Science.gov

Sample records for combined computational chemistry

  1. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  2. Combined use of computational chemistry and chemoinformatics methods for chemical discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Ideo, Toshihiro; Iwane, Ryo

    2015-12-31

    Data analysis on numerical data by the computational chemistry calculations is carried out to obtain knowledge information of molecules. A molecular database is developed to systematically store chemical, electronic-structure, and knowledge-based information. The database is used to find molecules related to a keyword of “cancer”. Then the electronic-structure calculations are performed to quantitatively evaluate quantum chemical similarity of the molecules. Among the 377 compounds registered in the database, 24 molecules are found to be “cancer”-related. This set of molecules includes both carcinogens and anticancer drugs. The quantum chemical similarity analysis, which is carried out by using numerical results of the density-functional theory calculations, shows that, when some energy spectra are referred to, carcinogens are reasonably distinguished from the anticancer drugs. Therefore these spectral properties are considered of as important measures for classification.

  3. Computational quantum chemistry website

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-22

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

  4. Computational chemistry research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Task 41 is composed of two parts: (1) analysis and design studies related to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Extended Operating Configuration (EOC) and (2) computational chemistry. During the first half of 1987, Dr. Levin served as a member of an advanced system planning team to establish the requirements, goals, and principal technical characteristics of the NAS EOC. A paper entitled 'Scaling of Data Communications for an Advanced Supercomputer Network' is included. The high temperature transport properties (such as viscosity, thermal conductivity, etc.) of the major constituents of air (oxygen and nitrogen) were correctly determined. The results of prior ab initio computer solutions of the Schroedinger equation were combined with the best available experimental data to obtain complete interaction potentials for both neutral and ion-atom collision partners. These potentials were then used in a computer program to evaluate the collision cross-sections from which the transport properties could be determined. A paper entitled 'High Temperature Transport Properties of Air' is included.

  5. Extensible Computational Chemistry Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-09

    ECCE provides a sophisticated graphical user interface, scientific visualization tools, and the underlying data management framework enabling scientists to efficiently set up calculations and store, retrieve, and analyze the rapidly growing volumes of data produced by computational chemistry studies. ECCE was conceived as part of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory construction to solve the problem of researchers being able to effectively utilize complex computational chemistry codes and massively parallel high performance compute resources. Bringing themore » power of these codes and resources to the desktops of researcher and thus enabling world class research without users needing a detailed understanding of the inner workings of either the theoretical codes or the supercomputers needed to run them was a grand challenge problem in the original version of the EMSL. ECCE allows collaboration among researchers using a web-based data repository where the inputs and results for all calculations done within ECCE are organized. ECCE is a first of kind end-to-end problem solving environment for all phases of computational chemistry research: setting up calculations with sophisticated GUI and direct manipulation visualization tools, submitting and monitoring calculations on remote high performance supercomputers without having to be familiar with the details of using these compute resources, and performing results visualization and analysis including creating publication quality images. ECCE is a suite of tightly integrated applications that are employed as the user moves through the modeling process.« less

  6. Computational Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, So; Fan, Peng-Dong; Head-Gordon, Martin; Kamiya, Muneaki; Keçeli, Murat; Lee, Timothy J.; Shiozaki, Toru; Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin; Valeev, Edward F.; Yagi, Kiyoshi

    Computational applications of electronic and vibrational many-body theories are increasingly indispensable in interpreting and, in some instances, predicting the spectra of gas-phase molecular species of importance in interstellar chemistry as well as in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This chapter briefly reviews our methodological developments of electronic and vibrational many-body theories that are particularly useful for these gas-phase molecular problems. Their applications to anharmonic vibrational frequencies of triatomic and tetratomic interstellar molecules and to electronic absorption spectra of the radical ions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, are also discussed.

  7. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways. PMID:26114392

  8. NWChem: scalable parallel computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, Hubertus JJ; De Jong, Wibe A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Straatsma, TP; Valiev, Marat

    2011-11-01

    NWChem is a general purpose computational chemistry code specifically designed to run on distributed memory parallel computers. The core functionality of the code focuses on molecular dynamics, Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods for both plane-wave basis sets as well as Gaussian basis sets, tensor contraction engine based coupled cluster capabilities and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics descriptions. It was realized from the beginning that scalable implementations of these methods required a programming paradigm inherently different from what message passing approaches could offer. In response a global address space library, the Global Array Toolkit, was developed. The programming model it offers is based on using predominantly one-sided communication. This model underpins most of the functionality in NWChem and the power of it is exemplified by the fact that the code scales to tens of thousands of processors. In this paper the core capabilities of NWChem are described as well as their implementation to achieve an efficient computational chemistry code with high parallel scalability. NWChem is a modern, open source, computational chemistry code1 specifically designed for large scale parallel applications2. To meet the challenges of developing efficient, scalable and portable programs of this nature a particular code design was adopted. This code design involved two main features. First of all, the code is build up in a modular fashion so that a large variety of functionality can be integrated easily. Secondly, to facilitate writing complex parallel algorithms the Global Array toolkit was developed. This toolkit allows one to write parallel applications in a shared memory like approach, but offers additional mechanisms to exploit data locality to lower communication overheads. This framework has proven to be very successful in computational chemistry but is applicable to any engineering domain. Within the context created by the features

  9. Computational Chemistry and Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Members of NASA Lewis Research Center's Tribology and Surface Science Branch are applying high-level computational chemistry techniques to the development of new lubrication systems for space applications and for future advanced aircraft engines. The next generation of gas turbine engines will require a liquid lubricant to function at temperatures in excess of 350 C in oxidizing environments. Conventional hydrocarbon-based lubricants are incapable of operating in these extreme environments, but a class of compounds known as the perfluoropolyether (PFAE) liquids (see the preceding illustration) shows promise for such applications. These commercially available products are already being used as lubricants in conditions where low vapor pressure and chemical stability are crucial, such as in satellite bearings and composite disk platters. At higher temperatures, however, these compounds undergo a decomposition process that is assisted (catalyzed) by metal and metal oxide bearing surfaces. This decomposition process severely limits the applicability of PFAE's at higher temperatures. A great deal of laboratory experimentation has revealed that the extent of fluid degradation depends on the chemical properties of the bearing surface materials. Lubrication engineers would like to understand the chemical breakdown mechanism to design a less vulnerable PFAE or to develop a chemical additive to block this degradation.

  10. Recent computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Taku

    2015-12-01

    Now we can investigate quantum phenomena for the real materials and molecules, and can design functional materials by computation, due to the previous developments of quantum theory and calculation methods. As there still exist the limit and problem in theory, the cooperation between theory and computation is getting more important to clarify the unknown quantum mechanism, and discover more efficient functional materials. It would be next-generation standard. Finally, our theoretical methodology for boundary solid is introduced.

  11. Recent computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Taku

    2015-12-31

    Now we can investigate quantum phenomena for the real materials and molecules, and can design functional materials by computation, due to the previous developments of quantum theory and calculation methods. As there still exist the limit and problem in theory, the cooperation between theory and computation is getting more important to clarify the unknown quantum mechanism, and discover more efficient functional materials. It would be next-generation standard. Finally, our theoretical methodology for boundary solid is introduced.

  12. Collaborative Physical Chemistry Projects Involving Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisnant, David M.; Howe, Jerry J.; Lever, Lisa S.

    2000-02-01

    The physical chemistry classes from three colleges have collaborated on two computational chemistry projects using Quantum CAChe 3.0 and Gaussian 94W running on Pentium II PCs. Online communication by email and the World Wide Web was an important part of the collaboration. In the first project, students used molecular modeling to predict benzene derivatives that might be possible hair dyes. They used PM3 and ZINDO calculations to predict the electronic spectra of the molecules and tested the predicted spectra by comparing some with experimental measurements. They also did literature searches for real hair dyes and possible health effects. In the final phase of the project they proposed a synthetic pathway for one compound. In the second project the students were asked to predict which isomer of a small carbon cluster (C3, C4, or C5) was responsible for a series of IR lines observed in the spectrum of a carbon star. After preliminary PM3 calculations, they used ab initio calculations at the HF/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d) level to model the molecules and predict their vibrational frequencies and rotational constants. A comparison of the predictions with the experimental spectra suggested that the linear isomer of the C5 molecule was responsible for the lines.

  13. Cuby: An integrative framework for computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Řezáč, Jan

    2016-05-15

    Cuby is a computational chemistry framework written in the Ruby programming language. It provides unified access to a wide range of computational methods by interfacing external software and it implements various protocols that operate on their results. Using structured input files, elementary calculations can be combined into complex workflows. For users, Cuby provides a unified and userfriendly way to automate their work, seamlessly integrating calculations carried out in different computational chemistry programs. For example, the QM/MM module allows combining methods across the interfaced programs and the builtin molecular dynamics engine makes it possible to run a simulation on the resulting potential. For programmers, it provides high-level, object-oriented environment that allows rapid development and testing of new methods and computational protocols. The Cuby framework is available for download at http://cuby4.molecular.cz. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26841135

  14. Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

  15. Outlook Bright for Computers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Rudy M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the recent decision to close down the National Resource for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC), implications of that decision, and various alternatives in the field of computational chemistry. (CS)

  16. ATOMIC-SCALE DESIGN OF IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS: A COMBINED COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, EXPERIMENTAL, AND MICROKINETIC MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2005-03-22

    Efforts during this first year focused on four areas: (1) searching/summarizing published FTS mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) construction of mass spectrometer-TPD and Berty CSTR reactor systems; (3) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts at various iron loadings (4) Determination of thermochemical parameters such as binding energies of reactive intermediates, heat of FTS elementary reaction steps, and kinetic parameters such as activation energies, and frequency factors of FTS elementary reaction steps on a number of model surfaces. Literature describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts was compiled in a draft review. Construction of the mass spectrometer-TPD system is 90% complete and of a Berty CSTR reactor system 98% complete. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by nonaqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2}, thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. The alumina-supported iron catalysts will be used for kinetic and mechanistic studies. In the coming year, adsorption/desorption properties, rates of elementary steps, and global reaction rates will be measured for these catalysts, with and without promoters, providing a database for understanding effects of dispersion, metal loading, and support on elementary kinetic parameters and for validation of computational models that incorporate effects of surface structure and promoters. Furthermore, using state-of-the-art self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods, we have extensively studied the thermochemistry and kinetics of various elementary steps on

  17. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2006-03-03

    rate-determining steps. In the coming year, studies will focus on quantitative determination of the rates of kinetically-relevant elementary steps on Fe catalysts with/without K and Pt promoters and at various levels of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support, providing a database for understanding (1) effects of promoter and support on elementary kinetic parameters and (2) for validation of computational models that incorporate effects of surface structure and promoters. Kinetic parameters will be incorporated into a microkinetics model, enabling prediction of rate without invoking assumptions, e.g. of a rate-determining step or a most-abundant surface intermediate. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on two model surfaces: (1) Fe(110) with 1/4 ML subsurface carbon, and (2) Fe(110) with 1/4 ML Pt adatoms. Reaction networks for FTS on these systems were characterized in full detail by evaluating the thermodynamics and kinetics of each elementary step. We discovered that subsurface C stabilizes all the reactive intermediates, in contrast to Pt, which destabilizes most of them. A comparative study of the reactivities of the modified-Fe surfaces against pure Fe is expected to yield a more comprehensive understanding of promotion mechanisms for FTS on Fe.

  18. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient

  19. Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 101 NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database is a collection of experimental and ab initio thermochemical properties for a selected set of molecules. The goals are to provide a benchmark set of molecules for the evaluation of ab initio computational methods and allow the comparison between different ab initio computational methods for the prediction of thermochemical properties.

  20. Plug Pulled on Chemistry Computer Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the controversy surrounding the initial decision to establish, and the current decision to phase out, the National Resource for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC), a computational chemistry center jointly sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. (CS)

  1. Chemistry of combined residual chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

  2. Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1996-02-01

    Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

  3. Computing Advances in the Teaching of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, W. P.; Matthews, G. P.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses three trends in computer-oriented chemistry instruction: (1) availability of interfaces to integrate computers with experiments; (2) impact of the development of higher resolution graphics and greater memory capacity; and (3) role of videodisc technology on computer assisted instruction. Includes program listings for auto-titration and…

  4. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  5. Formulating and Solving Problems in Computational Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Considered are the main elements of computational chemistry problems and how these elements can be used to formulate the problems mathematically. Techniques that are useful in devising an appropriate solution are also considered. (Author/TG)

  6. Perspectives on Computational Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Streitwieser, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The author reviews how his early love for theoretical organic chemistry led to experimental research and the extended search for quantitative correlations between experiment and quantum calculations. The experimental work led to ion pair acidities of alkali-organic compounds and most recently to equilibria and reactions of lithium and cesium enolates in THF. This chemistry is now being modeled by ab initio calculations. An important consideration is the treatment of solvation in which coordination of the alkali cation with the ether solvent plays a major role. PMID:19518150

  7. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  8. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990. PMID:25571750

  9. Integrating Computational Chemistry into the Physical Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Engel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Relatively few undergraduate physical chemistry programs integrate molecular modeling into their quantum mechanics curriculum owing to concerns about limited access to computational facilities, the cost of software, and concerns about increasing the course material. However, modeling exercises can be integrated into an undergraduate course at a…

  10. Selected new developments in computational chemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Darden, T A; Bartolotti, L; Pedersen, L G

    1996-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is a general technique for simulating the time-dependent properties of molecules and their environments. Quantum mechanics, as applied to molecules or clusters of molecules, provides a prescription for predicting properties exactly (in principle). It is reasonable to expect that both will have a profound effect on our understanding of environmental chemistry in the future. In this review, we consider several recent advances and applications in computational chemistry. Images Figure 1. PMID:8722111

  11. Computational chemistry and aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. M.; Jaffe, R. L.; Arnold, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the radiative heating phenomena encountered during a typical aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) trajectory was made to determine the potential impact of computational chemistry on AOTV design technology. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation mechanisms were considered. This analysis showed that computational chemistry can be used to predict (1) radiative intensity factors and spectroscopic data; (2) the excitation rates of both atoms and molecules; (3) high-temperature reaction rate constants for metathesis and charge exchange reactions; (4) particle ionization and neutralization rates and cross sections; and (5) spectral line widths.

  12. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  13. Information-computational system: atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamov, Dmitri P.; Akhlyostin, Alexey Y.; Fazliev, Alexandre Z.; Gordov, Eugeni P.; Karyakin, Alexey S.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Rodimova, Olga B.

    1999-11-01

    The atmospheric chemistry information-computational system (ICS) with Internet access is presented. The ICS is aimed summarizing fundamental data on atmospheric processes, determining the dynamics of complex chemical systems and providing educational information. The system consist of three functional blocks: data preparation, computation and information blocks, within which a user may choose the chemical reactions and atmospheric models, drive relevant kinetic equations and conservation laws, solve the kinetic equations, visualize the results of calculations and get access to related information.

  14. Computational Chemistry Studies on the Carbene Hydroxymethylene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzzacco, Charles J.; Baum, J. Clayton

    2011-01-01

    A density functional theory computational chemistry exercise on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the carbene hydroxymethylene is presented. The potential energy curve for the decomposition reaction of the carbene to formaldehyde and the geometry of the transition state are explored. The results are in good agreement with recent…

  15. Computing UV/vis spectra using a combined molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry approach: bis-triazin-pyridine (BTP) ligands studied in solution.

    PubMed

    Höfener, Sebastian; Trumm, Michael; Koke, Carsten; Heuser, Johannes; Ekström, Ulf; Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Panak, Petra J

    2016-03-21

    We report a combined computational and experimental study to investigate the UV/vis spectra of 2,6-bis(5,6-dialkyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (BTP) ligands in solution. In order to study molecules in solution using theoretical methods, force-field parameters for the ligand-water interaction are adjusted to ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Based on these parameters, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out from which snapshots are extracted as input to quantum chemical excitation-energy calculations to obtain UV/vis spectra of BTP ligands in solution using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) employing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The range-separated CAM-B3LYP functional is used to avoid large errors for charge-transfer states occurring in the electronic spectra. In order to study environment effects with theoretical methods, the frozen-density embedding scheme is applied. This computational procedure allows to obtain electronic spectra calculated at the (range-separated) DFT level of theory in solution, revealing solvatochromic shifts upon solvation of up to about 0.6 eV. Comparison to experimental data shows a significantly improved agreement compared to vacuum calculations and enables the analysis of relevant excitations for the line shape in solution. PMID:26907588

  16. Algorithms versus architectures for computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The algorithms employed are computationally intensive and, as a result, increased performance (both algorithmic and architectural) is required to improve accuracy and to treat larger molecular systems. Several benchmark quantum chemistry codes are examined on a variety of architectures. While these codes are only a small portion of a typical quantum chemistry library, they illustrate many of the computationally intensive kernels and data manipulation requirements of some applications. Furthermore, understanding the performance of the existing algorithm on present and proposed supercomputers serves as a guide for future programs and algorithm development. The algorithms investigated are: (1) a sparse symmetric matrix vector product; (2) a four index integral transformation; and (3) the calculation of diatomic two electron Slater integrals. The vectorization strategies are examined for these algorithms for both the Cyber 205 and Cray XMP. In addition, multiprocessor implementations of the algorithms are looked at on the Cray XMP and on the MIT static data flow machine proposed by DENNIS.

  17. Computer Instruction on Sentence Combining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humes, Ann

    This description of an interactive instructional computer program in sentence combining for upper elementary and middle school students begins by summarizing the content of the program, which focuses on the instructional technique in which students are given two or more short simple sentences to combine into one longer, complex and/or compound…

  18. Mathematical challenges from theoretical/computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The committee believes that this report has relevance and potentially valuable suggestions for a wide range of readers. Target audiences include: graduate departments in the mathematical and chemical sciences; federal and private agencies that fund research in the mathematical and chemical sciences; selected industrial and government research and development laboratories; developers of software and hardware for computational chemistry; and selected individual researchers. Chapter 2 of this report covers some history of computational chemistry for the nonspecialist, while Chapter 3 illustrates the fruits of some past successful cross-fertilization between mathematical scientists and computational/theoretical chemists. In Chapter 4 the committee has assembled a representative, but not exhaustive, survey of research opportunities. Most of these are descriptions of important open problems in computational/theoretical chemistry that could gain much from the efforts of innovative mathematical scientists, written so as to be accessible introductions to the nonspecialist. Chapter 5 is an assessment, necessarily subjective, of cultural differences that must be overcome if collaborative work is to be encouraged between the mathematical and the chemical communities. Finally, the report ends with a brief list of conclusions and recommendations that, if followed, could promote accelerated progress at this interface. Recognizing that bothersome language issues can inhibit prospects for collaborative research at the interface between distinctive disciplines, the committee has attempted throughout to maintain an accessible style, in part by using illustrative boxes, and has included at the end of the report a glossary of technical terms that may be familiar to only a subset of the target audiences listed above.

  19. Algorithms Bridging Quantum Computation and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClean, Jarrod Ryan

    The design of new materials and chemicals derived entirely from computation has long been a goal of computational chemistry, and the governing equation whose solution would permit this dream is known. Unfortunately, the exact solution to this equation has been far too expensive and clever approximations fail in critical situations. Quantum computers offer a novel solution to this problem. In this work, we develop not only new algorithms to use quantum computers to study hard problems in chemistry, but also explore how such algorithms can help us to better understand and improve our traditional approaches. In particular, we first introduce a new method, the variational quantum eigensolver, which is designed to maximally utilize the quantum resources available in a device to solve chemical problems. We apply this method in a real quantum photonic device in the lab to study the dissociation of the helium hydride (HeH+) molecule. We also enhance this methodology with architecture specific optimizations on ion trap computers and show how linear-scaling techniques from traditional quantum chemistry can be used to improve the outlook of similar algorithms on quantum computers. We then show how studying quantum algorithms such as these can be used to understand and enhance the development of classical algorithms. In particular we use a tool from adiabatic quantum computation, Feynman's Clock, to develop a new discrete time variational principle and further establish a connection between real-time quantum dynamics and ground state eigenvalue problems. We use these tools to develop two novel parallel-in-time quantum algorithms that outperform competitive algorithms as well as offer new insights into the connection between the fermion sign problem of ground states and the dynamical sign problem of quantum dynamics. Finally we use insights gained in the study of quantum circuits to explore a general notion of sparsity in many-body quantum systems. In particular we use

  20. Integrating Computational Chemistry into a Course in Classical Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, Sheridan R.; Hartzell, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Computational chemistry is commonly addressed in the quantum mechanics course of undergraduate physical chemistry curricula. Since quantum mechanics traditionally follows the thermodynamics course, there is a lack of curricula relating computational chemistry to thermodynamics. A method integrating molecular modeling software into a semester long…

  1. Recent advances in computational actinoid chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongqi; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-09-01

    We briefly review advances in computational actinoid (An) chemistry during the past ten years in regard to two issues: the geometrical and electronic structures, and reactions. The former addresses the An-O, An-C, and M-An (M is a metal atom including An) bonds in the actinoid molecular systems, including actinoid oxo and oxide species, actinoid-carbenoid, dinuclear and diatomic systems, and the latter the hydration and ligand exchange, the disproportionation, the oxidation, the reduction of uranyl, hydroamination, and the photolysis of uranium azide. Concerning their relevance to the electronic structures and reactions of actinoids and their importance in the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, we also mentioned the work on actinoid carbides and nitrides, which have been proposed to be candidates of the next generation of nuclear fuel, and the oxidation of PuO(x), which is important to understand the speciation of actinoids in the environment, followed by a brief discussion on the urgent need for a heavier involvement of computational actinoid chemistry in developing advanced reprocessing protocols of spent nuclear fuel. The paper is concluded with an outlook. PMID:22777520

  2. Integrating Computational Chemistry into the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum: A Wet Lab/Dry Lab Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpen, Mary E.; Henderleiter, Julie; Schaertel, Stephanie A.

    2004-01-01

    The usage of computational chemistry in a pedagogically effective manner in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum is described. The changes instituted for an effective course structure and the assessment of the course efficacy are discussed.

  3. Introducing the Practical Aspects of Computational Chemistry to Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jason K.

    2007-01-01

    Various efforts are being made to introduce the different physical aspects and uses of computational chemistry to the undergraduate chemistry students. A new laboratory approach that demonstrates all such aspects via experiments has been devised for the purpose.

  4. Scalable Computational Chemistry: New Developments and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri Alexeev

    2002-12-31

    The computational part of the thesis is the investigation of titanium chloride (II) as a potential catalyst for the bis-silylation reaction of ethylene with hexaclorodisilane at different levels of theory. Bis-silylation is an important reaction for producing bis(silyl) compounds and new C-Si bonds, which can serve as monomers for silicon containing polymers and silicon carbides. Ab initio calculations on the steps involved in a proposed mechanism are presented. This choice of reactants allows them to study this reaction at reliable levels of theory without compromising accuracy. The calculations indicate that this is a highly exothermic barrierless reaction. The TiCl{sub 2} catalyst removes a 50 kcal/mol activation energy barrier required for the reaction without the catalyst. The first step is interaction of TiCl{sub 2} with ethylene to form an intermediate that is 60 kcal/mol below the energy of the reactants. This is the driving force for the entire reaction. Dynamic correlation plays a significant role because RHF calculations indicate that the net barrier for the catalyzed reaction is 50 kcal/mol. They conclude that divalent Ti has the potential to become an important industrial catalyst for silylation reactions. In the programming part of the thesis, parallelization of different quantum chemistry methods is presented. The parallelization of code is becoming important aspects of quantum chemistry code development. Two trends contribute to it: the overall desire to study large chemical systems and the desire to employ highly correlated methods which are usually computationally and memory expensive. In the presented distributed data algorithms computation is parallelized and the largest arrays are evenly distributed among CPUs. First, the parallelization of the Hartree-Fock self-consistent field (SCF) method is considered. SCF method is the most common starting point for more accurate calculations. The Fock build (sub step of SCF) from AO integrals is also

  5. Computational Chemistry at the Petascale: Are We There Yet?

    SciTech Connect

    Apra, Edoardo; Harrison, Richard J; Tipparaju, Vinod; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro

    2009-02-01

    We have run computational chemistry calculations approaching the Petascale level of performance ({approx}0.5 PFlops). We used the Coupled Cluster CCSD(T) module of the computational chemistry code NWChem to evaluate accurate energetics of water clusters on a 1.4 PFlops Cray XT5 computer.

  6. JACOB: An Enterprise Framework for Computational Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Mark P; Dresselhaus, Thomas; Yang, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present just a collection of beans (JACOB): an integrated batch-based framework designed for the rapid development of computational chemistry applications. The framework expedites developer productivity by handling the generic infrastructure tier, and can be easily extended by user-specific scientific code. Paradigms from enterprise software engineering were rigorously applied to create a scalable, testable, secure, and robust framework. A centralized web application is used to configure and control the operation of the framework. The application-programming interface provides a set of generic tools for processing large-scale noninteractive jobs (e.g., systematic studies), or for coordinating systems integration (e.g., complex workflows). The code for the JACOB framework is open sourced and is available at: http://www.wallerlab.org/jacob. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23553271

  7. Computational Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry: From Childhood to Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hillisch, Alexander; Heinrich, Nikolaus; Wild, Hanno

    2015-12-01

    Computational chemistry within the pharmaceutical industry has grown into a field that proactively contributes to many aspects of drug design, including target selection and lead identification and optimization. While methodological advancements have been key to this development, organizational developments have been crucial to our success as well. In particular, the interaction between computational and medicinal chemistry and the integration of computational chemistry into the entire drug discovery process have been invaluable. Over the past ten years we have shaped and developed a highly efficient computational chemistry group for small-molecule drug discovery at Bayer HealthCare that has significantly impacted the clinical development pipeline. In this article we describe the setup and tasks of the computational group and discuss external collaborations. We explain what we have found to be the most valuable and productive methods and discuss future directions for computational chemistry method development. We share this information with the hope of igniting interesting discussions around this topic. PMID:26358802

  8. Computationally efficient implementation of combustion chemistry in parallel PDF calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liuyan; Lantz, Steven R.; Ren, Zhuyin; Pope, Stephen B.

    2009-08-01

    In parallel calculations of combustion processes with realistic chemistry, the serial in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm [S.B. Pope, Computationally efficient implementation of combustion chemistry using in situ adaptive tabulation, Combustion Theory and Modelling, 1 (1997) 41-63; L. Lu, S.B. Pope, An improved algorithm for in situ adaptive tabulation, Journal of Computational Physics 228 (2009) 361-386] substantially speeds up the chemistry calculations on each processor. To improve the parallel efficiency of large ensembles of such calculations in parallel computations, in this work, the ISAT algorithm is extended to the multi-processor environment, with the aim of minimizing the wall clock time required for the whole ensemble. Parallel ISAT strategies are developed by combining the existing serial ISAT algorithm with different distribution strategies, namely purely local processing (PLP), uniformly random distribution (URAN), and preferential distribution (PREF). The distribution strategies enable the queued load redistribution of chemistry calculations among processors using message passing. They are implemented in the software x2f_mpi, which is a Fortran 95 library for facilitating many parallel evaluations of a general vector function. The relative performance of the parallel ISAT strategies is investigated in different computational regimes via the PDF calculations of multiple partially stirred reactors burning methane/air mixtures. The results show that the performance of ISAT with a fixed distribution strategy strongly depends on certain computational regimes, based on how much memory is available and how much overlap exists between tabulated information on different processors. No one fixed strategy consistently achieves good performance in all the regimes. Therefore, an adaptive distribution strategy, which blends PLP, URAN and PREF, is devised and implemented. It yields consistently good performance in all regimes. In the adaptive parallel

  9. Triclosan Computational Conformational Chemistry Analysis for Antimicrobial Properties in Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Triclosan is a diphenyl ether antimicrobial that has been analyzed by computational conformational chemistry for an understanding of Mechanomolecular Theory. Subsequent energy profile analysis combined with easily seen three-dimensional chemistry structure models for the nonpolar molecule Triclosan show how single bond rotations can alternate rapidly at a polar and nonpolar interface. Bond rotations for the center ether oxygen atom of the two aromatic rings then expose or hide nonbonding lone-pair electrons for the oxygen atom depending on the polar nature of the immediate local molecular environment. Rapid bond movements can subsequently produce fluctuations as vibration energy. Consequently, related mechanical molecular movements calculated as energy relationships by forces acting through different bond positions can help improve on current Mechanomolecular Theory. A previous controversy reported as a discrepancy in literature contends for a possible bacterial resistance from Triclosan antimicrobial. However, findings in clinical settings have not reported a single case for Triclosan bacterial resistance in over 40 years that has been documented carefully in government reports. As a result, Triclosan is recommended whenever there is a health benefit consistent with a number of approvals for use of Triclosan in healthcare devices. Since Triclosan is the most researched antimicrobial ever, literature meta analysis with computational chemistry can best describe new molecular conditions that were previously impossible by conventional chemistry methods. Triclosan vibrational energy can now explain the molecular disruption of bacterial membranes. Further, Triclosan mechanomolecular movements help illustrate use in polymer matrix composites as an antimicrobial with two new additive properties as a toughening agent to improve matrix fracture toughness from microcracking and a hydrophobic wetting agent to help incorporate strengthening fibers. Interrelated

  10. Integrating medicinal chemistry, organic/combinatorial chemistry, and computational chemistry for the discovery of selective estrogen receptor modulators with Forecaster, a novel platform for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Eric; Englebienne, Pablo; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Mendoza-Sanchez, Rodrigo; Corbeil, Christopher R; Weill, Nathanael; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Moitessier, Nicolas

    2012-01-23

    As part of a large medicinal chemistry program, we wish to develop novel selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) as potential breast cancer treatments using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. However, one of the remaining difficulties nowadays is to fully integrate computational (i.e., virtual, theoretical) and medicinal (i.e., experimental, intuitive) chemistry to take advantage of the full potential of both. For this purpose, we have developed a Web-based platform, Forecaster, and a number of programs (e.g., Prepare, React, Select) with the aim of combining computational chemistry and medicinal chemistry expertise to facilitate drug discovery and development and more specifically to integrate synthesis into computer-aided drug design. In our quest for potent SERMs, this platform was used to build virtual combinatorial libraries, filter and extract a highly diverse library from the NCI database, and dock them to the estrogen receptor (ER), with all of these steps being fully automated by computational chemists for use by medicinal chemists. As a result, virtual screening of a diverse library seeded with active compounds followed by a search for analogs yielded an enrichment factor of 129, with 98% of the seeded active compounds recovered, while the screening of a designed virtual combinatorial library including known actives yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AU-ROC) of 0.78. The lead optimization proved less successful, further demonstrating the challenge to simulate structure activity relationship studies. PMID:22133077

  11. Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry at Humboldt State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paselk, Richard A.; Zoellner, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a molecular modeling and computational chemistry (MM&CC) facility for undergraduate instruction and research at Humboldt State University. This facility complex allows the introduction of MM&CC throughout the chemistry curriculum with tailored experiments in general, organic, and inorganic courses as well as a new molecular modeling…

  12. What Chemists (or Chemistry Students) Need to Know about Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Mary L.; Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    1995-01-01

    Presents key points of an on-line conference discussion and integrates them with information from the literature. Key points included: computer as a tool for learning, study, research, and communication; hardware, software, computing concepts, and other teaching concerns; and the appropriate place for chemistry computer-usage instruction. (45…

  13. Student Attitudes Toward Computer-Assisted Instruction in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerlin, Lee

    1971-01-01

    High school chemistry Computer Assisted Instruction program is evaluated in terms of student attitudes and total time. CAI took less time than a classroom presentation, but students missed interaction with teacher and classmates. (DS)

  14. Development and Formative Evaluation of Computer Simulated College Chemistry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavin, Claudia S.; Cavin, E. D.

    1978-01-01

    This article describes the design, preparation, and initial evaluation of a set of computer-simulated chemistry experiments. The experiments entailed the use of an atomic emission spectroscope and a single-beam visible absorption spectrophometer. (Author/IRT)

  15. Computer-Based Learning in Chemistry Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietzner, Verena

    2014-01-01

    Currently not many people would doubt that computers play an essential role in both public and private life in many countries. However, somewhat surprisingly, evidence of computer use is difficult to find in German state schools although other countries have managed to implement computer-based teaching and learning in their schools. This paper…

  16. Computational solution of atmospheric chemistry problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafri, J.; Ake, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive studies were performed on problems of interest in atmospheric chemistry. In addition to several minor projects, four major projects were performed and described (theoretical studies of ground and low-lying excited states of ClO2; ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of the methyl peroxy radical; electronic states ot the FO radical; and theoretical studies S02 (H2O) (sub n)).

  17. Developing and Using Conceptual Computer Animations for Chemistry Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, K. A.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Windschitl, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Contends that developing computer displays of dynamic motion offers a means to help students understand complex chemistry concepts. Describes how to set up a computer animation team, gives an example of the animation of chemical processes in a standard hydrogen electrode, illustrates how to teach with animations, recommends hardware and software…

  18. Teaching Mathematics to Chemistry Students with Symbolic Computation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogilvie, J. F.; Monagan, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of mathematics courses to chemistry students that is strongly based on symbolic computation and allows an instructor to explore a topic or principle is reviewed. The mathematical software available, nominally for symbolic computation associated with numerical and graphical capabilities are highly developed and provides an invaluable…

  19. Software and resources for computational medicinal chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Sitzmann, Markus; Pugliese, Angelo; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design plays a vital role in drug discovery and development and has become an indispensable tool in the pharmaceutical industry. Computational medicinal chemists can take advantage of all kinds of software and resources in the computer-aided drug design field for the purposes of discovering and optimizing biologically active compounds. This article reviews software and other resources related to computer-aided drug design approaches, putting particular emphasis on structure-based drug design, ligand-based drug design, chemical databases and chemoinformatics tools. PMID:21707404

  20. Interdisciplinary Educational Collaborations: Chemistry and Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Ronald S.; Woo, Daniel T.; Hudson, Benjamin T.; Mori, Joji C.; Ngan, Evey S. M.; Pak, Wing-Yee

    2007-01-01

    Research collaborations between chemists and other scientists resulted in significant outcomes such as development of software. Such collaboration provided a realistic learning experience for computer science students.

  1. A Program of Computational Chemistry Exercises for the First-Semester General Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Scott E.; Dallinger, Richard F.; McKinney, Paul Caylor

    2004-01-01

    The computer systems available for molecular modeling are described, along with a discussion of a molecular modeling program created and supported by computational techniques for the first-semester general chemistry course. Various exercises are listed, which direct the learner from a beginner's course in software practice to more complex…

  2. Probing Student Teachers' Subject Content Knowledge in Chemistry: Case Studies Using Dynamic Computer Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toplis, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports case study research into the knowledge and understanding of chemistry for six secondary science student teachers. It combines innovative student-generated computer animations, using "ChemSense" software, with interviews to probe understanding of four common chemical processes used in the secondary school curriculum. Findings…

  3. Applications of Computers and Computer Software in Teaching Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Haver, T. C.

    1991-01-01

    Some commercially available software tools that have potential applications in the analytical chemistry curriculum are surveyed and evaluated. Tools for instruction, analysis and research, and courseware development are described. A list of the software packages, the compatible hardware, and the vendor's address is included. (KR)

  4. New reagents, new reactions: Computers in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dessy, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    There is a new reagent in chemical reaction vessels-the computer. From data collection, through information processing, to knowledge creation the computer is an integral partner of today`s chemist. Despite its ability to be a Sorcerer`s Apprentice, it has become a leading weapon in overcoming some of the fiscal and technical demands placed upon research and development teams by global competition. In the process it is forcing changes in our work habits that arc, stressing both the Corporation and the individual, this article explores the uses, abuses, and possible future of the new reagent, and explores the meta-physics of the electronic web. 42 refs.

  5. National Resource for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC). Attached scientific processors for chemical computations: a report to the chemistry community

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The demands of chemists for computational resources are well known and have been amply documented. The best and most cost-effective means of providing these resources is still open to discussion, however. This report surveys the field of attached scientific processors (array processors) and attempts to indicate their present and possible future use in computational chemistry. Array processors have the possibility of providing very cost-effective computation. This report attempts to provide information that will assist chemists who might be considering the use of an array processor for their computations. It describes the general ideas and concepts involved in using array processors, the commercial products that are available, and the experiences reported by those currently using them. In surveying the field of array processors, the author makes certain recommendations regarding their use in computational chemistry. 5 figures, 1 table (RWR)

  6. Writing and Computing across the USM Chemistry Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Nancy R.; Newton, Thomas A.; Rhodes, Gale; Ricci, John S.; Stebbins, Richard G.; Tracy, Henry J.

    2001-01-01

    The faculty of the University of Southern Maine believes the ability to communicate effectively is one of the most important skills required of successful chemists. To help students achieve that goal, the faculty has developed a Writing and Computer Program consisting of writing and computer assignments of gradually increasing sophistication for all our laboratory courses. The assignments build in complexity until, at the junior level, students are writing full journal-quality laboratory reports. Computer assignments also increase in difficulty as students attack more complicated subjects. We have found the program easy to initiate and our part-time faculty concurs as well. The Writing and Computing across the Curriculum Program also serves to unite the entire chemistry curriculum. We believe the program is helping to reverse what the USM chemistry faculty and other educators have found to be a steady deterioration in the writing skills of many of today's students.

  7. Incorporating Computational Chemistry into the Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    A graduate-level computational chemistry course was designed and developed and carried out in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in the Fall of 2005. The thrust of the course was a reaction assignment that led students through a series of steps, beginning with energetic predictions based upon fundamental…

  8. Dissociation of the Ethyl Radical: An Exercise in Computational Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassabeh, Nahal; Tran, Mark; Fleming, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    A set of exercises for use in a typical physical chemistry laboratory course are described, modeling the unimolecular dissociation of the ethyl radical to form ethylene and atomic hydrogen. Students analyze the computational results both qualitatively and quantitatively. Qualitative structural changes are compared to approximate predicted values…

  9. One Instructor's Approach to Computer Assisted Instruction in General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLorenzo, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Discusses advantages of using computer-assisted instruction in a college general chemistry course. Advantages include using programs which generate random equations with double arrows (equilibrium systems) or generate alkane structural formula, asking for the correct IUPAC name of the structure. (Author/JN)

  10. Investigating the Effectiveness of Computer Simulations for Chemistry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plass, Jan L.; Milne, Catherine; Homer, Bruce D.; Schwartz, Ruth N.; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Jordan, Trace; Verkuilen, Jay; Ng, Florrie; Wang, Yan; Barrientos, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Are well-designed computer simulations an effective tool to support student understanding of complex concepts in chemistry when integrated into high school science classrooms? We investigated scaling up the use of a sequence of simulations of kinetic molecular theory and associated topics of diffusion, gas laws, and phase change, which we designed…

  11. Applied Computational Chemistry for the Blind and Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedler, Henry B.; Cohen, Sarah R.; Davis, Rebecca L.; Harrison, Jason G.; Siebert, Matthew R.; Willenbring, Dan; Hamann, Christian S.; Shaw, Jared T.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe accommodations that we have made to our applied computational-theoretical chemistry laboratory to provide access for blind and visually impaired students interested in independent investigation of structure-function relationships. Our approach utilizes tactile drawings, molecular model kits, existing software, Bash and Perl scripts…

  12. Developing and Using Conceptual Computer Animations for Chemistry Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, K. A.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Windschitl, Mark A.

    1998-12-01

    Multimedia technology has advanced rapidly within the past two years providing an opportunity for chemistry instructors to develop and use their own computer animations. Conceptual computer animations are designed to help students understand the basic concept or principle of a dynamic chemical process. This paper discusses several issues surrounding the development and use of instructional conceptual computer animations. If possible, an animation sequence should be linked to a lecture demonstration, thereby assisting in the presentation of all three levels of representation: microscopic, macroscopic and symbolic. Computer animations provide instructors with a vehicle for presenting topics from the particulate nature of matter view and a technique for teaching for conceptual understanding. A design team consisting of individuals who have knowledge or expertise in the content area, instructional design, computer animation techniques, and graphic and sound production should work with the chemistry instructor to develop and produce the animation sequences. Various software tools for drawing, animating, and incorporating audio tracks along with the animation are discussed. Aspects of effective computer anmation are listed. Techniques for 24-hour student access to instructional computer animations through the internet via the World Wide Web, as well as to a local file servers through the intranet are mentioned. Chemistry instructors who develop computer animations or multimedia presentations must be aware of copyright laws pertaining to the educational use and distribution of images, pictures, illustrations, and sounds. Using computer animations does take additonal time in lecture. However instructors must decide whether they want to "cover" or "uncover" material. The inclusion of computer animations is consistent with reports from the ACS task force that emphasizes "less is more" in terms of curriculum reform.

  13. Computational Tools To Model Halogen Bonds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ford, Melissa Coates; Ho, P Shing

    2016-03-10

    The use of halogens in therapeutics dates back to the earliest days of medicine when seaweed was used as a source of iodine to treat goiters. The incorporation of halogens to improve the potency of drugs is now fairly standard in medicinal chemistry. In the past decade, halogens have been recognized as direct participants in defining the affinity of inhibitors through a noncovalent interaction called the halogen bond or X-bond. Incorporating X-bonding into structure-based drug design requires computational models for the anisotropic distribution of charge and the nonspherical shape of halogens, which lead to their highly directional geometries and stabilizing energies. We review here current successes and challenges in developing computational methods to introduce X-bonding into lead compound discovery and optimization during drug development. This fast-growing field will push further development of more accurate and efficient computational tools to accelerate the exploitation of halogens in medicinal chemistry. PMID:26465079

  14. How changes in computer technology are revolutionizing the practice of chemistry.

    PubMed

    Levy, G C

    1988-11-01

    During the early 1980s, two major developments in computer technology changed the way chemists approached their science. The advent of the micropressor and then the PC changed experimental chemistry, while the availability of two classes of computer, the superminicomputer and supercomputer, greatly influenced computational chemistry. In the past two years, graphics workstation computers have begun to affect the practice of chemistry by combining fast, high-resolution, multiwindow graphics with superminicomputer power. In 1988, the advent of a new class of computer--the graphics supercomputer--offers extraordinary promise to both theoretician and experimentalist. In these systems, near-Cray compute power is combined with ultrahigh-speed 3-dimensional graphics for unparalleled visualization of molecular processes and other complex events. This is made practical not just by computing and graphics power but by use of ultrahigh internal bandwidths inside the graphics supercomputers. Another major development in scientific computing is the evolving concept of the laboratory computer network. Current network designs include hierarchical configurations incorporating various levels of computers--through supercomputers--either locally or via national or regional networks. New software methods are also having impact on chemical research, allowing, for example, the scientist to better abstract information from noisy or incomplete experimental data. Use of parallelism (multiple CPUs) in new design workstation computers will extend their power, by the early 1990s, past that of current supercomputer mainframes. Within five years the chemist will have $10 million of 1985 computer power on his desk, for considerably less than $100,000, along with visualization tools and software only dreamed of in 1985.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3235470

  15. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  16. Gabedit--a graphical user interface for computational chemistry softwares.

    PubMed

    Allouche, Abdul-Rahman

    2011-01-15

    Gabedit is a freeware graphical user interface, offering preprocessing and postprocessing adapted (to date) to nine computational chemistry software packages. It includes tools for editing, displaying, analyzing, converting, and animating molecular systems. A conformational search tool is implemented using a molecular mechanics or a semiempirical potential. Input files can be generated for the computational chemistry software supported by Gabedit. Some molecular properties of interest are processed directly from the output of the computational chemistry programs; others are calculated by Gabedit before display. Molecular orbitals, electron density, electrostatic potential, nuclear magnetic resonance shielding density, and any other volumetric data properties can be displayed. It can display electronic circular dichroism, UV-visible, infrared, and Raman-computed spectra after a convolution. Gabedit can generate a Povray file for geometry, surfaces, contours, and color-coded planes. Output can be exported to a selection of popular image and vector graphics file formats; the program can also generate a series of pictures for animation. Quantum mechanical electrostatic potentials can be calculated using the partial charges on atoms, or by solving the Poisson equation using the multigrid method. The atoms in molecule charges can also be calculated. Gabedit is platform independent. The code is distributed under free open source X11 style license and is available at http://gabedit.sourceforge.net/. PMID:20607691

  17. Computational chemistry in Argonne`s Reactor Analysis Division

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbard, E.; Agrawal, R.; Fanning, T.

    1997-08-01

    Roughly 3 years ago work on Argonne`s Integral Fast Reactor ({open_quotes}IFR{close_quotes}) was terminated and at that time, ANL funding was redirected to a number of alternative programs. One such alternative was waste management and, since disposal of spent fuel from ANL`s EBR-II reactor presents some special problems, this seemed an appropriate area for ANL work. Methods for the treatment and disposal of spent fuel (particularly from EBR-II but also from other sources) are now under very active investigation at ANL. The very large waste form development program is mainly experimental at this point, but within the Reactor Analysis ({open_quotes}RA{close_quotes}) Division a small computational chemistry program is underway, designed to supplement the experimental program. One of the most popular proposals for the treatment of much of our high-level wastes is vitrification. As noted below, this approach has serious drawbacks for EBR-II spent fuel. ANL has proposed, instead, that spent fuel first be pretreated by a special metallurgical process which produces, as waste, chloride salts of the various fission products; these salts would then be adsorbed in zeolite A, which is subsequently bonded with glass to produce a waste form suitable for disposal. So far it has been the main mission of RA`s computational chemistry program to study the process by which leaching occurs when the glass-bonded zeolite waste form is exposed to water. It is the purpose of this paper to describe RA`s computational chemistry program, to discuss the computational techniques involved in such a program, and in general to familiarize the M. and C. Division with a computational area which is probably unfamiliar to most of its member. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Teaching chemistry using guided discovery and an interactive computer tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Samia A.

    An initial test of scientific inquiry skills revealed that students enrolled in a computer enhanced introductory college chemistry class using a guided discovery approach produced significantly larger gains after class instruction compared with two other introductory chemistry classes at the same institution and three introductory science classes at two other college institutions. The purpose of this study was to analyze the instructional strategy in this class to understand how it may have contributed to gains in inquiry skills. Classroom observations of the computer enhanced guided discovery class and two other lecture based chemistry classes, uncovered a pattern of instruction in the guided discovery case that was markedly different from the other two classes, yet more similar to model construction processes of scientists. The central pattern of instruction in the primary case was referred to as the guided discovery approach and was characterized by instructional strategies designed to trigger generate, evaluate, and modify or GEM cycles, other teacher guidance strategies, and the integration of an interactive computer tool. Analysis of classroom observation data and student surveys confirmed a higher frequency of students' generating ideas about chemistry, constructing explanations, and quantitative problem solving in the guided discovery case than the lecture-based classes and a higher rate of teacher requests for students to engage in several of these processes. Small group observations revealed students' reasoning processes as they interacted with their teacher and the computer during instruction. Overall, compared with more traditional forms of chemistry instruction, the evidence suggests that the instructional strategies in the guided discovery case were successful in sustaining student engagement with several fundamental processes of scientific inquiry and may have led to the development of important inquiry skills. The guided discovery case used

  19. Turbulent reacting flow computations including turbulence-chemistry interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, J. R.; Girimaji, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    A two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model has been extended to be applicable for compressible reacting flows. A compressibility correction model based on modeling the dilatational terms in the Reynolds stress equations has been used. A turbulence-chemistry interaction model is outlined. In this model, the effects of temperature and species mass concentrations fluctuations on the species mass production rates are decoupled. The effect of temperature fluctuations is modeled via a moment model, and the effect of concentration fluctuations is included using an assumed beta-pdf model. Preliminary results obtained using this model are presented. A two-dimensional reacting mixing layer has been used as a test case. Computations are carried out using the Navier-Stokes solver SPARK using a finite rate chemistry model for hydrogen-air combustion.

  20. Introductory College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Stoichiometry: Connections between Conceptual and Computational Understandings and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfer, Adam J.; Lederman, Norman G.

    Many studies of college chemistry students have found a gap between students' success in solving computational chemistry problems and their success in solving conceptual chemistry problems. This paper examines college students' understanding of the concept of stoichiometry, the particulate nature of matter, and chemistry problem solving. This…

  1. Development and Assessment of a Chemistry-Based Computer Video Game as a Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Hernandez, Kermin Joel

    2010-01-01

    The chemistry-based computer video game is a multidisciplinary collaboration between chemistry and computer graphics and technology fields developed to explore the use of video games as a possible learning tool. This innovative approach aims to integrate elements of commercial video game and authentic chemistry context environments into a learning…

  2. The performance of low-cost commercial cloud computing as an alternative in computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Thackston, Russell; Fortenberry, Ryan C

    2015-05-01

    The growth of commercial cloud computing (CCC) as a viable means of computational infrastructure is largely unexplored for the purposes of quantum chemistry. In this work, the PSI4 suite of computational chemistry programs is installed on five different types of Amazon World Services CCC platforms. The performance for a set of electronically excited state single-point energies is compared between these CCC platforms and typical, "in-house" physical machines. Further considerations are made for the number of cores or virtual CPUs (vCPUs, for the CCC platforms), but no considerations are made for full parallelization of the program (even though parallelization of the BLAS library is implemented), complete high-performance computing cluster utilization, or steal time. Even with this most pessimistic view of the computations, CCC resources are shown to be more cost effective for significant numbers of typical quantum chemistry computations. Large numbers of large computations are still best utilized by more traditional means, but smaller-scale research may be more effectively undertaken through CCC services. PMID:25753841

  3. Computer Series, 118. Instructional Computing as Replacement for Recitations in Freshman Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, James D.; Allen, Joe F.

    1990-01-01

    Computer assisted instruction (CAI) as an optional enrichment versus required component is described. Discussed are making CAI an integral component of freshman chemistry, program requirements, need for user modification of programs, staff and facilities, mode of operation, student evaluation, and effect on student performance. (KR)

  4. Faster quantum chemistry simulation on fault-tolerant quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody Jones, N.; Whitfield, James D.; McMahon, Peter L.; Yung, Man-Hong; Van Meter, Rodney; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-11-01

    Quantum computers can in principle simulate quantum physics exponentially faster than their classical counterparts, but some technical hurdles remain. We propose methods which substantially improve the performance of a particular form of simulation, ab initio quantum chemistry, on fault-tolerant quantum computers; these methods generalize readily to other quantum simulation problems. Quantum teleportation plays a key role in these improvements and is used extensively as a computing resource. To improve execution time, we examine techniques for constructing arbitrary gates which perform substantially faster than circuits based on the conventional Solovay-Kitaev algorithm (Dawson and Nielsen 2006 Quantum Inform. Comput. 6 81). For a given approximation error ɛ, arbitrary single-qubit gates can be produced fault-tolerantly and using a restricted set of gates in time which is O(log ɛ) or O(log log ɛ) with sufficient parallel preparation of ancillas, constant average depth is possible using a method we call programmable ancilla rotations. Moreover, we construct and analyze efficient implementations of first- and second-quantized simulation algorithms using the fault-tolerant arbitrary gates and other techniques, such as implementing various subroutines in constant time. A specific example we analyze is the ground-state energy calculation for lithium hydride.

  5. Opportunities and challenges of high-performance computing in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Guest, M.F.; Kendall, R.A.; Nichols, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    The field of high-performance computing is developing at an extremely rapid pace. Massively parallel computers offering orders of magnitude increase in performance are under development by all the major computer vendors. Many sites now have production facilities that include massively parallel hardware. Molecular modeling methodologies (both quantum and classical) are also advancing at a brisk pace. The transition of molecular modeling software to a massively parallel computing environment offers many exciting opportunities, such as the accurate treatment of larger, more complex molecular systems in routine fashion, and a viable, cost-effective route to study physical, biological, and chemical `grand challenge` problems that are impractical on traditional vector supercomputers. This will have a broad effect on all areas of basic chemical science at academic research institutions and chemical, petroleum, and pharmaceutical industries in the United States, as well as chemical waste and environmental remediation processes. But, this transition also poses significant challenges: architectural issues (SIMD, MIMD, local memory, global memory, etc.) remain poorly understood and software development tools (compilers, debuggers, performance monitors, etc.) are not well developed. In addition, researchers that understand and wish to pursue the benefits offered by massively parallel computing are often hindered by lack of expertise, hardware, and/or information at their site. A conference and workshop organized to focus on these issues was held at the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (February 1993). This report is the culmination of the organized workshop. The main conclusion: a drastic acceleration in the present rate of progress is required for the chemistry community to be positioned to exploit fully the emerging class of Teraflop computers, even allowing for the significant work to date by the community in developing software for parallel architectures.

  6. Atomdroid: a computational chemistry tool for mobile platforms.

    PubMed

    Feldt, Jonas; Mata, Ricardo A; Dieterich, Johannes M

    2012-04-23

    We present the implementation of a new molecular mechanics program designed for use in mobile platforms, the first specifically built for these devices. The software is designed to run on Android operating systems and is compatible with several modern tablet-PCs and smartphones available in the market. It includes molecular viewer/builder capabilities with integrated routines for geometry optimizations and Monte Carlo simulations. These functionalities allow it to work as a stand-alone tool. We discuss some particular development aspects, as well as the overall feasibility of using computational chemistry software packages in mobile platforms. Benchmark calculations show that through efficient implementation techniques even hand-held devices can be used to simulate midsized systems using force fields. PMID:22404249

  7. Supramolecular Chemistry: Computer-Assisted Instruction in Undergraduate and Graduate Chemistry Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnek, Alexandre A.; Dietrich, Bernard; Wipff, Georges; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Boldyreva, Elena V.

    2000-02-01

    An interactive electronic textbook (SC-WEB) based on Supramolecular Chemistry, by J.-M. Lehn, is described. It includes the text, which has been specially adapted for teaching, and data on the structures of molecules and supermolecules. The list includes about 100 structures retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database (version 1997) as well as those obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in solution. The structures can be retrieved either from the text or, independently, from the list. SC-WEB uses two types of programs: the first one reads files in HTML format (Word97, Netscape, or Internet Explorer), and WebLab Viewer Lite is used for visualizing and manipulating the structures. It can run on any PC (W95/NT4.0) computer. The application of SC-WEB for a course in supramolecular chemistry, as well as in other chemical courses, is discussed. A few examples related to the binding of alkali cations by organic and inorganic receptors, and of R-NH3+ cations by organic receptors, are considered in more detail.

  8. Theoretical Hammett Plot for the Gas-Phase Ionization of Benzoic Acid versus Phenol: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Blake E.

    2013-01-01

    Computational chemistry undergraduate laboratory courses are now part of the chemistry curriculum at many universities. However, there remains a lack of computational chemistry exercises available to instructors. This exercise is presented for students to develop skills using computational chemistry software while supplementing their knowledge of…

  9. Web-Based Job Submission Interface for the GAMESS Computational Chemistry Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, M. J.; Weber, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    A Web site is described that facilitates use of the free computational chemistry software: General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS). Its goal is to provide an opportunity for undergraduate students to perform computational chemistry experiments without the need to purchase expensive software.

  10. Interactive Computer Visualization in the Introductory Chemistry Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, Victoria M.

    1996-08-01

    Increasingly, chemistry instructors, especially in two-year colleges, find themselves teaching classes where there is great disparity in the academic preparation of the students and where even those students with good mathematics and basic science backgrounds have poor English language and communication skills. This project explores the use of technological innovations to facilitate learning in introductory chemistry courses by those with a poor academic background, while also challenging those prepared to master the curriculum. An additional objective is to improve the communication skills of all students. Material is presented visually and in as engaging a fashion as possible, students are provided ready access to relevant information about the course content in ways that are adapted to their individual learning styles, and collaborative learning is encouraged, especially among those who work and live at a distance from campus. The chief tactics employed are: Development of software that can be customized to meet the varying needs of individual students, courses, and instructors. Use of simulations that, while not replacing laboratory bench experiments, allow students to practice important laboratory techniques and observe the physical behavior of chemical systems. Use of software that allows students to explore the molecular basis of chemical phenomena. Use of software that allows students to display and analyze data in ways that facilitate drawing general conclusions about the quantitative relationships between observable properties. Use of the computer as a communications device. The ability to customize software is important in adapting to different learning styles and in encouraging students to learn by discovery. For example, TitrationLab was developed so that the material may merely be presented empirically or in ways in which the principles of equilibrium are demonstrated. At the advanced level, automatically generated titration curves are used to

  11. Interactive Computer Visualization in the Introductory Chemistry Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, Victoria M.

    1996-08-01

    Increasingly, chemistry instructors, especially in two-year colleges, find themselves teaching classes where there is great disparity in the academic preparation of the students and where even those students with good mathematics and basic science backgrounds have poor English language and communication skills. This project explores the use of technological innovations to facilitate learning in introductory chemistry courses by those with a poor academic background, while also challenging those prepared to master the curriculum. An additional objective is to improve the communication skills of all students. Material is presented visually and in as engaging a fashion as possible, students are provided ready access to relevant information about the course content in ways that are adapted to their individual learning styles, and collaborative learning is encouraged, especially among those who work and live at a distance from campus. The chief tactics employed are: Development of software that can be customized to meet the varying needs of individual students, courses, and instructors. Use of simulations that, while not replacing laboratory bench experiments, allow students to practice important laboratory techniques and observe the physical behavior of chemical systems. Use of software that allows students to explore the molecular basis of chemical phenomena. Use of software that allows students to display and analyze data in ways that facilitate drawing general conclusions about the quantitative relationships between observable properties. Use of the computer as a communications device. The ability to customize software is important in adapting to different learning styles and in encouraging students to learn by discovery. For example, TitrationLab was developed so that the material may merely be presented empirically or in ways in which the principles of equilibrium are demonstrated. At the advanced level, automatically generated titration curves are used to

  12. Array files for computational chemistry: MP2 energies.

    PubMed

    Ford, Alan R; Janowski, Tomasz; Pulay, Peter

    2007-05-01

    A simple message-passing implementation for distributed disk storage, called array files (AF), is described. It is designed primarily for parallelizing computational chemistry applications but it should be useful for any application that handles large amounts of data stored on disk. AF allows transparent distributed storage and access of large data files. An AF consists of a set of logically related records, i.e., blocks of data. It is assumed that the records have the typical dimension of matrices in quantum chemical calculations, i.e., they range from 0.1 to approximately 32 MB in size. The individual records are not striped over nodes; each record is stored on a single node. As a simple application, second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) energies have been implemented using AF. The AF implementation approaches the efficiency of the hand-coded program. MP2 is relatively simple to parallelize but for more complex applications, such as Coupled Cluster energies, the AF system greatly simplifies the programming effort. PMID:17299726

  13. A Timesharing Computer Program for a General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Gary L.; Drum, Donald A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which general and physical chemistry students can determine the heat of vaporization of a volatile substance from experimental laboratory data using timesharing techniques. (MLH)

  14. On combining computational differentiation and toolkits for parallel scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C. H.; Buecker, H. M.; Hovland, P. D.

    2000-06-08

    Automatic differentiation is a powerful technique for evaluating derivatives of functions given in the form of a high-level programming language such as Fortran, C, or C++. The program is treated as a potentially very long sequence of elementary statements to which the chain rule of differential calculus is applied over and over again. Combining automatic differentiation and the organizational structure of toolkits for parallel scientific computing provides a mechanism for evaluating derivatives by exploiting mathematical insight on a higher level. In these toolkits, algorithmic structures such as BLAS-like operations, linear and nonlinear solvers, or integrators for ordinary differential equations can be identified by their standardized interfaces and recognized as high-level mathematical objects rather than as a sequence of elementary statements. In this note, the differentiation of a linear solver with respect to some parameter vector is taken as an example. Mathematical insight is used to reformulate this problem into the solution of multiple linear systems that share the same coefficient matrix but differ in their right-hand sides. The experiments reported here use ADIC, a tool for the automatic differentiation of C programs, and PETSC, an object-oriented toolkit for the parallel solution of scientific problems modeled by partial differential equations.

  15. Modeling molecular computing systems by an artificial chemistry - its expressive power and application.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kazuto; Watanabe, Tooru; Kobayashi, Keiji; Nakamura, Masaki; Kishi, Koji; Kazuno, Mitsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Artificial chemistries are mainly used to construct virtual systems that are expected to show behavior similar to living systems. In this study, we explore possibilities of applying an artificial chemistry to modeling natural biochemical systems-or, to be specific, molecular computing systems-and show that it may be a useful modeling tool for molecular computation. We previously proposed an artificial chemistry based on string pattern matching and recombination. This article first demonstrates that this artificial chemistry is computationally universal if it has only rules that have one reactant or two reactants. We think this is a good property of an artificial chemistry that models molecular computing, because natural elementary chemical reactions, on which molecular computing is based, are mostly unimolecular or bimolecular. Then we give two illustrative example models for DNA computing in our artificial chemistry: one is for the type of computation called the Adleman-Lipton paradigm, and the other is for a DNA implementation of a finite automaton. Through the construction of these models we observe preferred properties of the artificial chemistry for modeling molecular computing, such as having no spatial structure and being flexible in choosing levels of abstraction. PMID:17567243

  16. Promoting Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Chemistry Students Using Computer-Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambari, Isiaka A.; Gbodi, Bimpe E.; Olakanmi, Eyitao U.; Abalaka, Eneojo N.

    2016-01-01

    The role of computer-assisted instruction in promoting intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among Nigerian secondary school chemistry students was investigated in this study. The study employed two modes of computer-assisted instruction (computer simulation instruction and computer tutorial instructional packages) and two levels of gender (male and…

  17. Combined Volatolomics for Monitoring of Human Body Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Broza, Yoav Y.; Zuri, Liat; Haick, Hossam

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a promising approach for non-invasive, fast and potentially inexpensive diagnostics. Here, we present a new methodology for profiling the body chemistry by using the volatile fraction of molecules in various body fluids. Using mass spectrometry and cross-reactive nanomaterial-based sensors array, we demonstrate that simultaneous VOC detection from breath and skin would provide complementary, non-correlated information of the body's volatile metabolites profile. Eventually with further wide population validation studies, such a methodology could provide more accurate monitoring of pathological changes compared to the information provided by a single body fluid. The qualitative and quantitative methods presented here offers a variety of options for novel mapping of the metabolic properties of complex organisms, including humans. PMID:24714440

  18. Combined Volatolomics for Monitoring of Human Body Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broza, Yoav Y.; Zuri, Liat; Haick, Hossam

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a promising approach for non-invasive, fast and potentially inexpensive diagnostics. Here, we present a new methodology for profiling the body chemistry by using the volatile fraction of molecules in various body fluids. Using mass spectrometry and cross-reactive nanomaterial-based sensors array, we demonstrate that simultaneous VOC detection from breath and skin would provide complementary, non-correlated information of the body's volatile metabolites profile. Eventually with further wide population validation studies, such a methodology could provide more accurate monitoring of pathological changes compared to the information provided by a single body fluid. The qualitative and quantitative methods presented here offers a variety of options for novel mapping of the metabolic properties of complex organisms, including humans.

  19. Using Computational Chemistry Activities to Promote Learning and Retention in a Secondary School General Chemistry Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochterski, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of using state-of-the-art, research-quality software as a learning tool in a general chemistry secondary school classroom setting. I present three activities designed to introduce fundamental chemical concepts regarding molecular shape and atomic orbitals to students with little background in chemistry, such as…

  20. The effect of computer-assisted instruction on the attitudes of college students toward computers and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavin, Claudia S.; Cavin, E. D.; Lagowski, J. J.

    The purpose of this study was to see whether college students' attitudes toward computers and chemistry would be affected by using CAI materials in a chemistry course, and whether there would be any difference for students of different sex. Students were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups, pre- and posttests were given to both groups, and the data were analyzed using 2-way analysis of covariance. It was found that the attitude of women toward computers was improved by using CAI. No change in attitude toward chemistry was found.

  1. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML) for computational chemistry : CompChem

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a subdomain chemistry format for storing computational chemistry data called CompChem. It has been developed based on the design, concepts and methodologies of Chemical Markup Language (CML) by adding computational chemistry semantics on top of the CML Schema. The format allows a wide range of ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of individual molecules to be stored. These calculations include, for example, single point energy calculation, molecular geometry optimization, and vibrational frequency analysis. The paper also describes the supporting infrastructure, such as processing software, dictionaries, validation tools and database repositories. In addition, some of the challenges and difficulties in developing common computational chemistry dictionaries are discussed. The uses of CompChem are illustrated by two practical applications. PMID:22870956

  2. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY: AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY FOR SOLVING PROBLEMS IN ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past three decades, atmospheric chemistry has served as an important component in developing strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of air pollutants. Laboratory studies are carried out to investigate the key chemical reactions that determine the fates and lif...

  3. Computational Chemistry in the Undergraduate Laboratory: A Mechanistic Study of the Wittig Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The Wittig reaction is one of the most useful reactions in organic chemistry. Despite its prominence early in the organic chemistry curriculum, the exact mechanism of this reaction is still under debate, and this controversy is often neglected in the classroom. Introducing a simple computational study of the Wittig reaction illustrates the…

  4. Integrating Free Computer Software in Chemistry and Biochemistry Instruction: An International Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedeno, David L.; Jones, Marjorie A.; Friesen, Jon A.; Wirtz, Mark W.; Rios, Luz Amalia; Ocampo, Gonzalo Taborda

    2010-01-01

    At the Universidad de Caldas, Manizales, Colombia, we used their new computer facilities to introduce chemistry graduate students to biochemical database mining and quantum chemistry calculations using freeware. These hands-on workshops allowed the students a strong introduction to easily accessible software and how to use this software to begin…

  5. Effects of Computer Based Learning on Students' Attitudes and Achievements towards Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Husamettin; Durmaz, Asli; Tuysuz, Cengiz; Feyzioglu, Burak

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of computer-based learning and traditional method on students' attitudes and achievement towards analytical chemistry. Students from Chemistry Education Department at Dokuz Eylul University (D.E.U) were selected randomly and divided into three groups; two experimental (Eg-1 and Eg-2) and a control…

  6. The Use of Computer-Based Instruction in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, George H.

    Thirty-two computer-based lesson modules in organic chemistry were developed at the University of Texas (Austin) over an 18-month period and evaluated in varying classroom situations for three semesters starting in the Fall of 1972. The modules were designed as supplements to the traditional organic chemistry course of the University. As such,…

  7. Using Computer Visualization Models in High School Chemistry: The Role of Teacher Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robblee, Karen M.; Garik, Peter; Abegg, Gerald L.; Faux, Russell; Horwitz, Paul

    This paper discusses the role of high school chemistry teachers' beliefs in implementing computer visualization software to teach atomic and molecular structure from a quantum mechanical perspective. The informants in this study were four high school chemistry teachers with comparable academic and professional backgrounds. These teachers received…

  8. Systems Theory as a Conceptual and Organizational Framework for Computational and Inferential Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, Mark E.

    1986-01-01

    Provides general background on basic concepts of systems theory. Discusses applications of systems theory to computational and inferential chemistry in molecular and reaction systems, systems analysis, and synthesis. Describes methodology for studying chemical systems by computer and gives advantages of an integrated computational environment. (JM)

  9. LABORATORY AND COMPUTATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY OF KEY OXIDATION PRODUCTS CONTROLLING TROPOSPHERIC OZONE FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Major uncertainties remain in our ability to identify the key reactions and primary oxidation products of volatile hydrocarbons that contribute to ozone formation in the troposphere. To reduce these uncertainties, computational chemistry, mechanistic and process analysis techniqu...

  10. Computer information resources of inorganic chemistry and materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyova, N. N.; Dudarev, V. A.; Zemskov, V. S.

    2010-02-01

    Information systems used in inorganic chemistry and materials science are considered. The following basic trends in the development of modern information systems in these areas are highlighted: access to information via the Internet, merging of documental and factual databases, involvement of experts in the evaluation of the data reliability, supplementing databases with information analysis tools on the properties of inorganic substances and materials.

  11. Suicidal chemistry: combined intoxication with carbon monoxide and formic acid.

    PubMed

    Bakovic, Marija; Nestic, Marina; Mayer, Davor

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we present a rare case of suicidal intoxication with carbon monoxide produced via reaction of formic and sulphuric acid with additional toxic effect of formic acid. The deceased was a 22-year-old men found dead in the bathroom locked from the inside. A bucket filled with liquid was found next to him, together with an almost empty canister labeled "formic acid" and another empty unlabeled canister. The postmortem examination revealed corrosive burns of the face, neck and chest, cherry-pink livor mortis, corrosive injury to the oropharyngeal area and trachea, subpleural petechiae, 100 mL of blood in stomach and superficial erosions of stomach mucosa. Toxicology analysis revealed 30% of carboxyhemoglobin in the femoral blood and the presence of the formic acid in various samples. Quantitative analysis of formic acid was performed by measuring methyl ester derivative of formic acid by using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The highest concentration of formic acid was measured in the lungs (0.55 g/kg), gastric content (0.39 g/L), and blood (0.28 g/L). In addition, it was established that content of the unlabeled canister had a pH value of 0.79 and contained sulphuric ions. Morphological and toxicology findings suggested that the main route of exposure to formic acid was inhalation of vapors with a possible ingestion of only small amount of liquid acid. The cause of death was determined to be combined intoxication with carbon monoxide and formic acid. PMID:26041513

  12. LABORATORY AND COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY INVESTIGATIONS OF THE GAS PHASE ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY OF AIR TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A full assessment of the impact of the release of air toxic compounds into the atmospheric requires a detailed understanding of their atmospheres lifetimes and fates. To address this issue a detailed review of the atmospheric chemistry of each of these classes was carried out t...

  13. On the Impact of Execution Models: A Case Study in Computational Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2015-05-25

    Efficient utilization of high-performance computing (HPC) platforms is an important and complex problem. Execution models, abstract descriptions of the dynamic runtime behavior of the execution stack, have significant impact on the utilization of HPC systems. Using a computational chemistry kernel as a case study and a wide variety of execution models combined with load balancing techniques, we explore the impact of execution models on the utilization of an HPC system. We demonstrate a 50 percent improvement in performance by using work stealing relative to a more traditional static scheduling approach. We also use a novel semi-matching technique for load balancing that has comparable performance to a traditional hypergraph-based partitioning implementation, which is computationally expensive. Using this study, we found that execution model design choices and assumptions can limit critical optimizations such as global, dynamic load balancing and finding the correct balance between available work units and different system and runtime overheads. With the emergence of multi- and many-core architectures and the consequent growth in the complexity of HPC platforms, we believe that these lessons will be beneficial to researchers tuning diverse applications on modern HPC platforms, especially on emerging dynamic platforms with energy-induced performance variability.

  14. Art, Meet Chemistry; Chemistry, Meet Art: Case Studies, Current Literature, and Instrumental Methods Combined to Create a Hands-On Experience for Nonmajors and Instrumental Analysis Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nivens, Delana A.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Verges, Katie J.; Jamieson, Deborah S.

    2010-01-01

    Case studies and current literature are combined with spectroscopic analysis to provide a unique chemistry experience for art history students and to provide a unique inquiry-based laboratory experiment for analytical chemistry students. The XRF analysis method was used to demonstrate to nonscience majors (art history students) a powerful…

  15. Development of an Undergraduate Course in the Use of Digital Computers With Chemistry Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Charles L.

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) has proven useful in teaching chemistry instrumentation techniques to undergraduate students. The work completed at the time of this interim report has clearly shown that a general purpose laboratory computer system, equipped with suitable devices to allow direct data input from experiments, can be an effective…

  16. Molecular Orbitals of NO, NO[superscript+], and NO[superscript-]: A Computational Quantum Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orenha, Renato P.; Galembeck, Sérgio E.

    2014-01-01

    This computational experiment presents qualitative molecular orbital (QMO) and computational quantum chemistry exercises of NO, NO[superscript+], and NO[superscript-]. Initially students explore several properties of the target molecules by Lewis diagrams and the QMO theory. Then, they compare qualitative conclusions with EHT and DFT calculations…

  17. The Impact of Learner's Prior Knowledge on Their Use of Chemistry Computer Simulations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Han-Chin; Andre, Thomas; Greenbowe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    It is complicated to design a computer simulation that adapts to students with different characteristics. This study documented cases that show how college students' prior chemistry knowledge level affected their interaction with peers and their approach to solving problems with the use of computer simulations that were designed to learn…

  18. Using Free Computational Resources to Illustrate the Drug Design Process in an Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Ricardo P.; Andrade, Saulo F.; Mantoani, Susimaire P.; Eifler-Lima, Vera L.; Silva, Vinicius B.; Kawano, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in, and dissemination of, computer technologies in the field of drug research now enable the use of molecular modeling tools to teach important concepts of drug design to chemistry and pharmacy students. A series of computer laboratories is described to introduce undergraduate students to commonly adopted "in silico" drug design…

  19. Parallel Computation Chemistry Using Constraints: Final Report, LDRD 97-0301, Case 3504140000

    SciTech Connect

    Todd D. Plantenga

    1998-11-01

    Computer modeling to estimate material properties, design chem/bio sensors, and evaluate protein-protein interactions all require solving force field equations for molecular structures that contain tens of thousands of covalently connected atoms. Potential energy minimization is a key step in the calculation, but stiff covalent bonding forces make optimization difficult and expensive. This two-year LDRD developed two classes of advanced minimization algorithms that were specialized for chemistry applications and distributed computing machines. The project led to two successful algorithms that were implemented in three Sandia computational chemistry codes to support various users.

  20. Computer Augmented Lectures (CAL): A New Teaching Technique for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masten, F. A.; And Others

    A new technique described as computer augmented lectures (CAL) is being used at the University of Texas at Austin. It involves the integration of on-line, interactive, time sharing computer terminals and theater size video projectors for large screen display. This paper covers the basic concept, pedagogical techniques, experiments conducted,…

  1. Combination of organotrifluoroborates with photoredox catalysis marking a new phase in organic radical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Koike, Takashi; Akita, Munetaka

    2016-08-01

    Combination of organotrifluoroborates and visible-light-driven photoredox catalysis, both of which have attracted the attention of synthetic chemists, marks a new phase in the field of organic radical chemistry. We have developed photoredox-catalyzed radical reactions with organotrifluoroborates, which turn out to serve not only as a source of organic radicals but also as radical acceptors. The first part of this Perspective deals with the generation of organic radicals from organotrifluoroborates, and the latter part describes addition of the CF3 radical to alkenyltrifluoroborates. The good chemistry between organoborates and photoredox catalysis and its future will be discussed. PMID:27282517

  2. CHEMEX; Understanding and Solving Problems in Chemistry. A Computer-Assisted Instruction Program for General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Stephen K.

    A brief overview of CHEMEX--a problem-solving, tutorial style computer-assisted instructional course--is provided and sample problems are offered. In CHEMEX, students receive problems in advance and attempt to solve them before moving through the computer program, which assists them in overcoming difficulties and serves as a review mechanism.…

  3. Computer-based, Jeopardy™-like game in general chemistry for engineering majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, S. S.; Saffre, F.; Kadadha, M.; Gater, D. L.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design of Jeopardy™-like computer game for enhancement of learning of general chemistry for engineering majors. While we examine several parameters of student achievement and attitude, our primary concern is addressing the motivation of students, which tends to be low in a traditionally run chemistry lectures. The effect of the game-playing is tested by comparing paper-based game quiz, which constitutes a control group, and computer-based game quiz, constituting a treatment group. Computer-based game quizzes are Java™-based applications that students run once a week in the second part of the last lecture of the week. Overall effectiveness of the semester-long program is measured through pretest-postest conceptual testing of general chemistry. The objective of this research is to determine to what extent this ``gamification'' of the course delivery and course evaluation processes may be beneficial to the undergraduates' learning of science in general, and chemistry in particular. We present data addressing gender-specific difference in performance, as well as background (pre-college) level of general science and chemistry preparation. We outline the plan how to extend such approach to general physics courses and to modern science driven electives, and we offer live, in-lectures examples of our computer gaming experience. We acknowledge support from Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi

  4. The role of computational chemistry in the science and measurements of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    The role of computational chemistry in determining the stability, photochemistry, spectroscopic parameters, and parameters for estimating reaction rates of atmospheric constituents is discussed. Examples dealing with the photolysis cross sections of HOCl and (1 Delta g) O2 and with the stability of gaseous NH4Cl and asymmetric ClO3 are presented. It is concluded that computational chemistry can play an important role in the study of atmospheric constituents, particularly reactive and short-lived species which are difficult to investigate experimentally.

  5. COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE FOR RESEARCH IN METEOROLOGY AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study examines the feasibility of constructing a peripheral hardware module that could be attached to a mini or midsized computer to accelerate the execution of large air pollution models, such as the EPA's Regional Oxidant Model (ROM). Crucial information necessary to design...

  6. The Use of Computers to Aid Instruction in Beginning Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandey, Robert C.

    1971-01-01

    Describes computer-aided lessons for determining chemical formulas from composition by weight, quantities from chemical equations, and balancing equations for oxidation-reduction reactions. Lessons were developed and used on the PLATO system at the University of Illinois. A brief analysis of student attitudes and of effectiveness of the programs…

  7. Computer Programs for Chemistry Experiments I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynard, Dale C.

    This unit of instruction includes nine laboratory experiments. All of the experiments are from the D.C. Health Revision of the Chemical Education Materials Study (CHEMS) with one exception. Program six is the lab from the original version of the CHEMS program. Each program consists of three parts (1) the lab and computer hints, (2) the description…

  8. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, Maryline G; Batista, Enrique R; Berg, John M; Birnbaum, Eva R; Cross, Justin N; Engle, Jonathan W; La Pierre, Henry S; Kozimor, Stosh A; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S; Stein, Benjamin W; Stieber, S Chantal E; Wilson, Justin J

    2016-01-01

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, Ac(III) reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac-Cl and Ac-OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy comparisons between Ac(III) and Am(III) in HCl solutions indicate Ac(III) coordinates more inner-sphere Cl(1-) ligands (3.2±1.1) than Am(III) (0.8±0.3). These results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique Ac(III) chemical behaviour. PMID:27531582

  9. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Maryline G.; Batista, Enrique R.; Berg, John M.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Cross, Justin N.; Engle, Jonathan W.; La Pierre, Henry S.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Stein, Benjamin W.; Stieber, S. Chantal E.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2016-01-01

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, AcIII reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac–Cl and Ac–OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy comparisons between AcIII and AmIII in HCl solutions indicate AcIII coordinates more inner-sphere Cl1– ligands (3.2±1.1) than AmIII (0.8±0.3). These results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique AcIII chemical behaviour. PMID:27531582

  10. Computational Chemistry at the Petascale: Are We There Yet?

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Robert J; Apra, Edoardo; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Tipparaju, Vinod; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    The field of electronic structure is struggling to get efficient parallel implementation on Petascale class hardware. One notable exception has been the achievement of Qbox, a planewave pseudopotential electronic structure code that obtained a performance of 207 TFlops on a BlueGene/L computer. Qbox makes use of the message-passing MPI library for parallelization. Instead, NWChem makes use of the Global Arrays library; this allows the software developer to reach a high level of abstraction and, at the same time, to use one-sided communication to efficiently exploit the network hardware. In the remainder of the paper, we will discuss recent benchmarks and scientic results obtained with NWChem on a parallel computer whose theoretical peak performance is in excess of 1 PFlops.

  11. Computer Series, 106. KC? Discoverer. A Computer Program for Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotz, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an interactive database of chemical information called "KC? Discoverer: Exploring the Periodic Table." An overview of the program and details of specific functions are given. The uses of this program in teaching undergraduate inorganic chemistry are stressed. (CW)

  12. ROLE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY IN SUPPORT OF HAZARD IDENTIFICATION (ID) MECHANISM-BASED SARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mechanism-based structure-activity relationship (SAR) study attempts to determine a structural basis for activity by targeting a single or a few stages in a postulated mechanism of action.Computational chemistry approaches provide a valuable complement to experiment for probing...

  13. Annotated List of Chemistry Laboratory Experiments with Computer Access. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunce, S. C.; And Others

    Project Chemlab was designed to prepare an "Annotated List of Laboratory Experiments in Chemistry from the Journal of Chemical Education (1957-1979)" and to develop a computer file and program to search for specific types of experiments. Provided in this document are listings (photoreduced copies of printouts) of over 1500 entries classified into…

  14. Students' Cognitive Focus during a Chemistry Laboratory Exercise: Effects of a Computer-Simulated Prelab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winberg, T. Mikael; Berg, C. Anders R.

    2007-01-01

    To enhance the learning outcomes achieved by students, learners undertook a computer-simulated activity based on an acid-base titration prior to a university-level chemistry laboratory activity. Students were categorized with respect to their attitudes toward learning. During the laboratory exercise, questions that students asked their assistant…

  15. Computational Modeling of the Optical Rotation of Amino Acids: An "in Silico" Experiment for Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Autschbach, Jochen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates the optical activity of the amino acid valine has been developed for an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Hybrid density functional theory calculations were carried out for valine to confirm the rule that adding a strong acid to a solution of an amino acid in the l…

  16. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry: Design, Application, and Evaluation. Technical Report 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, George

    The computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program in undergraduate organic chemistry at the University of Texas was evaluated by an experimental design in 1969 and found to be successful. This report discusses in detail the formation of the design, its application, and the method of evaluation. The program itself included 15 teaching modules that…

  17. A Computer Algebra Approach to Solving Chemical Equilibria in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalainoff, Melinda; Lachance, Russ; Riegner, Dawn; Biaglow, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report on a semester-long study of the incorporation into our general chemistry course, of advanced algebraic and computer algebra techniques for solving chemical equilibrium problems. The method presented here is an alternative to the commonly used concentration table method for describing chemical equilibria in general…

  18. Exploring Interactive and Dynamic Simulations Using a Computer Algebra System in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the use of Mathematica, a computer algebra system (CAS), in a high school chemistry course. Mathematica was used to generate a graph, where a slider controls the value of parameter(s) in the equation; thus, students can visualize the effect of the parameter(s) on the behavior of the system. Also, Mathematica can show the…

  19. Project Longhorn: A Pilot Project in the Use of Batch Computing in High School Chemistry Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busboom, Sally Young

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of batch-oriented computing as the basis for reintroducing homework problems as a teaching tool in beginning chemistry instruction. Stems from and expands upon a system used in a university setting that produces, delivers, grades, and keeps records for homework problems. (DDR)

  20. A Compilation of Postgraduate Theses Written in Turkey on Computer Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Demirbas, Murat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study conducted is to present in-depth information about the postgraduate theses written within the context of Computer Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Education in Turkey. The theses collected in National Thesis Centre of Turkish Council of Higher Education were examined. As a result of an examination, it was found that about…

  1. RESEARCH STRATEGIES FOR THE APPLICATION OF THE TECHNIQUES OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY TO ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On October 25 and 26, 1984, the U.S. EPA sponsored a workshop to consider the potential applications of the techniques of computational biological chemistry to problems in environmental health. Eleven extramural scientists from the various related disciplines and a similar number...

  2. Factors Affecting Energy Barriers for Pyramidal Inversion in Amines and Phosphines: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate exercise in computational chemistry that investigates the energy barrier for pyramidal inversion of amines and phosphines is presented. Semiempirical calculations (PM3) of the ground-state and transition-state energies for NR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] and PR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] allow…

  3. Chemistry, physics and time: the computer modelling of glassmaking.

    PubMed

    Martlew, David

    2003-01-01

    A decade or so ago the remains of an early flat glass furnace were discovered in St Helens. Continuous glass production only became feasible after the Siemens Brothers demonstrated their continuous tank furnace at Dresden in 1870. One manufacturer of flat glass enthusiastically adopted the new technology and secretly explored many variations on this theme during the next fifteen years. Study of the surviving furnace remains using today's computer simulation techniques showed how, in 1887, that technology was adapted to the special demands of window glass making. Heterogeneous chemical reactions at high temperatures are required to convert the mixture of granular raw materials into the homogeneous glass needed for windows. Kinetics (and therefore the economics) of glassmaking is dominated by heat transfer and chemical diffusion as refractory grains are converted to highly viscous molten glass. Removal of gas bubbles in a sufficiently short period of time is vital for profitability, but the glassmaker must achieve this in a reaction vessel which is itself being dissolved by the molten glass. Design and operational studies of today's continuous tank furnaces need to take account of these factors, and good use is made of computer simulation techniques to shed light on the way furnaces behave and how improvements may be made. This paper seeks to show how those same techniques can be used to understand how the early Siemens continuous tank furnaces were designed and operated, and how the Victorian entrepreneurs succeeded in managing the thorny problems of what was, in effect, a vulnerable high temperature continuous chemical reactor. PMID:12555863

  4. Recent developments in computer vision-based analytical chemistry: A tutorial review.

    PubMed

    Capitán-Vallvey, Luis Fermín; López-Ruiz, Nuria; Martínez-Olmos, Antonio; Erenas, Miguel M; Palma, Alberto J

    2015-10-29

    Chemical analysis based on colour changes recorded with imaging devices is gaining increasing interest. This is due to its several significant advantages, such as simplicity of use, and the fact that it is easily combinable with portable and widely distributed imaging devices, resulting in friendly analytical procedures in many areas that demand out-of-lab applications for in situ and real-time monitoring. This tutorial review covers computer vision-based analytical (CVAC) procedures and systems from 2005 to 2015, a period of time when 87.5% of the papers on this topic were published. The background regarding colour spaces and recent analytical system architectures of interest in analytical chemistry is presented in the form of a tutorial. Moreover, issues regarding images, such as the influence of illuminants, and the most relevant techniques for processing and analysing digital images are addressed. Some of the most relevant applications are then detailed, highlighting their main characteristics. Finally, our opinion about future perspectives is discussed. PMID:26547492

  5. Photocatalytic water splitting with acridine dyes: Guidelines from computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Karsili, Tolga N. V.; Sobolewski, Andrzej L.; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic splitting of water into Hrad and OHrad radicals in hydrogen-bonded chromophore-water complexes has been explored with computational methods for the chromophores acridine orange (AO) and benzacridine (BA). These dyes are strong absorbers within the range of the solar spectrum. It is shown that low-lying charge-transfer excited states exist in the hydrogen-bonded AOsbnd H2O and BAsbnd H2O complexes which drive the transfer of a proton from water to the chromophore, which results in AOHradsbnd OHrad or BAHradsbnd OHrad biradicals. The AOHrad and BAHrad radicals possess bright ππ∗ excited states with vertical excitation energies near 3.0 eV which are predissociated by a low-lying repulsive πσ∗ state. The conical intersections of the πσ∗ state with the ππ∗ excited states and the ground state provide a mechanism for the photodetachment of the H-atom by a second photon. Our results indicate that AO and BA are promising chromophores for water splitting with visible light.

  6. Microscopes and computers combined for analysis of chromosomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. W.; Butler, M. K.; Stroud, A. N.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning machine CHLOE, developed for photographic use, is combined with a digital computer to obtain quantitative and statistically significant data on chromosome shapes, distribution, density, and pairing. CHLOE permits data acquisition about a chromosome complement to be obtained two times faster than by manual pairing.

  7. Effects of a test taking strategy on postsecondary computer assisted chemistry assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manco, Sharon Ann

    Metacognitive test taking strategies have proven advantageous in improving content-based test scores in a wide variety of disciplines and age/grade levels using traditional paper-and-pencil tests. However, despite the increase in computer assisted assessment (CAA), little research has examined whether these test taking strategies are effective for computer assisted tests. Research was conducted to determine if learning a proven test taking strategy would improve the online quiz scores of six university students in an introductory chemistry course intended for science, technology, engineering and math majors. Participants completed six to ten chemistry quizzes prior to intervention---learning the test taking strategy---and four to eight chemistry quizzes after intervention. Results indicated that, while students learned the strategy, it had little effect on their online chemistry quiz scores. Additionally, at the end of the semester, participants completed a satisfaction survey indicating general satisfaction with having learned the test taking strategy and generalization to other courses and types of tests. Furthermore, results suggest that adaptations to the on-line delivery method of the quizzes and to the test taking strategies may improve the robustness of the effect. Due to the increased use of computer assisted assessment, additional research is warranted to determine appropriate test taking strategies for online tests.

  8. Water chemistry of a combined-cycle power plant's auxiliary equipment cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, B. M.; Korotkov, A. N.; Oparin, M. Yu.; Larin, A. B.

    2013-04-01

    Results from an analysis of methods aimed at reducing the corrosion rate of structural metal used in heat-transfer systems with water coolant are presented. Data from examination of the closed-circuit system for cooling the auxiliary mechanisms of a combined-cycle plant-based power unit and the results from adjustment of its water chemistry are given. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of using a reagent prepared on the basis of sodium sulfite for reducing the corrosion rate when the loss of coolant is replenished with nondeaerated water.

  9. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C. E-mail: melott@ku.edu

    2010-05-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV. An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV–1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

  10. Computational chemistry for graphene-based energy applications: progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Zak E.; Walsh, Tiffany R.

    2015-04-01

    Research in graphene-based energy materials is a rapidly growing area. Many graphene-based energy applications involve interfacial processes. To enable advances in the design of these energy materials, such that their operation, economy, efficiency and durability is at least comparable with fossil-fuel based alternatives, connections between the molecular-scale structure and function of these interfaces are needed. While it is experimentally challenging to resolve this interfacial structure, molecular simulation and computational chemistry can help bridge these gaps. In this Review, we summarise recent progress in the application of computational chemistry to graphene-based materials for fuel cells, batteries, photovoltaics and supercapacitors. We also outline both the bright prospects and emerging challenges these techniques face for application to graphene-based energy materials in future.

  11. A numerical method for parameterization of atmospheric chemistry - Computation of tropospheric OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivakovsky, C. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Prather, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient and stable computational scheme for parameterization of atmospheric chemistry is described. The 24-hour-average concentration of OH is represented as a set of high-order polynomials in variables such as temperature, densities of H2O, CO, O3, and NO(t) (defined as NO + NO2 + NO3 + 2N2O5 + HNO2 + HNO4) as well as variables determining solar irradiance: cloud cover, density of the overhead ozone column, surface albedo, latitude, and solar declination. This parameterization of OH chemistry was used in the three-dimensional study of global distribution of CH3CCl3. The proposed computational scheme can be used for parameterization of rates of chemical production and loss or of any other output of a full chemical model.

  12. User's guide for vectorized code EQUIL for calculating equilibrium chemistry on Control Data STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Graves, R. A., Jr.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A vectorized code, EQUIL, was developed for calculating the equilibrium chemistry of a reacting gas mixture on the Control Data STAR-100 computer. The code provides species mole fractions, mass fractions, and thermodynamic and transport properties of the mixture for given temperature, pressure, and elemental mass fractions. The code is set up for the electrons H, He, C, O, N system of elements. In all, 24 chemical species are included.

  13. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L. N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Farmer, D. K.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-08-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment) must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA) concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  14. Computational Materials Science and Chemistry: Accelerating Discovery and Innovation through Simulation-Based Engineering and Science

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George; Glotzer, Sharon; McCurdy, Bill; Roberto, Jim

    2010-07-26

    This report is based on a SC Workshop on Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation on July 26-27, 2010, to assess the potential of state-of-the-art computer simulations to accelerate understanding and discovery in materials science and chemistry, with a focus on potential impacts in energy technologies and innovation. The urgent demand for new energy technologies has greatly exceeded the capabilities of today's materials and chemical processes. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance. New materials and processes are critical pacing elements for progress in advanced energy systems and virtually all industrial technologies. Over the past two decades, the United States has developed and deployed the world's most powerful collection of tools for the synthesis, processing, characterization, and simulation and modeling of materials and chemical systems at the nanoscale, dimensions of a few atoms to a few hundred atoms across. These tools, which include world-leading x-ray and neutron sources, nanoscale science facilities, and high-performance computers, provide an unprecedented view of the atomic-scale structure and dynamics of materials and the molecular-scale basis of chemical processes. For the first time in history, we are able to synthesize, characterize, and model materials and chemical behavior at the length scale where this behavior is controlled. This ability is transformational for the discovery process and, as a result, confers a significant competitive advantage. Perhaps the most spectacular increase in capability has been demonstrated in high performance computing. Over the past decade, computational power has increased by a factor of a million due to advances in hardware and software. This rate of improvement, which shows no sign of abating, has

  15. Introduction to Computational Chemistry: Teaching Hu¨ckel Molecular Orbital Theory Using an Excel Workbook for Matrix Diagonalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litofsky, Joshua; Viswanathan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    Matrix diagonalization, the key technique at the heart of modern computational chemistry for the numerical solution of the Schrödinger equation, can be easily introduced in the physical chemistry curriculum in a pedagogical context using simple Hückel molecular orbital theory for p bonding in molecules. We present details and results of…

  16. Post-16 Physics and Chemistry Uptake: Combining Large-Scale Secondary Analysis with In-Depth Qualitative Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Lubben, Fred; Bennett, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative secondary analysis of large-scale data can be combined with in-depth qualitative methods. In this paper, we discuss the role of this combined methods approach in examining the uptake of physics and chemistry in post compulsory schooling for students in England. The secondary data analysis of the National Pupil Database (NPD) served…

  17. Application of computer assisted combinatorial chemistry in antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer agents design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burello, E.; Bologa, C.; Frecer, V.; Miertus, S.

    Combinatorial chemistry and technologies have been developed to a stage where synthetic schemes are available for generation of a large variety of organic molecules. The innovative concept of combinatorial design assumes that screening of a large and diverse library of compounds will increase the probability of finding an active analogue among the compounds tested. Since the rate at which libraries are screened for activity currently constitutes a limitation to the use of combinatorial technologies, it is important to be selective about the number of compounds to be synthesized. Early experience with combinatorial chemistry indicated that chemical diversity alone did not result in a significant increase in the number of generated lead compounds. Emphasis has therefore been increasingly put on the use of computer assisted combinatorial chemical techniques. Computational methods are valuable in the design of virtual libraries of molecular models. Selection strategies based on computed physicochemical properties of the models or of a target compound are introduced to reduce the time and costs of library synthesis and screening. In addition, computational structure-based library focusing methods can be used to perform in silico screening of the activity of compounds against a target receptor by docking the ligands into the receptor model. Three case studies are discussed dealing with the design of targeted combinatorial libraries of inhibitors of HIV-1 protease, P. falciparum plasmepsin and human urokinase as potential antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer drugs. These illustrate library focusing strategies.

  18. Internet-Based Prelaboratory Tutorials and Computer-Based Probes in General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Brian P.; Orvis, Jessica N.

    2003-06-01

    A strong desire to upgrade the general chemistry laboratory program at Georgia Southern University (GSU) through greater use of more modern laboratory techniques led to an NSF-DUE grant (0088586) to purchase computers and interfaced analytical probes. Included in the project was a complete restructuring of many of the traditional laboratory experiments to utilize the new equipment and also the development of Web-based laboratory tutorials to better prepare students for the experiments and to ease the transition into use of the new technology. Immediate improvements could be seen with the addition of computers for data acquisition, spreadsheets for data analysis, and molecular modeling software. Furthermore, the use of the Web-based tutorials served to familiarize the students with the equipment and techniques involved in the experiment, reducing the anxiety associated with using previously unseen equipment and allowing students to begin with a greater degree of confidence. This has been very important for those students with limited prior chemistry experience and was instrumental in helping students adapt to the new computer-based equipment. A particularly beneficial result of the computers and tutorials has been the savings in laboratory time, which has allowed experiments to be expanded to explore conceptual understandings and related applications.

  19. Research and Teaching: Computational Methods in General Chemistry--Perceptions of Programming, Prior Experience, and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Chiu, Jennie L.; Grisham, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how integrating computational tools into a general chemistry laboratory course can influence student perceptions of programming and investigates relationships among student perceptions, prior experience, and student outcomes.

  20. Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2009-11-21

    Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

  1. Managing the computational chemistry big data problem: the ioChem-BD platform.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Moreno, M; de Graaf, C; López, N; Maseras, F; Poblet, J M; Bo, C

    2015-01-26

    We present the ioChem-BD platform ( www.iochem-bd.org ) as a multiheaded tool aimed to manage large volumes of quantum chemistry results from a diverse group of already common simulation packages. The platform has an extensible structure. The key modules managing the main tasks are to (i) upload of output files from common computational chemistry packages, (ii) extract meaningful data from the results, and (iii) generate output summaries in user-friendly formats. A heavy use of the Chemical Mark-up Language (CML) is made in the intermediate files used by ioChem-BD. From them and using XSL techniques, we manipulate and transform such chemical data sets to fulfill researchers' needs in the form of HTML5 reports, supporting information, and other research media. PMID:25469626

  2. Protein Engineering by Combined Computational and In Vitro Evolution Approaches.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Lior; Heyne, Michael; Shifman, Julia M; Papo, Niv

    2016-05-01

    Two alternative strategies are commonly used to study protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and to engineer protein-based inhibitors. In one approach, binders are selected experimentally from combinatorial libraries of protein mutants that are displayed on a cell surface. In the other approach, computational modeling is used to explore an astronomically large number of protein sequences to select a small number of sequences for experimental testing. While both approaches have some limitations, their combination produces superior results in various protein engineering applications. Such applications include the design of novel binders and inhibitors, the enhancement of affinity and specificity, and the mapping of binding epitopes. The combination of these approaches also aids in the understanding of the specificity profiles of various PPIs. PMID:27061494

  3. Optimizing qubit resources for quantum chemistry simulations in second quantization on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Fuhrer, Andreas; Staar, Peter; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2016-07-01

    Quantum chemistry simulations on a quantum computer suffer from the overhead needed for encoding the Fermionic problem in a system of qubits. By exploiting the block diagonality of a Fermionic Hamiltonian, we show that the number of required qubits can be reduced while the number of terms in the Hamiltonian will increase. All operations for this reduction can be performed in operator space. The scheme is conceived as a pre-computational step that would be performed prior to the actual quantum simulation. We apply this scheme to reduce the number of qubits necessary to simulate both the Hamiltonian of the two-site Fermi–Hubbard model and the hydrogen molecule. Both quantum systems can then be simulated with a two-qubit quantum computer. Despite the increase in the number of Hamiltonian terms, the scheme still remains a useful tool to reduce the dimensionality of specific quantum systems for quantum simulators with a limited number of resources.

  4. The effects of computer animation on the particulate mental models of college chemistry students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Vickie M.; Abraham, Michael R.

    Modern chemistry concepts have the particulate nature of matter at their core. Chemists explain most phenomena in terms of atomic and molecular models. The lack of understanding of chemistry concepts may be linked to the students' inability to build complete mental models that visualize particulate behavior. With computer animation technology, dynamic and three-dimensional presentations are possible. This study explores the effect of computer animations depicting the particulate nature of matter on college students' mental models of the chemical phenomena. A Particulate Nature of Matter Evaluation Test (PNMET) instrument was used to determine the nature of the students' visualizations and, therefore, their comprehension of the chemical concept studied. Animations were used in two treatment situations: (a) as a supplement in large-group lectures, and (b) as both the lecture supplement and an assigned individual activity in a computer laboratory. These two experimental treatments were compared to a control group. Both treatment groups received significantly higher conceptual understanding scores on the PNMET than did the control group. This increased understanding may be due to the superiority of the formation of more expertlike, dynamic mental models of particle behavior in these chemical processes.

  5. FOREWORD: Third Nordic Symposium on Computer Simulation in Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaski, K.; Salomaa, M.

    1990-01-01

    These are Proceedings of the Third Nordic Symposium on Computer Simulation in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Mathematics, held August 25-26, 1989, at Lahti (Finland). The Symposium belongs to an annual series of Meetings, the first one of which was arranged in 1987 at Lund (Sweden) and the second one in 1988 at Kolle-Kolle near Copenhagen (Denmark). Although these Symposia have thus far been essentially Nordic events, their international character has increased significantly; the trend is vividly reflected through contributions in the present Topical Issue. The interdisciplinary nature of Computational Science is central to the activity; this fundamental aspect is also responsible, in an essential way, for its rapidly increasing impact. Crucially important to a wide spectrum of superficially disparate fields is the common need for extensive - and often quite demanding - computational modelling. For such theoretical models, no closed-form (analytical) solutions are available or they would be extremely difficult to find; hence one must rather resort to the Art of performing computational investigations. Among the unifying features in the computational research are the methods of simulation employed; methods which frequently are quite closely related with each other even for faculties of science that are quite unrelated. Computer simulation in Natural Sciences is presently apprehended as a discipline on its own right, occupying a broad region somewhere between the experimental and theoretical methods, but also partially overlapping with and complementing them. - Whichever its proper definition may be, the computational approach serves as a novel and an extremely versatile tool with which one can equally well perform "pure" experimental modelling and conduct "computational theory". Computational studies that have earlier been made possible only through supercomputers have opened unexpected, as well as exciting, novel frontiers equally in mathematics (e.g., fractals

  6. Computation and Experiment: A Powerful Combination to Understand and Predict Reactivities.

    PubMed

    Sperger, Theresa; Sanhueza, Italo A; Schoenebeck, Franziska

    2016-06-21

    Computational chemistry has become an established tool for the study of the origins of chemical phenomena and examination of molecular properties. Because of major advances in theory, hardware and software, calculations of molecular processes can nowadays be done with reasonable accuracy on a time-scale that is competitive or even faster than experiments. This overview will highlight broad applications of computational chemistry in the study of organic and organometallic reactivities, including catalytic (NHC-, Cu-, Pd-, Ni-catalyzed) and noncatalytic examples of relevance to organic synthesis. The selected examples showcase the ability of computational chemistry to rationalize and also predict reactivities of broad significance. A particular emphasis is placed on the synergistic interplay of computations and experiments. It is discussed how this approach allows one to (i) gain greater insight than the isolated techniques, (ii) inspire novel chemistry avenues, and (iii) assist in reaction development. Examples of successful rationalizations of reactivities are discussed, including the elucidation of mechanistic features (radical versus polar) and origins of stereoselectivity in NHC-catalyzed reactions as well as the rationalization of ligand effects on ligation states and selectivity in Pd- and Ni-catalyzed transformations. Beyond explaining, the synergistic interplay of computation and experiments is then discussed, showcasing the identification of the likely catalytically active species as a function of ligand, additive, and solvent in Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. These may vary between mono- or bisphosphine-bound or even anionic Pd complexes in polar media in the presence of coordinating additives. These fundamental studies also inspired avenues in catalysis via dinuclear Pd(I) cycles. Detailed mechanistic studies supporting the direct reactivity of Pd(I)-Pd(I) with aryl halides as well as applications of air-stable dinuclear Pd(I) catalysts are

  7. Energy-Efficient Computational Chemistry: Comparison of x86 and ARM Systems.

    PubMed

    Keipert, Kristopher; Mitra, Gaurav; Sunriyal, Vaibhav; Leang, Sarom S; Sosonkina, Masha; Rendell, Alistair P; Gordon, Mark S

    2015-11-10

    The computational efficiency and energy-to-solution of several applications using the GAMESS quantum chemistry suite of codes is evaluated for 32-bit and 64-bit ARM-based computers, and compared to an x86 machine. The x86 system completes all benchmark computations more quickly than either ARM system and is the best choice to minimize time to solution. The ARM64 and ARM32 computational performances are similar to each other for Hartree-Fock and density functional theory energy calculations. However, for memory-intensive second-order perturbation theory energy and gradient computations the lower ARM32 read/write memory bandwidth results in computation times as much as 86% longer than on the ARM64 system. The ARM32 system is more energy efficient than the x86 and ARM64 CPUs for all benchmarked methods, while the ARM64 CPU is more energy efficient than the x86 CPU for some core counts and molecular sizes. PMID:26574303

  8. A unified view on heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts through a combination of spectroscopy and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Maganas, Dimitrios; Trunschke, Annette; Schlögl, Robert; Neese, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Identifying catalytically active structures or intermediates in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is a formidable challenge. However, obtaining experimentally verified insight into the active species in heterogeneous catalysis is a tremendously challenging problem. Many highly advanced spectroscopic and microscopic methods have been developed to probe surfaces. In this discussion we employ a combination of spectroscopic methods to study two closely related systems from the heterogeneous (the silica-supported vanadium oxide VOx/SBA-15) and homogeneous (the complex K[VO(O2)Hheida]) domains. Spectroscopic measurements were conducted strictly in parallel for both systems and consisted of oxygen K-edge and vanadium L-edge X-ray absorption measurements in conjunction with resonance Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the full information content of the spectra can be developed through advanced quantum chemical calculations that directly address the sought after structure-spectra relationships. To this end we employ the recently developed restricted open shell configuration interaction theory together with the time-dependent theory of electronic spectroscopy to calculate XAS and rR spectra respectively. The results of the study demonstrate that: (a) a combination of several spectroscopic techniques is of paramount importance in identifying signature structural motifs and (b) quantum chemistry is an extremely powerful guide in cross connecting theory and experiment as well as the homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis fields. It is emphasized that the calculation of spectroscopic observables provides an excellent way for the critical experimental validation of theoretical results. PMID:27062973

  9. Combined experiment and theory approach in surface chemistry: Stairway to heaven?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, Kai S.; Heß, Franziska; Over, Herbert; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo

    2015-10-01

    In this perspective we discuss how an intimate interaction of experiments with theory is able to deepen our insight into the catalytic reaction system on the molecular level. This strategy is illustrated by discussing various examples from our own research of surface chemistry and model catalysis. The particular examples were carefully chosen to balance the specific strength of both approaches - theory and experiment - and emphasize the benefit of this combined approach. We start with the determination of complex surface structures, where diffraction techniques in combination with theory are clear-cut. The promoter action of alkali metals in heterogeneous catalysis is rationalized with theory and experiment for the case of CO coadsorption. Predictive power of theory is limited as demonstrated with the apparent activity of chlorinated TiO2(110) in the oxidation of HCl: Even if we know all elementary reaction steps of a catalytic reaction mechanism, the overall kinetics may remain elusive and require the application kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Catalysts are not always stable under reaction conditions and may chemically transform as discussed for the CO oxidation reaction over ruthenium. Under oxidizing reaction conditions ruthenium transforms into RuO2, a process which is hardly understood on the molecular level. Lastly we focus on electrochemical reactions. Here theory is clearly ahead since spectroscopic methods are not available to resolve the processes at the electrode surface.

  10. Predicting chemical kinetics with computational chemistry: is QOO&(H)rarr;HOQO important in fuel ignition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, William H.; Wijaya, Catherina D.; Yelvington, Paul E.; Sumathi, R.

    An overview of predictive chemical kinetics is presented, with an application to the simulation and design of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines. The engine simulations are sensitive to the details of hydroperoxyalkyl (QOOH) radical chemistry, which are only partially understood, and there is a significant discrepancy between the simulations and experiment that limits the usefulness of the simulations. One possible explanation is that QOOH decomposes by other channels not considered in existing combustion chemistry models. Rate constants for one of these neglected channels, the intramolecular radical attack on the QOOH peroxide linkage to form hydroxyalkoxyl (HOQO) radicals, are predicted using quantum chemistry (CBS-QB3), to test whether or not this proposed channel can explain the observed discrepancies in the engine simulations. Although this channel has a significant rate, the competing attack on the other O atom in the peroxide to form a cyclic ether+OH is computed to be an order of magnitude faster, so the HOQO channel does not appear to be fast enough to explain the discrepancy. Definitive judgement on the importance of this reaction channel will require a careful reconsideration of all the coupled chemically activated QOOH reaction channels using modern predictive chemical kinetics software.

  11. Computational chemistry modeling and design of photoswitchable alignment materials for optically addressable liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, K. L.; Sekera, E. R.; Xiao, K.

    2015-09-01

    Photoalignment technology based on optically switchable "command surfaces" has been receiving increasing interest for liquid crystal optics and photonics device applications. Azobenzene compounds in the form of low-molar-mass, watersoluble salts deposited either directly on the substrate surface or after dispersion in a polymer binder have been almost exclusively employed for these applications, and ongoing research in the area follows a largely empirical materials design and development approach. Recent computational chemistry advances now afford unprecedented opportunities to develop predictive capabilities that will lead to new photoswitchable alignment layer materials with low switching energies, enhanced bistability, write/erase fatigue resistance, and high laser-damage thresholds. In the work described here, computational methods based on the density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory were employed to study the impact of molecular structure on optical switching properties in photoswitchable methacrylate and acrylamide polymers functionalized with azobenzene and spiropyran pendants.

  12. Helicopter fuselage drag - combined computational fluid dynamics and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A.; Kusyumov, A.; Mikhailov, S.; Pakhov, V.; Sungatullin, A.; Valeev, M.; Zherekhov, V.; Barakos, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, wind tunnel experiments are combined with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) aiming to analyze the aerodynamics of realistic fuselage configurations. A development model of the ANSAT aircraft and an early model of the AKTAI light helicopter were employed. Both models were tested at the subsonic wind tunnel of KNRTU-KAI for a range of Reynolds numbers and pitch and yaw angles. The force balance measurements were complemented by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigations for the cases where the experimental force measurements showed substantial unsteadiness. The CFD results were found to be in fair agreement with the test data and revealed some flow separation at the rear of the fuselages. Once confidence on the CFD method was established, further modifications were introduced to the ANSAT-like fuselage model to demonstrate drag reduction via small shape changes.

  13. Heterogeneous processes at the intersection of chemistry and biology: A computational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J

    2008-02-11

    Heterogeneous processes hold the key to understanding many problems in biology and atmospheric science. In particular, recent experiments have shown that heterogeneous chemistry at the surface of sea-salt aerosols plays a large role in important atmospheric processes with far reaching implications towards understanding of the fate and transport of aerosolized chemical weapons (i.e. organophosphates such as sarin and VX). Unfortunately, the precise mechanistic details of the simplest surface enhanced chemical reactions remain unknown. Understanding heterogeneous processes also has implications in the biological sciences. Traditionally, it is accepted that enzymes catalyze reactions by stabilizing the transition state, thereby lowering the free energy barrier. However, recent findings have shown that a multitude of phenomena likely contribute to the efficiency of enzymes, such as coupled protein motion, quantum mechanical tunneling, or strong electrostatic binding. The objective of this project was to develop and validate a single computational framework based on first principles simulations using tera-scale computational resources to answer fundamental scientific questions about heterogeneous chemical processes relevant to atmospheric chemistry and biological sciences.

  14. A Combined Experimental/Computational Investigation of a Rocket Based Combined Cycle Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Michael K.; Trexler, Carl A.; Goldman, Allen L.

    2001-01-01

    A rocket based combined cycle inlet geometry has undergone wind tunnel testing and computational analysis with Mach 4 flow at the inlet face. Performance parameters obtained from the wind tunnel tests were the mass capture, the maximum back-pressure, and the self-starting characteristics of the inlet. The CFD analysis supplied a confirmation of the mass capture, the inlet efficiency and the details of the flowfield structure. Physical parameters varied during the test program were cowl geometry, cowl position, body-side bleed magnitude and ingested boundary layer thickness. An optimum configuration was determined for the inlet as a result of this work.

  15. The Use of Modular Computer-Based Lessons in a Modification of the Classical Introductory Course in Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotter, Philip L.; Culp, George H.

    An experimental course in organic chemistry utilized computer-assisted instructional (CAI) techniques. The CAI lessons provided tutorial drill and practice and simulated experiments and reactions. The Conversational Language for Instruction and Computing was used, along with a CDC 6400-6600 system; students scheduled and completed the lessons at…

  16. Combining Chemical Information Literacy, Communication Skills, Career Preparation, Ethics, and Peer Review in a Team-Taught Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Mary Lou Baker; Seybold, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The widely acknowledged need to include chemical information competencies and communication skills in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum can be accommodated in a variety of ways. We describe a team-taught, semester-length course at Wright State University which combines chemical information literacy, written and oral communication skills,…

  17. A Unique Master's Program in Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarnemark, Gunnar; Allard, Stefan; Ekberg, Christian; Nordlund, Anders

    2009-08-01

    The need for engineers and scientists who can ensure safe and secure use of nuclear energy is large in Sweden and internationally. Chalmers University of Technology is therefore launching a new 2-year master's program in Nuclear Engineering, with start from the autumn of 2009. The program is open to Swedish and foreign students. The program starts with compulsory courses dealing with the basics of nuclear chemistry and physics, radiation protection, nuclear power and reactors, nuclear fuel supply, nuclear waste management and nuclear safety and security. There are also compulsory courses in nuclear industry applications and sustainable energy futures. The subsequent elective courses can be chosen freely but there is also a possibility to choose informal tracks that concentrate on nuclear chemistry or reactor technology and physics. The nuclear chemistry track comprises courses in e.g. chemistry of lanthanides, actinides and transactinides, solvent extraction, radioecology and radioanalytical chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals. The program is finished with a one semester thesis project. This is probably a unique master program in the sense of its combination of deep courses in both nuclear technology and nuclear chemistry.

  18. New Combined Laser Ablation Platform Determines Cell Wall Chemistry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    NREL has designed and developed a combined laser ablation/pulsed sample introduction/mass spectrometry platform that integrates pyrolysis and/or laser ablation with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Using this apparatus, we can measure the cell wall chemical composition of untreated biomass materials. Understanding the chemical composition of untreated biomass is key to both the biochemical and thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels. In the biochemical conversion process, the new technique provides a better understanding of the chemistry of lignin and will improve accessibility to plant sugars. In thermochemical conversion, the information provided by the new technique may help to reduce the formation of unwanted byproducts during gasification. NREL validated the ability of the system to detect pyrolysis products from plant materials using poplar, a potentially high-impact bioenergy feedstock. In the technique, biomass vapors are produced by laser ablation using the 3rd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (355 nm). The resulting vapors are entrained in a free jet expansion of helium, then skimmed and introduced into an ionization region. REMPI is used to ionize the vapors because it is highly sensitive for detecting lignin and aromatic metabolites. The laser ablation method was used to selectively volatilize specific plant tissues and detect lignin-based products from the vapors with enhanced sensitivity. This will allow the determination of lignin distribution in future biomass studies.

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  20. Combining coordination and supramolecular chemistry for the formation of uranyl-organic hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Deifel, N. P.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Three hybrid compounds have been synthesized through hydrothermal reactions of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O with 4-halobenzoic acid (X = Cl, Br, I). The formation of these compounds utilizes a composite synthesis methodology that explicitly employs aspects of both coordination chemistry and supramolecular chemistry (namely halogen---halogen interactions).

  1. FOREWORD: Third Nordic Symposium on Computer Simulation in Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaski, K.; Salomaa, M.

    1990-01-01

    These are Proceedings of the Third Nordic Symposium on Computer Simulation in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Mathematics, held August 25-26, 1989, at Lahti (Finland). The Symposium belongs to an annual series of Meetings, the first one of which was arranged in 1987 at Lund (Sweden) and the second one in 1988 at Kolle-Kolle near Copenhagen (Denmark). Although these Symposia have thus far been essentially Nordic events, their international character has increased significantly; the trend is vividly reflected through contributions in the present Topical Issue. The interdisciplinary nature of Computational Science is central to the activity; this fundamental aspect is also responsible, in an essential way, for its rapidly increasing impact. Crucially important to a wide spectrum of superficially disparate fields is the common need for extensive - and often quite demanding - computational modelling. For such theoretical models, no closed-form (analytical) solutions are available or they would be extremely difficult to find; hence one must rather resort to the Art of performing computational investigations. Among the unifying features in the computational research are the methods of simulation employed; methods which frequently are quite closely related with each other even for faculties of science that are quite unrelated. Computer simulation in Natural Sciences is presently apprehended as a discipline on its own right, occupying a broad region somewhere between the experimental and theoretical methods, but also partially overlapping with and complementing them. - Whichever its proper definition may be, the computational approach serves as a novel and an extremely versatile tool with which one can equally well perform "pure" experimental modelling and conduct "computational theory". Computational studies that have earlier been made possible only through supercomputers have opened unexpected, as well as exciting, novel frontiers equally in mathematics (e.g., fractals

  2. The Combined Effects of Classroom Teaching and Learning Strategy Use on Students' Chemistry Self-Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Derek

    2015-02-01

    For students to be successful in school chemistry, a strong sense of self-efficacy is essential. Chemistry self-efficacy can be defined as students' beliefs about the extent to which they are capable of performing specific chemistry tasks. According to Bandura (Psychol. Rev. 84:191-215, 1977), students acquire information about their level of self-efficacy from four sources: performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and physiological states. No published studies have investigated how instructional strategies in chemistry lessons can provide students with positive experiences with these four sources of self-efficacy information and how the instructional strategies promote students' chemistry self-efficacy. In this study, questionnaire items were constructed to measure student perceptions about instructional strategies, termed efficacy-enhancing teaching, which can provide positive experiences with the four sources of self-efficacy information. Structural equation modeling was then applied to test a hypothesized mediation model, positing that efficacy-enhancing teaching positively affects students' chemistry self-efficacy through their use of deep learning strategies such as metacognitive control strategies. A total of 590 chemistry students at nine secondary schools in Hong Kong participated in the survey. The mediation model provided a good fit to the student data. Efficacy-enhancing teaching had a direct effect on students' chemistry self-efficacy. Efficacy-enhancing teaching also directly affected students' use of deep learning strategies, which in turn affected students' chemistry self-efficacy. The implications of these findings for developing secondary school students' chemistry self-efficacy are discussed.

  3. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-grained protein folding.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Frank C; Miller, Benjamin T; Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) Gō-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the Gō-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG Gō model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field. PMID:25058338

  4. Web-Based Computational Chemistry Education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-Grained Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) G-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the G-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG G model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field. PMID:25058338

  5. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  6. Computational simulation of CV combination preferences in babbling

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hosung; Goldstein, Louis M.; Giulivi, Sara; Levitt, Andrea G.; Whalen, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    There is a tendency for spoken consonant-vowel (CV) syllables, in babbling in particular, to show preferred combinations: labial consonants with central vowels, alveolars with front, and velars with back. This pattern was first described by MacNeilage and Davis, who found the evidence compatible with their “frame-then-content” (F/C) model. F/C postulates that CV syllables in babbling are produced with no control of the tongue (and therefore effectively random tongue positions) but systematic oscillation of the jaw. Articulatory Phonology (AP; Browman & Goldstein) predicts that CV preferences will depend on the degree of synergy of tongue movements for the C and V. We present computational modeling of both accounts using articulatory synthesis. Simulations found better correlations between patterns in babbling and the AP account than with the F/C model. These results indicate that the underlying assumptions of the F/C model are not supported and that the AP account provides a better and account with broader coverage by showing that articulatory synergies influence all CV syllables, not just the most common ones. PMID:24496111

  7. Absorption spectra of riboflavin--a difficult case for computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Eriksson, Leif A

    2010-09-23

    Computing accurate absorption spectra of riboflavin (RBF) has proven a difficult task for computational chemistry. Time-dependent density functional theory have herein been employed using a wide range of recent range-separated and hybrid meta functionals to investigate ultraviolet and visible spectra of RBF to determine if any progress has been made through recent developments. It is concluded that B3LYP and PBE0 perform the best throughout the entire test set. However, since all methods deviate from experimental results by at least 40 nm when computing the spectra in vacuum, two approaches to describe aqueous solution are implemented together with the MPWB1K, B3LYP, and PBE0 functionals: implicitly using integral equation formulation of the polarized continuum model (minor improvement) and explicitly through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the molecule embedded in a water cluster whereafter snapshots of RBF-water clusters are extracted and time-dependent density functional theory calculations performed. The resulting averaged spectra from the MD-simulated clusters show a constant blue-shift for all peaks by ∼20 nm compared to experimental data at the TD-B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. PMID:20718485

  8. Combining Chemistry and Music to Engage Student Interest: Using Songs to Accompany Selected Chemical Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Last, Arthur M.

    2009-01-01

    The use of recorded music to add interest to a variety of lecture topics is described. Topics include the periodic table, the formation of ionic compounds, thermodynamics, carbohydrates, nuclear chemistry, and qualitative analysis. (Contains 1 note.)

  9. The structural chemistry of metallocorroles: combined X-ray crystallography and quantum chemistry studies afford unique insights.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kolle E; Alemayehu, Abraham B; Conradie, Jeanet; Beavers, Christine M; Ghosh, Abhik

    2012-08-21

    Although they share some superficial structural similarities with porphyrins, corroles, trianionic ligands with contracted cores, give rise to fundamentally different transition metal complexes in comparison with the dianionic porphyrins. Many metallocorroles are formally high-valent, although a good fraction of them are also noninnocent, with significant corrole radical character. These electronic-structural characteristics result in a variety of fascinating spectroscopic behavior, including highly characteristic, paramagnetically shifted NMR spectra and textbook cases of charge-transfer spectra. Although our early research on corroles focused on spectroscopy, we soon learned that the geometric structures of metallocorroles provide a fascinating window into their electronic-structural characteristics. Thus, we used X-ray structure determinations and quantum chemical studies, chiefly using DFT, to obtain a comprehensive understanding of metallocorrole geometric and electronic structures. This Account describes our studies of the structural chemistry of metallocorroles. At first blush, the planar or mildly domed structure of metallocorroles might appear somewhat uninteresting particularly when compared to metalloporphyrins. Metalloporphyrins, especially sterically hindered ones, are routinely ruffled or saddled, but the missing meso carbon apparently makes the corrole skeleton much more resistant to nonplanar distortions. Ruffling, where the pyrrole rings are alternately twisted about the M-N bonds, is energetically impossible for metallocorroles. Saddling is also uncommon; thus, a number of sterically hindered, fully substituted metallocorroles exhibit almost perfectly planar macrocycle cores. Against this backdrop, copper corroles stand out as an important exception. As a result of an energetically favorable Cu(d(x2-y2))-corrole(π) orbital interaction, copper corroles, even sterically unhindered ones, are inherently saddled. Sterically hindered substituents

  10. Bromine and heavy halide chemistry at the air/water and air/ice interfaces: a computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Shepson, P. B.; Szleifer, I.; Carignano, M.

    2010-12-01

    The air-water and air-ice interfaces are critically important surfaces, with respect to the physical and chemical properties of the Earth's atmosphere. In particular chloride, bromide and iodide ions are strongly involved in the reactions occurring at aerosol surfaces that are hydrated and at the air-ice interface in the polar boundary layer. Unfortunately, experimental access to these interfaces are quite problematic and the computational approach, based on molecular dynamic simulations and quantum mechanic calculations, is an interesting alternative approach. In this work, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are used to study the halide enhancements at the air-water interface in the case of a dilute mixture of iodide, bromide and chloride ions. The MD results show how the air- water halide enhancement is different in the case of mixtures from the case of binary solutions (i.e. anions plus counter-positive ions) and how the presence of these halides at the interfaces depends from their relative concentrations in solution. In detail, heavy halides are strongly enhanced at the interfaces even if they are minor constituents in the bulk. Furthermore the enhancement of the larger halide ions, like bromide, at the surface is greater if lighter halides, like chloride, are in greater excess in the bulk. The applications of this last result on some real system, like sea-water, and the importance of bromide ions in the polar chemistry of ozone depletion events suggest a combined approach, MD and quantum mechanism (QM) calculation, to investigate the ozonation reaction of bromide (Br-+O3 → BrO-+O2 ) in the ice-QLL and in bulk water. The study of the reaction constants suggests how the different environments can affect the kinetics of such reaction. These results can help to understand the complex chemistry occurring at the air-water interface of hydrated aerosol and at the air-ice interface in the polar boundary layer.

  11. Toward Computational Cumulative Biology by Combining Models of Biological Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Ali; Peltonen, Jaakko; Georgii, Elisabeth; Rung, Johan; Kaski, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    A main challenge of data-driven sciences is how to make maximal use of the progressively expanding databases of experimental datasets in order to keep research cumulative. We introduce the idea of a modeling-based dataset retrieval engine designed for relating a researcher's experimental dataset to earlier work in the field. The search is (i) data-driven to enable new findings, going beyond the state of the art of keyword searches in annotations, (ii) modeling-driven, to include both biological knowledge and insights learned from data, and (iii) scalable, as it is accomplished without building one unified grand model of all data. Assuming each dataset has been modeled beforehand, by the researchers or automatically by database managers, we apply a rapidly computable and optimizable combination model to decompose a new dataset into contributions from earlier relevant models. By using the data-driven decomposition, we identify a network of interrelated datasets from a large annotated human gene expression atlas. While tissue type and disease were major driving forces for determining relevant datasets, the found relationships were richer, and the model-based search was more accurate than the keyword search; moreover, it recovered biologically meaningful relationships that are not straightforwardly visible from annotations—for instance, between cells in different developmental stages such as thymocytes and T-cells. Data-driven links and citations matched to a large extent; the data-driven links even uncovered corrections to the publication data, as two of the most linked datasets were not highly cited and turned out to have wrong publication entries in the database. PMID:25427176

  12. Interactive computer modeling of combustion chemistry and coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computer code for simulation of a high-intensity turbulent combustor as a single point inhomogeneous stirred reactor was developed from an existing batch processing computer code CDPSR. The interactive CDPSR code was used as a guide for interpretation and direction of DOE-sponsored companion experiments utilizing Xenon tracer with optical laser diagnostic techniques to experimentally determine the appropriate mixing frequency, and for validation of CDPSR as a mixing-chemistry model for a laboratory jet-stirred reactor. The coalescence-dispersion model for finite rate mixing was incorporated into an existing interactive code AVCO-MARK I, to enable simulation of a combustor as a modular array of stirred flow and plug flow elements, each having a prescribed finite mixing frequency, or axial distribution of mixing frequency, as appropriate. Further increase the speed and reliability of the batch kinetics integrator code CREKID was increased by rewriting in vectorized form for execution on a vector or parallel processor, and by incorporating numerical techniques which enhance execution speed by permitting specification of a very low accuracy tolerance.

  13. Characterization of High Explosives and Other Energetic Compounds by Computational Chemistry and Molecular Modeling: Experiments for Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumpus, John A.; Lewis, Anne; Stotts, Corey; Cramer, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments suited for the undergraduate instructional laboratory in which the heats of formation of several aliphatic and aromatic compounds are calculated, are described. The experiments could be used to introduce students to commercially available computational chemistry and its thermodynamics, while assess and compare the energy content of…

  14. Introductory Molecular Orbital Theory: An Honors General Chemistry Computational Lab as Implemented Using Three-Dimensional Modeling Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruddick, Kristie R.; Parrill, Abby L.; Petersen, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computational molecular orbital theory experiment was implemented in a first-semester honors general chemistry course. Students used the GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) quantum mechanical software (as implemented in ChemBio3D) to optimize the geometry for various small molecules. Extended Huckel…

  15. Using an Advanced Computational Laboratory Experiment to Extend and Deepen Physical Chemistry Students' Understanding of Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    A computational laboratory experiment is described, which involves the advanced study of an atomic system. The students use concepts and techniques typically covered in a physical chemistry course but extend those concepts and techniques to more complex situations. The students get a chance to explore the study of atomic states and perform…

  16. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES FOR MINERALS AND XENOBIOTICS: USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY AND VIRTUAL REALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter we review the literature on scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (VR), and computational chemistry and our earlier work dealing with modeling lignin, lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC), humic substances (HSs) and non-bonded organo-mineral interactions...

  17. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 3: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Cynthia J.

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on chemical equilibrium calculations includes objectives, prerequisites, a discussion of the equilibrium constant (K), and ten…

  18. Solutions, Unit 5: Colligative Properties of Solutions. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, Morris

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student manual for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on the colligative properties of solutions includes objectives, prerequisites, pretest, discussion, and 20 problem sets. Included in…

  19. Combining human and computer interpretation capabilities to analyze ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The human photointerpreter and the computer have complementary capabilities that are exploited in a computer-based data analysis system developed at the Forestry Remote Sensing Laboratory, University of California. This system is designed to optimize the process of extracting resource information from ERTS images. The human has the ability to quickly delineate gross differences in land classes, such as wildland, urban, and agriculture on appropriate ERTS images, and to further break these gross classes into meaningful subclasses. The computer, however, can more efficiently analyze point-by-point spectral information and localized textural information which can result in a much more detailed agricultural or wildland classification based on species composition and/or plant association. These human and computer capabilities have been integrated through the use of an inexpensive small scale computer dedicated to the interactive preprocessing of the human inputs and the display of raw ERTS images and computer classified images. The small computer is linked to a large scale computer system wherein the bulk of the statistical work and the automatic point-by-point classification is done.

  20. Improving Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure through Broad-Based Use of Computer Models in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Several articles suggest how to incorporate computer models into the organic chemistry laboratory, but relatively few papers discuss how to incorporate these models broadly into the organic chemistry lecture. Previous research has suggested that "manipulating" physical or computer models enhances student understanding; this study…

  1. Combining high performance simulation, data acquisition, and graphics display computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Issues involved in the continuing development of an advanced simulation complex are discussed. This approach provides the capability to perform the majority of tests on advanced systems, non-destructively. The controlled test environments can be replicated to examine the response of the systems under test to alternative treatments of the system control design, or test the function and qualification of specific hardware. Field tests verify that the elements simulated in the laboratories are sufficient. The digital computer is hosted by a Digital Equipment Corp. MicroVAX computer with an Aptec Computer Systems Model 24 I/O computer performing the communication function. An Applied Dynamics International AD100 performs the high speed simulation computing and an Evans and Sutherland PS350 performs on-line graphics display. A Scientific Computer Systems SCS40 acts as a high performance FORTRAN program processor to support the complex, by generating numerous large files from programs coded in FORTRAN that are required for the real time processing. Four programming languages are involved in the process, FORTRAN, ADSIM, ADRIO, and STAPLE. FORTRAN is employed on the MicroVAX host to initialize and terminate the simulation runs on the system. The generation of the data files on the SCS40 also is performed with FORTRAN programs. ADSIM and ADIRO are used to program the processing elements of the AD100 and its IOCP processor. STAPLE is used to program the Aptec DIP and DIA processors.

  2. The use of computer-aided learning in chemistry laboratory instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Brian Robert Tracy

    This research involves developing and implementing computer software for chemistry laboratory instruction. The specific goal is to design the software and investigate whether it can be used to introduce concepts and laboratory procedures without a lecture format. This would allow students to conduct an experiment even though they may not have been introduced to the chemical concept in their lecture course. This would also allow for another type of interaction for those students who respond more positively to a visual approach to instruction. The first module developed was devoted to using computer software to help introduce students to the concepts related to thin-layer chromatography and setting up and running an experiment. This was achieved through the use of digitized pictures and digitized video clips along with written information. A review quiz was used to help reinforce the learned information. The second module was devoted to the concept of the "dry lab". This module presented students with relevant information regarding the chemical concepts and then showed them the outcome of mixing solutions. By these observations, they were to determine the composition of unknown solutions based on provided descriptions and comparison with their written observations. The third piece of the software designed was a computer game. This program followed the first two modules in providing information the students were to learn. The difference here, though, was incorporating a game scenario for students to use to help reinforce the learning. Students were then assessed to see how much information they retained after playing the game. In each of the three cases, a control group exposed to the traditional lecture format was used. Their results were compared to the experimental group using the computer modules. Based upon the findings, it can be concluded that using technology to aid in the instructional process is definitely of benefit and students were more successful in

  3. Final report summary of LDRD 02-LW-022''Quantum Vibrations in Molecules: A New Frontier in Computational Chemistry''

    SciTech Connect

    Glaesemann, K R

    2004-01-22

    With the trend towards needing information about chemistry at conditions significantly different from 298K and 1 atm., methods need to be developed to generate and interpret this data. This demand for information about chemistry at extreme conditions comes from many fields. The study of atmospheric chemistry requires knowledge of unusual species that are formed when molecules are exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Studying of energetic materials requires knowledge of the thermochemical and structural properties of a myriad of chemical species under a wide range of temperatures. Basic scientific understanding of the very nature of a chemical bond requires detailed information. Studying these problems computationally requires multiple capabilities. The methodology used must provide both high accuracy and computational efficiency. Studying extreme chemistry also suffers from all the challenges of studying chemistry under non-extreme conditions. Therefore, either a new method must be developed or an old method must be applied in an innovative way. The method we have chosen to use is path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) for the nuclear degrees of freedom and ab initio electronic structure methods for the electronic degrees of freedom. PIMC and ab initio electronic structure are methods of treating the quantum nature of particles. These methods have been chosen, because an accurate treatment requires treating both the electrons and the nuclei as quantum particles. We developed new ''projected'' methods that reduce the computational demands. These methods along with PIMC in general are described in two Journal of Chemical Physics articles (UCRL-JC-144960 and UCRL-JC-147423). This methodology was implemented into a PIMC code developed as part of this LDRD. The code was parallelized in order to utilize the computational resources of LLNL.

  4. Computing gas solubility in reservoir waters for environmental chemistry applications: the role of satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, R.; Lima, I.; Ramos, F.; Bambace, L.; Assireu, A.; Stech, J.; Novo, E.; Lorenzeti, L.

    Atmospheric greenhouse gases concentration has increased during the past centuries basically due to biogenic and pyrogenic anthopogenic emissions Recent investigations have shown that gas emission methane as an important example from tropical hydroelectric reservoirs may comprise a considerable fraction of the total anthropogenic bulk In order to evaluate the concentration of gases of potential importance in environmental chemistry the solubility of such gases have been collected and converted into a uniform format using the Henry s law which states that the solubility of a gas in a liquid is directly proportional to its partial pressure However the Henry s law can be derived as a function of temperature density molar mixing ratio in the aqueous phase and molar mass of water In this paper we show that due to the complex temperature variation and water composition measured in brazilian tropical reservoirs as Serra da Mesa and Manso expressive secular variation on the traditional solubility constants concentration of a species in the aqueous phase by the partial pressure of that species in the gas phase can change in a rate of approximately 30 in 6 decades This estimation comes from a computational analysis of temperature variation measured during 6 months in Serra da Mesa and Manso reservoirs taking into account a simulated density and molar mass variation of the aqueous composition in these environments As an important global change issue from this preliminary analysis we discuss its role in the current estimations on the concentration emission rates

  5. Computational chemistry insights in the REDOX Behaviour of Cr and W Fischer carbene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, Marile; Conradie, Jeanet; van Rooyen, Petrus H.

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical study of a series of Fischer carbene complexes containing a hetero-aryl group showed that Cr and W carbenes exhibit different electrochemical behaviour. The Cr carbenes are oxidized in two one electron oxidation processes, namely Cr(0) to Cr(I) and Cr(I) to Cr(II). On the contrary, Fischer carbene complexes of tungsten are directly oxidized from W(0) to W(II). The first reduction process observed for both W- and Cr- carbenes, is a one electron process. A density functional theory (DFT) computational chemistry study of the electronic structure of the Cr- and W-carbenes, showed that the oxidation is metal based and the reduction is located on the carbene ligand. The DFT calculations further showed that the Cr(II) species is a triplet and the W(II) species a closed shell singlet. The DFT calculated energies of the HOMO and LUMO of the neutral carbenes relate linearly to the experimental oxidation and reduction potential, respectively. These mathematical relationships obtained can be used to predict experimentally measured potentials of related Fischer carbene complexes.

  6. Web-Based Computational Chemistry Education with CHARMMing III: Reduction Potentials of Electron Transfer Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, B. Scott; Miller, Benjamin T.; Schalk, Vinushka; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org). The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis. PMID:25058418

  7. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing III: Reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Perrin, B Scott; Miller, Benjamin T; Schalk, Vinushka; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2014-07-01

    A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org). The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis. PMID:25058418

  8. Excitons in a photosynthetic light-harvesting system: A combined molecular dynamics, quantum chemistry, and polaron model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damjanović, Ana; Kosztin, Ioan; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions in light-harvesting complexes is studied with an approach that combines molecular dynamics simulations with quantum chemistry calculations and a polaron model analysis. The molecular dynamics simulation of light-harvesting (LH) complexes was performed on an 87 055 atom system comprised of a LH-II complex of Rhodospirillum molischianum embedded in a lipid bilayer and surrounded with appropriate water layers. For each of the 16 B850 bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), we performed 400 ab initio quantum chemistry calculations on geometries that emerged from the molecular dynamical simulations, determining the fluctuations of pigment excitation energies as a function of time. From the results of these calculations we construct a time-dependent Hamiltonian of the B850 exciton system from which we determine within linear response theory the absorption spectrum. Finally, a polaron model is introduced to describe both the excitonic and coupled phonon degrees of freedom by quantum mechanics. The exciton-phonon coupling that enters into the polaron model, and the corresponding phonon spectral function, are derived from the molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations. The model predicts that excitons in the B850 BChl ring are delocalized over five pigments at room temperature. Also, the polaron model permits the calculation of the absorption and circular dichroism spectra of the B850 excitons from the sole knowledge of the autocorrelation function of the excitation energies of individual BChls, which is readily available from the combined molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations. The obtained results are found to be in good agreement with the experimentally measured absorption and circular dichroism spectra.

  9. Chemistry for Kids: Generating Carbon Dioxide in Elementary School Chemistry and Using a Computer To Write about It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.; Yoshida, Sarah

    This material describes an activity using vinegar and baking soda to generate carbon dioxide, and writing a report using the Appleworks word processing program for grades 3 to 8 students. Time requirement, relevant process skills, vocabulary, mathematics skills, computer skills, and materials are listed. Activity procedures including class…

  10. Combining Computational and Social Effort for Collaborative Problem Solving

    PubMed Central

    Wagy, Mark D.; Bongard, Josh C.

    2015-01-01

    Rather than replacing human labor, there is growing evidence that networked computers create opportunities for collaborations of people and algorithms to solve problems beyond either of them. In this study, we demonstrate the conditions under which such synergy can arise. We show that, for a design task, three elements are sufficient: humans apply intuitions to the problem, algorithms automatically determine and report back on the quality of designs, and humans observe and innovate on others’ designs to focus creative and computational effort on good designs. This study suggests how such collaborations should be composed for other domains, as well as how social and computational dynamics mutually influence one another during collaborative problem solving. PMID:26544199

  11. Combining Computational and Social Effort for Collaborative Problem Solving.

    PubMed

    Wagy, Mark D; Bongard, Josh C

    2015-01-01

    Rather than replacing human labor, there is growing evidence that networked computers create opportunities for collaborations of people and algorithms to solve problems beyond either of them. In this study, we demonstrate the conditions under which such synergy can arise. We show that, for a design task, three elements are sufficient: humans apply intuitions to the problem, algorithms automatically determine and report back on the quality of designs, and humans observe and innovate on others' designs to focus creative and computational effort on good designs. This study suggests how such collaborations should be composed for other domains, as well as how social and computational dynamics mutually influence one another during collaborative problem solving. PMID:26544199

  12. Factors associated with computer and Internet technology implementation in biology, chemistry, and physics education in Turkish secondary schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Melike

    The main purposes of the research were to identify computer and Internet use by biology, chemistry and physics teachers in Turkish secondary schools and identify factors associated with computer and Internet technology. To this end, survey documents were sent by the Provincial Directorate of National Education to 250 selected schools' administrators for further distribution. Administrators were asked to complete the "Computer and Internet Use: School Survey," and to distribute the "Science Teacher Computer and Internet Use" surveys to the two teachers who teach science class. Surveys were then returned to the General Directorate of Educational Technologies. Research findings showed that computer and Internet use has not occurred effectively. Computers were first introduced to Turkish schools in 1984; unfortunately the current situation of computer and Internet use in science education is not at the projected earlier point in time. Considering the fact that science teachers' participation in technology-related professional development program is higher than other subject teachers, the use of computer and Internet technologies in Turkish secondary schools is still at its early stages. Lack of computer knowledge and not knowing how to integrate computers into education were the major factors reported. With regard to computer and Internet use, a regression model for Turkish schools, which includes access and knowledge, explains a large part of the variance in study results. There was a significant relationship between computer attitude (computer liking, usefulness, and confidence) and computer and Internet use. Although there was a significant negative relationship between Internet and computer uses and the attitudinal component, computer anxiety, it did not deter individuals from expressing a desire to engage in computer use in education.

  13. Computer-Based Sentence-Combining Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Regional Laboratory for Educational Research and Development, Los Alamitos, CA.

    As part of a larger investigation into the use of microcomputers in composition instruction, this report focuses on one instructional technique--sentence combining. Consisting of four parts, the report first provides the courseware and operating manual developed from the project. The second part includes specifications for instruction and content.…

  14. Combining dynamical decoupling with fault-tolerant quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Hui Khoon; Preskill, John; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-07-15

    We study how dynamical decoupling (DD) pulse sequences can improve the reliability of quantum computers. We prove upper bounds on the accuracy of DD-protected quantum gates and derive sufficient conditions for DD-protected gates to outperform unprotected gates. Under suitable conditions, fault-tolerant quantum circuits constructed from DD-protected gates can tolerate stronger noise and have a lower overhead cost than fault-tolerant circuits constructed from unprotected gates. Our accuracy estimates depend on the dynamics of the bath that couples to the quantum computer and can be expressed either in terms of the operator norm of the bath's Hamiltonian or in terms of the power spectrum of bath correlations; we explain in particular how the performance of recursively generated concatenated pulse sequences can be analyzed from either viewpoint. Our results apply to Hamiltonian noise models with limited spatial correlations.

  15. Preparation of a tetrazolyl monolithic column via the combination of ATRP and click chemistry for the separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lei, Huan; Bai, Ligai; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Gengliang

    2014-01-01

    Tetrazolyl monolithic column is first prepared through the combination of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and "click chemistry" technique. In the ATRP fabrication process, vinyl ester resin is used as both the monomer and the cross-linking agent, and cetyl alcohol is used as the porogen, carbon tetrachloride as the initiator and ferrous chloride as the catalyst. The monolith is modified by click chemistry, which forms the tetrazolyl monolithic column. The chemical group of the prepared monolith is assayed by infrared spectroscopy, and its internal morphology is investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The pore size distribution is determined by a mercury porosimeter. What is more, the monolithic column was used as the stationary phase during high-performance liquid chromatography. Moreover, the monolith is used to separate lysozyme (Lys) from egg whites in a short time period (4 min). At the same time, the influences of buffer concentration and pH value on the elution of Lys are investigated. In addition, human serum albumin is successfully separated from human plasma by the prepared monoliths. The results show that click chemistry is an efficient method to modify the monoliths prepared by ATRP. PMID:24388861

  16. Cathepsin B Inhibitors: Combining Dipeptide Nitriles with an Occluding Loop Recognition Element by Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Janina; Li, Tianwei; Bartz, Ulrike; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-03-10

    An active site mapping of human cathepsin B with dipeptide nitrile inhibitors was performed for a combinatorial approach by introducing several points of diversity and stepwise optimizing the inhibitor structure. To address the occluding loop of cathepsin B by a carboxylate moiety, click chemistry to generate linker-connected molecules was applied. Inhibitor 17 exhibited K i values of 41.3 nM, 27.3 nM, or 19.2 nM, depending on the substrate and pH of the assay. Kinetic data were discussed with respect to the conformational selection and induced fit models. PMID:26985300

  17. Implementation of Protocols To Enable Doctoral Training in Physical and Computational Chemistry of a Blind Graduate Student

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There exists a sparse representation of blind and low-vision students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. This is due in part to these individuals being discouraged from pursuing STEM degrees as well as a lack of appropriate adaptive resources in upper level STEM courses and research. Mona Minkara is a rising fifth year graduate student in computational chemistry at the University of Florida. She is also blind. This account presents efforts conducted by an expansive team of university and student personnel in conjunction with Mona to adapt different portions of the graduate student curriculum to meet Mona’s needs. The most important consideration is prior preparation of materials to assist with coursework and cumulative exams. Herein we present an account of the first four years of Mona’s graduate experience hoping this will assist in the development of protocols for future blind and low-vision graduate students in computational chemistry. PMID:26300560

  18. Combinatorial computational chemistry approach as a promising method for design of Fischer Tropsch catalysts based on Fe and Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosludov, Rodion V.; Sakahara, Satoshi; Yajima, Kenji; Takami, Seiichi; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2002-04-01

    The combinatorial computational chemistry approach was applied to design new types of catalysts, which can be used in the Fisher-Tropsh (FT) synthesis for the production of ecologically high-quality transportation fuels. For this purpose, the density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the CO adsorption on Fe- and Co-based multi-component catalysts. The energetic, electronic and structural properties of CO on the catalyst surfaces were calculated. It was found that Mn, Mo, and Zr could be used as additional elements in the Fe- and Co-based catalysts, since one cannot observe a degradation of the adsorption properties of the active sites as well as showing a high sulfur tolerance. For the Co-based catalyst, the same tendency is also found in the case of the Si promoter. The obtained results are in agreement with available experimental data that confirmed the validity of combinatorial computational chemistry approach.

  19. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  20. Zwitterionic polymer functionalization of polysulfone membrane with improved antifouling property and blood compatibility by combination of ATRP and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tao; Lu, Ting; Xie, Yi; Zhao, Wei-Feng; Sun, Shu-Dong; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    The chemical compositions are very important for designing blood-contacting membranes with good antifouling property and blood compatibility. In this study, we propose a method combining ATRP and click chemistry to introduce zwitterionic polymer of poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA), negatively charged polymers of poly(sodium methacrylate) (PNaMAA) and/or poly(sodium p-styrene sulfonate) (PNaSS), to improve the antifouling property and blood compatibility of polysulfone (PSf) membranes. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle results confirmed the successful grafting of the functional polymers. The antifouling property and blood compatibility of the modified membranes were systematically investigated. The zwitterionic polymer (PSBMA) grafted membranes showed good resistance to protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion; the negatively charged polymer (PNaSS or PNaMAA) grafted membranes showed improved blood compatibility, especially the anticoagulant property. Moreover, the PSBMA/PNaMAA modified membrane showed both antifouling property and anticoagulant property, and exhibited a synergistic effect in inhibiting blood coagulation. The functionalization of membrane surfaces by a combination of ATRP and click chemistry is demonstrated as an effective route to improve the antifouling property and blood compatibility of membranes in blood-contact. PMID:27039977

  1. A Titanium-Organic Framework as an Exemplar of Combining the Chemistry of Metal- and Covalent-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha L; Gándara, Felipe; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Doan, Tan L H; Cordova, Kyle E; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-04-01

    A crystalline material with a two-dimensional structure, termed metal-organic framework-901 (MOF-901), was prepared using a strategy that combines the chemistry of MOFs and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs). This strategy involves in situ generation of an amine-functionalized titanium oxo cluster, Ti6O6(OCH3)6(AB)6 (AB = 4-aminobenzoate), which was linked with benzene-1,4-dialdehyde using imine condensation reactions, typical of COFs. The crystal structure of MOF-901 is composed of hexagonal porous layers that are likely stacked in staggered conformation (hxl topology). This MOF represents the first example of combining metal cluster chemistry with dynamic organic covalent bond formation to give a new crystalline, extended framework of titanium metal, which is rarely used in MOFs. The incorporation of Ti(IV) units made MOF-901 useful in the photocatalyzed polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA). The resulting polyMMA product was obtained with a high-number-average molar mass (26 850 g mol(-1)) and low polydispersity index (1.6), which in many respects are better than those achieved by the commercially available photocatalyst (P-25 TiO2). Additionally, the catalyst can be isolated, reused, and recycled with no loss in performance. PMID:26998612

  2. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  3. Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiufeng

    2006-01-01

    Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry…

  4. Designing a Scalable Fault Tolerance Model for High Performance Computational Chemistry: A Case Study with Coupled Cluster Perturbative Triples.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Hubertus J J; Vishnu, Abhinav; de Jong, Wibe A

    2011-01-11

    In the past couple of decades, the massive computational power provided by the most modern supercomputers has resulted in simulation of higher-order computational chemistry methods, previously considered intractable. As the system sizes continue to increase, the computational chemistry domain continues to escalate this trend using parallel computing with programming models such as Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming models such as Global Arrays. The ever increasing scale of these supercomputers comes at a cost of reduced Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF), currently on the order of days and projected to be on the order of hours for upcoming extreme scale systems. While traditional disk-based check pointing methods are ubiquitous for storing intermediate solutions, they suffer from high overhead of writing and recovering from checkpoints. In practice, checkpointing itself often brings the system down. Clearly, methods beyond checkpointing are imperative to handling the aggravating issue of reducing MTBF. In this paper, we address this challenge by designing and implementing an efficient fault tolerant version of the Coupled Cluster (CC) method with NWChem, using in-memory data redundancy. We present the challenges associated with our design, including an efficient data storage model, maintenance of at least one consistent data copy, and the recovery process. Our performance evaluation without faults shows that the current design exhibits a small overhead. In the presence of a simulated fault, the proposed design incurs negligible overhead in comparison to the state of the art implementation without faults. PMID:26606219

  5. A computer model study of multiphase chemistry in the Arctic boundary layer during polar sunrise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalowski, Brian A.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Li, Shao-Meng; Barrie, Leonard A.; Bottenheim, Jan W.; Shepson, Paul B.

    2000-06-01

    A multiphase chemical box model of Arctic halogen chemistry has been developed using a PC-based modeling program developed by Environment Canada called the Chemical Reactions Modeling System (CREAMS). The multiphase model contains 125 gas phase reactions, 19 photolysis reactions, and 16 aqueous reactions occurring in suspended aerosol particles and the quasi-liquid component of snow. The model simulates mass transfer of species between the gas phase and particles, and between the gas phase and the snowpack. Model simulations were conducted for the Arctic for the period April 16 to April 24 at 245 K within a 400 m boundary layer. The complete model simulates halogen-catalyzed ozone depletion within 5 days from the start of the model run, via known gas and heterogeneous phase activation mechanisms. A critically important model reaction is BrO + HCHO → HOBr + CHO, which has a substantial impact on gas phase HOBr, and subsequent condensed phase chemistry. When coupled with a necessary snowpack efflux of aldehydes, required to maintain the aldehyde concentrations at observed levels, the new BrO chemistry has a significant impact on the concentrations of gas phase bromine species, particle bromide, and chlorine atoms, through chemistry occurring in the snowpack. We also find that O3 depletion cannot be simulated without the presence of heterogeneous halogen chemistry occurring in the snowpack and that the rate of O3 depletion is limited by the mass transfer rate of HOBr to the snowpack.

  6. Cheminformatics and Computational Chemistry: A Powerful Combination for the Encoding of Process Science

    EPA Science Inventory

    The registration of new chemicals under the Toxicological Substances Control Act (TSCA) and new pesticides under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) requires knowledge of the process science underlying the transformation of organic chemicals in natural...

  7. Combining computational chemistry and crystallography for a better understanding of the structure of cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The approaches in this article seek to enhance understanding of cellulose at the molecular level, independent of the source and the particular crystalline form of cellulose. Four main areas of structure research are reviewed. Initially the molecular shape is inferred from the crystal structures of m...

  8. Porous solids arising from synergistic and competing modes of assembly: combining coordination chemistry and covalent bond formation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ananya; Koh, Kyoungmoo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J

    2015-03-23

    Design and synthesis of porous solids employing both reversible coordination chemistry and reversible covalent bond formation is described. The combination of two different linkage modes in a single material presents a link between two distinct classes of porous materials as exemplified by metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs). This strategy, in addition to being a compelling material-discovery method, also offers a platform for developing a fundamental understanding of the factors influencing the competing modes of assembly. We also demonstrate that even temporary formation of reversible connections between components may be leveraged to make new phases thus offering design routes to polymorphic frameworks. Moreover, this approach has the striking potential of providing a rich landscape of structurally complex materials from commercially available or readily accessible feedstocks. PMID:25678276

  9. A Computer-Interfaced O2 Probe: Instrumentation for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Gary E.; Nakhleh, Mary B.; Zimmerman, James R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes interfacing a hand-held oxygen probe with a microcomputer and suggests experiments for undergraduate chemistry courses that could facilitate student understanding of aquatic environmental processes which involve dissolved oxygen. Data can be analyzed through the program or exported into other software. Presents results of an experiment…

  10. Combining Laboratory and Observational Data to Elucidate the Pathway from Simple to Complex Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Helen Jane; Suutarinnen, Aleksi; Dawes, Anita; Noble, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    CH3OH is the linchpin in many astrochemical reaction schemes between the simple solid-state chemistry and the generation of complex organic molecules (COMS). It provides us with a handle to unravelling gas-ice synergy in star-forming regions, if only we understood exactly where and when in the ice evolutionary cycle CH3OH was formed. To date astrochemical models and ice observations have reached different conclusions.The aim here is to determine the prevalence of methanol ice from a large statistical set of observations, spanning pre-stellar and early YSO evolution, with the data fitting informed by new laboratory spectra. We have exploited 23 AKARI/IRC and 29 VLT/ISAAC near-IR observations. We show that the red component of CO-ice features (previously assigned to CO in water-rich ices) could alternatively be interpreted as CO in a CH3OH rich environment (cf. Cuppen et al (2011)), and that CH3OH column densities constrained this way are entirely commensurate with ice spectral features in the 3 micron region.We hypothesise that more methanol ice could be "hidden" under this H2O ice feature. Having first established how much methanol might have been reported for each of the 52 sources using the "standard" approach (e.g. Brooke et al (1999)), we use concurrent component fitting across both the 4.7 and the 3 micron ice bands to evaluate the column densities of all ices, towards all the examined sources.Our laboratory data show the ice spectroscopy reflects the hydrogen-bonding network, and CH3OH switches between being a proton-donor and proton-acceptor in the water ice. Whilst our column densities are consistent with those reported previously, we detect CH3OH ices much earlier in the pre-stellar phases, aligning the observational constraints more closely with those of astrochemical models. We show that most of the CH3OH is present in the apolar (CO-dominated) ice layer, and that its concentration in H2O-rich ices varies considerably, but cannot exceed ~ 40 %. The

  11. Providing nearest neighbor point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Faraj, Ahmad A.; Inglett, Todd A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2012-10-23

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for providing nearest neighbor point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer, each compute node connected to each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through a link, that include: identifying each link in the global combining network for each compute node of the operational group; designating one of a plurality of point-to-point class routing identifiers for each link such that no compute node in the operational group is connected to two adjacent compute nodes in the operational group with links designated for the same class routing identifiers; and configuring each compute node of the operational group for point-to-point communications with each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through the link between that compute node and that adjacent compute node using that link's designated class routing identifier.

  12. Calcite sealing in a fractured geothermal reservoir: Insights from combined EBSD and chemistry mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, David D.; Lister, Aaron; Prior, Dave J.

    2016-09-01

    Fractures play an important role as fluid flow pathways in geothermal resources hosted in indurated greywacke basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, including the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Over time, the permeability of such geothermal reservoirs can be degraded by fracture sealing as minerals deposit out of transported geothermal fluids. Calcite is one such fracture sealing mineral. This study, for the first time, utilises combined data from electron backscatter diffraction and chemical mapping to characterise calcite vein fill morphologies, and gain insight into the mechanisms of calcite fracture sealing in the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Two calcite sealing mechanisms are identified 1) asymmetrical syntaxial growth of calcite, inferred by the presence of single, twinned, calcite crystals spanning the entire fracture width, and 2) 3D, interlocking growth of bladed vein calcite into free space as determined from chemical and crystallographic orientation mapping. This study also identifies other potential uses of combined EBSD and chemical mapping to understand geothermal field evolution including, potentially informing on levels of fluid supersaturation from the study of calcite lattice distortion, and providing information on a reservoir's history of stress, strain, and deformation through investigation of calcite crystal deformation and twinning patterns.

  13. Combining Small-Volume Metabolomic and Transcriptomic Approaches for Assessing Brain Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The integration of disparate data types provides a more complete picture of complex biological systems. Here we combine small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic platforms to determine subtle chemical changes and to link metabolites and genes to biochemical pathways. Capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry (CE–MS) and whole-genome gene expression arrays, aided by integrative pathway analysis, were utilized to survey metabolomic/transcriptomic hippocampal neurochemistry. We measured changes in individual hippocampi from the mast cell mutant mouse strain, C57BL/6 KitW-sh/W-sh. These mice have a naturally occurring mutation in the white spotting locus that causes reduced c-Kit receptor expression and an inability of mast cells to differentiate from their hematopoietic progenitors. Compared with their littermates, the mast cell-deficient mice have profound deficits in spatial learning, memory, and neurogenesis. A total of 18 distinct metabolites were identified in the hippocampus that discriminated between the C57BL/6 KitW-sh/W-sh and control mice. The combined analysis of metabolite and gene expression changes revealed a number of altered pathways. Importantly, results from both platforms indicated that multiple pathways are impacted, including amino acid metabolism, increasing the confidence in each approach. Because the CE–MS and expression profiling are both amenable to small-volume analysis, this integrated analysis is applicable to a range of volume-limited biological systems. PMID:23409944

  14. The Combined Effects of Classroom Teaching and Learning Strategy Use on Students' Chemistry Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Derek

    2015-01-01

    For students to be successful in school chemistry, a strong sense of self-efficacy is essential. Chemistry self-efficacy can be defined as students' beliefs about the extent to which they are capable of performing specific chemistry tasks. According to Bandura ("Psychol. Rev." 84:191-215, 1977), students acquire information about…

  15. Computational and Experimental Assessment of Benzene Cation Chemistry for the Measurement of Marine Derived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds with Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoerb, M.; Kim, M.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is a highly selective and sensitive technique for the measurement of trace gases in the atmosphere. However, competing side reactions and dependence on relative humidity (RH) can make the transition from the laboratory to the field challenging. Effective implementation of chemical ionization requires a thorough knowledge of the elementary steps leading to ionization of the analyte. We have recently investigated benzene cations for the detection of marine derived biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), such isoprene and terpene compounds, from algal bloom events. Our experimental results indicate that benzene ion chemistry is an attractive candidate for field measurements, and the RH dependence is weak. To further understand the advantages and limitations of this approach, we have also used electronic structure theory calculations to compliment the experimental work. These theoretical methods can provide valuable insight into the physical chemistry of ion molecule reactions including thermodynamical information, the stability of ions to fragmentation, and potential sources of interference such as dehydration to form isobaric ions. The combined experimental and computational approach also allows validation of the theoretical methods and will provide useful information towards gaining predictive power for the selection of appropriate reagent ions for future experiments.

  16. Actinide chemistry using singlet-paired coupled cluster and its combinations with density functionals.

    PubMed

    Garza, Alejandro J; Sousa Alencar, Ana G; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2015-12-28

    Singlet-paired coupled cluster doubles (CCD0) is a simplification of CCD that relinquishes a fraction of dynamic correlation in order to be able to describe static correlation. Combinations of CCD0 with density functionals that recover specifically the dynamic correlation missing in the former have also been developed recently. Here, we assess the accuracy of CCD0 and CCD0+DFT (and variants of these using Brueckner orbitals) as compared to well-established quantum chemical methods for describing ground-state properties of singlet actinide molecules. The f(0) actinyl series (UO2(2+), NpO2(3+), PuO2(4+)), the isoelectronic NUN, and thorium (ThO, ThO(2+)) and nobelium (NoO, NoO2) oxides are studied. PMID:26723650

  17. Meeting report from the fourth meeting of the Computational Modeling in Biology Network (COMBINE)

    PubMed Central

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Bergmann, Frank T.; Chaouiya, Claudine; Czauderna, Tobias; Gleeson, Padraig; Goble, Carole; Golebiewski, Martin; Hucka, Michael; Juty, Nick; Krebs, Olga; Le Novère, Nicolas; Mi, Huaiyu; Moraru, Ion I.; Myers, Chris J.; Nickerson, David; Olivier, Brett G.; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Schreiber, Falk; Smith, Lucian; Zhang, Fengkai; Bonnet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The Computational Modeling in Biology Network (COMBINE) is an initiative to coordinate the development of community standards and formats in computational systems biology and related fields. This report summarizes the topics and activities of the fourth edition of the annual COMBINE meeting, held in Paris during September 16-20 2013, and attended by a total of 96 people. This edition pioneered a first day devoted to modeling approaches in biology, which attracted a broad audience of scientists thanks to a panel of renowned speakers. During subsequent days, discussions were held on many subjects including the introduction of new features in the various COMBINE standards, new software tools that use the standards, and outreach efforts. Significant emphasis went into work on extensions of the SBML format, and also into community-building. This year’s edition once again demonstrated that the COMBINE community is thriving, and still manages to help coordinate activities between different standards in computational systems biology.

  18. A lookup table to compute high energy cosmic ray effects on terrestrial atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. We have created a table that, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the effects of high energy cosmic rays (10 GeV - 1 PeV ) ionizing the atmosphere. By interpolation, the table can be used to generate values for other uses which depend upon atmospheric energy deposition by ensembles of high-energy cosmic rays. We discuss the table, its use, weaknesses, and strengths.

  19. Synergy in Extraction System Chemistry: Combining Configurational Entropy, Film Bending, and Perturbation of Complexation.

    PubMed

    Rey, J; Dourdain, S; Berthon, L; Jestin, J; Pellet-Rostaing, S; Zemb, T

    2015-06-30

    Iron-uranium selectivity in liquid-liquid extraction depends not only on the mole fraction of extractants, but also on the nature of the diluent used, even if the diluent has no complexation interaction with the extracted ions. Modeling strong nonlinearity is difficult to parametrize without a large number of parameters, interpreted as "apparent constants". We determine in this paper the synergy curve versus mole fraction of HDEHP-TOPO (di(2-ethylexyl) phosphoric acid/tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) and compare the free energy of aggregation to the free energy of extraction in various diluents. There is always a concomitant maximum of the two quantities, but with a gradual influence on intensity. The diluent is wetting the chains of the reverse aggregates responsible of the extraction. We show here that the intensity of the unexplained synergy peak is strongly dependent on the "penetrating" or "nonpenetrating" nature of the diluent. This experimental determination allows us to attribute the synergy to a combination of entropic effects favoring extraction, opposed to perturbation of the first coordination sphere by penetration as well as surfactant film bending energy. PMID:26053416

  20. Synthesis of Zwitterionic Polymer Particles via Combined Distillation Precipitation Polymerization and Click Chemistry for Highly Efficient Enrichment of Glycopeptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Shao, Wenya; Li, Senwu; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Shen; Qu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-08-31

    Because of the low abundance of glycopeptide in natural biological samples, methods for efficient and selective enrichment of glycopeptides play a significant role in mass spectrometry (MS)-based glycoproteomics. In this study, a novel kind of zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography polymer particles, namely, poly(N,N-methylenebisacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid)@l-Cys (poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys), for the enrichment of glycopeptides was synthesized by a facile and efficient approach that combined distillation precipitation polymerization (DPP) and "thiol-ene" click reaction. In the DPP approach, residual vinyl groups explored outside the core with high density, then the functional ligand cysteine was immobilized onto the surface of core particles by highly efficient thiol-ene click reaction. Taking advantage of the unique structure of poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys, the resulting particles possess remarkable enrichment selectivity for glycopeptides from the tryptic digested human immunoglobulin G. The polymer particles were successfully employed for the analysis of human plasma, and 208 unique glycopeptides corresponding to 121 glycoproteins were reliably identified in triple independent nano-LC-MS/MS runs. The selectivity toward glycopeptides of these particles poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys is ∼2 times than that of the commercial beads. These results demonstrated that these particles had great potential for large-scale glycoproteomics research. Moreover, the strategy with the combination of DPP and thiol-ene click chemistry might be a facile method to produce functional polymer particles for bioenrichment application. PMID:27498760

  1. A novel UV degradation product of Ebastine: isolation and characterization using Q-TOF, NMR, IR and computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rapolu, Ravi; Pandey, Avadhesh Kumar; Raju, Ch Krishnam; Ghosh, Kaushik; Srinivas, Kolupula; Awasthi, Atul; Navalgund, Sameer G; Surendranath, Koduru V

    2015-03-25

    Forced degradation of Ebastine (1-(4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)phenyl)-4-(4-(diphenylmethoxy) piperidin-1-yl)butan-1-one) drug substance in ultraviolet light condition resulted into an unknown significant degradation product. This degradation product was analyzed using a newly developed reverse-phase HPLC, where it was eluted at 2.73 relative retention time to Ebastine peak. UV degradation product was isolated from reaction mass using preparative HPLC and its structure was elucidated using high resolution MS, multidimensional NMR and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. UV degradation product has been characterized as 2-(4-(benzhydryloxy)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-(tert-butyl)phenyl)-2-methylcyclopropanol. (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values were generated using computational chemistry for possible two diastereomers (7R10S and 7R10R) and later 7R10R was confirmed (and its enantiomer) as final structure given it showed close agreement with experimental NMR data. Formation of UV degradation product as a recemic mixture was further verified by computational chemistry evaluation, chiral HPLC and polarimetery. To best of our knowledge, this is a novel degradation product which is not discussed at any form of publication yet. PMID:25679093

  2. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  3. A Summary Report of the Results of an Advertisement Placed in the "Journal of Chemical Education" Offering a Free Demonstration of Computer-Based Education in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Project C-BE.

    Project C-BE and CONDUIT had overlapping research objectives concerning the transferability of computer-related curriculum materials. In this regard, the projects co-sponsored an advertisement placed in the Journal of Chemical Education offering a "Free Demonstration of Computer Based Education in Chemistry." Forty packets were mailed. Of this…

  4. A Systematic Approach for Understanding Slater-Gaussian Functions in Computational Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Brianna; Hylton, Derrick J.; Ravi, Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    A systematic way to understand the intricacies of quantum mechanical computations done by a software package known as "Gaussian" is undertaken via an undergraduate research project. These computations involve the evaluation of key parameters in a fitting procedure to express a Slater-type orbital (STO) function in terms of the linear…

  5. A diagonal implicit scheme for computing flows with finite-rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Scott; Imlay, Scott

    1990-01-01

    A new algorithm for solving steady, finite-rate chemistry, flow problems is presented. The new scheme eliminates the expense of inverting large block matrices that arise when species conservation equations are introduced. The source Jacobian matrix is replaced by a diagonal matrix which is tailored to account for the fastest reactions in the chemical system. A point-implicit procedure is discussed and then the algorithm is included into the LU-SGS scheme. Solutions are presented for hypervelocity reentry and Hydrogen-Oxygen combustion. For the LU-SGS scheme a CFL number in excess of 10,000 has been achieved.

  6. Designing a Scalable Fault Tolerance Model for High Performance Computational Chemistry: A Case Study with Coupled Cluster Perturbative Triples

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, Hubertus JJ; Vishnu, Abhinav; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2011-01-11

    In the last couple of decades, the massive computational power provided by the most modern supercomputers has resulted in simulation of higher order computational chem- istry methods, previously considered intractable. As the system sizes continue to increase, computational chemistry domain continues to escalate this trend using parallel comput- ing with programming models such as Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming models such as Global Arrays. The ever increasing scale of these supercomputers comes at a cost of reduced mean time between failures, currently in the order of days, and projected to be in the order of hours for up- coming extreme scale systems. While traditional disk based checkpointing methods are ubiquitous for storing intermediate solutions, they suffer from high overhead of writing and recovering from checkpoints. In practice, checkpointing itself often brings the system down. Clearly, methods beyond checkpointing are imperative to handling the aggravating issue of reducing MTBF. In this paper, we address this challenge by designing and im- plementing an efficient fault tolerant version of coupled cluster method with NWChem, using in memory data redundancy. We present the challenges associated with our de- sign including efficient data storage model, maintenance of at least one consistent data copy and the recovery process. Our performance evaluation without faults shows that the current design exhibits negligible overhead. In the presence of a fault, the proposed design incurs negligible overhead in comparison to the state of the art implementation without faults.

  7. Combined and Iterative Use of Computational Design and Directed Evolution for Protein-Ligand Binding Design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    The advantages of computational design and directed evolution are complementary, and only through combined and iterative use of both approaches, a daunting task such as protein-ligand interaction design, can be achieved efficiently. Here, we describe a systematic strategy to combine structure-guided computational design, iterative site saturation mutagenesis, and yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H)-based phenotypic screening to engineer novel and orthogonal interactions between synthetic ligands and human estrogen receptor α (hERα) for the development of novel gene switches. PMID:27094289

  8. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  9. Providing full point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Faraj, Ahmad A; Inglett, Todd A; Ratterman, Joseph D

    2013-04-16

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for providing full point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer, each compute node connected to each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through a link, that include: receiving a network packet in a compute node, the network packet specifying a destination compute node; selecting, in dependence upon the destination compute node, at least one of the links for the compute node along which to forward the network packet toward the destination compute node; and forwarding the network packet along the selected link to the adjacent compute node connected to the compute node through the selected link.

  10. The effectiveness of a computer-assisted instruction package in high school chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, Camille L.

    The attributes of a commercial microcomputer software package were evaluated as a supplement to traditional instruction in general chemistry classes in a suburban public high school. During a unit of study of writing and naming formulas and balancing chemical equations, the experimental group received reinforcement via microcomputer while the control group used parallel worksheet exercises over a period of three weeks for concept reinforcement. Analysis of achievement scores indicated significantly higher scores among the students in the control group. In order to ascertain any possible differential effects favoring either method for students at varying cognitive development levels, the study investigated the relationship between treatment (CAI versus worksheet) and development stage; no significant interactions were discovered.