AOR: 0.55, 95 percent CI: 0.49–0.61); 0.4 versus 0.8 percent for COL-WFF (AOR: 0.60, 95 percent CI: 0.54–0.67); and 1.8 versus 2.5 percent for COL-ONLY (AOR: 0.85, 95 percent CI: 0.80–0.89); p<.001 for all comparisons. Conclusions Duals are significantly less likely than nonduals to undergo CRC screening, even after adjusting for individual- and county-level covariates. Future studies should evaluate the contribution of comorbidity and low socioeconomic status to these disparities. PMID:17116113

  6. Functional Screening Identifies miRNAs Influencing Apoptosis and Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Juha; Kallioniemi, Olli; Rasmussen, Mads H.; Ostenfeld, Marie S.; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Øster, Bodil; Schepeler, Troels; Tobiasen, Heidi; Thorsen, Kasper; Sieber, Oliver M.; Gibbs, Peter; Lamy, Philippe; Hansen, Torben F.; Jakobsen, Anders; Riising, Eva M.; Helin, Kristian; Lubinski, Jan; Hagemann-Madsen, Rikke; Laurberg, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Andersen, Claus L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in many biological processes and are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. Particular miRNAs function either as tumor suppressors or oncogenes and appear to have diagnostic and prognostic significance. Although numerous miRNAs are dys-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) only a small fraction has been characterized functionally. Using high-throughput functional screening and miRNA profiling of clinical samples the present study aims at identifying miRNAs important for the control of cellular growth and/or apoptosis in CRC. The high-throughput functional screening was carried out in six CRC cell lines transfected with a pre-miR library including 319 synthetic human pre-miRs. Phenotypic alterations were evaluated by immunostaining of cleaved cPARP (apoptosis) or MKI67 (proliferation). Additionally, TaqMan Human MicroRNA Array Set v2.0 was used to profile the expression of 667 miRNAs in 14 normal colon mucosa and 46 microsatellite stable stage II CRC patients. Among the miRNAs that induced growth arrest and apoptosis in the CRC cell lines, and at same time were dys-regulated in the clinical samples, miR-375 was selected for further analysis. Independent in vitro analysis of transient and stable transfected CRC cell lines confirmed that miR-375 reduces cell viability through the induction of apoptotic death. We identified YAP1 as a direct miR-375 target in CRC and show that HELLS and NOLC1 are down-stream targets. Knock-down of YAP1 mimicked the phenotype induced by miR-375 over-expression indicating that miR-375 most likely exerts its pro-apoptotic role through YAP1 and its anti-apoptotic down-stream targets BIRC5 and BCL2L1. Finally, in vivo analysis of mouse xenograft tumors showed that miR-375 expression significantly reduced tumor growth. We conclude that the high-throughput screening successfully identified miRNAs that induce apoptosis and/or inhibit proliferation in CRC cells. Finally, combining the functional screening

  7. Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Screening in U.S. Medicaid Patients with and without HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Momplaisir, Florence; Re, Vincent Lo; Newcomb, Craig; Liu, Qing; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Long, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-AIDS defining malignancies, particularly colorectal cancer (CRC), may be more prevalent among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Further, PLWH may be less likely to receive CRC screening (CRCS). We studied the epidemiology of CRC and CRCS patterns in patients with and without HIV in a large US Medicaid population. We performed a matched cohort study examining CRC incidence in 2006 and CRCS between 1999 and 2007. Study participants were continuously enrolled in the Medicaid programs of California, Florida, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. All HIV-infected enrollees were matched to five randomly sampled HIV-uninfected enrollees on five-year age group, sex, and state. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for incident CRC (adjusted for comorbidity index) and the presence of CRCS (adjusted for comorbidity index and years in the dataset) among PLWH compared to HIV-negative enrollees were calculated. PLWH were not more likely to be diagnosed with CRC after adjusting for comorbidity index (AOR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.98-1.70). While CRCS rates were low overall, PLWH were more likely to have received CRCS in unadjusted analyses (35.8% vs. 33.7%; OR 1.10, 95% CI: 1.07-1.13). This relationship reversed after adjusting for comorbidity index and years in the dataset (AOR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.77-0.83). In conclusion, PLWH were not more likely to be diagnosed with CRC. In adjusted analyses, PLWH were less likely to have received CRCS. We showed a low rate of CRCS overall. Work should be done to improve CRC screening rates for all patients, particularly those with HIV. PMID:24188387

  8. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial and Its Associated Research Resource

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial is a large-scale research effort conducted by the National Cancer Institute. PLCO offers an example of coordinated research by both the extramural and intramural communities of the National Institutes of Health. The purpose of this article is to describe the PLCO research resource and how it is managed and to assess the productivity and the costs associated with this resource. Such an in-depth analysis of a single large-scale project can shed light on questions such as how large-scale projects should be managed, what metrics should be used to assess productivity, and how costs can be compared with productivity metrics. A comprehensive publication analysis identified 335 primary research publications resulting from research using PLCO data and biospecimens from 2000 to 2012. By the end of 2012, a total of 9679 citations (excluding self-citations) have resulted from this body of research publications, with an average of 29.7 citations per article, and an h index of 45, which is comparable with other large-scale studies, such as the Nurses’ Health Study. In terms of impact on public health, PLCO trial results have been used by the US Preventive Services Task Force in making recommendations concerning prostate and ovarian cancer screening. The overall cost of PLCO was $454 million over 20 years, adjusted to 2011 dollars, with approximately $37 million for the collection, processing, and storage of biospecimens, including blood samples, buccal cells, and pathology tissues. PMID:24115361

  9. Patient and Provider Preferences for Colorectal Cancer Screening: How Does CT Colonography Compare to Other Modalities?

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Audrey H.; Wasan, Sharmeel K.; Heeren, Timothy C.; Schroy, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patient and provider preferences toward CT colonography (CTC) remain unclear. The primary goals of this study were 1) to investigate patient preferences for one of the currently recommended CRC screening modalities and 2) to evaluate provider preferences before and after review of updated guidelines. Methods Cross-sectional survey of ambulatory-care patients and providers in the primary care setting. Providers were surveyed before and after reviewing the 2008 guidelines by the American Cancer Society, US Multisociety Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American College of Radiology. Results Of 100 patients surveyed, 59% preferred colonoscopy, 17% fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), 14% stool DNA (sDNA) testing, and 10% CTC (P <0.001). The majority of those whose first choice was a stool-based test chose the alternate stool-based test as their second choice over CTC or colonoscopy (P<0.0001). Patients who preferred colonoscopy chose accuracy (76%) and frequency of testing (10%) as the most important test features, whereas patients who preferred a stool-based test chose discomfort (52%) and complications (23%). Of 170 providers surveyed, 96% chose colonoscopy, 2% FOBT, and 1% FOBT with flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) (p < 0.0001). No providers chose CTC or sDNA as their preferred option before reviewing guidelines, and 89% kept their preference after review of guidelines. As a default option for patients who declined colonoscopy, 44% of providers chose FOBT, 12% FOBT+FS, 4% CTC, and 37% deferred to patient preference before review of guidelines. Of the 33% of providers who changed their preference after review of guidelines, 46% recommended CTC. Accuracy was the most influential reason for provider test choice. Conclusions Patients and providers prefer colonoscopy for CRC screening. Revised guidelines endorsing the use of CTC are unlikely to change provider preferences but may influence choice of default strategies for patients who decline colonoscopy. PMID

  10. The effect on compliance of a health education leaflet in colorectal cancer screening in general practice in central England.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, A R; Barone, T L; Gay, S P; Inglis, A; Griffin, L; Tallon, C A; Mayberry, J F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To raise compliance in a general practice based colorectal cancer screening programme by the use of a simple health educational leaflet. DESIGN: A randomised controlled trial of the leaflet's effect on completion of faecal occult blood tests. The leaflet explained the high frequency of colorectal cancer, the principles of screening, and addressed reasons for non-compliance. SETTING: The British town of Market Harborough where most of the population are registered with a single practice. PARTICIPANTS: These comprised 1571 residents aged 61 to 70 years registered with the practice. Residents were invited to receive a free faecal occult blood test in a colorectal cancer screening programme. Half the population were randomly assigned to receive the educational leaflet about screening. RESULTS: Compliance in test and control groups, positive rate of stool testing, and pathology detected were measured. Compliance was higher in men who received the leaflet in those aged 61 to 65 years (36% v 27%, chi2 = 4.0, p < 0.05) and in men aged 66 to 70 years (39% v 23%, chi2 = 9.7, p < 0.01). In women, use of the leaflet did not affect compliance in those aged either 61 to 65 years (38% v 36%, chi2 = 0.1, NS) or 66 to 70 years (31% v 31%, chi2 = 0.0, NS). The positive rate of stool testing in patients observing the required dietary restrictions was 1.6%. A significant lesion was detected in 1.4% of people tested (2 carcinomas and 5 patients with adenomatous polyps). CONCLUSIONS: Health education leaflets addressing reasons for non-compliance significantly increased compliance in men and should be used in screening programmes. Reasons for the lack of success of the leaflet in women should be investigated and other interventions for raising compliance should be developed. PMID:9196650

  11. Does patient time spent viewing computer-tailored colorectal cancer screening materials predict patient-reported discussion of screening with providers?

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mechelle; Fiscella, Kevin; Veazie, Peter; Dolan, James G; Jerant, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    The main aim is to examine whether patients' viewing time on information about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening before a primary care physician (PCP) visit is associated with discussion of screening options during the visit. We analyzed data from a multi-center randomized controlled trial of a tailored interactive multimedia computer program (IMCP) to activate patients to undergo CRC screening, deployed in primary care offices immediately before a visit. We employed usage time information stored in the IMCP to examine the association of patient time spent using the program with patient-reported discussion of screening during the visit, adjusting for previous CRC screening recommendation and reading speed.On average, patients spent 33 minutes on the program. In adjusted analyses, 30 minutes spent using the program was associated with a 41% increase in the odds of the patient having a discussion with their PCP (1.04, 1.59, 95% CI). In a separate analysis of the tailoring modules; the modules encouraging adherence to the tailored screening recommendation and discussion with the patient's PCP yielded significant results. Other predictors of screening discussion included better self-reported physical health and increased patient activation. Time spent on the program predicted greater patient-physician discussion of screening during a linked visit.Usage time information gathered automatically by IMCPs offers promise for objectively assessing patient engagement around a topic and predicting likelihood of discussion between patients and their clinician. PMID:27343254

  12. The Colorectal Cancer Mortality-to-Incidence Ratio as an Indicator of Global Cancer Screening and Care

    PubMed Central

    Sunkara, Vasu; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Disparities in cancer screening, incidence, treatment, and survival are worsening globally. The mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) has been used previously to evaluate such disparities. METHODS The MIR for colorectal cancer is calculated for all Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries using the 2012 GLOBOCAN incidence and mortality statistics. Health system rankings were obtained from the World Health Organization. Two linear regression models were fit with the MIR as the dependent variable and health system ranking as the independent variable; one included all countries and one model had the “divergents” removed. RESULTS The regression model for all countries explained 24% of the total variance in the MIR. Nine countries were found to have regression-calculated MIRs that differed from the actual MIR by >20%. Countries with lower-than-expected MIRs were found to have strong national health systems characterized by formal colorectal cancer screening programs. Conversely, countries with higher-than-expected MIRs lack screening programs. When these divergent points were removed from the data set, the recalculated regression model explained 60% of the total variance in the MIR. CONCLUSIONS The MIR proved useful for identifying disparities in cancer screening and treatment internationally. It has potential as an indicator of the long-term success of cancer surveillance programs and may be extended to other cancer types for these purposes. PMID:25572676

  13. Recommendations for colorectal cancer screening in ulcerative colitis: a review of research from a single university-based surveillance program.

    PubMed

    Lashner, B A

    1992-02-01

    Colorectal cancer screening in ulcerative colitis patients is a commonly accepted practice whose parameters are based on convention and not necessarily on the epidemiology of disease. This review summarizes previously published data from a single university-based surveillance program to estimate important screening parameters. The hazard rate (annual risk) of developing cancer was found to rise exponentially with disease duration and to be approximately 2% at 20 yr of disease and nearly 8% at 30 yr of disease. Older age at symptom onset was a significant risk factor for neoplasia. The lead time between the development of low-grade dysplasia and high-grade dysplasia or cancer was approximately 3 yr. Efficient scheduling of tests (maximum benefit for a given cost) implied that the screening test interval should be inversely proportional to the square root of the hazard rate. As the hazard rate increased with duration of disease, the screening interval should shorten accordingly. An historical cohort study demonstrated that the parameters used in our program were not associated with the anticipated result of reduced colorectal cancer mortality. A surveillance program should be tested that uses a more sensitive criterion for a positive test. PMID:1531163

  14. FIT for the future: a case for risk-based colorectal cancer screening using the faecal immunochemical test.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J A; Moss, S M; Smith, S; Seaman, H E; Taylor-Phillips, S; Parsons, N; Halloran, S P

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide, the guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) is being replaced with the more accurate faecal immunochemical test (FIT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. From January 2016, the National Screening Committee in the UK has recommended a change from the gFOBT to the FIT following a successful Bowel Cancer Screening Programme pilot study with over 40 000 participants. Although the test has shown improved uptake and the ability to detect significantly more colorectal cancers and advanced adenomas, the higher uptake and test positivity will challenge the capacity of colonoscopy services. One of the main advantages of the FIT is that it provides a quantitative haemoglobin concentration which has been shown to relate to the risk of CRC. Risk scoring systems which combine the FIT concentration with risk factor assessment have been shown to improve the sensitivity of the test. This individualized approach to screening could enable those at greatest risk to be referred for colonoscopy, optimizing resource use and ultimately patient outcomes. PMID:27135192

  15. Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Perceived Barriers of Colorectal Cancer Screening among Family Physicians in National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study is to explore the current knowledge, attitude, and practice of family physicians working in family medicine clinics in National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA), Riyadh, toward colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to identify the barriers of the screening. Methods. Data were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire adopted from the National Cancer Institute in USA, customized by adding and eliminating questions to be in line with the institution (NGHA) characteristics. Results. Of the 130 physicians, 56.2% of the physicians were not practicing CRC screening although 94.6% considered CRC screening effective. Board certified physicians had higher knowledge score and were practicing CRC screening more when compared to other physicians. Physicians who reported practicing CRC screening scored more on the knowledge score than those not practicing. Male physicians scored better on attitude score than female physicians. The study found that barriers were cited in higher rates among physicians not practicing CRC screening compared with practicing physicians. Lack of patients' awareness was the most cited barrier. Conclusion. Large percentage of family physicians in this study do not practice CRC screening, despite the knowledge level and the positive attitude. PMID:25328703

  16. Multitarget stool DNA for colorectal cancer screening: A review and commentary on the United States Preventive Services Draft Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Barry M; Levin, Bernard; Hilsden, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) testing was approved for average risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by the United States Food and Drug Administration and thereafter reimbursed for use by the Medicare program (2014). The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) October 2015 draft recommendation for CRC screening included mt-sDNA as an “alternative” screening test that “may be useful in select clinical circumstances”, despite its very high sensitivity for early stage CRC. The evidence supporting mt-sDNA for routine screening use is robust. The clinical efficacy of mt-sDNA as measured by sensitivity, specificity, life-years gained (LYG), and CRC deaths averted is similar to or exceeds that of the other more specifically recommended screening options included in the draft document, especially those requiring annual testing adherence. In a population with primarily irregular screening participation, tests with the highest point sensitivity and reasonable specificity are more likely to favorably impact CRC related morbidity and mortality than those depending on annual adherence. This paper reviews the evidence supporting mt-sDNA for routine screening and demonstrates, using USPSTF’s modeling data, that mt-sDNA at three-year intervals provides significant clinical net benefits and fewer complications per LYG than annual fecal immunochemical testing, high sensitivity guaiac based fecal occult blood testing and 10-year colonoscopy screening. PMID:27190584

  17. Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme in Spain: Results of Key Performance Indicators After Five Rounds (2000–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Garcia, Montse; Milà, Núria; Fernández, Esteve; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Gonzalo, Núria; Benito, Llúcia; Clopés, Ana; Guardiola, Jordi; Moreno, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Effective quality assurance is essential in any screening programme. This article provides a unique insight into key quality indicators of five rounds of the first population-based colorectal cancer screening programme implemented in Spain (2000–2012), providing the results according to the type of screening (prevalent or first screen and incident or subsequent screen) and test (guaiac or immunochemical). The total crude participation rate increased from 17.2% (11,011) in the first round to 35.9% (22,988) in the last one. Rescreening rate was very high (88.6% in the fifth round). Positivity rate was superior with the faecal immunochemical test (6.2%) than with the guaiac-based test (0.7%) (p < 0.0001) and detection rates were also better with the immunochemical test. The most significant rise in detection rate was observed for high risk adenoma in men (45.5 per 1,000 screened). Most cancers were diagnosed at an early stage (61.4%) and there was a statistically significant difference between those detected in first or subsequent screening (52.6% and 70.0% respectively; p = 0.024). The availability of these results substantially improves data comparisons and the exchange of experience between screening programmes. PMID:26787510

  18. Multitarget stool DNA for colorectal cancer screening: A review and commentary on the United States Preventive Services Draft Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Berger, Barry M; Levin, Bernard; Hilsden, Robert J

    2016-05-15

    Multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) testing was approved for average risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by the United States Food and Drug Administration and thereafter reimbursed for use by the Medicare program (2014). The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) October 2015 draft recommendation for CRC screening included mt-sDNA as an "alternative" screening test that "may be useful in select clinical circumstances", despite its very high sensitivity for early stage CRC. The evidence supporting mt-sDNA for routine screening use is robust. The clinical efficacy of mt-sDNA as measured by sensitivity, specificity, life-years gained (LYG), and CRC deaths averted is similar to or exceeds that of the other more specifically recommended screening options included in the draft document, especially those requiring annual testing adherence. In a population with primarily irregular screening participation, tests with the highest point sensitivity and reasonable specificity are more likely to favorably impact CRC related morbidity and mortality than those depending on annual adherence. This paper reviews the evidence supporting mt-sDNA for routine screening and demonstrates, using USPSTF's modeling data, that mt-sDNA at three-year intervals provides significant clinical net benefits and fewer complications per LYG than annual fecal immunochemical testing, high sensitivity guaiac based fecal occult blood testing and 10-year colonoscopy screening. PMID:27190584

  19. Use of faecal markers in screening for colorectal neoplasia: a European group on tumor markers position paper.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Michael J; van Rossum, Leo G M; van Turenhout, Sietze T; Malminiemi, Outi; Sturgeon, Catherine; Lamerz, Rolf; Nicolini, Andrea; Haglund, Caj; Holubec, Lubos; Fraser, Callum G; Halloran, Stephen P

    2011-01-01

    Several randomized controlled trials have shown that population-based screening using faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) can reduce mortality from colorectal neoplasia. Based on this evidence, a number of countries have introduced screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) and high-risk adenoma and many others are considering its introduction. The aim of this article is to critically review the current status of faecal markers as population-based screening tests for these neoplasia. Most of the available faecal tests involve the measurement of either occult blood or a panel of DNA markers. Occult blood may be measured using either the guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) or a faecal immunochemical test (iFOBT). Although iFOBT may require a greater initial investment, they have several advantages over gFOBT, including greater analytical sensitivity and specificity. Their use results in improved clinical performance and higher uptake rates. Importantly for population screening, some of the iFOBTs can be automated and provide an adjustable cutoff for faecal haemoglobin concentration. However, samples for iFOBT, may be less stable after collection than for gFOBT. For new centres undertaking FOBT for colorectal neoplasia, the European Group on Tumour Markers recommends use of a quantitative iFOBT with an adjustable cutoff point and high throughput analysis. All participants with positive FOBT results should be offered colonoscopy. The panel recommends further research into increasing the stability of iFOBT and the development of improved and affordable DNA and proteomic-based tests, which reduce current false negative rates, simplify sample transport and enable automated analysis. PMID:20824704

  20. Screening of average-risk individuals for colorectal cancer. WHO Collaborating Centre for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, S. J.; St John, J.; Bond, J.; Hardcastle, J. D.; Kronborg, O.; Flehinger, B.; Schottenfeld, D.; Blinov, N. N.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in screening, diagnosis and treatment of colon cancer could lead to a reduction in mortality from this disease. Removal of adenomas, identification of risk factors, appropriate application of accurate diagnostic tests, and aggressive anatomic-surgical resection of colon cancers may already be having a favourable impact. Screening of average-risk populations over the age of 50 also offers promise in the control of this important cancer. The disease is of sufficient magnitude to deserve detection at an early stage with better prospects of patient survival, since screening tests with moderate sensitivity and high specificity are available. Flexible sigmoidoscopy and faecal occult blood tests are sufficiently acceptable to be included in case-finding among patients who are in the health care system. The results of current controlled trials involving more than 300,000 individuals for evaluating the impact of screening on mortality from colon cancer are needed before this approach can be recommended for general public health screening of the population. Further research is required to develop better screening tests, improve patient and physician compliance, and answer more definitively critical questions on cost-effectiveness. Mathematical modelling using current and new data can be used to determine the effectiveness of screening in conjunction with recommendations for primary prevention. PMID:2208563

  1. Management of early gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Jensen, Robert T; Cadiot, Guillaume; Stölzel, Ulrich; Klöppel, Günter

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) of the stomach, duodenum, appendix or rectum that are small (≤ 1 cm) and well differentiated can be considered “early” tumors, since they generally have a (very) good prognosis. In the new WHO classification of 2010, these neoplasms are called neuroendocrine tumors/ carcinoids (NETs), grade (G) 1 or 2, and distinguished from poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs), G3. NETs are increasing, with a rise in the age-adjusted incidence in the U.S.A. by about 700 % in the last 35 years. Improved early detection seems to be the main reason for these epidemiological changes. Both the better general availability of endoscopy, and imaging techniques, have led to a shift in the discovery of smaller-sized (≤ 10-20 mm) intestinal NETs/carcinoids and earlier tumor stages at diagnosis. Endoscopic screening is therefore effective in the early diagnosis, not only of colorectal adenocarcinomas, but also of NETs/carcinoids. Endoscopic removal, followed up with endoscopic surveillance is the treatment of choice in NETs/carcinoids of the stomach, duodenum and rectum that are ≤ 10 mm in size, have a low proliferative activity (G1), do not infiltrate the muscular layer and show no angioinvasion. In all the other intestinal NENs, optimal treatment generally needs surgery and/or medical therapy depending on type, biology and stage of the tumor, as well as the individual situation of the patient. PMID:21860682

  2. Effectiveness of fecal immunochemical testing in reducing colorectal cancer mortality from the One Million Taiwanese Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Han-Mo; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Lee, Yi-Chia; Pan, Shin-Liang; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi; Koong, Shin-Lan; Chiou, Shu-Ti

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effectiveness of fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) in reducing colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality has not yet been fully assessed in a large, population-based service screening program. METHODS A prospective cohort study of the follow-up of approximately 5 million Taiwanese from 2004 to 2009 was conducted to compare CRC mortality for an exposed (screened) group and an unexposed (unscreened) group in a population-based CRC screening service targeting community residents of Taiwan who were 50 to 69 years old. Given clinical capacity, this nationwide screening program was first rolled out in 2004. In all, 1,160,895 eligible subjects who were 50 to 69 years old (ie, 21.4% of the 5,417,699 subjects of the underlying population) participated in the biennial nationwide screening program by 2009. RESULTS The actual effectiveness in reducing CRC mortality attributed to the FIT screening was 62% (relative rate for the screened group vs the unscreened group, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.35-0.42) with a maximum follow-up of 6 years. The 21.4% coverage of the population receiving FIT led to a significant 10% reduction in CRC mortality (relative rate, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.95) after adjustments for a self-selection bias. CONCLUSIONS This large, prospective Taiwanese cohort undergoing population-based FIT screening for CRC had the statistical power to demonstrate a significant CRC mortality reduction, although the follow-up time was short. Although such findings are informative for health decision makers, continued follow-up of this large cohort will be required to estimate the long-term impact of FIT screening if the covered population is expanded. Cancer 2015;121:3221–3229. © 2015 American Cancer Society. A significant reduction in colorectal cancer mortality resulting from fecal immunochemical testing is demonstrated by a large, population-based, nationwide service screening program with a maximum follow-up of 6 years. Although long

  3. Consensus on the Prevention, Screening, Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Tumors in China: Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, October 14-15, 2011, Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing-Yuan; Zheng, Shu; Jiang, Bo; Lai, Mao-De; Fang, Dian-Chun; Han, Ying; Sheng, Qian-Jiu; Li, Jing-Nan; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Gao, Qin-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is steadily increasing in China. Colorectal adenoma (CRA) is the most important precancerous disease of CRC. Screening for colorectal tumors can aid early diagnosis. Advances in endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection can aid the early treatment of colorectal tumors. Furthermore, because of high risk of recurrence after removal of adenomas under endoscopy, factors contributing to recurrence, the follow-up mode and the interval established, and the feasibility of application and the time of various chemical preventions should be concerned. However, a relevant consensus on the screening, early diagnosis and treatment, and prevention of colorectal tumors in China is lacking. Summary The consensus recommendations include epidemiology, pathology, screening, early diagnosis, endoscopic treatment, monitoring and follow-up, and chemoprevention of colorectal tumors in China. Key Message This is the first consensus on the prevention, screening, early diagnosis and treatment of CRA and CRC in China based on evidence in the literature and on local data. Practical Implications Through reviewing the literature, regional data and passing the consensus by an anonymous vote, gastroenterology experts from all over China launch the consensus recommendations in Shanghai. The incidence and mortality of CRC in China has increased, and the incidence or detection rate of CRA has increased rapidly. Screening for colorectal tumors should be performed at age 50-74 years. Preliminary screening should be undertaken to find persons at high risk, followed by colonoscopy. A screening cycle of 3 years is recommended for persistent interventions. Opportunistic screening is a mode suitable for the current healthcare system and national situation. Colonoscopy combined with pathological examination is the standard method for the diagnosis of colorectal tumors. CRA removal under endoscopy can prevent CRC to some extent, but CRA has an obvious

  4. Predicting Incongruence between Self-reported and Documented Colorectal Cancer Screening in a Sample of African American Medicare Recipients.

    PubMed

    Manning, Mark; Burnett, Janice; Chapman, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Assessments of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates typically rely on self-reported screening data, which are often incongruent with medical records. We used multilevel models to examine health-related, socio-demographic and psychological predictors of incongruent self-reports for CRC screening among Medicare-insured African Americans (N = 3,740). Results indicated that living alone decreased, and income increased, the odds of congruently self-reporting endoscopic CRC screening. Being male and having greater number of comorbidities decreased, and having less than a high school education increased, the odds of congruently self-reported fecal occult blood tests. Living alone, age and income had the most robust effects across classifications into one of four mutually exclusive categories defined by screening status (screened/unscreened) and congruence of self-reports. The results underscore the clinical importance of gathering socio-demographic data via patient interviews, and the relevance of these data for judging the veracity of self-reported CRC screenings behaviors. PMID:25961362

  5. Costs and Cost Effectiveness of a Health Care Provider–Directed Intervention to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Veena; Luu, Thanh Ha; Nonzee, Narissa; Richey, Elizabeth; McKoy, June M.; Graff Zivin, Joshua; Ashford, Alfred; Lantigua, Rafael; Frucht, Harold; Scoppettone, Marc; Bennett, Charles L.; Sheinfeld Gorin, Sherri

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening remains underutilized in the United States. Prior studies reporting the cost effectiveness of randomized interventions to improve CRC screening have not been replicated in the setting of small physician practices. We recently conducted a randomized trial evaluating an academic detailing intervention in 264 small practices in geographically diverse New York City communities. The objective of this secondary analysis is to assess the cost effectiveness of this intervention. Methods A total of 264 physician offices were randomly assigned to usual care or to a series of visits from trained physician educators. CRC screening rates were measured at baseline and 12 months. The intervention costs were measured and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was derived. Sensitivity analyses were based on varying cost and effectiveness estimates. Results Academic detailing was associated with a 7% increase in CRC screening with colonoscopy. The total intervention cost was $147,865, and the ICER was $21,124 per percentage point increase in CRC screening rate. Sensitivity analyses that varied the costs of the intervention and the average medical practice size were associated with ICERs ranging from $13,631 to $36,109 per percentage point increase in CRC screening rates. Conclusion A comprehensive, multicomponent academic detailing intervention conducted in small practices in metropolitan New York was clinically effective in improving CRC screening rates, but was not cost effective. PMID:19826133

  6. Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Program Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, Andrea; Baldwin, Laura-Mae

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) provide primary care to low-income and uninsured patients in the United States. FQHCs are required to report annual measurements and provide evidence of improvement for quality measures; effective methods to improve quality in FQHCs are needed. Systems of Support (SOS) is a proactive, mail-based, colorectal cancer screening program that was developed and tested in an integrated health care system. The objective of this study was to adapt SOS for use in an FQHC system, guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Methods We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews in 2014 with organizational leadership, medical staff, and nursing staff to identify facilitators of and barriers to implementation of SOS in an FQHC system. The interview guide was based on the CFIR framework. Interview transcripts were analyzed using Template Analysis. We adapted SOS and planned implementation strategies to address identified barriers. Results Facilitators of implementation of SOS were previous quality improvement experience and engagement of clinic and administrative leadership. Barriers to implementation were a more diverse patient population, a decentralized administrative structure, and communication challenges throughout the organization. Program adaptations focused on patient instructions and educational materials as well as elimination of follow-up phone calls. Implementation strategies included early and frequent engagement with organizational leadership and a smaller pilot program before organization-wide implementation. Conclusions Use of CFIR identified facilitators of and barriers to implementation of the evidence-based colorectal cancer screening program. Program adaptations and implementation strategies based on this study may generalize to other FQHC systems that are considering implementation of a proactive, mail-based colorectal cancer screening program. PMID:26632954

  7. Gene Environment Risk Assessment and Colorectal Cancer Screening in an Average Risk Population: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, David S.; Myers, Ronald E.; Keenan, Eileen; Ruth, Karen; Sifri, Randa; Ziring, Barry; Ross, Eric; Manne, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Background New methods are needed to improve health behaviors such as adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. There is increasing availability of personalized genetic information to inform medical decisions. It is not known if such information motivates behavioral change. Objective To determine, in average risk persons, if individualized gene-environment risk assessment about CRC susceptibility improves adherence to screening. Design Two-arm, randomized, controlled trial Setting Four medical school affiliated primary care practices Patients 783 patients at average risk for CRC, but not adherent with screening at study entry Intervention Patients were randomized to usual care or to receipt of Gene Environmental Risk Assessment (GERA), which assessed Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and serum folate level. Based on pre-specified polymorphism/folate level combinations, GERA participants were told they were at either “elevated” or at “average” risk for CRC. Measurements The primary outcome was receipt of CRC screening within 6 months of study entry. Results CRC screening rates were not statistically significantly different between usual care (35.7%) and GERA (33.1%) arms overall. After adjustment for baseline participant factors, the odds ratio (OR) for screening completion for GERA vs usual care was 0.88 (95% CI 0.64 - 1.22). Within the GERA arm, there was no significant difference in screening rates between GERA average risk (38.1%) and GERA elevated risk (26.9%) groups. Odds ratios for elevated vs. average risk remained non-significant after adjustment for covariates (OR=0.75, 95% CI 0.39 - 1.42). Limitations Only one personalized, gene-environment interaction and only one health behavior, colorectal cancer screening, were assessed. Conclusion In average risk persons, there was no positive association between CRC screening uptake and feedback of a single personalized gene-environment risk assessment (GERA). Additional

  8. Inconsistencies in Patient Perceptions and Observer Ratings of Shared Decision Making: The Case of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Tracy; Cooper, Gregory; Divine, George; Flocke, Susan; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Stange, Kurt; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare patient-reported and observer-rated shared decision making (SDM) use for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and evaluate patient, physician and patient-reported relational communication factors associated with patient-reported use of shared CRC screening decisions. Methods Study physicians are salaried primary care providers. Patients are insured, aged 50-80 and due for CRC screening. Audio-recordings from 363 primary care visits were observer-coded for elements of SDM. A post-visit patient survey assessed patient-reported decision-making processes and relational communication during visit. Association of patient-reported SDM with observer-rated elements of SDM, as well as patient, physician and relational communication factors were evaluated using generalized estimating equations. Results 70% of patients preferred SDM for preventive health decisions, 47% of patients reported use of a SDM process, and only one of the screening discussions included all four elements of SDM per observer ratings. Patient report of SDM use was not associated with observer-rated elements of SDM, but was significantly associated with female physician gender and patient-reported relational communication. Conclusion Inconsistencies exist between patient reports and observer ratings of SDM for CRC screening. Practice Implications Future studies are needed to understand whether SDM that is patient-reported, observer-rated or both are associated with informed and value-concordant CRC screening decisions. PMID:20667678

  9. Low adherence to colonoscopy in the screening of first‐degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Zubiaurre, Leire; Cosme, Angel; Muñoz, Carmen; Sánchez, Araceli; Martín, Cristina; Tito, Llucia; Piñol, Virginia; Castells, Antoni; Llor, Xavier; Xicola, Rosa M; Pons, Elisenda; Clofent, Juan; de Castro, María L; Cuquerella, Jaime; Medina, Enrique; Gutierrez, Ana; Arenas, Juan I; Jover, Rodrigo

    2007-01-01

    Background Colonoscopy is one of the methods of choice for screening relatives of patients with colorectal cancer. Objective To evaluate the rate of adherence to colonoscopy in first‐degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer and describe the lesions found. Methods A prospective, cross‐sectional, multicentre, nationwide study was conducted. The study population was composed of first‐degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer selected randomly from the EPICOLON study. Seventy‐four index patients were included. These had 342 living first‐degree relatives (parents, siblings and children), of whom 281 were interviewed. Results The adherence rate was 38% (107/281). Adherence was greater in families with a higher degree of familial aggregation for colorectal cancer (88.9% for Amsterdam vs 33.3% for Bethesda and sporadic cancer; p<0.05), an index patient aged under 65 years (60% for patients <65 years vs 32.9% for patients ⩾65 years; p<0.05) and an index patient who was female (46.2% for women vs 31% for men; p = 0.28). Adherence was also greater in relatives under 65 years (54% in patients <65 years vs 18% in patients ⩾65 years; p = 0.05), in female relatives (49% in female relatives vs 27.3% in male relatives; p<0.05) and in siblings and children (40% in siblings and children vs 13% in parents; p<0.05). Lesions were found in 26% (28/107) of the study population. Nine (8.4%) individuals had a total of 18 advanced lesions. Conclusions These results indicate that adherence to colonoscopy in our population of first‐degree relatives was low. The adherence was more frequently associated with a higher degree of familial aggregation, a relative age of under 65 years, a sibling or offspring relationship, and female sex. PMID:17400596

  10. Effect of Public Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior on Willingness to Undergo Colorectal Cancer Screening Using the Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    Almadi, Majid A.; Mosli, Mahmoud H.; Bohlega, Mohamed S.; Al Essa, Mohanned A.; AlDohan, Mohammed S.; Alabdallatif, Turki A.; AlSagri, Turki Y.; Algahtani, Faleh A.; Mandil, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Success of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is dependent in part on the proportion of uptake by the targeted population. We aimed in this study to identify factors that were associated with willingness to undergo CRC screening based on the health belief model (HBM). Patients and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study among citizens of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Demographic data collected included gender, age, education, marital status, employment status, a history of CRC in the family or knowing a friend with CRC, as well as income. A questionnaire was developed in Arabic based on the HBM and included enquiries on knowledge about CRC symptoms and risk factors, types of CRC screening tests, perceived risk of CRC, previously undergoing CRC screening, intent to undergo CRC screening, perceived barriers to CRC screening, perceived severity of CRC, as well as attitudes toward CRC and its screening. Results: Five hundred participants were included. The mean age was 41.0 years (SD 10.7). Males were 50% and only 6.7% of those between 50 and 55 years of age had undergone CRC screening. Of those surveyed, 70.7% were willing to undergo CRC screening. Also, 70.5% thought that CRC is curable, 73.3% believed it was preventable, whereas 56.7% thought it was a fatal disease. Neither gender, level of education, occupation, income, marital status, nor general knowledge about CRC was found to be associated with the willingness to undergo CRC screening. Recognizing that colonoscopy was a screening test (OR 1.55, 95% CI; 1.04–2.29) was associated with a strong desire to undergo CRC screening while choosing a stool-based test was associated with not willing to undergo CRC screening (OR 0.59, 95%CI; 0.38–0.91). Conclusion: We found that the majority of those interviewed were willing to undergo CRC screening and identified a number of barriers as well as potential areas that could be targeted in the promotion of CRC screening uptake if such a national program were to

  11. Identification of familial colorectal cancer and hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes through the Dutch population-screening program: results ofa pilot study

    PubMed Central

    van Erp, Sanne J. H.; Leicher, Laura W.; Hennink, Simone D.; Ghorbanoghli, Zeinab; Breg, Simone A. C.; Morreau, Hans; Nielsen, Maartje; Hardwick, James C. H.; Roukema, Jan A.; Langers, Alexandra M. J.; Cappel, Walter H. de Vos tot Nederveen; Vasen, Hans F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: In 2014, a population-screening program using immuno-faecal occult blood testing (I-FOBT) has started in the Netherlands. The aims of this study were to evaluate the proportion of individuals in the Dutch screening program with a positive I-FOBT that fulfill the criteria for familial colorectal cancer (FCC) and to evaluate the proportion of participants that needs genetic counseling or colonoscopic surveillance. Material and methods: This retrospective observational study was performed in two large hospitals. Individuals aged between 55 and 75 years with a positive I-FOBT that underwent colonoscopy were included. A detailed family history was obtained in all individuals. Results: A total of 657 individuals with a positive I-FOBT test underwent colonoscopy. A total of 120 (18.3%) participants were found to have a positive family history for CRC, 20 (3.0%) fulfilled the FCC criteria, 4 (0.6%) the Bethesda guidelines and 1 (0.2%) participant the Amsterdam criteria. Multiple adenomas (>10) were found in 21 (3.2%) participants. No cases of serrated polyposis were identified. Based on these criteria and guidelines, a total of 35 (5.3%) required referral to the clinical geneticist and the relatives of 20 (3.0%) participants should be referred for surveillance colonoscopy. Conclusion: Obtaining a detailed family history at the time of intake of participants with a positive I-FOBT in the Dutch surveillance program increased the identification of participants with familial CRC. PMID:27310819

  12. Development Of An Educational Video To Improve Patient Knowledge And Communication With Their Healthcare Providers About Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Mira L.; Heaner, Sarah; Reiter, Paul; van Putten, Julie; Murray, Lee; McDougle, Leon; Cegala, Donald J.; Post, Douglas; David, Prabu; Slater, Michael; Paskett, Electra D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening persist due to individual, provider and system level barriers. Purpose To develop and obtain initial feedback about a CRC screening educational video from community members and medical professionals. Methods Focus groups of patients were conducted prior to the development of an educational video and focus groups of patients provided initial feedback about the developed CRC screening educational video. Medical personnel reviewed the video and made recommendations prior to final editing of the video. Results Patients identified CRC screening barriers and made suggestions about the information to include in the educational video. Their suggestions included using a healthcare provider to state the importance of completing CRC screening, demonstrate how to complete the fecal occult blood test, and that men and women from diverse ethnic groups and races could be included in the same video. Participants reviewed the developed video and mentioned that their suggestions were portrayed correctly, the video was culturally appropriate, and the information presented in the video was easy to understand. Medical personnel made suggestions on ways to improve the content and the delivery of the medical information prior to final editing of the video. Discussion Participants provided valuable information in the development of an educational video to improve patient knowledge and patient-provider communication about CRC screening. The educational video developed was based on the Protection Motivation Theory and addressed the colon cancer screening barriers identified in this mostly minority and low-income patient population. Future research will determine if CRC screening increases among patients who watch the educational video. Translation to Health Education Practice Educational videos can provide important information about CRC and CRC screening to average-risk adults. PMID:20209024

  13. Patient-Physician Discussions of Colorectal Cancer Screening: Delivery of the 5 ‘As’ in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Cooper, Gregory S.; Divine, George; Flocke, Susan A.; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Stange, Kurt C.; Wunderlich, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Background The US Preventive Services Task Force advocates for shared decision-making and 5As framework (assess, advise, agree, assist and arrange) for preventive health recommendations. Purpose To describe patient-physician colorectal cancer (CRC) screening discussions, evaluate concordance with 5As framework, and test whether discussion content varies by patient adherence to prior recommendation. Methods Direct observation of periodic health examinations in 2007-2009 among primary care patients aged 50-80 due for CRC screening. Qualitative content analyses used to code office visit audio-recordings for occurrence of 5As and other discussion content. Results 97% of visits contained CRC screening discussion; 31% of these contained evidence of patient non-adherence to prior physician recommendation for CRC screening. While 59% of visits provided some assistance (i.e., help scheduling a colonoscopy or delivery of stool cards), the first three steps of 5As (assess, advise, and agree) were rarely comprehensively provided (1-21%). Only 3% included the recommended last step, arrange follow up. Patients non-adherent to a prior recommendation were significantly (P<0.05) less likely to have the reason(s) for screening discussed (37% vs, 65%) or be told endoscopy clinic would call to schedule colonoscopy (19% vs. 27%), and significantly more likely to have fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) (34% vs. 25%) or FOBT and colonoscopy recommended (24% vs. 14%) and a screening plan negotiated (21% vs. 14%). Conclusions Most patients due for CRC screening discuss screening with their physician, but with limited application of 5As approach. Opportunities to improve CRC screening decision-making are great, particularly among those non-adherent with prior recommendations. PMID:22011418

  14. Patient-Physician Discussions of Colorectal Cancer Screening: Delivery of the 5 ‘As’ in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Cooper, Gregory S.; Divine, George; Flocke, Susan A.; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Stange, Kurt C.; Wunderlich, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Background The US Preventive Services Task Force advocates for shared decision-making and 5As framework (assess, advise, agree, assist and arrange) for preventive health recommendations. Purpose To describe patient-physician colorectal cancer (CRC) screening discussions, evaluate concordance with 5As framework, and test whether discussion content varies by patient adherence to prior recommendation. Methods Direct observation of periodic health examinations in 2007-2009 among primary care patients aged 50-80 due for CRC screening. Qualitative content analyses used to code office visit audio-recordings for occurrence of 5As and other discussion content. Results 97% of visits contained CRC screening discussion; 31% of these contained evidence of patient non-adherence to prior physician recommendation for CRC screening. While 59% of visits provided some assistance (i.e., help scheduling a colonoscopy or delivery of stool cards), the first three steps of 5As (assess, advise, and agree) were rarely comprehensively provided (1-21%). Only 3% included the recommended last step, arrange follow up. Patients non-adherent to a prior recommendation were significantly (P<0.05) less likely to have the reason(s) for screening discussed (37% vs, 65%) or be told endoscopy clinic would call to schedule colonoscopy (19% vs. 27%), and significantly more likely to have fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) (34% vs. 25%) or FOBT and colonoscopy recommended (24% vs. 14%) and a screening plan negotiated (21% vs. 14%). Conclusions Most patients due for CRC screening discuss screening with their physician, but with limited application of 5As approach. Opportunities to improve CRC screening decision-making are great, particularly among those non-adherent with prior recommendations. PMID:16905030

  15. Effect of reminders mailed to general practitioners on colorectal cancer screening adherence: a cluster-randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Julien; Ferrat, Émilie; Attali, Claude; Bercier, Sandrine; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Brixi, Zahida; Veerabudun, Kalaivani; Renard, Vincent; Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie

    2016-09-01

    Reminders have been used in various settings, but failed to produce convincing evidence of benefits on patient adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of sending general practitioners (GPs) printed reminders about CRC screening. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 144 GPs in the Val-de-Marne district (France), who provided care for any reason to 20 778 patients eligible for CRC screening between June 2010 and November 2011. Data were collected from the main statutory health-insurance programme and local cancer screening agency. GPs were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 proportion to the intervention or the control group. Every 4 months, intervention-group GPs received a computer-generated printed list of patients who had not performed scheduled faecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening. The primary outcome was patient adherence to FOBT screening or exclusion from CRC screening for medical reasons. The screening adherence rate was 31.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 30.3-32.1] in the control group and 32.9% (95% CI 32.0-33.8) in the intervention group [crude relative risk, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01-1.09), P<0.01]. This rate was not significantly different between groups by multilevel modelling accounting for clustering and confounding variables [adjusted relative risk, 1.07 (95% CI 0.95-1.20), P=0.27]. Computer-generated printed reminders sent to GPs did not significantly improve patient adherence to organized CRC screening by the FOBT. PMID:26340058

  16. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms. PMID:8731834

  17. Incremental net benefit and acceptability of alternative health policies: a case study of mass screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Pauline; Josselin, Jean-Michel; Heresbach, Denis

    2012-06-01

    The incremental net benefit (INB) and the related acceptability curves for public health programs provide valuable tools for decision making. We proposed to apply them to the assessment of mass screening of colorectal cancer. The now standard guaiac fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is already implemented in several countries. We considered the innovative immunological FOBT and computed tomography colonography (CTC) as competing screening technologies. Using biennial guaiac FOBT as the reference strategy, we estimated the cost-effectiveness of the following alternatives: biennial immunological FOBT, CTC every 5 years (strategy CTC5), and CTC every 10 years (strategy CTC10). Over a 30-year horizon and from the perspective of a third-party payer, we developed a Markov model on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 subjects at average risk of colorectal cancer. Close expected net benefits between immunological FOBT and CTC5 induced uncertainty in the choice of the optimal strategy. Probabilistic sensibility analysis then suggested that below a willingness to pay (WTP) per life-years gained (LYG) of 8,587 €/LYG, CTC10 was optimal, while CTC5 would be preferred beyond a WTP of 8,587 €/LYG. PMID:21305335

  18. Race/Ethnicity and Primary Language: Health Beliefs about Colorectal Cancer Screening in a Diverse, Low-Income Population

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Alison Tytell; Ko, Linda K.; Janz, Nancy; Gupta, Shivani; Inadomi, John

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important cause of cancer death in adults in the U.S.; screening is effective but underutilized, particularly among minorities. The purpose of this paper was to explore whether health belief model (HBM) constructs pertaining to CRC screening differ by race/ethnicity and primary language. Data were from the baseline surveys of 933 participants (93.5%) in a randomized trial promoting CRC screening in San Francisco. Composite scores for each construct were created from multiple items, dichotomized for analysis, and analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Most participants were Asian (29.7%) or Hispanic (34.3%), and many were non-English speakers. Non-English speaking Hispanics (p<.001) and English-speaking Asians (p=.002) reported lower perceived susceptibility than non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Non-English speaking Hispanics reported more and non-English speaking Asians fewer perceived barriers (psychological and structural) than NHW. Understanding how different populations think about CRC screening may be critical in promoting screening in diverse populations. PMID:26320917

  19. Association Between Socioeconomic Status and Participation in Colonoscopy Screening Program in First Degree Relatives of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chouhdari, Arezoo; Yavari, Parvin; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad Amin; Sohrabi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% to 25% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases have positive family history for disease. Colonoscopy screening test is the best way for prevention and early diagnosis. Studies have found that first degree relatives (FDRs) with low socioeconomic status are less likely to participate in colonoscopy screening program. Objectives The aim of this study is to determine the association between socioeconomic status and participation in colonoscopy screening program in FDRs. Patients and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional, study has been conducted on 200 FDRs who were consulted for undergoing colonoscopy screening program between 2007 and 2013 in research institute for gastroenterology and liver disease of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. They were interviewed via phone by a valid questionnaire about socioeconomic status. For data analysis, chi-square, exact fisher and multiple logistic regression were executed by SPSS 19. Results The results indicated 58.5% participants underwent colonoscopy screening test at least once to the time of the interview. There was not an association between participation in colonoscopy screening program and socioeconomic status to the time of the interview in binomial analysis. But statistical significance between intention to participate and educational and income level were found. We found, in logistic regression analysis, that high educational level (Diploma and University degree in this survey) was a predictor to participate in colonoscopy screening program in FDRs. Conclusions According to this survey low socioeconomic status is an important factor to hinder participation of FDRs in colonoscopy screening program. Therefore, planned interventions for elevation knowledge and attitude in FDRs with low educational level are necessary. Also, reducing colonoscopy test costs should be a major priority for policy makers. PMID:27482334

  20. Addressing Low Colorectal Cancer Screening in African Americans: Using Focus Groups to Inform the Development of Effective Interventions.

    PubMed

    May, Folasade P; Whitman, Cynthia B; Varlyguina, Ksenia; Bromley, Erica G; Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2016-09-01

    African Americans have the highest burden of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States of America (USA) yet lower CRC screening rates than whites. Although poor screening has prompted efforts to increase screening uptake, there is a persistent need to develop public health interventions in partnership with the African American community. The aim of this study was to conduct focus groups with African Americans to determine preferences for the content and mode of dissemination of culturally tailored CRC screening interventions. In June 2013, 45-75-year-old African Americans were recruited through online advertisements and from an urban Veterans Affairs system to create four focus groups. A semi-structured interview script employing open-ended elicitation was used, and transcripts were analyzed using ATLAS.ti software to code and group data into a concept network. A total of 38 participants (mean age = 54) were enrolled, and 59 ATLAS.ti codes were generated. Commonly reported barriers to screening included perceived invasiveness of colonoscopy, fear of pain, and financial concerns. Facilitators included poor diet/health and desire to prevent CRC. Common sources of health information included media and medical providers. CRC screening information was commonly obtained from medical personnel or media. Participants suggested dissemination of CRC screening education through commercials, billboards, influential African American public figures, Internet, and radio. Participants suggested future interventions include culturally specific information, including details about increased risk, accessing care, and dispelling of myths. Public health interventions to improve CRC screening among African Americans should employ media outlets, emphasize increased risk among African Americans, and address race-specific barriers. Specific recommendations are presented for developing future interventions. PMID:25963898

  1. Engaging Traditional Medicine Providers in Colorectal Cancer Screening Education in a Chinese American Community: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Adam; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Le, Gem M.; Stewart, Susan; Gildengorin, Ginny; Wong, Ching; Chow, Elaine; Woo, Kent; Nguyen, Tung T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is effective in preventing colon cancer, it remains underused by Asian Americans. Because Chinese Americans often use traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), we conducted a pilot study to explore the feasibility and acceptability of having TCM providers deliver education about CRC screening. Methods Four TCM providers (2 herbalists and 2 acupuncturists) were trained to deliver small-group educational sessions to promote CRC screening. Each provider recruited 15 participants aged 50 to 75. Participants completed a baseline survey on CRC-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and then attended one 2-hour educational session delivered by the providers in Cantonese or Mandarin. Three months later, participants completed a postintervention survey. Results Sixty participants were recruited from the San Francisco Chinatown neighborhood. The average age was 62.4 years. Most participants had limited English proficiency (96.7%), annual household income less than $20,000 per year (60%), and low educational attainment (65.1% < high school education). At postintervention (n = 57), significant increases were found in having heard of CRC (from 52.6% to 79.0%, P < .001) and colon polyps (from 64.9% to 84.2%, P < .001). Knowledge regarding screening frequency recommendations also increased significantly. The rate of ever having received any CRC screening test increased from 71.9% to 82.5% (P <.001). The rate of up-to-date screening increased from 70.2% to 79.0% (P = .04). Conclusion The findings suggest that TCM providers can be trained to deliver culturally and linguistically appropriate outreach on CRC screening within their community. Participants reached by TCM providers increased CRC knowledge and self-reported CRC screening. PMID:25496557

  2. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  3. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial Etiologic and Early Marker Studies (EEMS), 2016 Winter Review Cycle Has New Website | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial Etiologic and Early Marker Studies (EEMS) has a new application process for specimen requests. Researchers planning to submit a grant application in response to the Funding Opportunity Announcement PAR-15-297 must use a new website to submit applications. |

  4. Longitudinal predictors of colorectal cancer screening among participants in a randomized controlled trial ☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Vernon, Sally W.; Haddock, Nicole M.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Chubak, Jessica; Green, Beverly B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few studies use longitudinal data to identify predictors of colorectal cancer screening (CRCS). We examined predictors of (1) initial CRCS during the first year of a randomized trial, and (2) repeat CRCS during the second year of the trial among those that completed FOBT in Year 1. Methods The sample comprised 1247 participants of the Systems of Support to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening (SOS) Trial (Group Health Cooperative, August 2008 to November 2011). Potential predictors of CRCS were identified with logistic regression and included sociodemographics, health history, and validated scales of psychosocial constructs. Results Prior CRCS (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.99–3.52) and intervention group (Automated: OR 2.06 95% CI 1.43–2.95; Assisted: OR 4.03, 95% CI 2.69–6.03; Navigated: OR 5.64, 95% CI 3.74–8.49) were predictors of CRCS completion at Year 1. For repeat CRCS at Year 2, prior CRCS at baseline (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.25–3.11), intervention group (Automated: OR 9.27, 95% CI 4.56–18.82; Assisted: OR 11.17, 95% CI 5.44–22.94; Navigated: OR 13.10, 95% CI 6.33–27.08), and self-efficacy (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.00–1.73) were significant predictors. Conclusion Self-efficacy and prior CRCS are important predictors of future screening behavior. CRCS completion increased when access barriers were removed through interventions. PMID:24937648

  5. Patients' & Healthcare Professionals' Values Regarding True- & False-Positive Diagnosis when Colorectal Cancer Screening by CT Colonography: Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Darren; Mallett, Susan; Zhu, Shihua; Yao, Guiqing Lily; Bell, Nichola; Ghanouni, Alex; von Wagner, Christian; Taylor, Stuart A.; Altman, Douglas G.; Lilford, Richard; Halligan, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To establish the relative weighting given by patients and healthcare professionals to gains in diagnostic sensitivity versus loss of specificity when using CT colonography (CTC) for colorectal cancer screening. Materials and Methods Following ethical approval and informed consent, 75 patients and 50 healthcare professionals undertook a discrete choice experiment in which they chose between “standard” CTC and “enhanced” CTC that raised diagnostic sensitivity 10% for either cancer or polyps in exchange for varying levels of specificity. We established the relative increase in false-positive diagnoses participants traded for an increase in true-positive diagnoses. Results Data from 122 participants were analysed. There were 30 (25%) non-traders for the cancer scenario and 20 (16%) for the polyp scenario. For cancer, the 10% gain in sensitivity was traded up to a median 45% (IQR 25 to >85) drop in specificity, equating to 2250 (IQR 1250 to >4250) additional false-positives per additional true-positive cancer, at 0.2% prevalence. For polyps, the figure was 15% (IQR 7.5 to 55), equating to 6 (IQR 3 to 22) additional false-positives per additional true-positive polyp, at 25% prevalence. Tipping points were significantly higher for patients than professionals for both cancer (85 vs 25, p<0.001) and polyps (55 vs 15, p<0.001). Patients were willing to pay significantly more for increased sensitivity for cancer (p = 0.021). Conclusion When screening for colorectal cancer, patients and professionals believe gains in true-positive diagnoses are worth much more than the negative consequences of a corresponding rise in false-positives. Evaluation of screening tests should account for this. PMID:24349014

  6. A genomic screen for long noncoding RNA genes epigenetically silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumegawa, Kohei; Maruyama, Reo; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Ashida, Masami; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Tsuyada, Akihiro; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Yamano, Hiro-o; Sugai, Tamotsu; Tokino, Takashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key components in multiple cellular processes, although their physiological and pathological functions are not fully understood. To identify cancer-related lncRNAs, we screened for those that are epigenetically silenced in colorectal cancer (CRC). Through a genome-wide analysis of histone modifications in CRC cells, we found that the transcription start sites (TSSs) of 1,027 lncRNA genes acquired trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) after DNA demethylation. Integrative analysis of chromatin signatures and the DNA methylome revealed that the promoter CpG islands (CGIs) of 66 lncRNA genes contained cancer-specific methylation. By validating the expression and methylation of lncRNA genes in CRC cells, we ultimately identified 20 lncRNAs, including ZNF582-AS1, as targets of epigenetic silencing in CRC. ZNF582-AS1 is frequently methylated in CRC cell lines (87.5%), primary CRCs (77.2%), colorectal adenomas (44.7%) and advanced adenomas (87.8%), suggesting that this methylation is an early event during colorectal tumorigenesis. Methylation of ZNF582-AS1 is associated with poor survival of CRC patients, and ectopic expression of ZNF582-AS1 suppressed colony formation by CRC cells. Our findings offer insight into the association between epigenetic alterations and lncRNA dysregulation in cancer and suggest that ZNF582-AS1 may be a novel tumor-suppressive lncRNA. PMID:27215978

  7. A genomic screen for long noncoding RNA genes epigenetically silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumegawa, Kohei; Maruyama, Reo; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Ashida, Masami; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Tsuyada, Akihiro; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Yamano, Hiro-O; Sugai, Tamotsu; Tokino, Takashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key components in multiple cellular processes, although their physiological and pathological functions are not fully understood. To identify cancer-related lncRNAs, we screened for those that are epigenetically silenced in colorectal cancer (CRC). Through a genome-wide analysis of histone modifications in CRC cells, we found that the transcription start sites (TSSs) of 1,027 lncRNA genes acquired trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) after DNA demethylation. Integrative analysis of chromatin signatures and the DNA methylome revealed that the promoter CpG islands (CGIs) of 66 lncRNA genes contained cancer-specific methylation. By validating the expression and methylation of lncRNA genes in CRC cells, we ultimately identified 20 lncRNAs, including ZNF582-AS1, as targets of epigenetic silencing in CRC. ZNF582-AS1 is frequently methylated in CRC cell lines (87.5%), primary CRCs (77.2%), colorectal adenomas (44.7%) and advanced adenomas (87.8%), suggesting that this methylation is an early event during colorectal tumorigenesis. Methylation of ZNF582-AS1 is associated with poor survival of CRC patients, and ectopic expression of ZNF582-AS1 suppressed colony formation by CRC cells. Our findings offer insight into the association between epigenetic alterations and lncRNA dysregulation in cancer and suggest that ZNF582-AS1 may be a novel tumor-suppressive lncRNA. PMID:27215978

  8. Selective information seeking: can consumers' avoidance of evidence-based information on colorectal cancer screening be explained by the theory of cognitive dissonance?

    PubMed Central

    Steckelberg, Anke; Kasper, Jürgen; Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based patient information (EBPI) is a prerequisite for informed decision-making. However, presentation of EBPI may lead to irrational reactions causing avoidance, minimisation and devaluation of the information. Objective: To explore whether the theory of cognitive dissonance is applicable to medical decision-making and useful to explain these phenomena. Setting and participants: 261 volunteers from Hamburg (157 women), ≥50 years old without diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Design and variables: Within an experiment we simulated information seeking on colorectal cancer screening. Consumers’ attitudes towards screening were surveyed using a rating scale from -5 (participate in no way) to +5 (participate unconditionally) (independent variable). Using a cover story, participants were asked to sort 5 article headlines according to their reading preferences. The headlines simulated the pro to contra variety of contents to be found in print media about colorectal cancer screening. The dependent variable was the sequence of article headlines. Results: Participants were very much in favour of screening with scores for faecal occult blood test of 4.0 (0.1) and for colonoscopy 3.3 (0.1). According to our hypothesis we found statistically significant positive correlations between the stimuli in favour of screening and attitudes and significant negative correlations between the stimuli against screening and attitudes. Conclusion: The theory of cognitive dissonance is applicable to medical decision-making. It may explain some phenomena of irrational reactions to evidence-based patient information. PMID:19675713

  9. Colorectal adenomas and diet: a case-control study of subjects participating in the Nottingham faecal occult blood screening programme.

    PubMed Central

    Little, J.; Logan, R. F.; Hawtin, P. G.; Hardcastle, J. D.; Turner, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Diets high in animal fat and protein and low in fibre and calcium are thought to be factors in the etiology of colorectal cancer. Intakes of these nutrients were determined in three groups participating in a randomised trial of faecal occult blood (FOB) screening. A diet history was obtained by interview from 147 patients with colorectal adenomas, 153 age and sex matched FOB-negative controls (a) and 176 FOB-positive controls without colorectal neoplasia (b). Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence limits (increases) adjusted for age, sex and social class. After adjustment for total energy intake, no associations were found with total, saturated or mono-unsaturated fat, or calcium intake. For total fibre intake there were non-linear relationships with both control groups with the crude RR for highest quintiles of total fibre intake compared to the lowest being 0.6, although this pattern was no longer apparent after adjustment for energy intake with group (a). In comparison with group (b) cereal fibre intake showed a more consistent inverse relationship with adenoma prevalence with the RR for ascending quintiles of intake being 1.0, 0.7 (0.3-1.6), 0.5 (0.3-1.1), 0.7 (0.4-1.4) and 0.3 (0.1-0.6) (trend chi 2 = 8.80, p = 0.003). In comparison with group (a), the adjusted RR for the highest quintile of cereal fibre intake compared with the lowest was 0.6, but no clear trend was apparent. There was an unexpected positive relationship between adenomas and polyunsaturated fat intake with the RR for having an adenoma being 1.0, 2.8 (1.3-6.1), 1.6 (0.7-3.4), 3.5 (1.6-7.5) and 2.3 (1.1-5.0) for ascending quintiles of polyunsaturated fat intakes (trend chi 2 = 4.8, P = 0.03) in comparison with group (a) only. Our data, while providing no support for the role of dietary animal fat or protein, do support the protective role of dietary cereal fibre in the etiology of colorectal adenomas. PMID:8381298

  10. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  11. Colorectal Cancer Screening among Low-Income African Americans in East Harlem: A Theoretical Approach to Understanding Barriers and Promoters to Screening

    PubMed Central

    DuHamel, Katherine; Weiss, Anthony; Rakowski, William; Jandorf, Lina

    2006-01-01

    African Americans (AAs) have the highest incidence rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) among all races in the US. These disparities may be attributed to lower participation in CRC prevention and control activities [e.g., flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS), fecal occult blood testing (FOBT)]. This is a current issue in East Harlem where less than half the residents in this area participate in CRC screening and mortality rates due to CRC are higher than the national average. We examined correlates of FS and FOBT screening among AAs based on the transtheoretical model (TTM) of behavior change. One hundred and eleven AA men and women, 50 years and older (51–92), low-income, and at average risk for CRC were recruited at an ambulatory care center in East Harlem. Assessments focused on sociodemographic, medical, psychosocial and TTM variables. The first logistic regression model showed that higher levels of education (p < 0.05), greater knowledge of FS (p < 0.05), and greater endorsements of Thinking Beyond Oneself (p < 0.05) were associated with adherence to FS screening guidelines. The second model showed that only greater knowledge of FOBT (p < 0.05) and receiving a physician’s recommendation (p < 0.01) were significant correlates of adherence to FOBT screening guidelines. This study supported the application of components of the TTM for FS and FOBT screening among low-income AAs receiving care in an urban medical center and illustrated the need for interventions targeting both patients and their providers. PMID:17186375

  12. The Usefulness of a Novel Screening Kit for Colorectal Cancer Using the Immunochromatographic Fecal Tumor M2 Pyruvate Kinase Test

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Cheol; Kim, Jeong Ho; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Tae Ho; Jun, Eun Jung; Oh, Jung-Whan; Kim, Chang Whan; Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Byung-Wook; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Soo-Heon; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims M2 pyruvate kinase (M2-PK) is an enzyme that is produced in undifferentiated and proliferating tissues. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness of the immunochromatographic M2 pyruvate kinase (iM2-PK) for the screening of colorectal cancer (CRC) and premalignant lesions. Methods Healthy volunteers and patients with colorectal neoplasia were enrolled in six academic hospitals in the capital province of Korea. The iM2-PK value was compared with the immunochromatographic fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) and fecal tumor M2-PK enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results A total of 323 subjects were enrolled. The sensitivity of iM2-PK for CRC was 92.8%, which was superior to iFOBT (47.5%, p<0.0001). For adenomatous lesions, the sensitivity of iM2-PK was 69.4%, which was also superior to iFOBT (12.1%, p<0.001). Compared with M2-PK ELISA, iM2-PK exhibited significantly enhanced sensitivity for CRC (97.5% vs 80.0%, p=0.0289). The sensitivity of iM2-PK was higher in advanced stages of CRC compared with cancers confined to the mucosa and submucosa (p<0.05). However, lymph node metastasis had no influence on the sensitivity of iM2-PK. Conclusions The iM2-PK exhibited increased sensitivity for identifying CRC and adenomatous lesions compared with iFOBT. Given its rapid results and convenience, CRC screening using iM2-PK is promising. PMID:25473070

  13. Male Role Norms, Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Colorectal Cancer Screening among Young Adult African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Charles R.; Goodson, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Racial disparities in health among African American men (AAM) in the United States are extensive. In contrast to their White counterparts, AAM have more illnesses and die younger. AAM have colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates 25% and 50% higher, respectively, than White men. Due to CRC’s younger age at presentation and high incidence among AAM, CRC screening (CRCS) is warranted at the age of 45 rather than 50, but little is known about younger AAM’s views of CRCS. Employing survey design, the purpose of the study was to describe the male role norms (MRN), knowledge, attitudes, perceived subjective norms, and perceived barriers associated with screening for CRC among a non-random sample of 157 young adult AAM (ages 19–45). Sixty-seven percent of the study sample received a passing knowledge score (85% or better), yet no significant differences were found among the three educational levels (i.e., low, medium, high). More negative attitudes toward CRCS correlated with the participants’ strong perceptions of barriers, but no extremely negative or positive MRN and perceived subjective norms were found. The factors significantly associated with attitudes were family history of cancer (unsure), work status, and perceived barriers. Findings from this study provide a solid basis for developing structured health education interventions that address the salient factors shaping young adult AAM’s view of CRC and early detection screening behaviors. PMID:25506049

  14. European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis: Overview and introduction to the full Supplement publication

    PubMed Central

    von Karsa, L.; Patnick, J.; Segnan, N.; Atkin, W.; Halloran, S.; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, I.; Malila, N.; Minozzi, S.; Moss, S.; Quirke, P.; Steele, R. J.; Vieth, M.; Aabakken, L.; Altenhofen, L.; Ancelle-Park, R.; Antoljak, N.; Anttila, A.; Armaroli, P.; Arrossi, S.; Austoker, J.; Banzi, R.; Bellisario, C.; Blom, J.; Brenner, H.; Bretthauer, M.; Camargo Cancela, M.; Costamagna, G.; Cuzick, J.; Dai, M.; Daniel, J.; Dekker, E.; Delicata, N.; Ducarroz, S.; Erfkamp, H.; Espinàs, J. A.; Faivre, J.; Faulds Wood, L.; Flugelman, A.; Frkovic-Grazio, S.; Geller, B.; Giordano, L.; Grazzini, G.; Green, J.; Hamashima, C.; Herrmann, C.; Hewitson, P.; Hoff, G.; Holten, I.; Jover, R.; Kaminski, M. F.; Kuipers, E. J.; Kurtinaitis, J.; Lambert, R.; Launoy, G.; Lee, W.; Leicester, R.; Leja, M.; Lieberman, D.; Lignini, T.; Lucas, E.; Lynge, E.; Mádai, S.; Marinho, J.; Maučec Zakotnik, J.; Minoli, G.; Monk, C.; Morais, A.; Muwonge, R.; Nadel, M.; Neamtiu, L.; Peris Tuser, M.; Pignone, M.; Pox, C.; Primic-Zakelj, M.; Psaila, J.; Rabeneck, L.; Ransohoff, D.; Rasmussen, M.; Regula, J.; Ren, J.; Rennert, G.; Rey, J.; Riddell, R. H.; Risio, M.; Rodrigues, V.; Saito, H.; Sauvaget, C.; Scharpantgen, A.; Schmiegel, W.; Senore, C.; Siddiqi, M.; Sighoko, D.; Smith, R.; Smith, S.; Suchanek, S.; Suonio, E.; Tong, W.; Törnberg, S.; Van Cutsem, E.; Vignatelli, L.; Villain, P.; Voti, L.; Watanabe, H.; Watson, J.; Winawer, S.; Young, G.; Zaksas, V.; Zappa, M.; Valori, R.

    2015-01-01

    Population-based screening for early detection and treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) and precursor lesions, using evidence-based methods, can be effective in populations with a significant burden of the disease provided the services are of high quality. Multidisciplinary, evidence-based guidelines for quality assurance in CRC screening and diagnosis have been developed by experts in a project co-financed by the European Union. The 450-page guidelines were published in book format by the European Commission in 2010.They include 10 chapters and over 250 recommendations, individually graded according to the strength of the recommendation and the supporting evidence. Adoption of the recommendations can improve and maintain the quality and effectiveness of an entire screening process, including identification and invitation of the target population, diagnosis and management of the disease and appropriate surveillance in people with detected lesions. To make the principles, recommendations and standards in the guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community and to facilitate their use in the scientific literature, the original content is presented in journal format in an open-access Supplement of Endoscopy. The editors have prepared the present overview to inform readers of the comprehensive scope and content of the guidelines. PMID:23212726

  15. Prospective evaluation of 64 serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer in a true screening setting

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongda; Werner, Simone; Butt, Julia; Zörnig, Inka; Knebel, Phillip; Michel, Angelika; Eichmüller, Stefan B.; Jäger, Dirk; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Novel blood-based screening tests are strongly desirable for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to identify and evaluate autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers for early detection of CRC. 380 clinically identified CRC patients and samples of participants with selected findings from a cohort of screening colonoscopy participants in 2005–2013 (N=6826) were included in this analysis. Sixty-four serum autoantibody markers were measured by multiplex bead-based serological assays. A two-step approach with selection of biomarkers in a training set, and validation of findings in a validation set, the latter exclusively including participants from the screening setting, was applied. Anti-MAGEA4 exhibited the highest sensitivity for detecting early stage CRC and advanced adenoma. Multi-marker combinations substantially increased sensitivity at the price of a moderate loss of specificity. Anti-TP53, anti-IMPDH2, anti-MDM2 and anti-MAGEA4 were consistently included in the best-performing 4-, 5-, and 6-marker combinations. This four-marker panel yielded a sensitivity of 26% (95% CI, 13–45%) for early stage CRC at a specificity of 90% (95% CI, 83–94%) in the validation set. Notably, it also detected 20% (95% CI, 13–29%) of advanced adenomas. Taken together, the identified biomarkers could contribute to the development of a useful multi-marker blood-based test for CRC early detection. PMID:26909861

  16. Prospective evaluation of 64 serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer in a true screening setting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongda; Werner, Simone; Butt, Julia; Zörnig, Inka; Knebel, Phillip; Michel, Angelika; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Jäger, Dirk; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-03-29

    Novel blood-based screening tests are strongly desirable for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to identify and evaluate autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers for early detection of CRC. 380 clinically identified CRC patients and samples of participants with selected findings from a cohort of screening colonoscopy participants in 2005-2013 (N=6826) were included in this analysis. Sixty-four serum autoantibody markers were measured by multiplex bead-based serological assays. A two-step approach with selection of biomarkers in a training set, and validation of findings in a validation set, the latter exclusively including participants from the screening setting, was applied. Anti-MAGEA4 exhibited the highest sensitivity for detecting early stage CRC and advanced adenoma. Multi-marker combinations substantially increased sensitivity at the price of a moderate loss of specificity. Anti-TP53, anti-IMPDH2, anti-MDM2 and anti-MAGEA4 were consistently included in the best-performing 4-, 5-, and 6-marker combinations. This four-marker panel yielded a sensitivity of 26% (95% CI, 13-45%) for early stage CRC at a specificity of 90% (95% CI, 83-94%) in the validation set. Notably, it also detected 20% (95% CI, 13-29%) of advanced adenomas. Taken together, the identified biomarkers could contribute to the development of a useful multi-marker blood-based test for CRC early detection. PMID:26909861

  17. Acceptability of Physician Directed Academic Detailing to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening: an Application of the RESPECT Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Gwen; Basch, Corey H.; Zybert, Patricia; Wolf, Randi L.; Basch, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In developing effective interventions to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in at risk populations, a necessary first requirement is feasibility. This paper describes how the RESPECT approach to health education guided the conceptualization and implementation of physician-directed academic detailing (AD) to increase practice-wide CRC screening uptake. Methods: Physician-directed AD was one intervention component in a large educational randomized controlled trial to increase CRC screening uptake. Study participants, primarily urban minority, were aged 50 or older, insured for CRC screening with no out-of-pocket expense and out of compliance with current screening recommendations. The trial was conducted in the New York City metropolitan area. Participants identified their primary care physician; 564 individuals were recruited, representing 459 physician practices. Two-thirds of the physician practices were randomized to receive AD. The RESPECT approach, modified for AD, comprises: 1) Rapport, 2) Educate, but don’t overwhelm, 3) Start with physicians where they are, 4) Philosophical orientation based on a humanistic approach to education, 5) Engagement of the physician and his/her office staff, 6) Care and show empathy, and 7) Trust. Feasibility was assessed as rate of AD delivery. Results: The AD was delivered to 283 (92.5%) of the 306 practices assigned to receive it; 222/283 (78.4%) delivered to the doctor. Conclusion: The AD was feasible and acceptable to implement across a range of clinical settings. The RESPECT approach offers a framework for tailoring educational efforts, allowing flexibility, as opposed to strict adherence to a highly structured script or a universal approach. PMID:26634194

  18. Anticipating implementation of colorectal cancer screening in The Netherlands: a nation wide survey on endoscopic supply and demand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening requires sufficient endoscopic resources. The present study aims to determine the Dutch endoscopic production and manpower for 2009, evaluate trends since 2004, determine additional workload which would be caused by implementation of a CRC screening program, and inventory colonoscopy rates performed in other European countries. Methods All Dutch endoscopy units (N = 101) were surveyed for manpower and the numbers of endoscopy procedures performed in 2009. Based on calculations in the report issued by the Dutch Health Council, future additional workload caused by faecal immunochemical test (FIT) screening was estimated. The number of colonoscopies performed in Europe was evaluated by a literature search and an email-inquiry. Results Compared to 2004, there was a 24% increase in total endoscopies (N = 505,226 in 2009), and a 64% increase in colonoscopies (N = 191,339 in 2009) in The Netherlands. The number of endoscopists had increased by 4.6% (N = 583 in 2009). Five years after stepwise implementation of FIT-based CRC screening, endoscopic capacity needs to be increased an additional 15%. A lack of published data on the number of endoscopies performed in Europe was found. Based on our email-inquiry, the number of colonoscopies per 100,000 inhabitants ranged from 126 to 3,031 in 15 European countries. Conclusions Over the last years, endoscopic procedures increased markedly in The Netherlands without a corresponding increase in manpower. A FIT-based CRC screening program requires an estimated additional 15% increase in endoscopic procedures. It is very likely that current colonoscopy density varies widely across European countries. PMID:22280408

  19. Image quality assurance in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial network of the National Lung Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephen M; Gierada, David S; Clark, Kenneth W; Blaine, G James

    2005-09-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial is evaluating the effectiveness of low-dose spiral CT and conventional chest X-ray as screening tests for persons who are at high risk for developing lung cancer. This multicenter trial requires quality assurance (QA) for the image quality and technical parameters of the scans. The electronic system described here helps manage the QA process. The system includes a workstation at each screening center that de-identifies the data, a DICOM storage service at the QA Coordinating Center, and Web-based systems for presenting images and QA evaluation forms to the QA radiologists. Quality assurance data are collated and analyzed by an independent statistical organization. We describe the design and implementation of this electronic QA system, emphasizing issues relating to data security and privacy, the various obstacles encountered in the installation of a common system at different participating screening centers, and the functional success of the system deployed. PMID:15924251

  20. Adaptation of an evidence-based intervention to promote colorectal cancer screening: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To accelerate the translation of research findings into practice for underserved populations, we investigated the adaptation of an evidence-based intervention (EBI), designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in one limited English-proficient (LEP) population (Chinese), for another LEP group (Vietnamese) with overlapping cultural and health beliefs. Methods Guided by Diffusion of Innovations Theory, we adapted the EBI to achieve greater reach. Core elements of the adapted intervention included: small media (a DVD and pamphlet) translated into Vietnamese from Chinese; medical assistants distributing the small media instead of a health educator; and presentations on CRC screening to the medical assistants. A quasi-experimental study examined CRC screening adherence among eligible Vietnamese patients at the intervention and control clinics, before and after the 24-month intervention. The proportion of the adherence was assessed using generalized linear mixed models that account for clustering under primary care providers and also within-patient correlation between baseline and follow up. Results Our study included two cross-sectional samples: 1,016 at baseline (604 in the intervention clinic and 412 in the control clinic) and 1,260 post-intervention (746 in the intervention and 514 in the control clinic), including appreciable overlaps between the two time points. Pre-post change in CRC screening over time, expressed as an odds ratio (OR) of CRC screening adherence by time, showed a marginally-significant greater increase in CRC screening adherence at the intervention clinic compared to the control clinic (the ratio of the two ORs = 1.42; 95% CI 0.95, 2.15). In the sample of patients who were non-adherent to CRC screening at baseline, compared to the control clinic, the intervention clinic had marginally-significant greater increase in FOBT (adjusted OR = 1.77; 95% CI 0.98, 3.18) and a statistically-significantly greater increase in CRC

  1. Can an alert in primary care electronic medical records increase participation in a population-based screening programme for colorectal cancer? COLO-ALERT, a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem in Spain. Over the last decade, several regions have carried out screening programmes, but population participation rates remain below recommended European goals. Reminders on electronic medical records have been identified as a low-cost and high-reach strategy to increase participation. Further knowledge is needed about their effect in a population-based screening programme. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an electronic reminder to promote the participation in a population-based colorectal cancer screening programme. Secondary aims are to learn population’s reasons for refusing to take part in the screening programme and to find out the health professionals’ opinion about the official programme implementation and on the new computerised tool. Methods/Design This is a parallel randomised trial with a cross-sectional second stage. Participants: all the invited subjects to participate in the public colorectal cancer screening programme that includes men and women aged between 50–69, allocated to the eleven primary care centres of the study and all their health professionals. The randomisation unit will be the primary care physician. The intervention will consist of activating an electronic reminder, in the patient’s electronic medical record, in order to promote colorectal cancer screening, during a synchronous medical appointment, throughout the year that the intervention takes place. A comparison of the screening rates will then take place, using the faecal occult blood test of the patients from the control and the intervention groups. We will also take a questionnaire to know the opinions of the health professionals. The main outcome is the screening status at the end of the study. Data will be analysed with an intention-to-treat approach. Discussion We expect that the introduction of specific reminders in electronic medical records, as a tool to facilitate

  2. Cost-effectiveness of Standard vs. a Navigated Intervention on Colorectal Cancer Screening Use in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Lairson, David; DiCarlo, Melissa; Deshmuk, Ashish A.; Fagan, Heather B.; Sifri, Randa; Katurakes, Nora; Cocroft, James; Sendecki, Jocelyn; Swan, Heidi; Vernon, Sally W.; Myers, Ronald E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is cost-effective but underutilized. This study aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of mailed standard intervention (SI) and tailored navigation interventions (TNI) to increase CRC screening use in the context of a randomized trial among primary care patients. Methods Participants (n=945) were randomized either to a usual care Control Group (n=317), SI Group (n=316), or TNI Group (n=312). The SI Group was sent both colonoscopy instructions and stool blood tests irrespective of baseline preference. TNI Group participants were sent instructions for scheduling a colonoscopy, a stool blood test, or both based on their test preference as determined at baseline, and then received a navigation telephone call. Activity cost estimation was used to determine the cost of each intervention and compute incremental cost-effectiveness ratios . Statistical uncertainty within the base case was assessed with 95 percent confidence intervals derived from net benefit regression analysis. Effects of uncertain parameters such as the cost of planning, training, and involvement of those receiving “investigator salaries” were assessed with sensitivity analyses. Results Program costs of the SI were $167 per participant. Average cost of the TNI was $289 per participant. Conclusion The TNI was more effective than the SI, but substantially increased the cost per additional person screened. Decision-makers need to consider cost structure, level of planning, and training required to implement these two intervention strategies, and their willingness to pay for additional persons screened, to determine whether tailored navigation would be justified and feasible. PMID:24435411

  3. Practice Adaptive Reserve and Colorectal Cancer Screening Best Practices at Community Health Center Clinics in Seven States

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shin-Ping; Young, Vicki; Coombs, Letoynia J.; Williams, Rebecca; Kegler, Michelle; Kimura, Amanda; Risendal, Betsy; Friedman, Daniela B.; Glenn, Beth; Pfeiffer, Debbie J.; Fernandez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Enhancing the capability of community health centers to implement best practices may mitigate health disparities. We investigated the association of Practice Adaptive Reserve (PAR) to implementation of Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening best practices (BPs) at community health center clinics in seven states. Methods A convenience sample of clinic staff participated in a self-administered online survey. We scored eight PCMH CRC screening BPs as a composite ranging from 0–32. The PAR composite score was scaled from 0 to 1 then categorized into three levels. Multilevel analyses examined the relationship between PAR and self-reported implementation of the PCMH BPs. Results Out of 296 respondents, 59% reported 6 or more PCMH BPs at their clinics. The mean PAR score was 0.66 (s.d. 0.18) and PCMH BP mean scores were significantly higher for respondents who reported higher clinic PAR categories. Compared to the lowest PAR level, adjusted PCMH BP means were 25.0 percent higher at the middle PAR level (Difference = 3.2, SE = 1.3, t = 2.44, p = 0.015) and 63.2 percent higher at the highest PAR level (Difference = 8.0, SE = 1.9, t = 4.86, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Higher Adaptive Reserve, as measured by the PAR score, is positively associated with self-reported implementation of PCMH CRC screening BPs by clinic staff. Future research is needed to determine PAR levels most conducive to implementing CRC screening and to develop interventions that enhance PAR in primary care settings. PMID:25524651

  4. [Cutaneous neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Dummer, R; Beyeler, M; Morcinek, J; Burg, G

    2003-09-01

    The skin is the organ most commonly affected by malignancies. Various cancers of the skin show a dramatic increase in incidence over the last decades. Epithelial skin tumors are most frequently, e.g., basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma with its precursors, the actinic keratoses. Melanoma, which is extremely difficult to treat in advanced tumor stages, is dreaded. Besides that, there are other epithelial malignant diseases, e.g. Morbus Bowen and adnexal tumors originating from the skin appendices. Mesenchymal malignant neoplasias such as Morbus Kaposi, angiosarcomas and other dermal sarcomas, are rare. Since the majority of malignant neoplasms is removable and curable by a simple surgical intervention, the knowledge of the different skin tumors is essential for non-dermatologist. PMID:14526630

  5. The utility and predictive value of combinations of low penetrance genes for screening and risk prediction of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hawken, Steven J.; Greenwood, Celia M. T.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kustra, Rafal; McLaughlin, John; Yang, Quanhe; Zanke, Brent W.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that colorectal cancer (CRC) is a highly treatable form of cancer if detected early, a very low proportion of the eligible population undergoes screening for this form of cancer. Integrating a genomic screening profile as a component of existing screening programs for CRC could potentially improve the effectiveness of population screening by allowing the assignment of individuals to different types and intensities of screening and also by potentially increasing the uptake of existing screening programs. We evaluated the utility and predictive value of genomic profiling as applied to CRC, and as a potential component of a population-based cancer screening program. We generated simulated data representing a typical North American population including a variety of genetic profiles, with a range of relative risks and prevalences for individual risk genes. We then used these data to estimate parameters characterizing the predictive value of a logistic regression model built on genetic markers for CRC. Meta-analyses of genetic associations with CRC were used in building science to inform the simulation work, and to select genetic variants to include in logistic regression model-building using data from the ARCTIC study in Ontario, which included 1,200 CRC cases and a similar number of cancer-free population-based controls. Our simulations demonstrate that for reasonable assumptions involving modest relative risks for individual genetic variants, that substantial predictive power can be achieved when risk variants are common (e.g., prevalence > 20%) and data for enough risk variants are available (e.g., ~140–160). Pilot work in population data shows modest, but statistically significant predictive utility for a small collection of risk variants, smaller in effect than age and gender alone in predicting an individual’s CRC risk. Further genotyping and many more samples will be required, and indeed the discovery of many more risk loci associated with

  6. Promoting Chinese-speaking primary care physicians' communication with immigrant patients about colorectal cancer screening: a cluster randomized trial design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Liang, Wenchi; Ma, Grace X; Gehan, Edmund; Wang, Haoying Echo; Ji, Cheng-Shuang; Tu, Shin-Ping; Vernon, Sally W; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2014-08-01

    Chinese Americans underutilize colorectal cancer screening. This study evaluated a physician-based intervention guided by social cognitive theory (SCT) to inform future research involving minority physicians and patients. Twenty-five Chinese-speaking primary care physicians were randomized into intervention or usual care arms. The intervention included two 45-minute in-office training sessions paired with a dual-language communication guide detailing strategies in addressing Chinese patients' screening barriers. Physicians' feedback on the intervention, their performance data during training, and pre-post intervention survey data were collected and analyzed. Most physicians (~85%) liked the intervention materials but ~84% spent less than 20 minutes reading the guide and only 46% found the length of time for in-office training acceptable. Despite this, the intervention increased physicians' perceived communication self-efficacy with patients (p<.01). This study demonstrated the feasibility of enrolling and intervening with minority physicians. Time constraints in primary care practice should be considered in the design and implementation of interventions. PMID:25130226

  7. Valuations of Genetic Test Information for Treatable Conditions: The Case of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kilambi, Vikram; Johnson, F. Reed; González, Juan Marcos; Mohamed, Ateesha F.

    2014-01-01

    Background The value of the information that genetic testing services provide can be questioned for insurance-based health systems. The results of genetic tests oftentimes may not lead to well-defined clinical interventions; however, Lynch syndrome, a genetic mutation for which carriers are at an increased risk for colorectal cancer, can be identified through genetic testing, and meaningful health interventions are available via increased colonoscopic surveillance. Valuations of test information for such conditions ought to account for the full impact of interventions and contingent outcomes. Objectives To conduct a discrete-choice experiment to elicit individuals’ preferences for genetic test information. Methods A Web-enabled discrete-choice experiment survey was administered to a representative sample of US residents aged 50 years and older. In addition to specifying expenditures on colonoscopies, respondents were asked to make a series of nine selections between two hypothetical genetic tests or a no-test option under the premise that a relative had Lynch syndrome. The hypothetical genetic tests were defined by the probability of developing colorectal cancer, the probability of a false-negative test result, privacy of the result, and out-of-pocket cost. A model specification identifying necessary interactions was derived from assumptions of risk behavior and the decision context and was estimated using random-parameters logit. Results A total of 650 respondents were contacted, and 385 completed the survey. The monetary equivalent of test information was approximately $1800. Expenditures on colonoscopies to reduce mortality risks affected valuations. Respondents with lower income or who reported being employed significantly valued genetic tests more. Conclusion Genetic testing may confer benefits through the impact of subsequent interventions on private individuals. PMID:25498779

  8. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  9. Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The PLCO Cancer Screening Trial was a population-based randomized trial to determine the effects of screening on cancer-related mortality and secondary endpoints in more than 150,000 men and women aged 55 to 74.  The PLCO Biorepository, accessible by the Cancer Data Access System (CDAS) web portal, contains about 2.7 million biologic specimens from intervention participants during their six trial screening years, and buccal cell specimens from control participants. The Etiology and Early Marker Studies (EEMS) component has biologic materials and risk factor information from trial participants before diagnosis of disease.  | A repository of data from a large randomized trial on the effects of screening on cancer-related mortality and secondary endpoints in men and women aged 55 to 74.

  10. Developing a typology of African Americans with limited literacy based on preventive health practice orientation: implications for colorectal cancer screening strategies.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Thomas F; Bass, Sarah Bauerle; Ruzek, Sheryl B; Wolak, Caitlin; Rovito, Michael J; Ruggieri, Dominique G; Ward, Stephanie; Paranjape, Anuradha; Greener, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Preventive health messages are often tailored to reach broad sociodemographic groups. However, within groups, there may be considerable variation in perceptions of preventive health practices, such as colorectal cancer screening. Segmentation analysis provides a tool for crafting messages that are tailored more closely to the mental models of targeted individuals or subgroups. This study used cluster analysis, a psychosocial marketing segmentation technique, to develop a typology of colorectal cancer screening orientation among 102 African American clinic patients between the ages of 50 and 74 years with limited literacy. Patients were from a general internal medicine clinic in a large urban teaching hospital, a subpopulation known to have high rates of colorectal cancer and low rates of screening. Preventive screening orientation variables included the patients' responses to questions involving personal attitudes and preferences toward preventive screening and general prevention practices. A k-means cluster analysis yielded three clusters of patients on the basis of their screening orientation: ready screeners (50.0%), cautious screeners (30.4%), and fearful avoiders (19.6%). The resulting typology clearly defines important subgroups on the basis of their preventive health practice perceptions. The authors propose that the development of a validated typology of patients on the basis of their preventive health perceptions could be applicable to a variety of health concerns. Such a typology would serve to standardize how populations are characterized and would provide a more accurate view of their preventive health-related attitudes, values, concerns, preferences, and behaviors. Used with standardized assessment tools, it would provide an empirical basis for tailoring health messages and improving medical communication. PMID:24673248

  11. Universal Screening of Colorectal Cancers for Lynch Syndrome: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Stephen M; Kaz, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common heritable colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome, accounting for approximately 3 % of CRC cases in the USA each year. LS results from a genetic mutation in one of the four mismatch repair genes, and clinically LS is associated with CRC and other gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal malignancies. In this review, we describe the various clinical criteria utilized for the identification of LS patients and the inherent flaws with these criteria. We discuss the concept of universal testing for LS in all cases of newly diagnosed CRC, along with the potential benefits and challenges of universal testing. Several studies have shown that universal tumor testing is cost-effective and identifies cases of LS that are missed using traditional clinical criteria, which may result in reduced cancer mortality for probands and their families. Yet the full benefits of universal tumor testing may be limited by the availability and patient acceptance of genetic testing, and by logistical obstacles affecting the implementation of universal testing programs. Lastly, we comment on developing technologies such as massively parallel next-generation sequencing, which permits simultaneous sequencing of multiple genes involved in LS and other inherited colon cancer syndromes. PMID:26602911

  12. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test ... death and complications caused by colorectal cancer. SCREENING TESTS There are several ways to screen for colon ...

  13. Reducing income-related inequities in colorectal cancer screening: lessons learned from a retrospective analysis of organised programme and non-programme screening delivery in Winnipeg, Manitoba

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Kathleen M; Demers, Alain A; Nugent, Zoann; Biswanger, Natalie; Singh, Harminder

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined organised colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme and non-programme faecal occult blood test (FOBT) use from 2008 to 2012 for individuals living in Winnipeg, Manitoba, by area-level income. Setting Winnipeg, Manitoba, a region with universal healthcare and an organised CRC screening programme. Participants Individuals who had a non-programme FOBT were identified from the Provincial Medical Claims database. Individuals who had a programme FOBT were identified from the provincial screening registry. Census data were used to determine average household income based on area of residence. Statistical analysis Trends in age-standardised FOBT rates were examined using Joinpoint Regression. Logistic regression was performed to explore the association between programme and non-programme FOBT use and income quintile. Results FOBT use (non-programme and programme) increased from 32.2% in 2008 to 41.6% in 2012. Individuals living in the highest income areas (Q5) were more likely to have a non-programme FOBT compared with those living in other areas. Individuals living in areas with the lowest average income level (Q1) were less likely to have had programme FOBT than those living in areas with the highest average income level (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.82). There was no difference in programme FOBT use for individuals living in areas with the second lowest income level (Q2) compared with those living in areas with the highest. Individuals living in areas with a moderate-income level (Q3 and Q4) were more likely to have had a programme FOBT compared with those living in an area with the highest income level (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.15 for Q3 and OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.13 for Q4). Conclusions Inequities by income observed for non-programme FOBTs were largely eliminated when programme FOBTs were examined. Targeted interventions within organised screening programmes in very low-income areas are needed. PMID:26908517

  14. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for colorectal cancer What’s new in colorectal cancer research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  15. Cultural and linguistic adaptation of a multimedia colorectal cancer screening decision aid for Spanish-speaking Latinos.

    PubMed

    Ko, Linda K; Reuland, Daniel; Jolles, Monica; Clay, Rebecca; Pignone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the United States becomes more linguistically and culturally diverse, there is a need for effective health communication interventions that target diverse, vulnerable populations, including Latinos. To address such disparities, health communication interventionists often face the challenge to adapt existing interventions from English into Spanish in a way that retains essential elements of the original intervention while also addressing the linguistic needs and cultural perspectives of the target population. The authors describe the conceptual framework, context, rationale, methods, and findings of a formative research process used in creating a Spanish-language version of an evidence-based (English language) multimedia colorectal cancer screening decision aid. The multistep process included identification of essential elements of the existing intervention, literature review, assessment of the regional context and engagement of key stakeholders, and solicitation of direct input from target population. The authors integrated these findings in the creation of the new adapted intervention. They describe how they used this process to identify and integrate sociocultural themes such as personalism (personalismo), familism (familismo), fear (miedo), embarrassment (verguenza), power distance (respeto), machismo, and trust (confianza) into the Spanish-language decision aid. PMID:24328496

  16. Making it work: health care provider perspectives on strategies to increase colorectal cancer screening in federally qualified health centers.

    PubMed

    Gwede, Clement K; Davis, Stacy N; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Koskan, Alexis M; Ealey, Jamila; Abdulla, Rania; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Elliott, Gloria; Lopez, Diana; Shibata, David; Roetzheim, Richard G; Meade, Cathy D

    2013-12-01

    Colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) rates are low among men and women who seek health care at federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). This study explores health care providers' perspectives about their patient's motivators and impediments to CRCS and receptivity to preparatory education. A mixed methods design consisting of in-depth interviews, focus groups, and a short survey is used in this study. The participants of this study are 17 health care providers practicing in FQHCs in the Tampa Bay area. Test-specific patient impediments and motivations were identified including fear of abnormal findings, importance of offering less invasive fecal occult blood tests, and need for patient-centered test-specific educational materials in clinics. Opportunities to improve provider practices were identified including providers' reliance on patients' report of symptoms as a cue to recommend CRCS and overemphasis of clinic-based guaiac stool tests. This study adds to the literature on CRCS test-specific motivators and impediments. Providers offered unique approaches for motivating patients to follow through with recommended CRCS and were receptive to in-clinic patient education. Findings readily inform the design of educational materials and interventions to increase CRCS in FQHCs. PMID:23943277

  17. Making It Work: Health Care Provider Perspectives on Strategies to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Gwede, Clement K.; Davis, Stacy N.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Koskan, Alexis M.; Ealey, Jamila; Abdulla, Rania; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Elliott, Gloria; Lopez, Diana; Shibata, David; Roetzheim, Richard G.; Meade, Cathy D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) rates are low among men and women who seek health care at federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). This study explores health care providers' perspectives about their patient's motivators and impediments to CRCS and receptivity to preparatory education. Methods A mixed methods design consisting of in-depth interviews, focus groups, and a short survey. Setting: FQHCs in the Tampa Bay area. Participants: Seventeen health care providers practicing in FQHCs. Results Test-specific patient impediments and motivations were identified including fear of abnormal findings; importance of offering less invasive fecal occult blood tests; and need for patient-centered test-specific educational materials in clinics. Opportunities to improve provider practices were identified including providers' reliance on patients' report of symptoms as a cue to recommend CRCS and overemphasis of clinic-based guaiac stool tests. Conclusions This study adds to the literature on CRCS test-specific motivators and impediments. Providers offered unique approaches for motivating patients to follow through with recommended CRCS and were receptive to in-clinic patient education and. Findings are readily inform the design of educational materials and interventions to increase CRCS in FQHCs. PMID:23943277

  18. Multidimensional Screening Platform for Simultaneously Targeting Oncogenic KRAS and Hypoxia-Inducible Factors Pathways in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Michelle S; Ma, Jia Jia; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Havre, Pamela A; Yao, Jin; Dang, Nam H; Paul, Valerie J; Carney, Thomas J; Dang, Long H; Luesch, Hendrik

    2016-05-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a genetic disease, due to progressive accumulation of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Large scale genomic sequencing projects revealed >100 mutations in any individual CRC. Many of these mutations are likely passenger mutations, and fewer are driver mutations. Of these, activating mutations in RAS proteins are essential for cancer initiation, progression, and/or resistance to therapy. There has been significant interest in developing drugs targeting mutated cancer gene products or downstream signaling pathways. Due to the number of mutations involved and inherent redundancy in intracellular signaling, drugs targeting one mutation or pathway have been either ineffective or led to rapid resistance. We have devised a strategy whereby multiple cancer pathways may be simultaneously targeted for drug discovery. For proof-of-concept, we targeted the oncogenic KRAS and HIF pathways, since oncogenic KRAS has been shown to be required for cancer initiation and progression, and HIF-1α and HIF-2α are induced by the majority of mutated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in CRC. We have generated isogenic cell lines defective in either oncogenic KRAS or both HIF-1α and HIF-2α and subjected them to multiplex genomic, siRNA, and high-throughput small molecule screening. We have identified potential drug targets and compounds for preclinical and clinical development. Screening of our marine natural product library led to the rediscovery of the microtubule agent dolastatin 10 and the class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor largazole to inhibit oncogenic KRAS and HIF pathways. Largazole was further validated as an antiangiogenic agent in a HIF-dependent manner in human cells and in vivo in zebrafish using a genetic model with activated HIF. Our general strategy, coupling functional genomics with drug susceptibility or chemical-genetic interaction screens, enables the identification of potential drug targets and candidates with

  19. Endometrial thickness and risk of breast and endometrial carcinomas in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Ashley S.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Modugno, Francesmary; Black, Amanda; Hill, Lyndon M.; Martin, Jerry; Sit, Anita S.; Sherman, Mark E.; Brinton, Louise A.

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal women with higher circulating estrogen levels are at increased risk of developing breast and endometrial carcinomas. In the endometrium, excess estrogen relative to progesterone produces a net proliferative stimulus, which may result in endometrial thickening. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that endometrial thickness is a biological marker of excess estrogen stimulation that is associated with risk of breast and endometrial carcinomas. Endometrial thickness was measured in 1,272 postmenopausal women, aged 55–74, who underwent transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) screening as part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Serial endometrial thickness measurements were available for a subset of women at one (n=1,018), two (n=869) and three years (n=641) after baseline. We evaluated associations between endometrial thickness and breast (n=91) and endometrial (n=14) carcinoma by estimating relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards regression with age as the time metric. Models incorporating baseline endometrial thickness and as a time-varying covariate using all measurements were examined. Median follow-up among study participants was 12.5 years (range: 0.3–13.8 years). Compared to baseline endometrial thickness of 1.0 – 2.99 mm, women with baseline endometrial thickness greater than or equal to 5.0 mm had an increased risk of breast (RR: 2.00, 95% CI 1.15, 3.48) and endometrial (RR: 5.02, 95% CI 0.96, 26.36) carcinomas in models adjusted for menopausal hormone use and BMI. Our data suggest that increased endometrial thickness as assessed by TVU was associated with increased risk of breast and endometrial carcinomas. PMID:23907658

  20. Improving uptake of screening for colorectal cancer: a study on invitation strategies and different test kit use

    PubMed Central

    Kojalo, Ilona; Huttunen, Teppo; Rikacovs, Sergejs; Rucevskis, Peteris; Boka, Viesturs; Leja, Marcis

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the uptake of mail-delivered tests for colorectal cancer screening. We assessed the effect of an advance notification letter and a reminder letter, and analysed the proportion of inappropriately handled tests. Materials and methods Fifteen thousand randomly selected residents of Latvia aged 50–74 years were allocated to receive one of three different test systems: either a guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) or one of two laboratory-based immunochemical tests (FIT) – FOB Gold or OC-Sensor. Half of the target population received an advance notification letter; all nonresponders were sent a reminder letter. Results The uptake of screening was 31.2% for the gFOBT, 44.7% for FOB Gold and 47.4% for the OC-Sensor (odds ratio 0.55; 95% confidence interval 0.51–0.60 for gFOBT vs. FOB Gold; odds ratio 0.90; 95% confidence interval 0.83–0.98 for FOB Gold vs. OC-Sensor). The uptake in the gFOBT group was improved by the advance notification letter (7.7%, P<0.0001). 30.9% returned tests were received after the reminder letter. The proportion of tests that could not be analysed because of inadequate handling was 0.9% for gFOBT, 4.4% for FOB Gold and 0.2% for the OC-Sensor (P=0.002 for gFOBT vs. OC-Sensor; P<0.001 for all comparisons vs. FOB Gold). Conclusion The use of FIT resulted in higher uptake. Receipt of a reminder letter was critical to participation, but the use of an advance notification letter was important mainly for gFOBT. The proportion of inappropriately handled tests was markedly higher for FOB Gold. PMID:25806603

  1. Alcohol, genetics and risk of breast cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Catherine A; Reding, Douglas J; Commins, John; Williams, Craig; Yeager, Meredith; Burmester, James K; Schairer, Catherine; Ziegler, Regina G

    2012-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that genes involved in the alcohol oxidation pathway modify the association between alcohol intake and breast cancer. Subjects were women aged 55-74 at baseline from the screening arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Incident breast cancers were identified through annual health surveys. Controls were frequency matched to cases by age and year of entry into the trial. A self-administered food frequency questionnaire queried frequency and usual serving size of beer, wine or wine coolers, and liquor. Three SNPs in genes in the alcohol metabolism pathway were genotyped: alcohol dehydrogenase 2, alcohol dehydrogenase 3, and CYP2E1. The study included 1,041 incident breast cancer cases and 1,070 controls. In comparison to non-drinkers, the intake of any alcohol significantly increased the risk of breast cancer, and this risk increased with each category of daily alcohol intake (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.14, 3.53) for women who drank three or more standard drinks per day. Stratification by genotype revealed significant gene/environment interactions. For the ADH1B gene, there were statistically significant associations between all levels of alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer (all OR > 1.34 and all lower CI > 1.01), while for women with the GA or AA genotype, there were no significant associations between alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer. Alcohol intake, genes involved in alcohol metabolism and their interaction increase the risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. This information could be useful for primary care providers to personalize information about breast cancer risk reduction. PMID:22331481

  2. Emerging stool-based and blood-based non-invasive DNA tests for colorectal cancer screening: the importance of cancer prevention in addition to cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Perry J

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can be undertaken utilizing a variety of distinct approaches, which provides both opportunities and confusion. Traditionally, there has often been a trade-off between the degree of invasiveness of a screening test and its ability to prevent cancer, with fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and optical colonoscopy (OC) at each end of the spectrum. CT colonography (CTC), although currently underutilized for CRC screening, represents an exception since it is only minimally invasive, yet provides accurate evaluation for advanced adenomas. More recently, the FDA approved a multi-target stool DNA test (Cologuard) and a blood-based test (Epi proColon) for average-risk CRC screening. This commentary will provide an overview of these two new non-invasive tests, including the clinical indications, mechanism of action, and diagnostic performance. Relevance to radiology practice, including a comparison with CTC, will also be discussed. PMID:27259335

  3. The discriminatory capability of existing scores to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia: a prospective colonoscopy study of 5,899 screening participants

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C. S.; Ching, Jessica Y. L.; Ng, Simpson; Lam, Thomas Y. T.; Luk, Arthur K. C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S. M.; Wu, Justin C. Y.; Chan, Francis K. L.; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of seven existing risk scoring systems in predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia in an asymptomatic Chinese cohort. We prospectively recruited 5,899 Chinese subjects aged 50–70 years in a colonoscopy screening programme(2008–2014). Scoring systems under evaluation included two scoring tools from the US; one each from Spain, Germany, and Poland; the Korean Colorectal Screening(KCS) scores; and the modified Asia Pacific Colorectal Screening(APCS) scores. The c-statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values(PPVs), and negative predictive values(NPVs) of these systems were evaluated. The resources required were estimated based on the Number Needed to Screen(NNS) and the Number Needed to Refer for colonoscopy(NNR). Advanced neoplasia was detected in 364 (6.2%) subjects. The German system referred the least proportion of subjects (11.2%) for colonoscopy, whilst the KCS scoring system referred the highest (27.4%). The c-statistics of all systems ranged from 0.56–0.65, with sensitivities ranging from 0.04–0.44 and specificities from 0.74–0.99. The modified APCS scoring system had the highest c-statistics (0.65, 95% C.I. 0.58–0.72). The NNS (12–19) and NNR (5-10) were similar among the scoring systems. The existing scoring systems have variable capability to predict advanced neoplasia among asymptomatic Chinese subjects, and further external validation should be performed. PMID:26838178

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Screening of High-Risk Individuals in Arkansas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Peutz-Jegher's Syndrome; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Ataxia Telangiectasia; Familial Atypical Mole-Malignant Melanoma Syndrome; Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis; Hereditary Pancreatitis

  5. [Faecal occult blood test for colorectal cancer screening: high quality for a good price].

    PubMed

    van Veldhuizen, Harriët; Bonfrer, J M G Hans; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) awarded the immunochemical faecal occult blood test (IFOBT) to FOB Gold of Sentinel following a European call for tenders. The contract-awarding procedure included the application of quality knock-out criteria, which were met by two suppliers. The decisive factor was the best price/quality ratio. A recent review indicated that, at present, no single IFOBT is better than any other. The decision to opt for a test manufactured by a different supplier than was used in the previous screening pilots made it necessary to re-determine the cut-off value. This value has now been set (88 ng/ml) and is confirmed by a laboratory test. Colonoscopy-related capacity planning, as well as its diagnostic yield, depends on numerous factors; therefore, the RIVM is currently monitoring the referral percentage and number of adenomas detected and is collaborating on quality terms. Any necessary adjustments are to be made during the introduction of the screening test. PMID:23594877

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Colorectal Cancer Screening in High Risk Spanish Patients: Use of a Validated Model to Inform Public Policy

    PubMed Central

    Ladabaum, Uri; Ferrandez, Angel; Lanas, Angel I.

    2011-01-01

    Background The European Community has made a commitment to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, but regional considerations may affect the design of national screening programs. We developed a decision analytic model tailored to a pilot screening program for high risk persons in Spain with the aim of informing public policy decisions. Methods We constructed a decision analytic Markov model based on our validated model of CRC screening that reflected CRC epidemiology and costs in persons with first-degree relatives with CRC in Aragón, Spain, and superimposed colonoscopy every 5 or 10 years from ages 40-80 years. The pilot program’s preliminary clinical results and our modeling results were presented to regional health authorities. Results In the model, without screening, 88 CRC cases occurred per 1,000 persons from age 40-85 years. In the base case, screening reduced this by 72-77% and gained 0.12 discounted life-years/person. Screening every 10 years was cost-saving, and screening every 5 years vs. every 10 years cost 7,250 €/life-year gained. Based on these savings, 36-39 €/person/year could go towards operating costs while maintaining a neutral budget. If screening costs doubled, screening remained highly cost-effective, but no longer cost-saving. These results contributed to the health authorities’ decision to expand the pilot program to the entire region in 2009. Conclusions Colonoscopic screening of first-degree relatives of persons with CRC may be cost-saving in public systems like Spain’s. Decision analytic modeling tailored to regional considerations can inform public policy decisions. Impact Tailored decision analytic modeling can inform regional policy decisions on cancer screening. PMID:20810603

  7. Immunohistochemistry as first-line screening for detecting colorectal cancer patients at risk for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome: a 2-antibody panel may be as predictive as a 4-antibody panel.

    PubMed

    Shia, Jinru; Tang, Laura H; Vakiani, Efsevia; Guillem, Jose G; Stadler, Zsofia K; Soslow, Robert A; Katabi, Nora; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Temple, Larissa K; Nash, Garrett M; Wong, W Douglas; Offit, Kenneth; Klimstra, David S

    2009-11-01

    The utility of immunohistochemical detection of DNA mismatch repair proteins in screening colorectal cancer for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is being widely investigated. Currently, in both research and clinical settings, a 4-antibody panel that includes the 4 most commonly affected proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) is being used generally. On the basis of the biochemical properties of these proteins, we hypothesized that a 2-antibody panel, comprising MSH6 and PMS2, would be sufficient to detect abnormalities in all 4 proteins. We tested this hypothesis on a series of 232 colorectal carcinoma samples derived from 2 patient cohorts: (1) a prospectively accrued series of patients who were judged to carry a higher-than-average risk for HNPCC based on the revised Bethesda guidelines (n=190); and (2) a retrospective series of patients who were 40 years of age or younger (n=42). Immunohistochemical stains were regarded as negative (protein lost), when there was no nuclear labeling in tumor cells (with positive internal control). Overall, 70 of the 232 tumors demonstrated loss of at least one protein. The most common abnormality was concurrent loss of MLH1 and PMS2 (observed in 17% of the cases), followed by concurrent loss of MSH2 and MSH6 (6%). All MLH1 and MSH2-abnormal cases were also abnormal for PMS2 and MSH6, respectively, whereas 9 of 50 (18%) PMS2 and 6 of 20 (30%) MSH6-abnormal cases showed only isolated loss of PMS2 or MSH6 (with normal staining for MLH1 and MSH2). As such, our findings provide evidence that a 2-antibody panel (PMS2 and MSH6) is as effective as the current 4-antibody panel in detecting DNA mismatch repair protein abnormalities. Such a cost-effective approach carries significant implication, as immunohistochemistry is being widely used as first-line screening for HNPCC. PMID:19701074

  8. Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical profile of ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Gozde; Gurbuz, Ayse; Karateke, Ates; Kir, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinoma of the ovary is not an uncommon occurrence and ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma frequently mimic endometrioid and mucinous primary ovarian carcinoma. The clinical and pathologic features of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma involving the ovary is reviewed with particular focus on the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasm. Immunohistochemical stains that may be useful in the differential diagnosis of metastatic colorectal tumors to the ovary and primary ovarian tumors are detailed. PMID:21160859

  9. Implications of the histological determination of microRNAs in the screening, diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Pablo; Villarejo, Pedro; Padilla, David; Menéndez, José María; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNA molecules that participate in the regulation of gene expression. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of microRNAs in oncogenesis and a variety of physiological functions. We conducted a literature review of studies that evaluated histological microRNAs in colorectal cancer. Although additional clinical studies are required to substantiate the relationship between microRNAs and colorectal cancer, there is preliminary evidence that microRNAs are related to the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer. PMID:23609475

  10. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Thyroid Cancer Risk in the Prostate, Colorectal, Lung, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; DellaValle, Curt T.; Purdue, Mark; Kim, Christopher; Zhang, Yawei; Sjodin, Andreas; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) alter thyroid hormone homeostasis, but their relationship with thyroid cancer is unknown. To investigate whether serum concentrations of PBDE were associated with thyroid cancer, we conducted a nested, case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a large multicenter clinical trial in the United States. Cases with thyroid cancer (n = 104) were recruited from 1992 to 2001 and diagnosed through 2009, and controls (n = 208) were individually matched (2:1) to cases by race, sex, birth date (within 1 year), center, and blood collection date (within 15 days). We used gas chromatography isotope dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry to measure 10 tri- to heptabrominated diphenyl eithers in serum samples. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression for lipid-adjusted PBDE levels detected in more than 50% of controls and for the sum of these BDEs (∑PBDEs). We observed no significant differences between cases and controls in lipid-adjusted concentrations of ∑PBDEs (for cases, median = 12.8 ng/g lipid (interquartile range, 6.2–42.1); for controls, median = 19.4 ng/g lipid (interquartile range, 7.6–50.2)) or for individual congeners. Increasing quartiles of ∑PBDEs and 4 BDE congeners were not associated with risk of thyroid cancer (for the fourth vs. first quartile of ∑PBDEs, adjusted odd ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 1.30; P for trend = 0.56). Our study does not support an association between exposure to PBDEs and thyroid cancer. PMID:25939348

  11. Serum IgE and risk of pancreatic cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO)

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Sara H.; Hsu, Meier; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Bracci, Paige M.; Zhou, Mi; Patoka, Joseph; Reisacher, William I.; Wang, Julie; Kurtz, Robert C.; Silverman, Debra T.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have consistently found that self-reported allergies are associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Our aim was to prospectively assess the relationship between serum IgE, a marker of allergy, and risk. This nested case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) included subjects enrolled in 1994-2001 and followed through 2010. There were 283 cases of pancreatic cancer and 544 controls matched on age, gender, race, and calendar date of blood draw. Using the ImmunoCAP system, we measured total IgE (normal, borderline, elevated), IgE to respiratory allergens, and IgE to food allergens (negative or positive) in serum collected at baseline. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. We assessed interactions with age, gender, smoking, body mass index, and time between randomization and case diagnosis. Overall, there was no association between the IgE measures and risk. We found a statistically significant interaction by baseline age: in those aged >65, elevated risks were observed for borderline total IgE (OR=1.43; 95% CI, 0.88-2.32) and elevated total IgE (OR=1.98; 95% CI, 1.16-3.37) and positive IgE to food allergens (OR=2.83; 95% CI, 1.29-6.20); among participants <65, ORs were <1. Other interactions were not statistically significant. The reduced risk of pancreatic cancer associated with self-reported allergies is not reflected in serum IgE. PMID:24718282

  12. Serum vitamin D and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian screening trial.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Hayes, Richard B; Horst, Ron L; Anderson, Kristin E; Hollis, Bruce W; Silverman, Debra T

    2009-02-15

    Experimental evidence suggests that vitamin D has anticarcinogenic properties; however, a nested case-control study conducted in a population of male Finnish smokers found that higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the best indicator of vitamin D status as determined by the sun and diet, was associated with a significant 3-fold increased risk for pancreatic cancer. We conducted a nested case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Screening Trial cohort of men and women 55 to 74 years of age at baseline to test whether prediagnostic serum 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Between 1994 and 2006, 184 incident cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma occurred (follow-up to 11.7 years). Two controls (n = 368) who were alive at the time the case was diagnosed were selected for each case and matched by age, race, sex, and calendar date of blood draw (to control for seasonal variation). We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for smoking and body mass index. Vitamin D concentrations were not associated with pancreatic cancer overall (highest versus lowest quintile, >82.3 versus <45.9 nmol/L: OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.66-3.15; P trend = 0.49). However, positive associations were observed among subjects with low estimated annual residential solar UBV exposure, but not among those with moderate to high annual exposure (P interaction = 0.015). We did not confirm the previous strong positive association between 25(OH)D and pancreatic cancer; however, the increased risk among participants with low residential UVB exposure is similar. PMID:19208842

  13. Serum immunoglobulin e and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Olson, Sara H; Hsu, Meier; Wiemels, Joseph L; Bracci, Paige M; Zhou, Mi; Patoka, Joseph; Reisacher, William R; Wang, Julie; Kurtz, Robert C; Silverman, Debra T; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies have consistently found that self-reported allergies are associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Our aim was to prospectively assess the relationship between serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), a marker of allergy, and risk. This nested case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) included subjects enrolled in 1994 to 2001 and followed through 2010. There were 283 cases of pancreatic cancer and 544 controls matched on age, gender, race, and calendar date of blood draw. Using the ImmunoCAP system, we measured total IgE (normal, borderline, elevated), IgE to respiratory allergens, and IgE to food allergens (negative or positive) in serum collected at baseline. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. We assessed interactions with age, gender, smoking, body mass index, and time between randomization and case diagnosis. Overall, there was no association between the IgE measures and risk. We found a statistically significant interaction by baseline age: in those aged ≥65 years, elevated risks were observed for borderline total IgE (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.88-2.32) and elevated total IgE (OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.16-3.37) and positive IgE to food allergens (OR, 2.83; 95% CI, 1.29-6.20); among participants <65 years, ORs were <1. Other interactions were not statistically significant. The reduced risk of pancreatic cancer associated with self-reported allergies is not reflected in serum IgE. PMID:24718282

  14. Prospective evaluation of serum sarcosine and risk of prostate cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Koutros, Stella; Hsing, Ann W.; Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling has identified, sarcosine, a derivative of the amino acid glycine, as an important metabolite involved in the etiology or natural history of prostate cancer. We examined the association between serum sarcosine levels and risk of prostate cancer in 1122 cases (813 non-aggressive and 309 aggressive) and 1112 controls in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Sarcosine was quantified using high-throughput liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. A significantly increased risk of prostate cancer was observed with increasing levels of sarcosine (odds ratio [OR] for the highest quartile of exposure [Q4] versus the lowest quartile [Q1] = 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02, 1.65; P-trend 0.03). When stratified by disease aggressiveness, we observed a stronger association for non-aggressive cases (OR for Q4 versus Q1 = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.88; P-trend 0.006) but no association for aggressive prostate cancer (OR for Q4 versus Q1 = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.73, 1.47; P-trend 0.89). Although not statistically significant, temporal analyses showed a stronger association between sarcosine and prostate cancer for serum collected closer to diagnosis, suggesting that sarcosine may be an early biomarker of disease. Interestingly, the association between sarcosine and prostate cancer risk was stronger among men with diabetes (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.04, 6.84) compared with those without reported diabetes (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.95–1.59, P-interaction = 0.01). This study found that elevated levels of serum sarcosine are associated with an increased prostate cancer risk and evidence to suggest that sarcosine may be an early biomarker for this disease. PMID:23698636

  15. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and thyroid cancer risk in the Prostate, Colorectal, Lung, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial cohort.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; DellaValle, Curt T; Purdue, Mark; Kim, Christopher; Zhang, Yawei; Sjodin, Andreas; Ward, Mary H

    2015-06-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) alter thyroid hormone homeostasis, but their relationship with thyroid cancer is unknown. To investigate whether serum concentrations of PBDE were associated with thyroid cancer, we conducted a nested, case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a large multicenter clinical trial in the United States. Cases with thyroid cancer (n = 104) were recruited from 1992 to 2001 and diagnosed through 2009, and controls (n = 208) were individually matched (2:1) to cases by race, sex, birth date (within 1 year), center, and blood collection date (within 15 days). We used gas chromatography isotope dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry to measure 10 tri- to heptabrominated diphenyl eithers in serum samples. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression for lipid-adjusted PBDE levels detected in more than 50% of controls and for the sum of these BDEs (∑PBDEs). We observed no significant differences between cases and controls in lipid-adjusted concentrations of ∑PBDEs (for cases, median = 12.8 ng/g lipid (interquartile range, 6.2-42.1); for controls, median = 19.4 ng/g lipid (interquartile range, 7.6-50.2)) or for individual congeners. Increasing quartiles of ∑PBDEs and 4 BDE congeners were not associated with risk of thyroid cancer (for the fourth vs. first quartile of ∑PBDEs, adjusted odd ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 1.30; P for trend = 0.56). Our study does not support an association between exposure to PBDEs and thyroid cancer. PMID:25939348

  16. Colorectal cancer screening: factors associated with colonoscopy after a positive faecal occult blood test

    PubMed Central

    Ferrat, E; Le Breton, J; Veerabudun, K; Bercier, S; Brixi, Z; Khoshnood, B; Paillaud, E; Attali, C; Bastuji-Garin, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Contextual socio-economic factors, health-care access, and general practitioner (GP) involvement may influence colonoscopy uptake and its timing after positive faecal occult blood testing (FOBT). Our objectives were to identify predictors of delayed or no colonoscopy and to assess the role for GPs in colonoscopy uptake. Methods: We included all residents of a French district with positive FOBTs (n=2369) during one of the two screening rounds (2007–2010). Multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed to identify individual and area-level predictors of delayed colonoscopy, no colonoscopy, and no information on colonoscopy. Results: A total of 998 (45.2%) individuals underwent early, 989 (44.8%) delayed, and 102 (4.6%) no colonoscopy; no information was available for 119 (5.4%) individuals. Delayed colonoscopy was independently associated with first FOBT (odds ratio, (OR)), 1.61; 95% confidence interval ((95% CI), 1.16–2.25); and no colonoscopy and no information with first FOBT (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.02–3.97), FOBT kit not received from the GP (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.67–3.14), and socio-economically deprived area (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.98–5.08). Colonoscopy uptake varied significantly across GPs (P=0.01). Conclusion: Socio-economic factors, GP-related factors, and history of previous FOBT influenced colonoscopy uptake after a positive FOBT. Interventions should target GPs and individuals performing their first screening FOBT and/or living in socio-economically deprived areas. PMID:23989948

  17. Knowledge and Informed Decision-Making about Population-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Participation in Groups with Low and Adequate Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Essink-Bot, M. L.; Dekker, E.; Timmermans, D. R. M.; Uiters, E.; Fransen, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze and compare decision-relevant knowledge, decisional conflict, and informed decision-making about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening participation between potential screening participants with low and adequate health literacy (HL), defined as the skills to access, understand, and apply information to make informed decisions about health. Methods. Survey including 71 individuals with low HL and 70 with adequate HL, all eligible for the Dutch organized CRC screening program. Knowledge, attitude, intention to participate, and decisional conflict were assessed after reading the standard information materials. HL was assessed using the Short Assessment of Health Literacy in Dutch. Informed decision-making was analyzed by the multidimensional measure of informed choice. Results. 64% of the study population had adequate knowledge of CRC and CRC screening (low HL 43/71 (61%), adequate HL 47/70 (67%), p > 0.05). 57% were informed decision-makers (low HL 34/71 (55%), adequate HL 39/70 (58%), p > 0.05). Intention to participate was 89% (low HL 63/71 (89%), adequate HL 63/70 (90%)). Respondents with low HL experienced significantly more decisional conflict (25.8 versus 16.1; p = 0.00). Conclusion. Informed decision-making about CRC screening participation was suboptimal among both individuals with low HL and individuals with adequate HL. Further research is required to develop and implement effective strategies to convey decision-relevant knowledge about CRC screening to all screening invitees. PMID:27200089

  18. Knowledge and Informed Decision-Making about Population-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Participation in Groups with Low and Adequate Health Literacy.

    PubMed

    Essink-Bot, M L; Dekker, E; Timmermans, D R M; Uiters, E; Fransen, M P

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze and compare decision-relevant knowledge, decisional conflict, and informed decision-making about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening participation between potential screening participants with low and adequate health literacy (HL), defined as the skills to access, understand, and apply information to make informed decisions about health. Methods. Survey including 71 individuals with low HL and 70 with adequate HL, all eligible for the Dutch organized CRC screening program. Knowledge, attitude, intention to participate, and decisional conflict were assessed after reading the standard information materials. HL was assessed using the Short Assessment of Health Literacy in Dutch. Informed decision-making was analyzed by the multidimensional measure of informed choice. Results. 64% of the study population had adequate knowledge of CRC and CRC screening (low HL 43/71 (61%), adequate HL 47/70 (67%), p > 0.05). 57% were informed decision-makers (low HL 34/71 (55%), adequate HL 39/70 (58%), p > 0.05). Intention to participate was 89% (low HL 63/71 (89%), adequate HL 63/70 (90%)). Respondents with low HL experienced significantly more decisional conflict (25.8 versus 16.1; p = 0.00). Conclusion. Informed decision-making about CRC screening participation was suboptimal among both individuals with low HL and individuals with adequate HL. Further research is required to develop and implement effective strategies to convey decision-relevant knowledge about CRC screening to all screening invitees. PMID:27200089

  19. Recent trends in breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening test utilization in Canada, using self-reported data from 2008 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Major, D; Armstrong, D; Bryant, H; Cheung, W; Decker, K; Doyle, G; Mai, V; McLachlin, C M; Niu, J; Payne, J; Shukla, N

    2015-08-01

    In Canada, self-reported data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2008 and 2012 provide an opportunity to examine overall utilization of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening tests for both programmatic and opportunistic screening. Among women 50-74 years of age, utilization of screening mammography was stable (62.0% in 2008 and 63.0% in 2012). Pap test utilization for women 25-69 years of age remained high and stable across Canada in 2008 and 2012 (78.9% in 2012). The percentage of individuals 50-74 years of age who reporting having at least 1 fecal test within the preceding 2 years increased in 2012 (to 23.0% from 16.9% in 2008), but remains low. Stable rates of screening mammography utilization (about 30%) were reported in 2008 and 2012 among women 40-49 years of age, a group for which population-based screening is not recommended. Although declining over time, cervical cancer screening rates were high for women less than 25 years of age (for whom screening is not recommended). Interestingly, an increased percentage of women 70-74 years of age reported having a Pap test. In 2012, a smaller percentage of women 50-69 years of age reported having no screening test (5.9% vs. 8.5% in 2008), and more women reported having the three types of cancer screening tests (19.0% vs. 13.2%). Efforts to encourage use of screening within the recommended average-risk age groups are needed, and education for stakeholders about the possible harms of screening outside those age groups has to continue. PMID:26300668

  20. Recent trends in breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening test utilization in Canada, using self-reported data from 2008 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Major, D.; Armstrong, D.; Bryant, H.; Cheung, W.; Decker, K.; Doyle, G.; Mai, V.; McLachlin, C.M.; Niu, J; Payne, J.; Shukla, N.

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, self-reported data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2008 and 2012 provide an opportunity to examine overall utilization of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening tests for both programmatic and opportunistic screening. Among women 50–74 years of age, utilization of screening mammography was stable (62.0% in 2008 and 63.0% in 2012). Pap test utilization for women 25–69 years of age remained high and stable across Canada in 2008 and 2012 (78.9% in 2012). The percentage of individuals 50–74 years of age who reporting having at least 1 fecal test within the preceding 2 years increased in 2012 (to 23.0% from 16.9% in 2008), but remains low. Stable rates of screening mammography utilization (about 30%) were reported in 2008 and 2012 among women 40–49 years of age, a group for which population-based screening is not recommended. Although declining over time, cervical cancer screening rates were high for women less than 25 years of age (for whom screening is not recommended). Interestingly, an increased percentage of women 70–74 years of age reported having a Pap test. In 2012, a smaller percentage of women 50–69 years of age reported having no screening test (5.9% vs. 8.5% in 2008), and more women reported having the three types of cancer screening tests (19.0% vs. 13.2%). Efforts to encourage use of screening within the recommended average-risk age groups are needed, and education for stakeholders about the possible harms of screening outside those age groups has to continue. PMID:26300668

  1. Screening and preliminary validation of miRNAs with the regulation of hTERT in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    QIN, YU-ZHOU; XIE, XUE-CHENG; LIU, HAI-ZHOU; LAI, HAO; QIU, HAI; GE, LIAN-YING

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) has been associated with the invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and has received extensive attention, although the underlying mechanism involved remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to screen and preliminarily validate new tumor-suppressor microRNAs (miRNAs) that potentially inhibit hTERT expression and to assess its clinical significance. Screening for downregulated miRNAs in CRC tissues was performed by retrieving and analysing microRNA microarray data. miRNA candidates were then filtered by bioinformatics analysis. The expression of miRNAs candidates was verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in the CRC and corresponding normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used for the detection of hTERT protein expression. Spearman’s correlation coefficient between miRNA candidates and hTERT protein expression was calculated (r) to identify hTERT-targeting miRNAs. A survival analysis was performed to assess the prognostic significance of hTERT-targeting miRNAs in CRC. Eight miRNAs with the potential to interact with hTERT were predicted: miR-29c-3p, miR-124-3p, miR-133a-3p, miR-133b, miR-138-5p, miR-150-5p, miR-378a-3p and miR-422a, respectively. Following detection of the miRNAs using RT-qPCR, miR-29c-3p was excluded. miR-138-5p and miR-422a were observed to potentially interact with hTERT (r=−0.362, P=0.001; r=−0.306, P=0.005, respectively). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrating high- vs. low-expression group of miR-422a showed a highly significant difference in CRC patients (P=0.024), which suggests that the downregulation of miR-422a was associated with a poorer prognosis. The results indicated that miR-138-5p and miR-422a potentially inhibited hTERT expression in CRC, and suggest a potential application of miR-422a in prognosis prediction and CRC treatment. PMID:25845814

  2. Self-perceived Mental Health Status and Uptake of Fecal Occult Blood Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening in Canada: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hategekimana, Celestin; Karamouzian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: While colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most preventable causes of cancer mortality, it is one of the leading causes of cancer death in Canada where CRC screening uptake is suboptimal. Given the increased rate of mortality and morbidity among mental health patients, their condition could be a potential barrier to CRC screening due to greater difficulties in adhering to behaviours related to long-term health goals. Using a population-based study among Canadians, we hypothesize that self-perceived mental health (SPMH) status and fecal occult blood test (FOBT) uptake for the screening of CRC are associated. Methods: The current study is cross-sectional and utilised data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2011-2012. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was undertaken to assess whether SPMH is independently associated with FOBT uptake among a representative sample of 11 386 respondents aged 50-74 years. Results: Nearly half of the respondents reported having ever had FOBT for CRC screening, including 37.28% who have been screened within two years of the survey and 12.41% who had been screened more than two years preceding the survey. Respondents who reported excellent mental health were more likely to have ever been screened two years or more before the survey (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.08; 95% CI, 1.00-4.43) and to have been screened in the last two years preceding the survey (AOR = 1.53; 95% CI, 0.86-2.71) than those reported poor mental health status. Conclusion: This study supports the association between SPMH status and FOBT uptake for CRC screening. While the efforts to maximize CRC screening uptake should be deployed to all eligible people, those with poor mental health may need more attention. PMID:27285514

  3. Examining Factors Influencing Colorectal Cancer Screening of Rural Nebraskans Using Data from Clinics Participating in an Accountable Care Organization: A Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Young, Lufei; Kim, Jungyoon; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Li-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although mortality rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) can be significantly reduced through increased screening, rural communities are still experiencing lower rates of screening compared to urban counterparts. Understanding and eliminating barriers to cancer screening will decrease cancer burden and lead to substantial gains in quality and quantity of life for rural populations. However, existing studies have shown inconsistent findings and fail to address how contextual and provider-level factors impact CRC screening in addition to individual-level factors.  Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine multi-level factors related to CRC screening, and providers’ perception of barriers and facilitators of CRC screening in rural patients cared for by accountable care organization (ACO) clinics. Methods/Design: This is a convergent mixed method design. For the quantitative component, multiple data sources, such as electronic health records (EHRs), Area Resource File (ARF), and provider survey data, will be used to examine patient-, provider-, clinic-, and county-level factors. About 21,729 rural patients aged between 50 and 75 years who visited the participating ACO clinics in the past 12 months are included in the quantitative analysis. The qualitative methods include semi-structured in-depth interviews with healthcare professionals in selected rural clinics. Both quantitative and qualitative data will be merged for result interpretation. Quantitative data identifies “what” factors influence CRC screening, while qualitative data explores “how” these factors interact with CRC screening. The study setting is 10 ACO clinics located in nine rural Nebraska counties. Discussion: This will be the first study examining multi-level factors related to CRC screening in the new healthcare delivery system (i.e., ACO clinics) in rural communities. The study findings will enhance our understanding of how the ACO model, particularly in rural areas, interacts

  4. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Informed Cancer Home Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... helps pay for colorectal cancer screening. Ask Your Doctor Do I need to get a screening test ...

  5. Communicating the Benefits and Harms of Colorectal Cancer Screening Needed for an Informed Choice: A Systematic Evaluation of Leaflets and Booklets

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Maren; Borutta, Birgit; Seidel, Gabriele; Münch, Inga; Kramer, Silke; Töppich, Jürgen; Dierks, Marie-Luise; Walter, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evidence-based health information (EBHI) can support informed choice regarding whether or not to attend colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. The present study aimed to assess if German leaflets and booklets appropriately inform consumers on the benefits and harms of CRC screening. Methods A systematic search for print media on CRC screening was performed via email enquiry and internet search. The identified documents were assessed for the presence and correctness of information on benefits and harms by two reviewers independently using a comprehensive list of criteria. Results Many of the 28 leaflets and 13 booklets identified presented unbalanced information on the benefits and harms of CRC screening: one-third did not provide any information on harms. Numeracy information was often lacking. Ten cross-language examples of common misinterpretations or basically false and misleading information were identified. Discussion Most of the CRC screening leaflets and booklets in Germany do not meet current EBHI standards. After the study, the publishers of the information materials were provided feedback, including a discussion of our findings. The results can be used to revise existing information materials or to develop new materials that provide correct, balanced, quantified, understandable and unbiased information on CRC screening. PMID:25215867

  6. Increasing late stage colorectal cancer and rectal cancer mortality demonstrates the need for screening: a population based study in Ireland, 1994-2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes trends in colorectal cancer incidence, survival and mortality from 1994 to 2010 in Ireland prior to the introduction of population-based screening. Methods We examined incidence (National Cancer Registry Ireland (NCRI) and mortality (Central Statistics Office) from 1994 to 2010. Age standardised rates (ASR) for incidence and mortality have been calculated, weighted by the European standard population. Annual percentage change was calculated in addition to testing for linear trends in treatment and case fraction of early and late stage disease. Relative survival was calculated considering deaths from all causes. Results The colorectal cancer ASR was 63.7 per 100,000 in males and 38.7 per 100,000 in females in 2010. There was little change in the ASR over time in either sex, or when colon and rectal cancers were considered separately; however the number of incident cancers increased significantly during 1994-2010 (1752 to 2298). The case fractions of late stage (III/IV) colon and rectal cancers rose significantly over time. One and 5 year relative survival improved for both sexes between the periods 1994-2008. Colorectal cancer mortality ASRs decreased annually from 1994-2009 by 1.8% (95% CI -2.2, -1.4). Rectal cancer mortality ASRs rose annually by 2.4% (95% CI 1.1, 3.6) and 2.8% (95% CI 1.2, 4.4) in males and females respectively. Conclusions Increases in late-stage disease and rectal cancer mortality demonstrate an urgent need for colorectal cancer screening. However, the narrow age range at which screening is initially being rolled-out in Ireland means that the full potential for reductions in late-stage cancers and incidence and mortality are unlikely to be achieved. While it is possible that the observed increase in rectal cancer mortality may be partly an artefact of cause of death misclassification, it could also be explained by variations in treatment and adherence to best practice guidelines; further investigation is

  7. Screening of aptamers specific to colorectal cancer cells and stem cells by utilizing On-chip Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Lien-Yu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Che, Yu-Jui; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer around the world, causing about 700,000 deaths every year. It is clear now that a small fraction of CRC, named colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs) exhibiting self-renewal and extensive proliferative activities, are hard to be eradicated. Unfortunately, highly specific biomarkers for colorectal CSC (CR-CSCs) are lacking that prohibits the development of effective therapeutic strategies. This study designed and manufactured a novel microfluidic system capable of performing a fully automated cell-based, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process. Eight CR-CSC/CRC-specific aptamers were successfully selected using the microfluidic chip. Three of the aptamers showed high affinities towards their respective target cells with a dissociation constant of 27.4, 28.5 and 12.3 nM, which are comparable to that of antibodies. PMID:25999049

  8. Comparison of Fecal Occult Blood Tests for Colorectal Cancer Screening in an Alaska Native Population With High Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection, 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Ellen; Asay, Elvin; Roberts, Diana; Haverkamp, Donald; Perdue, David; Bruce, Michael G.; Sacco, Frank; Espey, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Alaska Native colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. CRC screening using guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests (gFOBT) are not recommended for Alaska Native people because of false-positive results associated with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated hemorrhagic gastritis. This study evaluated whether the newer immunochemical FOBT (iFOBT) resulted in a lower false-positive rate and higher specificity for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasia than gFOBT in a population with elevated prevalence of H. pylori infection. Methods We used a population-based sample of 304 asymptomatic Alaska Native adults aged 40 years or older undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy (April 2008–January 2012). Results Specificity differed significantly (P < .001) between gFOBT (76%; 95% CI, 71%–81%) and iFOBT (92%; 95% CI, 89%–96%). Among H. pylori-positive participants (54%), specificity of iFOBT was even higher (93% vs 69%). Overall, sensitivity did not differ significantly (P = .73) between gFOBT (29%) and iFOBT (36%). Positive predictive value was 11% for gFOBT and 32% for iFOBT. Conclusion The iFOBT had a significantly higher specificity than gFOBT, especially in participants with current H. pylori infection. The iFOBT represents a potential strategy for expanding CRC screening among Alaska Native and other populations with elevated prevalence of H. pylori, especially where access to screening endoscopy is limited. PMID:24721216

  9. Evidence-based Guidelines for Precision Risk Stratification-Based Screening (PRSBS) for Colorectal Cancer: Lessons learned from the US Armed Forces: Consensus and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Avital, Itzhak; Langan, Russell C.; Summers, Thomas A.; Steele, Scott R.; Waldman, Scott A.; Backman, Vadim; Yee, Judy; Nissan, Aviram; Young, Patrick; Womeldorph, Craig; Mancusco, Paul; Mueller, Renee; Noto, Khristian; Grundfest, Warren; Bilchik, Anton J.; Protic, Mladjan; Daumer, Martin; Eberhardt, John; Man, Yan Gao; Brücher, Björn LDM; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States (U.S.), with estimates of 143,460 new cases and 51,690 deaths for the year 2012. Numerous organizations have published guidelines for CRC screening; however, these numerical estimates of incidence and disease-specific mortality have remained stable from years prior. Technological, genetic profiling, molecular and surgical advances in our modern era should allow us to improve risk stratification of patients with CRC and identify those who may benefit from preventive measures, early aggressive treatment, alternative treatment strategies, and/or frequent surveillance for the early detection of disease recurrence. To better negotiate future economic constraints and enhance patient outcomes, ultimately, we propose to apply the principals of personalized and precise cancer care to risk-stratify patients for CRC screening (Precision Risk Stratification-Based Screening, PRSBS). We believe that genetic, molecular, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities impact oncological outcomes in general, those related to CRC, in particular. This document highlights evidence-based screening recommendations and risk stratification methods in response to our CRC working group private-public consensus meeting held in March 2012. Our aim was to address how we could improve CRC risk stratification-based screening, and to provide a vision for the future to achieving superior survival rates for patients diagnosed with CRC. PMID:23459409

  10. Heterogeneous Demographic and Cultural Profiles of Non-adherent Chinese-American Patients to Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Carol; Ji, Cheng Shuang; Liang, Wenchi; Ma, Grace; Brown, Roger; Wang, Judy Huei-yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death for Chinese Americans, but their CRC screening rates remain low. Objective We examined subgroups of Chinese-American patients non-adherent to CRC screening guidelines to better inform clinical practices to effectively promote screening. Methods Using latent class analysis (LCA) of data from 327 participants recruited from 18 primary care clinics, we classified non-adherent patients based on sociodemographics, screening barriers, attitudinal and clinical factors for CRC screening. Results The best-fitting LCA model described three distinctive classes: Western Healthcare Class (WHC, 35%), Eastern Healthcare Class (EHC, 18%) and Mixed Healthcare Class (MHC, 46%). WHC patients were highly-educated with average 20 years of U.S. residency, high level of English proficiency, the least Eastern cultural views of care and the greatest exposure to physician recommendations, but reported having no time for screenings. EHC patients were highly-educated seniors and recent immigrants with the least CRC knowledge and the more Eastern cultural views. MHC patients had low level of education, resided in the U.S. for 20 years, and had relatively long relationships with physicians, but their knowledge and cultural views were similar to those of EHC patients. Conclusions Non-adherent Chinese-American patients are heterogeneous. It is essential to have future intervention programs tailored to address specific screening beliefs and barriers for subtypes of non-adherent patients. Implications for Practice Training primary care physicians to recognize patients’ different demographic characteristics and healthcare beliefs may facilitate physician’s communication with patients to overcome their barriers and improve screening behaviors. PMID:23519040

  11. Cost-effectiveness of population-based screening for colorectal cancer: a comparison of guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing, faecal immunochemical testing and flexible sigmoidoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, L; Tilson, L; Whyte, S; O'Ceilleachair, A; Walsh, C; Usher, C; Tappenden, P; Chilcott, J; Staines, A; Barry, M; Comber, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several colorectal cancer-screening tests are available, but it is uncertain which provides the best balance of risks and benefits within a screening programme. We evaluated cost-effectiveness of a population-based screening programme in Ireland based on (i) biennial guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) at ages 55–74, with reflex faecal immunochemical testing (FIT); (ii) biennial FIT at ages 55–74; and (iii) once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSIG) at age 60. Methods: A state-transition model was used to estimate costs and outcomes for each screening scenario vs no screening. A third party payer perspective was adopted. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken. Results: All scenarios would be considered highly cost-effective compared with no screening. The lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER vs no screening €589 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained) was found for FSIG, followed by FIT (€1696) and gFOBT (€4428); gFOBT was dominated. Compared with FSIG, FIT was associated with greater gains in QALYs and reductions in lifetime cancer incidence and mortality, but was more costly, required considerably more colonoscopies and resulted in more complications. Results were robust to variations in parameter estimates. Conclusion: Population-based screening based on FIT is expected to result in greater health gains than a policy of gFOBT (with reflex FIT) or once-only FSIG, but would require significantly more colonoscopy resources and result in more individuals experiencing adverse effects. Weighing these advantages and disadvantages presents a considerable challenge to policy makers. PMID:22343624

  12. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  13. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  16. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  17. General Information about Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  18. Comparing the effect of a decision aid plus patient navigation with usual care on colorectal cancer screening completion in vulnerable populations: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Screening can reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality. However, screening is underutilized in vulnerable patient populations, particularly among Latinos. Patient-directed decision aids can increase CRC screening knowledge, self-efficacy, and intent; however, their effect on actual screening test completion tends to be modest. This is probably because decision aids do not address some of the patient-specific barriers that prevent successful completion of CRC screening in these populations. These individual barriers might be addressed though patient navigation interventions. This study will test a combined decision aid and patient navigator intervention on screening completion in diverse populations of vulnerable primary care patients. Methods/Design We will conduct a multisite, randomized controlled trial with patient-level randomization. Planned enrollment is 300 patients aged 50 to 75 years at average CRC risk presenting for appointments at two primary clinics in North Carolina and New Mexico. Intervention participants will view a video decision aid immediately before the clinic visit. The 14 to 16 minute video presents information about fecal occult blood tests and colonoscopy and will be viewed on a portable computer tablet in English or Spanish. Clinic-based patient navigators are bilingual and bicultural and will provide both face-to-face and telephone-based navigation. Control participants will view an unrelated food safety video and receive usual care. The primary outcome is completion of a CRC screening test at six months. Planned subgroup analyses include examining intervention effectiveness in Latinos, who will be oversampled. Secondarily, the trial will evaluate the intervention effects on knowledge of CRC screening, self-efficacy, intent, and patient-provider communication. The study will also examine whether patient ethnicity, acculturation, language preference, or health insurance status moderate the intervention effect on

  19. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kakushima, Naomi; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. Three steps characterize it: injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the lesion, cutting the surrounding mucosa of the lesion, and dissecting the submucosa beneath the lesion. The ESD technique has rapidly permeated in Japan for treatment of early gastric cancer, due to its excellent results of en-bloc resection compared to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Although there is still room for improvement to lessen its technical difficulty, ESD has recently been applied to esophageal and colorectal neoplasms. Favorable short-term results have been reported, but the application of ESD should be well considered by three aspects: (1) the possibility of nodal metastases of the lesion, (2) technical difficulty such as location, ulceration and operator’s skill, and (3) organ characteristics. PMID:18494043

  20. Worldwide variations in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Center, Melissa M; Jemal, Ahmedin; Smith, Robert A; Ward, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented significant international variations in colorectal cancer rates. However, these studies were limited because they were based on old data or examined only incidence or mortality data. In this article, the colorectal cancer burden and patterns worldwide are described using the most recently updated cancer incidence and mortality data available from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The authors provide 5-year (1998-2002), age-standardized colorectal cancer incidence rates for select cancer registries in IARC's Cancer Incidence in Five Continents, and trends in age-standardized death rates by single calendar year for select countries in the World Health Organization mortality database. In addition, available information regarding worldwide colorectal cancer screening initiatives are presented. The highest colorectal cancer incidence rates in 1998-2002 were observed in registries from North America, Oceania, and Europe, including Eastern European countries. These high rates are most likely the result of increases in risk factors associated with "Westernization," such as obesity and physical inactivity. In contrast, the lowest colorectal cancer incidence rates were observed from registries in Asia, Africa, and South America. Colorectal cancer mortality rates have declined in many longstanding as well as newly economically developed countries; however, they continue to increase in some low-resource countries of South America and Eastern Europe. Various screening options for colorectal cancer are available and further international consideration of targeted screening programs and/or recommendations could help alleviate the burden of colorectal cancer worldwide. PMID:19897840

  1. Testicular neoplasm diagnosed by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Senay, B A; Stein, B S

    1986-06-01

    The diagnosis of testicular cancer is usually made by the findings of a testicular mass on physical examination. In rare cases a young man will present with retroperitoneal nodes and a normal testicular examination. In such cases a testicular ultrasound may localize the testis which harbors a subclinical neoplasm. In addition serum markers of B-HCG and AFP are essential. As a screening procedure a urine pregnancy test is helpful, since it can be obtained quickly while quantitative B-HCG and APF results are delayed. PMID:3523046

  2. Associations of beta-catenin alterations and MSI screening status with expression of key cell cycle regulating proteins and survival from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite their pivotal roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, the interrelationship and prognostic significance of beta-catenin alterations and microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer (CRC) needs to be further clarified. In this paper, we studied the associations between beta-catenin overexpression and MSI status with survival from CRC, and with expression of p21, p27, cyclin D1 and p53, in a large, prospective cohort study. Methods Immunohistochemical MSI-screening status and expression of p21, p27 and p53 was assessed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 557 cases of incident CRC in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Chi Square and Spearman’s correlation tests were used to explore the associations between beta-catenin expression, MSI status, clinicopathological characteristics and investigative parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the relationship between beta-catenin overexpression, MSI status and cancer specific survival (CSS). Results Positive MSI screening status was significantly associated with older age, female sex, proximal tumour location, non-metastatic disease, and poor differentiation, and inversely associated with beta-catenin overexpression. Beta-catenin overexpression was significantly associated with distal tumour location, low T-stage and well-differentiated tumours. Patients with MSI tumours had a significantly prolonged CSS in the whole cohort, and in stage III-IV disease, also in multivariable analysis, but not in stage I-II disease. Beta-catenin overexpression was associated with a favourable prognosis in the full cohort and in patients with stage III-IV disease. Neither MSI nor beta-catenin status were predictive for response to adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively treated stage III patients. P53 and p27 expression was positively associated with beta-catenin overexpression and inversely associated with MSI. Cyclin D1 expression was positively associated with MSI

  3. Cytokine gene polymorphisms, cytokine levels and the risk of colorectal neoplasia in a screened population of Northeast Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraju, U; Shebl, FM; Palmer, AJ; Berry, S; Hold, GL; El-Omar, EM; Rabkin, CS

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Cytokine gene polymorphisms modify expression and their circulating protein levels reflect inflammatory response. Chronic inflammation plays key role in pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia (CRN) associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is not clear if inflammation is a cause or effect of tumours in sporadic CRN. We therefore investigated association of cytokine gene polymorphisms and circulating cytokine levels on risk of CRN in North East Scotland, which has a high incidence of CRN. Methods We recruited two groups of subjects from a screening colonoscopy cohort, either pre-procedure or 3–24 months post-procedure. Participants with (CRN) were compared to participants with no evidence of CRN (controls). Blood-derived DNA was used to genotype polymorphisms in IL1B, IL1-RN, IL6, IL8, IL10, PTGS2 and TNFA genes. Circulating levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) and 6 cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-alpha) were measured. In order to examine effect of CRN resection on marker levels, we used propensity score matching. Results There were 884 subjects eligible for analysis, including 388 CRN cases and 496 controls. Cases were older (mean age 64 vs. 62 yrs, p<0.01) and more likely to be male (67% vs. 55%, p<0.001). Controls were more likely to be regular users of NSAID (p<0.0001). Compared to homozygous carriage of respective common alleles, pro-inflammatory CC genotypes of IL1B-31 C>T [OR (95% CI) 1.68 (1.03–2.73)] and PTGS2-765 C>G [OR (95% CI) 2.97 (1.05–8.46)] were each associated with increased CRN risk. Conversely, carriage of the A allele of IL8-251 A>T was associated with lower CRN risk compared to the TT genotype [ORs (95% CI) 0.60 (0.41–0.86) for heterozygous, 0.88 (0.57–1.37) for homozygous, and 0.68 (0.48–0.95) for heterozygous and homozygous combined]. Compared to post-procedure cases, IL8, TNFα, and CRP levels were significantly higher in pre-procedure cases, but IL4 and IL

  4. Physician recommendation for colorectal cancer screening by race, ethnicity, and health insurance status among men and women in the United States, 2000.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Thompson, Trevor

    2005-10-01

    In this study, the authors examined whether men and women in the United States had received a physician recommendation to get a colorectal cancer screening test, by race, ethnicity, and health insurance status using data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey. Among men and women who had had a doctor visit in the past year but who had not had a recent fecal occult blood test, about 94.6% (95% CI 94.0-95.2) reported that their doctor had not recommended the test in the past year. African Americans, Hispanics, and American Indians/Alaska Natives were less likely to report receiving a recommendation for endoscopy compared to Whites. PMID:16210678

  5. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial: Questions and Answers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Key Points The PLCO Cancer Screening Trial is a large, randomized study to determine whether the use of certain screening tests will reduce the risk of dying of those four cancers.  (Question 1) PLCO results showed that: |

  6. Reducing the Social Gradient in Uptake of the NHS Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme Using a Narrative-Based Information Leaflet: A Cluster-Randomised Trial.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Lesley M; von Wagner, Christian; Atkin, Wendy; Kralj-Hans, Ines; Halloran, Stephen P; Handley, Graham; Logan, Richard F; Rainbow, Sandra; Smith, Steve; Snowball, Julia; Thomas, Mary C; Smith, Samuel G; Vart, Gemma; Howe, Rosemary; Counsell, Nicholas; Hackshaw, Allan; Morris, Stephen; Duffy, Stephen W; Raine, Rosalind; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To test the effectiveness of adding a narrative leaflet to the current information material delivered by the NHS English colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme on reducing socioeconomic inequalities in uptake. Participants. 150,417 adults (59-74 years) routinely invited to complete the guaiac Faecal Occult Blood test (gFOBt) in March 2013. Design. A cluster randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN74121020) to compare uptake between two arms. The control arm received the standard NHS CRC screening information material (SI) and the intervention arm received the standard information plus a supplementary narrative leaflet, which had previously been shown to increase screening intentions (SI + N). Between group comparisons were made for uptake overall and across socioeconomic status (SES). Results. Uptake was 57.7% and did not differ significantly between the two trial arms (SI: 58.5%; SI + N: 56.7%; odds ratio = 0.93; 95% confidence interval: 0.81-1.06; p = 0.27). There was no interaction between group and SES quintile (p = 0.44). Conclusions. Adding a narrative leaflet to existing information materials does not reduce the SES gradient in uptake. Despite the benefits of using a pragmatic trial design, the need to add to, rather than replace, existing information may have limited the true value of an evidence-based intervention on behaviour. PMID:27069473

  7. Reducing the Social Gradient in Uptake of the NHS Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme Using a Narrative-Based Information Leaflet: A Cluster-Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Lesley M.; von Wagner, Christian; Atkin, Wendy; Kralj-Hans, Ines; Halloran, Stephen P.; Handley, Graham; Logan, Richard F.; Rainbow, Sandra; Smith, Steve; Snowball, Julia; Thomas, Mary C.; Smith, Samuel G.; Vart, Gemma; Howe, Rosemary; Counsell, Nicholas; Hackshaw, Allan; Morris, Stephen; Duffy, Stephen W.; Raine, Rosalind; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To test the effectiveness of adding a narrative leaflet to the current information material delivered by the NHS English colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme on reducing socioeconomic inequalities in uptake. Participants. 150,417 adults (59–74 years) routinely invited to complete the guaiac Faecal Occult Blood test (gFOBt) in March 2013. Design. A cluster randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN74121020) to compare uptake between two arms. The control arm received the standard NHS CRC screening information material (SI) and the intervention arm received the standard information plus a supplementary narrative leaflet, which had previously been shown to increase screening intentions (SI + N). Between group comparisons were made for uptake overall and across socioeconomic status (SES). Results. Uptake was 57.7% and did not differ significantly between the two trial arms (SI: 58.5%; SI + N: 56.7%; odds ratio = 0.93; 95% confidence interval: 0.81–1.06; p = 0.27). There was no interaction between group and SES quintile (p = 0.44). Conclusions. Adding a narrative leaflet to existing information materials does not reduce the SES gradient in uptake. Despite the benefits of using a pragmatic trial design, the need to add to, rather than replace, existing information may have limited the true value of an evidence-based intervention on behaviour. PMID:27069473

  8. Self-rated health is prospectively associated with uptake of screening for the early detection of colorectal cancer, not vice versa.

    PubMed

    Neter, Efrat; Stein, Nili; Rennert, Gad; Hagoel, Lea

    2016-07-01

    Self-rated health (SRH) is a consistent predictor of mortality and other health outcomes. One of the mechanisms hypothesized to explain its validity as a predictor is that SRH affects the adoption of health behaviors. The present study examined the prospective association between SRH and performance of a recommended colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test. One thousand four hundred and seventy-six men and women aged 50-74 years, eligible for CRC screening, who had undergone the test a year before were interviewed 1-2 weeks (long interview, before testing) or 2 months (short interview, after testing) following the mailing of a test kit. Test performance was ascertained using an HMO's computerized data set. Respondents in the long interview group who rated their health as 'higher than others' performed the screening test 2 months following the invitation more than those who rated their health as similar to or lower than that of others (65.4, 61.6, and 49.1%, respectively, χ=8.02, P=0.018). At the same time, these respondents perceived the risk of CRC as significantly lower than that of those who rated their health as comparable with or lower than that of others. In a multivariate logistic regression of CRC screening behavior that included demographic and perceptual variables, age, intentions, and SRH were found to be significant predictors. Among respondents in the short interview, who tested before the interview, there was no significant association between SRH and behavior. SRH prospectively predicts uptake of CRC screening better than other perceptual variables, after accounting for demographic variables. PMID:26230609

  9. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Peter; Leon, Maria Elena

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a important public health problem: there are nearly one million new cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed world-wide each year and half a million deaths. Recent reports show that, in the US, it was the most frequent form of cancer among persons aged 75 years and older. Given that the majority of cancers occur in elder people and with the ageing of the population in mind, this observation gives further impetus to investigating prevention and treatment strategies among this subgroup of the population. Screening research, recommendations and implementation is an obvious priority. While there are many questions to be resolved, it is apparent that many facets of colorectal cancer are becoming increasingly understood and prospects for prevention are becoming apparent. Achieving colorectal cancer control is the immediate challenge. PMID:12421722

  10. Colorectal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... SJ, et al. United States Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after ... consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Gastroenterology . 2012;143:844-857. ...

  11. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  12. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  13. [Epidemiology of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer increased in France until the 2000s' then decreased. Time trends in incidence for this cancer varied according to its sublocation along the gut. Incidence increased for right and left colon cancers, whereas it remained stable for sigmoid cancers in males and decreased in females. Incidence decreased over time for rectal cancers. The proportion of colorectal cancer in the overall French cancer prevalence is 12%. In 2008, 121,000 patients had a colorectal cancer diagnosed in the 5 previous years. The cumulative risk of colorectal cancer increased from 3.9% for males born around 1900 to 4.9% for those born around 1930 and then slightly decreased, being 4.5% among those born around 1950. It remained at the same level for females and was 2.9% for those born around 1950. The prognosis of colorectal cancer improved over time. Net 5-year survival increased in males from 53% for cancers diagnosed between 1989 and 1991 to 58% for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2004. The highest improvement of 10 year survival rates concerned left colon and rectosigmoid junction (+19% in a decade). The progressive set up of national colorectal screening since the early 2000's and the introduction of recent immunological tests in 2015 should decrease the mortality for this cancer and, at term, should decrease its incidence too. PMID:26298897

  14. The relevance of unrelated costs internal and external to the healthcare sector to the outcome of a cost-comparison analysis of secondary prevention: the case of general colorectal cancer screening in the German population.

    PubMed

    Tscheulin, Dieter K; Drevs, Florian

    2010-04-01

    The potential of secondary prevention measures, such as cancer screening, to produce cost savings in the healthcare sector is a controversial issue in healthcare economics. Potential savings are calculated by comparing treatment costs with the cost of a prevention program. When survivors' subsequent unrelated health care costs are included in the calculation, however, the overall cost of disease prevention rises. What have not been studied to date are the secondary effects of fatal disease prevention measures on social security systems. From the perspective of a policy maker responsible for a social security system budget, it is not only future healthcare costs that are relevant for budgeting, but also changes in the contributions to, and expenditures from, statutory pension insurance and health insurance systems. An examination of the effect of longer life expectancies on these insurance systems can be justified by the fact that European social security systems are regulated by the state, and there is no clear separation between the financing of individual insurance systems due to cross-subsidisation. This paper looks at how the results of cost-comparison analyses vary depending on the inclusion or exclusion of future healthcare and non-healthcare costs, using the example of colorectal cancer screening in the German general population. In contrast to previous studies, not only are future unrelated medical costs considered, but also the effects on the social security system. If a German colorectal cancer screening program were implemented, and unrelated future medical care were excluded from the cost-benefit analysis, savings of up to 548 million euros per year would be expected. The screening program would, at the same time, generate costs in the healthcare sector as well as in the social security system of 2,037 million euros per year. Because the amount of future contributions and expenditures in the social security system depends on the age and gender of the

  15. A randomized trial to increase colonoscopy screening in members of high risk families in the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry and Cancer Genetics Network

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jan T; Horick, Nora; Kinney, Anita Y; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Garrett, Kathleen; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Sandler, Robert S.; Burke, Carol; Hill, Deirdre A.; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with a strong family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) have significant risk for CRC, though adherence to colonoscopy screening in these groups remains low. This study assessed whether a tailored, telephone counseling intervention can increase adherence to colonoscopy in members of high risk families in a randomized, controlled trial. Methods Eligible participants were recruited from two national cancer registries if they had a first-degree relative with CRC under age 60 or multiple affected family members, which included families that met Amsterdam criteria for Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colon Cancer, and if they were due for colonoscopy within 24-months. Participants were randomized to receive a tailored, telephone intervention grounded in behavioral theory or a mailed packet with general information about screening. Colonoscopy status was assessed through follow-up surveys and endoscopy reports. Cox-proportional hazards models were used to assess intervention effect. Results Of the 632 participants (aged 25–80), 60% were female, the majority were White, non-Hispanic, educated and had health insurance. Colonoscopy adherence increased 11 percentage points in the tailored, telephone intervention group, compared to no significant change in the mailed group. The telephone intervention was associated with a 32% increase in screening adherence compared to the mailed intervention (Hazard Ratio=1.32; p=0.01). Conclusions A tailored, telephone intervention can effectively increase colonoscopy adherence in high risk persons. This intervention has the potential for broad dissemination to health-care organizations or other high risk populations. Impact Increasing adherence to colonoscopy among persons with increased CRC risk could effectively reduce incidence and mortality from this disease. PMID:24501379

  16. Relationship Between Male Pattern Baldness and the Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer: An Analysis of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Cleary, Sean D.; Hoffman, Heather J.; Levine, Paul H.; Chu, Lisa W.; Hsing, Ann W.; Cook, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Male pattern baldness and prostate cancer appear to share common pathophysiologic mechanisms. However, results from previous studies that assess their relationship have been inconsistent. Therefore, we investigated the association of male pattern baldness at age 45 years with risks of overall and subtypes of prostate cancer in a large, prospective cohort—the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Methods We included 39,070 men from the usual care and screening arms of the trial cohort who had no cancer diagnosis (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer) at the start of follow-up and recalled their hair-loss patterns at age 45 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated by using Cox proportional hazards regression models with age as the time metric. Results During follow-up (median, 2.78 years), 1,138 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed, 571 of which were aggressive (biopsy Gleason score ≥ 7, and/or clinical stage III or greater, and/or fatal). Compared with no baldness, frontal plus moderate vertex baldness at age 45 years was not significantly associated with overall (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.45) or nonaggressive (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.30) prostate cancer risk but was significantly associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.80). Adjustment for covariates did not substantially alter these estimates. Other classes of baldness were not significantly associated with overall or subtypes of prostate cancer. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that frontal plus moderate vertex baldness at age 45 years is associated with an increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer and supports the possibility of common pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:25225425

  17. Training primary care physicians to offer their patients faecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening on an equal basis: a pilot intervention with before–after and parallel group surveys

    PubMed Central

    Cornuz, Jacques; Gachoud, David; Bulliard, Jean-Luc; Nichita, Cristina; Dorta, Gian; Ducros, Cyril; Auer, Reto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Primary care physicians (PCPs) should prescribe faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) or colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening based on their patient's values and preferences. However, there are wide variations between PCPs in the screening method prescribed. The objective was to assess the impact of an educational intervention on PCPs’ intent to offer FIT or colonoscopy on an equal basis. Design Survey before and after training seminars, with a parallel comparison through a mailed survey to PCPs not attending the training seminars. Setting All PCPs in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. Participants Of 592 eligible PCPs, 133 (22%) attended a seminar and 106 (80%) filled both surveys. 109 (24%) PCPs who did not attend the seminars returned the mailed survey. Intervention A 2 h-long interactive seminar targeting PCP knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding offering a choice of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening options. Outcome measures The primary outcome was PCP intention of having their patients screened with FIT and colonoscopy in equal proportions (between 40% and 60% each). Secondary outcomes were the perceived role of PCPs in screening decisions (from paternalistic to informed decision-making) and correct answer to a clinical vignette. Results Before the seminars, 8% of PCPs reported that they had equal proportions of their patients screened for CRC by FIT and colonoscopy; after the seminar, 33% foresaw having their patients screened in equal proportions (p<0.001). Among those not attending, there was no change (13% vs 14%, p=0.8). Of those attending, there was no change in their perceived role in screening decisions, while the proportion responding correctly to a clinical vignette increased (88–99%, p<0.001). Conclusions An interactive training seminar increased the proportion of physicians with the intention to prescribe FIT and colonoscopy in equal proportions. PMID:27178977

  18. Screening for colorectal cancer: the rationale and a recent advance in the detection of fecal occult blood.

    PubMed

    Friend, W G

    1985-01-01

    For the very first time, an occult blood test has been designed to conform to convenient and natural bathroom habits. For the very first time, we therefore expect the general public to agree willingly to participate in occult blood testing. For the very first time, we expect Early Detector to successfully screen the general public, so that survival rates from colon and rectal cancer may show a significant improvement in the next decade. PMID:4034607

  19. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  20. Methodological approaches to population based research of screening procedures in the presence of selection bias and exposure measurement error: colonoscopy and colorectal cancer outcomes in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study describes the methodological challenges encountered in an observational study estimating the effectiveness of colonoscopy in reducing colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality. Methods Using Ontario provincial administrative data, we conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study to assess CRC incidence and mortality in a group of average-risk subjects aged 50–74 years who underwent colonoscopy between 1996–2000. We created two study cohorts; unselected and restricted. The unselected cohort consists of subjects aged 50–74 years who were eligible for CRC screening and who had the same primary care physician (PCP) during the period 1996–2000 with at least two years of follow-up. PCPs are general practioners/family physicians who are the main source of health care for Ontarians. The restricted cohort was a nested sample of unselected cohort who were alive and free of CRC as on January 1, 2001 and whose PCPs had at least 10 screen-eligible patients with a colonoscopy referral rate of more than 3%. We compared the outcomes in the two study cohorts; unselected vs. restricted. We then estimated the absolute risk reduction associated with colonoscopy in preventing CRC incidence and mortality in the restricted cohort, using traditional regression analysis, propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis. Results The unselected cohort (N = 1,341,612) showed that colonoscopy was associated with an increase in CRC incidence (1.61% vs. 4.61%) and mortality (0.36% vs. 1.16%), whereas the restricted cohort (N = 1,089,998) showed that colonoscopy was associated with a reduction in CRC incidence (1.36% vs. 0.84%) and mortality (0.23% vs. 0.15%). For CRC incidence, the absolute risk reduction (ARR) associated with colonoscopy use was 0.52% in an unadjusted model, 0.53% in a multivariate logistic regression model, 0.54% in a propensity score-weighted outcome model, 0.56% in propensity score-matched model, and 0

  1. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Beiderwellen, K; Sabet, A; Lauenstein, T C; Lahner, H; Poeppel, T D

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. PMID:27003413

  2. The MLH1 c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A) Variant in Colorectal Cancer: Genetic Association Study in 18,723 Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Bujanda, Luis; Muñoz, Jenifer; Buch, Stephan; Schafmayer, Clemens; Valeria Maiorana, Maria; Veneroni, Silvia; van Wezel, Tom; Liu, Tao; Westers, Helga; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Ocaña, Teresa; Piqué, Josep M.; Andreu, Montserrat; Jover, Rodrigo; Carracedo, Angel; Xicola, Rosa M.; Llor, Xavier; Castells, Antoni; Dunlop, Malcolm; Hofstra, Robert; Lindblom, Annika; Wijnen, Juul; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hampe, Jochen; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms and an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Mendelian syndromes account for about 5% of the total burden of CRC, being Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis the most common forms. Lynch syndrome tumors develop mainly as a consequence of defective DNA mismatch repair associated with germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. A significant proportion of variants identified by screening these genes correspond to missense or noncoding changes without a clear pathogenic consequence, and they are designated as “variants of uncertain significance”, being the c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A) variant in the MLH1 gene a clear example. The implication of this variant as a low-penetrance risk variant for CRC was assessed in the present study by performing a case-control study within a large cohort from the COGENT consortium-COST Action BM1206 including 18,723 individuals (8,055 colorectal cancer cases and 10,668 controls) and a case-only genotype-phenotype correlation with several clinical and pathological characteristics restricted to the Epicolon cohort. Our results showed no involvement of this variant as a low-penetrance variant for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility and no association with any clinical and pathological characteristics including family history for this neoplasm or Lynch syndrome. PMID:24743384

  3. High-throughput RNAi screening of human kinases identifies predictors of clinical outcome in colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ajian; Tang, Erjiang; Peng, Jian; Tang, Wenxian; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Liang; Xiao, Yihua; Wei, Qing; Yin, Lu; Li, Huaguang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify protein kinase genes that modulate oxaliplatin cytotoxicity in vitro and evaluate the roles of these genes in predicting clinical outcomes in CRC patients receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. A high-throughput RNAi screening targeting 626 human kinase genes was performed to identify kinase genes whose inhibition potentiates oxaliplatin sensitivity in CRC cells. The associations between copy numbers of the candidate genes and recurrence-free survival and overall survival were analyzed in 142 stage III CRC patients receiving first-line oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy who were enrolled from two independent hospitals. HT-RNAi screening identified 40 kinase genes whose inhibition potentiated oxaliplatin cytotoxicity in DLD1 cells. The relative copy number (RCN) of MAP4K1 and CDKL4 were associated with increased risks of both recurrence and death. Moreover, significant genes-based risk score and the ratios of RCN of different genes can further categorize patients into subgroups with distinctly differing outcomes. The estimated AUC for the prediction models including clinical variables plus kinase biomarkers was 0.77 for the recurrence and 0.82 for the survival models. The copy numbers of MAP4K1 and CDKL4 can predict clinical outcomes in CRC patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:25904054

  4. Associations Between Anthropometry, Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Consumption, and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Troy, Jesse D.; Hartge, Patricia; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Oken, Martin M.; Colditz, Graham A.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies of lifestyle and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are conflicting, and some are inconsistent with case-control studies. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial was used to evaluate risk of NHL and its subtypes in association with anthropometric factors, smoking, and alcohol consumption in a prospective cohort study. Lifestyle was assessed via questionnaire among 142,982 male and female participants aged 55–74 years enrolled in the PLCO Trial during 1993–2001. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. During 1,201,074 person-years of follow-up through 2006, 1,264 histologically confirmed NHL cases were identified. Higher body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) at ages 20 and 50 years and at baseline was associated with increased NHL risk (Ptrend < 0.01 for all; e.g., for baseline BMI ≥30 vs. 18.5–24.9, hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 1.54). Smoking was not associated with NHL overall but was inversely associated with follicular lymphoma (ever smoking vs. never: hazard ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval: 0.45, 0.85). Alcohol consumption was unrelated to NHL (drinks/week: Ptrend = 0.187). These data support previous studies suggesting that BMI is positively associated with NHL, show an inverse association between smoking and follicular lymphoma (perhaps due to residual confounding), and do not support a causal association between alcohol and NHL. PMID:20494998

  5. A nested case-control study of leukocyte mitochondrial DNA copy number and renal cell carcinoma in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Hosgood, H Dean; Liu, Chin-San; Chow, Wong-Ho; Shuch, Brian; Cheng, Wen-Ling; Lin, Ta-Tsung; Moore, Lee E; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Purdue, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is vulnerable to mutations, and the number of copies of mtDNA per cell may increase to compensate for DNA damage. Case-control studies have reported associations between altered mtDNA copy number and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC); however, this association has not been investigated prospectively. We conducted a nested case-control study (252 cases and 504 controls) of RCC risk in relation to pre-diagnostic leukocyte mtDNA copy number in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. mtDNA copy number was measured in triplicate using a fluorescence-based quantitative PCR assay; samples from 22 cases and 36 controls could not be assayed, leaving 230 cases and 468 controls for analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. High mtDNA copy number was associated with an increased risk of RCC, both overall (highest quartile versus lowest: OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2-3.2; P trend = 0.002) and among cases diagnosed ≥6 years after blood collection (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.4-5.0; P trend = 0.003). These findings did not differ significantly by sex, body mass index, history of hypertension or smoking status (P interaction ≥ 0.3). Results of this study suggest that high pre-diagnostic leukocyte mtDNA copy number, a suspected marker of oxidative DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, is associated with increased future RCC risk. PMID:24398668

  6. Associations between anthropometry, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Troy, Jesse D; Hartge, Patricia; Weissfeld, Joel L; Oken, Martin M; Colditz, Graham A; Mechanic, Leah E; Morton, Lindsay M

    2010-06-15

    Prospective studies of lifestyle and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are conflicting, and some are inconsistent with case-control studies. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial was used to evaluate risk of NHL and its subtypes in association with anthropometric factors, smoking, and alcohol consumption in a prospective cohort study. Lifestyle was assessed via questionnaire among 142,982 male and female participants aged 55-74 years enrolled in the PLCO Trial during 1993-2001. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. During 1,201,074 person-years of follow-up through 2006, 1,264 histologically confirmed NHL cases were identified. Higher body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) at ages 20 and 50 years and at baseline was associated with increased NHL risk (P(trend) < 0.01 for all; e.g., for baseline BMI > or =30 vs. 18.5-24.9, hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 1.54). Smoking was not associated with NHL overall but was inversely associated with follicular lymphoma (ever smoking vs. never: hazard ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval: 0.45, 0.85). Alcohol consumption was unrelated to NHL (drinks/week: P(trend) = 0.187). These data support previous studies suggesting that BMI is positively associated with NHL, show an inverse association between smoking and follicular lymphoma (perhaps due to residual confounding), and do not support a causal association between alcohol and NHL. PMID:20494998

  7. A combined prognostic serum IL-8 and IL-6 classifier for stage 1 lung cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Bríd M.; Pine, Sharon R.; Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Caporaso, Neil; Harris, Curtis C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis The advent of LDCT for lung cancer screening will likely lead to an increase in the detection of stage I lung cancer. Presently, these patients are primarily treated with surgery alone and ~ 30% will develop recurrence and die. Biomarkers that can identify patients for whom adjuvant chemotherapy would be a benefit could significantly reduce both patient morbidity and mortality. Herein, we sought to build a prognostic inflammatory-based classifier for stage I lung cancer. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 548 European American lung cancer cases prospectively enrolled in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) study. CRP, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα and IL-1β were measured using an ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence immunoassay in serum samples collected at the time of study entry. Results IL-6 and IL-8 were each associated with significantly shorter survival (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.08–1.64, P=0.007) (HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.09–1.67, P=0.005), respectively). Moreover, a combined classifier of IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly associated with poor outcome in stage I lung cancer patients (HR, 3.39; 95% C.I. 1.54 – 7.48, P=0.002) and in stage 1 patients with ≥30 pack-years of smoking (HR, 3.15; 95% C.I. 1.54 – 6.46, P=0.002). Conclusions These results further support the association between inflammatory markers and lung cancer outcome and suggest that a combined serum IL-6/IL-8 classifier could be a useful tool for guiding therapeutic decisions in stage I lung cancer patients. PMID:25170636

  8. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators of Using a Web-Based Interactive Decision Aid for Colorectal Cancer Screening in Community Practice Settings: Findings From Focus Groups With Primary Care Clinicians and Medical Office Staff

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Information is lacking about the capacity of those working in community practice settings to utilize health information technology for colorectal cancer screening. Objective To address this gap we asked those working in community practice settings to share their perspectives about how the implementation of a Web-based patient-led decision aid might affect patient-clinician conversations about colorectal cancer screening and the day-to-day clinical workflow. Methods Five focus groups in five community practice settings were conducted with 8 physicians, 1 physician assistant, and 18 clinic staff. Focus groups were organized using a semistructured discussion guide designed to identify factors that mediate and impede the use of a Web-based decision aid intended to clarify patient preferences for colorectal cancer screening and to trigger shared decision making during the clinical encounter. Results All physicians, the physician assistant, and 8 of the 18 clinic staff were active participants in the focus groups. Clinician and staff participants from each setting reported a belief that the Web-based patient-led decision aid could be an informative and educational tool; in all but one setting participants reported a readiness to recommend the tool to patients. The exception related to clinicians from one clinic who described a preference for patients having fewer screening choices, noting that a colonoscopy was the preferred screening modality for patients in their clinic. Perceived barriers to utilizing the Web-based decision aid included patients’ lack of Internet access or low computer literacy, and potential impediments to the clinics’ daily workflow. Expanding patients’ use of an online decision aid that is both easy to access and understand and that is utilized by patients outside of the office visit was described as a potentially efficient means for soliciting patients’ screening preferences. Participants described that a system to link the

  9. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  10. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... be acceptable screening tests for colorectal cancer: High-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests (FOBT). Both polyps and ... higher than that of gFOBT or FIT. Test sensitivity for adenomas is low. False-positive test results ...

  11. Assessment of a Colonoscopy Triage Sheet for Use in a Province-Wide Population-Based Colorectal Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Sharara, Nour; Nolan, Sabrina; Sewitch, Maida; Martel, Myriam; Dias, Maria; Barkun, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. A colonoscopy triage sheet (CTS) integrating 6 hierarchical scheduling priorities based on indications for screening, surveillance, or symptoms was designed for colonoscopy referral. We compared CTS priority ratings by referring physicians and endoscopists, assessing yields. Methods. Retrospective study of consecutive patients. Data were collected on demographics, CTS and endoscopist priority ratings, and endoscopic findings. Weighted kappa values measured interrater agreement on priority assignment. Predictors of agreement and lesions were identified using multivariable analysis. Results. Among 1230 patients (60.3 years, 52.5% female), clinically significant lesions included tumors (1.1%), polyps per patient ≥ 10 mm (7.6%), and ileocolitis (4.6%). Moderate agreement was found between referring physician and endoscopist on all 6 priorities (weighted kappa 0.55 (0.51; 0.59)). P4 and P5 ratings predicted increased agreement (range of OR for P4: 2.47–4.57; P5: 1.58–2.93). Predictors of clinically significant findings were male gender (OR 1.44, 1.03–2.03) and P1/P2 priorities that were significantly superior to P3 (OR = 2.14; 1.04–4.43), P4 (OR = 2.90; 1.35–6.23), and P5 (OR = 4.30; 2.08–8.88). Conclusion. Priority-assignment agreement is moderate and highest for less urgent ratings. Predictors of clinically significant findings validate the hierarchal priority scheme. Broader validation and physician education are needed. PMID:27446841

  12. [Foregut diseases: foregut neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Duda, Miloslav; Suchánek, Štěpán; Adamčík, Lukáš; Jínek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    The diseases esophagus, stomach and duodenum are more frequently described as the foregut diseases. This term arises from the common embryologic origin of this part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Therefore similar diagnostic approach, surgical therapy and possible secondary prevention are recommended.The concept of foregut surgery has been used for many years in USA and western countries mainly among surgeons and gastroenterologist, especially i the management of patients with upper GI tract malignancies.In the Czech Republic, there were 2,204 patients diagnosed yearly with foregut cancers in years 2006-2010. These carcinomas are the second most common solid GI malignancies, following colorectal cancer (8,127 yearly). Among all cancers they occupy the fourth position in incidence after colorectal cancer, breast cancer (6,371 yearly) and lung cancer (6,782 yearly). Regarding the numbers of surgically treated cancers, they rank the third position. The late clinical stage diagnosis is associated with low five year survival (18 % esophagus; 30 % stomach).Therefore, it is necessary to search for better early endoscopic diagnosis. In case of surgery, the improvement is possible by using the high volume hospitals principle. PMID:26898788

  13. Apoptosis deregulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Raquel; Nunes, Natália de Souza; de Castro, Fabíola Attié

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Philadelphia-chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are clonal hematologic diseases characterized by hematopoietic progenitor independence from or hypersensitivity to cytokines. The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms have not yet been fully clarified. Pathophysiologic findings relevant for myeloproliferative neoplasms are associated with genetic alterations, such as, somatic mutation in the gene that codifies JAK-2 (JAK V617F). Deregulation of the process of programmed cellular death, called apoptosis, seems to participate in the pathogenesis of these disorders. It is known that expression deregulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes promotes cell resistance to apoptosis, culminating with the accumulation of myeloid cells and establishing neoplasms. This review will focus on the alterations in apoptosis regulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms, and the importance of a better understanding of this mechanism for the development of new therapies for these diseases. PMID:24488400

  14. Reduced levels of hydroxylated, polyunsaturated ultra long-chain fatty acids in the serum of colorectal cancer patients: implications for early screening and detection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are currently no accurate serum markers for detecting early risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We therefore developed a non-targeted metabolomics technology to analyse the serum of pre-treatment CRC patients in order to discover putative metabolic markers associated with CRC. Using tandem-mass spectrometry (MS/MS) high throughput MS technology we evaluated the utility of selected markers and this technology for discriminating between CRC and healthy subjects. Methods Biomarker discovery was performed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Comprehensive metabolic profiles of CRC patients and controls from three independent populations from different continents (USA and Japan; total n = 222) were obtained and the best inter-study biomarkers determined. The structural characterization of these and related markers was performed using liquid chromatography (LC) MS/MS and nuclear magnetic resonance technologies. Clinical utility evaluations were performed using a targeted high-throughput triple-quadrupole multiple reaction monitoring (TQ-MRM) method for three biomarkers in two further independent populations from the USA and Japan (total n = 220). Results Comprehensive metabolomic analyses revealed significantly reduced levels of 28-36 carbon-containing hydroxylated polyunsaturated ultra long-chain fatty-acids in all three independent cohorts of CRC patient samples relative to controls. Structure elucidation studies on the C28 molecules revealed two families harbouring specifically two or three hydroxyl substitutions and varying degrees of unsaturation. The TQ-MRM method successfully validated the FTICR-MS results in two further independent studies. In total, biomarkers in five independent populations across two continental regions were evaluated (three populations by FTICR-MS and two by TQ-MRM). The resultant receiver-operator characteristic curve AUCs ranged from 0.85 to 0.98 (average = 0.91 ± 0.04). Conclusions A

  15. Sexually transmitted infections, benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptom-related outcomes: results from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Benjamin N.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Rabkin, Charles S.; Alderete, John F.; Pakpahan, Ratna; Beason, Tracey S.; Kenfield, Stacey A.; Mabie, Jerome; Ragard, Lawrence; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Grubb, Robert L.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Sutcliffe, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether a history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or positive STI serology is associated with prevalent and incident benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)/lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)-related outcomes in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Methods Self-reported history of STIs (gonorrhoea, syphilis) was ascertained at baseline, and serological evidence of STIs (Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, human papillomavirus (HPV)-16, HPV-18, herpes simplex virus type 2, human herpesvirus type 8 and cytomegalovirus) was detected in baseline serum specimens. We used data collected on the baseline questionnaire, as well as results from the baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal examination (DRE), to define prevalent BPH/LUTS-related outcomes as evidence of LUTS (self-reported diagnosis of an enlarged prostate/BPH, BPH surgery or nocturia [waking ≥2 times/night to urinate]) and evidence of prostate enlargement (PSA > 1.4 ng/mL or prostate volume ≥30 mL) in men without prostate cancer. We created a similar definition of incident BPH using data from the follow-up questionnaire completed 5–13 years after enrolment (self-reported diagnosis of an enlarged prostate/BPH or nocturia), data on finasteride use during follow-up, and results from the follow-up PSA tests and DREs. We used Poisson regression with robust variance estimation to calculate prevalence ratios (PRs) in our cross-sectional analysis of self-reported (n = 32 900) and serologically detected STIs (n = 1 143) with prevalent BPH/LUTS, and risk ratios in our prospective analysis of self-reported STIs with incident BPH/LUTS (n = 5 226). Results Generally null results were observed for associations of a self-reported history of STIs and positive STI serologies with prevalent and incident BPH/LUTS-related outcomes, with the possible exception of T. vaginalis infection. This STI was positively associated with prevalent

  16. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  17. MSH-2 and MLH-1 Protein Expression in Muir Torre Syndrome-Related and Sporadic Sebaceous Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Burgos, Adisbeth; Sánchez, Jorge L.; Figueroa, Luz D.; De Jesús-Monge, Wilfredo E.; Cruz-Correa, Marcia R.; González-Keelan, Carmen; Nazario, Cruz María

    2009-01-01

    Background Muir-Torre Syndrome (MTS) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by the predisposition to both sebaceous neoplasm and internal malignancies. MTS-associated sebaceous neoplasms reveal mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and microsatellite instability. A significant part of MTS patients represents a phenotypic variant, the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). A strong correlation between microsatellite instability and immunostaining has been demonstrated. The early recognition of sebaceous neoplasm as part of MTS, and their differentiation from sporadic sebaceous neoplasm may have an important application in a clinical setting. The absence of MLH-1 or MSH-2 expression by immunostaining identifies tumors with mismatch repair deficiency. Objectives Our aim is to determine whether an immunohistochemical approach, targeting DNA repair proteins MSH-2 and MLH-1 in MTS-related sebaceous neoplasm and their sporadic counterparts, can be used for their identification. Methods We examined 15 sebaceous neoplasms (including 6 internal malignancy- associated sebaceous neoplasms and 8 sporadic sebaceous neoplasms) from 11 patients for the expression of MSH-2 and MLH-1 by immunohistochemistry. Results Four of 5 internal malignancy-associated sebaceous neoplasms showed loss of expression of MSH-2 or MLH-1. Correlation of the immunostaining pattern of the sebaceous neoplasms and the patients’ positive history of colon carcinoma was 80%. Seven of 8 sporadic sebaceous neoplasms showed a positive expression of MSH-2 and MLH-1. The prevalence for loss of expression of MMR proteins in sebaceous neoplasms was 38.5%. MMR immunostaining had 87.5% specificity and 80% sensitivity. Limitations This study is limited by a small sample size, and by bias selection due to the use of non nationwide data-base as the resource of cases. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that immunohistochemical testing for internal malignancy-associated sebaceous

  18. Factors affecting compliance with colorectal cancer screening among households residing in the largely Haitian community of Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Meredith Leigh; Acuña, Juan Manuel; de la Vega, Pura Rodriguez; Castro, Grettel; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-05-01

    The United States Black population is disproportionately affected by colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of incidence and mortality. Studies suggest that screening rates are lower among Blacks compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). However, studies on CRC screening within Black subgroups are lacking. This study examined disparities in blood stool test (BST) compliance and colonoscopy use by race/ethnicity (Haitian, NHW, non-Hispanic Black [NHB], and Hispanic) among randomly selected households in Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida.This study used cross-sectional, health and wellness data from a random-sample, population-based survey conducted within 951 households in Little Haiti between November 2011 and December 2012. BST compliance and colonoscopy use were self-reported and defined, conservatively, as the use of BST within the past 2 years and the ever use of colonoscopy by any household member. Factors associated with BST compliance and colonoscopy use were identified using logistic regression models. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member ≥50 years (n = 666).Nearly half of the households were compliant with BST (rate [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 45% [41%-49%]) and completed colonoscopy (rate [95% CI] = 53% [49%-58%]). Compliance with BST was not associated with race/ethnicity (P = 0.76). Factors independently associated with BST compliance included low educational attainment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.63, P = 0.03), being single (AOR = 0.47, P = 0.004), retirement (AOR = 1.96, P = 0.01), and the presence of diagnosed health problems (AOR = 1.24, P = 0.01). Colonoscopy use was lower among Haitian households (46%) compared with NHW (63%), NHB (62%), and Hispanic households (54%) (P = 0.002). Factors independently associated with colonoscopy use included identifying as NHB (compared with Haitian) (AOR = 1.80, P = 0.05), being single (AOR = 0.44, P = 0

  19. Factors Affecting Compliance With Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Households Residing in the Largely Haitian Community of Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Meredith Leigh; Acuña, Juan Manuel; de la Vega, Pura Rodriguez; Castro, Grettel; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The United States Black population is disproportionately affected by colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of incidence and mortality. Studies suggest that screening rates are lower among Blacks compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). However, studies on CRC screening within Black subgroups are lacking. This study examined disparities in blood stool test (BST) compliance and colonoscopy use by race/ethnicity (Haitian, NHW, non-Hispanic Black [NHB], and Hispanic) among randomly selected households in Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida. This study used cross-sectional, health and wellness data from a random-sample, population-based survey conducted within 951 households in Little Haiti between November 2011 and December 2012. BST compliance and colonoscopy use were self-reported and defined, conservatively, as the use of BST within the past 2 years and the ever use of colonoscopy by any household member. Factors associated with BST compliance and colonoscopy use were identified using logistic regression models. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member ≥50 years (n = 666). Nearly half of the households were compliant with BST (rate [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 45% [41%–49%]) and completed colonoscopy (rate [95% CI] = 53% [49%–58%]). Compliance with BST was not associated with race/ethnicity (P = 0.76). Factors independently associated with BST compliance included low educational attainment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.63, P = 0.03), being single (AOR = 0.47, P = 0.004), retirement (AOR = 1.96, P = 0.01), and the presence of diagnosed health problems (AOR = 1.24, P = 0.01). Colonoscopy use was lower among Haitian households (46%) compared with NHW (63%), NHB (62%), and Hispanic households (54%) (P = 0.002). Factors independently associated with colonoscopy use included identifying as NHB (compared with Haitian) (AOR = 1.80, P = 0.05), being single (AOR = 0

  20. Diagnostic potential for gold nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to provide colorectal cancer screening using blood serum sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Duo; Feng, Shangyuan; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Yanping; Lin, Juqiang; Sun, Liqing; Chen, Rong

    2012-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that is capable of probing the biomolecular changes associated with diseased transformation. The objective of our study was to explore gold nanoparticle based SERS to obtain blood serum biochemical information for non-invasive colorectal cancer detection. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of blood serum samples: one group from patients (n = 38) with pathologically confirmed colorectal cancer and the other group from healthy volunteers (control subjects, n = 45). Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the measured SERS spectra suggested interesting cancer specific biomolecular changes, including an increase in the relative amounts of nucleic acid, a decrease in the percentage of saccharide and proteins contents in the blood serum of colorectal cancer patients as compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the measured SERS spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps. Linear discriminate analysis (LDA) based on the PCA generated features differentiated the nasopharyngeal cancer SERS spectra from normal SERS spectra with high sensitivity (97.4%) and specificity (100%). The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that gold nanoparticle based SERS serum analysis combined with PCA-LDA has tremendous potential for the non-invasive detection of colorectal cancers.

  1. Diagnostic potential for gold nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to provide colorectal cancer screening using blood serum sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Duo; Feng, Shangyuan; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Yanping; Lin, Juqiang; Sun, Liqing; Chen, Rong

    2011-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that is capable of probing the biomolecular changes associated with diseased transformation. The objective of our study was to explore gold nanoparticle based SERS to obtain blood serum biochemical information for non-invasive colorectal cancer detection. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of blood serum samples: one group from patients (n = 38) with pathologically confirmed colorectal cancer and the other group from healthy volunteers (control subjects, n = 45). Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the measured SERS spectra suggested interesting cancer specific biomolecular changes, including an increase in the relative amounts of nucleic acid, a decrease in the percentage of saccharide and proteins contents in the blood serum of colorectal cancer patients as compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the measured SERS spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps. Linear discriminate analysis (LDA) based on the PCA generated features differentiated the nasopharyngeal cancer SERS spectra from normal SERS spectra with high sensitivity (97.4%) and specificity (100%). The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that gold nanoparticle based SERS serum analysis combined with PCA-LDA has tremendous potential for the non-invasive detection of colorectal cancers.

  2. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  3. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by aberrant proliferation of one or more myeloid lineages often with increased immature cells in the peripheral blood. The three classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs are: 1) polycythemia vera (PV), 2) essential thrombocythemia (ET), and 3) primary myelofibrosis (PMF), which are typically disorders of older adults and are exceedingly rare in children. The diagnostic criteria for MPNs remain largely defined by clinical, laboratory and histopathology assessments in adults, but they have been applied to the pediatric population. The discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation, and more recently, MPL and CALR mutations, are major landmarks in the understanding of MPNs. Nevertheless, they rarely occur in children, posing a significant diagnostic challenge given the lack of an objective, clonal marker. Therefore, in pediatric patients, the diagnosis must rely heavily on clinical and laboratory factors, and exclusion of secondary disorders to make an accurate diagnosis of MPN. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, diagnostic work up, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs (PV, ET and PMF) in children and highlights key differences to the adult diseases. Particular attention will be given to pediatric PMF, as it is the only disorder of this group that is observed in infants and young children, and in many ways appears to be a unique entity compared to adult PMF. PMID:26609329

  4. Myeloproliferative neoplasms and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Barbui, Tiziano; Finazzi, Guido; Falanga, Anna

    2013-09-26

    Major causes of morbidity and mortality in myeloproliferative neoplasms are represented by arterial and venous complications, progression to myelofibrosis, and transformation to acute leukemia. The pathogenesis of thrombosis results from a complex interplay of clinical and disease-related factors. Abnormalities of blood cells arising from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells involve not only quantitative changes but also qualitative modifications that characterize the switch of these cells from a resting to a procoagulant phenotype. According to age and previous thrombosis, patients are classified in a "high risk" or "low risk". Novel disease-related determinants such as leukocytosis and JAK2V617F mutational status and/or mutational burden are now under active investigation. In low-risk polycythemia vera patients, only phlebotomy and primary antithrombotic prophylaxis with aspirin is recommended, while in high-risk patients cytotoxic therapy is considered. Whether novel drugs targeting the constitutively active JAK2/STAT pathway will improve the management of thrombosis is a challenge for future studies. PMID:23823316

  5. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) Patient Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-28

    Primary Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Essential Thrombocythemia; Mastocytosis; Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic, Atypical, BCR-ABL Negative; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Juvenile; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia-not Otherwise Specified; Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neoplasms; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic