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Sample records for combination gene therapy

  1. Gene and Stem Cell Therapy: Alone or in Combination?

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Both gene and stem cell therapies hold great promise in the treatment of many genetic diseases and are currently focus of interest for many investigators. While both approaches are offering great and valuable treatment options for devastating and life-threatening diseases, they hold much greater promise in combination. Methods As there are multiple options in selecting gene transfer vehicles among the non-viral and viral vectors, there are also many options among the different transplantable cell types ranging from lineage-restricted progenitor cells to multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. Here, combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy is discussed. Results Several suc-cessful gene and stem cell therapies have been reported both in animal and human trials. Combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy can be carried out sequentially where the cell transplantation and the in vivo gene therapy are accomplished one after the other; or, as it is more commonly practiced, they can be carried out as ex vivo gene therapy where the transplantable cells are genetically modified outside the body before being transplanted into the body. Conclusion The combination of the stem-cell technology with gene therapy has the potential of providing both regenerative tissue and therapeutic material simultaneously; therefore, having the benefits of both technologies. PMID:23678430

  2. Synergistic nanomedicine by combined gene and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Kim, Won Jong

    2016-03-01

    To date, various nanomaterials with the ability for gene delivery or photothermal effect have been developed in the field of biomedicine. The therapeutic potential of these nanomaterials has raised considerable interests in their use in potential next-generation strategies for effective anticancer therapy. In particular, the advancement of novel nanomedicines utilizing both therapeutic strategies of gene delivery and photothermal effect has generated much optimism regarding the imminent development of effective and successful cancer treatments. In this review, we discuss current research progress with regard to combined gene and photothermal therapy. This review focuses on synergistic therapeutic systems combining gene regulation and photothermal ablation as well as logically designed nano-carriers aimed at enhancing the delivery efficiency of therapeutic genes using the photothermal effect. The examples detailed in this review provide insight to further our understanding of combinatorial gene and photothermal therapy, thus paving the way for the design of promising nanomedicines. PMID:26748259

  3. Gene Therapy for Brain Cancer: Combination Therapies Provide Enhanced Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Muhammad, A.K.M.G.; Yagiz, Kader; Farrokhi, Catherine; Pechnick, Robert N.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain cancer in adults. Despite significant advances in treatment and intensive research, the prognosis for patients with GBM remains poor. Therapeutic challenges for GBM include its invasive nature, the proximity of the tumor to vital brain structures often preventing total resection, and the resistance of recurrent GBM to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Gene therapy has been proposed as a useful adjuvant for GBM, to be used in conjunction with current treatment. Work from our laboratory has shown that combination of conditional cytotoxic with immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of GBM elicits regression of large intracranial tumor masses and anti-tumor immunological memory in syngeneic rodent models of GBM. In this review we examined the currently available animal models for GBM, including rodent transplantable models, endogenous rodent tumor models and spontaneous GBM in dogs. We discuss non-invasive surrogate end points to assess tumor progression and therapeutic efficacy, such as behavioral tests and circulating biomarkers. Growing preclinical and clinical data contradict the old dogma that cytotoxic anti-cancer therapy would lead to an immune-suppression that would impair the ability of the immune system to mount an anti-tumor response. The implications of the findings reviewed indicate that combination of cytotoxic therapy with immunotherapy will lead to synergistic antitumor efficacy with reduced neurotoxicity and supports the clinical implementation of combined cytotoxic-immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of patients with GBM. PMID:19860655

  4. Photothermal combined gene therapy achieved by polyethyleneimine-grafted oxidized mesoporous carbon nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Yan, Xueying; Yao, Shuangchao; Peng, Xiyue; Wang, Yi; Huang, Rongqin

    2016-09-01

    Combining controllable photothermal therapy and efficacious gene therapy in a single platform holds great promise in cancer therapy due to the enhanced combined therapeutic effects. Herein, polyethyleneimine-grafted oxidized mesoporous carbon nanospheres (OP) were developed for combined photothermal combined gene therapy in vitro and in vivo. The synthesized OP was characterized to have three dimensional spherical structure with uniformed diameter, ordered mesopores with graphitic domains, high water dispersion with zeta potential of +22 mV, and good biocompatibility. Consequently, OP was exploited as the photothermal convertor with strong NIR absorption and the gene vector via electrostatic interaction, which therefore cannot only deliver the therapeutic gene (pING4) to tumors for gene therapy, but also can eliminate the tumors by photothermal ablation. Moreover, the improved gene therapy accompanied by the NIR photothermally enhanced gene release was also well achieved based on OP. The excellent combined therapeutic effects demonstrated in vitro and in vivo suggested the OP's potential for cancer therapy. PMID:27258483

  5. Internal ribosome entry site-based vectors for combined gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Renaud-Gabardos, Edith; Hantelys, Fransky; Morfoisse, Florent; Chaufour, Xavier; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Prats, Anne-Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy appears as a promising strategy to treat incurable diseases. In particular, combined gene therapy has shown improved therapeutic efficiency. Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs), RNA elements naturally present in the 5’ untranslated regions of a few mRNAs, constitute a powerful tool to co-express several genes of interest. IRESs are translational enhancers allowing the translational machinery to start protein synthesis by internal initiation. This feature allowed the design of multi-cistronic vectors expressing several genes from a single mRNA. IRESs exhibit tissue specificity, and drive translation in stress conditions when the global cell translation is blocked, which renders them useful for gene transfer in hypoxic conditions occurring in ischemic diseases and cancer. IRES-based viral and non viral vectors have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical assays of combined gene therapy and resulted in therapeutic benefits for various pathologies including cancers, cardiovascular diseases and degenerative diseases. PMID:25699230

  6. Correction of ADA-SCID by stem cell gene therapy combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Slavin, Shimon; Aker, Memet; Ficara, Francesca; Deola, Sara; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Morecki, Shoshana; Andolfi, Grazia; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Marinello, Enrico; Cattaneo, Federica; Vai, Sergio; Servida, Paolo; Miniero, Roberto; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bordignon, Claudio

    2002-06-28

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has shown limited clinical efficacy because of the small proportion of engrafted genetically corrected HSCs. We describe an improved protocol for gene transfer into HSCs associated with nonmyeloablative conditioning. This protocol was used in two patients for whom enzyme replacement therapy was not available, which allowed the effect of gene therapy alone to be evaluated. Sustained engraftment of engineered HSCs with differentiation into multiple lineages resulted in increased lymphocyte counts, improved immune functions (including antigen-specific responses), and lower toxic metabolites. Both patients are currently at home and clinically well, with normal growth and development. These results indicate the safety and efficacy of HSC gene therapy combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning for the treatment of SCID. PMID:12089448

  7. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  8. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  9. Expanding the therapeutic index of radiation therapy by combining in situ gene therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Teh, Bin S; Timme, Terry L; Fujita, Tetsuo; Satoh, Takefumi; Tabata, Ken-Ichi; Mai, Wei-Yuan; Vlachaki, Maria T; Amato, Robert J; Kadmon, Dov; Miles, Brian J; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Thompson, Timothy C; Butler, E Brian

    2006-02-01

    The advances in radiotherapy (3D-CRT, IMRT) have enabled high doses of radiation to be delivered with the least possible associated toxicity. However, the persistence of cancer (local recurrence after radiotherapy) despite these increased doses as well as distant failure suggesting the existence of micro-metastases, especially in the case of higher risk disease, have underscored the need for continued improvement in treatment strategies to manage local and micro-metastatic disease as definitively as possible. This has prompted the idea that an increase in the therapeutic index of radiotherapy might be achieved by combining it with in situ gene therapy. The goal of these combinatorial therapies is to maximize the selective pressure against cancer cell growth while minimizing treatment-associated toxicity. Major efforts utilizing different gene therapy strategies have been employed in conjunction with radiotherapy. We reviewed our and other published clinical trials utilizing this combined radio-genetherapy approach including their associated pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo models. The use of in situ gene therapy as an adjuvant to radiation therapy dramatically reduced cell viability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. No significant worsening of the toxicities normally observed in single-modality approaches were identified in Phase I/II clinical studies. Enhancement of both local and systemic T-cell activation was noted with this combined approach suggesting anti-tumor immunity. Early clinical outcome including biochemical and biopsy data was very promising. These results demonstrate the increased therapeutic efficacy achieved by combining in situ gene therapy with radiotherapy in the management of local prostate cancer. The combined approach maximizes tumor control, both local-regional and systemic through radio-genetherapy induced cytotoxicity and anti-tumor immunity. PMID:16417399

  10. Suicide gene and cytokines combined nonviral gene therapy for spontaneous canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Fiszman, G L; Karara, A L; Glikin, G C

    2008-03-01

    Canine spontaneous melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor resistant to current therapies. We evaluated the safety, efficacy and antitumor effects of direct intratumor injections of lipoplexes encoding herpes simplex thymidine kinase coadministrated with ganciclovir, and irradiated transgenic xenogeneic cells secreting 20-30 mug day(-1) of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-2. Toxicity was minimal or absent in all patients. This combined treatment (CT) induced tumor regression and a pronounced immune cell infiltration. The objective responses (47%: 21/45) averaged 80% of tumor mass loss. Local CT also induced systemic antitumor response evidenced by complete remission of one pulmonary metastasis and by the significantly higher percentage of metastasis-free patients (76: 34/45)) until the study ending compared to untreated (UC: 29%, 5/17), surgery-treated (CX: 48%, 11/23) or suicide gene-treated controls (SG: 56%, 9/16) (Fisher's exact test). CT significantly improved median survival time: 160 (57-509) days compared to UC (69 (10-169)), CX (82 (43-216)) or SG (94 (46-159)). CT also increased (P<0.00001, Kaplan-Meier analysis) metastasis-free survival: >509 (57-509) days with respect to UC: 41 (10-169), CX: 133 (43-216) and SG: >159 (41-159). Therefore, CT controlled tumor growth by delaying or preventing distant metastasis, thereby significantly extending survival and recovering the quality of life. PMID:18219342

  11. Near-infrared light triggered photodynamic therapy in combination with gene therapy using upconversion nanoparticles for effective cancer cell killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Kai; Yang, Guangbao; Cheng, Liang; He, Lu; Liu, Yumeng; Li, Yonggang; Guo, Liang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-07-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via resonance energy transfer from UCNPs to photosensitizer Ce6, while the residual upconversion luminescence is utilized for imaging. On the other hand, the silencing of Plk1 induced by siRNA delivered with UCNPs could induce significant cancer cell apoptosis. As the result of such combined photodynamic and gene therapy, a remarkably enhanced cancer cell killing effect is realized. Our work thus highlights the promise of UCNPs for imaging guided combination therapy of cancer.Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via

  12. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Wu, Xiaolin; Moir, Susan; Anaya-O'Brien, Sandra; Kwatemaa, Nana; Littel, Patricia; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Su, Ling; Marquesen, Martha; Hilligoss, Dianne; Lee, Janet; Buckner, Clarissa M; Zarember, Kol A; O'Connor, Geraldine; McVicar, Daniel; Kuhns, Douglas; Throm, Robert E; Zhou, Sheng; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hanson, I Celine; Cowan, Mort J; Kang, Elizabeth; Hadigan, Coleen; Meagher, Michael; Gray, John T; Sorrentino, Brian P; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-20

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a profound deficiency of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cell immunity caused by mutations inIL2RGencoding the common chain (γc) of several interleukin receptors. Gamma-retroviral (γRV) gene therapy of SCID-X1 infants without conditioning restores T cell immunity without B or NK cell correction, but similar treatment fails in older SCID-X1 children. We used a lentiviral gene therapy approach to treat five SCID-X1 patients with persistent immune dysfunction despite haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant in infancy. Follow-up data from two older patients demonstrate that lentiviral vector γc transduced autologous HSC gene therapy after nonmyeloablative busulfan conditioning achieves selective expansion of gene-marked T, NK, and B cells, which is associated with sustained restoration of humoral responses to immunization and clinical improvement at 2 to 3 years after treatment. Similar gene marking levels have been achieved in three younger patients, albeit with only 6 to 9 months of follow-up. Lentiviral gene therapy with reduced-intensity conditioning appears safe and can restore humoral immune function to posthaploidentical transplant older patients with SCID-X1. PMID:27099176

  13. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases. PMID:24372817

  14. Combined Alloreactive CTL Cellular Therapy with Prodrug Activator Gene Therapy in a Model of Breast Cancer Metastatic to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Malone, Colin C.; Erickson, Kate L.; Lin, Amy; Soto, Horacio; Ha, Edward T.; Kamijima, Shuichi; Inagaki, Akihito; Takahashi, Masamichi; Kato, Yuki; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Mueller, Barbara M.; Kruse, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Individual or combined strategies of cellular therapy with alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (alloCTL) and gene therapy employing retroviral replicating vectors (RRV) encoding a suicide prodrug activating gene were explored for the treatment of breast tumors metastatic to the brain. Experimental Design AlloCTL, sensitized to the human leukocyte antigens of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, were examined in vitro for anti-tumor functionality toward breast cancer targets. RRV encoding the yeast cytosine deaminase (CD) gene was tested in vivo for virus spread, ability to infect, and kill breast cancer targets when exposed to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Individual and combination treatments were tested in subcutaneous and intracranial xenograft models with 231BR, a brain tropic variant. Results AlloCTL preparations were cytotoxic, proliferated and produced interferon-gamma when coincubated with target cells displaying relevant HLA. In vivo, intratumorally-placed alloCTL trafficked through one established intracranial 231BR focus to another in contralateral brain and induced tumor cell apoptosis. RRV-CD efficiently spread in vivo, infected 231BR and induced their apoptosis upon 5-FC exposure. Subcutaneous tumor volumes were significantly reduced in alloCTL and/or gene therapy treated groups compared to control groups. Mice with established intracranial 231BR tumors treated with combined alloCTL and RRV-CD had a median survival of 97.5 days compared with single modalities (50–83 days); all experimental treatment groups survived significantly longer than sham-treated groups (median survivals 31.5 or 40 days) and exhibited good safety/toxicity profiles. Conclusion The results indicate combining cellular and suicide gene therapies is a viable strategy for the treatment of established breast tumors in the brain. PMID:23780889

  15. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  16. In vitro therapeutic effect of PDT combined with VEGF-A gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecaros, Rumwald Leo G.; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2014-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), commonly known as VEGF, is one of the primary factors that affect tumor angiogenesis. It was found to be expressed in cancer cell lines including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel therapeutic modality to treat cancer by using a photosensitizer which is activated by a light source to produce reactive oxygen species and mediates oxygen-independent hypoxic conditions to tumor. Another emerging treatment to cure cancer is the use of interference RNA (e.g. siRNA) to silence a specific mRNA sequence. VEGF-A was found to be expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma and overexpressed after 24 hour post-PDT by Western blot analysis. Cell viability was found to decrease at 25 nM of transfected VEGF-A siRNA. In vitro combined therapy of PDT and VEGF-A siRNA showed better response as compared with PDT and gene therapy alone. The results suggest that PDT combined with targeted gene therapy has a potential mean to achieve better therapeutic outcome.

  17. Combining Cytotoxic and Immune-Mediated Gene Therapy to Treat Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, James F.; King, Gwendalyn D.; Candolfi, Marianela; Greeno, Remy B.; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2006-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a type of intracranial brain tumor, for which there is no cure. In spite of advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, patients die within a year of diagnosis. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop novel therapeutic approaches for this disease. Gene therapy, which is the use of genes or other nucleic acids as drugs, is a powerful new treatment strategy which can be developed to treat GBM. Several treatment modalities are amenable for gene therapy implementation, e.g. conditional cytotoxic approaches, targeted delivery of toxins into the tumor mass, immune stimulatory strategies, and these will all be the focus of this review. Both conditional cytotoxicity and targeted toxin mediated tumor death, are aimed at eliminating an established tumor mass and preventing further growth. Tumors employ several defensive strategies that suppress and inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in eliciting anti-tumor immune responses has identified promising targets for immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is designed to aid the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells in order to eliminate the tumor burden. Also, immune-therapeutic strategies have the added advantage that an activated immune system has the capability of recognizing tumor cells at distant sites from the primary tumor, therefore targeting metastasis distant from the primary tumor locale. Pre-clinical models and clinical trials have demonstrated that in spite of their location within the central nervous system (CNS), a tissue described as ‘immune privileged’, brain tumors can be effectively targeted by the activated immune system following various immunotherapeutic strategies. This review will highlight recent advances in brain tumor immunotherapy, with particular emphasis on advances made using gene therapy strategies, as well as reviewing other novel therapies that can be used in combination with immunotherapy. Another

  18. Combination Gene Therapy for Liver Metastasis of Colon Carcinoma in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hsai; Chen, X. H. Li; Wang, Yibin; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Finegold, Milton J.; Rich, Susan S.

    1995-03-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8^+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver.

  19. Combination gene therapy for liver metastasis of colon carcinoma in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S H; Chen, X H; Wang, Y; Kosai, K; Finegold, M J; Rich, S S; Woo, S L

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7708688

  20. Combining cell transplants or gene therapy with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Nathan C; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S; Ostrem, Jill L; Marks, William J; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    Cell transplantation and gene therapy each show promise to enhance the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, because cell transplantation and gene therapy generally require direct delivery to the central nervous system, clinical trial design involves unique scientific, ethical, and financial concerns related to the invasive nature of the procedure. Typically, such biologics have been tested in PD patients who have not received any neurosurgical intervention. Here, we suggest that PD patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) device implantation are an ideal patient population for the clinical evaluation of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Randomizing subjects to an experimental group that receives the biologic concurrently with the DBS implantation-or to a control group that receives the DBS treatment alone-has several compelling advantages. First, this study design enables the participation of patients likely to benefit from DBS, many of whom simultaneously meet the inclusion criteria of biologic studies. Second, the need for a sham neurosurgical procedure is eliminated, which may reduce ethical concerns, promote patient recruitment, and enhance the blinding of surgical trials. Third, testing the biologic by "piggybacking" onto an established, reimbursable procedure should reduce the cost of clinical trials, which may allow a greater number of biologics to reach this critical stage of research translation. Finally, this clinical trial design may lead to combinatorial treatment strategies that provide PD patients with more durable control over disabling motor symptoms. By combining neuromodulation with biologics, we may also reveal important treatment paradigms relevant to other diseases of the brain. PMID:25521796

  1. Combinations Therapies.

    PubMed

    Reinmuth, Niels; Reck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer encompasses different strategies that elicit or enhance the immune response against tumors. The first results from clinical studies have provided promising data for the treatment of lung cancer patients with immunomodulating monotherapies. To improve the potential benefit of cancer immunotherapy, synergistic combinations of the various immunotherapy approaches or of different elements within each of the immunotherapy approaches are being explored. The rationale typically involves different but complementary mechanisms of action, eventually impinging on more than one immune system mechanism. As a prominent example, the simultaneous blockade of PD-1 and CTLA-4 is giving rise to therapeutic synergy, while still offering room for efficacy improvement. Moreover, combinations of immunomodulating agents with chemotherapy or targeted molecules are being tested. Animal models suggest that immunotherapies in combination with these various options offer evidence for synergistic effects and are likely to radically change cancer treatment paradigms. However, data obtained so far indicate that toxic side effects are also potentiated, which may even restrict the selection of patients that are suitable for these combinational approaches. Advancing the field of combinatorial immunotherapy will require changes in the way investigational agents are clinically developed as well as novel experimental end-points for efficacy evaluation. However, this combined therapeutic manipulation of both tumor and stromal cells may lead to a dramatic change in the therapeutic options of lung cancer patients in any disease stage that can only grossly be appreciated by the current studies. PMID:26384009

  2. Gene Therapy Studies in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.; Sorrentino, Brian P.; Burtner, Christopher; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the occurrence of T cell leukemias in the original human γ-retroviral gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), considerable effort has been devoted to developing safer vectors. This review summarizes gene therapy studies performed in a canine model of XSCID to evaluate the efficacy of γ-retroviral, lentiviral, and foamy viral vectors for treating XSCID and a novel method of vector delivery. These studies demonstrate that durable T cell reconstitution and thymopoiesis with no evidence of any serious adverse events and, in contrast to the human XSCID patients, sustained marking in myeloid cells and B cells with reconstitution of normal humoral immune function can be achieved for up to 5 years without any pretreatment conditioning. The presence of sustained levels of gene-marked T cells, B cells, and more importantly myeloid cells for almost 5 years is highly suggestive of transduction of either multipotent hematopoietic stem cells or very primitive committed progenitors. PMID:25603151

  3. A dual-targeting drug co-delivery system for tumor chemo- and gene combined therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangrong; Li, Min; Su, Yujie; Zhou, Jianping; Wang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression using p53 is a promising strategy for treatment of numerous cancers, and chemotherapeutic drug dichloroacetate (DCA) induces apoptosis and growth inhibition in tumor, without apparent toxicity in normal tissues. Combining DCA and p53 gene could be an effective way to treat tumors. The progress towards broad applications of DCA/p53 combination requires the development of safe and efficient vectors that target to specific cells. In this study, we developed a DSPE-PEG-AA (1,2-distearoryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethyleneglycol-2000)] ammonium salt-anisamide) modified reconstituted high-density lipoprotein-based DCA/p53-loaded nanoparticles (DSPE-PEG-AA/rHDL/DCA-PEI/p53 complexes), which was fabricated as a drug/gene dual-targeting co-delivery system for potential cancer therapy. Here, DCA-PEI was utilized to effectively condense the p53 plasmid, to incorporate the plasmid into rHDL and to act as an antitumor drug to inhibit tumor cell growth. The DSPE-PEG-AA/rHDL/DCA-PEI/p53 complexes exhibited desirable and homogenous particle size, neutral surface charge and low cytotoxicity for normal cells in vitro. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry confirmed that the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and sigma receptor mediated dual-targeting function of the complexes inducing efficient cytoplasmic drug delivery and gene transfection in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. And in vivo investigation on nude mice bearing A549 tumor xenografts revealed that DSPE-PEG-AA/rHDL/DCA-PEI/p53 complexes possessed specific tumor targeting and strong antitumor activity. The work described here demonstrated that the DSPE-PEG-AA/rHDL/DCA-PEI/p53 complexes might offer a promising tool for effective cancer therapy. PMID:27127046

  4. Combination gene therapy targeting on interleukin-1β and RANKL for wear debris-induced aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Jia, T-H; Zacharias, N; Gong, W; Du, H-X; Wooley, P H; Yang, S-Y

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a combination gene therapy to repress interleukin-1 (IL-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL) for the treatment of particulate debris-induced aseptic loosening, and tried to explore the molecular mechanism of the exogenous gene modifications on osteoclastogenesis. RAW cells activated by titanium particles were transduced with DFG-IL-1Ra (retroviral vector encoding IL-1 receptor antagonist) and AAV-OPG (adeno-associated viral vectors-osteoprotegerin) individually or in combination for 4 weeks. Pro-inflammatory cytokines in culture media were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gene expressions of RANK, IL-1β, c-Fos, TRAF6, JNK1 and CPK were examined using real-time PCR. An established knee-implant-failure mouse model was employed to evaluate the efficacy of the in vivo double-gene therapy. The surgical implantation of a titanium alloy pin into the proximal tibia was followed by monthly challenge with titanium debris. Peri-implant gene transfers of IL-1Ra and OPG (respectively or in combination) were given 3 weeks after surgery. The combination of OPG and IL-1Ra gene transfer exhibited strong synergetic effects in blockage of inflammation and osteoclastogenesis at 8 weeks after gene modification. The combination therapy reversed peri-implant bone resorption and restored implant stability when compared with either single gene transduction. Real-time PCR data indicated that the action of IL-1Ra gene therapy may be mediated via the JNK1 pathway, while the reduction of osteoclastogenesis by OPG gene modification may be regulated by c-Fos expression. In addition, both gene modifications resulted in significant diminishment of TRAF6 expression. PMID:22318091

  5. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  6. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  7. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Mai, W.-Y.; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD4{sup +} T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer.

  8. Gene therapy progress and prospects: gene therapy for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, V; Chan, L

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has long been targeted, as yet unsuccessfully, as being curable with gene therapy. The main hurdles have not only been vector-related toxicity but also the lack of physiological regulation of the expressed insulin. Recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of beta-cells and the transcriptional cascade that drives it have enabled both in vivo and ex vivo gene therapy combined with cell therapy to be used in animal models of diabetes with success. The associated developments in the stem cell biology and immunology have opened up further opportunities for gene therapy to be applied to target autoimmune diabetes. PMID:15496957

  9. Non-viral in vivo immune gene therapy of cancer: combined strategies for treatment of systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Tangney, M; Casey, G; Larkin, J O; Collins, C G; Soden, D; Cashman, J; Whelan, M C; O'Sullivan, G C

    2006-11-01

    Many patients with various types of cancers have already by the time of presentation, micrometastases in their tissues and are left after treatment in a minimal residual disease state [Am J Gastroenterol 95(12), 2000]. To prevent tumour recurrence these patients require a systemic based therapy, but current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. We have previously reported that immune reactivity to the primary tumour is an important regulator of micrometastases and determinant of prognosis. This suggests that recruitment of specific anti-tumour mechanisms within the primary tumour could be used advantageously for tumour control as either primary or neo-adjuvant treatments. Recently, we have focused on methods of stimulating immune eradication of solid tumours and minimal residual disease using gene therapy approaches. Gene therapy is now a realistic prospect and a number of delivery approaches have been explored, including the use of viral and non-viral vectors. Non-viral vectors have received significant attention since, in spite of their relative delivery inefficiency, they may be safer and have greater potential for delivery of larger genetic units. By in vivo electroporation of the primary tumour with plasmid expressing GM-CSF and B7-1, we aim to stimulate immune eradication of the treated tumour and associated metastases. In this symposium report, we describe an effective gene based approach for cancer immunotherapy by inducing cytokine and immune co-stimulatory molecule expression by the growing cells of the primary tumour using a plasmid electroporation gene delivery strategy. We discuss the potential for enhancement of this therapy by its application as a neoadjuvant to surgical excision and by its use in combination with suppressor T cell depletion. PMID:16612593

  10. Advances in combining gene therapy with cell and tissue engineering-based approaches to enhance healing of the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, M; McNulty, A L; Mauck, R L; Setton, L A; Guilak, F; Madry, H

    2016-08-01

    Meniscal lesions are common problems in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, and injury or loss of the meniscus accelerates the onset of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Despite a variety of therapeutic options in the clinics, there is a critical need for improved treatments to enhance meniscal repair. In this regard, combining gene-, cell-, and tissue engineering-based approaches is an attractive strategy to generate novel, effective therapies to treat meniscal lesions. In the present work, we provide an overview of the tools currently available to improve meniscal repair and discuss the progress and remaining challenges for potential future translation in patients. PMID:27063441

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Effect of 5-FC Combined Gene Therapy with TNF-α and CD Suicide Gene on Human Laryngeal Carcinoma Cell Line Hep-2

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Li-Ping; Wang, Zhang-Feng; Liang, Wei-Ying; Chen, Lei; Chen, Dan; Wang, An-Xun; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of combined cancer gene therapy with exogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene on laryngeal carcinoma cell line Hep-2 in vitro and in vivo. Transfection of the recombinant eukaryotic vectors of pcDNA3.1 (+) containing TNF-α and/or CD into Hep-2 cells resulted in expression of TNF-α and/or CD gene in vitro. The significant increase in apoptotic Hep-2 cells and decrease of Hep-2 cell proliferation were observed using 5-FC treatment combined with TNF-a expression by CD/5-FC suicide system. Moreover, bystander effect was also observed in the TNF-α and CD gene co-expression group. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) mice model was established by using BALB/c mice which different transfected Hep-2 cells with pcDNA3.1 (+) containing TNF-α and/or CD were applied subcutaneously. So these mice are divided into four groups, namely, Hep-2/TIC group; Hep-2/CD group; Hep-2/TNF-α group; Hep-2/0 group. At day 29 after cell inoculation, volume of grafted tumor had significant difference between each two of them (P<0.05). These results showed that the products of combined CD and TNF-α genes inhibited the growth of transplanted LSCC in mice model. So by our observed parameters and many others results, we hypothesized that 5-FC combined gene therapy with TNF-αand CD suicide gene should be an effective treatment on Laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:23593411

  12. Combination therapy with statins.

    PubMed

    Gylling, Helena; Miettinen, Tatu A

    2002-09-01

    Statins effectively inhibit cholesterol synthesis and are currently the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. However, patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and those unwilling to take, or who cannot tolerate statins, and patients with combined hyperlipidemia require a combination treatment. Statins combined with cholesterol malabsorption, caused, e.g., by plant stanol esters or ezetimibe (Schering-Plough Corp/Merck & Co Inc), or with bile acid malabsorption, caused by bile acid binding resins or guar gum, inhibit compensatory increases in cholesterol synthesis and effectively lower LDL cholesterol levels. Combination therapy of statins with fibrates should be controlled by lipidology experts. Recent information on indications and advantages of combining statins with n-3 fatty acids, hormone replacement therapy, or niacin, will also be discussed. PMID:12498007

  13. Complete destruction of deep-tissue buried tumors via combination of gene silencing and gold nanoechinus-mediated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Priya; Vankayala, Raviraj; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Sung, Hsing-Wen; Hwang, Kuo Chu

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is one of the major diseases leading to human deaths. Complete destruction of deep tissue-buried tumors using non-invasive therapies is a grand challenge in clinical cancer treatments. Many therapeutic modalities were developed to tackle this problem, but only partial tumor suppression or delay growths were usually achieved. In this study, we report for the first time that complete destruction of deep tissue-buried tumors can be achieved by combination of gold nanoechinus (Au NEs)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene silencing under ultra-low doses of near infra-red (NIR) light irradiation (915 nm, 340 mW/cm(2); 1064 nm, 420 mW/cm(2)) in the first and second biological windows. The average lifespan of the mice treated by the above combined therapy is beyond 40 days, which are ∼ 2.6 times longer than that (15 days) observed from the anticancer drug doxorubicin-treated group. The current study points out a new direction for the therapeutic design to treat deeply seated tumors in future cancer treatments. PMID:26016691

  14. Monodisperse double-walled microspheres loaded with chitosan-p53 nanoparticles and doxorubicin for combined gene therapy and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingxing; Xia, Yujie; Wang, Chi-Hwa; Pack, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and evaluated a dual anticancer delivery system to provide combined gene therapy and chemotherapy. Double-walled microspheres consisting of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) shell were fabricated via the precision particle fabrication (PPF) technique. We make use of the advantages of double-walled microspheres to deliver chitosan-DNA nanoparticles containing the gene encoding the p53 tumor suppressor protein (chi-p53) and/or doxorubicin (Dox), loaded in the shell and core phases, respectively. Different molecular weights of PLA were used to form the shell layer for each formulation. The microspheres were monodisperse with a mean diameter of 65 to 75 μm and uniform shell thickness of 8 to 17 μm. Blank and Dox-loaded microspheres typically exhibited a smooth surface with relatively few small pores, while chi-microspheres containing p53 nanoparticles, with and without Dox, presented rough and porous surfaces. The encapsulation efficiency of Dox was significantly higher when it was encapsulated alone compared to co-encapsulation with chi-p53 nanoparticles. The encapsulation efficiency of chi-p53 nanoparticles, on the other hand, was not affected by the presence of Dox. As desired, chi-p53 nanoparticles were released first, followed by simultaneous release of chi-p53 nanoparticles and Dox at a near zero-order rate. Thus, we have demonstrated that the PPF method is capable of producing double-walled microspheres and encapsulating dual agents for combined modality treatment, such as gene therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:22981564

  15. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. PMID:23618815

  16. Monotherapy versus combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shilpa M; Saravolatz, Louis D

    2006-11-01

    The science of antibiotic therapy for infectious diseases continues to evolve. In many instances where empiric coverage is necessary, treatment with more than one agent is considered prudent. If an etiology is identified, antibiotics are modified based on culture and susceptibility data. Even when the organism is known, more than one antibiotic may be needed. Decisions about antibiotics should be made after assessments of pertinent clinical information, laboratory and microbiology information, ease of administration, patient compliance, potential adverse effects, cost, and available evidence supporting various treatment options. Clinicians also need to consider synergy and local resistance patterns in selecting therapeutic options. In this article, the authors outline monotherapy and combination therapy options for several common infectious diseases. PMID:17116443

  17. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  18. Combined gene therapy of endostatin and interleukin 12 with polyvinylpyrrolidone induces a potent antitumor effect on hepatoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Yuan; Lin, Ju-Sheng; Feng, Zuo-Hua; He, Yu-Fei; Zhou, He-Jun; Ma, Xin; Cai, Xiao-Kun; Tian, De-An

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the antitumor effect of combined gene therapy of endostatin and interleukin 12 (IL-12) with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on mouse transplanted hepatoma. METHODS: Mouse endostatin eukaryotic plasmid (pSecES) with a mouse Igκ signal sequence inside and mouse IL-12 eukaryotic plasmid (pmIL-12) were transfected into BHK-21 cells respectively. Endostatin and IL-12 were assayed by ELISA from the supernant and used to culture endothelial cells and spleen lymphocytes individually. Proliferation of the latter was evaluated by MTT. H22 cells were inoculated into the leg muscle of mouse, which was injected intratumorally with pSecES/PVP, pmIL-12/PVP or pSecES + pmIL-12/PVP repeatedly. Tumor weight, serum endostatin and serum IL-12 were assayed. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, tumor microvessel density and apoptosis of tumor cells were also displayed by HE staining, CD31 staining and TUNEL. RESULTS: Endostatin and IL-12 were secreted after transfection, which could inhibit the proliferation of endothelial cells or promote the proliferation of spleen lymphocytes. Tumor growth was highly inhibited by 91.8% after injection of pSecES + pmIL-12/PVP accompanied by higher serum endostatin and IL-12, more infiltrating lymphocytes, fewer tumor vessels and more apoptosis cells compared with injection of pSecES/PVP, pmIL-12/PVP or vector/PVP. CONCLUSION: Mouse endostatin gene and IL-12 gene can be expressed after intratumoral injection with PVP. Angiogenesis of hepatoma can be inhibited synergisticly, lymphocytes can be activated to infiltrate, and tumor cells are induced to apoptosis. Hepatoma can be highly inhibited or eradiated. PMID:15259064

  19. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  20. B Cell Function in Severe Combined Immunodeficiency after Stem Cell or Gene Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2010-01-01

    While bone marrow transplantation has resulted in life-saving T cell reconstitution in infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), correction of B cell function has been more problematic. This review examines B cell reconstitution results presented in 19 reports from the United States and Europe on post-transplantation immune reconstitution in SCID over the past two decades. The analysis considered whether pre-transplantation conditioning regimens were used, the overall survival rate, the percentage with donor B cell chimerism, the percentage with B cell function, and the percentage of survivors requiring immunoglobulin (IG) replacement. The survival rates were higher at those Centers that did not use pre-transplant conditioning or post-transplantation graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. The percentage of survivors with B cell chimerism and/or function was higher and the percentage requiring IG replacement was lower at those Centers that used pre-transplant conditioning. However there were substantial numbers of patients requiring IG replacement at all Centers. Thus, pre-transplant conditioning does not guarantee that B cell function will develop. Since most infants with SCID either present with serious infections or are diagnosed as newborns, one must decide whether there is justification for using agents that compromise innate immunity and have intrinsic toxicities to gain B cell immune reconstitution. PMID:20371393

  1. A pilot study of combined suicide/cytokine gene therapy in two patients with end-stage anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Taccaliti, Augusto; Franchin, Elisa; Bruglia, Matteo; Boscaro, Marco; Palù, Giorgio

    2005-05-01

    This study represents the first report of gene therapy for anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, one of the most aggressive solid tumors in humans. Two patients with end-stage anaplastic thyroid carcinoma were treated by direct intratumor injection of retroviral vector producer cells followed by ganciclovir. The retroviral vector carried the human IL-2 gene and the suicide gene thymidine kinase of herpes simplex virus type 1. Treatment was safe and associated with only mild adverse events. Transduction of tumor cells and production of T helper type 1 cytokines was demonstrated in tumor biopsies. Gene therapy led also to a marked increase in T helper type 1 cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Radiological evaluation of injected tumor masses demonstrated local tumor necrosis. PMID:15713704

  2. Combined antitumor gene therapy with herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase and short hairpin RNA specific for mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ha-Na; Lee, Won Il; Kim, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Jeonghyun; Han, Jeong Hee; Lim, Sue Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Heuiran

    2015-12-01

    A proof-of-concept study is presented using dual gene therapy that employed a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) specific for mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and a herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene to inhibit the growth of tumors. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors containing a mutant TK gene (sc39TK) were transduced into HeLa cells, and the prodrug ganciclovir (GCV) was administered to establish a suicide gene-therapy strategy. Additionally, rAAV vectors expressing an mTOR-targeted shRNA were employed to suppress mTOR-dependent tumor growth. GCV selectively induced death in tumor cells expressing TK, and the mTOR-targeted shRNA altered the cell cycle to impair tumor growth. Combining the TK-GCV system with mTOR inhibition suppressed tumor growth to a greater extent than that achieved with either treatment alone. Furthermore, HSV-TK expression and mTOR inhibition did not mutually interfere with each other. In conclusion, gene therapy that combines the TK-GCV system and mTOR inhibition shows promise as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:26459571

  3. Vaginal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Isla, Arantxazu; Solinís, María Angeles

    2015-09-15

    In the last years, vaginal gene therapy has gained increasing attention mainly for the treatment and control of sexually transmitted infections. DNA delivery has been also suggested to improve reproductive outcomes for women with deficiencies in the female reproductive tract. Although no product has reached clinical phase, preclinical investigations reveal the potential of the vaginal tract as an effective administration route for gene delivery. This review focuses on the main advantages and challenges of vaginal gene therapy, and on the most used nucleic acid delivery systems, including viral and non-viral vectors. Additionally, the advances in the application of vaginal gene therapy for the treatment and/or prevention of infectious diseases such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the human papillomavirus (HPV) or the herpes simplex virus (HSV) are presented. PMID:26189799

  4. New combination therapies for asthma.

    PubMed

    Donohue, J F; Ohar, J A

    2001-03-01

    Combination products often have useful clinical benefits in asthma. The scientific rationale for combination therapy includes the fact that different agents have complimentary modes of action. Long-acting beta(2)-agonists have effects on airway smooth muscle, and inhaled corticosteroids have potent topical antiinflammatory effect. This combination has been shown to effectively reduce exacerbations and improve symptoms. Substantial clinical trial data provide a rationale for dual-control therapy supported by basic scientific data. Another combined therapy is inhaled steroids plus leukotriene-receptor antagonists, which provides the patient with two effective therapies. Leukotriene-receptor antagonist can also be combined with antihistamines for improved asthma control. Older therapies including theophylline and controlled release albuterol have been effectively added to inhaled corticosteroids, enabling a reduction in the dose of the inhaled steroids. Many other combination therapies are presently being tested. PMID:11224725

  5. Gene therapy in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Riban, Véronique; Fitzsimons, Helen L.; During, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Results from animal models suggest gene therapy is a promising new approach for the treatment of epilepsy. Several candidate genes such as neuropeptide Y and galanin have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to have a positive effect on seizure activity. For a successful gene therapy-based treatment, efficient delivery of a transgene to target neurons is also essential. To this end, advances have been made in the areas of cell transplantation and in the development of recombinant viral vectors for gene delivery. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors in particular show promise for gene therapy of neurological disorders due to their neuronal tropism, lack of toxicity, and stable persistence in neurons, which results in robust, long-term expression of the transgene. rAAV vectors have been recently used in phase I clinical trials of Parkinson’s disease with an excellent safety profile. Prior to commencement of phase I trials for gene therapy of epilepsy, further preclinical studies are ongoing including evaluation of the therapeutic benefit in chronicmodels of epileptogenesis, as well as assessment of safety intoxicological studies. PMID:18717707

  6. Single low-dose cyclophosphamide combined with interleukin-12 gene therapy is superior to a metronomic schedule in inducing immunity against colorectal carcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Malvicini, Mariana; Alaniz, Laura; Bayo, Juan; Garcia, Mariana; Piccioni, Flavia; Fiore, Esteban; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Aquino, Jorge B.; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    The use of conventional cytotoxic agents at metronomic schedules, alone or in combination with targeted agents or immunotherapy, is being explored as a promising anticancer strategy. We previously reported a potent antitumor effect of a single low-dose cyclophosphamide and interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene therapy against advanced gastrointestinal carcinoma, in mice. Here, we assessed whether the delivery of IL-12 by gene therapy together with metronomic cyclophosphamide exerts antitumor effects in a murine model of colorectal carcinoma. This combination therapy was able, at least in part, to reverse immunosuppression, by decreasing the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as of splenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). However, metronomic cyclophosphamide plus IL-12 gene therapy failed to increase the number of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes and, more importantly, to induce a specific antitumor immune response. With respect to this, cyclophosphamide at a single low dose displayed a superior anticancer profile than the same drug given at a metronomic schedule. Our results may have important implications in the design of new therapeutic strategies against colorectal carcinoma using cyclophosphamide in combination with immunotherapy. PMID:23170252

  7. Targeted Therapies Combined With Immune Checkpoint Therapy.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Peter A; Reuben, Alexandre; Cooper, Zachary A; Wargo, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    The age of personalized medicine continues to evolve within clinical oncology with the arsenal available to clinicians in a variety of malignancies expanding at an exponential rate. The development and advancement of molecular treatment modalities, including targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade, continue to flourish. Treatment with targeted therapy (BRAF, MEK, and other small molecule inhibitors) can be associated with swift disease control and high response rates, but limited durability when used as monotherapy. Conversely, treatment with immune checkpoint blockade monotherapy regimens (anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and anti-programmed cell death protein 1/programmed cell death protein 1 ligand) tends to have lower response rates than that observed with BRAF-targeted therapy, although these treatments may offer long-term durable disease control. With the advent of these forms of therapy, there was interest early on in empirically combining targeted therapy with immune checkpoint blockade with the hopes of preserving high response rates and adding durability; however, there is now strong scientific rationale for combining these forms of therapy-and early evidence of synergy in preclinical models of melanoma. Clinical trials combining these strategies are ongoing, and mature data regarding response rates and durability are not yet available. Synergy may ultimately be apparent; however, it has also become clear that complexities exist regarding toxicity when combining these therapies. Nonetheless, this increased appreciation of the complex interplay between oncogenic mutations and antitumor immunity has opened up tremendous opportunities for studying targeted agents and immunotherapy in combination, which extends far beyond melanoma to other solid tumors and also to hematologic malignancies. PMID:27111910

  8. Combining Clozapine and Talk Therapies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin

    Clozapine is an antipsychotic medication used in the treatment of schizophrenia. This paper reviews articles concerning clozapine therapy. It considers its benefits and dangers in various situations, and how it can be successfully combined with talk therapies. Studies are reviewed concerning patients in outpatient clinics, partial hospitalization…

  9. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA-SCID) ADA- ... in preclinical animal models of this disease. Other genetic disorders After many years of laboratory and preclinical ...

  10. Evaluation of radiation effects against C6 glioma in combination with vaccinia virus-p53 gene therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Timiryasova, T.; Chen, B.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of recombinant vaccinia virus-p53 (rVV-p53) in combination with radiation therapy against the C6 rat glioma, a p53 deficient tumor that is relatively radioresistant. VV-LIVP, the parental virus (Lister strain), was used as a control. Localized treatment of subcutaneous C6 tumors in athymic mice with either rVV-p53 or VV-LIVP together with tumor irradiation resulted in low tumor incidence and significantly slower tumor progression compared to the agents given as single modalities. Assays of blood and spleen indicated that immune system activation may account, at least partly, for the enhance tumor inhibition seen with combined treatment. No overt signs of treatment-related toxicity were noted.

  11. nanosheets for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  12. Multifunctional pDNA-Conjugated Polycationic Au Nanorod-Coated Fe3 O4 Hierarchical Nanocomposites for Trimodal Imaging and Combined Photothermal/Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Zhou, Yiqiang; Zhao, Nana; Liu, Fusheng; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2016-05-01

    It is very desirable to design multifunctional nanocomposites for theranostic applications via flexible strategies. The synthesis of one new multifunctional polycationic Au nanorod (NR)-coated Fe3 O4 nanosphere (NS) hierarchical nanocomposite (Au@pDM/Fe3 O4 ) based on the ternary assemblies of negatively charged Fe3 O4 cores (Fe3 O4 -PDA), polycation-modified Au nanorods (Au NR-pDM), and polycations is proposed. For such nanocomposites, the combined near-infrared absorbance properties of Fe3 O4 -PDA and Au NR-pDM are applied to photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. Besides, Fe3 O4 and Au NR components allow the nanocomposites to serve as MRI and CT contrast agents. The prepared positively charged Au@pDM/Fe3 O4 also can complex plasmid DNA into pDNA/Au@pDM/Fe3 O4 and efficiently mediated gene therapy. The multifunctional applications of pDNA/Au@pDM/Fe3 O4 nanocomposites in trimodal imaging and combined photothermal/gene therapy are demonstrated using a xenografted rat glioma nude mouse model. The present study demonstrates that the proper assembly of different inorganic nanoparticles and polycations is an effective strategy to construct new multifunctional theranostic systems. PMID:26996155

  13. Saporin suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarovni, Natasa; Vago, Riccardo; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2009-01-01

    New genes useful in suicide gene therapy are those encoding toxins such as plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), which can irreversibly block protein synthesis, triggering apoptotic cell death. Plasmids expressing a cytosolic saporin (SAP) gene from common soapwort (Saponaria officinalis) are generated by placing the region encoding the mature plant toxin under the control of strong viral promoters and may be placed under tumor-specific promoters. The ability of the resulting constructs to inhibit protein synthesis is tested in cultured tumor cells co-transfected with a luciferase reporter gene. SAP expression driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (pCI-SAP) demonstrates that only 10 ng ofplasmid DNA per 1.6 x 10(4) B16 melanoma cells drastically reduces luciferase reporter activity to 18% of that in control cells (1). Direct intratumoral injections are performed in an aggressive melanoma model. B16 melanoma-bearing mice injected with pCI-SAP complexed with lipofectamine or N-(2,3-dioleoyloxy-1-propyl) trimethylammonium methyl sulfate (DOTAP) show a noteworthy attenuation in tumor growth, and this effect is significantly augmented by repeated administrations of the DNA complexes. Here, we describe in detail this cost-effective and safe suicide gene approach. PMID:19565907

  14. Cardiac Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaanine, Antoine H.; Kalman, Jill; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic progressive disorder where frequent and recurrent hospitalizations are associated with high mortality and morbidity. The incidence and the prevalence of this disease will increase with the increase in the number of the aging population of the United States. Understanding the molecular pathology and pathophysiology of this disease will uncover novel targets and therapies that can restore the function or attenuate the damage of malfunctioning cardiomyocytes by gene therapy that becomes an interesting and a promising field for the treatment of heart failure as well as other diseases in the future. Of equal importance is developing vectors and delivery methods that can efficiently transduce the majority of the cardiomyocytes, that can offer a long term expression and that can escape the host immune response. Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors have the potential to become a promising novel therapeutic vehicles for molecular medicine in the future. PMID:21092890

  15. [Combination therapy for invasive aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel

    2011-03-01

    The frequency of invasive fungal infections, and specifically invasive aspergillosis, has increased in the last few decades. Despite the development of new antifungal agents, these infections are associated with high mortality, ranging from 40% to 80%, depending on the patient and the localization of the infection. To reduce these figures, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed, including combination therapy. Most of the available data on the efficacy of these combinations are from experimental models, in vitro data and retrospective observational studies or studies with a small number of patients that have included both patients in first-line treatment and those receiving rescue therapy; in addition there are many patients with possible forms of aspergillosis and few with demonstrated or probable forms. To date, there is no evidence that combination therapy has significantly higher efficacy than monotherapy; however, combination therapy could be indicated in severe forms of aspergillosis, or forms with central nervous involvement or extensive pulmonary involvement with respiratory insufficiency, etc. Among the combinations, the association of an echinocandin--the group that includes micafungin--with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B seems to show synergy. These combinations are those most extensively studied in clinical trials and therefore, although the grade of evidence is low, are recommended by the various scientific societies. PMID:21420576

  16. Endogenous MCM7 MicroRNA Cluster as a Novel Platform to Multiplex Small Interfering and Nucleolar RNAs for Combinational HIV-1 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Janet; Zhang, Jane; Li, Haitang; Ouellet, Dominique L.; DiGiusto, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Combinational therapy with small RNA inhibitory agents against multiple viral targets allows efficient inhibition of viral production by controlling gene expression at critical time points. Here we explore combinations of different classes of therapeutic anti-HIV-1 RNAs expressed from within the context of an intronic MCM7 (minichromosome maintenance complex component-7) platform that naturally harbors 3 microRNAs (miRNAs). We replaced the endogenous miRNAs with anti-HIV small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting HIV-1 tat and rev messages that function to induce post-transcriptional gene silencing by the RNA interference pathway, a nucleolar-localizing RNA ribozyme that targets the conserved U5 region of HIV-1 transcripts for degradation, and finally nucleolar trans-activation response (TAR) and Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA decoys designed to sequester HIV-1 Tat and Rev proteins inside the nucleolus. We demonstrate the versatility of the MCM7 platform in expressing and efficiently processing the siRNAs as miRNA mimics along with nucleolar small RNAs. Furthermore, three of the combinatorial constructs tested potently suppressed viral replication during a 1-month HIV challenge, with greater than 5-log inhibition compared with untransduced, HIV-1-infected CEM T lymphocytes. One of the most effective constructs contains an anti-HIV siRNA combined with a nucleolar-localizing U5 ribozyme and TAR decoy. This represents the first efficacious example of combining Drosha-processed siRNAs with small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP)-processed nucleolar RNA chimeras from a single intron platform for effective inhibition of viral replication. Moreover, we demonstrated enrichment/selection for cells expressing levels of the antiviral RNAs that provide optimal inhibition under the selective pressure of HIV. The combinations of si/snoRNAs represent a new paradigm for combinatorial RNA-based gene therapy applications. PMID:22834872

  17. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Farjadnia, Mahgol; Naderan, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable. PMID:25709266

  18. Prospects for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Robin R

    2004-01-01

    Inherited retinal disease, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), affects about 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by gradual loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of 60 or so different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Many of the disease genes are photoreceptor- or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell specific. Since adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can be used for efficient gene transfer to these two cell types, we are developing AAV-mediated gene therapy approaches for inherited retinal degeneration using animal models that have defects in these cells. The retinal degeneration slow (rds or Prph2Rd2/Rd) mouse, a model of recessive RP, lacks a functional gene encoding peripherin 2, which is a photoreceptor-specific protein required for the formation of outer segment discs. We have previously demonstrated restoration of photoreceptor ultrastructure and function by AAV-mediated gene transfer of peripherin 2. We have now extended our assessment to central visual neuronal responses in order to show an improvement of central visual function. The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat, provides another model of recessive RP. Here the defect is due to a defect in Mertk, a gene that is expressed in the RPE and encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that is thought to be involved in the recognition and binding of outer segment debris. The gene defect results in the inability of the RPE to phagocytose the shed outer segments from photoreceptor cells. The resulting accumulation of debris between the RPE and the neuroretina leads to progressive loss of photoreceptor cells. AAV-mediated delivery of Mertk to the RPE results in reduction of debris indicating that the phagocytosing function of the RPE is restored and delays the degeneration of the

  19. Combined modality doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and chitosan-mediated p53 gene therapy using double-walled microspheres for treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingxing; Leong, Jiayu; Chua, Qi Yi; Chi, Yu Tse; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Pack, Daniel W; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-07-01

    The therapeutic efficiency of combined chemotherapy and gene therapy on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells was investigated using double-walled microspheres that consisted of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) shell layer and fabricated via the precision particle fabrication (PPF) technique. Here, double-walled microspheres were used to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and/or chitosan-DNA nanoparticles containing the gene encoding the p53 tumor suppressor protein (chi-p53), loaded in the core and shell phases, respectively. Preliminary studies on chi-DNA nanoparticles were performed to optimize gene transfer to HepG2 cells. The transfection efficiency of chi-DNA nanoparticles was optimal at an N/P ratio of 7. In comparison to the 25-kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI), chitosan showed no inherent toxicity towards the cells. Next, the therapeutic efficiencies of Dox and/or chi-p53 in microsphere formulations were compared to free drug(s) and evaluated in terms of growth inhibition, and cellular expression of tumor suppressor p53 and apoptotic caspase 3 proteins. Overall, the combined Dox and chi-p53 treatment exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity as compared to either Dox or chi-p53 treatments alone. Moreover, the antiproliferative effect was more substantial when cells were treated with microspheres than those treated with free drugs. High p53 expression was maintained during a five-day period, and was largely due to the controlled and sustained release of the microspheres. Moreover, increased activation of caspase 3 was observed, and was likely to have been facilitated by high levels of p53 expression. Overall, double-walled microspheres present a promising dual anticancer delivery system for combined chemotherapy and gene therapy. PMID:23578555

  20. Combined modality doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and chitosan-mediated p53 gene therapy using double-walled microspheres for treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingxing; Leong, Jiayu; Chua, Qi Yi; Chi, Yu Tse; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Pack, Daniel W.; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic efficiency of combined chemotherapy and gene therapy on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells was investigated using double-walled microspheres that consisted of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) shell layer and fabricated via the precision particle fabrication (PPF) technique. Here, double-walled microspheres were used to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and/or chitosan-DNA nanoparticles containing the gene encoding the p53 tumor suppressor protein (chi-p53), loaded in the core and shell phases, respectively. Preliminary studies on chi-DNA nanoparticles were performed to optimize gene transfer to HepG2 cells. The transfection efficiency of chi-DNA nanoparticles was optimal at an N/P ratio of 7. In comparison to the 25-kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI), chitosan showed no inherent toxicity towards the cells. Next, the therapeutic efficiencies of Dox and/or chi-p53 in microsphere formulations were compared to free drug(s) and evaluated in terms of growth inhibition, and cellular expression of tumor suppressor p53 and apoptotic caspase 3 proteins. Overall, the combined Dox and chi-p53 treatment exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity as compared to either Dox or chi-p53 treatments alone. Moreover, the antiproliferative effect was more substantial when cells were treated with microspheres than those treated with free drugs. High p53 expression was maintained during a five-day period, and was largely due to the controlled and sustained release of the microspheres. Moreover, increased activation of caspase 3 was observed, and was likely to have been facilitated by high levels of p53 expression. Overall, double-walled microspheres present a promising dual anticancer delivery system for combined chemotherapy and gene therapy. PMID:23578555

  1. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vectors are engineered to replicate preferentially in cancer cells and to destroy cancer cells through the natural process of lytic virus replication. Many clinical trials indicate that replication-defective and replication-competent adenovirus vectors are safe and have therapeutic activity. PMID:24279313

  2. Identification of a set of genes associated with response to interleukin-2 and interferon-α combination therapy for renal cell carcinoma through genome-wide gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    MIZUMORI, OSAMU; ZEMBUTSU, HITOSHI; KATO, YOICHIRO; TSUNODA, TATSUHIKO; MIYA, FUYUKI; MORIZONO, TAKASHI; TSUKAMOTO, TAIJI; FUJIOKA, TOMOAKI; TOMITA, YOSHIHIKO; KITAMURA, TADAICHI; OZONO, SEIICHIRO; MIKI, TSUNEHARU; NAITO, SEIJI; AKAZA, HIDEYUKI; NAKAMURA, YUSUKE

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-α combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) improves the prognosis for a subset of patients, while some patients suffer from severe adverse drug reactions with little benefit. To establish a method to predict responses to this combination therapy (approximately 30% response rate), the gene expression profiles of primary RCCs were analyzed using an oligoDNA microarray consisting of 38,500 genes or ESTs, after enrichment of the cancer cell population by laser micro-beam microdissection. The analysis of 10 responders and 18 non-responders identified 24 genes that exhibited significant differential expression between the two groups. In addition, the patients whose tumors did not express HLA-DQA1 or HLA-DQB1 molecules demonstrated poor clinical response. Exclusion of patients with tumors lacking either of these two genes is likely to improve the response rate to IL-2 and IFN-α combination therapy from 30 to 67%, indicating that a simple pretreatment test provides useful information with which to subselect patients with renal cancer in order to improve the efficacy of this treatment and reduce unnecessary medical costs. PMID:22993625

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles: Applications in gene delivery and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Sima; Zeinali Sehrig, Fatemeh; Samiei, Mohammad; Milani, Morteza; Abbasi, Elham; Dadashzadeh, Kianoosh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-06-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the direct transfer of genetic material to tissues or cells for the treatment of inherited disorders and acquired diseases. For gene delivery, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are typically combined with a delivery platform to encapsulate the gene, and promote cell uptake. Delivery technologies that have been used with MNPs contain polymeric, viral, as well as non-viral platforms. In this review, we focus on targeted gene delivery using MNPs. PMID:25727710

  4. Impact of α-Targeted Radiation Therapy on Gene Expression in a Pre-Clinical Model for Disseminated Peritoneal Disease when Combined with Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the molecular basis of the enhanced cell killing effected by the combined modality of paclitaxel and 212Pb-trastuzumab (Pac/212Pb-trastuzumab), gene expression in LS-174T i.p. xenografts was investigated 24 h after treatment. Employing a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array), 84 DNA damage response genes were quantified. Differentially expressed genes following therapy with Pac/212Pb-trastuzumab included those involved in apoptosis (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45α, GADD45γ, GML, IP6K3, PCBP4, PPP1R15A, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, GADD45α, GML, GTSE1, NBN, PCBP4, PPP1R15A, RAD9A, and SESN1), and damaged DNA repair (ATRX, BTG2, EXO1, FEN1, IGHMBP2, OGG1, MSH2, MUTYH, NBN, PRKDC, RAD21, and p73). This report demonstrates that the increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by the Pac/212Pb-trastuzumab treatment suppresses cell proliferation through the regulation of genes which are involved in apoptosis and damaged DNA repair including single and double strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that 212Pb-trastuzumab potentiation of cell killing efficacy results from the perturbation of genes related to the mitotic spindle checkpoint and BASC (BRCA1-associated genome surveillance complex), suggesting cross-talk between DNA damage repair and the spindle damage response. PMID:25268703

  5. Optimized human CYP4B1 in combination with the alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol serves as a novel suicide gene system for adoptive T-cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Roellecke, K; Virts, E L; Einholz, R; Edson, K Z; Altvater, B; Rossig, C; von Laer, D; Scheckenbach, K; Wagenmann, M; Reinhardt, D; Kramm, C M; Rettie, A E; Wiek, C; Hanenberg, H

    2016-07-01

    Engineering autologous or allogeneic T cells to express a suicide gene can control potential toxicity in adoptive T-cell therapies. We recently reported the development of a novel human suicide gene system that is based on an orphan human cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP4B1, and the naturally occurring alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol. The goal of this study was to systematically develop a clinically applicable self-inactivating lentiviral vector for efficient co-expression of CYP4B1 as an ER-located protein with two distinct types of cell surface proteins, either MACS selection genes for donor lymphocyte infusions after allogeneic stem cell transplantation or chimeric antigen receptors for retargeting primary T cells. The U3 region of the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus in combination with the T2A site was found to drive high-level expression of our CYP4B1 mutant with truncated CD34 or CD271 as MACS suitable selection markers. This lentiviral vector backbone was also well suited for co-expression of CYP4B1 with a codon-optimized CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) construct. Finally, 4-ipomeanol efficiently induced apoptosis in primary T cells that co-express mutant CYP4B1 and the divergently located MACS selection and CAR genes. In conclusion, we here developed a clinically suited lentiviral vector that supports high-level co-expression of cell surface proteins with a potent novel human suicide gene. PMID:27092941

  6. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases. PMID:23566848

  7. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, potentially fatal pediatric disease, which results from mutations within the ADA gene, leading to metabolic abnormalities and ultimately profound immunologic and nonimmunologic defects. In this study, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors based on serotypes 1 and 9 were used to deliver a secretory version of the human ADA (hADA) gene to various tissues to promote immune reconstitution following enzyme expression in a mouse model of ADA deficiency. Here, we report that a single-stranded rAAV vector, pTR2-CB-Igκ-hADA, (1) facilitated successful gene delivery to multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, (2) promoted ectopic expression of hADA, and (3) allowed enhanced serum-based enzyme activity over time. Moreover, the rAAV-hADA vector packaged in serotype 9 capsid drove partial, prolonged, and progressive immune reconstitution in ADA-deficient mice. Overview Summary Gene therapies for severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency (ADA-SCID) over two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoietic progenitor cells. These groundbreaking gene therapies represented an unprecedented revolution in clinical medicine but in most cases did not fully correct the immune deficiency and came with the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Alternatively, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained attention as valuable tools for gene transfer, having demonstrated no pathogenicity in humans, minimal immunogenicity, long-term efficacy, ease of administration, and broad tissue tropism (Muzyczka, 1992 ; Flotte et al., 1993 ; Kessler et al., 1996 ; McCown et al., 1996 ; Lipkowitz et al., 1999 ; Marshall, 2001 ; Chen et al., 2003 ; Conlon and Flotte, 2004 ; Griffey et al., 2005 ; Pacak et al., 2006 ; Stone et al., 2008 ; Liu et al., 2009 ; Choi et al., 2010

  8. Suppression of human breast tumors in NOD/SCID mice by CD44 shRNA gene therapy combined with doxorubicin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Van Pham, Phuc; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Duong, Thuy Thanh; Nguyen, Tam Thanh; Truong, Nhung Hai; Phan, Nhan Lu Chinh; Vuong, Tue Gia; Pham, Viet Quoc; Nguyen, Hoang Minh; Nguyen, Kha The; Nguyen, Nhung Thi; Nguyen, Khue Gia; Khat, Lam Tan; Van Le, Dong; Truong, Kiet Dinh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer stem cells with a CD44+CD24− phenotype are the origin of breast tumors. Strong CD44 expression in this population indicates its important role in maintaining the stem cell phenotype. Previous studies show that CD44 down-regulation causes CD44+CD24− breast cancer stem cells to differentiate into non-stem cells that are sensitive to antitumor drugs and lose many characteristics of the original cells. In this study, we determined tumor suppression in non-obese severe combined immunodeficiency mice using CD44 shRNA therapy combined with doxorubicin treatment. Methods Tumor-bearing non-obese severe combined immunodeficiency mice were established by injection of CD44+CD24− cells. To track CD44+CD24− cells, green fluorescence protein was stably transduced using a lentiviral vector prior to injection into mice. The amount of CD44 shRNA lentiviral vector used for transduction was based on CD44 down-regulation by in vitro CD44 shRNA transduction. Mice were treated with direct injection of CD44 shRNA lentiviral vector into tumors followed by doxorubicin administration after 48 hours. The effect was evaluated by changes in the size and weight of tumors compared with that of the control. Results The combination of CD44 down-regulation and doxorubicin strongly suppressed tumor growth with significant differences in tumor sizes and weights compared with that of CD44 down-regulation or doxorubicin treatment alone. In the combination of CD44 down-regulation and doxorubicin group, the tumor weight was significantly decreased by 4.38-fold compared with that of the control group. Conclusion These results support a new strategy for breast cancer treatment by combining gene therapy with chemotherapy. PMID:22649280

  9. Gene therapy for CNS diseases - Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  10. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tangney, Mark; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Sara A; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2010-05-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor's vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  11. Combined gene/cell therapies provide long-term and pervasive rescue of multiple pathological symptoms in a murine model of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ricca, Alessandra; Rufo, Nicole; Ungari, Silvia; Morena, Francesco; Martino, Sabata; Kulik, Wilem; Alberizzi, Valeria; Bolino, Alessandra; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Biffi, Alessandra; Gritti, Angela

    2015-06-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient activity of β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The infantile forms manifest with rapid and progressive central and peripheral demyelination, which represent a major hurdle for any treatment approach. We demonstrate here that neonatal lentiviral vector-mediated intracerebral gene therapy (IC GT) or transplantation of GALC-overexpressing neural stem cells (NSC) synergize with bone marrow transplant (BMT) providing dramatic extension of lifespan and global clinical-pathological rescue in a relevant GLD murine model. We show that timely and long-lasting delivery of functional GALC in affected tissues ensured by the exclusive complementary mode of action of the treatments underlies the outstanding benefit. In particular, the contribution of neural stem cell transplantation and IC GT during the early asymptomatic stage of the disease is instrumental to enhance long-term advantage upon BMT. We clarify the input of central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and periphery to the disease, and the relative contribution of treatments to the final therapeutic outcome, with important implications for treatment strategies to be tried in human patients. This study gives proof-of-concept of efficacy, tolerability and clinical relevance of the combined gene/cell therapies proposed here, which may constitute a feasible and effective therapeutic opportunity for children affected by GLD. PMID:25749991

  12. Combined gene/cell therapies provide long-term and pervasive rescue of multiple pathological symptoms in a murine model of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ricca, Alessandra; Rufo, Nicole; Ungari, Silvia; Morena, Francesco; Martino, Sabata; Kulik, Wilem; Alberizzi, Valeria; Bolino, Alessandra; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Biffi, Alessandra; Gritti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient activity of β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The infantile forms manifest with rapid and progressive central and peripheral demyelination, which represent a major hurdle for any treatment approach. We demonstrate here that neonatal lentiviral vector-mediated intracerebral gene therapy (IC GT) or transplantation of GALC-overexpressing neural stem cells (NSC) synergize with bone marrow transplant (BMT) providing dramatic extension of lifespan and global clinical–pathological rescue in a relevant GLD murine model. We show that timely and long-lasting delivery of functional GALC in affected tissues ensured by the exclusive complementary mode of action of the treatments underlies the outstanding benefit. In particular, the contribution of neural stem cell transplantation and IC GT during the early asymptomatic stage of the disease is instrumental to enhance long-term advantage upon BMT. We clarify the input of central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and periphery to the disease, and the relative contribution of treatments to the final therapeutic outcome, with important implications for treatment strategies to be tried in human patients. This study gives proof-of-concept of efficacy, tolerability and clinical relevance of the combined gene/cell therapies proposed here, which may constitute a feasible and effective therapeutic opportunity for children affected by GLD. PMID:25749991

  13. Gene Therapy Targeting Glaucoma: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuyang; Rasmussen, Carol A.; Gabelt, B’Ann T.; Brandt, Curtis R.; Kaufman, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    In a chronic disease such as glaucoma, a therapy that provides a long lasting local effect, with minimal systemic side effects, while circumventing the issue of patient compliance, is very attractive. The field of gene therapy is growing rapidly and ocular applications are expanding. Our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glaucoma is leading to greater specificity in ocular tissue targeting. Improvements in gene delivery techniques, refinement of vector construction methods, and development of better animal models combine to bring this potential therapy closer to reality. PMID:19539835

  14. Gene therapy: progress and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of viral vectors. There are also a number of promising gene therapy approaches for cancer and infectious disease. We predict that the next 25 years will see improvements in safety, efficacy and manufacture of gene delivery vectors and introduction of gene-editing technologies to the clinic. Gene delivery may also prove a cost-effective method for the delivery of biological medicines. PMID:26702034

  15. Gene Therapy for Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Samiy, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has a growing research potential particularly in the field of ophthalmic and retinal diseases owing to three main characteristics of the eye; accessibility in terms of injections and surgical interventions, its immune-privileged status facilitating the accommodation to the antigenicity of a viral vector, and tight blood-ocular barriers which save other organs from unwanted contamination. Gene therapy has tremendous potential for different ocular diseases. In fact, the perspective of gene therapy in the field of eye research does not confine to exclusive monogenic ophthalmic problems and it has the potential to include gene based pharmacotherapies for non-monogenic problems such as age related macular disease and diabetic retinopathy. The present article has focused on how gene transfer into the eye has been developed and used to treat retinal disorders with no available therapy at present. PMID:25709778

  16. Association of ITPA gene polymorphisms and the risk of ribavirin-induced anemia in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected patients receiving HCV combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Pere; Guardiola, Josep M; Salazar, Juliana; Torres, Ferran; Mateo, M Gracia; Pacho, Cristina; Del Mar Gutierrez, M; Lamarca, Karuna; Fontanet, Angels; Martin, Jordi; Muñoz, Jessica; Vidal, Francesc; Baiget, Montserrat

    2012-06-01

    Polymorphisms of the ITPA gene have been associated with anemia during combination therapy in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected patients. Our aim was to confirm this association in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. In this prospective, observational study, 73 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (RBV) were enrolled. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms within or adjacent to the ITPA gene (rs1127354 and rs7270101) were genotyped. The associations between the ITPA genotype and anemia or treatment outcome were examined. Fifty-nine patients (80.8%) had CC at rs1127354, whereas 14 (19.2%) had a CA/AA ITPA genotype. Percent decreases from baseline hemoglobin level were significantly greater in patients with the CC genotype than in those with the CA/AA genotype at week 4 (P = 0.0003), week 12 (P < 0.0001), and week 36 (P = 0.0102) but not at the end of treatment. RBV dose reduction was more often needed in patients with the CC genotype than in those with the CA/AA genotype (odds ratio [OR] = 11.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.45 to 256.17; P = 0.0039), as was erythropoietin therapy (OR = 8.28; 95% CI = 1.04 to 371.12; P = 0.0057). Risk factors independently associated with percent hemoglobin nadir decrease were RBV dose reduction (OR = 11.72; 95% CI = 6.82 to 16.63; P < 0.001), baseline hemoglobin (OR = 1.69; 95% CI = 0.23 to 3.15; P = 0.024), and body mass index (OR = -0.7; 95% CI = -1.43 to 0.03; P = 0.061). ITPA polymorphism was not an independent predictor of sustained virological response. Polymorphisms at rs1127354 in the ITPA gene influence hemoglobin levels during combination HCV therapy and the need for RBV dose reduction and erythropoietin use in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. PMID:22430973

  17. Association of ITPA Gene Polymorphisms and the Risk of Ribavirin-Induced Anemia in HIV/Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-Coinfected Patients Receiving HCV Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guardiola, Josep M.; Salazar, Juliana; Torres, Ferran; Mateo, M. Gracia; Pacho, Cristina; del Mar Gutierrez, M.; Lamarca, Karuna; Fontanet, Angels; Martin, Jordi; Muñoz, Jessica; Vidal, Francesc; Baiget, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms of the ITPA gene have been associated with anemia during combination therapy in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected patients. Our aim was to confirm this association in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. In this prospective, observational study, 73 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (RBV) were enrolled. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms within or adjacent to the ITPA gene (rs1127354 and rs7270101) were genotyped. The associations between the ITPA genotype and anemia or treatment outcome were examined. Fifty-nine patients (80.8%) had CC at rs1127354, whereas 14 (19.2%) had a CA/AA ITPA genotype. Percent decreases from baseline hemoglobin level were significantly greater in patients with the CC genotype than in those with the CA/AA genotype at week 4 (P = 0.0003), week 12 (P < 0.0001), and week 36 (P = 0.0102) but not at the end of treatment. RBV dose reduction was more often needed in patients with the CC genotype than in those with the CA/AA genotype (odds ratio [OR] = 11.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.45 to 256.17; P = 0.0039), as was erythropoietin therapy (OR = 8.28; 95% CI = 1.04 to 371.12; P = 0.0057). Risk factors independently associated with percent hemoglobin nadir decrease were RBV dose reduction (OR = 11.72; 95% CI = 6.82 to 16.63; P < 0.001), baseline hemoglobin (OR = 1.69; 95% CI = 0.23 to 3.15; P = 0.024), and body mass index (OR = −0.7; 95% CI = −1.43 to 0.03; P = 0.061). ITPA polymorphism was not an independent predictor of sustained virological response. Polymorphisms at rs1127354 in the ITPA gene influence hemoglobin levels during combination HCV therapy and the need for RBV dose reduction and erythropoietin use in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. PMID:22430973

  18. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein. PMID:27481008

  19. Human Studies of Angiogenic Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh; Tongers, Jörn; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medical, interventional, and surgical therapy for coronary and peripheral arterial disease, the burden of these illnesses remains high. To address this unmet need, the science of therapeutic angiogenesis has been evolving for almost two decades. Early pre-clinical studies and phase I clinical trials achieved promising results with growth factors administered as recombinant proteins or as single-agent gene therapies, and data accumulated through 10 years of clinical trials indicate that gene therapy has an acceptable safety profile. However, more rigorous phase II and phase III clinical trials have failed to unequivocally demonstrate that angiogenic agents are beneficial under the conditions and in the patients studied to date. Investigators have worked to understand the biology of the vascular system and to incorporate their findings into new treatments for patients with ischemic disease. Recent gene- and cell-therapy trials have demonstrated the bioactivity of several new agents and treatment strategies. Collectively, these observations have renewed interest in the mechanisms of angiogenesis and deepened our understanding of the complexity of vascular regeneration. Gene therapy that incorporates multiple growth factors, approaches that combine cell and gene therapy, and the administration of "master switch" agents that activate numerous downstream pathways are among the credible and plausible steps forward. In this review, we will examine the clinical development of angiogenic therapy, summarize several of the lessons learned during the conduct of these trials, and suggest how this prior experience may guide the conduct of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:19815827

  20. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy. PMID:24202446

  1. Gene therapy on the move

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Büning, Hildegard; Galy, Anne; Schambach, Axel; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The first gene therapy clinical trials were initiated more than two decades ago. In the early days, gene therapy shared the fate of many experimental medicine approaches and was impeded by the occurrence of severe side effects in a few treated patients. The understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to treatment- and/or vector-associated setbacks has resulted in the development of highly sophisticated gene transfer tools with improved safety and therapeutic efficacy. Employing these advanced tools, a series of Phase I/II trials were started in the past few years with excellent clinical results and no side effects reported so far. Moreover, highly efficient gene targeting strategies and site-directed gene editing technologies have been developed and applied clinically. With more than 1900 clinical trials to date, gene therapy has moved from a vision to clinical reality. This review focuses on the application of gene therapy for the correction of inherited diseases, the limitations and drawbacks encountered in some of the early clinical trials and the revival of gene therapy as a powerful treatment option for the correction of monogenic disorders. PMID:24106209

  2. [Combination therapy of hypopharyngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, H

    1987-06-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, ninety-three patients with cancer of the hypopharynx were treated. They were evaluated as to sex, age, primary site, TNM classification, stage, habits of smoking and drinking, past history of irradiation, treatment modality and end results. Eighty-seven percent of the patients visited us at as late a stage as advanced stage III or IV, and were treated mainly by combined therapy involving irradiation and pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy. The 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 38.6% and 33.3%, respectively. After December 1983, 14 new patients with advanced disease including three with coervical esophageal cancer were treated with neo-adjuvant combination chemotherapy which included cisplatin, peplomycin, methotrexate, and bleomycin over two courses of therapy. The response rate (CR + PR) was high, being 82% for the primary tumor and 78% for the metastatic node. Histopathological effects of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy were studied in the resected specimens. The evaluation was based on the Ohboshi-Shimosato classification. The histological effects did not agree with the clinical effects. Grade II b change was evaluated mostly in CR cases and grade II a change was seen in PR cases. It thus seems that neo-adjuvant chemotherapy prior to surgery and/or radiation including cisplatin and other agents is very useful as a multidisciplinary treatment for cancer of the hypopharynx. PMID:3592715

  3. Gene Therapy for "Bubble Boy" Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Jonathan

    2016-07-14

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites that destroy the immune system, causing severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), often referred to as the "bubble boy" disease. Strimvelis is a European Medicines Agency approved gene therapy for ADA-SCID patients without a suitable bone marrow donor. PMID:27419862

  4. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers. PMID:9034598

  5. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vinge, Leif Erik; Raake, Philip W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    With increasing knowledge of basic molecular mechanisms governing the development of heart failure (HF), the possibility of specifically targeting key pathological players is evolving. Technology allowing for efficient in vivo transduction of myocardial tissue with long-term expression of a transgene enables translation of basic mechanistic knowledge into potential gene therapy approaches. Gene therapy in HF is in its infancy clinically with the predominant amount of experience being from animal models. Nevertheless, this challenging and promising field is gaining momentum as recent preclinical studies in larger animals have been carried out and, importantly, there are 2 newly initiated phase I clinical trials for HF gene therapy. To put it simply, 2 parameters are needed for achieving success with HF gene therapy: (1) clearly identified detrimental/beneficial molecular targets; and (2) the means to manipulate these targets at a molecular level in a sufficient number of cardiac cells. However, several obstacles do exist on our way to efficient and safe gene transfer to human myocardium. Some of these obstacles are discussed in this review; however, it primarily focuses on the molecular target systems that have been subjected to intense investigation over the last decade in an attempt to make gene therapy for human HF a reality. PMID:18566312

  6. Gene Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has seen substantial advances in the development of gene therapy strategies and vector technology for the treatment of a diverse number of diseases, with a view to translating the successes observed in animal models into the clinic. Perhaps the overwhelming drive for the increase in vascular gene transfer studies is the current lack of successful long-term pharmacological treatments for complex cardiovascular diseases. The increase in cardiovascular disease to epidemic proportions has also led many to conclude that drug therapy may have reached a plateau in its efficacy and that gene therapy may represent a realistic solution to a long-term problem. Here, we discuss gene delivery approaches and target diseases. PMID:12721517

  7. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Hacein-Bey Abina, S; Touzot, F; Cavazzana, M

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy has effectively entered Medicine via the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Because hematopoietic stem cells are accessible and because it was understood that genetic correction of lymphocyte progenitor cells carrying a genetic defect impairing differentiation, could result in the production of long-lived T lymphocytes, it was reasoned that ex vivo gene transfer in hematopoietic cells could lead to disease phenotype correction. Retroviral vectors were designed to ex vivo transduce such cells. This has indeed been shown to lead to sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiency associated with two forms of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) for now more than ten years. Occurrence in some patients of genotoxicity related to retroviral vectors integration close to and transactivation of oncogenes has led to the development of retroviral vectors devoid of its enhancer element. Results of recent trials performed for several forms of PID indeed suggest that their use is both safe and efficacious. It is thus anticipated that their application to the treatment of many more life threatening PID will be developed over the coming years. PMID:25708106

  8. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and interferon-β plus suicide gene as combined therapy for spontaneous canine sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Villaverde, Marcela S; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Riveros, María D; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2011-10-01

    Eleven soft tissue- and five osteosarcoma canine patients were subjected to: (i) periodic subcutaneous injection of irradiated xenogeneic cells secreting hGM-CSF and hIL-2 mixed with allogeneic or autologous tumor homogenates; and (ii) injections of cIFN-β and HSVtk-carrying lipoplexes and ganciclovir, marginal (after surgery) and/or intratumoral (in the case of partial tumor resection, local relapse or small surface tumors). This treatment alone (4 patients) or as surgery adjuvant (12 patients), was safe and well tolerated. In those patients presenting local disease (6/11), the suicide gene plus cIFN-β treatment induced local antitumor activity evidenced by the objective responses (3 complete, 2 partial) and stable diseases (2). In addition, the treatment prevented or delayed local relapse, regional metastases (lymph nodes developed only in 3/16) and distant metastases (0/16), suggesting a strong systemic antitumor immunity. The most encouraging result was the long survival times of 10 patients (>1 year, with good quality of life). PMID:21300385

  9. Gene Therapy in Corneal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Yureeda; Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed organ transplantation. Immune privilege of the cornea is widely recognized, partly because of the relatively favorable outcome of corneal grafts. The first-time recipient of corneal allografts in an avascular, low-risk setting can expect a 90% success rate without systemic immunosuppressive agents and histocompatibility matching. However, immunologic rejection remains the major cause of graft failure, particularly in patients with a high risk for rejection. Corticosteroids remain the first-line therapy for the prevention and treatment of immune rejection. However, current pharmacological measures are limited in their side-effect profiles, repeated application, lack of targeted response, and short duration of action. Experimental ocular gene therapy may thus present new horizons in immunomodulation. From efficient viral vectors to sustainable alternative splicing, we discuss the progress of gene therapy in promoting graft survival and postulate further avenues for gene-mediated prevention of allogeneic graft rejection. PMID:24138037

  10. Combination of pGL1-TNF-alpha gene and radiation (proton and gamma-ray) therapy against brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Li, J; Kajioka, E H; Andres, M L; Moyers, M F; Slater, J M

    2000-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine if treatment with the newly constructed plasmid vector for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (pGL1-TNF-alpha) could enhance the radiation-induced growth reduction of C6 rat glioma. In addition, two different forms of ionizing radiation (gamma-rays and protons) were utilized. Body and spleen mass, leukocyte blastogenesis, and flow cytometry analysis of cell populations in blood and spleen were performed to detect toxicity, if any, and to identify mechanisms that may correlate with the anti-tumor action of combination therapy. C6 tumor cells were implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice and allowed to become established before treatment initiation. pGL1-TNF-alpha was injected into the implanted tumors, which were then irradiated 16-18 hr later; each modality was administered three times over 8-9 days. The addition of pGL1-TNF-alpha significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of radiation (p < 0.05). The effect was more than additive, since pGL1-TNF-alpha alone did not slow tumor progression and radiation alone had only a modest effect. Administration of pGL1-TNF-alpha together with proton radiation resulted in tumor volumes that were 23% smaller than those following pGL1-TNF-alpha + gamma-ray treatment; a similar differential in tumor size was observed in the groups receiving only radiation. Body weights and blood and spleen cell analyses did not reveal treatment-related toxicity. High basal proliferation of blood leukocytes and increased B cell levels in the spleen were associated with pGL1-TNF-alpha + 60Co (gamma-radiation) or proton treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the pGL1-TNF-alpha/radiation combination is effective and safe under the conditions employed. This is the first study to combine gene and proton radiation therapy and to show, under controlled experimental conditions, that proton radiation may have a greater effect against malignant tumors compared to the same physical dose of gamma-radiation. PMID

  11. Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Patricia A; During, Matthew J

    2004-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder arising from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and subsequent depletion of striatal dopamine levels, which results in distressing motor symptoms. The current standard pharmacological treatment for PD is direct replacement of dopamine by treatment with its precursor, levodopa (L-dopa). However, this does not significantly alter disease progression and might contribute to the ongoing pathology. Several features of PD make this disease one of the most promising targets for clinical gene therapy of any neurological disease. The confinement of the major pathology to a compact, localised neuronal population and the anatomy of the basal ganglia circuitry mean that global gene transfer is not required and there are well-defined sites for gene transfer. The multifactorial aetiology of idiopathic PD means that it is unlikely any single gene will cure the disease, and as a result at least three separate gene-transfer strategies are currently being pursued: transfer of genes for enzymes involved in dopamine production; transfer of genes for growth factors involved in dopaminergic cell survival and regeneration; and transfer of genes to reset neuronal circuitry by switching cellular phenotype. The merits of these strategies are discussed here, along with remaining hurdles that might impede transfer of gene therapy technology to the clinic as a treatment for PD. PMID:15000692

  12. [Review of cancer gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Tani, K

    2000-09-01

    Since the first introduction of gene-marking technology to the clinical field in 1989 by Rosenberg et al, more than 4,000 patients have participated gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. Most of those patients had malignancies. Nearly 90% of clinical trials, however, are still in phase I-II stage, and only 3 protocols are in the phase III stage in early 2000. As current clinical gene therapy protocols are intended essentially to examine the safety and feasibility of the new strategy, more careful and steady steps may be required before these clinical trials really produce clinical benefits. Focused on cancer gene therapy, direct and indirect approaches are undertaken. In the direct approach, HSV-TK, HLA-B7, or p53 tumor suppressor gene therapies are the three major approaches historically. In for the indirect approach, cytokine or adhesion molecule gene-transferred tumor cells or immunocompetent cells are considered to be promising to enhance patients' antitumor immunity. In particular, we have concentrated on developing immuno gene therapy using GM-CSF-transduced autologous tumor cells. We have already recruited three patients with stage IV renal cell cancer. In all patients, peripheral blood T cells were mobilized after vaccination with GM-CSF-transduced tumor cells, and two of the three patients showed the persistence of cytotoxic T cells against autologous tumor cells. Clinically, one patient has been followed up with stable disease for more than one year since the start of vaccination. Further clinical studies are required to obtain conclusive results. PMID:11022677

  13. Combination of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and polyethylenimine/p53 gene therapy for the treatment of lung cancer using porous PLGA microparticles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaozheng; Li, Chunjie; Gao, Sai; Zhang, Lingfei; Han, Haobo; Zhang, Jianxu; Shi, Wei; Li, Quanshun

    2014-10-01

    In this study, porous PLGA microparticles for the co-delivery of doxorubicin and PEI25K/p53 were successfully prepared by the water-oil-water emulsion solvent evaporation method, using ammonium bicarbonate as a porogen. The porous microparticles were obtained with a mean diameter of 22.9±11.8μm as determined by laser scattering particle size analysis. The particles' surface porous morphology and distributions of doxorubicin and p53 were systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy, flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, revealing that doxorubicin and the plasmid were successfully co-encapsulated. Encapsulation efficiencies of 88.2±1.7% and 36.5±7.5% were achieved for doxorubicin and the plasmid, respectively, demonstrating that the porous structure did not adversely affect payload encapsulation. Microparticles harboring both doxorubicin and PEI25K/p53 exhibited enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis induction compared to those loaded with either agent alone in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Overall, the porous PLGA microparticles provide a promising anticancer delivery system for combined chemotherapy and gene therapy, and have great potential as a tool for sustained local drug delivery by inhalation. PMID:25082753

  14. Gene therapy for paediatric leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, R F; Bollard, C M; Heslop, H E

    2001-07-01

    Improvements in the chemotherapeutic and transplant regimens have had a significant impact in improving survival rates for paediatric leukaemia. However, there are still important problems to address including what options are available for patients with chemoresistant disease and what strategies are available to avoid the concerns regarding the toxicity associated with highly cytotoxic treatment regimens. Gene therapy and immunotherapy protocols hold great promise. Using gene transfer of a marker gene, a number of biological issues in the therapy of leukaemia have been addressed. For example, by gene marking autologous bone marrow grafts it has been possible to demonstrate that infused marrow contributes to relapse in acute and chronic myeloid leukaemias. In the allogeneic transplant setting, genetically modified T-cells have proven valuable for the prophylaxis and treatment of viral diseases and may have an important role in preventing or treating disease relapse. Gene transfer is also being used to modify tumour function, enhance immunogenicity, and confer drug-resistance to normal haematopoietic stem cells. With the continued scientific advancements in this field, gene therapy will almost certainly have a major impact on the treatment of paediatric leukaemia in the future. PMID:11727502

  15. Experimental therapies: gene therapies and oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Cho, Choi-Fong; Chiocca, E Antonio; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Over the past three decades, the overall survival time has only improved by a few months, therefore novel alternative treatment modalities are needed to improve clinical management strategies. Such strategies should ultimately extend patient survival. At present, the extensive insight into the molecular biology of gliomas, as well as into genetic engineering techniques, has led to better decision processes when it comes to modifying the genome to accommodate suicide genes, cytokine genes, and tumor suppressor genes that may kill cancer cells, and boost the host defensive immune system against neoantigenic cytoplasmic and nuclear targets. Both nonreplicative viral vectors and replicating oncolytic viruses have been developed for brain cancer treatment. Stem cells, microRNAs, nanoparticles, and viruses have also been designed. These have been armed with transgenes or peptides, and have been used both in laboratory-based experiments as well as in clinical trials, with the aim of improving selective killing of malignant glioma cells while sparing normal brain tissue. This chapter reviews the current status of gene therapies for malignant gliomas and highlights the most promising viral and cell-based strategies under development. PMID:26948355

  16. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  17. Combining Individual Psychodynamics with Structural Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melito, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Presents integrative framework for combining central aspects of individual psychodynamics with structural family therapy in meaningful way. Explains how framework derives from developmental perspective. Presents case example to illustrate combined approach and demonstrate its utility. (Author/NB)

  18. [Gene therapy for osteoarticular disorders].

    PubMed

    Gouze, Jean-Noël; Evans, Christopher H; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Gouze, Elvire

    2007-03-01

    Osteoarticular disorders are the major cause of disability in Europe and North America. It is estimated that rheumatoid arthritis affects 1 % of the population and that more than two third of people over age 55 develop osteoarthritis. Because there are no satisfactory treatments, gene therapy offers a new therapeutic approach. The delivery of cDNA encoding anti-arthritic proteins to articular cells has shown therapeutic efficacy in numerous animal models in vivo. Through the development and the experimental progresses that have been made for both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, this review discusses the different gene therapy strategies available today and the safety issues with which they may be associated. Among the different vectors available today, adeno-associated virus seems the best candidate for a direct in vivo gene delivery approach for the treatment of joint disorders. PMID:17349293

  19. Gene Therapy for Coagulation Disorders.

    PubMed

    Swystun, Laura L; Lillicrap, David

    2016-04-29

    Molecular genetic details of the human coagulation system were among the first successes of the genetic revolution in the 1980s. This information led to new molecular diagnostic strategies for inherited disorders of hemostasis and the development of recombinant clotting factors for the treatment of the common inherited bleeding disorders. A longer term goal of this knowledge has been the establishment of gene transfer to provide continuing access to missing or defective hemostatic proteins. Because of the relative infrequency of inherited coagulation factor disorders and the availability of safe and effective alternative means of management, the application of gene therapy for these conditions has been slow to realize clinical application. Nevertheless, the tools for effective and safe gene transfer are now much improved, and we have started to see examples of clinical gene therapy successes. Leading the way has been the use of adeno-associated virus-based strategies for factor IX gene transfer in hemophilia B. Several small phase 1/2 clinical studies using this approach have shown prolonged expression of therapeutically beneficial levels of factor IX. Nevertheless, before the application of gene therapy for coagulation disorders becomes widespread, several obstacles need to be overcome. Immunologic responses to the vector and transgenic protein need to be mitigated, and production strategies for clinical grade vectors require enhancements. There is little doubt that with the development of more efficient and facile strategies for genome editing and the application of other nucleic acid-based approaches to influence the coagulation system, the future of genetic therapies for hemostasis is bright. PMID:27126652

  20. Treating Immunodeficiency through HSC Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2016-04-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has been successfully employed as a therapeutic option to treat specific inherited immune deficiencies, including severe combined immune deficiencies (SCID) over the past two decades. Initial clinical trials using first-generation gamma-retroviral vectors to transfer corrective DNA demonstrated clinical benefit for patients, but were associated with leukemogenesis in a number of cases. Safer vectors have since been developed, affording comparable efficacy with an improved biosafety profile. These vectors are now in Phase I/II clinical trials for a number of immune disorders with more preclinical studies underway. Targeted gene editing allowing precise DNA correction via platforms such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 may now offer promising strategies to improve the safety and efficacy of gene therapy in the future. PMID:26993219

  1. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... screenings or other regular exams. previous continue The Future of Gene Therapy To cure genetic diseases, scientists ... Gene therapy's potential to revolutionize medicine in the future is exciting, and hopes are high for its ...

  2. Theranostic Imaging of Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) is a promising therapeutic approach for treating cancers of various phenotypes. This strategy is independent of various other chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating cancers where the drugs are mainly designed to target endogenous cellular mechanisms, which are different in various cancer subtypes. In GDEPT an external enzyme, which is different from the cellular proteins, is expressed to convert the injected prodrug in to a toxic metabolite, that normally kill cancer cells express this protein. Theranostic imaging is an approach used to directly monitor the expression of these gene therapy enzymes while evaluating therapeutic effect. We recently developed a dual-GDEPT system where we combined mutant human herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV1sr39TK) and E. coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme, to improve therapeutic efficiency of cancer gene therapy by simultaneously injecting two prodrugs at a lower dose. In this approach we use two different prodrugs such as ganciclovir (GCV) and CB1954 to target two different cellular mechanisms to kill cancer cells. The developed dual GDEPT system was highly efficacious than that of either of the system used independently. In this chapter, we describe the complete protocol involved for in vitro and in vivo imaging of therapeutic cancer gene therapy evaluation. PMID:27424910

  3. Combination Antifungal Therapy for Invasive Aspergillosis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Panackal, Anil A.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) causes significant morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised hosts. Combination therapy with mold-active triazoles and echinocandins has been used with the hope of improving outcomes over monotherapy, especially in the setting of refractory disease. Herein, I update our prior systematic review and meta-analysis on combination therapy for salvage IA in the context of the recently published randomized clinical trial of combination therapy for primary IA. Clinicians should consider combination antifungals for IA in refractory disease despite immune reconstitution when there are concerns for resistance or pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:27441304

  4. [Realities and hopes of gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Zdanov, R I; Semenova, N V; Archakov, A I

    2000-01-01

    The work represents an introduction article of editors of special issue of the magazine devoted to gene therapy and therapeutics. The main results of clinical gene therapy in the past decade are critically considered in connection with a changes of paradigms of the field. They are: 1) change of the main target of genetic therapy--correction of defects in chromosomes--onto expression and/or output of target genes for gene therapy; 2) transfer from gene transplantation to cell transplantation; 3) tendency for the use of safe/non-viral vectors instead of viral ones.; and 4) conflict of interests in gene therapy. Outlooks in the field are discussed. PMID:11033881

  5. Statin combination therapy and cardiovascular risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter P; Farnier, Michel; Tomassini, Joanne E; Foody, JoAnne M; Tershakovec, Andrew M

    2016-05-01

    In numerous clinical trials, lowering LDL-C with statin therapy has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in primary and secondary prevention settings. Guidelines recommend statins for first-line therapy in cholesterol-lowering management of patients with CVD risk. Despite increased statin monotherapy use over the last decade, a number of patients with high CVD risk do not achieve optimal LDL-C lowering. Guidelines recommend consideration of statin combination therapy with nonstatin agents for these patients. However, combination therapy approaches have been hampered by neutral findings. Recently, ezetimibe added to simvastatin therapy reduced cardiovascular events in acute coronary syndrome patients, more than simvastatin alone. This article provides an overview of various agents in combination with statin therapy on cardiovascular outcomes. Other lipid-lowering agents in development, including PCSK9 and CETP inhibitors in development, are also described. PMID:27079178

  6. Vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms do not influence the outcome and serum vitamin D level in pegylated interferon/ribavirin therapy combined with protease inhibitor for patients with genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Arai, Taeang; Atsukawa, Masanori; Tsubota, Akihito; Kondo, Chisa; Shimada, Noritomo; Abe, Hiroshi; Itokawa, Norio; Nakagawa, Ai; Okubo, Tomomi; Aizawa, Yoshio; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Although several vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms were reported to affect the outcome of pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PR) therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients, there are no reports on the impact of the vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms in PR therapy combined with protease inhibitor (PI). Vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms were determined in 177 genotype 1b-infected chronic hepatitis C patients who received 12 weeks of PR therapy with telaprevir, a first-generation PI, followed by 12 weeks of PR therapy. The sustained virologic response (SVR) rate was 83.1% (147 of 177 patients). The frequencies of vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms were: 83 non-TT and 94 TT genotypes for GC, 97 non-AA and 80 AA genotypes for DHCR7, 151 non-AA and 26 AA genotypes for CYP2R1, 162 non-GG and 15 GG genotypes for CYP27B1, and 105 non-GG and 72 GG genotypes for VDR gene. Multivariate analysis extracted IL28B TT genotype (P = 2.05 × 10(-6)) and serum 25(OH) D3 level (P = 0.024) as independent factors contributing to the achieving of SVR. The SVR rate in IL28B TT genotype patients with serum 25(OH) D3 level of < 25 ng/ml was significantly low compared to other patients. None of the vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms affected the treatment outcome and serum 25(OH) D3 level. In conclusions, the IL28B polymorphism and serum 25(OH) D3 level contributed significantly and independently to SVR in PR combined with PI for genotype 1b-infected chronic hepatitis C patients. However, none of vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms had an impact on the treatment outcome and serum 25(OH) D3 level. PMID:25964133

  7. Muscle Gene Therapy for Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Denise E.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle-directed gene therapy for hemophilia is an attractive strategy for expression of therapeutic levels of clotting factor as evident from preclinical studies and an early phase clinical trial. Notably, local FIX expression by AAV-mediated direct intramuscular injection to skeletal muscle persists for years. Development of intravascular delivery of AAV vector approaches to skeletal muscle resulted in vector in widespread areas of the limb and increased expression of FIX in hemophilia B dogs. The use of FIX variants with improved biological activity may provide the opportunity to increase the efficacy of these approaches. Studies for hemophilia A are less developed at this point, but utilizing transgenes that improve hemostasis independent of FIX and FVIII has potential therapeutic application for both hemophilia A and B. Continuous monitoring of humoral and T cell responses to the transgene and AAV capsid in human trials will be critical for the translation of these promising approaches for muscle gene therapy for hemophilia. PMID:24883231

  8. Experimental Evolution of Resistance to Artemisinin Combination Therapy Results in Amplification of the mdr1 Gene in a Rodent Malaria Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Louise A.; Henriques, Gisela; Borges, Sofia T.; Hunt, Paul; Sanchez, Cecília P.; Martinelli, Axel; Cravo, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Background Lacking suitable alternatives, the control of malaria increasingly depends upon Artemisinin Combination Treatments (ACT): resistance to these drugs would therefore be disastrous. For ACTs, the biology of resistance to the individual components has been investigated, but experimentally induced resistance to component drugs in combination has not been generated. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi to select in vivo resistance to the artesunate (ATN) + mefloquine (MF) version of ACT, through prolonged exposure of parasites to both drugs over many generations. The selection procedure was carried out over twenty-seven consecutive sub-inoculations under increasing ATN + MF doses, after which a genetically stable resistant parasite, AS-ATNMF1, was cloned. AS-ATNMF1 showed increased resistance to ATN + MF treatment and to artesunate or mefloquine administered separately. Investigation of candidate genes revealed an mdr1 duplication in the resistant parasites and increased levels of mdr1 transcripts and protein. There were no point mutations in the atpase6 or ubp1genes. Conclusion Resistance to ACTs may evolve even when the two drugs within the combination are taken simultaneously and amplification of the mdr1 gene may contribute to this phenotype. However, we propose that other gene(s), as yet unidentified, are likely to be involved. PMID:20657645

  9. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  10. Advances of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In the recent past, the gene therapy field has witnessed a remarkable series of successes, many of which have involved primary immunodeficiency diseases, such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. While such progress has widened the choice of therapeutic options in some specific cases of primary immunodeficiency, much remains to be done to extend the geographical availability of such an advanced approach and to increase the number of diseases that can be targeted. At the same time, emerging technologies are stimulating intensive investigations that may lead to the application of precise genetic editing as the next form of gene therapy for these and other human genetic diseases. PMID:27508076

  11. Successful Combination of Sequential Gene Therapy and Rescue Allo-HSCT in Two Children with X-CGD - Importance of Timing.

    PubMed

    Siler, Ulrich; Paruzynski, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Kuzmenko, Elena; Koehl, Ulrike; Renner, Eleonore D; Alhan, Canan; de Loosdrecht, Arjan A van; Schwäble, Joachim; Pfluger, Thomas; Tchinda, Joelle; Schmugge, Markus; Jauch, Anna; Naundorf, Sonja; Kühlcke, Klaus; Notheis, Gundula; Güngor, Tayfun; Kalle, Christof V; Schmidt, Manfred; Grez, Manuel; Seger, Reinhard; Reichenbach, Janine

    2015-01-01

    We report on a series of sequential events leading to long-term survival and cure of pediatric X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) patients after gamma-retroviral gene therapy (GT) and rescue HSCT. Due to therapyrefractory life-threatening infections requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) but absence of HLAidentical donors, we treated 2 boys with X-CGD by GT. Following GT both children completely resolved invasive Aspergillus nidulans infections. However, one child developed dual insertional activation of ecotropic viral integration site 1 (EVI1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) genes, leading to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with monosomy 7. Despite resistance to mismatched allo-HSCT with standard myeloablative conditioning, secondary intensified rescue allo-HSCT resulted in 100 % donor chimerism and disappearance of MDS. The other child did not develop MDS despite expansion of a clone with a single insertion in the myelodysplasia syndrome 1 (MDS1) gene and was cured by early standard allo-HSCT. The slowly developing dominance of clones harboring integrations in MDS1-EVI1 may guide clinical intervention strategies, i.e. early rescue allo-HSCT, prior to malignant transformation. GT was essential for both children to survive and to clear therapy-refractory infections, and future GT with safer lentiviral self-inactivated (SIN) vectors may offer a therapeutic alternative for X-CGD patients suffering from life-threatening infections and lacking HLA-identical HSC donors. PMID:25981636

  12. Recent Advances in Combined Modality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nyati, Mukesh K.; Morgan, Meredith A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2010-01-01

    Combined modality therapy emerged from preclinical data showing that carefully chosen drugs could enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to radiation while having nonoverlapping toxicities. Recent advances in molecular biology involving the identification of cellular receptors, enzymes, and pathways involved in tumor growth and immortality have resulted in the development of biologically targeted drugs. This review highlights the recent clinical data in support of newer generation cytotoxic chemotherapies and systemic targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:20413642

  13. Rifampin Combination Therapy for Nonmycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Graeme N.; Tamura, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The increasing emergence of antimicrobial-resistant organisms, especially methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), has resulted in the increased use of rifampin combination therapy. The data supporting rifampin combination therapy in nonmycobacterial infections are limited by a lack of significantly controlled clinical studies. Therefore, its current use is based upon in vitro or in vivo data or retrospective case series, all with major limitations. A prominent observation from this review is that rifampin combination therapy appears to have improved treatment outcomes in cases in which there is a low organism burden, such as biofilm infections, but is less effective when effective surgery to obtain source control is not performed. The clinical data support rifampin combination therapy for the treatment of prosthetic joint infections due to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) after extensive debridement and for the treatment of prosthetic heart valve infections due to coagulase-negative staphylococci. Importantly, rifampin-vancomycin combination therapy has not shown any benefit over vancomycin monotherapy against MRSA infections either clinically or experimentally. Rifampin combination therapy with daptomycin, fusidic acid, and linezolid needs further exploration for these severe MRSA infections. Lastly, an assessment of the risk-benefits is needed before the addition of rifampin to other antimicrobials is considered to avoid drug interactions or other drug toxicities. PMID:20065324

  14. Gene Therapy in the Cornea: 2005-present

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rajiv R.; Tovey, Jonathan C.K.; Sharma, Ajay; Tandon, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Successful restoration of vision in human patients with gene therapy affirmed its promise to cure ocular diseases and disorders. The efficacy of gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic DNA introduction into targeted cells/tissues. The cornea is an ideal tissue for gene therapy due to its ease of access and relative immune-privilege. Considerable progress has been made in the field of corneal gene therapy in last 5 years. Several new gene transfer vectors, techniques and approaches have evolved. Although corneal gene therapy is still in its early stages of development, the potential of gene-based interventions to treat corneal abnormalities have begun to surface. Identification of next generation viral and nanoparticle vectors, characterization of delivered gene levels, localization, and duration in the cornea, and significant success in controlling corneal disorders, particularly fibrosis and angiogenesis, in experimental animal disease models, with no major side effects have propelled gene therapy a step closer towards establishing gene-based therapies for corneal blindness. Recently, researchers have assessed the delivery of therapeutic genes for corneal diseases and disorders due to trauma, infections, chemical, mechanical, and surgical injury, and/or abnormal wound healing. This review provides an update on the developments in gene therapy for corneal diseases and discusses the barriers that hinder its utilization for delivering genes in the cornea. PMID:21967960

  15. Pharmacological properties of combination therapies for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, D R

    1997-03-01

    Single drug therapy for the treatment of hypertension has traditionally been a standard of practice. More recently combination therapy as first-line treatment has gained acceptance both by the medical practice community and the US Food and Drug Administration. The advantages of combinations may be a synergistic or additive antihypertensive effect, metabolic improvement, or both. The combination of a thiazide-type diuretic and a potassium-sparing diuretic has been quite useful in the past to prevent the need for potassium supplementation. The combination of beta-adrenoceptor blockade and a thiazide diuretic results in an additive antihypertensive effect that permits the effective use of very low thiazide doses. The mechanism of antihypertensive effects of each member of the combination are complimentary with increased sympathetic outflow and renin-angiotensin axis activation induced by the diuretic being blunted by beta1-adrenergic blockade. Combinations not used as first-line therapy, such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockade and a thiazide diuretic, have complimentary antihypertensive mechanisms and have been useful in treating patient groups who do not respond well to converting enzyme inhibitor monotherapy. The combination of a calcium antagonist with diuretic therapy has an additive hypertensive effect as well; however, the complimentary mechanisms are less obvious. Finally, the combination of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and calcium antagonist therapy has been useful in selected patients, but again the complimentary mechanisms are less obvious. As first-line therapy, combinations for diuretics and beta1-receptor blockers have been useful for achieving increased antihypertensive effect with decreased adverse drug effect. PMID:9056702

  16. Gene therapy for bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, nonunion and delayed union of fractures, and spinal fusions. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment. PMID:20569532

  17. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Elbadawy, Hossein Mostafa; Gailledrat, Marine; Desseaux, Carole; Ponzin, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis. PMID:23326647

  18. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, D.D.; Kishnani, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19807648

  19. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Kishnani, Priya S

    2009-12-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19807648

  20. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted. PMID:23878787

  1. Promising combination therapies with gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Blaine W; Ostruszka, Leo; Im, Michael M; Shewach, Donna S

    2004-04-01

    Because treatment regimens for breast cancer commonly include gemcitabine, we evaluated two promising combinations in preclinical studies: gemcitabine (Gemzar; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) with either ionizing radiation or docetaxel (Taxotere; Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Parsippany, NJ). In breast cancer cell lines that expressed either wild-type p53 (MCF-7) or mutant p53 (MCF-7/Adr), sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine during a 24-hour incubation was similar (IC(50) values 80 and 60 nmol/L in MCF-7 and MCF-7/Adr, respectively). Both cell lines were well radiosensitized by gemcitabine at the corresponding IC(50), with radiation enhancement ratios of 1.6 to 1.7. Although the MCF-7 cells accumulated nearly twice as much gemcitabine triphosphate compared with the MCF-7/Adr cells, a similar reduction in 2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate pools was observed. While the number of dying cells, as measured by sub-G1 DNA content or S-phase cells unable to replicate DNA, differed between the wild-type p53 or mutant p53-expressing cell lines, neither parameter correlated with radiosensitization. Docetaxel was a more potent cytotoxic agent than gemcitabine in MCF-7 cells (IC(50) = 1 nmol/L). Strong synergistic cytotoxicity was observed in cells treated with gemcitabine (24 hours) followed by docetaxel (24 hours) or the reverse sequence. However, simultaneous addition of the two drugs was antagonistic. To determine whether synergy with radiation or docetaxel was mediated by increased DNA damage, DNA double-strand breaks (double-strand breaks) were measured by immunostaining for phosphorylated H2AX. Ionizing radiation produced more double-strand breaks than gemcitabine alone, while no significant double-strand breaks formed with docetaxel alone. The addition of docetaxel or ionizing radiation to gemcitabine-treated cells did not increase H2AX foci formation. These results show that the combination of gemcitabine with ionizing radiation or docetaxel

  2. Cardiac gene therapy: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Matkar, P N; Leong-Poi, H; Singh, K K

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing throughout the world and is associated with elevated morbidity and mortality. Gene therapy to treat cardiac dysfunction is gaining importance because of the limited therapeutic benefit offered by pharmacotherapies. The growing knowledge of the complex signaling pathways and the development of sophisticated vectors and delivery systems, are facilitating identification and targeting of specific molecular candidates involved in initiation and progression of CVDs. Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown the therapeutic efficiency of gene therapy in different disease models and patients. Hence, gene therapy might plausibly become an unconventional treatment modality for CVD patients. In this review, we summarize the gene delivery carriers, modes of delivery, recent preclinical/clinical studies and potential therapeutic targets. We also briefly discuss the existing limitations of gene therapy, technical challenges surrounding gene carriers and delivery systems, and some approaches to overcome these limitations for bringing CVD gene therapy one step closer to reality. PMID:27128687

  3. Gene therapy in monogenic congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xuan; Goddard, Melissa A; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2016-04-15

    Current treatment options for patients with monogenetic congenital myopathies (MCM) ameliorate the symptoms of the disorder without resolving the underlying cause. However, gene therapies are being developed where the mutated or deficient gene target is replaced. Preclinical findings in animal models appear promising, as illustrated by gene replacement for X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) in canine and murine models. Prospective applications and approaches to gene replacement therapy, using these disorders as examples, are discussed in this review. PMID:26454198

  4. Combined therapy in the treatment of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Zeljko

    2010-02-01

    This systematic review analyses the efficacy, tolerability and safety of combinations of different medicines used to treat dyslipidemias in clinical practice. A PubMed search up to January 2009, was conducted to identify relevant studies. Criteria used to identify studies included (1) English language, (2) published studies with original data or meta-analyses in peer-reviewed journals. Although statin treatment is a mainstay of dyslipidemia management today, complementary effects of other lipid-lowering and/or HDL-cholesterol-raising therapies might substantially increase the clinical benefits not only in the small minority of patients with severe dyslipidemias but in others as well. These therapies include combinations with bile acid sequestrants (cholestyramine, colestipol, colesevelam), ezetimibe, niacin, plant sterols, fibrates (fenofibrate, bezafibrate, gemfibrozil), and prescription omega-3 fatty acids. Therapeutic approaches which incorporate the use of multiple drugs combinations for dyslipidemia treatment should be more widely adopted since combination therapy might offer a means to increase the number of patients able to meet their lipoprotein goals according to the guidelines. However, it has to be stated that for most of these combination therapies data on cardiovascular outcomes are still lacking. PMID:19682080

  5. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described. PMID:26193303

  6. Gene therapy oversight: lessons for nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Susan M; Gupta, Rishi; Kohlhepp, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oversight of human gene transfer research ("gene therapy") presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution (by the Institutional Review Board and, for some research, the Institutional Biosafety Committee) and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene transfer research in parallel, including approval of protocols and regulation of products. This article traces the evolution of this dual oversight system; describes how the system is already addressing nanobiotechnology in gene transfer: evaluates gene therapy oversight based on public opinion, the literature, and preliminary expert elicitation; and offers lessons of the gene therapy oversight experience for oversight of nanobiotechnology. PMID:20122108

  7. Combination stem cell therapy for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) that are not eligible for transplantation have limited therapeutic options. Stem cell therapy such as autologous bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or purified cells thereof has been used clinically since 2001. To date over 1000 patients have received cellular therapy as part of randomized trials, with the general consensus being that a moderate but statistically significant benefit occurs. Therefore, one of the important next steps in the field is optimization. In this paper we discuss three ways to approach this issue: a) increasing stem cell migration to the heart; b) augmenting stem cell activity; and c) combining existing stem cell therapies to recapitulate a "therapeutic niche". We conclude by describing a case report of a heart failure patient treated with a combination stem cell protocol in an attempt to augment beneficial aspects of cord blood CD34 cells and mesenchymal-like stem cells. PMID:20398245

  8. Gene therapy of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Ulrich; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2005-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease that is caused by a deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA). The deficiency results in the intralysosomal accumulation of the acidic sphingolipid 3-O-sulfogalactosyl-ceramide (sulfatide). Patients suffer from progressive demyelination and die from multiple neurological deficits. Curative treatment is not available. ASA bears mannose 6-phosphate residues which function as recognition markers in endosome/lysosome-specific targeting pathways. The endocytic targeting route can be exploited to deliver exogenous ASA to the lysosomes of ASA-deficient cells. ASA knockout mice, which develop a disorder related to MLD, have therefore been treated by ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy. Following transplantation of bone marrow cells overexpressing ASA from a retroviral vector, donor-type cells secrete ASA, which is endocytosed by recipient cells. The enzyme transfer results in the metabolic cross-correction of recipient cells and the improvement of biochemical, histological and clinical parameters. For the transfer of the ASA cDNA to non-dividing cells, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors have been constructed. Such vectors might be particularly advantageous for direct ASA gene delivery to the brain, which is the main site of disease in MLD. PMID:15709909

  9. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  10. Gene therapy for high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of high-grade gliomas remains difficult despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. True advances may emerge from the increasing understanding in molecular biology and discovery of novel mechanisms for the delivery of tumoricidal agents. In an attempt to overcome this formidable neoplasm, molecular approaches using gene therapy have been investigated clinically since 1992. The clinical trials have mainly been classified into three approaches: suicide gene therapy, immune gene therapy and oncolytic viral therapy. In this article, we review these approaches, which have been studied in previous and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:19262115

  11. Advancements in gene transfer-based therapy for hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Christopher B; Spencer, H Trent

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy has promised clinical benefit to those suffering with hemophilia A, but this benefit has not yet been realized. However, during the past two decades, basic and applied gene therapy research has progressed and the goal of gene therapy for hemophilia A is once again in our sights. The hemophilia A patient population suffers from a disease that requires invasive, lifelong management, is exorbitantly expensive to treat, has geographically limited treatment access and can become untreatable due to immune reactions to the treatment product. Subsequent to the cloning of the factor VIII gene and cDNA in the early 1980s, academic and commercial research laboratories began to pursue gene transfer-based therapies to supplement or supplant the available protein replacement therapy. However, to date, clinical trials for gene therapy of hemophilia A have been unsuccessful. Three trials have been conducted with each having tested a different gene-transfer strategy and each demonstrating that there is a considerable barrier to achieving sustained expression of therapeutic amounts of factor VIII. Recent progress has been made in gene-transfer technology and, relevant to hemophilia A, towards increasing the biosynthetic efficiency of factor VIII. These advances are now being combined to develop novel strategies to treat and possibly cure hemophilia A. PMID:20577574

  12. Mixture dynamics: Combination therapy in oncology.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Gibbons, Francis D; Peletier, Lambertus A

    2016-06-10

    In recent years combination therapies have become increasingly popular in most therapeutic areas. We present a qualitative and quantitative approach and elucidate some of the challenges and solutions to a more optimal therapy. For tumor growth this involves the study of semi-mechanistic cell-growth/kill models with multiple sites of action. We introduce such models and analyze their dynamic properties using simulations and mathematical analysis. This is done for two specific case studies, one involving a single compound and one a combination of two compounds. We generalize the notion of Tumor Static Concentration to cases when two compounds are involved and develop a graphical method for determining the optimal combination of the two compounds, using ideas akin to those used in studies employing isobolograms. In studying the dynamics of the second case study we focus, not only on the different concentrations, but also on the different dosing regimens and pharmacokinetics of the two compounds. PMID:27050307

  13. Combination therapy for the treatment of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Streja, Dan

    2004-03-01

    Statins have been proven to reduce cardiovascular risk, and guidelines for cardiovascular prevention recommend statin therapy in a wide range of patients. However, in spite of the dramatic success in large randomized clinical trials, two thirds of patients administered statins are not protected against cardiovascular events. This has prompted a search for additional targets for therapy. The pandemic of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes has led to a dramatic increase in the prevalence of dyslipidemia. This, in turn, has prompted a resurgence of the search for drugs and algorithms that favorably affect high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) metabolism and function. Fibrates are the best-studied class of agents to be used as an addition to statins since they have also been proven to reduce clinical events as a monotherapy. However, there is a need for large safety trials of statin-fibrate combination therapy. Statin-niacin combination therapy has proven to be safe and effective in altering lipoprotein pattern. Randomized clinical trials and more research on the mechanism of action of niacin are necessary. Inhibitors of cholesterol ester transfer protein and HDL therapy drugs are in early developmental stages, and are the most promising potential additions to the current arsenal. PMID:15083597

  14. [Gene therapy with cytokines against cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy is an excellent alternative for treatment of many diseases. Capacity to manipulate the DNA has allowed direct the gene therapy to correct the function of an altered gene, to increase the expression of a gene and to favour the activation of the immune response. This way, it can intend the use of the DNA like medication able to control, to correct or to cure many diseases. Gene therapy against cancer has an enormous potential, and actually the use of the DNA has increased to control diverse cancer in animal models, with very encouraging results that have allowed its applications in experimental protocols in human. This work concentrates a review of the foundations of the gene therapy and its application on cervical cancer, from the point of view of the alterations of the immune system focused on the tumour micro-environment, and the use of the cytokines as immunomodulators. PMID:16983992

  15. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  16. Combination Therapy Accelerates Diabetic Wound Closure

    PubMed Central

    Allen Jr., Robert J.; Soares, Marc A.; Haberman, Ilyse D.; Szpalski, Caroline; Schachar, Jeffrey; Lin, Clarence D.; Nguyen, Phuong D.; Saadeh, Pierre B.; Warren, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-healing foot ulcers are the most common cause of non-traumatic amputation and hospitalization amongst diabetics in the developed world. Impaired wound neovascularization perpetuates a cycle of dysfunctional tissue repair and regeneration. Evidence implicates defective mobilization of marrow-derived progenitor cells (PCs) as a fundamental cause of impaired diabetic neovascularization. Currently, there are no FDA-approved therapies to address this defect. Here we report an endogenous PC strategy to improve diabetic wound neovascularization and closure through a combination therapy of AMD3100, which mobilizes marrow-derived PCs by competitively binding to the cell surface CXCR4 receptor, and PDGF-BB, which is a protein known to enhance cell growth, progenitor cell migration and angiogenesis. Methods and Results Wounded mice were assigned to 1 of 5 experimental arms (n = 8/arm): saline treated wild-type, saline treated diabetic, AMD3100 treated diabetic, PDGF-BB treated diabetic, and AMD3100/PDGF-BB treated diabetic. Circulating PC number and wound vascularity were analyzed for each group (n = 8/group). Cellular function was assessed in the presence of AMD3100. Using a validated preclinical model of type II diabetic wound healing, we show that AMD3100 therapy (10 mg/kg; i.p. daily) alone can rescue diabetes-specific defects in PC mobilization, but cannot restore normal wound neovascularization. Through further investigation, we demonstrate an acquired trafficking-defect within AMD3100-treated diabetic PCs that can be rescued by PDGF-BB (2 μg; topical) supplementation within the wound environment. Finally, we determine that combination therapy restores diabetic wound neovascularization and accelerates time to wound closure by 40%. Conclusions Combination AMD3100 and PDGF-BB therapy synergistically improves BM PC mobilization and trafficking, resulting in significantly improved diabetic wound closure and neovascularization. The success of this

  17. Mechanism of enhanced responses after combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in carcinoma cells involves C/EBP-mediated transcriptional upregulation of the coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO) gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sanjay; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinate (ALA) is widely accepted as an effective treatment for superficial carcinomas and pre-cancers. However, PDT is still suboptimal for deeper tumors, mainly due to inadequate ALA penetration and subsequent conversion to PpIX. We are interested in improving the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for deep tumors, using a combination approach (cPDT) in which target protoporphyrin (PpIX) levels are significantly enhanced by differentiation caused by giving Vitamin D or methotrexate (MTX) for 3 days prior to ALAPDT. In LNCaP and MEL cells, a strong correlation between inducible differentiation and expression of C/EBP transcription factors, as well as between differentiation and mRNA levels of CPO (a key heme-synthetic enzyme), indicates the possibility of CPO transcriptional regulation by the C/EBPs. Sequence analysis of the first 1300 base pairs of the murine CPO upstream region revealed 15 consensus C/EBP binding sites. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) proved that these sites form specific complexes that have strong, moderate or weak affinities for C/EBPs. However, in the context of the full-length CPO promoter, inactivation of any type of site (strong or weak) reduced CPO promoter activity (luciferase assay) to nearly the same extent, suggesting cooperative interactions. A comparative analysis of murine and human CPO promoters revealed possible protein-protein interactions between C/EBPs and several neighboring transcription factors such as NFkB, Sp1, AP-1, CBP/p300 and CREB (an enhanceosome complex). Overall, these results confirm that C/EBP's are important for CPO expression via complex mechanisms which upregulate PpIX and enhance the outcome of cPDT.

  18. The Combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and iPSC Technologies in the Gene Therapy of Human β-thalassemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Zhanhui; Niu, Xiaohua; He, Wenyin; Chen, Yuchang; Song, Bing; Xian, Yexing; Fan, Di; Tang, Daolin; Sun, Xiaofang

    2016-01-01

    β-thalassemia results from point mutations or small deletions in the β-globin (HBB) gene that ultimately cause anemia. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the somatic cells of patients in combination with subsequent homologous recombination-based gene correction provides new approaches to cure this disease. CRISPR/Cas9 is a genome editing tool that is creating a buzz in the scientific community for treating human diseases, especially genetic disorders. Here, we reported that correction of β-thalassemia mutations in patient-specific iPSCs using the CRISPR/Cas9 tool promotes hematopoietic differentiation in vivo. CRISPR/Cas9-corrected iPSC-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were injected into sublethally-irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rg−/− (NSI) mice. HBB expression was observed in these HSCs after hematopoietic differentiation in the NSI mice. Importantly, no tumor was found in the livers, lungs, kidneys, or bone marrow at 10 weeks in the NSI mice after implantation with these HSCs. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 successfully corrects β-thalassemia mutations in patient-specific iPSCs. These CRISPR/Cas9-corrected iPSC-derived HSCs express normal HBB in mice without tumorigenic potential, suggesting a safe strategy for personalized treatment of β-thalassemia. PMID:27581487

  19. The Combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and iPSC Technologies in the Gene Therapy of Human β-thalassemia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhanhui; Niu, Xiaohua; He, Wenyin; Chen, Yuchang; Song, Bing; Xian, Yexing; Fan, Di; Tang, Daolin; Sun, Xiaofang

    2016-01-01

    β-thalassemia results from point mutations or small deletions in the β-globin (HBB) gene that ultimately cause anemia. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the somatic cells of patients in combination with subsequent homologous recombination-based gene correction provides new approaches to cure this disease. CRISPR/Cas9 is a genome editing tool that is creating a buzz in the scientific community for treating human diseases, especially genetic disorders. Here, we reported that correction of β-thalassemia mutations in patient-specific iPSCs using the CRISPR/Cas9 tool promotes hematopoietic differentiation in vivo. CRISPR/Cas9-corrected iPSC-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were injected into sublethally-irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rg-/- (NSI) mice. HBB expression was observed in these HSCs after hematopoietic differentiation in the NSI mice. Importantly, no tumor was found in the livers, lungs, kidneys, or bone marrow at 10 weeks in the NSI mice after implantation with these HSCs. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 successfully corrects β-thalassemia mutations in patient-specific iPSCs. These CRISPR/Cas9-corrected iPSC-derived HSCs express normal HBB in mice without tumorigenic potential, suggesting a safe strategy for personalized treatment of β-thalassemia. PMID:27581487

  20. Emerging targets for combination therapy in melanomas.

    PubMed

    Saito, Renata de Freitas; Tortelli, Tharcísio Citrângulo; Jacomassi, Mayara D'Auria; Otake, Andréia Hanada; Chammas, Roger

    2015-11-14

    Cutaneous melanomas are often difficult to treat when diagnosed in advanced stages. Melanoma cells adapt to survive in extreme environmental conditions and are among the tumors with larger genomic instability. Here we discuss some intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of resistance of melanoma cells to both conventional and target therapies, such as autophagy, adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum stress, metabolic reprogramming, mechanisms of tumor repopulation and the role of extracellular vesicles in this later phenomenon. These biological processes are potentially targetable and thus provide a platform for research and discovery of new drugs for combination therapy to manage melanoma patient treatment. PMID:26450371

  1. Combined Therapy of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Hompes, Daphne

    2016-10-01

    Radical surgery is the mainstay of therapy for primary resectable, localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Nevertheless, approximately 40% to 50% of patients with potentially curative resections develop recurrent or metastatic disease. The introduction of imatinib mesylate has revolutionized the therapy of advanced (inoperable and/or metastatic) GIST and has become the standard of care in treatment of patients with advanced GIST. This article discusses the proper selection of candidates for adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in locally advanced GIST, exploring the available evidence behind the combination of preoperative imatinib and surgery. PMID:27591496

  2. Adenoviral Vectors for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited blood clotting disorder resulting from deficiency of blood coagulation factors. Current standard of care for hemophilia patients is frequent intravenous infusions of the missing coagulation factor. Gene therapy for hemophilia involves the introduction of a normal copy of the deficient coagulation factor gene thereby potentially offering a definitive cure for the bleeding disorder. A variety of approaches have been pursued for hemophilia gene therapy and this review article focuses on those that use adenoviral vectors. PMID:24883229

  3. Novel approaches and mechanisms in hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bigger, Brian W; Wynn, Robert F

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy is one of the most exciting clinical tools to emerge from the gene therapy stable. This technology combines the expansion capability of hematopoietic stem cells, capable of replacing the entire blood and immune system of an individual, with the capacity for long-term replacement of one or more gene copies using integrating gene therapy vectors. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits significantly from the pre-existing experience of standard blood and marrow transplantation, whilst at the same time having the capacity to deliver a safer and more effective therapy to a wider range of diseases. In this review we summarize the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to expand the scope of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, including the evolution of vector delivery systems and the success and failures of current clinical experience with this treatment. In particular we deal with the incidence of vector mediated transformation in patients and the steps that have been taken to minimize this risk. Finally we discuss the innovations in preclinical development that are likely to drive the future of this field, including the expansion to many more genetic diseases, particularly those affecting the brain. PMID:24759625

  4. MiRNA-21 silencing mediated by tumor-targeted nanoparticles combined with sunitinib: A new multimodal gene therapy approach for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro M; Cardoso, Ana L; Custódia, Carlos; Cunha, Pedro; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    2015-06-10

    Malignant brain tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM), are among the most lethal human cancers, due to their tremendous invasive capacity and limited therapeutic options. Despite remarkable advances in cancer theranostics, which resulted in significant improvement of clinical outcomes, GBM relapse is very frequent and patient survival remains under one year. The elucidation of the role of abnormally-expressed miRNAs in different steps of GBM pathogenesis and in tumor resistance to therapy paved the way for the development of new miRNA-based therapeutic approaches targeting this disease, aiming at increasing specific tumor cell killing and, ultimately, cancer eradication. Here, we demonstrate that intravenously-administered chlorotoxin (CTX)-coupled (targeted) stable nucleic acid lipid particle (SNALP)-formulated anti-miR-21 oligonucleotides accumulate preferentially within brain tumors and promote efficient miR-21 silencing, which results in increased mRNA and protein levels of its target RhoB, while showing no signs of systemic immunogenicity. Decreased tumor cell proliferation and tumor size, as well as enhanced apoptosis activation and, to a lesser extent, improvement of animal survival, were also observed in GBM-bearing mice upon systemic delivery of targeted nanoparticle-formulated anti-miR-21 oligonucleotides and exposure to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. Overall, our results provide evidence that CTX-coupled SNALPs are a reliable and efficient system for systemic delivery of anti-miRNA oligonucleotides. Moreover, although further studies are still necessary to demonstrate a therapeutic benefit in a clinical context, our findings suggest that miRNA modulation by the targeted nanoparticles combined with anti-angiogenic chemotherapy may hold promise as an attractive approach towards GBM treatment. PMID:25861727

  5. Targeted Gene Therapies: Tools, Applications, Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Many devastating human diseases are caused by mutations in a single gene that prevent a somatic cell from carrying out its essential functions, or by genetic changes acquired as a result of infectious disease or in the course of cell transformation. Targeted gene therapies have emerged as potential strategies for treatment of such diseases. These therapies depend upon rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave at specific sites in or near disease genes. Targeted gene correction provides a template for homology-directed repair, enabling the cell's own repair pathways to erase the mutation and replace it with the correct sequence. Targeted gene disruption ablates the disease gene, disabling its function. Gene targeting can also promote other kinds of genome engineering, including mutation, insertion, or gene deletion. Targeted gene therapies present significant advantages compared to approaches to gene therapy that depend upon delivery of stably expressing transgenes. Recent progress has been fueled by advances in nuclease discovery and design, and by new strategies that maximize efficiency of targeting and minimize off-target damage. Future progress will build on deeper mechanistic understanding of critical factors and pathways. PMID:22530743

  6. Getting arthritis gene therapy into the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.; Ghivizzani, Steven C.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Gene transfer technologies enable the controlled, targeted and sustained expression of gene products at precise anatomical locations, such as the joint. In this way, they offer the potential for more-effective, less-expensive treatments of joint diseases with fewer extra-articular adverse effects. A large body of preclinical data confirms the utility of intra-articular gene therapy in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. However, relatively few clinical trials have been conducted, only one of which has completed phase II. This article summarizes the status in 2010 of the clinical development of gene therapy for arthritis, identifies certain constraints to progress and suggests possible solutions. PMID:21135882

  7. Convergence of gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bersenev, Alexey; Levine, Bruce L

    2012-11-01

    Gene therapy and cell therapy have followed similar roller coaster paths of rising public expectations and disappointment over the past two decades. There is now reason to believe that momentum in the field has reached the point where the successes will be more frequent. The use of gene-modified cells has opened new avenues for engineering desired cell properties, for the use of cells as vehicles for gene delivery, and for tracking cells and controlling cell persistence after transplantation. Some notable recent clinical developments in cellular engineering by gene transfer offer lessons on how the field has emerged, and hint at additional future clinical applications. PMID:23210811

  8. European attitudes to gene therapy and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Hudson, John; Orviska, Marta

    2011-10-01

    Views on pharmacogenetics and gene therapy systematically differ across European countries. But despite a complex regulatory regime there is a balance of support, albeit laced with considerable uncertainty. PMID:21745587

  9. Fixed-dose combination therapy for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Lyn C

    2004-01-01

    Fixed-dose combination therapy offers stable products containing two or more medications with different mechanisms of action and safety profiles. It is also convenient for patients since only one product rather than two or more needs to be applied. Topical corticosteroids are often the mainstay of therapy in psoriasis. Diprosalic and Nerisalic contain a topical corticosteroid (betamethasone dipropionate and diflucortolone, respectively) and salicylic acid. A left/right study showed that both products have comparable efficacy. It has also been shown that betamethasone dipropionate + salicylic acid ointment has similar efficacy to clobetasol and calcipotriene (calcipotriol) ointments. Betamethasone dipropionate + salicylic acid lotion has similar efficacy to clobetasol lotion. Faster improvement of scaling, itching, and redness was noted with betamethasone dipropionate + salicylic acid lotion compared with betamethasone dipropionate alone. Dovobet (Daivobet) ointment is a fixed-dose combination product containing betamethasone dipropionate and calcipotriene. Clinical studies have shown that it has greater efficacy and a faster speed of onset than the individual components or tacalcitol. Once daily and twice daily treatments have similar efficacy. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index reductions of approximately 40% after 1 week and 70% after 4 weeks of therapy were consistently noted in six large international studies involving >6000 patients. Betamethasone dipropionate + calcipotriene treatment is associated with approximately 75% less adverse cutaneous events as compared with tacalcitol, 50% less compared with calcipotriene, and a similar number as treatment with betamethasone dipropionate. PMID:15109271

  10. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  11. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Over 60 patients affected by SCID due to IL2RG deficiency (SCID-X1) or adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID have received hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in the past 15 years using gammaretroviral vectors, resulting in immune reconstitution and clinical benefit in the majority of them. However, the occurrence of insertional oncogenesis in the SCID-X1 trials has led to the development of new clinical trials based on integrating vectors with improved safety design as well as investigation on new technologies for highly efficient gene targeting and site-specific gene editing. Here we will present the experience and perspectives of gene therapy for SCID-X1 and ADA-SCID and discuss the pros and cons of gene therapy in comparison to allogeneic transplantation. PMID:22981681

  12. Chemogenomics and orthology-based design of antibiotic combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Cokol-Cakmak, Melike; Sahin, Nil; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Kazan, Hilal; Collins, James J; Cokol, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Combination antibiotic therapies are being increasingly used in the clinic to enhance potency and counter drug resistance. However, the large search space of candidate drugs and dosage regimes makes the identification of effective combinations highly challenging. Here, we present a computational approach called INDIGO, which uses chemogenomics data to predict antibiotic combinations that interact synergistically or antagonistically in inhibiting bacterial growth. INDIGO quantifies the influence of individual chemical-genetic interactions on synergy and antagonism and significantly outperforms existing approaches based on experimental evaluation of novel predictions in Escherichia coli Our analysis revealed a core set of genes and pathways (e.g. central metabolism) that are predictive of antibiotic interactions. By identifying the interactions that are associated with orthologous genes, we successfully estimated drug-interaction outcomes in the bacterial pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus, using the E. coli INDIGO model. INDIGO thus enables the discovery of effective combination therapies in less-studied pathogens by leveraging chemogenomics data in model organisms. PMID:27222539

  13. The Association of Substitutions in the Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 1b Core Gene and IL28B Polymorphisms With the Response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV Combination Therapy in Azerbaijani Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Farzin; Esghaei, Maryam; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Fakhim, Shahin; Keyvani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been identified as a leading cause of progressive liver diseases worldwide. Despite new treatment strategies, pegylated interferon alfa-2a (Peg-IFNα-2a), in combination with ribavirin (RBV), still represents the gold standard of therapy for hepatitis C in developing countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association of substitutions in the HCV subtype 1b (HCV-1b) core protein and the rs12979860 polymorphism in the interleukin 28B gene (IL28B) with the response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV combination therapy in Azerbaijani patients. Patients and Methods A total of fifty-one chronically HCV-1b-infected Azerbaijani patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from March 2010 to June 2015. After RNA extraction from pre-treatment plasma, the core region of the HCV genome was amplified using the nested reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, followed by standard sequencing. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens, and the rs12979860 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was identified using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results In this study, a significant association was observed between the non-responders and relapsers to antiviral therapy and substitutions in the HCV-1b core region at positions 43 (R43K, P = 0.047), 70 (R70Q, P < 0.001), 91 (M91L, P = 0.037), and 106 (S106N, P = 0.018). Concerning the IL28B polymorphism, the results showed that sustained virological response was significantly associated with homozygous CC patients (P = 0.009) as compared with other genotypes, while homozygous TT subjects were associated with HCV relapse after therapy (P = 0.006). Conclusions The data of the present study suggest that amino acid substitutions at position 43, 70, 91, and 106 in the HCV-1b core protein are correlated with the response to the Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV treatment in

  14. Virotherapy: cancer gene therapy at last?

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Alan E.; Spiliopoulou, Pavlina; Evans, T. R. Jeffry

    2016-01-01

    For decades, effective cancer gene therapy has been a tantalising prospect; for a therapeutic modality potentially able to elicit highly effective and selective responses, definitive efficacy outcomes have often seemed out of reach. However, steady progress in vector development and accumulated experience from previous clinical studies has finally led the field to its first licensed therapy. Following a pivotal phase III trial, Imlygic (talimogene laherparepvec/T-Vec) received US approval as a treatment for cutaneous and subcutaneous melanoma in October 2015, followed several weeks later by its European authorisation. These represent the first approvals for an oncolytic virotherapy. Imlygic is an advanced-generation herpesvirus-based vector optimised for oncolytic and immunomodulatory activities. Many other oncolytic agents currently remain in development, providing hope that current success will be followed by other diverse vectors that may ultimately come to constitute a new class of clinical anti-cancer agents. In this review, we discuss some of the key oncolytic viral agents developed in the adenovirus and herpesvirus classes, and the prospects for further enhancing their efficacy by combining them with novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

  15. Clinical applications of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Cicalese, Maria Pia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have represented a paradigmatic model for successes and pitfalls of hematopoietic stem cells gene therapy. First clinical trials performed with gamma retroviral vectors (γ-RV) for adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), X-linked SCID (SCID-X1), and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) showed that gene therapy is a valid therapeutic option in patients lacking an HLA-identical donor. No insertional mutagenesis events have been observed in more than 40 ADA-SCID patients treated so far in the context of different clinical trials worldwide, suggesting a favorable risk-benefit ratio for this disease. On the other hand, the occurrence of insertional oncogenesis in SCID-X1, WAS, and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) RV clinical trials prompted the development of safer vector construct based on self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral or lentiviral vectors (LVs). Here we present the recent results of LV-mediated gene therapy for WAS showing stable multilineage engraftment leading to hematological and immunological improvement, and discuss the differences with respect to the WAS RV trial. We also describe recent clinical results of SCID-X1 gene therapy with SIN γ-RV and the perspectives of targeted genome editing techniques, following early preclinical studies showing promising results in terms of specificity of gene correction. Finally, we provide an overview of the gene therapy approaches for other PIDs and discuss its prospects in relation to the evolving arena of allogeneic transplant. PMID:25860576

  16. Prospects for retinal gene replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R

    2009-04-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), affects approximately 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of >100 different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Preliminary results from three clinical trials indicate that the treatment of a form of LCA by gene therapy can be safe and effective. Here, we discuss the potential for treating other forms of retinal degeneration by gene therapy, focusing on the gene defects that are likely to be the most amenable to treatment. PMID:19303164

  17. Combination Therapies in Ophthalmology: Implications for Intravitreal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Peyman, Gholam A.; Hosseini, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Most pathological processes involve complex molecular pathways that can only be modified or blocked by a combination of medications. Combination therapy has become a common practice in medicine. In ophthalmology, this approach has been used effectively to treat bacterial, fungal, proliferative/neoplastic, and inflammatory eye diseases and vascular proliferation. Combination therapy also encompasses the synergistic effect of electromagnetic radiation and medications. However, combination therapy can augment inherent complications of individual interventions, therefore vigilance is required. Complications of combination therapy include potential incompatibility among compounds and tissue toxicity. Understanding these effects will assist the ophthalmologist in his decision to maximize the benefits of combination therapy while avoiding an unfavorable outcome. PMID:22454705

  18. Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.

    PubMed

    Ledley, F D; McNamee, L M; Uzdil, V; Morgan, I W

    2014-02-01

    This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. We show that the field of gene therapy has matured steadily since the 1980s, with the congruent accumulation of >35 000 papers, >16 000 US patents, >1800 clinical trials and >$4.3 billion in capital investment in gene therapy companies. Gene therapy technologies comprise a series of dissimilar approaches for gene delivery, each of which has introduced a distinct product architecture. Using bibliometric methods, we quantify the maturation of each technology through a characteristic life cycle S-curve, from a Nascent stage, through a Growing stage of exponential advance, toward an Established stage and projected limit. Capital investment in gene therapy is shown to have occurred predominantly in Nascent stage technologies and to be negatively correlated with maturity. Gene therapy technologies are now achieving the level of maturity that innovation research and biotechnology experience suggest may be requisite for efficient product development. Asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and capital investment in development-focused business models may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy. PMID:24305420

  19. Gene replacement therapy for hereditary emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnick, A.

    1989-11-10

    Investigators suggest that human trials of gene therapy to correct a genetic disorder that usually leads to emphysema early in life may be only a few years away. Speaking at the American Lung Association's Second Annual Science Writers' Forum, R. G. Crystal, chief of the Pulmonary Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute offered an explanation of how hereditary emphysema may be more amenable to genetic therapy than other such diseases. In persons who lack a functioning gene for alpha{sup 1}-antitrypsin, a proteolytic enzyme, neutrophil elastase, attacks the walls of the lungs' alveoli, eventually leading to progressive pulmonary function loss. Two animal models of gene insertion are described.

  20. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  1. What Is Next for Retinal Gene Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, Luk H.

    2015-01-01

    The field of gene therapy for retinal blinding disorders is experiencing incredible momentum, justified by hopeful results in early stage clinical trials for inherited retinal degenerations. The premise of the use of the gene as a drug has come a long way, and may have found its niche in the treatment of retinal disease. Indeed, with only limited treatment options available for retinal indications, gene therapy has been proven feasible, safe, and effective and may lead to durable effects following a single injection. Here, we aim at putting into context the promise and potential, the technical, clinical, and economic boundaries limiting its application and development, and speculate on a future in which gene therapy is an integral component of ophthalmic clinical care. PMID:25877395

  2. Combination immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel

    2006-02-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among modern people largely due to metastatic disease. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with minimal toxicity towards normal tissue. This is best accomplished by priming the body's immune system to recognize the tumor antigens so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species leading to vascular shutdown and tumor cell death. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, generation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins. Combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments are likely to even further enhance post-PDT immunity. These immunostimulants are likely to include products derived from pathogenic microorganisms that are effectively recognized by Toll-like receptors and lead to upregulation of transcription factors for cytokines and inflammatory mediators. The following cascade of events causes activation of macrophages, dendritic and natural killer cells. Exogenous cytokine administration can be another way to increase PDT-induced immunity as well as treatment with a low dose of cyclophosphamide that selectively reduces T-regulatory cells. Although so far these combination therapies have only been used in animal models, their use in clinical trials should receive careful consideration.

  3. Effect of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cytochrome P450 Isoenzyme and N-Acetyltransferase 2 Genes on the Metabolism of Artemisinin-Based Combination Therapies in Malaria Patients from Cambodia and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Staehli Hodel, Eva Maria; Csajka, Chantal; Ariey, Frédéric; Guidi, Monia; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor Mulokozi; Duong, Socheat; Decosterd, Laurent Arthur; Olliaro, Piero; Genton, Blaise

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacogenetics of antimalarial agents are poorly known, although the application of pharmacogenetics might be critical in optimizing treatment. This population pharmacokinetic-pharmacogenetic study aimed at assessing the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cytochrome P450 isoenzyme genes (CYP, namely, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5) and the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) on the pharmacokinetics of artemisinin-based combination therapies in 150 Tanzanian patients treated with artemether-lumefantrine, 64 Cambodian patients treated with artesunate-mefloquine, and 61 Cambodian patients treated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. The frequency of SNPs varied with the enzyme and the population. Higher frequencies of mutant alleles were found in Cambodians than Tanzanians for CYP2C9*3, CYP2D6*10 (100C→T), CYP3A5*3, NAT2*6, and NAT2*7. In contrast, higher frequencies of mutant alleles were found in Tanzanians for CYP2D6*17 (1023C→T and 2850C→T), CYP3A4*1B, NAT2*5, and NAT2*14. For 8 SNPs, no significant differences in frequencies were observed. In the genetic-based population pharmacokinetic analyses, none of the SNPs improved model fit. This suggests that pharmacogenetic data need not be included in appropriate first-line treatments with the current artemisinin derivatives and quinolines for uncomplicated malaria in specific populations. However, it cannot be ruled out that our results represent isolated findings, and therefore more studies in different populations, ideally with the same artemisinin-based combination therapies, are needed to evaluate the influence of pharmacogenetic factors on the clearance of antimalarials. PMID:23229480

  4. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26846804

  5. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle that gene expression occurs at the correct location and at a sufficient level. Gene-based imaging can advance cancer detection and diagnosis. By combining the cancer-targeted imaging and therapeutic strategies, the exciting prospect of a ‘one-two punch’ to find hidden, disseminated cancer cells and destroy them simultaneously can potentially be realized. PMID:14557054

  6. Systemic therapy and synergies by combination.

    PubMed

    Wörns, Marcus-Alexander

    2013-01-01

    After years of therapeutic nihilism due to the inefficacy of conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib was the first agent to demonstrate a significant improvement in the survival of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, survival benefits on sorafenib treatment remain modest in clinical practice and developing more effective systemic therapies is challenging. No other targeted agent or regimen has proven efficacy to improve survival in a phase III trial in the first- or second-line setting, and no standard treatment option currently exists outside of clinical trials for patients with acquired resistance or intolerance to sorafenib. In contrast to other malignancies, no oncogene addiction has been identified in hepatocarcinogenesis thus far, which may explain why currently tested agents do not achieve sustained partial or complete response in the majority of patients. Several agents with mainly antiangiogenic properties are currently in phase II and III development, including brivanib, ramucirumab, everolimus, tivantinib and resminostat. In addition, the role of molecularly targeted therapy (MTT) in earlier stages of the disease in combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization or in the adjuvant setting after potentially curative approaches is under investigation. The identification of the key driver mutations and the assessment of relevant targets for specific subpopulations of patients according to their biomarker-based profile will hopefully lead to a more personalized medicine. This article attempts to provide a concise overview on recent developments of MTT in the phase II-III setting in advanced HCC with an additional focus on synergistic combinations and combined treatment approaches. PMID:23797131

  7. Gene Therapy for Neurologic Manifestations of Mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel A.; Banerjee, Sharbani; Hackett, Perry B.; Whitley, Chester B.; McIvor, R. Scott; Low, Walter C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mucopolysaccharidoses are a family of lysosomal disorders caused by mutations in genes that encode enzymes involved in the catabolism of glycoaminoglycans. These mutations affect multiple organ systems and can be particularly deleterious to the nervous system. At the present time, enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem-cell therapy are used to treat patients with different forms of these disorders. However, to a great extent the nervous system is not adequately responsive to current therapeutic approaches. Areas Covered Recent advances in gene therapy show great promise for treating mucopolysaccharidoses. This article reviews the current state of the art for routes of delivery in developing genetic therapies for treating the neurologic manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses. Expert Opinion Gene therapy for treating neurological manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses can be achieved by intraventricular, intrathecal, intranasal, and systemic administration. The intraventricular route of administration appears to provide the most wide-spread distribution of gene therapy vectors to the brain. The intrathecal route of delivery results in predominant distribution to the caudal areas of the brain while the intranasal route of delivery results in good distribution to the rostral areas of brain. The systemic route of delivery via intravenous delivery can also achieve wide spread delivery to the CNS, however, the distribution to the brain is greatly dependent on the vector system. Intravenous delivery using lentiviral vectors appear to be less effective than adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Moreover, some subtypes of AAV vectors are more effective than others in crossing the blood-brain-barrier. In summary, the recent advances in gene vector technology and routes of delivery to the CNS will facilitate the clinical translation of gene therapy for the treatment of the neurological manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses. PMID:25510418

  8. Gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bleijs, D A; Haenen, I T W C; Bergmans, J E N

    2007-10-01

    Several regulatory organisations are involved in the assessment of clinical gene therapy trials involving genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in The Netherlands. Medical, ethical and scientific aspects are, for instance, evaluated by the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO). The Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) is the competent authority for the environmental risk assessment according to the deliberate release Directive 2001/18/EC. A Gene Therapy Office has been established in order to streamline the different national review processes and to enable the official procedures to be completed as quickly as possible. Although the Gene Therapy Office improved the application process at the national level, there is a difference of opinion between the EU member states with respect to the EU Directive according to which gene therapy trials are assessed, that urges for harmonisation. This review summarises the gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands and in particular The Netherlands rationale to follow Directive 2001/18/EC for the environmental risk assessment. PMID:17721872

  9. International perceptions and approval of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Macer, D R; Akiyama, S; Alora, A T; Asada, Y; Azariah, J; Azariah, H; Boost, M V; Chatwachirawong, P; Kato, Y; Kaushik, V

    1995-06-01

    Gene therapy is in clinical trials in a number of countries, raising the question of whether different ethical standards can be justified in different countries. One key issue is how divergent are the perceptions and bioethical reasoning of peoples around the world. An International Bioethics Survey with 150 questions, including 35 open ones, was developed to look at how people think about diseases, life, nature, and selected issues of science and technology, biotechnology, genetic engineering, genetic screening, and gene therapy. The mail response survey was conducted in 1993 among the public in Australia, India, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, and Thailand, and the same written survey was conducted among university students in Australia, Hong Kong, India, Japan, New Zealand, The Philippines, Russia, Singapore, and Thailand. Similar questions were included in an international high school education bioethics survey among high school teachers in Australia, Japan, and New Zealand. Further international comparisons to the United States and Europe are made. About three-quarters of all samples supported personal use of gene therapy, with higher support for children's use of gene therapy. The diversity of views was generally similar within each country. The major reasons given were to save life and increase the quality of life. About 5-7% rejected gene therapy, considering it to be playing God, or unnatural. There was very little concern about eugenics (0.5-2%), and more respondents gave supportive reasons like "improving genes," especially in Thailand and India. Support for specific applications was significantly less for "improving physical characters," "improving intelligence," or "making people more ethical" than for curing diseases like cancer or diabetes, but there was little difference between inheritable or noninheritable gene therapy. PMID:7548279

  10. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  11. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  12. NIH modifies gene therapy research guidelines.

    PubMed

    Levine, Carol

    1985-06-01

    In response to public comments on the first draft of its "Points to Consider in the Design and Submission of Human Somatic-Cell Gene Therapy Protocols," the Working Group on Human Gene Therapy of the National Institutes of Health has issued a revised set of guidelines for researchers. This second draft spells out the need for public review of gene therapy protocols, the Working Group's willingness to review selected protocols before the completion of animal studies, and requirements for informed consent to long-term follow-up and to autopsy in the event of death. The document also expresses the Working Group's concern that researchers and the public be kept fully informed of the results of such studies. PMID:11643786

  13. Moving forward: cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2013-10-15

    Since cloning of the CFTR gene more than 20 years ago a large number of pre-clinical and clinical CF gene therapy studies have been performed and a vast amount of information and know-how has been generated. Here, we will review key studies with a particular emphasis on clinical findings. We have learnt that the lung is a more difficult target than originally anticipated, and we describe the strength and weaknesses of the most commonly used airway gene transfer agents (GTAs). In our view, one of the most significant developments in recent years is the generation of lentiviral vectors, which efficiently transduce lung tissue. However, focused and co-ordinated efforts assessing lentiviral vector safety and scaling up of production will be required to move this vector into clinical lung gene therapy studies. PMID:23918661

  14. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  15. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  16. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life. PMID:19820803

  17. Gene therapies for inherited skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Qasim, Waseem; McGrath, John A

    2014-06-01

    Skin is an amenable organ for gene replacement and gene editing therapeutics. Its accessibility makes it well-suited for direct topical gene delivery, grafting of genetically corrected cells, and monitoring of possible adverse events. Monogenic recessive disorders with a clinically severe or life-threatening phenotype provide the best candidate diseases for the introduction of a single normal copy of the gene into the target cell, usually keratinocytes. Preclinical studies have shown impressive results in terms of gene correction using both in vivo and ex vivo approaches. The clinical application of gene replacement or genomic editing as potential therapies for inherited skin disorders, however, has been held back by the inadequacy of delivery vectors and concerns from regulatory agencies regarding safety; thus translation to clinical trials has been slow. Over the past 15 years, cell culture and animal models have shown efficient gene correction techniques as preludes to treat inherited skin disorders such as junctional epidermolysis bullosa, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, xeroderma pigmentosum, lamellar ichthyosis and Netherton syndrome, but so far only one patient has been treated in a clinical trial. This article reviews the current status of gene therapies for patients with inherited skin diseases and explores future perspectives. PMID:25085667

  18. Developments in gene therapy for muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD) presents significant challenges, including the large amount of muscle tissue in the body, the large size of many genes defective in different muscular dystrophies, and the possibility of a host immune response against the therapeutic gene. Overcoming these challenges requires the development and delivery of suitable gene transfer vectors. Encouraging progress has been made in modifying adenovirus (Ad) vectors to reduce immune response and increase capacity. Recently developed gutted Ad vectors can deliver full-length dystrophin cDNA expression vectors to muscle tissue. Using muscle-specific promoters to drive dystrophin expression, a strong immune response has not been observed in mdx mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can deliver small genes to muscle without provocation of a significant immune response, which should allow long-term expression of several MD genes. AAV vectors have also been used to deliver sarcoglycan genes to entire muscle groups. These advances and others reviewed here suggest that barriers to gene therapy for MD are surmountable. PMID:10679969

  19. Gene Insertion Into Genomic Safe Harbors for Human Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Schambach, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Genomic safe harbors (GSHs) are sites in the genome able to accommodate the integration of new genetic material in a manner that ensures that the newly inserted genetic elements: (i) function predictably and (ii) do not cause alterations of the host genome posing a risk to the host cell or organism. GSHs are thus ideal sites for transgene insertion whose use can empower functional genetics studies in basic research and therapeutic applications in human gene therapy. Currently, no fully validated GSHs exist in the human genome. Here, we review our formerly proposed GSH criteria and discuss additional considerations on extending these criteria, on strategies for the identification and validation of GSHs, as well as future prospects on GSH targeting for therapeutic applications. In view of recent advances in genome biology, gene targeting technologies, and regenerative medicine, gene insertion into GSHs can potentially catalyze nearly all applications in human gene therapy. PMID:26867951

  20. ORTHOPAEDIC GENE THERAPY – LOST IN TRANSLATION?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C.H.; Ghivizzani, S.C.; Robbins, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Orthopaedic gene therapy has been the topic of considerable research for two decades. The preclinical data are impressive and many orthopaedic conditions are well suited to genetic therapies. But there have been few clinical trials and no FDA-approved product exists. This paper examines why this is so. The reasons are multifactorial. Clinical translation is expensive and difficult to fund by traditional academic routes. Because gene therapy is viewed as unsafe and risky, it does not attract major funding from the pharmaceutical industry. Start-up companies are burdened by the complex intellectual property environment and difficulties in dealing with the technology transfer offices of major universities. Successful translation requires close interactions between scientists, clinicians and experts in regulatory and compliance issues. It is difficult to create such a favourable translational environment. Other promising fields of biological therapy have contemplated similar frustrations approximately 20 years after their founding, so there seem to be more general constraints on translation that are difficult to define. Gene therapy has noted some major clinical successes in recent years, and a sense of optimism is returning to the field. We hope that orthopaedic applications will benefit collaterally from this upswing and move expeditiously into advanced clinical trials. PMID:21948071

  1. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  2. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2006-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted, this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:16457645

  3. The gene therapy revolution in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saikhan, Fahad I.

    2013-01-01

    The advances in gene therapy hold significant promise for the treatment of ophthalmic conditions. Several studies using animal models have been published. Animal models on retinitis pigmentosa, Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), and Stargardt disease have involved the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver functional genes into mice and canines. Mice models have been used to show that a mutation in cGMP phosphodiesterase that results in retinitis pigmentosa can be corrected using rAAV vectors. Additionally, rAAV vectors have been successfully used to deliver ribozyme into mice with a subsequent improvement in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. By using dog models, researchers have made progress in studying X-linked retinitis pigmentosa which results from a RPGR gene mutation. Mouse and canine models have also been used in the study of LCA. The widely studied form of LCA is LCA2, resulting from a mutation in the gene RPE65. Mice and canines that were injected with normal copies of RPE65 gene showed signs such as improved retinal pigment epithelium transduction, visual acuity, and functional recovery. Studies on Stargardt disease have shown that mutations in the ABCA4 gene can be corrected with AAV vectors, or nanoparticles. Gene therapy for the treatment of red–green color blindness was successful in squirrel monkeys. Plans are at an advanced stage to begin clinical trials. Researchers have also proved that CD59 can be used with AMD. Gene therapy is also able to treat primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in animal models, and studies show it is economically viable. PMID:24227970

  4. Methods to improve cardiac gene therapy expression.

    PubMed

    Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Sydnes, Kate E; Zuppo, Daniel A; Koch, Walter J

    2014-11-01

    Gene therapy strategies are becoming a valuable approach for the treatment of heart failure. Some trials are ongoing and others are being organized. Vascular access in clinical experimentation is still the chosen modality of delivery, but many other approaches are in research and development. A successful gene therapy strategy involves not only the choice of the right vector and gene, but also the correct delivery strategy that allows for transduction of the highest percentage of cardiomyocytes, limited spilling of virus into other organs and the possibility to correlate the amount of injected virus to the rate of the expression within the cardiac tissue. The authors will first concentrate on clarifying what the barriers are that the virus has to overcome in order to reach the nuclei of the target organs and methodologies that have been tested to improve the range of expression. PMID:25340284

  5. Gene and splicing therapies for neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Benchaouir, Rachid; Robin, Valerie; Goyenvalle, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are heterogeneous group of genetic diseases characterized by muscle weakness and wasting. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are two of the most common and severe forms in humans and although the molecular mechanisms of these diseases have been extensively investigated, there is currently no effective treatment. However, new gene-based therapies have recently emerged with particular noted advances in using conventional gene replacement strategies and RNA-based technology. Whilst proof of principle have been demonstrated in animal models, several clinical trials have recently been undertaken to investigate the feasibility of these strategies in patients. In particular, antisense mediated exon skipping has shown encouraging results and hold promise for the treatment of dystrophic muscle. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of therapeutic approaches to neuromuscular diseases, with an emphasis on gene therapy and splicing modulation for DMD and SMA, focusing on the advantages offered by these technologies but also their challenges. PMID:25961553

  6. Gene Therapy and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Eming, Sabine A.; Krieg, Thomas; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Wound repair involves the sequential interaction of various cell types, extracellular matrix molecules, and soluble mediators. During the past 10 years, much new information on signals controlling wound cell behavior has emerged. This knowledge has led to a number of novel_therapeutic strategies. In particular, the local delivery of pluripotent growth factor molecules to the injured tissue has been intensively investigated over the past decade. Limited success of clinical trails indicates that a crucial aspect of the growth factor wound-healing strategy is the effective delivery of these polypeptides to the wound site. A molecular approach in which genetically modified cells synthesize and deliver the desired growth factor in regulated fashion has been used to overcome the limitations associated with the (topical) application of recombinant growth factor proteins. We have summarized the molecular and cellular basis of repair mechanisms and their failure, and we give an overview of techniques and studies applied to gene transfer in tissue repair. PMID:17276205

  7. [Gene therapy in lysosomal diseases].

    PubMed

    Moullier, P; Salvetti, A; Bohl, D; Danos, O; Heard, J M

    1996-01-01

    The study of the mechanisms of secretion and recapture of lysosomal enzymes has lead to the proposal of a treatment of lysosomal diseases by enzyme replacement. Autologous implants of genetically modified cells which secrete enzymes ensure systemic distribution of the lacking enzyme. A procedure which permits reimplantation of genetically modified fibroblasts is described. The stable secretion of human glucuronidase by autologous fibroblasts was thus obtained in animal species. This approach should by applicable to the treatment of Hurler's syndrome by obtaining the production and distribution of alpha-L-iduronidase in patients lacking this enzyme by retroviral transfer of the human alpha-L-iduronidase gene to cultured fibroblasts and by preparation of implants. PMID:8881268

  8. Artemisinin combination therapy for vivax malaria?

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Nicholas M.; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Angus, Brian J.; Nosten, Francois; Price, Ric N.

    2012-01-01

    Early parasitological diagnosis and treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) are seen as key components of global malaria elimination programmes. In general, use of ACTs has been limited to patients with falciparum malaria whereas blood-stage P. vivax infections are mostly still treated with chloroquine. We review the evidence for the relative benefits and disadvantages of the existing ‘separate’ treatment approach versus a ‘unified’ ACT-based strategy for treating P. falciparum and P. vivax infections in regions where both species are endemic (co-endemic). The ‘separate’ treatment scenario is justifiable where P. vivax remains sensitive to chloroquine and providing that diagnostic tests reliably distinguish P. vivax from P. falciparum. However, with the high frequency of misdiagnosis in routine practice and the rise and spread of chloroquine-resistant P. vivax, there may be a compelling rationale for a unified ACT-based strategy for vivax and falciparum malaria in all co-endemic areas. Analyses of the cost-effectiveness of ACTs for both Plasmodium species are required to assess the role of these drugs in vivax malaria control and elimination efforts. PMID:20510281

  9. Combined therapy for post-irradiation infection

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, T.B.; Madonna, G.S.; Ledney, G.D.; Brook, I.

    1989-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to bacterial infection, probably by translocation from the intestinal flora, can be a lethal complication for 2-3 weeks after exposure to ionizing radiation. Antibiotics alone do not provide adequate therapy for induced infections in neutropenic mice. Because some substances that are derived from bacterial cell walls activate macrophages and stimulate nonspecific resistance to infection, such agents might be used to prevent or treat postirradiation infections. In this study, a cell-wall glycolipid, trehalose dimycolate (TDM), was evaluated together with a third-generation cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, for their separate and combined effects on survival of B6D2F1 female mice that were exposed to the sublethal dose of 7.0 Gy Co radiation and challenged s.c. with lethal doses of Klebsiella pneumoniae. A single injection of TDM inoculated i.p. 1 hr postirradiation increased 30-day survival to 80% after a lethal challenge by K. pneumoniae 4 days later. When the challenge dose of K. pneumoniae was increased to 5000 Ld 50/30 on Day 4, all mice died.

  10. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  11. Effectiveness of Combined Modality Radiotherapy of Orthotopic Human Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Nu/Nu Mice Using Cetuximab, Tirapazamine and MnSOD-Plasmid Liposome Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; LAI, STEPHEN Y.; KANAI, ANTHONY J.; MASON, NEAL; LOPRESI, BRIAN; DIXON, TRACEY; FRANICOLA, DARCY; NIU, YUNYUN; WILSON, WILLIAM R.; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic regions limit the radiocontrollability of head and neck carcinomas. Whether or not combinations of plasmid/liposome mediated overexpression of normal tissue protective manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), cetuximab (C225), and the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (TPZ) enhanced radiotherapeutic effects was tested in a CAL-33 orthotopic mouse cheek tumor model. The tumor volume continued to increase in the control (untreated) mice, with a ninefold increase by 10 days when the tumors exceeded 2 cm3. The mice receiving 14 Gy only showed reduced tumor growth to 3.1±0.1 fold at day 10. The mice receiving MnSOD-PL, C225, TPZ plus 14 Gy had the best outcome with 0.7±0.1 fold increase in tumor volume by 10 days (p=0.015) compared to irradiation only. The addition of MnSOD-PL, TPZ, and C225 to irradiation optimized the therapeutic ratio for the local control of hypoxic region-containing CAL-33 orthotopic tumors. PMID:20133969

  12. Effectiveness of combined modality radiotherapy of orthotopic human squamous cell carcinomas in Nu/Nu mice using cetuximab, tirapazamine and MnSOD-plasmid liposome gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Lai, Stephen Y; Kanai, Anthony J; Mason, Neal; Lopresi, Brian; Dixon, Tracey; Franicola, Darcy; Niu, Yunyun; Wilson, William R; Greenberger, Joel S

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic regions limit the radiocontrollability of head and neck carcinomas. Whether or not combinations of plasmid/liposome mediated overexpression of normal tissue protective manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), cetuximab (C225), and the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (TPZ) enhanced radiotherapeutic effects was tested in a CAL-33 orthotopic mouse cheek tumor model. The tumor volume continued to increase in the control (untreated) mice, with a ninefold increase by 10 days when the tumors exceeded 2 cm(3). The mice receiving 14 Gy only showed reduced tumor growth to 3.1+/-0.1 fold at day 10. The mice receiving MnSOD-PL, C225, TPZ plus 14 Gy had the best outcome with 0.7+/-0.1 fold increase in tumor volume by 10 days (p=0.015) compared to irradiation only. The addition of MnSOD-PL, TPZ, and C225 to irradiation optimized the therapeutic ratio for the local control of hypoxic region-containing CAL-33 orthotopic tumors. PMID:20133969

  13. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Waseem; Gennery, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy using autologous haematopoietic stem cells offers a valuable treatment option for patients with primary immunodeficiencies who do not have access to an HLA-matched donor, although such treatments have not been without their problems. This review details gene therapy trials for X-linked and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). X-linked SCID was chosen for gene therapy because of previous 'natural' genetic correction through a reversion event in a single lymphoid precursor, demonstrating limited thymopoiesis and restricted T-lymphocyte receptor repertoire, showing selective advantage of progenitors possessing the wild-type gene. In early studies, patients were treated with long terminal repeats-intact gamma-retroviral vectors, without additional chemotherapy. Early results demonstrated gene-transduced cells, sustained thymopoiesis, and a diverse T-lymphocyte repertoire with normal function. Serious adverse effects were subsequently reported in 5 of 20 patients, with T-lymphocyte leukaemia developing, secondary to the viral vector integrating adjacent to a known oncogene. New trials using self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vectors are progressing. Trials for ADA-SCID using gamma-retroviral vectors have been successful, with no similar serious adverse effects reported; trials using lentiviral vectors are in progress. Patients with WAS and CGD treated with early gamma-retroviral vectors have developed similar lymphoproliferative adverse effects to those seen in X-SCID--current trials are using new-generation vectors. Targeted gene insertion using homologous recombination of corrected gene sequences by cellular DNA repair pathways following targeted DNA breakage will improve efficacy and safety of gene therapy. A number of new techniques are discussed. PMID:24848753

  14. An Integrative Pharmacogenomic Approach Identifies Two-drug Combination Therapies for Personalized Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Fei, Teng; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Brown, Myles; Zhang, Peng; Liu, X. Shirley; Wang, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    An individual tumor harbors multiple molecular alterations that promote cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis and differentiation. Drugs that target specific molecular alterations have been introduced into personalized cancer medicine, but their effects can be modulated by the activities of other genes or molecules. Previous studies aiming to identify multiple molecular alterations for combination therapies are limited by available data. Given the recent large scale of available pharmacogenomic data, it is possible to systematically identify multiple biomarkers that contribute jointly to drug sensitivity, and to identify combination therapies for personalized cancer medicine. In this study, we used pharmacogenomic profiling data provided from two independent cohorts in a systematic in silico investigation of perturbed genes cooperatively associated with drug sensitivity. Our study predicted many pairs of molecular biomarkers that may benefit from the use of combination therapies. One of our predicted biomarker pairs, a mutation in the BRAF gene and upregulated expression of the PIM1 gene, was experimentally validated to benefit from a therapy combining BRAF inhibitor and PIM1 inhibitor in lung cancer. This study demonstrates how pharmacogenomic data can be used to systematically identify potentially cooperative genes and provide novel insights to combination therapies in personalized cancer medicine. PMID:26916442

  15. An Integrative Pharmacogenomic Approach Identifies Two-drug Combination Therapies for Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Fei, Teng; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Brown, Myles; Zhang, Peng; Liu, X Shirley; Wang, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    An individual tumor harbors multiple molecular alterations that promote cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis and differentiation. Drugs that target specific molecular alterations have been introduced into personalized cancer medicine, but their effects can be modulated by the activities of other genes or molecules. Previous studies aiming to identify multiple molecular alterations for combination therapies are limited by available data. Given the recent large scale of available pharmacogenomic data, it is possible to systematically identify multiple biomarkers that contribute jointly to drug sensitivity, and to identify combination therapies for personalized cancer medicine. In this study, we used pharmacogenomic profiling data provided from two independent cohorts in a systematic in silico investigation of perturbed genes cooperatively associated with drug sensitivity. Our study predicted many pairs of molecular biomarkers that may benefit from the use of combination therapies. One of our predicted biomarker pairs, a mutation in the BRAF gene and upregulated expression of the PIM1 gene, was experimentally validated to benefit from a therapy combining BRAF inhibitor and PIM1 inhibitor in lung cancer. This study demonstrates how pharmacogenomic data can be used to systematically identify potentially cooperative genes and provide novel insights to combination therapies in personalized cancer medicine. PMID:26916442

  16. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  17. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ...

  18. Noninvasive Tracking of Gene Transcript and Neuroprotection after Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaqian; Chen, Y. Iris; Liu, Christina H.; Chen, Po-Chih; Prentice, Howard; Wu, Jang-Yen; Liu, Philip K.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) cDNA encoded in scAAV-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy, and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer’s dementia, Parkinson’s disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  19. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  20. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, N.; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy. PMID:24284874

  1. Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158046.html Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Heart Failure Inserting new ... who suffer from heart failure: A trial using gene therapy appears to have boosted patients' cardiac function. "This ...

  2. Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158415.html Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease ... WEDNESDAY, April 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new gene therapy shows preliminary promise against so-called "Bubble ...

  3. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Primary Immune Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Caroline Y; Kohn, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The use of gene therapy in the treatment of primary immune deficiencies (PID) has advanced significantly in the last decade. Clinical trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome have demonstrated that gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells and autologous transplant can result in clinical improvement and is curative for many patients. Unfortunately, early clinical trials were complicated by vector-related insertional mutagenic events for several diseases with the exception of ADA-deficiency SCID. These results prompted the current wave of clinical trials for primary immunodeficiency using alternative retro- or lenti-viral vector constructs that are self-inactivating, and they have shown clinical efficacy without leukemic events thus far. The field of gene therapy continues to progress, with improvements in viral vector profiles, stem cell culturing techniques, and site-specific genome editing platforms. The future of gene therapy is promising, and we are quickly moving towards a time when it will be a standard cellular therapy for many forms of PID. PMID:27056559

  4. Gene therapy for lysosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Naffakh, N; Bohl, D; Salvetti, A; Moullier, P; Danos, O; Heard, J M

    1994-01-01

    Genetic defects of lysosomal hydrolases result in severe storage diseases and treatments based on enzyme replacement have been proposed. In mice lacking beta-glucuronidase, which develop a disease homologous to human mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, sly syndrome), we have used autologous implants of genetically-modified cells for the continuous in vivo production of the enzyme. A retroviral vector containing the human beta-glucuronidase cDNA under the control of the mouse phosphoglycerate kinase promoter was used to infect primary skin fibroblasts, bone marrow cells, or myoblasts from mutant MPS VII animals. The fibroblasts were embedded into collagen lattices and reimplanted into the peritoneal cavity of recipient MPS VII mice. All animals, when analysed 10 to 155 days later, expressed beta-glucuronidase from the vascularised neo-organs that developed after implantation, and accumulated the enzyme in their tissues. A complete disappearance of the lysosomal storage lesions was observed in their liver and spleen. This procedure has been scaled up for long term lysosomal enzyme delivery in dogs. The bone marrow cells were used for partial hematopoietic reconstruction of sublethally irradiated MPS VII mice. Five months after gene transfer, animals in which under 5% of genetically-modified hematopoietic cells were detected in the spleen showed a drastic reduction of lysosomal storage lesions in the liver and spleen. Genetically-modified myoblasts were transplanted into injured muscles, where they participated in the regeneration of a significant proportion of muscle fibers. Enzyme secretion and liver uptake were observed for at least one month.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8177709

  5. Gene and stem cell therapy for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Calne, Roy Y; Ghoneim, Mohamed A; Lee, K O; Uin, Gan Shu

    2013-01-01

    Gene and stem cell therapy has been on the scientific agenda in many laboratories for more than 20 years. The literature is enormous, but practical applications have been few. Recently advances in stem cell biology and gene therapy are clarifying some of the issues. I have made a few observations concerning our own studies on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells cultured to produce a small percentage of insulin-producing cells and human insulin gene engineered into Lenti and AA viruses. The aim of clinical application would still seem to be several years away, if all goes well. The first step will be to produce enough insulin-secreting cells to be of potential value to patients. The next crucial question will be how to persuade the cells to respond to blood glucose levels swiftly and appropriately. With both stem cell and gene therapy, another important factor will be to ensure that any positive results will continue long enough to be preferable to insulin injections. PMID:25095498

  6. Gene Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Julian; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a relatively common inherited disorder caused by defective expression of the protein dystrophin. The most direct approach to treating this disease would be to restore dystrophin production in muscle. Recent progress has greatly increased the prospects for successful gene therapy of DMD, and here we summarize the most promising developments. Areas Covered Gene transfer using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising method to restore dystrophin production in muscles bodywide, and represents a treatment option applicable to all DMD patients. Using information gleaned from PubMed searches of the literature, attendance at scientific conferences and results from our own lab, we provide an overview of the potential for gene therapy of DMD using AAV vectors including a summary of promising developments and issues that need to be resolved prior to large-scale therapeutic implementation. Expert Opinion Of the many approaches being pursued to treat DMD and BMD, gene therapy based on AAV-mediated delivery of microdystrophin is the most direct and promising method to treat the cause of the disorder. The major challenges to this approach are ensuring that microdystrophin can be delivered safely and efficiently without eliciting an immune response. PMID:26594599

  7. Suicide Gene Therapy for Cancer - Current Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Sakkas, Antonios; Yarmus, Lonny; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Freitag, Lutz; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Malecki, Marek

    2013-08-01

    Current cancer treatments may create profound iatrogenic outcomes. The adverse effects of these treatments still remain, as the serious problems that practicing physicians have to cope with in clinical practice. Although, non-specific cytotoxic agents constitute an effective treatment modality against cancer cells, they also tend to kill normal, quickly dividing cells. On the other hand, therapies targeting the genome of the tumors are both under investigation, and some others are already streamlined to clinical practice. Several approaches have been investigated in order to find a treatment targeting the cancer cells, while not affecting the normal cells. Suicide gene therapy is a therapeutic strategy, in which cell suicide inducing transgenes are introduced into cancer cells. The two major suicide gene therapeutic strategies currently pursued are: cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine and the herpes simplex virus/ganciclovir. The novel strategies include silencing gene expression, expression of intracellular antibodies blocking cells' vital pathways, and transgenic expression of caspases and DNases. We analyze various elements of cancer cells' suicide inducing strategies including: targets, vectors, and mechanisms. These strategies have been extensively investigated in various types of cancers, while exploring multiple delivery routes including viruses, non-viral vectors, liposomes, nanoparticles, and stem cells. We discuss various stages of streamlining of the suicide gene therapy into clinical oncology as applied to different types of cancer. Moreover, suicide gene therapy is in the center of attention as a strategy preventing cancer from developing in patients participating in the clinical trials of regenerative medicine. In oncology, these clinical trials are aimed at regenerating, with the aid of stem cells, of the patients' organs damaged by pathologic and/or iatrogenic factors. However, the stem cells carry the risk of neoplasmic transformation. We discuss

  8. Inhibition of nuclear factor-{kappa}B and target genes during combined therapy with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Van Waes, Carter . E-mail: vanwaesc@nidcd.nih.gov; Chang, Angela A.; Lebowitz, Peter F.; Druzgal, Colleen H.; Chen, Zhong; Elsayed, Yusri A.; Sunwoo, John B.; Rudy, Susan; Morris, John C.; Mitchell, James B.; Camphausen, Kevin; Gius, David; Adams, Julian; Sausville, Edward A.; Conley, Barbara A.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE) on transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and target genes and the feasibility of combination therapy with reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: The tolerability and response to bortezomib 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and 0.9 mg/m{sup 2} given twice weekly concurrent with daily reirradiation to 50-70 Gy was explored. Blood proteasome inhibition and NF-{kappa}B-modulated cytokines and factors were measured. Proteasome inhibition, nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B phospho-p65, apoptosis, and expression of NF-{kappa}B-modulated mRNAs were compared in serial biopsies from accessible tumors. Results: The maximally tolerated dose was exceeded, and study was limited to 7 and 2 patients, respectively, given bortezomib 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and 0.9 mg/m{sup 2}/dose with reirradiation. Grade 3 hypotension and hyponatremia were dose limiting. Mucositis was Grade 3 or less and was delayed. The mean blood proteasome inhibition at 1, 24, and 48 h after 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} was 32%, 16%, and 7% and after 0.9 mg/m{sup 2} was 56%, 26%, and 14%, respectively. Differences in proteasome and NF-{kappa}B activity, apoptosis, and expression of NF-{kappa}B-modulated cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis factor mRNAs were detected in 2 patients with minor tumor reductions and in serum NF-{kappa}B-modulated cytokines in 1 patient with a major tumor reduction. Conclusions: In combination with reirradiation, the maximally tolerated dose of bortezomib was exceeded at a dose of 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and the threshold of proteasome inhibition. Although this regimen with reirradiation is not feasible, bortezomib induced detectable differences in NF-{kappa}B localization, apoptosis, and NF-{kappa}B-modulated genes and cytokines in tumor and serum in association with tumor reduction, indicating that other schedules of bortezomib combined with primary

  9. New gene therapy strategies for hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Montes, Adriana M; Hernández-Ortega, Luis D; Lucano-Landeros, Martha S; Armendariz-Borunda, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the largest internal organ of the body, which may suffer acute or chronic injury induced by many factors, leading to cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. Cirrhosis is the irreversible end result of fibrous scarring and hepatocellular regeneration, characterized by diffuse disorganization of the normal hepatic structure, regenerative nodules and fibrotic tissue. Cirrhosis is associated with a high co-morbidity and mortality without effective treatment, and much research has been aimed at developing new therapeutic strategies to guarantee recovery. Liver-based gene therapy has been used to downregulate specific genes, to block the expression of deleterious genes, to delivery therapeutic genes, to prevent allograft rejection and to augment liver regeneration. Viral and non-viral vectors have been used, with viral vectors proving to be more efficient. This review provides an overview of the main strategies used in liver-gene therapy represented by non-viral vectors, viral vectors, novel administration methods like hydrodynamic injection, hybrids of two viral vectors and blocking molecules, with the hope of translating findings from the laboratory to the patient´s bed-side. PMID:25852266

  10. Gene therapy: prospects for glycolipid storage diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich; Klein, Diana; Mansson, Jan Eric; D'Hooge, Rudi; DeDeyn, Peter D; Lüllmann Rauch, Renate; Hartmann, Dieter; Harzer, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases comprise a group of about 40 disorders, which in most cases are due to the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme. Since lysosomal enzymes are involved in the degradation of various compounds, the diseases can be further subdivided according to which pathway is affected. Thus, enzyme deficiencies in the degradation pathway of glycosaminoglycans cause mucopolysaccharidosis, and deficiencies affecting glycopeptides cause glycoproteinosis. In glycolipid storage diseases enzymes are deficient that are involved in the degradation of sphingolipids. Mouse models are available for most of these diseases, and some of these mouse models have been used to study the applicability of in vivo gene therapy. We review the rationale for gene therapy in lysosomal disorders and present data, in particular, about trials in an animal model of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The data of these trials are compared with those obtained with animal models of other lysosomal diseases. PMID:12803926

  11. Gene therapy: prospects for glycolipid storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich; Klein, Diana; Mansson, Jan Eric; D'Hooge, Rudi; DeDeyn, Peter D; Lüllmann Rauch, Renate; Hartmann, Dieter; Harzer, Klaus

    2003-05-29

    Lysosomal storage diseases comprise a group of about 40 disorders, which in most cases are due to the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme. Since lysosomal enzymes are involved in the degradation of various compounds, the diseases can be further subdivided according to which pathway is affected. Thus, enzyme deficiencies in the degradation pathway of glycosaminoglycans cause mucopolysaccharidosis, and deficiencies affecting glycopeptides cause glycoproteinosis. In glycolipid storage diseases enzymes are deficient that are involved in the degradation of sphingolipids. Mouse models are available for most of these diseases, and some of these mouse models have been used to study the applicability of in vivo gene therapy. We review the rationale for gene therapy in lysosomal disorders and present data, in particular, about trials in an animal model of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The data of these trials are compared with those obtained with animal models of other lysosomal diseases. PMID:12803926

  12. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  13. Gene mutations and molecularly targeted therapies in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Georgiou, Georgios; Benetatos, Leonidas; Briasoulis, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) can progress quickly and without treatment can become fatal in a short period of time. However, over the last 30 years fine-tuning of therapeutics have increased the rates of remission and cure. Cytogenetics and mutational gene profiling, combined with the option of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation offered in selected patients have further optimized AML treatment on a risk stratification basis in younger adults. However there is still an unmet medical need for effective therapies in AML since disease relapses in almost half of adult patients becoming refractory to salvage therapy. Improvements in the understanding of molecular biology of cancer and identification of recurrent mutations in AML provide opportunities to develop targeted therapies and improve the clinical outcome. In the spectrum of identified gene mutations, primarily targetable lesions are gain of function mutations of tyrosine kinases FLT3, JAK2 and cKIT for which specific, dual and multi-targeted small molecule inhibitors have been developed. A number of targeted compounds such as sorafenib, quizartinib, lestaurtinib, midostaurin, pacritinib, PLX3397 and CCT137690 are in clinical development. For loss-of-function gene mutations, which are mostly biomarkers of favorable prognosis, combined therapeutic approaches can maximize the therapeutic efficacy of conventional therapy. Apart from mutated gene products, proteins aberrantly overexpressed in AML appear to be clinically significant therapeutic targets. Such a molecule for which targeted inhibitors are currently in clinical development is PLK1. We review characteristic gene mutations, discuss their biological functions and clinical significance and present small molecule compounds in clinical development, which are expected to have a role in treating AML subtypes with characteristic molecular alterations. PMID:23358589

  14. [Cellular therapy and gene therapy: perspectives in neuromuscular pathology].

    PubMed

    Fardeau, M

    1993-10-01

    Identification of the gene coding for the protein (dystrophin) which is lacking or abnormal in Duchenne or Becker type human muscular dystrophies was a decisive turning point in neuro-muscular pathology. Since that time, a considerable number of gene abnormalities have been identified or at least localized. The severity of these diseases, their steady evolution and the absence of any efficient drug therapy, have lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches based on restoring the genetic capacities of the muscle cell. There are two possibilities for therapy. The first is based on the transfer of myogenic cells derived from the 'satellite' cells normally present at the periphery of muscle fibers. The results obtained from a murine model of Duchenne dystrophy ('mdx' mouse) were very promising. However, the results from application of the same techniques to the canine model (GRMDX) or to affected children are, at the present time, disappointing. A number of biological questions remain to be solved before this technique can be more extensively applied to humans. The second possibility is based on gene transfer, through a viral vector. The adenovirus is presently a possible vector. The first experimental results, on 'mdx' mice, are again very encouraging. Extension of these studies to the canine model is a necessary prerequisite for any human application. It should be noted that these two approaches are complementary. Their future applications may depend on the diffuse or selective nature of the skeletal muscle atrophy, and on whether cardiac and respiratory muscles are involved. PMID:8290312

  15. Gene delivery systems for gene therapy in tissue engineering and central nervous system applications.

    PubMed

    Giordano, C; Causa, F; Bianco, F; Perale, G; Netti, P A; Ambrosio, L; Cigada, A

    2008-12-01

    The present review aims to describe the potential applications of gene delivery systems to tissue engineering and central nervous system diseases. Some key experimental work has been done with interesting results, but the subject is far from being fully explored. The combined approach of gene therapy and material science has a huge potential to improve the therapeutic approaches now available for a wide range of medical applications. Focus is given to this multidisciplinary strategy in neurodegenerative pathologies, where the use of polymeric matrices as gene carriers might make a crucial difference. PMID:19115193

  16. Gene therapy approaches to regenerating bone

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Nadav Kimelman; Kallai, Ilan; Lieberman, Jay R.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Pelled, Gadi; Gazit, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Bone formation and regeneration therapies continue to require optimization and improvement because many skeletal disorders remain undertreated. Clinical solutions to nonunion fractures and osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, for example, remain suboptimal and better therapeutic approaches must be created. The widespread use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) for spine fusion was recently questioned by a series of reports in a special issue of The Spine Journal, which elucidated the side effects and complications of direct rhBMP treatments. Gene therapy—both direct (in vivo) and cell-mediated (ex vivo)—has long been studied extensively to provide much needed improvements in bone regeneration. In this article, we review recent advances in gene therapy research whose aims are in vivo or ex vivo bone regeneration or formation. We examine appropriate vectors, safety issues, and rates of bone formation. The use of animal models and their relevance for translation of research results to the clinical setting are also discussed in order to provide the reader with a critical view. Finally, we elucidate the main challenges and hurdles faced by gene therapy aimed at bone regeneration as well as expected future trends in this field. PMID:22429662

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen in chronic traumatic brain injury: oxygen, pressure, and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Harch, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a treatment for wounds in any location and of any duration that has been misunderstood for 353 years. Since 2008 it has been applied to the persistent post-concussion syndrome of mild traumatic brain injury by civilian and later military researchers with apparent conflicting results. The civilian studies are positive and the military-funded studies are a mixture of misinterpreted positive data, indeterminate data, and negative data. This has confused the medical, academic, and lay communities. The source of the confusion is a fundamental misunderstanding of the definition, principles, and mechanisms of action of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This article argues that the traditional definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is arbitrary. The article establishes a scientific definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a wound-healing therapy of combined increased atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen over ambient atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen whose main mechanisms of action are gene-mediated. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy exerts its wound-healing effects by expression and suppression of thousands of genes. The dominant gene actions are upregulation of trophic and anti-inflammatory genes and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic genes. The combination of genes affected depends on the different combinations of total pressure and pressure of oxygen. Understanding that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a pressure and oxygen dose-dependent gene therapy allows for reconciliation of the conflicting TBI study results as outcomes of different doses of pressure and oxygen. PMID:26171141

  18. Gene therapy for ocular diseases meditated by ultrasound and microbubbles (Review)

    PubMed Central

    WAN, CAIFENG; LI, FENGHUA; LI, HONGLI

    2015-01-01

    The eye is an ideal target organ for gene therapy as it is easily accessible and immune-privileged. With the increasing insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ocular diseases, gene therapy has been proposed as an effective approach. Successful gene therapy depends on efficient gene transfer to targeted cells to prove stable and prolonged gene expression with minimal toxicity. At present, the main hindrance regarding the clinical application of gene therapy is not the lack of an ideal gene, but rather the lack of a safe and efficient method to selectively deliver genes to target cells and tissues. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), with the advantages of high safety, repetitive applicability and tissue targeting, has become a potential strategy for gene- and drug delivery. When gene-loaded microbubbles are injected, UTMD is able to enhance the transport of the gene to the targeted cells. High-amplitude oscillations of microbubbles act as cavitation nuclei which can effectively focus ultrasound energy, produce oscillations and disruptions that increase the permeability of the cell membrane and create transient pores in the cell membrane. Thereby, the efficiency of gene therapy can be significantly improved. The UTMD-mediated gene delivery system has been widely used in pre-clinical studies to enhance gene expression in a site-specific manner in a variety of organs. With reasonable application, the effects of sonoporation can be spatially and temporally controlled to improve localized tissue deposition of gene complexes for ocular gene therapy applications. In addition, appropriately powered, focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles can induce a reversible disruption of the blood-retinal barrier with no significant side effects. The present review discusses the current status of gene therapy of ocular diseases as well as studies on gene therapy of ocular diseases meditated by UTMD. PMID:26151686

  19. Combining Locoregional Therapies in the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Mikhail C. S. S.; Soulen, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to promote more durable local control of larger lesions, thermal ablation has been combined with chemical ablative techniques and with vaso-occlusive procedures such as chemoembolization and bland embolization in an effort to mitigate the limitations inherent in the use of any single treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) >3 cm. The heat-sink effect is the underlying principle for combining vaso-occlusive therapies with ablative techniques. Combination therapies do present viable options for abrogating tumor progression and potentially downsizing tumors to facilitate transplant. We discuss the two most commonly used combination locoregional therapies by the interventionalist and the evidence defining the best techniques in practice. PMID:24436520

  20. Consensus gene regulatory networks: combining multiple microarray gene expression datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeling, Emma; Tucker, Allan

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we present a method for modelling gene regulatory networks by forming a consensus Bayesian network model from multiple microarray gene expression datasets. Our method is based on combining Bayesian network graph topologies and does not require any special pre-processing of the datasets, such as re-normalisation. We evaluate our method on a synthetic regulatory network and part of the yeast heat-shock response regulatory network using publicly available yeast microarray datasets. Results are promising; the consensus networks formed provide a broader view of the potential underlying network, obtaining an increased true positive rate over networks constructed from a single data source.

  1. Creating a cardiac pacemaker by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Traian M; Pogwizd, Steven M

    2007-02-01

    While electronic cardiac pacing in its various modalities represents standard of care for treatment of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias and heart failure, it has limitations ranging from absent or rudimentary autonomic modulation to severe complications. This has prompted experimental studies to design and validate a biological pacemaker that could supplement or replace electronic pacemakers. Advances in cardiac gene therapy have resulted in a number of strategies focused on beta-adrenergic receptors as well as specific ion currents that contribute to pacemaker function. This article reviews basic pacemaker physiology, as well as studies in which gene transfer approaches to develop a biological pacemaker have been designed and validated in vivo. Additional requirements and refinements necessary for successful biopacemaker function by gene transfer are discussed. PMID:17139515

  2. Combination therapy for erectile dysfunction: an update review

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Rohit R; Lin, Hao-Cheng; Canfield, Steven E; Wang, Run

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) in the late 1990s and early 2000s revolutionized the field of sexual medicine and PDE5Is are currently first-line monotherapy for erectile dysfunction (ED). However, a significant proportion of patients with complex ED will be therapeutic non-responders to PDE5I monotherapy. Combination therapy has recently been adopted for more refractory cases of ED, but a critical evaluation of current combination therapies is lacking. A thorough PubMed and Cochrane Library search was conducted focusing on the effectiveness of combination therapies for ED in therapeutic non-responders to PDE5I therapy. Journal articles spanning the time period between January 1990 and December 2010 were reviewed. Criteria included all pertinent review articles, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and retrospective analyses. References from retrieved articles were also manually scanned for additional relevant publications. Published combination therapies include PDE5I plus vacuum erectile device (VED), intraurethral medication, intracavernosal injection (ICI), androgen supplement, α-blocker or miscellaneous combinations. Based on this review, some of these combination treatments appeared to be quite effective in preliminary testing. Caution must be advised, however, as the majority of combination therapy articles in the last decade have numerous limitations including study biases and small subject size. Regardless of limitations, present combination therapy research provides a solid foundation for future studies in complex ED management. PMID:21423198

  3. Concepts in Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Andre F.; Nöth, Ulrich; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Once articular cartilage is injured, it has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Although current surgical therapeutic procedures to cartilage repair are clinically useful, they cannot restore a normal articular surface. Current research offers a growing number of bioactive reagents, including proteins and nucleic acids, that may be used to augment different aspects of the repair process. As these agents are difficult to administer effectively, gene transfer approaches are being developed to provide their sustained synthesis at sites of repair. To augment regeneration of articular cartilage, therapeutic genes can be delivered to the synovium, or directly to the cartilage lesion. Gene delivery to the cells of the synovial lining is generally considered more suitable for chondroprotective approaches, based on the expression of anti-inflammatory mediators. Gene transfer targeted to cartilage defects can be achieved by either direct vector administration to cells located at or surrounding the defects, or by transplantation of genetically modified chondrogenic cells into the defect. Several studies have shown that exogenous cDNAs encoding growth factors can be delivered locally to sites of cartilage damage, where they are expressed at therapeutically relevant levels. Furthermore, data is beginning to emerge indicating, that efficient delivery and expression of these genes is capable of influencing a repair response toward the synthesis of a more hyaline cartilage repair tissue in vivo. This review presents the current status of gene therapy for cartilage healing and highlights some of the remaining challenges. PMID:18313477

  4. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June Lee, Yoon-Jin

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  5. Investigation of different combinations of estrogen therapy and radiation therapy on prostatic adenocarcinoma (R-3327)

    SciTech Connect

    Camuzzi, F.; Block, N.L.; Stover, B.; Gottlieb, C.; Charyulu, K.; Politano, V.A.

    1980-05-01

    The relative effectiveness of different combinations of estrogen therapy and radiation therapy against the R-3327 prostatic adenocarcinoma of the Copenhagen rat was studied. Because of similar actions of estrogens and radiation in the cell cycle, and possibly antagonistic effects reported in the clinical literature, we looked for an antagonism between these two therapeutic modalities. Radiation therapy consistently showed a greater tumor inhibitory effect than estrogen therapy alone at the dose tested. Combinations of radiation therapy with hormonal manipulation did not appear to show a greater inhibition of tumor growth than radiation therapy alone. There also did not appear to be an antagonistic effect between these two modalities in this system.

  6. Gene therapy approaches against cancer using in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer of interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Alcoceba, Ruben; Poutou, Joanna; Ballesteros-Briones, María Cristina; Smerdou, Cristian

    2016-02-01

    IL-12 is an immunostimulatory cytokine with strong antitumor properties. Systemic administration of IL-12 in cancer patients led to severe toxic effects, prompting the development of gene therapy vectors able to express this cytokine locally in tumors. Both nonviral and viral vectors have demonstrated a high antitumor efficacy in preclinical tumor models. Some of these vectors, including DNA electroporation, adenovirus and ex vivo transduced dendritic cells, were tested in patients, showing low toxicity and moderate antitumor efficacy. IL-12 activity can be potentiated by molecules with immunostimulatory, antiangiogenic or cytotoxic activity. These combination therapies are of clinical interest because they could lower the threshold for IL-12 efficacy, increasing the therapeutic potential of gene therapy and preventing the toxicity mediated by this cytokine. PMID:26786809

  7. Saporin as a novel suicide gene in anticancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarovni, N; Vago, R; Soldà, T; Monaco, L; Fabbrini, M S

    2007-02-01

    We used a non-viral gene delivery approach to explore the potential of the plant saporin (SAP) gene as an alternative to the currently employed suicide genes in cancer therapy. Plasmids expressing cytosolic SAP were generated by placing the region encoding the mature plant ribosome-inactivating protein under the control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus 40 (SV40) promoters. Their ability to inhibit protein synthesis was first tested in cultured tumor cells co-transfected with a luciferase reporter gene. In particular, SAP expression driven by CMV promoter (pCI-SAP) demonstrated that only 10 ng of plasmid per 1.6 x 10(4) B16 cells drastically reduced luciferase activity to 18% of that in control cells. Direct intratumoral injection of pCI-SAP complexed with either lipofectamine or N-(2,3-dioleoyloxy-1-propyl) trimethylammonium methyl sulfate (DOTAP) in B16 melanoma-bearing mice resulted in a noteworthy attenuation of tumor growth. This antitumor effect was increased in mice that received repeated intratumoral injections. A SAP catalytic inactive mutant (SAP-KQ) failed to exert any antitumor effect demonstrating that this was specifically owing to the SAP N-glycosidase activity. Our overall data strongly suggest that the gene encoding SAP, owing to its rapid and effective action and its independence from the proliferative state of target cells might become a suitable candidate suicide gene for oncologic applications. PMID:17008932

  8. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  9. Pronounced antitumor effects and tumor radiosensitization of double suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rogulski, K R; Zhang, K; Kolozsvary, A; Kim, J H; Freytag, S O

    1997-11-01

    The efficacy of HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene therapies as cancer treatments are currently being examined in humans. We demonstrated previously that compared to single suicide gene therapy, greater levels of targeted cytotoxicity and radiosensitization can be achieved in vitro by genetically modifying tumor cells to express CD and HSV-1 TK concomitantly, as a fusion protein. In the present study, the efficacy of the combined double suicide gene therapy/radiotherapy approach was examined in vivo. Nude mice were injected either s.c. or i.m. with 9L gliosarcoma cells expressing an E. coli CD/HSV-1 TK fusion gene. Double suicide gene therapy using 5-fluorocytosine (500 mg/kg) and ganciclovir (30 mg/kg) proved to be markedly better at delaying tumor growth and achieving a tumor cure than single suicide gene therapy, which used 5-fluorocytosine or ganciclovir administered independently. Importantly, double suicide gene therapy was highly effective against large experimental tumors (>2 cm3), reducing tumor volume an average of 99% and producing a 40% tumor cure. Moreover, double suicide gene therapy profoundly potentiated the antitumor effects of radiation. The results indicate that double suicide gene therapy, particularly when coupled with radiotherapy, may represent a highly effective means of eradicating tumors. PMID:9815600

  10. Diverse array-designed modes of combination therapies in Fangjiomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhong

    2015-06-01

    In line with the complexity of disease networks, diverse combination therapies have been demonstrated potential in the treatment of different patients with complex diseases in a personal combination profile. However, the identification of rational, compatible and effective drug combinations remains an ongoing challenge. Based on a holistic theory integrated with reductionism, Fangjiomics systematically develops multiple modes of array-designed combination therapies. We define diverse "magic shotgun" vertical, horizontal, focusing, siege and dynamic arrays according to different spatiotemporal distributions of hits on targets, pathways and networks. Through these multiple adaptive modes for treating complex diseases, Fangjiomics may help to identify rational drug combinations with synergistic or additive efficacy but reduced adverse side effects that reverse complex diseases by reconstructing or rewiring multiple targets, pathways and networks. Such a novel paradigm for combination therapies may allow us to achieve more precise treatments by developing phenotype-driven quantitative multi-scale modeling for rational drug combinations. PMID:25864646

  11. Hyperbilirubinemia without Transaminitis during Combined Therapy with Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hayato; Tajiri, Kazuto; Nagata, Kohei; Kawai, Kengo; Minemura, Masami; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) are direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Combined therapy with DCV and ASV shows high efficacy and safety even in patients with cirrhosis. We encountered a patient exhibiting severe hyperbilirubinemia during combined therapy, which is an unreported side effect of DCV and ASV. A 78-year-old woman with cirrhosis developed hyperbilirubinemia >10 mg/dl without transaminitis 3 weeks after starting combined therapy. We suspected DAAs-induced liver disorder and discontinued treatment, which resulted in the improvement of hyperbilirubinemia. Caution is required in the use of DAAs for patients with advanced cirrhosis. PMID:27504082

  12. Current concepts in combination antibiotic therapy for critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Widespread emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is a problem of global dimension. MDR infections are difficult to treat and frequently associated with high mortality. More than one antibiotic is commonly used to treat such infections, but scientific evidence does not favor use of combination therapy in most cases. However, there are certain subgroups where combination therapy may be beneficial, e.g. sepsis due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia, and patients with multiple organ failure. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to clearly define the role of combination therapy in these subgroups. PMID:24914260

  13. Hyperbilirubinemia without Transaminitis during Combined Therapy with Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Hayato; Tajiri, Kazuto; Nagata, Kohei; Kawai, Kengo; Minemura, Masami; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) are direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Combined therapy with DCV and ASV shows high efficacy and safety even in patients with cirrhosis. We encountered a patient exhibiting severe hyperbilirubinemia during combined therapy, which is an unreported side effect of DCV and ASV. A 78-year-old woman with cirrhosis developed hyperbilirubinemia >10 mg/dl without transaminitis 3 weeks after starting combined therapy. We suspected DAAs-induced liver disorder and discontinued treatment, which resulted in the improvement of hyperbilirubinemia. Caution is required in the use of DAAs for patients with advanced cirrhosis. PMID:27504082

  14. The Muscular Dystrophies: From Genes to Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Neil C; Bloch, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of many muscular disorders, including many of the more common muscular dystrophies, is now known. Clinically, the recent genetic advances have improved diagnostic capabilities, but they have not yet provided clues about treatment or management. Thanks to better management strategies and therapeutic interventions, however, many patients with a muscular dystrophy are more active and are living longer. Physical therapists, therefore, are more likely to see a patient with a muscular dystrophy, so understanding these muscle disorders and their management is essential. Physical therapy offers the most promise in caring for the majority of patients with these conditions, because it is unlikely that advances in gene therapy will significantly alter their clinical treatment in the near future. This perspective covers some of the basic molecular biological advances together with the clinical manifestations of the muscular dystrophies and the latest approaches to their management. PMID:16305275

  15. Study of the combined treatment of lung cancer using gene-loaded immunomagnetic albumin nanospheres in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Liang, Chen; Hou, Xinxin; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy for lung cancer has garnered widespread attention. Radiation therapy, gene therapy, and molecular targeted therapy for lung cancer have certain effects, but the disadvantages of these treatment methods are evident. Combining these methods can decrease their side effects and increase their curative effects. In this study, we constructed a pYr-ads-8-5HRE-cfosp-iNOS-IFNG plasmid (a gene circuit that can express IFNγ), which is a gene circuit, and used that plasmid together with C225 (cetuximab) to prepare gene-loaded immunomagnetic albumin nanospheres (IMANS). Moreover, we investigated the therapeutic effects of gene-loaded IMANS in combination with radiation therapy on human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that this gene circuit was successively constructed and confirmed that the expression of INFγ was increased due to the gene circuit. Gene-loaded IMANS combined with radiation therapy demonstrated improved results in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, gene-loaded IMANS enhanced the efficacy of combination therapy, solved problems related to gene transfer, and specifically targeted lung cancer cells. PMID:27042059

  16. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  17. Gene therapy: Into the home stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Tumors cannot live without blood. Shut off the blood vessels that feed a tumor and the tumor will turn black and shrivel away. That simple idea lies behind the first attempt to cure a disease by gene therapy, expected to take place at the National Cancer Institute in the next few weeks. When it does, it will test a technique that worked like a charm in mice. When a potent natural killer called tumor necrosis factor, or TNF, is injected into the bloodstream of mice, it begins to shrink tumors within hours, sometimes even minutes. But so far, attempts to recreate that miracle in people with cancer have not fared as well. TNF has been given intravenously to more than 35 patients in experiments that were a failure. Researchers hope to deliver TNF in much larger doses directly to a tumor by packaging the gene for TNF inside special lymphocytes that have a natural affinity for cancer.

  18. Combination Therapies for Traumatic Brain Injury: Prospective Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Ramona

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a cascade of numerous pathophysiological events that evolve over time. Despite the complexity of TBI, research aimed at therapy development has almost exclusively focused on single therapies, all of which have failed in multicenter clinical trials. Therefore, in February 2008 the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, with support from the National Institute of Child Health and Development, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Department of Veterans Affairs, convened a workshop to discuss the opportunities and challenges of testing combination therapies for TBI. Workshop participants included clinicians and scientists from a variety of disciplines, institutions, and agencies. The objectives of the workshop were to: (1) identify the most promising combinations of therapies for TBI; (2) identify challenges of testing combination therapies in clinical and pre-clinical studies; and (3) propose research methodologies and study designs to overcome these challenges. Several promising combination therapies were discussed, but no one combination was identified as being the most promising. Rather, the general recommendation was to combine agents with complementary targets and effects (e.g., mechanisms and time-points), rather than focusing on a single target with multiple agents. In addition, it was recommended that clinical management guidelines be carefully considered when designing pre-clinical studies for therapeutic development. To overcome the challenges of testing combination therapies it was recommended that statisticians and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration be included in early discussions of experimental design. Furthermore, it was agreed that an efficient and validated screening platform for candidate therapeutics, sensitive and clinically relevant biomarkers and outcome measures, and standardization and data sharing across centers would greatly facilitate the development of

  19. Combination Therapies for Lysosomal Storage Diseases: A Complex Answer to a Simple Problem.

    PubMed

    Macauley, Shannon L

    2016-06-01

    Abstract Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of 40-50 rare monogenic disorders that result in disrupted lysosomal function and subsequent lysosomal pathology. Depending on the protein or enzyme deficiency associated with each disease, LSDs affect an array of organ systems and elicit a complex set of secondary disease mechanisms that make many of these disorders difficult to fully treat. The etiology of most LSDs is known and the innate biology of lysosomal enzymes favors therapeutic intervention, yet most attempts at treating LSDs with enzyme replacement strategies fall short of being curative. Even with the advent of more sophisticated approaches, like substrate reduction therapy, pharmacologic chaperones, gene therapy or stem cell therapy, comprehensive treatments for LSDs have yet to be achieved. Given the limitations with individual therapies, recent research has focused on using a combination approach to treat LSDs. By coupling protein-, cell-, and gene- based therapies with small molecule drugs, researchers have found greater success in eradicating the clinical features of disease. This review seeks to discuss the positive and negatives of singular therapies used to treat LSDs, and discuss how, in combination, studies have demonstrated a more holistic benefit on pathological and functional parameters. By optimizing routes of delivery, therapeutic timing, and targeting secondary disease mechanisms, combination therapy represents the future for LSD treatment. PMID:27491211

  20. Retinal Gene Therapy: Current Progress and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Cristy A.; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials treating inherited retinal dystrophy caused by RPE65 mutations had put retinal gene therapy at the forefront of gene therapy. Both successes and limitations in these clinical trials have fueled developments in gene vectors, which continue to further advance the field. These novel gene vectors aim to more safely and efficiently transduce retinal cells, expand the gene packaging capacity of AAV, and utilize new strategies to correct the varying mechanisms of dysfunction found with inherited retinal dystrophies. With recent clinical trials and numerous pre-clinical studies utilizing these novel vectors, the future of ocular gene therapy continues to hold vast potential. PMID:26609316

  1. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rowzee, Anne M.; Cawley, Niamh X.; Chiorini, John A.; Di Pasquale, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a small peptide component of the prohormone, proglucagon, that is produced in the gut. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist originally isolated from the saliva of H. suspectum or Gila monster, is a peptide that shares sequence and functional homology with GLP-1. Both peptides have been demonstrated to stimulate insulin secretion, inhibit glucagon secretion, promote satiety and slow gastric emptying. As such, GLP-1 and Exendin-4 have become attractive pharmaceutical targets as an adjunctive therapy for individuals with type II diabetes mellitus, with several products currently available clinically. Herein we summarize the cell biology leading to GLP-1 production and secretion from intestinal L-cells and the endocrine functions of this peptide and Exendin-4 in humans. Additionally, gene therapeutic applications of GLP-1 and Exendin-4 are discussed with a focus on recent work using the salivary gland as a gene therapy target organ for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:21747830

  2. Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease Preliminary research tries new approach to rebuild ... therapy shows preliminary promise against so-called "Bubble Boy" disease, researchers report. A small, early-stage trial ...

  3. Perspectives on best practices for gene therapy programs.

    PubMed

    Cheever, Thomas R; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H; Byrne, Barry J; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J; High, Katherine A; Kaspar, Brian K; Klinger, Katherine W; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H; Tagle, Danilo A; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J; Wilson, James M; Porter, John D; Gubitz, Amelie K

    2015-03-01

    With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on "Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs," with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  4. Fixed-combination and emerging glaucoma therapies.

    PubMed

    Woodward, David F; Chen, June

    2007-05-01

    Ocular hypotensive agents are the only approved pharmacotherapy for glaucoma. Despite significant advances during the past two decades, a large proportion of glaucoma patients require more than one drug. The most recent additions to the armamentarium of antiglaucoma drugs are fixed-combination products for the glaucoma patient who is insufficiently responsive to monotherapy. Fixed-combination products have the combined efficacy of two ocular hypotensive drugs, and the convenience of a two-drug treatment regimen in a single container, which may aid patient adherence to treatment. Available fixed-combination products consist of timolol 0.5% as an invariant with brimonidine 0.2%, dorzolamide 2%, travoprost 0.004%, latanoprost 0.005% or bimatoprost 0.03%. Research on more advanced antiglaucoma medications continues. Promising new directions appear to be the Rho-kinase inhibitors, microtubule-disrupting agents, serotonergics and cannabimimetics. Efforts continue to improve existing antiglaucoma drugs in an attempt to design second-generation cholinomimetics, adrenergics, prostaglandins and prostamides. PMID:17604504

  5. A combination therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2015-09-24

    The most prevalent form of cystic fibrosis arises from an amino acid deletion in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. A recently approved treatment for individuals homozygous for this mutation combines a chemical corrector, which helps CFTR fold, and a potentiator that increases CFTR channel activity. PMID:26406363

  6. Assessment of combination therapy in BALB/c mice injected with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Noor A; Kissoyan, Kohar Annie B; Fadlallah, Sukayna; Cheaito, Katia; Araj, George F; Wakim, Rima; Kanj, Souha; Kanafani, Zeina; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Matar, Ghassan M

    2015-01-01

    Monotherapeutic options for carbapenem resistant infections are limited. Studies suggest that combination therapy may be associated with better outcomes than monotherapies. However, this is still controversial. This study assessed, the efficacy of combination therapy against carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae harboring singly various extended spectrum beta lactamase or carbapenemase encoding genes. Thus, four isolates harboring either bla CTXM-15, bla CTXM-15 and bla OXA-48, bla NDM-1, or bla KPC-2 genes were selected for testing. Minimal inhibitory concentration was determined by broth dilution method. Gene transcript levels on single and combined treatments were done in vitro and in vivo by qRT-PCR. Assessment of treatments was done in BALB/c mice according to a specific protocol. As such, the qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease of transcript levels in all isolates upon using rifampicin or tigecycline, singly or in combination with colistin. However, variable levels were obtained using colistin singly or in combination with meropenem or fosfomycin. In vivo assessment showed that all combinations used were effective against isolates harboring bla CTXM-15, bla OXA-48, and bla NDM-1. Conversely, the most significant combination against the isolate harboring bla KPC-2 gene was colistin with either carbapenem, fosfomycin, or kanamycin. As a conclusion, combination therapy selected based on the type of carbapenemase produced, appeared to be non-toxic and might be effective in BALB/c mice. Therefore, the use of a rationally optimized combination therapy might lead to better results than monotherapy, however, clinical trials are needed for human consumption. PMID:26441926

  7. Assessment of combination therapy in BALB/c mice injected with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Noor A.; Kissoyan, Kohar Annie B.; Fadlallah, Sukayna; Cheaito, Katia; Araj, George F.; Wakim, Rima; Kanj, Souha; Kanafani, Zeina; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Matar, Ghassan M.

    2015-01-01

    Monotherapeutic options for carbapenem resistant infections are limited. Studies suggest that combination therapy may be associated with better outcomes than monotherapies. However, this is still controversial. This study assessed, the efficacy of combination therapy against carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae harboring singly various extended spectrum beta lactamase or carbapenemase encoding genes. Thus, four isolates harboring either blaCTXM-15, blaCTXM-15 and blaOXA-48, blaNDM-1, or blaKPC-2 genes were selected for testing. Minimal inhibitory concentration was determined by broth dilution method. Gene transcript levels on single and combined treatments were done in vitro and in vivo by qRT-PCR. Assessment of treatments was done in BALB/c mice according to a specific protocol. As such, the qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease of transcript levels in all isolates upon using rifampicin or tigecycline, singly or in combination with colistin. However, variable levels were obtained using colistin singly or in combination with meropenem or fosfomycin. In vivo assessment showed that all combinations used were effective against isolates harboring blaCTXM-15, blaOXA-48, and blaNDM-1. Conversely, the most significant combination against the isolate harboring blaKPC-2 gene was colistin with either carbapenem, fosfomycin, or kanamycin. As a conclusion, combination therapy selected based on the type of carbapenemase produced, appeared to be non-toxic and might be effective in BALB/c mice. Therefore, the use of a rationally optimized combination therapy might lead to better results than monotherapy, however, clinical trials are needed for human consumption. PMID:26441926

  8. HT update: spotlight on estradiol/norethindrone acetate combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Colleen L; Murray, Christine A

    2008-01-01

    The goal of postmenopausal hormone therapy is to alleviate the symptoms that are associated with the loss of estrogen. Many formulations of estrogen and progestin are available, depending on the needs and circumstances of each individual woman. For postmenopausal women, the choice of whether or not to begin therapy requires knowledge of the risks and benefits of estrogen and/or progestin replacement. The purpose of this review is to describe the risks and benefits of hormonal therapy, focusing on estradiol/norethindrone acetate combination therapy. PMID:18488874

  9. Combination therapies for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hiele, M; Rutgeerts, P

    2000-06-01

    This review discusses the background and analysis of data in the literature regarding the effect of a combination of endoscopic therapies on the treatment of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Although these techniques are commonly used, convincing data to support combinations of injection therapies are scarce, and various studies give somewhat conflicting results. In one study, a combination of the injection of adrenaline and a high dose of thrombin was superior to using adrenaline alone. The combination of injection therapy with a thermal method tends to give better results than injection therapy alone in several studies, but the difference is only statistically significant in one study (which uses the gold probe). The data regarding a combination of injection therapy with haemostatic clips are somewhat discordant regarding the effect of the haemoclip itself, but none of the studies found an advantage of combining the two modalities. Some studies suggest that subgroups may exist, such as ulcers with spurting haemorrhage, in which combined treatment might be more useful. PMID:10952808

  10. Combination of phytochemicals as adjuvants for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ho, John W S; Cheung, Matt W M

    2014-01-01

    Newer treatments of advanced human cancer are based on combination of cancer drugs that have different mechanism of actions yet the combination strategy may potentiate the anti-cancer effects and cytotoxicity. Recent studies suggest that cancer growth can be inhibited more effectively by combination of phytochemicals that affect different pathways. The apoptotic activity can be modulated by intrinsic and extrinsic molecules. The combination of anti-tumor phytochemicals can be more effective in modulating different signaling pathways associated with tumor cell growth which is the common target for anti-tumor action. Combinations of cytotoxic anti-tumor agents and inhibitors from phytochemicals are believed to act together producing inhibitory mechanisms on cancer growth. This combination strategy shows promise on cancer therapy. However, the combination of phytochemicals in cancer therapy needs to be further investigated to develop a better treatment strategy. Recent patents on anti-tumor phytochemicals are reviewed in this article. PMID:24942759