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Sample records for combined granulocyte-colony stimulating

  1. Improved granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilization of hemopoietic progenitors using cytokine combinations in primates.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Stephen R; Chng, Keefe; Battah, Fiona; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Rasko, John E J

    2008-11-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs), usually mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone or in combination with chemotherapy, are the preferred source of cells for hemopoietic stem cell transplantation. Up to 25% of otherwise eligible transplant recipients fail to harvest adequate PBSCs. Therefore it is important to investigate existing and novel reagents to improve PBSC mobilization. Because of marked interindividual variation in humans, we developed a robust nonhuman primate model that allows the direct comparison of the efficacy of two PBSC mobilization regimens within the same animal. Using this model, we compared pegylated G-CSF (pegG-CSF) with standard G-CSF and compared the combination of G-CSF and pegylated megakaryocyte growth and development factor (pegMGDF) with G-CSF plus stem cell factor (SCF) by measuring the levels of CD34(+) cells, colony-forming cells (CFCs), and SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) before and after cytokine administration. Mobilization of CD34(+) cells, CFCs and SRCs using pegG-CSF achieved similar levels to those resulting from 5 days of standard G-CSF. The combination of G-CSF+pegMGDF mobilized progenitors to levels similar to G-CSF+SCF but greater than standard G-CSF for CD34(+) cells and CFC. This first direct comparison of PBSC mobilization in individual primates demonstrates that peg-G-CSF is equivalent to daily G-CSF and that the addition of pegMGDF to G-CSF improves mobilization. In light of the development of new thrombopoietin agonists, these data offer the potential for improved stem cell mobilization strategies. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:18719223

  2. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming combined with low-dose cytarabine and homoharringtonine in higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Xia; Zhang, Wang-Gang; He, Ai-Li; Cao, Xin-Mei; Chen, Yin-Xia; Zhao, Wan-Hong; Yang, Yun; Wang, Jian-Li; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Gu, Liu-Fang

    2016-09-01

    As sensitization of leukemia cells with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy in myeloid malignancies, a pilot study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy in patients with higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The regimen, G-HA, consisted of cytarabine (Ara-C) 7.5mg/m(2)/12h by subcutaneous injection, days 1-14, homoharringtonine (HHT) 1.5mg/m(2)/day by intravenous continuous infusion, days 1-14, and G-CSF 150mg/m(2)/day by subcutaneous injection, days 0-14. 56 patients were enrolled, 34 patients (61%, 95% confidence interval: 51.44-70.56%) achieved complete remission (CR). Median duration of neutropenia was 7days (ranging from 2 to 16days). Grade 1-2 nonhematologic toxicities were documented, including nausea and vomiting (5%), liver function abnormality (5%), and heart function abnormality (2%). No central nervous system toxicity was found. Mortality within the first 4 weeks was 4%. The G-HA regimen is effective in remission induction for higher risk MDS patients and well tolerated due to the acceptable toxicity in maintenance therapy in the patients who cannot undergo Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). PMID:27497340

  3. Case Report: Combination Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Case of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Saberi, Hooshang; Tayebi Meybodi, Keyvan; Taghvaei, Mohammad; Arjmand, Babak; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Kohan, Amir Hassan; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Rahmani, Shahrokh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various neuroregenerative procedures have been recently employed along with neurorehabilitation programs to promote neurological function after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), and recently most of them have focused on the acute stage of spinal cord injury. In this report, we present a case of acute SCI treated with neuroprotective treatments in conjunction with conventional rehabilitation program. Methods: A case of acute penetrative SCI (gunshot wound), 40 years old, was treated with intrathecal bone marrow derived stem cells and parenteral Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) along with rehabilitation program. The neurological outcomes as well as safety issues have been reported. Results: Assessment with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), showed neurological improvement, meanwhile he reported neuropathic pain, which was amenable to oral medication. Discussion: In the acute setting, combination therapy of G-CSF and intrathecal Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) was safe in our case as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation programs. Further controlled studies are needed to find possible side effects, and establish net efficacy. PMID:26649168

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and reproductive medicine: A review

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Marcelo Borges; Costa, Fabrício DA Silva; Barini, Ricardo; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed to improve pregnancy outcomes in reproductive medicine. Objective: A systematic review of the current use of G-CSF in patients who have difficulty conceiving and maintaining pregnancy was performed. Materials and Methods: Two electronic databases (PubMed/ Medline and Scopus) were searched. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment were performed in duplicate. The subject codes used were granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, G-CSF, recurrent miscarriage, IVF failure, and endometrium. Results: The search of electronic databases resulted in 215 citations (PubMed/ Medline: 139 and Scopus: 76), of which 38 were present in both databases. Of the remaining 177 publications, seven studies were included in the present review. Conclusion: Treatment with G-CSF is a novel proposal for immune therapy in patients with recurrent miscarriage and implantation failure following cycles of IVF. However, a larger number of well-designed studies are required for this treatment to be established. PMID:26131007

  5. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone

    PubMed Central

    Balseanu, Adrian Tudor; Buga, Ana-Maria; Catalin, Bogdan; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Boltze, Johannes; Zagrean, Ana-Maria; Reymann, Klaus; Schaebitz, Wolf; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs) in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg) or in combination with a single dose (106 cells) of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min) of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the “islet of regeneration.” However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies would have to be

  6. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor induces in vitro lymphangiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Kim, Dal; Wagle, Susbin Raj; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •G-CSF induces tube formation, migration and proliferation of lymphatic cells. •G-CSF increases phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in lymphatic endothelial cells. •MAPK and Akt pathways are linked to G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis. •G-CSF increases sprouting of a lymphatic ring. •G-CSF produces peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. -- Abstract: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported to induce differentiation in cells of the monocyte lineage and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells, but its effects on lymphangiogenesis is uncertain. Here we examined the effects and the mechanisms of G-CSF-induced lymphangiogenesis using human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Our results showed that G-CSF induced capillary-like tube formation, migration and proliferation of hLECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced sprouting of thoracic duct. G-CSF increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in hLECs. Supporting the observations, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase and MAPK suppressed the G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis and sprouting. Intraperitoneal administration of G-CSF to mice also stimulated peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. These findings suggest that G-CSF is a lymphangiogenic factor.

  7. Expression of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) in Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Talebkhan, Yeganeh; Samadi, Tannaz; Samie, Armin; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Azizi, Mohammad; Khalaj, Vahid; Mirabzadeh, Esmat

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: During past decades Hansenula polymorpha has attracted global attention for the expression of recombinant proteins due to its high growth rate, minimal nutritional porequirements and use of methanol as a low cost inducer. Materials and Methods: The corresponding nucleotide sequences for the expression of heterologous genes in Hansenula poylmorpha were extracted and assembled in an E. coli vector. The constructed expression cassette included formate dehydrogenase promoter (pFMD), a secretory signal sequence, a multiple cloning site (MCS) and methanol oxidase (MOX) terminator. Zeocin resistance gene fragment and complete cDNA encoding granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) were cloned downstream of the expression cassette in-frame with signal sequence. Restriction mapping and sequence analysis confirmed the correct cloning procedures. Final vector was transformed into Hansenula and recombinant host was induced for the expression of GCSF protein by adding methanol. SDS-PAGE and immuno-blotting were performed to confirm the identity of r-GCSF. Results: The expression cassette containing gcsf gene (615bp) and zeocin resistance marker (sh-ble, 1200bp) was prepared and successfully transformed into competent Hansenula polymorpha cells via electroporation. Zeocin resistant colonies were selected and GCSF expression was induced in recombinant Hansenula transformants using 0.5% methanol and an approximately 19kDa protein was observed on SDS-PAGE. Western blot analysis using serum isolated from GCSF-treated rabbit confirmed the identity of the protein. Conclusions: Molecular studies confirmed the designed expression cassette containing gcsf gene along with pFMD and signal sequence. The expressed 19kDa protein also confirmed the ability of designed vector in expressing heterologous genes in Hansenula cells. PMID:27092221

  8. Vasculitis complicating granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment of leukopenia and infection in Felty's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farhey, Y D; Herman, J H

    1995-06-01

    Recombinant myeloid growth factors have been increasingly used in recent years to combat induced and disease associated neutropenia. Their application in the management of Felty's syndrome with intercurrent infection has raised concern that resultant neutrophilia and activation of a diverse array of polymorphonuclear cell functions may have an adverse effect on the rheumatoid disease process. We describe a patient with Felty's syndrome receiving short term treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), who then developed acute renal failure in conjunction with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and presumptive gout. We address the issue of "adding fuel to the fire" and review reported implications of GCSF in induction of vasculitis. PMID:7545756

  9. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stephanie; Peters, Sebastian; Pitzer, Claudia; Resch, Herbert; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor. PMID:26301221

  10. Combined plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for harvesting high-dose hematopoietic stem cells: Possible niche for plerixafor use in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bitan, Menachem; Eshel, Rinat; Sadot, Efraim; Friedman, Shirley; Pinhasov, Aviva; Levin, Dror; Dvir, Rina; Manisterski, Michal; Berger-Achituv, Sivan; Rosenfeld-Keidar, Hila; Elhasid, Ronit

    2016-06-01

    PB is a source of HSC, especially for autologous HCT in solid tumors. However, there is a risk of failing to achieve the target number of SC after mobilization with growth factors alone in patients who were heavily pretreated with chemotherapy or those in need for tandem transplants. SC were harvested from seven pediatric patients with solid tumors who were in need of autologous HCT following combination GCSF and plerixafor. Six of them received plerixafor after failing to achieve enough SC with GCSF only, while the seventh patient received the combined protocol upfront. All seven patients achieved the target number of SC according to their treatment protocol. There were no adverse events. All patients underwent autologous HCT using the harvested HSC and achieved full engraftment. A protocol for harvesting autologous HCT using GCSF and plerixafor is feasible and safe in children with solid tumors who had been heavily pretreated with chemotherapy or needed tandem transplants. PMID:26991903

  11. Functional interaction between mutations in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor in severe congenital neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alister C; Gits, Judith; Majeed, Fidel; Aprikyan, Andrew A; Lewis, Rowena S; O'Sullivan, Lynda A; Freedman, Melvin; Shigdar, Sarah; Touw, Ivo P; Dale, David C; Dror, Yigal

    2008-08-01

    Most severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) cases possess constitutive neutrophil elastase mutations; a smaller cohort has acquired mutations truncating the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R). We have described a case with constitutive extracellular G-CSF-R mutation hyporesponsive to ligand. Here we report two independent acquired G-CSF-R truncation mutations and a novel constitutive neutrophil elastase mutation in this patient. Co-expression of a truncated receptor chain restored STAT5 signalling responses of the extracellular G-CSF-R mutant, while constitutively-active STAT5 enhanced its proliferative capacity. These data add to our knowledge of SCN and further highlight the importance of STAT5 in mediating proliferative responses to G-CSF. PMID:18513286

  12. Autopsy of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Haruna; Eguchi, Noriaki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Matsumoto, Kenta; Azakami, Takahiro; Sumida, Tomonori; Tamura, Tadamasa; Sumii, Masaharu; Uraoka, Naohiro; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to a nearby hospital with high fever and anorexia. An abdominal tumor was detected, and he was referred to our hospital. A pancreatic tumor was detected by computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. He had high fever, leukocytosis, and high serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a tumor biopsy and histological examination revealed anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Based on the diagnosis, we initiated chemotherapy using gemcitabine plus S-1. However, the tumor rapidly progressed and he deteriorated and died 123 days after admission. As immunohistochemical study showed positive staining for G-CSF in the tumor cell, we diagnosed the tumor producing G-CSF during autopsy. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing G-CSF is very rare, with 10 cases, including ours, reported in the literature. PMID:27498938

  13. Neutrophil kinetics of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced neutropenia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Yuji; Kawagishi, Mayumi; Kusaka, Masaru )

    1990-01-01

    Single injection of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) immediately induced a decrease in the number of circulating neutrophils in rats. This neutropenia occurred 10 minutes after the injection but disappeared 40 minutes after injection. This transient neutropenia was dose-dependently induced by rhG-CSF and also induced by repeated injections. We studied the kinetics of circulating neutrophils in transient neutropenia. rhG-CSF markedly decreased the number of {sup 3}H-diisopropylfluorophosphate ({sup 3}H-DFP) labeled neutrophils in the circulation 10 minutes after injection but the labeled neutrophils recovered to near the control level 40 minutes after the injection. These results indicate that the neutrophil margination accounts for the neutrophenia and the marginated neutrophils return to the circulation.

  14. Applications of recombinant DNA technology in the production of glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Holloway, C J

    1994-01-01

    Lenograstim has been developed by recombinant DNA technology and is expressed in large-scale mammalian cell culture. It has been shown that lenograstim is indistinguishable in its physicochemical, structural and biological properties with respect to native granulocyte colony stimulating factor isolated from a human cell line. In particular, both the recombinant and natural proteins have identical amino acid sequences, contain the same intra-polypeptide chain disulphide bridges and exhibit the same posttranslational carbohydrate structures. Lenograstim is manufactured by expanding inoculum from vials of the Manufacturer's Working Cell Bank (from molecular cloning) followed by culture in a large bioreactor. Purification of lenograstim involves a four-step chromatographic process. The active ingredient is monitored by in-process controls at all stages of manufacture and routinely as purified bulk. The finished product is formulated into excipients reflecting conditions close to the natural environment of the protein with respect to pH, osmolarity and the presence of human serum albumin. PMID:7535067

  15. RUNX1 haploinsufficiency results in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chin, D W L; Sakurai, M; Nah, G S S; Du, L; Jacob, B; Yokomizo, T; Matsumura, T; Suda, T; Huang, G; Fu, X-Y; Ito, Y; Nakajima, H; Osato, M

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1/AML1 is among the most commonly mutated genes in human leukemia. Haploinsufficiency of RUNX1 causes familial platelet disorder with predisposition to myeloid malignancies (FPD/MM). However, the molecular mechanism of FPD/MM remains unknown. Here we show that murine Runx1+/− hematopoietic cells are hypersensitive to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), leading to enhanced expansion and mobilization of stem/progenitor cells and myeloid differentiation block. Upon G-CSF stimulation, Runx1+/− cells exhibited a more pronounced phosphorylation of STAT3 as compared with Runx1+/+ cells, which may be due to reduced expression of Pias3, a key negative regulator of STAT3 signaling, and reduced physical sequestration of STAT3 by RUNX1. Most importantly, blood cells from a FPD patient with RUNX1 mutation exhibited similar G-CSF hypersensitivity. Taken together, Runx1 haploinsufficiency appears to predispose FPD patients to MM by expanding the pool of stem/progenitor cells and blocking myeloid differentiation in response to G-CSF. PMID:26745853

  16. Enhanced and Secretory Expression of Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor by Bacillus subtilis SCK6

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shaista; Sadaf, Saima; Ahmad, Sajjad; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for enhanced expression and secretion of a pharmaceutically important human cytokine, that is, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), in the culture supernatant of Bacillus subtilis SCK6 cells. Codon optimized GCSF and pNWPH vector containing SpymwC signal sequence were amplified by prolonged overlap extension PCR to generate multimeric plasmid DNA, which was used directly to transform B. subtilis SCK6 supercompetent cells. Expression of GCSF was monitored in the culture supernatant for 120 hours. The highest expression, which corresponded to 17% of the total secretory protein, was observed at 72 hours of growth. Following ammonium sulphate precipitation, GCSF was purified to near homogeneity by fast protein liquid chromatography on a QFF anion exchange column. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis showed that the secondary structure contents of the purified GCSF are similar to the commercially available GCSF. Biological activity, as revealed by the regeneration of neutrophils in mice treated with ifosfamine, was also similar to the commercial preparation of GCSF. This, to our knowledge, is the first study that reports secretory expression of human GCSF in B. subtilis SCK6 with final recovery of up to 96 mg/L of the culture supernatant, without involvement of any chemical inducer. PMID:26881203

  17. Regulatory elements responsible for inducible expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, M; Nagata, S

    1990-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an essential role in granulopoiesis during bacterial infection. Macrophages produce G-CSF in response to bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of G-CSF gene in macrophages or macrophage-monocytes, we have examined regulatory cis elements in the promoter of mouse G-CSF gene. Analyses of linker-scanning and internal deletion mutants of the G-CSF promoter by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay have indicated that at least three regulatory elements are indispensable for the LPS-induced expression of the G-CSF gene in macrophages. When one of the three elements was reiterated and placed upstream of the TATA box of the G-CSF promoter, it mediated inducibility as a tissue-specific and orientation-independent enhancer. Although this element contains a conserved NF-kappa B-like binding site, the gel retardation assay and DNA footprint analysis with nuclear extracts from macrophage cell lines demonstrated that nuclear proteins bind to the DNA sequence downstream of the NF-kappa B-like element, but not to the conserved element itself. The DNA sequence of the binding site was found to have some similarities to the LPS-responsive element which was recently identified in the promoter of the mouse class II major histocompatibility gene. Images PMID:1691438

  18. The Effects of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor on Regeneration in Nerve Crush Injuries in Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi-Sun; Joe, Jun-Ho; Joo, Hyun-Woo; Park, In-Hwa; Shen, Guang-Yin; Kim, Ki-Jun; Lee, Yonggu; Shin, Jeong Hun; Kim, Hyuck; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely known to have a neuroprotective effect, but its effects on function and morphology in mechanical nerve injury are not well understood. The aim of this study was to confirm the time course of the functional changes and morphological effects of G-CSF in a rat model of nerve crush injury. Twelve-eight rats were divided into three group: sham-operated control group, G-CSF-treated group, and saline treated group. 2 weeks after the nerve crush injury, G-CSF was injected for 5 days. After 4 weeks, functional tests such as motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), mechanical and cold allodynia tests, and morphological studies were performed. G-CSF-treated rats had significantly improved nerve function including MNCV and mechanical and cold allodynia. In addition, G-CSF-treated rats had significantly higher the density of myelinated fibers than saline-treated rats. In conclusion, we found that 100 μg/kg administration of G-CSF promoted long-term functional recovery in a rat model of nerve crush injury. PMID:26980007

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves alternative activation of microglia under microenvironment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Zhang, H; Yang, J; Liu, S; Bing, L; Gao, J; Hao, A

    2013-05-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was investigated in the present study to examine whether it could affect the activation status of microglia under microenvironment of spinal cord injury and provide a potential therapeutic treatment for spinal cord injury. We established mouse spinal cord hemisection model and injected recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) subcutaneously. The results demonstrated that G-CSF could recruit microglia to the injury site in the first 72h after spinal cord injury. Moreover, G-CSF inhibits the expression of pro-inflammatory factors and promotes the expression of neurotrophic factors. Additionally, G-CSF also increases the expression of markers of M2 macrophage and inhibits the expression of markers of M1 macrophage in BV2 microglia in vitro model, favoring the M2 polarization of microglia under the microenvironment of spinal cord hemisection. NFκB signal pathway was involved in G-CSF-induced polarization of BV2 microglia. As a conclusion, we suggested that administration of G-CSF within the first 72h after spinal cord injury might reduce early inflammation-induced detrimental effect and promote an anti-inflammatory response that favors repair via improving alternative activation of microglia. Administration of G-CSF in the acute phase of spinal cord injury may be a promising strategy in restorative therapy after spinal cord injury. PMID:23419550

  20. Expression and Control of Codon-Optimized Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Maity, Nitu; Thawani, Ankita; Sharma, Anshul; Gautam, Ashwani; Mishra, Saroj; Sahai, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) has therapeutic applications due to its proven efficacy in different forms of neutropenia and chemotherapy-induced leucopenia. The original 564-bp nucleotide sequence from NCBI was codon optimized and assembled by overlapping PCR method comprising of 16 oligos of 50-nt length with 15 base overhang. The synthetic gene (CO-GCSF) was cloned under glucose utilizing glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) and methanol-utilizing alcohol oxidase (AOX1) promoters and expressed in Pichia pastoris SMD1168 strain. Constitutive expression under GAP resulted in cellular toxicity while AOX1 promoter controlled expression was stable. Variation in the levels of expression was observed among the transformant colonies with transformant #2 secreting up to ∼4 mg/L of GCSF. The molecular mass of the expressed GCSF in P. pastoris was ∼19.0 kDa. Quatitation of the expressed protein was carried out by a highly reproducible gel densitometric method. Effect of several operational and nutritional conditions was studied on GCSF production and the results suggest a general approach for increasing the yield of GCSF several folds (2- to 5-fold) over the standard conditions employed currently. Cultivation of the single-copy integrant in the chemically defined medium in a 5-L fermenter resulted in a volumetric productivity of ∼0.7 mg/L/h at the end of the induction phase, which was about 4-fold higher than attained in the shake flask. PMID:26410223

  1. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor as a treatment for diabetic neuropathy in rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Soo; Song, Yi-Sun; Jin, Jiyong; Joe, Jun-Ho; So, Byung-Im; Park, Jun-Young; Fang, Cheng-Hu; Kim, Mi Jung; Cho, Youl-Hee; Hwang, Sejin; Ro, Young-Suck; Kim, Hyuck; Ahn, You-Hern; Sung, Hak-Joon; Sung, Jung-Joon; Park, Sung-Hye; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-10-15

    Effective treatment of diabetic neuropathy (DN) remains unsolved. We serendipitously observed dramatic relief of pain in several patients with painful DN receiving granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The aim of this study was to determine if G-CSF could treat DN in an animal model and to ascertain its mechanism of action. In a rodent model of DN, G-CSF dramatically recovered nerve function, retarded histological nerve changes and increased the expression of neurotrophic factors within nerve. A sex-mismatched bone marrow transplantation (BMT) study revealed that G-CSF treatment increased the abundance of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in nerves damaged by DN. However, we did not observe evidence of transdifferentiation or cell fusion of BM-derived cells. The beneficial effects of G-CSF were dependent on the integrity of BM. In conclusion, G-CSF produced a therapeutic effect in a rodent model of DN, which was attributed, at least in part, to the actions of BM-derived cells. PMID:26190836

  2. Effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on spinal cord tissue after experimental contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Sanli, A Metin; Serbes, Gökhan; Calişkan, Murat; Kaptanoğlu, Erkan; Sargon, Mustafa F; Kilinç, Kamer; Beşalti, Omer; Sekerci, Zeki

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the early effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and ultrastructural findings in rats after spinal cord injury (SCI). We also compared the effects of G-CSF and methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS). Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control, SCI alone (50 g/cm weight drop trauma), SCI+MPSS (30 mg/kg), and SCI+G-CSF (50 μg/kg). Administration of G-CSF and MPSS significantly decreased LPO (p < 0.05) and MPO activity (p < 0.05) in the first 24 hours. MPSS was more effective than G-CSF in reducing LPO (p < 0.05) and in minimizing ultrastructure changes. The results of this study indicate that G-CSF exerts a beneficial effect by decreasing MPO activity and LPO and may reduce tissue damage in the first 24 hours after SCI. Our findings do not exclude the possibility that G-CSF has a protective effect on spinal cord ultrastructure after the first 24 hours following SCI. PMID:20801040

  3. Sulfur mustard-induced neutropenia: treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dana R; Holmes, Wesley W; Lee, Robyn B; Dalal, Stephen J; Hurst, Charles G; Maliner, Beverly I; Newmark, Jonathan; Smith, William J

    2006-05-01

    Although best known as a blistering agent, sulfur mustard (HD) can also induce neutropenia in exposed individuals, increasing their susceptibility to infection. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and pegylated G-CSF (peg-G-CSF) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as hematopoietic growth factors to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of G-CSF and peg-G-CSF in ameliorating HD-induced neutropenia. African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were challenged with HD and, at 1, 3, 5, or 7 days after exposure, G-CSF therapy (10 microg/kg per day for 21 days) was initiated. Peg-G-CSF (300 microg/kg, single treatment) was similarly tested, with treatment given at 3 days after exposure. Untreated HD-exposed animals recovered from neutropenia 28 days after exposure, whereas G-CSF- or peg-G-CSF-treated animals recovered 8 to 19 days after exposure (p < 0.05). These results indicate that G-CSF or peg-G-CSF may provide Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments that will reduce the duration of HD-induced neutropenia. PMID:16761898

  4. Capillary electrophoretic separation of poly(ethylene glycol)-modified granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Na, Dong Hee

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the utility of capillary electrophoretic methods for analyzing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a long-acting form of GCSF for the treatment of cancer therapy-induced neutropenia. Low- and high-molecularweight PEG-G-CSF conjugates prepared with aldehyde-activated PEG-5K and PEG-20K were separated by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HP-SEC), capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-capillary gel electrophoresis (SDS-CGE). HPSEC showed low resolution for separating mono- and di-PEG-G-CSFs. SDS-CGE had higher resolution, but required a long analysis and had low peak efficiency. CZE could successfully separate both PEG-5K- and PEG-20K-conjugated G-CSFs with a running time of 20 min and high peak efficiency. In conclusion, CZE was better than SDS-CGE for separating PEG-G-CSF conjugates and will be useful for PEGylation studies, such as reaction monitoring for optimization of the PEGylation reaction, and purity and stability tests of PEG-G-CSF. PMID:20361316

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor delays neutrophil apoptosis by inhibition of calpains upstream of caspase-3

    PubMed Central

    Drewniak, Agata; Groenewold, Vincent; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophils have a very short life span and undergo apoptosis within 24 hours after leaving the bone marrow. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is essential for the recruitment of fresh neutrophils from the bone marrow but also delays apoptosis of mature neutrophils. To determine the mechanism by which G-CSF inhibits neutrophil apoptosis, the kinetics of neutrophil apoptosis during 24 hours in the absence or presence of G-CSF were analyzed in vitro. G-CSF delayed neutrophil apoptosis for approximately 12 hours and inhibited caspase-9 and -3 activation, but had virtually no effect on caspase-8 and little effect on the release of proapoptotic proteins from the mitochondria. However, G-CSF strongly inhibited the activation of calcium-dependent cysteine proteases calpains, upstream of caspase-3, via apparent control of Ca2+-influx. Calpain inhibition resulted in the stabilization of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and hence inhibited caspase-9 and -3 in human neutrophils. Thus, neutrophil apoptosis is controlled by G-CSF after initial activation of caspase-8 and mitochondrial permeabilization by the control of postmitochondrial calpain activity. PMID:18524991

  6. Enhancement of human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor production in recombinant E. coli using batch cultivation.

    PubMed

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Abbas, Mahdi Pesaran Haji; Sahebnazar, Zahra; Alizadeh, Reza

    2010-06-01

    Development of inexpensive and simple culture media is always favorable for recombinant protein over-expression in E. coli. The effects of medium composition on the production of recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rh-GCSF) were investigated in batch culture of E. coli BL21 (DE3) [pET23a-hgcsf]. First, the optimum medium for production of rh-GCSF was determined; and, then it was shown that mixture of amino acid addition at induction time, which was determined on the basis of amino acids frequency in the recombinant protein, increases recombinant protein expression level significantly. Furthermore, the effect of glucose concentration on productivity of rh-GCSF was investigated; 20 g/l of glucose will result in maximum attainable biomass and rh-GCSF in this process. At optimum conditions, a cell dry weight of 10.5 g/l, an expression level of about 35% of total cellular protein, rh-GCSF concentration of 1.75 +/- 0.1 g/l, and overall rh-GCSF yield of 165 +/- 5 mg/g were obtained. PMID:19859744

  7. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. Results: hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. Conclusions: This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment. PMID:23748895

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in repeated IVF failure, a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Aleyasin, Ashraf; Abediasl, Zhila; Nazari, Atefeh; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) in embryo implantation process and maintenance of pregnancy, and some studies showed promising results by using local intrauterine infusion of GCSF in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial included 112 infertile women with repeated IVF failure to evaluate the efficacy of systemic single-dose subcutaneous GCSF administration on IVF success in these women. In this study, the Long Protocol of ovarian stimulation was used for all participants. Sealed, numbered envelopes assigned 56 patients to receive subcutaneous 300 µg GCSF before implantation and 56 in the control group. The implantation (number of gestational sacs on the total number of transferred embryos), chemical pregnancy (positive serum β-HCG), and clinical pregnancy (gestational sac and fetal heart) rates were compared between the two groups. This trial is registered at www.irct.ir (IRCT201503119568N11). The successful implantation (18% vs 7.2%, P=0.007), chemical pregnancy (44.6% vs 19.6%, P=0.005), and clinical pregnancy (37.5% vs 14.3%, P=0.005) rates were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. After adjustment for participants' age, endometrial thickness, good-quality oocyte counts, number of transferred embryos, and anti-Mullerian hormone levels, GCSF treatment remained significantly associated with successful implantation (OR=2.63, 95% CI=1.09-6.96), having chemical pregnancy (OR= 2.74, 95% CI=1.11-7.38) and clinical pregnancy (OR=2.94, 95% CI=1.23-8.33). In conclusion, administration of single-dose systemic subcutaneous GCSF before implantation significantly increases the IVF success, implantation, and pregnancy rates in infertile women with repeated IVF failure. PMID:26980809

  9. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with radiotherapy promotes tumor growth by stimulating vascularization in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Sun; Son, Yeonghoon; Bae, Min Ji; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Chang Geun; Jo, Wol Soon; Kim, Sung Dae; Yang, Kwangmo

    2015-07-01

    Although granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used to support recovery from radiation-induced side-effects, the precise effects of G-CSF on colon cancer under radiotherapy remain poorly understood. In the present study, to investigate the effects of tumor growth following radiotherapy and G-CSF administration in a murine xenograft model of colon cancer, female BALB/c mice were injected with cells of a colon carcinoma cell line (CT26) with irradiation and G-CSF, alone or in combination. Mice received 2 Gy of focal radiation daily for 5 days and intraperitoneal injection of G-CSF (100 µg/kg/day) after irradiation for 7 days. Changes in the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase type 9 (MMP-9) and CD31 were assessed in the mouse cancer induced by injection of colon cancer cells. We observed that G-CSF increased the number of circulating neutrophils, but facilitated tumor growth. However, G-CSF treatment did not affect radiation-induced cytotoxicity and cell viability in CT26 cells in vitro. Increased levels of myeloperoxidase, a neutrophil marker and those of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed in tumors with G-CSF supplementation. In addition, we found that increased levels of CD31 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were correlated with the enhanced tumor growth after G-CSF treatment. Therefore, these data suggest that G-CSF may contribute to tumor growth and decrease the antitumor effect of radiotherapy, possibly by promoting vascularization in cancer lesions. PMID:25976379

  10. The effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in global cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Matchett, Gerald A.; Calinisan, Jason B.; Matchett, Genoveve C.; Martin, Robert D.; Zhang, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is an endogenous peptide hormone of the hematopoietic system that has entered Phase I/II clinical trials for treatment of ischemic stroke. Severe intraoperative hypotension can lead to global cerebral ischemia and apoptotic neuron loss within the hippocampus. We tested G-CSF in a rat model of global cerebral ischemia. Global cerebral ischemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (280–330g) with the 2-vessel occlusion model (hemorrhagic hypotension to a mean arterial pressure of 30–35 mmHg and bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 8 minutes). Three groups of animals were used: global ischemia without treatment (GI, n=49), global ischemia with G-CSF treatment (GI+G-CSF, n=42), and sham surgery (Sham, n = 26). Rats in the treatment group received G-CSF (50 μg / kg, subcutaneously) 12 hours before surgery, on the day of surgery, and on post-operative Day 1, and were euthanized on Day 2, 3, and 14. Mild hyperglycemia was observed in all groups. T-maze testing for spontaneous alternation demonstrated initial improvement in the G-CSF treatment group but no long-term benefit. Measurement of daily body weight demonstrated an initial trend toward improvement in the G-CSF group. Quantitative Nissl histology of the hippocampus demonstrated equivalent outcomes on Day 3 and 14, which was supported by quantitative TUNEL stain. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated an initial increase in phosphorylated-AKT in the GI+G-CSF group on Day 2. We conclude that G-CSF treatment is associated with transient early improvement in neurobehavioral outcomes after global ischemia complicated by mild hyperglycemia, but no long-term protection. PMID:17210148

  11. Soluble periplasmic production of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongfan; Cantin, Greg T; Maki, Steven; Chew, Lawrence C; Resnick, Sol M; Ngai, Jerry; Retallack, Diane M

    2011-07-01

    Cost-effective production of soluble recombinant protein in a bacterial system remains problematic with respect to expression levels and quality of the expressed target protein. These constraints have particular meaning today as "biosimilar" versions of innovator protein drugs are entering the clinic and the marketplace. A high throughput, parallel processing approach to expression strain engineering was used to evaluate soluble expression of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in Pseudomonas fluorescens. The human g-csf gene was optimized for expression in P. fluorescens and cloned into a set of periplasmic expression vectors. These plasmids were transformed into a variety of P. fluorescens host strains each having a unique phenotype, to evaluate soluble expression in a 96-well growth and protein expression format. To identify a strain producing high levels of intact, soluble Met-G-CSF product, more than 150 protease defective host strains from the Pfēnex Expression Technology™ toolbox were screened in parallel using biolayer interferometry (BLI) to quantify active G-CSF binding to its receptor. A subset of these strains was screened by LC-MS analysis to assess the quality of the expressed G-CSF protein. A single strain with an antibiotic resistance marker insertion in the pfaI gene was identified that produced>99% Met-GCSF. A host with a complete deletion of the autotransporter-coding gene pfaI from the genome was constructed, and expression of soluble, active Met-GSCF in this strain was observed to be 350mg/L at the 1 liter fermentation scale. PMID:21396452

  12. Effects of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor on Patients with Liver Failure: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiao; Yang, Ying; Shi, Yu; Lv, Fangfang; He, Jiliang; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: It remains controversial whether granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prolongs survival in liver failure (LF) patients. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF on patients with LF. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched to identify English language randomized controlled trials comparing G-CSF with control therapy published before14 February 2015. A meta-analysis was performed to examine changes in liver function and patient survival. The association was tested using odds ratio (OR) or risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Five randomized controlled trials were eligible for the meta-analysis. Significant amelioration of prothrombin time and total bilirubin in LF patients was attributed to G-CSF therapy (OR, −0.064; 95% CI,−0.481 to 0.353; p< 0.001; and OR, −0.803; 95% CI, −1.177 to −0.430; p = 0.000, respectively). Treatment with G-CSF resulted in improved Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scores (OR, −1.741; 95% CI, −2.234 to −1.250; p = 0.000; and OR, −0.830, 95% CI, −1.194 to −0.465; p = 0.000, respectively). A lower incidence of sepsis was found in patients treated with G-CSF (RR, 0.367; 95% CI, 0.158 to 0.854; p = 0.020). G-CSF therapy significantly increased survival rate in LF patients (RR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.517 to 3.338; p = 0.000). Conclusions: The results of this meta-analysis indicate that G-CSF treatment in patients with LF significantly improved liver function, reduced the incidence of sepsis, and prolonged short-term survival. PMID:27350939

  13. Cardiopulmonary effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in a canine model of bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Eichacker, P Q; Waisman, Y; Natanson, C; Farese, A; Hoffman, W D; Banks, S M; MacVittie, T J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the effects of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a canine model of septic shock. Awake 2-yr-old beagles were studied before and after intraperitoneal placement of an Escherichia coli-infected clot. Nine days before and until 3 days after clot placement, animals received daily high-dose (G-CSF (5 microgram/kg body wt; n = 17), low-dose G-CSF (0.1 microgram/kg body wt; n = 17), or a control protein (5 micrograms/kg body wt; n = 20). Survival rate was greater (P < 0.04, Wilcoxon test) in the high-dose G-CSF group (14/17) than in the low-dose G-CSF (10/17) and control (12/20) groups. High-dose G-CSF improved cardiovascular function, as evidenced by increased left ventricular ejection fraction (day 1 after clot; P < 0.001) and mean arterial pressure (day 2; P < 0.02) compared with low-dose G-CSF and control groups. High-dose G-CSF increased (P < 0.001) mean peripheral neutrophils before (-3 days) and after (2 h to 4 days) clot and produced a more rapid (P < 0.001) rise (day 2) and fall (day 4) in mean alveolar neutrophil numbers compared with the low-dose G-CSF and control groups. High-dose G-CSF decreased mean serum endotoxin (2-8 h; P < 0.002) and tumor necrosis factor (2 h; P < 0.02) levels and lowered blood bacteria counts (2-6 h; P < 0.04) compared with the low-dose G-CSF and control groups. Thus, in this canine model, G-CSF sufficient to increase peripheral neutrophils before and during peritonitis and septic shock enhances host defense, reduces cytokine (tumor necrosis factor) levels, and improves cardiovascular function and survival. PMID:7532649

  14. Does granulocyte-colony stimulating factor administration induce damage or repair response in schistosomiasis?

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Lobna Y; Dahmen, Uta; Dirsch, Olaf; Nosseir, Mona MF; Mahmoud, Soheir S; Mansour, Wafaa AF

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To introduce Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as a new therapeutic modality for schistosomiasis through stem cell mobilization, immunomodulation or fibrosis remodeling. METHODS: In this study, a 5 d course of human recombinant G-CSF (100 μg/kg sc) was applied to Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice at different stages of disease (5 d before infection as well as 3, 5 and 7 wk post-infection). The animals were sacrificed at 10 d as well as 4, 6 and 8 wk post infection. Mice were examined for: (1) Total leukocyte count which is an accepted surrogate marker for the stem cell mobilization into the circulation; (2) Egg count in intestine and liver tissue to assess the parasitic load; and (3) Histopathological changes in Hx/E and Masson trichrome stained sections as well as collagen content in Sirius red-stained liver sections to determine the severity of liver fibrosis. RESULTS: Mice developed leukocytosis. The egg load and the number of granulomas were not affected by the G-CSF treatment but there was an obvious change in the composition of granulomas towards an increased cellularity. Moreover, fibrosis was significantly decreased in treated groups compared to untreated animals (collagen content either preinfection or at 3 and 5 wk post infection: 5.8 ± 0.5, 4.7 ± 0.5, 4.0 ± 0.7 vs 8.2 ± 0.9; P ≤ 0.01). CONCLUSION: Although G-CSF did not cause direct elimination of the parasite, it enhanced granulomatous reaction and reduced the fibrosis. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms of these two actions is warranted. PMID:21191519

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Regulation of MTA1 Expression by Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arathy S; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Subramanian, Anirudh; Chidambaram, Saravana Babu; Surabhi, Rohan Prasad; Singhal, Mahak; Bhoopalan, Hemadev; Sekar, Sathiya; Pitani, Ravi Shankar; Duvuru, Prathiba; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with loss of dopaminergic neurons of the brain, which results in insufficient synthesis and action of dopamine. Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is an upstream modulator of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, and hence MTA1 plays a significant role in PD pathogenesis. To impart functional and clinical significance to MTA1, we analyzed MTA1 and TH levels in the substantia nigra region of a large cohort of human brain tissue samples by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MTA1 and TH levels were significantly down-regulated in PD samples as compared with normal brain tissue. Correspondingly, immunohistochemistry analysis for MTA1 in substantia nigra sections revealed that 74.1% of the samples had a staining intensity of <6 in the PD samples as compared with controls, 25.9%, with an odds ratio of 8.54. Because of the clinical importance of MTA1 established in PD, we looked at agents to modulate MTA1 expression in neuronal cells, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was chosen, due to its clinically proven neurogenic effects. Treatment of the human neuronal cell line KELLY and acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model with G-CSF showed significant induction of MTA1 and TH with rescue of phenotype in the mouse model. Interestingly, the observed induction of TH was compromised on silencing of MTA1. The underlying molecular mechanism of MTA1 induction by G-CSF was proved to be through induction of c-Fos and its recruitment to the MTA1 promoter. PMID:27044752

  16. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: a survey among Italian medical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Danova, Marco; Rosti, Giovanni; De Placido, Sabino; Bencardino, Katia; Venturini, Marco

    2005-12-01

    In October 2003, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) published its own guidelines on the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The present survey was conducted during the same period with the aim of collecting data on the current use of G-CSF to provide a starting point for future evaluations of the implementation of AIOM guidelines. From October 2003 to January 2004, 1591 AIOM members were asked to complete a questionnaire based on specific clinical scenarios, regarding the use of G-CSF for primary and secondary prophylaxis and treatment of neutropenia. The rate of response was 22%. For primary prophylaxis, the majority of physicians avoid using G-CSF, with no difference in cases of adjuvant, curative or palliative chemotherapy (CT). In fact, 67.2% to 74.9% would 'rarely or never' use G-CSF in the proposed clinical scenarios. In chemosensitive tumors, rather than reducing CT doses, 55.7% would use G-CSF as a secondary prophylaxis after afebrile neutropenia (AN), and 68.8% after febrile neutropenia (FN). In elderly patients experiencing FN, 35.7% would reduce the adjuvant CT doses and 23.1% would change the regimen. Most oncologists would use G-CSF to treat neutropenia, and the median duration of G-CSF treatment is less than 1 week and would depend on neutrophil count. Our survey shows that Italian oncologists are particularly oriented towards the use of G-CSF in clinical practice to maintain the CT dose intensity, and are sensitive to the prevention and treatment of not only FN, but also AN. Finally, Italian medical oncologists appear to be very cautious in introducing G-CSF when treating elderly patients. PMID:16273232

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor promotes behavioral recovery in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Shijie; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Acosta, Sandra; Sava, Vasyl; Borlongan, Cesar; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) represent a novel approach for treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). After mild controlled cortical impact (CCI), mice were treated with G-CSF (100 μg/kg) for 3 consecutive days. The primary behavioral endpoint was performance on the radial arm water maze (RAWM), assessed 7 and 14 days after CCI. Secondary endpoints included 1) motor performance on a rotating cylinder (rotarod), 2) measurement of microglial and astroglial response, 3) hippocampal neurogenesis, and 4) measures of neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor [GDNF]) and cytokines in brain homogenates. G-CSF-treated animals performed significantly better than vehicle-treated mice in the RAWM at 1 and 2 weeks but not on the rotarod. Cellular changes found in the G-CSF group included increased hippocampal neurogenesis as well as astrocytosis and microgliosis in both the striatum and the hippocampus. Neurotrophic factors GDNF and BDNF, elaborated by activated microglia and astrocytes, were increased in G-CSF-treated mice. These factors along with G-CSF itself are known to promote hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibit apoptosis and likely contributed to improvement in the hippocampal-dependent learning task. Six cytokines that were modulated by G-CSF treatment following CCI were elevated on day 3, but only one of them remained altered by day 7, and all of them were no different from vehicle controls by day 14. The pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines modulated by G-CSF administration interact in a complex and incompletely understood network involving both damage and recovery processes, underscoring the dual role of inflammation after TBI. PMID:26822127

  18. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1) ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS. PMID:21711557

  19. Clinical safety of tbo-filgrastim, a short-acting human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Pettengell, Ruth; Bias, Peter; Mueller, Udo; Lang, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    The recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) known as filgrastim (Tevagrastim(®), Ratiograstim(®), Biograstim(®)) in Europe (approved in 2008) and tbo-filgrastim (Granix(®)) in the USA (approved in 2012; Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Petach Tikva, Israel) is indicated to reduce the duration of severe neutropenia in patients with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive anti-cancer drugs associated with a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia. This article presents pooled clinical data for tbo-filgrastim compared with Neupogen(®) (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA) as well as tbo-filgrastim post-marketing safety data. The safety and efficacy of tbo-filgrastim were evaluated in three phase III studies in 677 patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy and study drug (348 patients with breast cancer, 237 with lung cancer, 92 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma). In each study, the efficacy of tbo-filgrastim was similar to that of Neupogen. Overall, 633 (93.5 %) patients receiving the study drug experienced 6093 treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs), most of which were related to chemotherapy. Adverse events related to the study drug (tbo-filgrastim or Neupogen) were experienced by 185 (27.3 %) patients; 19 (2.8 %) had severe drug-related AEs, 5 (0.7 %) had drug-related serious AEs, and 6 (0.9 %) discontinued the study due to drug-related AEs. Overall, the most common drug-related AEs were bone pain (7.1 %), myalgia (4.0 %), and asthenia (4.4 %). The post-marketing safety profile of tbo-filgrastim was consistent with that observed during the clinical studies. The availability of tbo-filgrastim, a G-CSF with safety and efficacy comparable to those of Neupogen, provides physicians with an alternative treatment option for supportive care of patients with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. PMID:26780505

  20. Characterization of Stress-Exposed Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Using ELISA and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Akashi, Satoko

    2014-10-01

    Information on the higher-order structure is important in the development of biopharmaceutical drugs. Recently, hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate protein conformation, and unique automated systems for HDX-MS are now commercially available. To investigate the potential of this technique for the prediction of the activity of biopharmaceuticals, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which had been subjected to three different stress types, was analyzed using HDX-MS and through comparison with receptor-binding activity. It was found that HDX-MS, in combination with ion mobility separation, was able to identify conformational changes in G-CSF induced by stress, and a good correlation with the receptor-binding activity was demonstrated, which cannot be completely determined by conventional peptide mapping alone. The direct evaluation of biological activity using bioassay is absolutely imperative in biopharmaceutical development, but HDX-MS can provide the alternative information in a short time on the extent and location of the structural damage caused by stresses. Furthermore, the present study suggests the possibility of this system being a versatile evaluation method for the preservation stability of biopharmaceuticals.

  1. Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry to Study Conformational Changes in Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor upon PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hui; Ahn, Joomi; Yu, Ying Qing; Tymiak, Adrienne; Engen, John R.; Chen, Guodong

    2012-01-01

    PEGylation is the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol to proteins, and it can be used to alter immunogenicity, circulating half life and other properties of therapeutic proteins. To determine the impact of PEGylation on protein conformation, we applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) to analyze Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) upon PEGylation as a model system. The combined use of HDX automation technology and data analysis software allowed reproducible and robust measurements of the deuterium incorporation levels for peptic peptides of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated G-CSF. The results indicated that significant differences in deuterium incorporation were induced by PEGylation of G-CSF, although the overall changes observed were quite small. PEGylation did not result in gross conformational rearrangement of G-CSF. The data complexity often encountered in HDX MS measurements was greatly reduced though a data processing and presentation format designed to facilitate the comparison process. This study demonstrates the practical utility of HDX MS for comparability studies, process monitoring and protein therapeutic characterization in the biopharmaceutical industry. PMID:22227798

  2. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Related Pathways Tested on an Endometrial Ex-Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Mona; Petitbarat, Marie; Dubanchet, Sylvie; Bensussan, Armand; Chaouat, Gerard; Ledee, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recombinant human Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (rhG-CSF) supplementation seems to be a promising innovative therapy in reproductive medicine, used in case of recurrent miscarriage, embryo implantation failure or thin endometrium, although its mechanisms of action remain unknown. Our aim was to identify possible endometrial pathways influenced by rhG-CSF. Materials and Methods Hypothetical molecular interactions regulated by G-CSF were designed through a previous large scale endometrial microarray study. The variation of endometrial expression of selected target genes was confirmed in control and infertile patients. G-CSF supplementation influence on these targets was tested on an endometrial ex-vivo culture. Middle luteal phase endometrial biopsies were cultured on collagen sponge with or without rhG-CSF supplementation during 3 consecutive days. Variations of endometrial mRNA expression for the selected targets were studied by RT-PCR. Results At the highest dose of rhG-CSF stimulation, the mRNA expression of these selected target genes was significantly increased if compared with their expression without addition of rhG-CSF. The selected targets were G-CSF Receptor (G-CSFR), Integrin alpha-V/beta-3 (ITGB3) implicated in cell migration and embryo implantation, Plasminogen Activator Urokinase Receptor (PLAUR) described as interacting with integrins and implicated in cell migration, Thymidine Phosphorylase (TYMP) implicated in local angiogenesis, CD40 and its ligand CD40L involved in cell proliferation control. Conclusion RhG-CSF seems able to influence endometrial expressions crucial for implantation process involving endometrial vascular remodelling, local immune modulation and cellular adhesion pathways. These variations observed in an ex-vivo model should be tested in-vivo. The strict indications or counter indication of rhG-CSF supplementation in reproductive field are not yet established, while the safety of its administration in early

  3. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor as treatment option in patients with recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Santjohanser, Claudia; Knieper, Catherine; Franz, Cordula; Hirv, Kaino; Meri, Osama; Schleyer, Manfred; Würfel, Wolfgang; Toth, Bettina

    2013-04-01

    In 1-5% of patients during childbearing years recurrent miscarriages (RM) occur. There are established risk factors like anatomical, endocrine and hemostatic disorders as well as immunological changes in the maternal immune system. Nevertheless, further elucidation of the pathogenesis remains a matter of debate. In addition, there are no standardized immunological treatment strategies. Recent studies indicate possible effects of tumor necrosis factor α blocker and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) concerning live birth rate (LBR) in RM patients. Therefore, we performed a retrospective cohort study in patients undergoing assisted reproductive treatment (ART) with known RM analysing the possible benefits of G-CSF application. From January 2002 to December 2010, 127 patients (199 cylces) with RM (at least 2 early miscarriages) 49 (72 cycles) receiving G-CSF and 78 (127 cycles) controls receiving either no medication (subgroup 1) or Cortisone, intravenous immunoglobulins or low molecular weight heparin (subgroup 2) undergoing ART for in vitro fertilisation/intracytoplasmic sperm injection were analysed. G-CSF was administered weekly once (34 Mill) in 11 patients, 38 patients received 2 × 13 Mill G-CSF per week until the 12th week of gestation. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS for Windows (19.0), p < 0.05 significant. The mean age of the study population was 37.3 ± 4.4 years (mean ± standard deviation) and differed not significantly between patients and subgroups. However, the number of early miscarriages was significantly higher in the G-CSF group as compared to the subgroups (G-CSF 2.67 ± 1.27, subgroup 1 0.85 ± 0.91, subgroup 2 0.64 ± 0.74) and RM patients receiving G-CSF had significantly more often a late embryo transfer (day 5) (G-CSF 36.7%, subgroup 1 12.1%, subgroup 2 8.9%). The LBR of patients and the subgroups differed significantly (G-CSF 32%, subgroup 1 13%, subgroup 2 14%). Side effects were present in less than 10% of

  4. Early Systemic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment Attenuates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Lin; Chen, Jin-Chung; Wang, Hung-Li; Yang, Yi-Ling; Cheng, Mei-Yun; Liao, Ming-Feng; Ro, Long-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that opioid treatment can reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production and counteract various neuropathic pain syndromes. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can promote immune cell differentiation by increasing leukocytes (mainly opioid-containing polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells), suggesting a potential beneficial role in treating chronic pain. This study shows the effectiveness of exogenous G-CSF treatment (200 µg/kg) for alleviating thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI), during post-operative days 1–25, compared to that of vehicle treatment. G-CSF also increases the recruitment of opioid-containing PMN cells into the injured nerve. After CCI, single administration of G-CSF on days 0, 1, and 2, but not on day 3, relieved thermal hyperalgesia, which indicated that its effect on neuropathic pain had a therapeutic window of 0–48 h after nerve injury. CCI led to an increase in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) protein in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). These high levels of IL-6 mRNA and TNF-α were suppressed by a single administration of G-CSF 48–144 h and 72–144 h after CCI, respectively. Furthermore, G-CSF administered 72–144 h after CCI suppressed the CCI-induced upregulation of microglial activation in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn, which is essential for sensing neuropathic pain. Moreover, the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide (NLXM) reversed G-CSF-induced antinociception 3 days after CCI, suggesting that G-CSF alleviates hyperalgesia via opioid/opioid receptor interactions. These results suggest that an early single systemic injection of G-CSF alleviates neuropathic pain via activation of PMN cell-derived endogenous opioid secretion to activate opioid receptors in the injured nerve, downregulate IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines, and attenuate microglial activation in the spinal dorsal horn. This

  5. Successful Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor Treatment of Relapsing Candida albicans Meningoencephalitis Caused by CARD9 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Celmeli, Fatih; Oztoprak, Nefise; Turkkahraman, Doga; Seyman, Derya; Mutlu, Esvet; Frede, Natalie; Köksoy, Sadi; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2016-04-01

    Caspase-associated recruitment domain-9 (CARD9) deficiency is an autosomal-recessive primary immunodeficiency with genetic defects in Th17 immunity marked by susceptibility to recurrent and invasive Candida infections. We present a case of relapsing Candida albicans meningoencephalitis over 1-year period despite appropriate antifungal therapy. We detected a homozygous p.Q295X mutation in CARD9 as well as a defective interleukin-17 and interferon gamma synthesis in Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot tests. We achieved complete clinical remission, and improvement of interleukin-17 secretion with subcutaneous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) treatment. PMID:26658378

  6. The synergistic therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yinghua; Su, Longxiang; Li, Yinghui; Guo, Na; Xie, Lixin; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Hongxia; Zhang, Guizhi; Wang, Yajuan; Liu, Changting

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and vascular resistance. Despite advances in therapy for PAH, its treatment and prognosis remain poor. We aimed to investigate whether the transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) overexpressing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), alone or in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), attenuates the development of experimental monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH. Three weeks after MCT administration, rats were divided into the following groups: (1) untreated (PAH); (2) HGF treated; (3) MSCs administered; (4) HGF-MSCs treated; and (5) HGF-MSCs plus G-CSF treated. After 3 weeks, hemodynamic changes, histomorphology, and angiogenesis were evaluated. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling and angiogenesis, serum levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were measured, and the gene and protein expression levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined. Compared with the PAH, MSC, and G-CSF groups, the HGF and HGF+G-CSF groups exhibited significantly reduced right ventricular hypertrophy and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (P < 0.05). Histologically, vessel muscularization or thickening and collagen deposition were also significantly decreased (P < 0.05). The number of vessels in the HGF+G-CSF group was higher than that in the other groups (P < 0.05). The TGF-β and ET-1 concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary hypertensive rats were markedly lower in the HGF and HGF+G-CSF groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, HGF induced the expression of VCAM-1, and HGF treatment together with G-CSF synergistically stimulated MMP-9 expression. Transplanted HGF-MSCs combined with G-CSF potentially offer synergistic therapeutic benefit for the treatment of PAH. PMID:23933910

  7. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as a potential inducer of ovulation in infertile women with luteinized unruptured follicle syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takeo; Makinoda, Satoru; Waseda, Tomoo; Tomizawa, Hideki; Fujii, Ryota; Utsunomiya, Takafumi

    2016-05-01

    Luteinized unruptured follicle (LUF) syndrome is one of the intractable ovulation disorders that are commonly observed during cycles of treatment with ovulation inducers, for which no effective therapy other than assisted reproductive technology is available. Here, we investigated whether granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) could prevent the onset of LUF syndrome. We analyzed the effects of G-CSF in 68 infertile women with LUF syndrome who received ovulation induction (clomiphene + human chorionic gonadotropin [hCG] therapy or follicle-stimulating hormone + hCG therapy). G-CSF (lenograstim, 100 μg) was administered subcutaneously. Onsets of LUF syndrome were compared between the cycle during which G-CSF was given in combination with the ovulation inducer (ie, the G-CSF treatment cycle) and the subsequent cycle during which only the ovulation inducer was given (ie, the G-CSF nontreatment control cycle). The results showed that LUF syndrome recurred in only 3 cycles during the G-CSF treatment cycle (4.4% [3/68 cycles]), whereas LUF syndrome recurred in 13 cycles during the subsequent G-CSF nontreatment control cycle (19.1% [13/68 cycles]). The additional use of G-CSF significantly prevented the onset of LUF syndrome during ovulation induction (P = 0.013, McNemar test). No serious adverse reactions because of the administration of G-CSF were observed. In conclusion, our findings indicate that G-CSF may become a useful therapy for LUF syndrome. PMID:26518992

  8. Giant Cell Arteritis which Developed after the Administration of Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor for Cyclic Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Ikenaga, Jin; Koga, Tomohiro; Michitsuji, Toru; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakasima, Yoshikazu; Kawashiri, Sin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with cyclic neutropenia 5 years previously had been treated with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). She developed fever, tenderness and distension of temporal arteries after the treatment with G-CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed wall thickening of the temporal arteries. She was therefore diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Small vessel vasculitis has been reported as a complication of G-CSF. However, the development of large vessel vasculitis after G-CSF treatment is quite rare. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of GCA suspected to be associated with coexisting cyclic neutropenia and G-CSF treatment. PMID:27523011

  9. Application of microchip CGE for the analysis of PEG-modified recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factors.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Ji; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Kang Choon; Na, Dong Hee

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microchip CGE (MCGE) for the analysis of PEG-modified granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) prepared with PEG-aldehydes. The unmodified and PEG-modified G-CSFs were analyzed by Protein 80 and 230 Labchips on the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. The MCGE allowed size-based separation and quantitation of PEG-G-CSF. The Protein 80 Labchip was useful for PEG-5K-G-CSF, while the Protein 230 Labchip was more suitable for PEG-20K-G-CSF. The MCGE was also used to monitor a search for optimal PEG-modification (PEGylation) conditions to produce mono-PEG-G-CSF. This study demonstrates the usefulness of MCGE for monitoring and optimizing the PEGylation of G-CSF with the advantages of speed, minimal sample consumption, and automatic quantitation. PMID:20945411

  10. Absence of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signaling and neutrophil development in CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D E; Zhang, P; Wang, N D; Hetherington, C J; Darlington, G J; Tenen, D G

    1997-01-21

    Transcription factors are master regulatory switches of differentiation, including the development of specific hematopoietic lineages from stem cells. Here we show that mice with targeted disruption of the CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha gene (C/EBP alpha) demonstrate a selective block in differentiation of neutrophils. Mature neutrophils and eosinophils are not observed in the blood or fetal liver of mutant animals, while other hematopoietic lineages, including monocytes, are not affected. Instead, most of the white cells in the peripheral blood of mutant mice had the appearance of myeloid blasts. We also observed a selective loss of expression of a critical gene target of CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. As a result, multipotential myeloid progenitors from the mutant fetal liver are unable to respond to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signaling, although they are capable of forming granulocyte-macrophage and macrophage colonies in methylcellulose in response to other growth factors. Finally, we demonstrate that the lack of granulocyte development results from a defect intrinsic to the hematopoietic system; transplanted fetal liver from mutant mice can reconstitute lymphoid but not neutrophilic cells in irradiated recipients. These studies suggest a model by which transcription factors can direct the differentiation of multipotential precursors through activation of expression of a specific growth factor receptor, allowing proliferation and differentiation in response to a specific extracellular signal. In addition, the c/ebp alpha -/- mice may be useful in understanding the mechanisms involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, in which a block in differentiation of myeloid precursors is a key feature of the disease. PMID:9012825

  11. Porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) delivered via replication-defective adenovirus induces a sustained increase in circulating peripheral blood neutrophils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of immunomodulators is a promising area for biotherapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease, particularly during periods of peak disease incidence. Cytokines, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), are one class of compounds that...

  12. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 enhances pro-angiogenic effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yaohong; Shao, Hongwei; Eton, Darwin; Yang, Zhe; Alonso-Diaz, Luis; Zhang, Hongkun; Schulick, Andrew; Livingstone, Alan S.; Yu, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes bone marrow mononuclear cells into the peripheral circulation. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) enhances the homing of progenitor cells mobilized from the bone marrow and augments neovascularization in ischemic tissue. We hypothesize that SDF-1 will boost the pro-angiogenic effect of G-CSF. Methods and results NIH 3T3 cells retrovirally transduced with SDF-1α gene (NIH 3T3/SDF-1) were used to deliver SDF-1 in vitro and in vivo. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) co-cultured with NIH 3T3/SDF-1 cells using cell culture inserts migrated faster and were less apoptotic compared to those not exposed to SDF-1. NIH 3T3/SDF-1 (106 cells) were injected into the ischemic muscles immediately after resection of the left femoral artery and vein of C57BL/6J mice. G-CSF (25 μg/kg/day) was injected intraperitioneally daily for 3 days after surgery. Blood perfusion was examined using a laser Doppler perfusion imaging system. The perfusion ratio of ischemic/non-ischemic limb increased to 0.57±0.03 and 0.50±0.06 with the treatment of either SDF-1 or G-CSF only, respectively, 3 weeks after surgery, which was significantly higher than the saline-injected control group (0.41±0.01, P<0.05). Combined treatment with both SDF-1 and G-CSF resulted in an even better perfusion ratio of 0.69±0.08 (P<0.05 versus the single treatment groups). Mice were sacrificed 21 days after surgery. Immunostaining and Western blot assay of the tissue lysates showed that the injected NIH 3T3/SDF-1 survived and expressed SDF-1. CD34+ cells were detected with immunostaining, capillary density was assessed with alkaline phosphatase staining, and the apoptosis of muscle cells was viewed using an in situ cell death detection kit. More CD34+ cells, increased capillary density, and less apoptotic muscle cells were found in both G-CSF and SDF-1 treated group (P<0.05 versus other groups). Conclusion Combination of G-CSF-mediated progenitor cell

  13. The costs of peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion mobilised by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor following high dose melphalan as compared with conventional therapy in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Uyl-de Groot, C A; Ossenkoppele, G J; van Riet, A A; Rutten, F F

    1994-01-01

    In a retrospective study, we calculated the treatment costs of 26 patients, who received either high dose melphalan combined with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; filgrastim)(n = 7) or without G-CSF (n = 11) or alternatively, peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion (PBPC) mobilised by G-CSF following high dose melphalan. In comparison with the control group, a shortening of the pancytopenic period and platelet recovery was noticed in the PBPC group. This resulted in a reduction in hospital costs, diagnostics, laboratory services, total parenteral nutrition and transfusions. The average costs per treatment in the PBPC group amounted to about US$ 17,908 as compared to US$ 32,223 in the control group, implying a cost reduction of 44% when changing to PBPC reinfusion. PMID:7517149

  14. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor promotes lung metastasis through mobilization of Ly6G+Ly6C+ granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kowanetz, Marcin; Wu, Xiumin; Lee, John; Tan, Martha; Hagenbeek, Thijs; Qu, Xueping; Yu, Lanlan; Ross, Jed; Korsisaari, Nina; Cao, Tim; Bou-Reslan, Hani; Kallop, Dara; Weimer, Robby; Ludlam, Mary J. C.; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Modrusan, Zora; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Peale, Franklin V.; Carano, Richard; Meng, Y. Gloria; Ferrara, Napoleone

    2010-01-01

    Priming of the organ-specific premetastatic sites is thought to be an important yet incompletely understood step during metastasis. In this study, we show that the metastatic tumors we examined overexpress granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which expands and mobilizes Ly6G+Ly6C+ granulocytes and facilitates their subsequent homing at distant organs even before the arrival of tumor cells. Moreover, G-CSF–mobilized Ly6G+Ly6C+ cells produce the Bv8 protein, which has been implicated in angiogenesis and mobilization of myeloid cells. Anti–G-CSF or anti-Bv8 antibodies significantly reduced lung metastasis. Transplantation of Bv8 null fetal liver cells into lethally irradiated hosts also reduced metastasis. We identified an unexpected role for Bv8: the ability to stimulate tumor cell migration through activation of one of the Bv8 receptors, prokineticin receptor (PKR)-1. Finally, we show that administration of recombinant G-CSF is sufficient to increase the numbers of Ly6G+Ly6C+ cells in organ-specific metastatic sites and results in enhanced metastatic ability of several tumors. PMID:21081700

  15. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S; Shuman, Anne L; Diener, Antonia K; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  16. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  17. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for white blood cell (WBC) loss, which are the body’s main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved white blood cell (WBC), specifically neutrophil, loss in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor does not enhance phagocytosis or microbicidal activity of human mature polymorphonuclear neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, N; Okada, K; Takeda, D; Eguchi, K; Misumi, H; Sawae, Y; Niho, Y

    1994-01-01

    The direct effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) on mature polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in vitro were studied with regard to chemotaxis, superoxide production, and phagocytosis and microbicidal activity against the following viable microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, serum-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. Recombinant hG-CSF (rhG-CSF) acted as a chemoattractant for human PMNs in a dose-dependent manner. The chemotactic response of PMNs to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) was not enhanced by rhG-CSF at any of the concentrations used. rhG-CSF did not induce the generation of superoxide by itself. However, rhG-CSF was able to prime human PMNs and to enhance O2- release stimulated by FMLP in a dose-dependent manner. rhg-CSF did not enhance phagocytosis or killing of the three species of microorganisms by normal PMNs. With PMNs obtained from patients who had hematological disorders or solid tumors, no enhancement of the microbicidal activity was observed in most cases. Microbial killing mediated by PMNs depended on the ratio of PMNs to target organisms. We concluded from these facts that the most important effect of rhG-CSF was to increase the number of the peripheral PMNs and not to enhance the functions of mature PMNs. PMID:8556501

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor enhances bone tumor growth in mice in an osteoclast-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Uluçkan, Özge; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Prior, Julie L.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Apicelli, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of osteoclast (OC) activity has been associated with decreased tumor growth in bone in animal models. Increased recognition of factors that promote osteoclastic bone resorption in cancer patients led us to investigate whether increased OC activation could enhance tumor growth in bone. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, but is also associated with increased markers of OC activity and decreased bone mineral density (BMD). We used G-CSF as a tool to investigate the impact of increased OC activity on tumor growth in 2 murine osteolytic tumor models. An 8-day course of G-CSF alone (without chemotherapy) significantly decreased BMD and increased OC perimeter along bone in mice. Mice administered G-CSF alone demonstrated significantly increased tumor growth in bone as quantitated by in vivo bioluminescence imaging and histologic bone marrow tumor analysis. Short-term administration of AMD3100, a CXCR4 inhibitor that mobilizes neutrophils with little effect on bone resorption, did not lead to increased tumor burden. However, OC-defective osteoprotegerin transgenic (OPGTg) mice and bisphosphonate-treated mice were resistant to the effects of G-CSF administration upon bone tumor growth. These data demonstrate a G-CSF–induced stimulation of tumor growth in bone that is OC dependent. PMID:17192391

  20. Expression of human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) in colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2).

    PubMed

    Jana, Snehasis; Patel, Hitesh

    2012-10-01

    Growth and progression of many cancer cells are mediated by alterations in the microenvironment often caused by an aberrant expression of growth factors and receptors. There is no report on expression of growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the experimental model, colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco2), that is commonly used in drug permeability assays. We hypothesize that in vitro, the Caco2 model is associated with a constitutive neo-expression of the hematopoietic G-CSF thereby causing an autocrine stimulation of Caco2 growth and proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we analyzed mRNA and protein expression of G-CSF in Caco2 cells using reverse transcriptase-PCR and SDS-PAGE. G-CSF mRNA and protein were detected in Caco2 cells. Expression of G-CSF protein was similar at different passages of this cell line. The expression of G-CSF has a significant role in the autocrine regulation of Caco2 cell growth and proliferation. PMID:22714276

  1. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh G-CSF) on murine resistance against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Serushago, B A; Yoshikai, Y; Handa, T; Mitsuyama, M; Muramori, K; Nomoto, K

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh G-CSF) enhanced resistance of mice against Listeria monocytogenes (LM) as determined by survival and bacterial growth. Mice pretreated with rh G-CSF twice daily for 5 days survived better than untreated animals to the challenge with LM. Number of bacteria in peritoneal cavity (PC) and spleen was lower in treated mice than that in the control group. Rh G-CSF increased mainly polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in blood and spleen. After LM inoculation, a larger number of PMN and monocyte-macrophages accumulated in PC and spleen of tested mice. In addition, PMN primed in vivo with rh G-CSF released more superoxide anions when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. The inhibition of bacterial growth in PC and spleen could be ascribed to the accumulation of phagocytic cells at the infection sites and the increased oxidative metabolism. The results provided further evidence of the important contribution of G-CSF and neutrophils, as target cells, to the host defence against the intracellular bacteria. PMID:1374055

  2. Long-term evaluation of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in infant rats

    PubMed Central

    Fathali, Nancy; Lekic, Tim; Zhang, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Hypoxia-ischemia (HI), as a major cause of fetal brain damage, has long-lasting neurological implications. Therefore, therapeutic interventions that attenuate the neuropathological outcome of HI while also improving the neuro-functional outcome are of paramount clinical importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term functional and protective actions of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment in an experimental model of cerebral HI. Methods Postnatal day-7 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to HI surgery, which entailed ligation of the right common carotid artery followed by 2 h of hypoxia (8% O2). Treatment consisted of subcutaneous injection of G-CSF at 1 h after hypoxia followed by an additional one injection per day for 5 days (6 total injections) or for 10 days (11 total injections). Animals were euthanized 5 weeks post-insult for extensive evaluation of neurological deficits and assessment of brain, spleen, heart, and liver damage. Results G-CSF treatment promoted somatic growth and prevented brain atrophy and under-development of the heart. Moreover, reflexes, limb placing, muscle strength, motor coordination, short-term memory, and exploratory behavior were all significantly improved by both G-CSF dosing regimens. Conclusions Long-term neuroprotection afforded by G-CSF in both morphological and functional parameters after a hypoxic-ischemic event in the neonate provides a rationale for exploring clinical translation. PMID:20461500

  3. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor decreases the extent of ovarian damage caused by cisplatin in an experimental rat model

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ali; Akman, Levent; Ergenoglu, Ahment Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Ozgur; Erbas, Oytun; Yavasoglu, Altug; Terek, Mustafa Cosan; Taskiran, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can decrease the extent of ovarian follicle loss caused by cisplatin treatment. Methods Twenty-one adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Fourteen rats were administered 2 mg/kg/day cisplatin by intraperitoneal injection twice per week for five weeks (total of 20 mg/kg). Half of the rats (n=7) were treated with 1 mL/kg/day physiological saline, and the other half (n=7) were treated with 100 µg/kg/day G-CSF. The remaining rats (n=7, control group) received no therapy. The animals were then euthanized, and both ovaries were obtained from all animals, fixed in 10% formalin, and stored at 4℃ for paraffin sectioning. Blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture and stored at -30℃ for hormone assays. Results All follicle counts (primordial, primary, secondary, and tertiary) and serum anti-Müllerian hormone levels were significantly increased in the cisplatin+G-CSF group compared to the cisplatin+physiological saline group. Conclusion G-CSF was beneficial in decreasing the severity of follicle loss in an experimental rat model of cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:25142624

  4. Analytical characterization of in vitro refolding in the quality by design paradigm: Refolding of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Mili; Dixit, Shruti; Muthukumar, S; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-07-15

    Protein based therapeutics dominate most pharmaceutical pipelines today. For a therapeutic product to be effective, it is important that it is in its native form as slight modifications have been known to result in significantly different performance in the clinic. When expressed in hosts such as Escherichia coli, formation of inactive insoluble aggregates of proteins popularly known as inclusion bodies occurs in most cases. This necessitates the need for in vitro refolding to generate the native (and active) form of the therapeutic protein. This paper aims to provide an approach to generate a deeper understanding of refolding of a therapeutic protein and then to use it for its optimal production commercially. Recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor has been chosen as the model protein. Seven orthogonal analytical tools have been used to elucidate the refolding process. By strategically using these tools protein refolding has been segregated into a series of well-defined sequence of events, starting from the unfolded random coil and ending with the uniquely folded metastable state. The study also suggests the choice of tools that can be used to monitor each event. We believe that this paper successfully demonstrates an approach to generate deeper understanding of the protein refolding process as per the expectations laid out in the Quality by Design paradigm. PMID:27206104

  5. Kinetics of Neutrophils in Mice Exposed to Radiation and/or Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A. L.; Wan, X. S.; Diffenderfer, E. S.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts have the potential to develop the hematopoietic syndrome as a result of exposure to radiation from a solar particle event (SPE) during exploration class missions. This syndrome is characterized by a reduction in the number of circulating blood cells (cytopenias). In the present study the effects of SPE-like proton and γ radiation on the kinetics of circulating neutrophils were evaluated during a one-month time period using mice as a model system. The results revealed that exposure to a 2 Gy dose of either SPE-like proton or γ radiation significantly decreased the number of circulating neutrophils, with two nadirs observed on day 4 and day 16 postirradiation. Low circulating neutrophil count (neutropenia) is particularly important because it can increase the risk of astronauts developing infections, which can compromise the success of the mission. Thus, two granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs), filgrastim and pegfilgrastim were evaluated as countermeasures for this endpoint. Both forms of G-CSF significantly increased neutrophil counts in irradiated mice, however, the effect of pegfilgrastim was more potent and lasted longer than filgrastim. Using the expression of CD11b, CD18 and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as markers of neutrophil activation, it was determined that the neutrophils in the irradiated mice treated with pegfilgrastim were physiologically active. Thus, these results suggest that pegfilgrastim could be a potential countermeasure for the reduced number of circulating neutrophils in irradiated animals. PMID:23829559

  6. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor reprograms bone marrow stromal cells to actively suppress B lymphopoiesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Day, Ryan B.; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that mediate the shift from lymphopoiesis to myelopoiesis in response to infectious stress are largely unknown. We show that treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which is often induced during infection, results in marked suppression of B lymphopoiesis at multiple stages of B-cell development. Mesenchymal-lineage stromal cells in the bone marrow, including CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells and osteoblasts, constitutively support B lymphopoiesis through the production of multiple B trophic factors. G-CSF acting through a monocytic cell intermediate reprograms these stromal cells, altering their capacity to support B lymphopoiesis. G-CSF treatment is associated with an expansion of CAR cells and a shift toward osteogenic lineage commitment. It markedly suppresses the production of multiple B-cell trophic factors by CAR cells and osteoblasts, including CXCL12, kit ligand, interleukin-6, interleukin-7, and insulin-like growth factor-1. Targeting bone marrow stromal cells is one mechanism by which inflammatory cytokines such as G-CSF actively suppress lymphopoiesis. PMID:25814527

  7. Radiation promotes invasiveness of non-small-cell lung cancer cells through granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y-H; Suh, Y; Lee, H-J; Yoo, K-C; Uddin, N; Jeong, Y-J; Lee, J-S; Hwang, S-G; Nam, S-Y; Kim, M-J; Lee, S-J

    2015-10-16

    Despite ionizing radiation (IR) is being widely used as a standard treatment for lung cancer, many evidences suggest that IR paradoxically promotes cancer malignancy. However, its molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cancer progression remain obscure. Here, we report that exposure to fractionated radiation (2 Gy per day for 3 days) induces the secretion of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that has been commonly used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. Intriguingly, radiation-induced G-CSF promoted the migratory and invasive properties by triggering the epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT) in non-small-cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). By irradiation, G-CSF was upregulated transcriptionally by β-catenin/TCF4 complex that binds to the promoter region of G-CSF as a transcription factor. Importantly, irradiation increased the stability of β-catenin through the activation of PI3K/AKT (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT), thereby upregulating the expression of G-CSF. Radiation-induced G-CSF is recognized by G-CSFR and transduced its intracellular signaling JAK/STAT3 (Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription), thereby triggering EMT program in NSCLCs. Taken together, our findings suggest that the application of G-CSF in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia should be reconsidered owing to its effect on cancer progression, and G-CSF could be a novel therapeutic target to mitigate the harmful effect of radiotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:25639867

  8. A single injection of polyethylene-glycol granulocyte colony-stimulating factor strongly prolongs survival of mice with systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    van Spriel, A B; van den Herik-Oudijk, I E; van de Winkel, J G

    2000-06-01

    Systemic candidiasis is a life-threatening disease occurring in immunocompromized patients. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces mortality in experimental invasive candidiasis. Covalent conjugation of polyethylene-glycol (peg) to proteins increases their stability and in vivo bioactivity. In this study, the effect of a single subcutaneous injection of peg-G-CSF on lethal candidiasis was assessed. This was performed in acute and chronic candidiasis models in non-neutropenic FVB/N mice. Peg-G-CSF rapidly increased circulating polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) numbers in mice, sustaining high for >4 days. Candida albicans outgrowth from kidneys of infected mice was strongly reduced after peg-G-CSF treatment (5.76 log cfu/g kidney vs 7.66 control), with absence of hyphal outgrowth and enhanced PMNL influx. Moreover, peg-G-CSF increased survival of C. albicans -infected mice, whereas efficacy of uncoupled G-CSF was obtained only after repeated treatment. These data document a potent in vivo biological effect of peg-G-CSF, resulting in strongly enhanced resistance against systemic candidiasis. PMID:10843742

  9. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration in individuals with sickle cell disease: time for a moratorium?

    PubMed

    Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Hsieh, Matthew M; Bolan, Charles D; Saenz, Carla; Tisdale, John F

    2009-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used commonly in an attempt to reduce the duration of neutropenia and hospitalization in patients undergoing chemotherapy and to obtain hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation applications. Despite the relative safety of administration of G-CSF in most individuals, including subjects with sickle cell trait, severe and life-threatening complications have been reported when used in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD), including those who were asymptomatic and undiagnosed prior to administration. The administration of G-CSF has now been reported in a total of 11 individuals with SCD. Seven developed severe adverse events, including vaso-occlusive episodes, acute chest syndrome, multi-organ system failure and death. Precautions, including minimizing the peak white blood cell count, dividing or reducing the G-CSF dose and red blood cell transfusions to reduce sickle hemoglobin (HbS) levels, have been employed with no consistent benefit. These reported data indicate that administration of G-CSF in individuals with SCD should be undertaken only in the absence of alternatives and after full disclosure of the risks involved. Unless further data demonstrate safety, routine usage of G-CSF in individuals with SCD should be avoided. PMID:19513902

  10. Fully Synthetic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enabled by Isonitrile-Mediated Coupling of Large, Side-Chain-Unprotected Peptides.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew G; Johnston, Eric V; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Sondey, Joseph P; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Moore, Malcolm A S; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2015-10-14

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is an endogenous glycoprotein involved in hematopoiesis. Natively glycosylated and nonglycosylated recombinant forms, lenograstim and filgrastim, respectively, are used clinically to manage neutropenia in patients undergoing chemotherapeutic treatment. Despite their comparable therapeutic potential, the purpose of O-linked glycosylation at Thr133 remains a subject of controversy. In light of this, we have developed a synthetic platform to prepare G-CSF aglycone with the goal of enabling access to native and designed glycoforms with site-selectivity and glycan homogeneity. To address the synthesis of a relatively large, aggregation-prone sequence, we advanced an isonitrile-mediated ligation method. The chemoselective activation and coupling of C-terminal peptidyl Gly thioacids with the N-terminus of an unprotected peptide provide ligated peptides directly in a manner complementary to that with conventional native chemical ligation-desulfurization strategies. Herein, we describe the details and application of this method as it enabled the convergent total synthesis of G-CSF aglycone. PMID:26401918

  11. Is primary prophylaxis with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) indicated in the treatment of lymphoma?

    PubMed

    Kansara, Roopesh; Kumar, Rajat; Seftel, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a common complication of cancer therapy. It can contribute to delays in treatment, increased rates of hospitalization, and severe infections. FN may also hinder completion of intended chemotherapy. Granulocyte colony stimulating factors (G-CSF) lower the rates of FN, infections, and hospitalization. Multiple national and international guidelines advocate the use of G-CSF in primary prophylaxis if the overall risk of FN is >20% (accounting for both patient and treatment-related risks). Lymphoma specific guidelines recommend G-CSF use in similar fashion. However, based on our updated review of published literature, we note that primary prophylaxis (PP) with G-CSF fails to improve overall survival as well as infection-related mortality. Moreover, lymphoma specific cost-effectiveness analyses on the use of PP have shed further doubt on the optimal use of this myeloid growth factor. In this general review, we will discuss whether PP with GCSF has any role in the management of adults with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:23768687

  12. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Hosseinisadat, Robabe; Baradaran, Ramesh; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF), endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy). In G-CSF group (n=50), 300 µg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50) were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII), two pronuclei (2PN), total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27326420

  13. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-liang; He, Mei-qing; Han, Xiang-yu; Sun, Jing-yi; Yang, Ming-feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-lei; Li, Da-wei; Zhang, Zong-yong; Zheng, Cheng-bi; Yang, Xiao-yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic. PMID:25432887

  14. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on the hematologic recovery and survival of irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tanikawa, S.; Nose, M.; Aoki, Y.; Tsuneoka, K.; Shikita, M.; Nara, N. )

    1990-08-01

    We studied the effects of intraperitoneal injections of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) according to various administration schedules on the recovery of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and peripheral blood counts, and on the survival of irradiated mice. The sooner and more frequently the mice were injected with rhG-CSF after irradiation, the more enhanced the recovery of CFU-S in bone marrow was obtained on day 7. Twice-daily injections of rhG-CSF from day 0 to day 2 significantly enhanced the recovery of platelets and hematocrit, but two injections of rhG-CSF on only day 0 did not. Twice-daily injections of rhG-CSF from day 0 to day 6 enhanced the recovery of platelets more effectively than twice-daily injections of rhG-CSF from day 1 to day 7, and increased the survival of irradiated mice more effectively than any other examined administration schedules. Twice-daily injections of rhG-CSF from day 0 to day 6 were significantly effective in enhancing the survival of mice irradiated with 8.5-, 9.0-, and 9.5-Gy x-rays, although not effective after irradiation of 10.5-Gy x-rays.

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor impairs CD8(+) T cell functionality by interfering with central activation elements.

    PubMed

    Bunse, C E; Tischer, S; Lahrberg, J; Oelke, M; Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2016-07-01

    Besides mobilizing stem cells into the periphery, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to influence various types of innate and adaptive immune cells. For example, it impairs the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). It is assumed that this effect is mediated indirectly by monocytes, regulatory T cells and immunomodulatory cytokines influenced by G-CSF. In this study, isolated G-CSF-treated CD8(+) T cells were stimulated antigen-dependently with peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC)-coupled artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) or stimulated antigen-independently with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulator beads. By measuring the changes in interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B expression at the mRNA and protein level, we showed for the first time that G-CSF has a direct effect on CD8(+) CTLs, which was confirmed based on the reduced production of IFN-γ and granzyme B by the cytotoxic T cell line TALL-104 after G-CSF treatment. By investigating further elements affected by G-CSF in CTLs from stem cell donors and untreated controls, we found a decreased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and CD3ζ after G-CSF treatment. Additionally, miRNA-155 and activation marker expression levels were reduced. In summary, our results show that G-CSF directly influences the effector function of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and affects various elements of T cell activation. PMID:26990855

  16. Efficient Process Development of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (rh-GCSF) Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Khanchezar, Sirwan; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Pesaran Hagi Abbas, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The protein hormone granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) stimulates the production of white blood cells and plays an important role in medical treatment of cancer patients. Methods: An efficient process was developed for heterologous expression of the human GCSF in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The feeding rate was adjusted to achieve the maximum attainable specific growth rate under critical value. In this method, specific growth rate was maintained at the maximum value of 0.55 h-1 at the beginning of feeding to 0.4 h-1 at the induction time. Recombinant human GCSF (rh-GCSF) was produced as inclusion body. At first, inclusion bodies were released by cell disruption and then washed, solubilized and refolded. Finally, the rh-GCSF was purified by cation exchange chromatography. Results: Obviouly, higher specific growth rate decreases process time and consequently increases productivity. The final concentration of biomass and GCSF was achieved 126 g DCW.l-1 and 32.1 g.l-1. Also, the final specific yield (YP/X) and total productivity of rh-GCSF were obtained 254 mg.g-1 DCW and 1.83 g.l-1.h-1, respectively. According to the available data, this is one of the highest YP/X and productivity that has been reported for any human protein which is expressed in E. coli. Recovery yield of purification process was %40 and purity of recombinant protein was over than 99%. The circular dichroism spectra of purified rh-GCSF, Neupogen® and PD-Grastim showed that all proteins have a similar secondary structure. Conclusion: Modified exponential feeding strategy for fed-batch cultivation of recombinant E. coli, results in minimum fed-batch duration and maximum productivity. PMID:25864815

  17. A Novel Combinatorial Therapy With Pulp Stem Cells and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Total Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of deep caries with pulpitis is a major challenge in dentistry. Stem cell therapy represents a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling conservation and restoration of teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude for the impending clinical trials. Clinical-grade pulp stem cells were isolated and expanded according to good manufacturing practice conditions. The absence of contamination, abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype, and tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse ensured excellent quality control. After autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth, regenerated pulp tissue including vasculature and innervation completely filled in the root canal, and regenerated dentin was formed in the coronal part and prevented microleakage up to day 180. Transplantation of pulp stem cells with G-CSF yielded a significantly larger amount of regenerated dentin-pulp complex compared with transplantation of G-CSF or stem cells alone. Also noteworthy was the reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and apoptotic cells and the significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared with results without G-CSF. The transplanted stem cells expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. It is significant that G-CSF together with conditioned medium of pulp stem cells stimulated cell migration and neurite outgrowth, prevented cell death, and promoted immunosuppression in vitro. Furthermore, there was no evidence of toxicity or adverse events. In conclusion, the combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications. PMID:23761108

  18. Immunomodulation Induced by Stem Cell Mobilization and Harvesting in Healthy Donors: Increased Systemic Osteopontin Levels after Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Melve, Guro Kristin; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Akkök, Çiğdem Akalın; Ahmed, Aymen Bushra; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Hervig, Tor; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells from healthy donors mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and harvested by leukapheresis are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The frequency of severe graft versus host disease is similar for patients receiving peripheral blood and bone marrow allografts, even though the blood grafts contain more T cells, indicating mobilization-related immunoregulatory effects. The regulatory phosphoprotein osteopontin was quantified in plasma samples from healthy donors before G-CSF treatment, after four days of treatment immediately before and after leukapheresis, and 18–24 h after apheresis. Myeloma patients received chemotherapy, combined with G-CSF, for stem cell mobilization and plasma samples were prepared immediately before, immediately after, and 18–24 h after leukapheresis. G-CSF treatment of healthy stem cell donors increased plasma osteopontin levels, and a further increase was seen immediately after leukapheresis. The pre-apheresis levels were also increased in myeloma patients compared to healthy individuals. Finally, in vivo G-CSF exposure did not alter T cell expression of osteopontin ligand CD44, and in vitro osteopontin exposure induced only small increases in anti-CD3- and anti-CD28-stimulated T cell proliferation. G-CSF treatment, followed by leukapheresis, can increase systemic osteopontin levels, and this effect may contribute to the immunomodulatory effects of G-CSF treatment. PMID:27447610

  19. Immunomodulation Induced by Stem Cell Mobilization and Harvesting in Healthy Donors: Increased Systemic Osteopontin Levels after Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor.

    PubMed

    Melve, Guro Kristin; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Akkök, Çiğdem Akalın; Ahmed, Aymen Bushra; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Hervig, Tor; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells from healthy donors mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and harvested by leukapheresis are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The frequency of severe graft versus host disease is similar for patients receiving peripheral blood and bone marrow allografts, even though the blood grafts contain more T cells, indicating mobilization-related immunoregulatory effects. The regulatory phosphoprotein osteopontin was quantified in plasma samples from healthy donors before G-CSF treatment, after four days of treatment immediately before and after leukapheresis, and 18-24 h after apheresis. Myeloma patients received chemotherapy, combined with G-CSF, for stem cell mobilization and plasma samples were prepared immediately before, immediately after, and 18-24 h after leukapheresis. G-CSF treatment of healthy stem cell donors increased plasma osteopontin levels, and a further increase was seen immediately after leukapheresis. The pre-apheresis levels were also increased in myeloma patients compared to healthy individuals. Finally, in vivo G-CSF exposure did not alter T cell expression of osteopontin ligand CD44, and in vitro osteopontin exposure induced only small increases in anti-CD3- and anti-CD28-stimulated T cell proliferation. G-CSF treatment, followed by leukapheresis, can increase systemic osteopontin levels, and this effect may contribute to the immunomodulatory effects of G-CSF treatment. PMID:27447610

  20. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-producing gallbladder carcinoma-include analysis all case reports: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Izumo, Wataru; Furukawa, Kenji; Katsuragawa, Hideo; Tezuka, Toru; Furukawa, Tatsuya; Hataji, Kenichirou; Komatsu, Akio; Shigematsu, Kyousuke; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is extremely rare for gallbladder carcinoma to produce granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and such tumors have a poor prognosis. Presentation of case A 67-year-old man was admitted with continuous fever. Laboratory tests showed a leukocyte count of 27,980/μL, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) of 9.2 mg/dL and serum G-CSF of 225 pg/mL. Imaging revealed an irregular gallbladder mass about 90 mm in diameter with peripheral enhancement that also involved the liver and transverse colon. G-CSF producing gallbladder carcinoma was diagnosed. We performed cholecystectomy, partial resection of segments 4 and 5 of the liver, partial resection of the transverse colon, and gastrostomy. Histopathological examination showed gallbladder carcinoma (pT3, pN0, M0, G2, and pStage IIIA by the UICC classification, version 7). On immunohistochemical staining, tumor cells were positive for G-CSF. The leukocyte count was normalized postoperatively and fever subsided immediately after surgery. Two months later, the leukocyte count rose to 56,820/μL and metastases to the liver and lymph nodes were detected by CT. Chemotherapy (gemcitabine plus cisplatin) was started and the leukocyte count was normalized after the first course. The patient has continued chemotherapy and has survived for 16 months postoperatively. Discussion G-CSF producing gallbladder carcinoma has a poor prognosis and most patients die within 12 months of starting therapy. It is rare for patients with recurrence to survive for 16 months after surgery, as in the present case. Conclusion Multidisciplinary therapy (surgery and chemotherapy) may prolong the survival of patients with G-CSF producing gallbladder carcinoma, especially those with recurrence. PMID:26945490

  1. Improved Production and Characterization of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor from E. coli under Optimized Downstream Processes.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sandeep; Thunuguntla, Rahul; Dedaniya, Akshay; Kokkiligadda, Sujana; Palle, Chaitanya; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the upstream and downstream process of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3)pLysS. The fed batch mode was selected for the maximum output of biomass (6.4g/L) and purified rhG-CSF (136mg/L) under suitable physicochemical environment. The downstream processing steps viz., recovery, solubilization, refolding and concentration were optimized in this study. The maximum rhG-CSF inclusion bodies recovery yield (97%) was accomplished with frequent homogenization and sonication procedure. An efficient solubilization (96%) of rhG-CSF inclusion bodies were observed with 8M urea at pH 9.5. Refolding efficiency studies showed maximum refolding ⩾86% and ⩾84% at 20°C and pH 9 respectively. The renatured protein solution was concentrated, clarified and partially purified (⩾95%) by the cross flow filtration technique. The concentrated protein was further purified by a single step size exclusion chromatography with ⩾98% purity. The characterization of purified rhG-CSF molecular mass as evidenced by SDS-PAGE, western blot and LC/MS analysis was shown to be 18.8kDa. The secondary structure of rhG-CSF was evaluated by the CD spectroscopic technique based on the helical structural components. The biological activity of the purified rhG-CSF showed a similar activity of cell proliferation with the standard rhG-CSF. Overall, the results demonstrate an optimized downstream process for obtaining high yields of biologically active rhG-CSF. PMID:25659501

  2. Two protocols to treat thin endometrium with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during frozen embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Qiong; Hao, Jie; Xu, Dabao; Li, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) protocols for thin endometrium were investigated. Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with thin endometrium (<7 mm). Thirty patients with previously cancelled embryo transfers received intrauterine G-CSF in subsequent frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles. Patients were divided into the G-CSF only and G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroups. Compared with previous cycles, endometrial thickness increased from 5.7 ± 0.7 mm to 8.1 ± 2.1 mm after G-CSF treatment (P < 0.001). Endometrial thickness increases were not significantly different between the two subgroups. The G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroup established nominally higher though non-significant clinical pregnancy and live birth rates than the G-CSF only subgroup (53.8 % versus 42.9% and 38.5% versus 28.6%, respectively). Fifty-two patients underwent FET despite edometrial thickness less than 7 mm, and were included as controls. Significantly higher embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were observed in the G-CSF group compared with the control group (31.5% versus 13.9%; P < 0.01; 48.1% versus 25.0%; P = 0.038, respectively). Endometrial scracth did not impair G-CSF treatment for thin endometrium and favoured pregnancy and live birth rates. For patients with thin endometrium, embryo transfer cancellation and G-CSF treatment in subsequent FET cycles is beneficial. PMID:25682303

  3. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on efficacy of radiation therapy in tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Koji Kabaya; Masahiko Watanabe; Masaru Kusaka; Hiromichi Akahori; Masatoshi Seki; Masato Fushiki

    1994-07-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on radiation-induced neutropenia and on growth of transplanted tumors treated by irradiation was investigated using tumor-bearing rats as a model for radiation therapy. In a preliminary study using normal rats, neutropenia induced by upper hemi-body irradiation at 3 Gy/day 5 times a week for 3 weeks was prevented by consecutive subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 100 {mu}g/kg/day. Rats bearing Walker-256, a mammary tumor, were scheduled to receive upper hemibody irradiation at 3 Gy/day for 15 times in 3 weeks if white blood cell (WBC) counts were maintained above 3,000/{mu}l. In control tumor-bearing rats not receiving rhG-CSF, irradiation was often withheld because of the decrease in WBC counts below 3,000/{mu}l. In contrast, a decrease in WBC counts below 3,000/{mu}l was rarely found in tumor-bearing rats injected daily with rhG-CSF. The average number of radiation treatments in control rats and rats treated with rhG-CSF was about 8 and 14, respectively, out of the scheduled 15 treatments in 3 weeks. Treatment with rgG-CSF made it possible to complete the radiation therapy regimen and thus inhibit the growth of the transplanted tumor more effectively. These results suggest that rgG-CSF may be useful to ensure radiation therapy on schedule in cancer patients. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Plerixafor and abbreviated-course granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for mobilizing hematopoietic progenitor cells in light chain amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Binod; Strouse, Christopher; D'Souza, Anita; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Esselman, Jeanie; Eastwood, Daniel; Pasquini, Marcelo; Saber, Wael; Drobyski, William; Rizzo, J Douglas; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2014-12-01

    Cytokine-based mobilization in light chain (AL) amyloidosis is frequently complicated by fluid overload, weight gain, cardiac arrhythmias, and peri-mobilization mortality. We analyzed hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) mobilization outcomes in 49 consecutive AL amyloidosis patients at our institution between 2004 and 2013 with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G) (10 μg/kg/day) (n = 25) versus an institutional protocol to limit G exposure using plerixafor (P) (.24 mg/kg s.c. starting day 3 of G 10 μg/kg) (n = 24). G+P strategy yielded higher total CD34(+) cells/kg (12.8 × 10(6) versus 6.3 × 10(6); P < .001) and CD34(+) cells/kg collected on day 1 (10.8 × 10(6) versus 4.9 × 10(6), P = .004) compared with the G cohort. More G+P patients collected ≥5 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (22 versus 16, P = .02) and ≥ 10 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (13 versus 5, P = .01). Four patients (16%) had mobilization failure with G; none with G+P. Peri-mobilization weight gain was lower with G+P strategy (median weight gain 1 versus 7 pounds, P = .009). Numbers of apheresis sessions (median, 1 versus 1, P = .52), number of hospitalization days (median, 1.1 versus 1.6, P = .52), transfusions, use of intravenous antibiotics, and cardiac arrhythmias were similar. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that upfront use of G+P as a mobilization strategy results in superior HPC collection, no mobilization failures, and less weight gain than G alone. PMID:25111581

  5. Bone marrow cell mobilization by the systemic use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) improves wound bed preparation.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Satori; Lin, Xiaofeng; Ramirez, Ron; Carson, Polly; Fiore, David; Goodrich, Jane; Yufit, Tatyana; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-12-01

    Innovative approaches are needed to accelerate the healing of human chronic wounds not responding to conventional therapies. An evolving and promising treatment is the use of stem cells. Our group has previously described the use of expanded (in vitro) autologous stem cells aspirated from human bone marrow and applied topically in a fibrin spray to human acute and chronic wounds. More recently, we have sought ways to mobilize stem cells directly from the bone marrow, without in vitro expansion. In this report, we show that systemic injections of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) can mobilize stem cells from bone marrow into the peripheral blood and then to the wound site. Our objectives were to optimize parameters for this method by using mouse models and proof of principle in a human chronic wound situation. Mice were injected for 5 days with 2 different formulations of GCSF and compared to control saline. To monitor stem cell mobilization, flow cytometric measurements of Sca-1 and c-Kit and colony-forming cell assays were performed. Full-thickness tail wounds in mice were created and monitored for healing, and polyvinyl alcohol sponges were implanted dorsally to assess collagen accumulation. To determine bone marrow stem cell homing to the wound site, chimeric mice transplanted with Green Fluorescent Protein bone marrow cells were scanned by live imaging. Additionally, as proof of principle, we tested the systemic GCSF approach in a patient with a nonhealing venous ulcer. Our findings lay the ground work and indicate that the systemic administration of GCSF is effective in mobilizing bone marrow stem cells into the peripheral blood and to the wound site. These findings are associated with an increased accumulation of collagen and promising results in terms of wound bed preparation and healing. PMID:24275756

  6. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration on renal regeneration after experimentally induced acute kidney injury in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae-Young; Han, Jae-Ik; Kim, Seung-Gon; Lee, Chang-Min; Park, Hee-Myung

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) administration in dogs with experimentally induced acute kidney injury. ANIMALS 6 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES After induction of kidney injury (day 0) with cisplatin (5 mg/kg, IV), the dogs were randomly assigned into 2 groups (n = 3 dogs/group). Then dogs immediately received GCSF (10 μg/kg) or 1 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control group) SC; this treatment was repeated once daily for 4 additional days (days 1 through 4). A once-daily CBC (day 0 to 4), serum biochemical analysis (day 0 to 3), and urinalysis (day 0 to 3) were performed for each dog; samples were collected before administration of cisplatin (day 0) and before treatment with GCSF or saline solution (days 1 through 4). After sample collection and treatment on day 4, all dogs were euthanized; kidney tissue samples underwent histologic evaluation, immunohistochemical analyses, and cytokine profiling via reverse transcriptase PCR assay. RESULTS In the GCSF-treated group, the histologic evaluation and immunohistochemical analyses of kidney tissue revealed less fibrotic change and greater proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells, compared with findings in the control group. The mRNA profiles of kidney tissue from the GCSF-treated group indicated lower expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and tumor growth factor-β, compared with findings in the control group; however, concentrations of factors related to renal regeneration were not greater in the GCSF-treated group. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that GCSF treatment can impede renal fibrosis and increase proliferation of renal tubules after experimentally induced acute kidney injury in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:199-207). PMID:27027715

  7. Timing of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration on neutropenia induced by cyclophosphamide in normal mice.

    PubMed Central

    Misaki, M.; Ueyama, Y.; Tsukamoto, G.; Matsumura, T.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of altering the timing of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) administration on neutropenia induced by cyclophosphamide (CPA) were studied experimentally in a mouse model. Experimental mice were divided into three groups: (a) treatment with rhG-CSF after CPA administration (post-treatment group); (b) treatment with rhG-CSF both before and after CPA administration (pre- and post-treatment group); and (c) treatment with saline after CPA administration (control group). The results were as follows. Mice receiving rhG-CSF on the 2 days preceding CPA treatment, in which progenitor cell counts outside the S-phase when CPA was administered were the lowest of all the groups, showed accelerated neutrophil recovery but decreased neutrophil nadirs compared with the control group despite rhG-CSF treatment. The pre- and post-treatment group, consisting of mice who received rhG-CSF treatment on days -4 and -3 before CPA treatment, and in which progenitor cell counts when CPA was administered were increased to greater levels than in the other groups, showed remarkably accelerated neutrophil recovery and the greatest increase in the neutrophil nadirs of all the groups. These results suggested that the kinetics of progenitor cell populations when chemotherapeutic agents were administered seemed to play an important role in neutropenia after chemotherapy, and that not only peripheral neutrophil cell and total progenitor cell counts but also progenitor cell kinetics should be taken into consideration when administering rhG-CSF treatment against the effects of chemotherapy. PMID:9528829

  8. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  9. A Soluble Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Decoy Receptor as a Novel Tool to Increase Hematopoietic Cell Homing and Reconstitution in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Audrey; Benabdallah, Basma; Palacio, Lina; Carbonneau, Cynthia L.; Le, Oanh N.; Haddad, Élie

    2013-01-01

    The relative ineffectiveness of hematopoietic stem cells in reaching the bone marrow upon transplantation combined with the limited number of these cells available is a major reason for graft failure and delayed hematopoietic recovery. Hence, the development of strategies that could enhance homing is of high interest. Here, we provide evidence that homing is severely impaired postexposure to ionizing radiation (IR) in mice, an effect we found was time dependent and could be partially rescued using mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy. In an attempt to further increase homing, we took advantage of our observation that the granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine known to induce cell mobilization, is increased in the marrow of mice shortly after their exposure to IR. As such, we developed a truncated, yet functional, soluble G-CSF receptor (solG-CSFR), which we hypothesized could act as a decoy and foster homing. Using MSCs or conditioned media as delivery vehicles, we show that an engineered solG-CSFR has the potential to increase homing and hematopoietic reconstitution in mice. Altogether, our results provide novel findings at the interplay of IR and stromal cell therapy and present the regulation of endogenous G-CSF as an innovative proof-of-concept strategy to manipulate hematopoietic cell homing. PMID:23205715

  10. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  11. Role of Stem Cell Factor and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Remodeling during Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyin; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Han, Yuyan; DeMorrow, Sharon; Stokes, Allison; Staloch, Dustin; Venter, Julie; White, Melanie; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Reid, Lola M.; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-01-01

    Functional pluripotent characteristics have been observed in specific subpopulations of hepatic cells that express some of the known cholangiocyte markers. Although evidence indicates that specific cytokines, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factors (GM-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) may be candidate treatments for liver injury, the role of these cytokines in intrahepatic biliary epithelium remodeling is unknown. Thus, our aim was to characterize the specific cytokines that regulate the remodeling potentials of cholangiocytes after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH). The expression of the cytokines and their downstream signaling molecules was studied in rats after 70% PH by immunoblots, and in small and large murine cholangiocyte cultures (SMCCs and LMCCs) by immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR. There was a significant and stable increase in SCF and GM-CSF levels until 7 days after PH. Real-time PCR analysis revealed significant increases of key remodeling molecules, such as S100A4 and miR-181b after SCF plus GM-CSF administration in SMCCs. SMCCs produced significant amounts of soluble and bound SCF and GM-CSF in response to TGF-β. When SMCCs were incubated with TGF-β plus anti–SCF and GM-CSF antibodies, there was a significant decrease in S100A4 expression. Furthermore, treatment of SMCCs with SCF + GM-CSF significantly increased matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) mRNA as well as miR-181b expression along with a reduction of metalloproteinase inhibitor 3 (TIMP-3). The levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and miR-181b were also up-regulated in rat liver and isolated cholangiocytes after PH. CONCLUSION Our data suggest that altered expression of SCF and GM-CSF following PH can contribute to biliary remodeling (for example post-transplantation) by functional deregulation of activity of key signaling intermediates involved in cell expansion and multipotent differentiation. PMID:21932404

  12. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for measurement of picogram quantities of murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Granger, J; Remick, D; Call, D; Ebong, S; Taur, A; Williams, B; Nauss, M; Millican, J; O'Reilly, M

    1999-05-27

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells of the neutrophil lineage. Measurement of murine G-CSF levels will allow examination of its role in host defense using murine models. Therefore, we developed a sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) for murine G-CSF. A polyclonal antibody to recombinant murine G-CSF was produced in rabbits and isolated using a protein A column. This purified native IgG served as the capture antibody and a portion of the IgG was biotinylated to serve as the developing antibody. Specificity was verified by lack of reactivity to GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-3, prolactin, and growth hormone. The lower limit of sensitivity routinely extended to 16 pg/ml in multiple ELISAs. Intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) ranged from 3.4 to 21.5% across the detection limits of the assay, with the greatest variance occurring near the standard curve maximum. Interassay CV ranged from 11.5 to 23.3%. The ability of the ELISA to detect G-CSF in different sample preparations was examined in RPMI 1640 with 10% FCS, Hanks balanced salt solution, PBS/Tween-20/2% FCS, and the dilution media for ELISA (10% BLOTTO/PBS/0.05% Tween-20). Average recovery in these media ranged from 98 to 107%. Heparin anti-coagulated normal mouse plasma had a suppressive effect on the ELISA that varied between individual mice. Recovery was also determined from liver, spleen, and lung homogenate suspensions at dilutions of 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 in dilution buffer. Recovery from liver was optimal at the 1:10 and 1:20 dilutions at 105%, with that of the 1:5 dilution at 135%. Recovery from spleen ranged from 94 to 96%. Lung homogenate displayed enhanced recovery (139% or greater) across all dilutions. The ability of the assay to detect G-CSF was explored by measurement of G-CSF levels in peritoneal lavage following polymicrobial intra-abdominal infection. Peak levels of G-CSF production

  13. Favorable outcome of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor use in neuromyelitis optica patients presenting with agranulocytosis in the setting of rituximab.

    PubMed

    Mealy, Maureen A; Levy, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe autoimmune condition affecting the central nervous system characterized by a relapsing disease course. Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the protein CD20, and is one of the most utilized medications for management of this disease. A known complication of rituximab use is neutropenia. We report on two patients who developed symptomatic early-onset rituximab-induced agranulocytosis who safely received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Neutrophil counts recovered quickly and both patients continue to receive rituximab without further incident. PMID:26439958

  14. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  15. Adjuvant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy results in improved spatial learning and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anna Kathrin; Reich, Arno; Falkenburger, Björn; Schulz, Jörg B; Brandenburg, Lars Ove; Ribes, Sandra; Tauber, Simone C

    2015-01-01

    Despite the development of new antibiotic agents, mortality of pneumococcal meningitis remains high. In addition, meningitis results in severe long-term morbidity, most prominently cognitive deficits. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells and increases the number of circulating neutrophil granulocytes. This study investigated the effect of adjuvant G-CSF treatment on cognitive function after pneumococcal meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were infected by subarachnoid injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 and treated with ceftriaxone and G-CSF subcutaneously or ceftriaxone alone for 5 days. Clinical scores, motor performance, and mortality during bacterial meningitis were unaffected by adjuvant G-CSF treatment. No effect of G-CSF treatment on production of proinflammatory cytokines or activation of microglia or astrocytes was observed. The G-CSF treatment did, however, result in hippocampal neurogenesis and improved spatial learning performance 6 weeks after meningitis. These results suggest that G-CSF might offer a new adjuvant therapeutic approach in bacterial meningitis to reduce long-term cognitive deficits. PMID:25470346

  16. Chemotherapy and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor primed donor leukocyte infusion for treatment of relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Di Mario, A; Salutari, P; Rutella, S; Chiusolo, P; Rumi, C; Menichella, G; D'Onofrio, G; Leone, G

    1995-09-01

    Two patients affected by acute leukemia relapsed 10 and 12 months respectively after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. They were treated with aggressive chemotherapy and then infused with HLA-identical donor leukocytes (DLI) collected after recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) administration. A total of 5.6 and 6.3 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells, 2.7 and 3.0 x 10(4)/kg CFU-GM, 4.7 and 4.4 x 10(8)/kg MNC, 4.6 and 3.9 x 10(9)/kg PMN respectively were infused. Both patients achieved complete remission (CR) and complete chimerism was re-established. One patient developed grade IV acute graft-versus-host disease of the liver requiring immunosuppression and he died in CR from disseminated aspergillosis, 7 months after chemotherapy; one patient is alive in relapse 12 months after treatment. PMID:8535325

  17. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can allow treatment with clozapine in a patient with severe benign ethnic neutropaenia (BEN): a case report.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Benjamin W J; Williams, Hugh R J; Gee, Siobhan H; Whiskey, Eromona; Rodrigues, Joseph P; Mijovic, Aleksandar; MacCabe, James H

    2012-09-01

    Clozapine is the treatment of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but it is associated with a risk of neutropaenia and agranulocytosis. Clozapine use is regulated by mandatory blood monitoring in the UK, requiring cessation of treatment should the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) drop below specified values. Benign reductions in the ANC in non-white populations are common, and this can preclude a patient from receiving treatment with clozapine. A diagnosis of benign ethnic neutropaenia can reduce these treatment restrictions (UK specific), but the degree of neutropaenia can be significant enough to still prevent treatment. In this report, we show that response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be quite variable and difficult to predict, but with careful monitoring it can be used to increase the ANC count and allow continued treatment with clozapine. PMID:22719015

  18. Role of the pituitary–adrenal axis in granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-induced neuroprotection against hypoxia–ischemia in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Mélissa S.; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Manaenko, Anatol; Duris, Kamil; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2013-01-01

    Several reports indicate that the activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (HPA) is increased after a brain insult and that its down-regulation can improve detrimental outcomes associated with ischemic brain injuries. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a neuroprotective drug shown in the naïve rat to regulate hormones of the HPA axis. In this study we investigate whether G-CSF confers its neuroprotective properties by influencing the HPA response after neonatal hypoxia–ischemia (HI). Following the Rice–Vannucci model, seven day old rats (P7) were subjected to unilateral carotid ligation followed by 2.5 h of hypoxia. To test our hypothesis, metyrapone was administered to inhibit the release of rodent specific glucocorticoid, corticosterone, at the adrenal level. Dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, was administered to agonize the effects of corticosterone. Our results show that both G-CSF and metyrapone significantly reduced infarct volume while dexamethasone treatment did not reduce infarct size even when combined with G-CSF. The protective effects of G-CSF do not include blood brain barrier preservation as suggested by the brain edema results. G-CSF did not affect the pituitary released adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels in the blood plasma at 4 h, but suppressed the increase of corticosterone in the blood. The administration of G-CSF and metyrapone increased weight gain, and significantly reduced the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the brain while dexamethasone reversed the effects of G-CSF. The combination of G-CSF and metyrapone significantly decreased caspase-3 protein levels in the brain, and the effect was antagonized by dexamethasone. We report that G-CSF is neuroprotective in neonatal HI by reducing infarct volume, by suppressing the HI-induced increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and by decreasing corticosterone in the blood. Metyrapone was able to confer similar neuroprotection as G-CSF while dexamethasone reversed the

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor inhibits CXCR4/SDF-1α signaling and overcomes stromal-mediated drug resistance in the HL-60 cell line

    PubMed Central

    SHENG, XIANFU; ZHONG, HUA; WAN, HAIXIA; ZHONG, JIHUA; CHEN, FANGYUAN

    2016-01-01

    Combining cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has demonstrated marked efficacy in the treatment of elderly and relapsed/refractory patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the role of G-CSF remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of G-CSF to overcome stromal-mediated drug resistance and the underlying molecular mechanism. Two types of co-culture models were established in the HS-5 human bone marrow/stromal and HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines, in order to imitate the interactions between stromal and leukemia cells in vitro, which is mediated by the stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α signaling axis. In the present study, HL-60 cells were attracted and adhered to HS-5 cells using migration assay and flow cytometry, respectively; however, these interactions were inhibited by treatment with G-CSF and/or the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) antagonist, AMD3100. Co-culture with HS-5 cells, including direct and indirect contact, protected HL-60 cells against spontaneous apoptosis or drug-induced apoptosis; however, these protective effects were disrupted by treatment with G-CSF and/or AMD3100. Notably, G-CSF and/or AMD3100 did not alter cell viability or apoptosis when HL-60 cells were cultured with medium alone. In addition, G-CSF significantly reduced the expression levels of surface CXCR4 protein, total CXCR4 protein and CXCR4 mRNA, and significantly upregulated the expression of microRNA (miR)-146a. Conversely, AMD3100 significantly reduced surface CXCR4 expression levels, but not the total CXCR4, CXCR4 mRNA or miR-146a expression levels. The results of the present study suggested that interfering with the CXCR4/SDF-1α signaling axis via G-CSF inhibited the migration and adhesion of HL-60 cells to HS-5 cells and eliminated HS5 cell-mediated protective effects. Furthermore, G-CSF administration reduced CXCR4 expression levels by upregulating the expression of

  20. Treatment with recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Filgrastin) stimulates neutrophils and tissue macrophages and induces an effective non-specific response against Mycobacterium avium in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, L E; Petrofsky, M; Stevens, P

    1998-01-01

    A role of neutrophils in the host response against Mycobacterium avium (MAC) has recently been suggested. To investigate this matter further, we determined the effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the outcome of MAC infection in mice. C57BL/6bg+/bg- black mice were intravenously infected with 1 x 10(7) MAC and then divided into four experimental groups to receive G-CSF as follows: (i) 10 micrograms/kg/day; (ii) 50 micrograms/kg/day; (iii) 100 micrograms/kg/day; (iv) placebo control. Mice were killed at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment to determine the bacterial load of liver and spleen. Treatment with G-CSF at both 10 and 50 micrograms/kg/day doses significantly decreased the number of viable bacteria in liver and spleen after 2 weeks (approximately 70.5% and 69.0%, respectively), and after 4 weeks (approximately 53% and 52%, respectively, P < 0.05 compared with placebo control). Treatment with 100 micrograms/kg/day did not result in decrease of bacterial colony-forming units in the liver and spleen after 4 weeks. Administration of G-CSF induced interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 production by splenocytes. To examine if the protective effect of G-CSF was accompanied by the activation of phagocytic cells, blood neutrophils and splenic macrophages were purified from mice receiving G-CSF and their ability to kill MAC was examined ex vivo. Neutrophils and macrophages from G-CSF-treated mice were able to inhibit the growth of or to kill MAC ex vivo, while phagocytic cells from untreated control mice had no anti-MAC effect. These results suggest that activation of neutrophils appears to induce an effective non-specific host defence against MAC, and further studies should aim for better understanding of the mechanisms of protection. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9767410

  1. An early granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment attenuates neuropathic pain through activation of mu opioid receptors on the injured nerve

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Yeh, Shin-Rung; Lo, Ai-Lun; Chao, Po-Kuan; Lee, Yun-Lin; Hung, Yu-Hui; Lu, Kwok-Tung; Ro, Long-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the mu opioid receptor (MOR) located in the peripheral nerves can be activated after nerve injury and that it attenuates peripheral nociceptive signals to the spinal dorsal horn. Various cytokines and phosphorylated-p38 (p-p38) activation in the dorsal horn also play an important role in neuropathic pain development. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is a growth factor that can stimulate granulocyte formation and has been shown to exert an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through recruiting opioid-containing leukocytes to the injured nerve. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Herein, the results of behavior tests in addition to MOR levels in the injured sciatic nerve and the levels of p-p38 and various cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn were studied in vehicle-treated or GCSF-treated chronic constriction injured (CCI) rats at different time points (i.e., 1, 3, and 7 days, respectively) after nerve injury. The results showed that a single early systemic GCSF treatment after nerve injury can up-regulate MORs in the injured nerve, which can decrease peripheral nociceptive signals. Thereafter, those changes suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 but enhance the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4, followed by decreases in p-p38 in the dorsal horn, and thus further attenuate neuropathic pain. PMID:27180600

  2. An early granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment attenuates neuropathic pain through activation of mu opioid receptors on the injured nerve.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Yeh, Shin-Rung; Lo, Ai-Lun; Chao, Po-Kuan; Lee, Yun-Lin; Hung, Yu-Hui; Lu, Kwok-Tung; Ro, Long-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the mu opioid receptor (MOR) located in the peripheral nerves can be activated after nerve injury and that it attenuates peripheral nociceptive signals to the spinal dorsal horn. Various cytokines and phosphorylated-p38 (p-p38) activation in the dorsal horn also play an important role in neuropathic pain development. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is a growth factor that can stimulate granulocyte formation and has been shown to exert an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through recruiting opioid-containing leukocytes to the injured nerve. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Herein, the results of behavior tests in addition to MOR levels in the injured sciatic nerve and the levels of p-p38 and various cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn were studied in vehicle-treated or GCSF-treated chronic constriction injured (CCI) rats at different time points (i.e., 1, 3, and 7 days, respectively) after nerve injury. The results showed that a single early systemic GCSF treatment after nerve injury can up-regulate MORs in the injured nerve, which can decrease peripheral nociceptive signals. Thereafter, those changes suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 but enhance the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4, followed by decreases in p-p38 in the dorsal horn, and thus further attenuate neuropathic pain. PMID:27180600

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor signalling via Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J; Fraser, F W; Riley, C; Ahmed, N; McCulloch, D R; Ward, A C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in women, with only limited understanding of disease aetiology at the molecular level. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a key regulator of both normal and emergency haematopoiesis, and is used clinically to aid haematopoietic recovery following ablative therapies for a variety of solid tumours including ovarian cancer. Methods: The expression of G-CSF and its receptor, G-CSFR, was examined in primary ovarian cancer samples and a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF treatment on proliferation, migration and survival were determined. Results: G-CSFR was predominantly expressed in high-grade serous ovarian epithelial tumour samples and a subset of ovarian cancer cell lines. Stimulation of G-CSFR-expressing ovarian epithelial cancer cells with G-CSF led to increased migration and survival, including against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. The effects of G-CSF were mediated by signalling via the downstream JAK2/STAT3 pathway. Conclusion: This study suggests that G-CSF has the potential to impact on ovarian cancer pathogenesis, and that G-CSFR expression status should be considered in determining appropriate therapy. PMID:24220695

  4. Repeated courses of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: clinical and biological results from a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Chiò, Adriano; Mora, Gabriele; La Bella, Vincenzo; Caponnetto, Claudia; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Sabatelli, Mario; Siciliano, Gabriele; Silani, Vincenzo; Corbo, Massimo; Moglia, Cristina; Calvo, Andrea; Mutani, Roberto; Rutella, Sergio; Gualandi, Francesca; Melazzini, Mario; Scimè, Rosanna; Petrini, Mario; Bondesan, Paola; Garbelli, Silvia; Mantovani, Stefania; Bendotti, Caterina; Tarella, Corrado

    2011-02-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induces a transient mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells from bone marrow to peripheral blood. Our aim was to evaluate safety of repeated courses of G-CSF in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), assessing disease progression and changes in chemokine and cytokine levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Twenty-four ALS patients entered an open-label, multicenter trial in which four courses of G-CSF and mannitol were administered at 3-month intervals. Levels of G-CSF were increased after treatment in the serum and CSF. Few and transitory adverse events were observed. No significant reduction of the mean monthly decrease in ALSFRS-R score and forced vital capacity was observed. A significant reduction in CSF levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) was observed. G-CSF treatment was safe and feasible in a multicenter series of ALS patients. A decrease in the CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines MCP-1 and IL-17 was found, indicating a G-CSF-induced central anti-inflammatory response. PMID:21254083

  5. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor permits dose intensification by interval compression in the treatment of Ewing's sarcomas and soft tissue sarcomas in children.

    PubMed

    Womer, R B; Daller, R T; Fenton, J G; Miser, J S

    2000-01-01

    71 children with sarcomas were treated in a prospective pilot study to determine whether granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) permits compression of the interval between chemotherapy cycles. Patients had Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET), rhabdomyosarcoma, non-rhabdo soft tissue sarcomas or other advanced soft tissue tumours. The chemotherapy alternated vincristine-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide-etoposide, with G-CSF between courses. Therapy had two phases: induction (six cycles) and continuation (six cycles), which included primary tumour treatment with surgery and/or radiation. Chemotherapy cycles began every 14 days, or upon absolute neutrophil count (ANC) and platelet count recovery. The median chemotherapy cycle interval was 16 (11-48) days in the induction phase, with a median average relative dose intensification (ARDI) of 1.27 compared with every-21-day therapy. In the continuation phase, the median cycle interval was 21 days, with a median ARDI of 1.10. Radiation therapy prolonged chemotherapy intervals, whilst erythropoietin shortened them. Toxicity was modest for such chemotherapy. Event-free survival is comparable with or superior to that in recent large studies. G-CSF permits intensification of this regimen through interval compression. The impact of this approach on efficacy remains to be determined in a randomised trial. PMID:10741300

  6. Effect of Periodic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Administration on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Different Monocyte Subsets in Pediatric Patients with Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Grubczak, Kamil; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Miklasz, Paula; Singh, Paulina; Radzikowska, Urszula; Kulak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by progressive muscle dysfunction. There is a large body of evidence indicating that angiogenesis is impaired in muscles of MD patients. Therefore, induction of dystrophic muscle revascularization should become a novel approach aimed at diminishing the extent of myocyte damage. Recently, we and others demonstrated that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) resulted in clinical improvement of patients with neuromuscular disorders. To date, however, the exact mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of G-CSF have not been fully understood. Here we used flow cytometry to quantitate numbers of CD34+ cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and different monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of pediatric MD patients treated with repetitive courses of G-CSF administration. We showed that repetitive cycles of G-CSF administration induced efficient mobilization of above-mentioned cells including cells with proangiogenic potential. These findings contribute to better understanding the beneficial clinical effects of G-CSF in pediatric MD patients. PMID:26770204

  7. The induction of prolonged myelopoietic effects in monkeys by GW003, a recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor genetically fused to recombinant human albumin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianxing; Yang, Jingwen; Liu, Yunlong; Shan, Chengqi; Wang, Qiushi; Chen, Zhihang; Cheng, Yuanguo

    2015-02-01

    GW003, a genetic fusion protein of human serum albumin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), was developed based on a novel strategy for producing long-acting proteins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hematologic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicokinetic effects of GW003 on cynomolgus monkeys. We show that following a single subcutaneous administration of GW003, the absolute neutrophil count increased significantly compared with monkeys that received only the vehicle, and the magnitude of the neutrophilic response to GW003 was dose dependent. After an injection at equal molar dose, the clearance of GW003 in the monkeys was approximately fourfold slower, and the terminal half-life (T1/2 ) was fivefold longer than the corresponding values for recombinant methionyl human G-CSF. Interestingly, both the clearance and T1/2 decreased with increasing doses of GW003, and much faster elimination was observed after multidose exposure. In toxicokinetic studies, the serum concentration of GW003 after the eighth injection was much lower than it was after the first injection, and a neutralizing antibody against G-CSF was found to have a dose-dependent effect upon the treatment groups. Overall, the favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties supported the selection and development of GW003 as a promising candidate for neutropenia therapy. PMID:25174614

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor does not enhance recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells in rats with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Otani, Hajime; Fujita, Masanori; Shimazu, Takayuki; Yoshioka, Kei; Enoki, Chiharu; Minato, Naoki; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2012-09-01

    Despite the potential benefit of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), the efficacy of G-CSF in regenerating the heart after MI remains controversial. The authors hypothesize that the limited efficacy of G-CSF is related to its inhibitory effect on recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) to the infarcted tissue. MI was induced in rats with intrabone marrow-bone marrow transplantation from syngenic rats expressing green fluorescence protein to track BMCs. G-CSF was administered for five days after the onset of MI. G-CSF increased the number of CD45(+) cells in the peripheral circulation but did not increase their recruitment to the heart. G-CSF had no effect on myocardial stromal-derived factor-1 alpha and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) expression in mononuclear cells in the peripheral blood and CXCR4(+) cells in the heart. G-CSF had no effect on angiogenesis, myocardial fibrosis or left ventricular function four weeks after MI. These results suggest that G-CSF mobilizes BMCs to the peripheral circulation but does not increase recruitment to the infarcted myocardium despite preservation of the stromal-derived factor-1 alpha/CXCR4 axis. PMID:23620693

  9. Hypoxic tumor cell death and modulation of endothelial adhesion molecules in the regression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-transduced tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, M. P.; Lombardi, L.; Melani, C.; Parenza, M.; Baroni, C.; Ruco, L.; Stoppacciaro, A.

    1996-01-01

    C-26 colon adenocarcinoma cells transduced with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) gene form large tumors when injected into sublethally irradiated mice. These tumors regress when leukocyte function is reconstituted. Electron microscopy and immunocytochemical analysis of regressing C-26/G-CSF nodules indicates that tumor destruction is due mainly to hypoxia resulting from the functional loss of tumor vasculature and is only marginally due to direct cytolysis. Desegregation of basal lamina, cell swelling, and loss of junctions characterized the vessels within regressing tumors. Tumor cells were necrotic or filled with lipid vacuoles regardless of the distance from nearby vessels. Damage of tumor vasculature was dependent on the infiltrating leukocytes and the cytotoxic cytokines they produced. Locally produced interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induced vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin on tumor vessels. Treatment with monoclonal antibodies to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or TNF-alpha blocked tumor regression by inhibiting VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression on tumor-associated endothelial cells resulting in a reduced number of infiltrating leukocytes. Thus, C-26/G-CSF tumor regression presents features typical of hemorrhagic necrosis that occurs through the cytokines produced by infiltrating leukocytes in response to G-CSF. Images Figure 1 p477-a Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8579110

  10. Effect of Periodic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Administration on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Different Monocyte Subsets in Pediatric Patients with Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Grubczak, Kamil; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Miklasz, Paula; Singh, Paulina; Radzikowska, Urszula; Kulak, Wojciech; Moniuszko, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by progressive muscle dysfunction. There is a large body of evidence indicating that angiogenesis is impaired in muscles of MD patients. Therefore, induction of dystrophic muscle revascularization should become a novel approach aimed at diminishing the extent of myocyte damage. Recently, we and others demonstrated that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) resulted in clinical improvement of patients with neuromuscular disorders. To date, however, the exact mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of G-CSF have not been fully understood. Here we used flow cytometry to quantitate numbers of CD34+ cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and different monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of pediatric MD patients treated with repetitive courses of G-CSF administration. We showed that repetitive cycles of G-CSF administration induced efficient mobilization of above-mentioned cells including cells with proangiogenic potential. These findings contribute to better understanding the beneficial clinical effects of G-CSF in pediatric MD patients. PMID:26770204

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in secondary prophylaxis for advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma treated with ABVD chemotherapy: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M C; Prica, A; Graczyk, J; Buckstein, R; Chan, K K W

    2016-08-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly administered to patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) with neutropenia. We constructed a decision-analytic model to compare the cost-effectiveness of secondary prophylaxis with G-CSF to a strategy of 'no G-CSF' in response to severe neutropenia for adults with advanced-stage HL treated with ABVD. A Canadian public health payer's perspective was considered and costs were presented in 2013 Canadian dollars. The quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) attained with the G-CSF and 'no G-CSF' strategies were 1.403 and 1.416, respectively. Costs for the strategies with and without G-CSF were $38,971 and $33,982, respectively. In the base case analysis, the 'no G-CSF' strategy was associated with cost savings and improved QALYs; therefore, 'no G-CSF' was the dominant approach. For patients with severe neutropenia during ABVD chemotherapy for advanced-stage HL, a strategy without G-CSF support is associated with improved quality-adjusted outcomes, cost savings, and is the preferred approach. PMID:26758765

  12. PU.1 (Spi-1) and C/EBP alpha regulate the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor promoter in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, L T; Hohaus, S; Gonzalez, D A; Dziennis, S E; Tenen, D G

    1996-08-15

    Cytokines, important for lineage commitment and differentiation during hematopoiesis, exert their influence by binding specific receptors. Receptor expression is tightly regulated and examining the factors that govern their expression will allow better understanding of the events that determine lineage commitment. The granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor is expressed exclusively in myeloid cells and the placenta. We show here that the G-CSF receptor transcription start site is identical in each of these tissues. A 1,391-bp fragment of the G-CSF receptor promoter is both active in myeloid cell lines and tissue specific. We have also found two regions that are important for G-CSF receptor promoter activity. One region, located at bp -49, contains a GCAAT site that specifically binds the C/EBP alpha transcription factor in myeloid nuclear extracts. Mutation of this site prevents C/EBP alpha binding and reduces promoter activity by 60%. The other functionally important region of the G-CSF receptor promoter is in the 5' untranslated region, at bp +36 and +43, where there are two sites for the ets family member PU.1. Mutation of these sites prevents PU.1 binding and reduces promoter activity by 75%. These results reinforce the importance of both PU.1 and C/EBP alpha in the expression of myeloid-specific genes and neutrophil development. PMID:8695841

  13. Development and Characterization of a Novel Fusion Protein of a Mutated Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Human Serum Albumin in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Shan; Wen, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Yu; Wu, Yi-Liang; Lu, You; Zhou, Lin-Fu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop a novel, long-acting and potent human serum albumin/granulocyte colony stimulating factor (HSA/G-CSF) therapeutic fusion protein. The novel fusion protein, called HMG, was constructed by genetically fusing mutated human derived G-CSF (mG-CSF) to the C-terminal of HSA and then prepared in Pichia pastoris. The molecular mass of HMG was about 85 kDa and the isoelectric point was 5.3. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested that mG-CSF retained nearly all of its native secondary structure, regardless of fusion. The binding capabilities of mG-CSF moiety to G-CSF receptor and HSA moiety to warfarin showed very little change after fusing. The bioactivity of HMG (11.0×106 IU/mg) was more than twice that of rHSA/G-CSF (4.6×106 IU/mg). A mutation was made at the 718th amino acid of HMG, substituting Ala for Thr, to investigate the glycosylation of HMG expressed in P. pastoris. Data indicated that HMG was modified at Thr718, speculatively with the addition of a mannose chain. In conclusion, a novel HSA/G-CSF fusion protein was successfully constructed based on a mutated G-CSF. This protein showed more potent bioactivity than rHSA/G-CSF and thus may be a suitable long-acting G-CSF. PMID:25535738

  14. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amirzagar, Nasibeh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Tafakhori, Abbas; Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Ghaffarpour, Majid; Siroos, Bahaddin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods Forty subjects with ALS were randomly assigned to two groups, which received either subcutaneous G-CSF (5 µg/kg/q12h) or placebo for 5 days. The subjects were then followed up for 3 months using the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R), manual muscle testing, ALS Assessment Questionnaire-40, and nerve conduction studies. CD34+/CD133+ cell count and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated at baseline. Results The rate of disease progression did not differ significantly between the two groups. The reduction in ALSFRS-R scores was greater in female subjects in the G-CSF group than in their counterparts in the placebo group. There was a trend toward a positive correlation between baseline CSF MCP-1 levels and the change in ALSFRS-R scores in both groups (Spearman's ρ=0.370, p=0.070). Conclusions With the protocol implemented in this study, G-CSF is not a promising option for the treatment of ALS. Furthermore, it may accelerate disease progression in females. PMID:25851895

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): A saturated fatty acid-induced myokine with insulin-desensitizing properties in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ordelheide, Anna-Maria; Gommer, Nadja; Böhm, Anja; Hermann, Carina; Thielker, Inga; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Staiger, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) are important metabolic signals that acutely enhance fatty acid oxidation, thermogenesis, energy expenditure, and insulin secretion. However, if chronically elevated, they provoke inflammation, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure. Moreover, FFAs act via multiple signaling pathways as very potent regulators of gene expression. In human skeletal muscle cells differentiated in vitro (myotubes), we have shown in previous studies that the expression of CSF3, the gene encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), is markedly induced upon FFA treatment and exercise. Methods and results We now report that CSF3 is induced in human myotubes by saturated, but not unsaturated, FFAs via Toll-like receptor 4-dependent and -independent pathways including activation of Rel-A, AP-1, C/EBPα, Src, and stress kinases. Furthermore, we show that human adipocytes and myotubes treated with G-CSF become insulin-resistant. In line with this, a functional polymorphism in the CSF3 gene affects adipose tissue- and whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in human subjects with elevated plasma FFA concentrations. Conclusion G-CSF emerges as a new player in FFA-induced insulin resistance and thus may be of interest as a target for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27069870

  16. Myeloid cell kinetics in mice treated with recombinant interleukin-3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF), or granulocyte-macrophage CSF in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, B.I.; Molineux, G.; Pojda, Z.; Souza, L.M.; Mermod, J.J.; Dexter, T.M. )

    1991-05-15

    Myeloid cell kinetics in mice treated with pure hematopoietic growth factors have been investigated using tritiated thymidine labeling and autoradiography. Mice were injected subcutaneously with 125 micrograms/kg granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (in some cases 5 micrograms/kg), or 10 micrograms/kg of granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), or interleukin-3 (IL-3) every 12 hours for 84 hours. {sup 3}HTdR labeling was performed in vivo after 3 days of treatment. G-CSF increased the peripheral neutrophil count 14-fold and increased the proportion and proliferation rate of neutrophilic cells in the marrow, suppressing erythropoiesis at the same time. Newly produced mature cells were released into the circulation within 24 hours of labeling, compared with a normal appearance time of about 96 hours. By contrast, GM-CSF and IL-3 had little effect on either marrow cell kinetics or on the rate of release of mature cells, although GM-CSF did stimulate a 50% increase in peripheral neutrophils. Monocyte production was also increased about eightfold by G-CSF and 1.5-fold by GM-CSF, but their peak release was only slightly accelerated. While the peripheral half-lives of the neutrophilic granulocytes were normal, those of the monocytes were dramatically reduced, perhaps due to sequestration in the tissues for functional purposes. The stimulated monocyte production in the case of G-CSF required an additional five cell cycles, a level that might have repercussions on the progenitor compartments.

  17. Hematopoietic properties of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/immunoglobulin (G-CSF/IgG-Fc) fusion proteins in normal and neutropenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Cox, George N; Chlipala, Elizabeth A; Smith, Darin J; Carlson, Sharon J; Bell, Stacie J; Doherty, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    Previously we showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro bioactivity is preserved when the protein is joined via a flexible 7 amino acid linker to an immunoglobulin-1 (IgG1)-Fc domain and that the G-CSF/IgG1-Fc fusion protein possessed a longer circulating half-life and improved hematopoietic properties compared to G-CSF in normal rats. We have extended this analysis by comparing the relative hematopoietic potencies of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc to G-CSF in normal mice and to G-CSF and polyethylene glycol (PEG) -modified G-CSF in neutropenic rats. Mice were treated for 5 days using different doses and dosing regimens of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc or G-CSF and circulating neutrophil levels in the animals measured on Day 6. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc stimulated greater increases in blood neutrophils than comparable doses of G-CSF when administered using daily, every other day or every third day dosing regimens. In rats made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide, G-CSF/IgG1-Fc accelerated recovery of blood neutrophils to normal levels (from Day 9 to Day 5) when administered as 5 daily injections or as a single injection on Day 1. By contrast, G-CSF accelerated neutrophil recovery when administered as 5 daily injections, but not when administered as a single injection. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc was as effective as PEG-G-CSF at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc and G-CSF/IgG4-Fc fusion proteins in which the 7 amino acid linker was deleted also were effective at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. These studies confirm the enhanced in vivo hematopoietic properties of G-CSF/IgG-Fc fusion proteins. PMID:24637521

  18. pH responsive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor variants with implications for treating Alzheimer's disease and other central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Systemic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has yielded encouraging results in treating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Making G-CSF a viable AD therapeutic will, however, require increasing G-CSF's ability to stimulate neurons within the brain. This objective could be realized by increasing transcytosis of G-CSF across the blood brain barrier (BBB). An established correlation between G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) binding pH responsiveness and increased recycling of G-CSF to the cell exterior after endocytosis motivated development of G-CSF variants with highly pH responsive G-CSFR binding affinities. These variants will be used in future validation of our hypothesis that increased BBB transcytosis can enhance G-CSF therapeutic efficacy. Flow cytometric screening of a yeast-displayed library in which G-CSF/G-CSFR interface residues were mutated to histidine yielded a G-CSF triple His mutant (L109H/D110H/Q120H) with highly pH responsive binding affinity. This variant's KD, measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), increases ∼20-fold as pH decreases from 7.4 to below histidine's pKa of ∼6.0; an increase 2-fold greater than for previously reported G-CSF His mutants. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) enabled expression and purification of soluble, bioactive G-CSF triple His variant protein, an outcome inaccessible via Escherichia coli inclusion body refolding. This purification and bioactivity validation will enable future identification of correlations between pH responsiveness and transcytosis in BBB cell culture model and animal experiments. Furthermore, the library screening and CFPS methods employed here could be applied to developing other pH responsive hematopoietic or neurotrophic factors for treating CNS disorders. PMID:25877663

  19. Effect of recombinant bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor covalently bound to polyethylene glycol injection on neutrophil number and function in periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kayoko; Goff, Jesse P; Canning, Peter; Wang, Chong; Roth, James A

    2014-01-01

    Dairy cows often experience decreased immune function around the time of calving, typified by impaired polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) function and a transient neutropenia. This is associated with increased disease incidence, including mastitis, retained placenta, and metritis. In an attempt to improve PMN functional capacity during the periparturient period, we injected cows with recombinant bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor covalently bound to polyethylene glycol (PEG rbG-CSF) twice subcutaneously, about 6d before calving and within 24h after calving. Twenty-one cows in their second pregnancy were enrolled in this study and divided into 2 groups: PEG rbG-CSF treated (n=11) and saline-treated controls (n=10). The PMN numbers quickly and dramatically increased after PEG rbG-CSF administration and remained elevated through the end of the experiment (13d after calving). Exocytosis of myeloperoxidase by stimulated PMN, which is generally decreased in periparturient cows, was markedly increased by PEG rbG-CSF after injection. Higher myeloperoxidase exocytosis persisted for at least 10d after calving. The PMN superoxide anion release and phagocytosis activity did not differ between groups. Injection of PEG rbG-CSF was safe for cows, with no significant negative effects observed. The greatest single effect of PEG rbG-CSF administration was a dramatic increase in circulating numbers of PMN. The increased numbers of PMN ready to move to a site of infection early in the course of an infection may improve the ability of the cow to ward off clinical disease in the periparturient period. PMID:24881799

  20. miR-155 Is Associated with the Leukemogenic Potential of the Class IV Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor in CD34+ Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, HaiJiao; Goudeva, Lilia; Immenschuh, Stephan; Schambach, Axel; Skokowa, Julia; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Blasczyk, Rainer; Figueiredo, Constança

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a major regulator of granulopoiesis on engagement with the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR). The truncated, alternatively spliced, class IV G-CSFR (G-CSFRIV) has been associated with defective differentiation and relapse risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. However, the detailed biological properties of G-CSFRIV in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and the potential leukemogenic mechanism of this receptor remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that G-CSFRIV–overexpressing (G-CSFRIV+) HSPCs demonstrated an enhanced proliferative and survival capacity on G-CSF stimulation. Cell cycle analyses showed a higher frequency of G-CSFRIV+ cells in the S and G2/M phase. Also, apoptosis rates were significantly lower in G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. These findings were shown to be associated with a sustained Stat5 activation and elevated miR-155 expression. In addition, G-CSF showed to further induce G-CSFRIV and miR-155 expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from AML patients. A Stat5 pharmacological inhibitor or ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference–mediated silencing of the expression of miR-155 abrogated the aberrant proliferative capacity of the G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. Hence, the dysregulation of Stat5/miR-155 pathway in the G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs supports their leukemogenic potential. Specific miRNA silencing or the inhibition of Stat5-associated pathways might contribute to preventing the risk of leukemogenesis in G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. This study may promote the development of a personalized effective antileukemia therapy, in particular for the patients exhibiting higher expression levels of G-CSFRIV, and further highlights the necessity of pre-screening the patients for G-CSFR isoforms expression patterns before G-CSF administration. PMID:25730818

  1. Hematopoietic Properties of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/Immunoglobulin (G-CSF/IgG-Fc) Fusion Proteins in Normal and Neutropenic Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cox, George N.; Chlipala, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Darin J.; Carlson, Sharon J.; Bell, Stacie J.; Doherty, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro bioactivity is preserved when the protein is joined via a flexible 7 amino acid linker to an immunoglobulin-1 (IgG1)-Fc domain and that the G-CSF/IgG1-Fc fusion protein possessed a longer circulating half-life and improved hematopoietic properties compared to G-CSF in normal rats. We have extended this analysis by comparing the relative hematopoietic potencies of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc to G-CSF in normal mice and to G-CSF and polyethylene glycol (PEG) - modified G-CSF in neutropenic rats. Mice were treated for 5 days using different doses and dosing regimens of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc or G-CSF and circulating neutrophil levels in the animals measured on Day 6. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc stimulated greater increases in blood neutrophils than comparable doses of G-CSF when administered using daily, every other day or every third day dosing regimens. In rats made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide, G-CSF/IgG1-Fc accelerated recovery of blood neutrophils to normal levels (from Day 9 to Day 5) when administered as 5 daily injections or as a single injection on Day 1. By contrast, G-CSF accelerated neutrophil recovery when administered as 5 daily injections, but not when administered as a single injection. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc was as effective as PEG-G-CSF at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc and G-CSF/IgG4-Fc fusion proteins in which the 7 amino acid linker was deleted also were effective at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. These studies confirm the enhanced in vivo hematopoietic properties of G-CSF/IgG-Fc fusion proteins. PMID:24637521

  2. Modulation of JAK2, STAT3 and Akt1 proteins by granulocyte colony stimulating factor following carbon monoxide poisoning in male rat.

    PubMed

    Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Imen Shahidi, Mohsen; Moallem, Seyyed Adel; Abnous, Khalil; Ghorbani, Maryam; Mohamadpour, Amir Hooshang

    2016-10-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless, tasteless and non-irritating by-product of inefficient combustion of hydrocarbon fuels such as motor vehicle exhausted gases. It is the leading cause of mortality in the USA among all unintentional toxicants. Male rats exposed to CO poisoning in the heart has many cardiovascular effects such as, cardiomyopathy, tachycardia, arrhythmias, and ischemia and in severe cases, myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiac arrest. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is one of the most frequent consequences in the heart. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that mobilizes and differentiates granulocytes from stem cells. It can stimulate many anti-apoptotic pathways such as JAK2-STAT3 and PI3-Akt kinases following cardiac ischemia. G-CSF exerts its anti-apoptotic effects through binding to its specific cell surface receptor. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of anti-apoptotic effect of G-CSF following CO poisoning. Rats were exposed to CO 1500 or 3000 ppm for 60 min. Animals received G-CSF 100 μg/kg subcutaneously for five consecutive days after CO intoxication. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression of six proteins namely JAK2, p-JAK2, STAT3, p-STAT3, Akt1 and p-Akt1 following G-CSF 100 μg/kg consecutive dose administration after CO poisoning. There was a significant difference between phosphorylated proteins including p-JAK2, p-STAT3 and p-Akt1 in the G-CSF groups and those in control groups and there were not any significant differences in total protein among the groups. PMID:26810905

  3. Tyrosine 763 of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor mediates Ras-dependent activation of the JNK/SAPK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, O; Marshall, C J

    1997-01-01

    The receptor for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can mediate differentiation and proliferation of hemopoietic cells. A proliferative signal is associated with activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. To determine whether other MAPK pathways are activated by G-CSF signalling, we have investigated activation of JNK/SAPK in cells proliferating in response to G-CSF. Here we show that G-CSF and interleukin-3 activate JNK/SAPK in two hemopoietic cell lines. The region of the G-CSF receptor required for G-CSF-induced JNK/SAPK activation is located within the C-terminal 68 amino acids of the cytoplasmic domain, which contains Tyr 763. Mutation of Tyr 763 to Phe completely blocks JNK/SAPK activation. However, the C-terminal 68 amino acids are not required for ERK2 activation. We show that activation of JNK/SAPK, like that of ERK2, is dependent on Ras but that higher levels of Ras-GTP are associated with activation of JNK/SAPK than with activation of ERK2. Two separate functional regions of the G-CSF receptor contribute to activation of Ras. The Y763F mutation reduces G-CSF-induced Ras activation from 30 to 35% Ras-GTP to 10 to 13% Ras-GTP. Low levels of Ras activation (10 to 13% Ras-GTP), which are sufficient for ERK2 activation, require only the 100 membrane-proximal amino acids. High levels of Ras-GTP provided by expression of oncogenic Ras are not sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK. An additional signal, also mediated by Tyr 763, is required for activation of JNK/SAPK. PMID:9032244

  4. Effectiveness of daily versus non-daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in patients with solid tumours undergoing chemotherapy: a multivariate analysis of data from current practice

    PubMed Central

    Almenar Cubells, D; Bosch Roig, C; Jiménez Orozco, E; Álvarez, R; Cuervo, JM; Díaz Fernández, N; Sánchez Heras, AB; Galán Brotons, A; Giner Marco, V; Codes M De Villena, M

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre, retrospective, observational study including patients with solid tumours (excluding breast cancer) that received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) and chemotherapy. We investigated the effectiveness of daily vs. non-daily G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim) adjusting by potential confounders. The study included 391 patients (211 daily G-CSF; 180 pegfilgrastim), from whom 47.3% received primary prophylaxis (PP) (57.8% pegfilgrastim), 26.3% secondary prophylaxis (SP: initiation after cycle 1 and no reactive treatment in any cycle) (51.5% pegfilgrastim) and 26.3% reactive treatment (19.4% pegfilgrastim). Only 42.2% of patients with daily G-CSF and 46.2% with pegfilgrastim initiated prophylaxis within 72 h after chemotherapy, and only 10.5% of patients with daily G-CSF received it for ≥7 days. In the multivariate models, daily G-CSF was associated with higher risk of grade 3-4 neutropenia (G3-4N) vs. pegfilgrastim [odds ratio (OR): 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.004–2.97]. Relative to SP, PP protected against G3-4N (OR for SP vs. PP: 6.0, 95%CI: 3.2–11.4) and febrile neutropenia (OR: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.1–8.8), and was associated to less chemotherapy dose delays and reductions (OR for relative dose intensity <85% for SP vs. PP: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.7–5.4) and higher response rate (OR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.7). Data suggest that pegfilgrastim, compared with a daily G-CSF, and PP, compared with SP, could be more effective in preventing neutropenia and its related events in the clinical practice. PMID:23331323

  5. Local transplantation of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized CD34+ cells for patients with femoral and tibial nonunion: pilot clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Niikura, Takahiro; Kawakami, Yohei; Fukui, Tomoaki; Lee, Sang Yang; Mifune, Yutaka; Kawamata, Shin; Fukushima, Masanori; Asahara, Takayuki; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Most bone fractures typically heal, although a significant proportion (5%-10%) of fractures fail to heal, resulting in delayed union or persistent nonunion. Some preclinical evidence shows the therapeutic potential of peripheral blood CD34(+) cells, a hematopoietic/endothelial progenitor cell-enriched population, for bone fracture healing; however, clinical outcome following transplantation of CD34(+) cells in patients with fracture has never been reported. We report a phase I/IIa clinical trial regarding transplantation of autologous, granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized CD34(+) cells with atelocollagen scaffold for patients with femoral or tibial fracture nonunion (n = 7). The primary endpoint of this study is radiological fracture healing (union) by evaluating anteroposterior and lateral views at week 12 following cell therapy. For the safety evaluation, incidence, severity, and outcome of all adverse events were recorded. Radiological fracture healing at week 12 was achieved in five of seven cases (71.4%), which was greater than the threshold (18.1%) predefined by the historical outcome of the standard of care. The interval between cell transplantation and union, the secondary endpoint, was 12.6 ± 5.4 weeks (range, 8-24 weeks) for clinical healing and 16.1 ± 10.2 weeks (range, 8-36 weeks) for radiological healing. Neither deaths nor life-threatening adverse events were observed during the 1-year follow-up after the cell therapy. These results suggest feasibility, safety, and potential effectiveness of CD34(+) cell therapy in patients with nonunion. PMID:24307697

  6. Crystallization of a 2:2 complex of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) with the ligand-binding region of the GCSF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Honjo, Eijiro; Tamada, Taro; Maeda, Yoshitake; Koshiba, Takumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Okamoto, Tomoyuki; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2005-08-01

    A 2:2 complex of highly purified GCSF receptor (Ig-CRH) with GCSF was crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. The granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) receptor receives signals for regulating the maturation, proliferation and differentiation of the precursor cells of neutrophilic granulocytes. The signalling complex composed of two GCSFs (GCSF, 19 kDa) and two GCSF receptors (GCSFR, 34 kDa) consisting of an Ig-like domain and a cytokine-receptor homologous (CRH) domain was crystallized. A crystal of the complex was grown in 1.0 M sodium formate and 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6 and belongs to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (or its enantiomorph P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.1, c = 331.8 Å. Unfortunately, this crystal form did not diffract beyond 5 Å resolution. Since the heterogeneity of GCSF receptor appeared to prevent the growth of good-quality crystals, the GCSF receptor was fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the GCSF–fractionated GCSF receptor complex were grown as a new crystal form in 0.2 M ammonium phosphate. This new crystal form diffracted to beyond 3.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 1}21 (or its enantiomorph P3{sub 2}21), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 134.8, c = 105.7 Å.

  7. The High Effect of Chemomobilization with High-Dose Etopside + Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Autologous Hematopoietic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Yanmaz, Mustafa Teoman; Selvi, Ahmet; Usul, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) provides hematopoietic support after high-dose chemotherapy and is the standard of care for patients with multiple myeloma (MM), chemo sensitive relapsed high or intermediate grade non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL). However, yields of hematopoietic stem cells vary greatly between patients, and the optimal strategy to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells into peripheral blood for collection has not been defined yet. We investigated the efficacy and safety of chemo mobilization with an intermediate dose etoposide (VP-16; 200 mg/m2 on days 1-3) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)(5 µg/kg twice daily from day 4 through the final day of collection). We reviewed our institutional experience with 91 patients (71 MM, 12 HL, 8 NHL) mobilized with this regimen. VP-16 + G-CSF resulted in successful mobilization in 95.55% of the patients (on one patient stem cell collection with plerixafor was applied), including 76 patients (83.52%) whose stem cells were collected successfully in a single day. Collection was managed between min. D8 and max. D17. Patient age, gender, exposure to previous irradiation and chemotherapy, previous mobilization attempts, and disease characteristics were not considered during selection. Adverse effects of the regimen included supportive transfusions and fevers requiring hospitalization or intravenous antibiotics. VP-16 and G-CSF appears to be a safe and effective mobilization regimen for patients with multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation, producing excellent stem cell yield with the majority of patients requiring 1 day of apheresis. PMID:27103979

  8. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use in a Large Iranian Hospital: Comparison with American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Sarah; Dadpoor, Mina; Ashrafi, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factors (GCSF) is high-cost agents commonly recommended for primary and secondary prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. GCSFs have been shown to be beneficial in some patient subgroups, although they are probably overused in clinical settings. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines summarize current data on the appropriate use of CSFs. The aim of this study was to assess and audit the use of GCSF in a tertiary care center according to the recommendation of ASCO guideline. Subjects and Methods: A prospective observational study from November 2014 to June 2015 was performed on all patients prescribed with filgrastim in the large teaching hospital (Isfahan, Iran). Data was collected on demographics, indication, dosing regimen and duration of treatment, the Absolute Neutrophil Count (ANC) and patient outcome. Results: 91 patients were recorded over the period of the study. 63.7% of prescription complied with the ASCO guideline. Febrile neutropenia post chemotherapy/radiotherapy was the most common appropriate indication (29.3%) followed by primary prophylaxis (25.8%). Fourteen (32%) patients showed ANC recovery in 1-3 days and 16 (37%) within 4-7 days. Ten patients (23%) showed no recovery. The overall mortality was 8 (8.8%) patients. Conclusion: This study revealed that at least one-third of prescribed GCSF was not in accordance with ASCO guideline. Considering the high cost of GCSF in our country and limitation of our resources, we proposed cost-effectiveness studies on GCSF treatment and also the development of a national guideline for optimizing GCSF use. PMID:27252808

  9. Autocrine protective mechanisms of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shun-Ping; Fang, Kan-Tang; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Wen, Yao-Tseng; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the role of autocrine mechanisms in the anti-apoptotic effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve (ON) crush. We observed that both G-CSF and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) are expressed in normal rat retina. Further dual immunofluorescence staining showed G-CSFR immunoreactive cells were colocalized with RGCs, Müller cells, horizontal and amacrine cells. These results confirm that G-CSF is an endogenous ligand in the retina. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR finding demonstrated the transcription levels of G-CSF and G-CSFR were up-regulated after ON crush injury. G-CSF treatment further increased and prolonged the expression level of G-CSFR in the retina. G-CSF has been shown to enhance transdifferentiation of the mobilized hematopoietic stem cells into tissue to repair central nervous system injury. We test the hypothesis that the hematopoietic stem cells recruited by G-CSF treatment can transdifferentiate into RGCs after ON crush by performing sublethal irradiation of the rats 5 days before ON crush. The flow cytometric analysis showed the number of CD34 positive cells in the peripheral blood is significantly lower in the irradiated, crushed and G-CSF-treated group than the sham control group or crush and G-CSF treated group. Nevertheless, the G-CSF treatment enhances the RGC survival after sublethal irradiation and ON crush injury. These data indicate that G-CSF seems unlikely to induce hematopoietic stem cell transdifferentiation into RGCs after ON crush injury. In conclusion, G-CSF may serve an endogenous protective signaling in the retina through direct activation of intrinsic G-CSF receptors and downstream signaling pathways to rescue RGCs after ON crush injury, exogenous G-CSF administration can enhance the anti-apoptotic effects on RGCs. PMID:26518178

  10. Four-Week Repeated Intravenous Dose Toxicity and Toxicokinetic Study of TS-DP2, a Novel Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JooBuom; Lee, Kyungsun; Choe, Keunbum; Jung, Hyunseob; Cho, Hyunseok; Choi, Kiseok; Kim, Taegon; Kim, Seojin; Lee, Hyeong-Seok; Cha, Mi-Jin; Song, Si-Whan; Lee, Chul Kyu; Chun, Gie-Taek

    2015-01-01

    TS-DP2 is a recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) manufactured by TS Corporation. We conducted a four-week study of TS-DP2 (test article) in repeated intravenous doses in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Lenograstim was used as a reference article and was administered intravenously at a dose of 1000 μg/kg/day. Rats received TS-DP2 intravenously at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 μg/kg/day once daily for 4 weeks, and evaluated following a 2-week recovery period. Edema in the hind limbs and loss of mean body weight and body weight gain were observed in both the highest dose group of TS-DP2 and the lenograstim group in male rats. Fibro-osseous lesions were observed in the lenograstim group in both sexes, and at all groups of TS-DP2 in males, and at doses of TS-DP2 500 μg/kg/day and higher in females. The lesion was considered a toxicological change. Therefore, bone is the primary toxicological target of TS-DP2. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) in males was 250 μg/kg/day, and no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) in females was 250 μg/kg/day in this study. In the toxicokinetic study, the serum concentrations of G-CSF were maintained until 8 hr after administration. The systemic exposures (AUC0-24h and C0) were not markedly different between male and female rats, between the administration periods, or between TS-DP2 and lenograstim. In conclusion, TS-DP2 shows toxicological similarity to lenograstim over 4-weeks of repeated doses in rats. PMID:26877840

  11. Multipotent hematopoietic cell lines derived from C/EBPalpha(-/-) knockout mice display granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte- colony-stimulating factor, and retinoic acid-induced granulocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Collins, S J; Ulmer, J; Purton, L E; Darlington, G

    2001-10-15

    The transcription factor C/EBPalpha is an important mediator of granulocyte differentiation and regulates the expression of multiple granulocyte-specific genes including the granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor, neutrophil elastase, and myeloperoxidase. Indeed C/EBPalpha knockout mice display a profound block in granulocyte differentiation. To study this block in granulocytic differentiation in more detail, retroviral vector-mediated transduction of a dominant-negative retinoic acid receptor was used to establish hematopoietic growth factor-dependent, lympho-myeloid progenitor cell lines from the fetal livers of both the C/EBPalpha knockout animals (C/EBPalpha(-/-)) and their heterozygous littermates (C/EBPalpha(+/-)). Surprisingly, the C/EBPalpha(-/-) cell lines displayed significant spontaneous granulocytic differentiation, and this differentiation was markedly enhanced when the cells were stimulated with granulocyte macrophage (GM)-CSF. This GM-CSF-mediated differentiation was associated with the up-regulation of G-CSF receptor mRNA, and the combination of GM-CSF and G-CSF generated more than 95% mature neutrophils in the C/EBPalpha(-/-) cultures. The addition of all-trans retinoic acid also enhanced this granulocytic differentiation of the cultured C/EBPalpha(-/-) cells, indicating that the activated retinoic acid receptors can enhance granulocytic differentiation through a molecular pathway that is independent of C/EBPalpha. These studies clearly indicate that terminal granulocytic differentiation associated with the up-regulation of C/EBPalpha-responsive genes can occur in the absence of C/EBPalpha, and they indicate the existence of multiple independent molecular pathways potentially used by primitive hematopoietic precursors that can lead to the development of mature granulocytes. PMID:11588034

  12. Effects of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF) and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) on acute radiation hematopoietic injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tanikawa, S.; Nakao, I.; Tsuneoka, K.; Nara, N. )

    1989-09-01

    We have attempted to evaluate in vivo effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on acute radiation hematopoietic injury in mice. BDF1 mice, irradiated with 7.5-Gy x-rays, were injected i.p. twice daily for 10 days with 10(5) U recombinant human G-CSF, 3.75 x 10(5) U recombinant murine GM-CSF, or a combination of both. G-CSF significantly enhanced the recovery of not only peripheral leukocytes but also platelets and hematocrit on days 14 and 21 after irradiation. GM-CSF significantly enhanced the recovery of platelets on day 14 and peripheral leukocytes on day 21. G-CSF markedly enhanced the recovery of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S), colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C), erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E), and megakaryocyte colony-forming units (CFU-Meg) both in bone marrow and in the spleen. GM-CSF significantly enhanced the recovery of CFU-Meg in bone marrow on day 14. We found synergistic effects between G-CSF and GM-CSF on CFU-S, CFU-C, and CFU-Meg in the spleen on day 14, although we found antagonistic effects between G-CSF and GM-CSF on CFU-S and CFU-C in bone marrow on day 7, and on platelet counts on day 7. These results indicate that the administration of recombinant G-CSF and GM-CSF may be useful in accelerating hematopoietic recovery in patients with acute radiation hematopoietic injuries.

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: A relation between serum and follicular fluid levels and in-vitro fertilization outcome in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kahyaoglu, Inci; Yılmaz, Nafiye; Timur, Hakan; Inal, Hasan Ali; Erkaya, Salim

    2015-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating in the literature about the potential role of serum and follicular fluid (FF) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as a non-invasive biomarker of oocyte competence and embryo selection in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of serum and FF G-CSF levels on IVF outcome in non-hyperandrogenic, non-obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Twenty-two patients with PCOS (Group I), and 22 patients with the etiology of male factor infertility (Group II) undergoing IVF treatment were included. Demographic features, controlled ovarian stimulation parameters, neutrophil count (NC), neutrophil/leukocyte (N/L) ratio, serum and FF G-CSF levels of the two groups were compared. Serum E2 level on the day of hCG (2982.5±171.4 vs. 2279.0±207.2 pg/mL), total number of retrieved oocytes (14.7±0.9 vs. 11.5±1.3) and mature oocytes (11.6±0.8 vs. 9.1±1.1) were significantly higher in group I when compared to group II (p<0.05). On the day of oocyte retrieval, both the mean serum (54.8±1.7 vs. 48.1±0.9 pg/mL) and FF G-CSF levels (48.8±1.4 vs. 44.1±0.5 pg/mL), NC (4.4±0.2×10(3) vs. 3.6±0.3×10(3)/μL) and N/L ratio (63.6±1.4 vs. 56.1±1.7) in group I were found to be significantly higher than group II ((p<0.05). Despite the increased levels of G-CSF both in the serum and follicular microenvironment in patients with PCOS, a relation between G-CSF and good ovarian response or clinical pregnancy rates could not be demonstrated in this study. PMID:25258001

  14. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  15. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain.

    PubMed

    Schlink, Sarah N; Lager, Kelly M; Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Miller, Laura C; Vorwald, Ann C; Yang, Han-Chun; Kehrli, Marcus E; Faaberg, Kay S

    2016-10-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or limit secondary bacterial infections are desired to reduce the impact of this virus on animal health. Neutrophils play a major role in combatting infection; they can act as phagocytes as well as produce and release lytic enzymes that have potent antimicrobial effects leading to the destruction and clearance of bacterial pathogens. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that controls the production, differentiation and function of granulocytes (including neutrophils) from the bone marrow. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that encoding porcine G-CSF in a replication-defective adenovirus (Ad5-G-CSF) and delivering a single dose to pigs induced a neutrophilia lasting more than two weeks. As secondary bacterial infection is a common occurrence following PRRSV infection, particularly following challenge with highly pathogenic (HP)-PRRSV, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a single prophylactic dose of adenovirus-encoded G-CSF to mitigate secondary bacterial disease associated with HP-PRRSV infection. Administration of Ad5-G-CSF induced a significant neutrophilia as expected. However, between 1 and 2days following HP-PRRSV challenge the number of circulating neutrophils decreased dramatically in the HP-PRRSV infected group, but not the non-infected Ad5-G-CSF group. Ad5-G-CSF administration induced monocytosis as well, which was also reduced by HP-PRRSV challenge. There was no difference in the progression of disease between the Ad5-G-CSF and Ad5-empty groups following HP-PRRSV challenge, with pneumonia and systemic bacterial infection occurring in both treatment groups. Given the impact of HP-PRRSV infection on the

  16. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh-G-CSF) may accelerate hematopoietic recovery after HLA-identical sibling allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Ustün, C; Akçağlayan, E; Akan, H; Arslan, O; Ilhan, O; Beksaç, M; Gürman, G; Demirer, T; Arat, M; Celebi, H; Konuk, N; Uysal, A; Koç, H

    2001-03-01

    We studied the effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on hematopoietic recovery and clinical outcome in patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation. Fifty-six patients with hematological malignancies who underwent allogeneic PBSC transplantation between 1995 and 1998 were entered into this study. Twenty-eight patients who received daily G-CSF from day +1 after allogeneic PBSC transplantation until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) reached >0.5 x 10(9)/l for 3 consecutive days were compared with 28 patients (control group) who did not receive G-CSF in a non-randomized manner. The study group and the control group were comparable with respect to baseline patient and transplantation characteristics. Median times to ANC of >0.5 x 10(9)/l and 1 x 10(9)/l with or without G-CSF were 12 days (range 8-21), 13 days (10-32) (P = 0.04) and 13 days (9-21), 15 days (11-44) (P = 0.02), respectively. Median times to reach a platelet count of >20 x 10(9)/l with and without G-CSF were 11 days (0-20) and 13 days (9-26), respectively (P = 0.03). The incidence of febrile episodes was significantly lower with G-CSF, 75% vs 100% (P = 0.008). Patients receiving G-CSF had less grade III-IV mucositis than those who did not receive G-CSF (P = 0.01). There was also no increase in the incidence and severity of acute GVHD in patients using G-CSF (P = 0.22). Although the number of relapsing patients was greater in the G-CSF group (seven vs three patients), this was not statistically significant (P = 0.24). Disease-free and overall survival rates did not differ between the two groups (P = 0.58 and 0.53, respectively). The administration of G-CSF after allogeneic PBSC transplantation provided faster neutrophil and platelet engraftment associated with less severe mucositis and less febrile episodes. PMID:11313683

  17. 9- and 13-Hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids (9+13 HODE) are inversely related to granulocyte colony stimulating factor and IL-6 in runners after 2h running.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Meaney, Mary Pat; John, Casey S; Knagge, Kevin J; Chen, Huiyuan

    2016-08-01

    This study utilized a pro-inflammatory exercise mode to explore potential linkages between increases in 9- and 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid (9+13 HODE) and biomarkers for inflammation, oxidative stress, and muscle damage. Male (N=10) and female (N=10) runners ran at ∼70% VO2max for 1.5h followed by 30min of downhill running (-10%). Blood samples were taken pre-run and immediately-, 1-h-, and 24-h post-run, and analyzed for 9+13 HODE, F2-isoprostanes, six cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), creatine kinase (CK), and myoglobin (MYO). Gender groups performed at comparable relative heart rate and oxygen consumption levels during the 2-h run. All outcome measures increased post-run (time effects, P⩽0.001), with levels near pre-run levels by 24h except for CRP, CK, MYO, and delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS). Plasma 9+13 HODE increased 314±38.4% post-run (P<0.001), 77.3±15.8% 1-h post-run (P<0.001), and 40.6±16.4% 24-h post-exercise (P=0.024), and F2-isoprostanes increased 50.8±8.9% post-run (P<0.001) and 19.0±5.3% 1-h post-run (P=0.006). Post-run increases were comparable between genders for all outcomes except for 9+13 HODE (interaction effect, P=0.024, post-run tending higher in females), IL-10 (P=0.006, females lower), and DOMS (P=0.029, females lower). The pre-to-post-run increase in 9+13 HODEs was not related to other outcomes except for plasma granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) (r=-0.710, P<0.001) and IL-6 (r=-0.457, P=0.043). Within the context of this study, exercise-induced increases in 9+13 HODEs tended higher in females, and were not related to increases in F2-isoprostanes, muscle damage, or soreness. The negative relationships to GCSF and IL-6 suggest a linkage between 9+13 HODES and exercise-induced neutrophil chemotaxis, degranulation, and inflammation. PMID:27018002

  18. The pros and cons of split-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone rather than a single high dose for hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization in small children (< 15 kg) with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Etienne; Piguet, Christophe; Auvrignon, Anne; Rubie, Hervé; Deméocq, François; Kanold, Justyna

    2006-07-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells were mobilized in 34 children with solid tumors weighing < or = 15 kg using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone at the doses of 10, 20 or 2 x 12 microg/kg/day. The mobilization with 2 x 12 microg/kg/day was more efficient than that with 10 mg/kg/day. Although the superiority of the split-dose compared to the single, high daily dose (20 microg/kg/day) was not statistically significant, our results suggest that the 2 x 12 microg/kg/day regimen is interesting. PMID:16818292

  19. Clinical observation of the therapeutic effects of pegylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    WU, FENG-PENG; WANG, JUN; WANG, HUI; LI, NA; GUO, YIN; CHENG, YUN-JIE; LIU, QING; YANG, XIANG-RAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and side-effects of preventive treatment with pegylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG-rhG-CSF) on concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia and to provide a rational basis for its clinical application. A total of 114 patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia were enrolled. A randomized approach was used to divide the patients into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group included three subgroups, namely a P-50 group, P-100 group and P + R group. The P-50 group had 42 cases, which were given a single 50-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF. The P-100 group had 30 cases, which received a single 100-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF. The P + R group comprised 22 cases, which were given a single 50-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF and rhG-CSF 5 μg/kg/day; when the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was ≥2.0×109/l, the administration of rhG-CSF was stopped. The control group (RC group) comprised 20 patients, who received rhG-CSF 5 μg/kg/day by subcutaneous injection until the ANC was ≥2.0×109/l. Changes in the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values over time, the neutropenic symptom remission time and incidence of adverse drug reactions were analyzed statistically in each group of patients. In the experimental group, the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values were significantly higher than those in the control group; the clinical effects began 12–24 h after treatment in the experimental group, and indicated that the treatment improved neutropenia in ~48 h after treatment. There was no significant difference in the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values between the P-50 and P+R groups. In the experimental group, the remission time of neutropenia-induced fever and muscle pain after administration was significantly shorter than that in the control group

  20. Laevofolinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of epirubicin with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support in locally advanced and/or metastatic breast carcinoma: a phase I-II study of the Southern Italy Oncology Group (GOIM).

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, G.; Romito, S.; Gebbia, V.; Pacilio, G.; Giotta, F.; Testa, A.; Pezzella, G.; Durini, E.; Agostara, B.; Cariello, S.

    1995-01-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients with locally advanced (n = 7) or metastatic breast cancer (n = 57), were treated with a combination of laevofolinic acid 100 mg m-2 plus 5-fluorouracil 340 mg m-2 i.v. on days 1-3, cyclophosphamide 600 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1 and epirubicin 90 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1. Epirubicin dose was progressively escalated by 10 mg m-2 per cycle up to 120 mg m-2 in the absence of dose-limiting toxicities. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was given subcutaneously in order to prevent neutropenia. Epirubicin dosage could be increased to 100 mg m-2 in 53 patients (87%), to 110 mg m-2 in 31 patients (51%) and to 120 mg m-2 in 18 cases (30%). In most patients the dose-limiting toxicity was represented by myelosuppression. A statistically significant correlation was found between median white blood count (WBC) or absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir and epirubicin dose level (P = 0.009; P = 0.008). Moreover, a statistically significant correlation was observed between the number of chemotherapeutic cycles, nadir ANC and WBC and the occurrence of anaemia and thrombocytopenia of increasing severity. These data suggest the occurrence of progressive cumulative bone marrow toxicity. Although patients who reached different epirubicin levels showed differences in mean dose intensity, such differences were not statistically significant. No correlation was found between the increase in dose intensity and type, rate or duration of objective responses. In patients with metastatic breast cancer the overall response rate was 72% (95% CL 66-78%) with a 25% complete response rate. Median duration of response was 10 and 13 months respectively for complete and partial responses. All patients with locally advanced breast cancer had an objective response and underwent radical mastectomy. Projected median survival of the whole series of patients with metastatic breast cancer was 20 + months. These data demonstrate that the combination of 5-fluorouracil with

  1. Randomized study of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a report from the Japanese pediatric leukemia/lymphoma study group B-NHL03 study.

    PubMed

    Tsurusawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Gosho, Masahiko; Mori, Tetsuya; Mitsui, Tetsuo; Sunami, Shosuke; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Fukano, Reiji; Tanaka, Fumiko; Fujita, Naoto; Inada, Hiroko; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Komada, Yoshihiro; Saito, Akiko M; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Horibe, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the primary prophylaxis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the management of childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Patients with advanced-stage mature B-NHL were randomized to receive prophylactic G-CSF (G-CSF+) or not receive G-CSF (G-CSF-) based on protocols of the B-NHL03 study. The G-CSF group received 5 μg/kg/d Lenograstim from day 2 after each course of six chemotherapy courses. Fifty-eight patients were assessable, 29 G-CSF + and 29 G-CSF-. G-CSF + patients showed a positive impact on the meantime to neutrophil recovery and hospital stay. On the other hand, they had no impact in the incidences of febrile neutropenia, serious infections, stomatitis and total cost. Our study showed that administration of prophylactic G-CSF through all six chemotherapy courses for childhood B-NHL showed no clinical and economic benefits for the management of childhood B-NHL treatment. PMID:26694130

  2. A low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming regimen versus a daunorubicin plus cytarabine regimen as induction therapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia: A propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Ito, Shoko; Mashima, Kiyomi; Umino, Kento; Nakano, Hirofumi; Kawasaki, Yasufumi; Sugimoto, Miyuki; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Hatano, Kaoru; Okazuka, Kiyoshi; Sato, Kazuya; Oh, Iekuni; Ohmine, Ken; Suzuki, Takahiro; Muroi, Kazuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-03-01

    This retrospective analysis compared the efficacy of intensive induction therapy consisting of daunorubicin and cytarabine (DNR-AraC) to that of less-intensive therapy including low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming (CAG). Patients aged 60 years or older who were newly diagnosed as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were analyzed. Sixty-four and 48 patients were treated with DNR-AraC and CAG, respectively. The complete remission rates, 3-year overall survival and event-free survival in the DNR-AraC group were significantly superior to those in the CAG group (65.6% vs. 29.2%, p<0.001, 38.4% vs. 12.3%, p=0.0033, and 20.3% vs. 7.8%, p=0.0030, respectively), although these differences were not statistically significant in multivariate analyses. Next, we calculated a propensity score for selecting the CAG regimen from six factors. The DNR-AraC regimen was associated with better survival than the CAG regimen in a low propensity score group, but there was no difference in survival between regimens in a high propensity score group. Intensive therapy should be performed for patients with sufficient general and comorbid conditions, but less-intensive therapy may be sufficient for patients with higher age, myelodysplasia-related changes, and lower white blood cell counts, which were relevant factors in the propensity score calculation. PMID:26790727

  3. Safety and efficacy of pegfilgrastim compared to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) supporting a dose-intensive, rapidly cycling anti-metabolite containing chemotherapy regimen (Hyper-CVAD) for lymphoid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Lane, Steven W; Crawford, Julie; Kenealy, Melita; Cull, Gavin; Seymour, John F; Prince, H Miles; Marlton, Paula; Gill, Devinder; Mollee, Peter N

    2006-09-01

    Pegfilgrastim (Neulasta) has proven efficacy as supportive therapy in a variety of 21-day chemotherapy regimens, but has not been studied in dose intensive, rapidly cycling regimens utilising cell-cycle active drugs (e.g. anti-metabolites) such as hyper-CVAD. This study examined whether pegfilgrastim was safe and lead to similar kinetics of neutrophil recovery as daily granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Using retrospective analysis, patients receiving pegfilgrastim (6 mg) were matched with controls (G-CSF 5 microg kg-1 per day) for a cycle of chemotherapy, prior chemotherapy, dose of cytarabine received, age (<60 or >60 years), diagnosis and bone marrow involvement. The primary endpoint was duration of grade IV neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count, ANC < 500 microl-1). Secondary endpoints included time to neutrophil recovery, incidence of febrile neutropenia, positive blood cultures and delay in subsequent chemotherapy. This study identified 124 pegfilgrastim supported cycles in 43 patients and successfully matched them to 124 G-CSF supported cycles from 38 patients treated between January 1999 and July 2005. There were no significant differences between pegfilgrastim and G-CSF groups in baseline or treatment-related variables. The median duration of grade IV neutropenia was 4 days in both groups (P = 0.55). Time to neutrophil recovery, incidence of febrile neutropenia, positive blood cultures and delay in subsequent chemotherapy were similar in both groups. Once per cycle dosing of pegfilgrastim appears safe and as effective as daily G-CSF for supporting the hyper-CVAD chemotherapy regimen. PMID:17064993

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-1β are important cytokines in repair of the cirrhotic liver after bone marrow cell infusion: comparison of humans and model mice.

    PubMed

    Mizunaga, Yuko; Terai, Shuji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Uchida, Koichi; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Nishina, Hiroshi; Fujita, Yusuke; Shinoda, Koh; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Sakaida, Isao

    2012-01-01

    We previously described the effectiveness of autologous bone marrow cell infusion (ABMi) therapy for patients with liver cirrhosis (LC). We analyzed chronological changes in 19 serum cytokines as well as levels of specific cytokines in patients after ABMi therapy and in a mouse model of cirrhosis generated using green fluorescent protein (GFP)/carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). We measured expression profiles of cytokines in serum samples collected from 13 patients before and at 1 day and 1 week after ABMi. Child-Pugh scores significantly improved in all of these patients. To analyze the meaning of early cytokine change, we infused GFP-positive bone marrow cells (BMCs) into mice with CCl4-induced LC and obtained serum and tissue samples at 1 day and as well as at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks later. We compared chronological changes in serum cytokine expression in humans and in the model mice at 1 day and 1 week after BMC infusion. Among 19 cytokine, both granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-1β(IL-1β) in serum was found to show the same chronological change pattern between human and mice model. Next, we examined changes in cytokine expression in cirrhosis liver before and at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after BMC infusion. Both G-CSF and IL-1β were undetectable in the liver tissues before and at 1 week after BMC infusion but increased at 2 weeks and continued until 4 weeks after infusion. The infused BMCs induced an early decrease of both G-CSF and IL-1β in serum and an increase in the model mice with LC. These dynamic cytokine changes might be important to repair liver cirrhosis after BMC infusion. PMID:22507241

  5. Routine Primary Prophylaxis for Febrile Neutropenia with Biosimilar Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (Nivestim) or Pegfilgrastim Is Cost Effective in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients undergoing Curative-Intent R-CHOP Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Jun; Tang, Tiffany; Farid, Mohamad; Quek, Richard; Tao, Miriam; Lim, Soon Thye; Wee, Hwee Lin; Chan, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to compare the cost-effectiveness of various strategies of myeloid growth factor prophylaxis for reducing the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Singapore who are undergoing R-CHOP chemotherapy with curative intent. Methods A Markov model was created to compare seven prophylaxis strategies: 1) primary prophylaxis (PP) with nivestim (biosimilar filgrastim) throughout all cycles of chemotherapy; 2) PP with nivestim during the first two cycles of chemotherapy; 3) secondary prophylaxis (SP) with nivestim; 4) PP with pegfilgrastim throughout all cycles of chemotherapy; 5) PP with pegfilgrastim during the first two cycles of chemotherapy; 6) SP with pegfilgrastim; and 7) no prophylaxis (NP). The perspective of a hospital was taken and cost-effectiveness was expressed as the cost per episode of FN avoided over six cycles of chemotherapy. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted. Results Strategies 3, 6, and 7 were dominated in the base case analysis by strategy 5. The costs associated with strategies 2, 5, 1, and 4 were US$3,813, US$4,056, US$4,545, and US$5,331, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for strategy 5 vs. strategy 2, strategy 1 vs. strategy 5, and strategy 4 vs. strategy 1 were US$13,532, US$22,565, and US$30,452, respectively, per episode of FN avoided. Strategy 2 has the highest probability to be cost-effective (ranged from 48% to 60%) when the willingness to pay (WTP) threshold is lower than US$10,000 per FN episode prevented. Conclusion In Singapore, routine PP with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (nivestim or pegfilgrastim) is cost-effective for reducing the risk of FN in patients receiving R-CHOP. PMID:26871584

  6. Phase I study of simultaneous dose escalation and schedule acceleration of cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-etoposide using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with or without antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzoni, A.; Pennucci, M. C.; Danova, M.; Viscoli, C.; Mariani, G. L.; Giorgi, G.; Venturini, M.; Mereu, C.; Scolaro, T.; Rosso, R.

    1996-01-01

    A phase I study was designed to assess whether dose intensity of an 'accelerated' cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-etoposide (CDE) regimen plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) could be increased further, in an outpatient setting, by escalating the dose of each single drug of the regimen. Patients with previously untreated small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) received escalating doses of cyclophosphamide (C) 1100-1300 mg m-2 intravenously (i.v.) on day 1, doxorubicin (D) 50-60 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1, etoposide (E) 110-130 mg m-2 i.v. on days 1, 2, 3 and every 14 days for at least three courses. Along with chemotherapy, G-CSF (filgastrim) 5 micrograms kg-1 from day 5 to day 11 was administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to all patients. Twenty-five patients were enrolled into the study. All patients at the first dose level (C 1100, D 50, E 110 x 3) completed three or more cycles at the dose and schedule planned by the protocol and no 'dose-limiting toxicity' (DLT) was seen. At the second dose level (C 1200, D 55, E 120 x 3) three out of five patients had a DLT consisting of 'granulocytopenic fever' (GCPF). Another six patients were treated at this dose level with the addition of ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice a day and only two patients had a DLT [one episode of documented oral candidiasis and one of 'fever of unknown origin' (FUO) with generalised mucositis]. Accrual of patients proceeded to the third dose level (C 1300, D 60, E 130 x 3) with the prophylactic use of ciprofloxacin. Four out of six patients experienced a DLT consisting of GCPF or documented non-bacterial infection. Accrual of patients at the third dose level was then resumed adding to ciprofloxacin anti-fungal prophylaxis (fluconazole 100 mg daily) and anti-viral prophylaxis (acyclovir 800 mg twice a day) from day 5 to 11. Out of five patients treated three experienced a DLT consisting of severe leucopenia and fever or infection. With a simultaneous dose escalation and schedule acceleration it is indeed

  7. Mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells with chemotherapy and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF): a randomized evaluation of different doses of rhG-CSF.

    PubMed

    Demirer, T; Ayli, M; Ozcan, M; Gunel, N; Haznedar, R; Dagli, M; Fen, T; Genc, Y; Dincer, S; Arslan, O; Gürman, G; Demirer, S; Ozet, G; Uysal, A; Konuk, N; Ilhan, O; Koc, H; Akan, H

    2002-02-01

    To date, no randomized study has compared different doses of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) following submyeloablative mobilization chemotherapy. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of different doses of rhG-CSF following mobilization chemotherapy on yields of CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Fifty patients were randomized to receive 8 (n = 25) versus 16 microg/kg/d (n = 25) of rhG-CSF following mobilization chemotherapy. The median number of CD34+ cells collected after 8 microg/kg/d of rhG-CSF was 2.36 x 10(6)/kg (range, 0.21-7.80), compared with 7.99 (2.76-14.89) after 16 microg/kg/d (P < 0.001). Twenty out of 25 (80%) patients in the low-dose and 23 out of 25 (92%) in the high-dose rhG-CSF arm underwent high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Median days to white blood cell engraftment in patients mobilized with 8 microg/kg and 16 microg/kg of rhG-CSF were 12 (10-20) and 9 (8-11) respectively (P < 0.001). There was no difference between the two groups regarding the other parameters of peritransplant morbidity: days to platelet engraftment (P = 0.10), number of red blood cell (P = 0.56) and platelet transfusions (P = 0.22), days of total parenteral nutrition requirement (P = 0.84), fever (P = 0.93) and antibiotics (P = 0.77), and number of different antibiotics used (P = 0.58). These data showed that higher doses of rhG-CSF following submyeloablative mobilization chemotherapy were associated with a clear dose-response effect based on the collected cell yields. Based on the parameters of peritransplant morbidity, 8 microg/kg/d was as effective as 16 microg/kg/d except for a rapid neutrophil engraftment in the high-dose arm. Therefore, in routine clinical practice, despite some advantage in the use of higher doses of rhG-CSF, lower doses may be used for PBSC collections following chemotherapy-based mobilization regimens in this cost-conscious era. PMID:11841454

  8. Comparison of neurological and functional outcomes after administration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in motor-complete versus motor-incomplete postrehabilitated, chronic spinal cord injuries: a phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Hooshang; Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a major growth factor in the activation and differentiation of granulocytes. This cytokine has been widely and safely employed in different disease conditions over many years. The administration of the growth factors in spinal cord injury (SCI) has been reported elsewhere; here we have tried to see the effect of SCI severity on the neurological outcomes after neuroprotective treatment for SCI with G-CSF. Seventy-four consecutive patients with SCI of at least 6 months' duration, with stable neurological status in the last 3 months, having informed consent for the treatment were included in the study. All the patients had undergone at least 3 months of standard rehabilitation. Patients were assessed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale, Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) III, and International Association of Neurorestoratology-Spinal Cord Injury Functional Rating Scale (IANR-SCIFRS) just before intervention and periodically until 6 months after subcutaneous administration of 5 µg/kg per day of G-CSF for 7 consecutive days. Multiple linear regression models were performed for statistical evaluation of lesion completeness and level of injury on changes in ASIA motor, light touch, pinprick, IANR-SCIFRS, and SCIM III scores, as a phase I/II comparative study. The study consisted of 52 motor-complete and 22 motor-incomplete SCI patients. There was no significant difference regarding age and sex, chronicity, and level of SCI between the two groups. Motor-incomplete patients had significantly more improvement in ASIA motor score compared to the motor-complete patients (7.68 scores, p < 0.001); also they had significant improvement in light touch (6.42 scores, p = 0.003) and pinprick sensory scores (4.89 scores, p = 0.011). Therefore, G-CSF administration in motor-incomplete SCIs is associated with significantly higher motor improvement, and also the higher the initial ASIA Impairment Scale

  9. Involvement of the high-affinity receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI; CD64) in enhanced tumor cell cytotoxicity of neutrophils during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Valerius, T; Repp, R; de Wit, T P; Berthold, S; Platzer, E; Kalden, J R; Gramatzki, M; van de Winkel, J G

    1993-08-01

    Three different classes of Fc receptors for IgG (Fc gamma R) are currently distinguished in humans, of which polymorphonuclear phagocytes (PMN) normally express both low-affinity receptor classes--Fc gamma RII (CD32) and Fc gamma RIII (CD16). During therapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), neutrophils from patients with various malignancies and different hematologic disorders were found to additionally express high levels of the receptor with high affinity for IgG (Fc gamma RI; CD64). For these patients, the relative fluorescence intensity (rFI) for Fc gamma RI was 5.3 (range, 1.7 to 10.3; n = 19), compared with 1.0 (range, 1.0 to 1.1; n = 8) for healthy donors. The expression of Fc gamma RI during G-CSF therapy could be confirmed by using a panel of six CD64-specific antibodies, and by showing mRNA for Fc gamma RI. So far, three genes for Fc gamma RI have been identified, encoding four distinct transcription products. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technology, transcripts for both membrane-associated isoforms (hFc gamma RIa and hFc gamma RIb2) could be detected. The functional activity of Fc gamma RI on PMN during G-CSF therapy was shown by measuring binding of monomeric human IgG and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Thus, Fc gamma RI-positive neutrophils displayed enhanced ADCC activity to glioma (A1207), squamous cell (A431), and ovarian (SK-ov3) carcinoma cell lines. The involvement of Fc gamma RI in this increased cytotoxic activity was shown by blocking Fc gamma receptors with monoclonal antibodies, and by using F(ab')2 x F(ab')2-bispecific antibodies with specificities against tumor-related antigens and Fc gamma RI, resulting in solely Fc gamma RI-mediated cytotoxicity. Therapeutically, this additional Fc receptor on PMN may increase the efficacy of experimental antibody therapy. PMID:7687898

  10. Prophylactic Administration of Vector-Encoded Porcine Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Salmonella Shedding, Tonsil Colonization, and Microbiota Alterations of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Salmonella-Challenged Swine

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Shawn M. D.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Loving, Crystal L.; Allen, Heather K.; Lee, InSoo; Madson, Darin; Kehrli, Marcus E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To develop an intervention strategy that is non-specific yet effective against diverse Salmonella serovars, we explored the prophylactic use of a cytokine to decrease Salmonella in swine by boosting the host’s innate immune system. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the major cytokine regulating the production, differentiation, function, and survival of neutrophils. Neutrophils play a critical role in the response to Salmonella; therefore, we evaluated the vectored-delivery of porcine G-CSF as a prophylactic to reduce Salmonella in pigs. Crossbred pigs, 5 weeks of age, were intramuscularly injected with a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) engineered to express porcine G-CSF (Ad5-G-CSF, n = 9). Control pigs received the same Ad5 vector lacking the gene encoding G-CSF (Ad5-empty, n = 7). Four days later, all pigs (n = 16) were intranasally inoculated with 1 × 107 colony forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1. At 2 and 3 days post-challenge with Salmonella, Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs shed significantly less Salmonella (~103 CFU/g) in their feces than Ad5-empty-treated pigs (~104–105 CFU/g; P < 0.05). A significant 4-log reduction in tonsil colonization was also observed in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs at 7 days post-challenge (P < 0.05). In the gastrointestinal tract, the Peyer’s patch region of the ileum exhibited a significant 0.5-log reduction in colonization in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs (P < 0.05). The microbiota of all challenged pigs was assessed by sequencing and analyzing the V1–V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene from fecal DNA samples. The microbial community structure of

  11. Prophylactic Administration of Vector-Encoded Porcine Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Salmonella Shedding, Tonsil Colonization, and Microbiota Alterations of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Salmonella-Challenged Swine.

    PubMed

    Bearson, Shawn M D; Bearson, Bradley L; Loving, Crystal L; Allen, Heather K; Lee, InSoo; Madson, Darin; Kehrli, Marcus E

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To develop an intervention strategy that is non-specific yet effective against diverse Salmonella serovars, we explored the prophylactic use of a cytokine to decrease Salmonella in swine by boosting the host's innate immune system. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the major cytokine regulating the production, differentiation, function, and survival of neutrophils. Neutrophils play a critical role in the response to Salmonella; therefore, we evaluated the vectored-delivery of porcine G-CSF as a prophylactic to reduce Salmonella in pigs. Crossbred pigs, 5 weeks of age, were intramuscularly injected with a replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) engineered to express porcine G-CSF (Ad5-G-CSF, n = 9). Control pigs received the same Ad5 vector lacking the gene encoding G-CSF (Ad5-empty, n = 7). Four days later, all pigs (n = 16) were intranasally inoculated with 1 × 10(7) colony forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1. At 2 and 3 days post-challenge with Salmonella, Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs shed significantly less Salmonella (~10(3) CFU/g) in their feces than Ad5-empty-treated pigs (~10(4)-10(5) CFU/g; P < 0.05). A significant 4-log reduction in tonsil colonization was also observed in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs at 7 days post-challenge (P < 0.05). In the gastrointestinal tract, the Peyer's patch region of the ileum exhibited a significant 0.5-log reduction in colonization in the Ad5-G-CSF-treated pigs (P < 0.05). The microbiota of all challenged pigs was assessed by sequencing and analyzing the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene from fecal DNA samples. The microbial community structure of

  12. Prognostic factors for re-mobilization using plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma previously failing mobilization with G-CSF with or without chemotherapy: the Korean multicenter retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seok; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Park, Seonyang; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Chang-Ki; Lee, Je-Jung; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Kim, Won Seog; Kim, Hawk; Do, Young Rok; Moon, Joon Ho; Lee, Jihye; Suh, Cheolwon

    2016-03-01

    Plerixafor in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to improve the rates of successful peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization in patients with malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma (MM) who experienced prior failure of PBSC mobilization. We evaluated the mobilization results of re-mobilization using plerixafor and G-CSF in insufficiently mobilizing patients. Forty-four patients with lymphoma (n = 29) or MM (n = 15) were included in the study. The median age was 50 (range, 24-64) years. Previous mobilization regimens were chemotherapy with G-CSF (n = 28), including cyclophosphamide with G-CSF (n = 15), and G-CSF only (n = 16). All patients with lymphoma achieved at least partial response (PR) before the mobilization, including 13 complete responses (CRs). Eleven patients with MM achieved at least PR and four patients with MM were in stable disease before mobilization. The median number of apheresis was 3 (range, 1-6). The median yield of PBSC collections was 3.41 (0.13-38.11) × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg. Thirty-four (77.3 %) patients had successful collections defined as at least 2 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg. The rate of successful collections was not different between the two underlying diseases (79.3 % in lymphoma and 73.3 % in MM). Of the entire cohort, 38 (86.4 %) of patients went on to receive an autologous transplant. Previous long-term use of high-risk drugs (>4 cycles use of alkylating agents, platinum-containing agents, or thalidomide) (HR 10.8, 95 % CI 1.1-110.0, P = 0.043) and low platelet count (<100 × 10(9)/L) 1 day before the first apheresis (HR 27.9, 95 % CI 2.9-273.7, P = 0.004) were independent prognostic factors for predicting failure of PBSC re-mobilization using plerixafor and G-CSF. In conclusion, re-mobilization using plerixafor and G-CSF showed a success rate of 77.3 % in patients with lymphoma or MM who experienced prior failure of PBSC

  13. Antilymphocyte globulin, cyclosporine, prednisolone, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for severe aplastic anemia: an update of the GITMO/EBMT study on 100 patients. European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Working Party on Severe Aplastic Anemia and the Gruppo Italiano Trapianti di Midolio Osseo (GITMO).

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Bruno, B; Saracco, P; Di Bona, E; Locasciulli, A; Locatelli, F; Gabbas, A; Dufour, C; Arcese, W; Testi, G; Broccia, G; Carotenuto, M; Coser, P; Barbui, T; Leoni, P; Ferster, A

    2000-03-15

    One hundred consecutive patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) received horse antilymphocyte globulin (ALG), cyclosporin A (CyA), 6-methylprednisolone (6Mpred), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as first-line therapy. The median age was 16 years (range, 1-72 years) and median neutrophil count was 0.2 x 10(9)/L (range, 0-0.5 x 10(9)/L). Trilineage hematologic recovery (at a median interval of 96 days from treatment) was seen in 77 patients (48 complete, 29 partial) after 1 (n = 50) or more courses of ALG (n = 27). Of the 23 nonresponders, 11 patients died at a median interval of 83 days (range, 16-1132 days), 6 were considered treatment failures and underwent transplantation, and 6 were pancytopenic. Cytogenetic abnormalities were seen in 11% of patients, clonal hematologic disease in 8%, and relapse of marrow aplasia in 9%. The actuarial survival at 5 years was 87% (median follow-up 1424 days): 76% versus 98% for patients with neutrophil counts less than versus greater than 0.2 x 10(9)/L (P =.001) and 88% versus 87% for patients aged less than versus more than 16 years (P =.8). The actuarial probability of discontinuing CyA was 38%. Patients who did not achieve a white blood cell (WBC) count of 5 x 10(9)/L during G-CSF treatment have a low probability of responding (37%) and a high mortality rate (42%). This update confirms a high probability for SAA patients of becoming transfusion independent and of surviving after treatment with ALG, CyA, 6Mpred, and G-CSF, with a significant effect of neutrophil counts on outcome. Problems still remain, such as absent or incomplete responses, clonal evolution, relapse of the original disease, and cyclosporine dependence. Early transplantation, also from alternative donors, may be warranted in patients with poor WBC response to G-CSF. (Blood. 2000;95:1931-1934) PMID:10706857

  14. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Improves MDX Mouse Response to Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Gustavo Ferreira; de Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Background G-CSF has been shown to increase neuronal survival, which may positively influence the spinal cord microenvironment during the course of muscular dystrophies. Methodology/Principal Findings Male MDX mice that were six weeks of age received a left sciatic nerve transection and were treated with intraperitoneal injections of 200 µg/kg/day of G-CSF 7 days before and 7 days after the transection. The axotomy was performed after the cycles of muscular degeneration/regeneration, consistent with previous descriptions of this model of muscular dystrophy. C57BL/10 mice were used as control subjects. Seven days after the surgery, the animals were sacrificed and their lumbar spinal cords were processed for immunohistochemistry (anti-MHC I, anti-Synaptophysin, anti-GFAP and anti-IBA-1) and transmission electron microscopy. MHC I expression increased in both strains of mice after the axotomy. Nevertheless, the MDX mice displayed a significantly smaller MHC I upregulation than the control mice. Regarding GFAP expression, the MDX mice showed a stronger astrogliosis compared with the C57BL/10 mice across all groups. Both groups that were treated with G-CSF demonstrated preservation of synaptophysin expression compared with the untreated and placebo groups. The quantitative analysis of the ultrastructural level showed a preservation of the synaptic covering for the both groups that were treated with G-CSF and the axotomized groups showed a smaller loss of synaptic contact in relation to the treated groups after the lesion. Conclusions/Significance The reduction of active inputs to the alpha-motoneurons and increased astrogliosis in the axotomized and control groups may be associated with the cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration that occur postnatally. The G-CSF treated group showed a preservation of the spinal cord microenvironment after the lesion. Moreover, the increase of MHC I expression in the MDX mice that were treated with G-CSF may indicate that this drug performs an active role in regenerative potential after lesions. PMID:22912741

  15. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) produced in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kraševec, Nada; Milunović, Tatjana; Lasnik, Marija Anžur; Lukančič, Irena; Komel, Radovan; Porekar, Vladka Gaberc

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a fungal production system is described for expression and secretion of the medically important human protein G-CSF, in Aspergillus niger. A reliable strategy was chosen with in-frame fusion of G-CSF behind a KEX2 cleavage site downstream of the coding region of the highly secreted homologous glucoamylase. This provided secretion levels of 5-10 mg/l culture medium of correctly processed G-CSF, although the majority of the protein (>90%) was biologically inactive. Following denaturation/ concentration and chromatographic separation/ renaturation, the G-CSF proliferation activity increased considerably, and analytical immobilised metal affinity chromatography confirmed the monomeric and correctly folded protein. These data suggest that this human secretory protein secreted into the medium of A. niger was not correctly folded, and that it escaped the endoplasmic reticulum folding control systems. This is compared to the folding of G-CSF produced in bacteria and yeast. PMID:25551710

  16. Isolated abdominal aortitis following administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward B; Grosu, Roy; Landau, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    G-CSF is a myeloid growth factor produced by monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Clinical uses of G-CSF includes mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acceleration of neutrophil recovery following chemotherapy, and in the management of neutropenia due to other causes including AIDS and genetic disorders of granulocyte production. G-CSF is well tolerated and reports to be safe in healthy donors, although follow-up studies are limited in duration (D'Souza et al. in Transfus Med Rev 22(4):280-290, 2008).Isolated abdominal aortitis (IAA) is a rare disorder most commonly caused by the large-vessel vasculitides giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, although it may also be associated with several other rheumatologic diseases and infections (Gornik and Creager in Circulation 117:3039-3051, 2008). To our knowledge, there only two cases have been published of IAA occurring in patients who had received G-CSF therapy (Dariea et al. in Rev Med Interne 25(3):225-229, 2004; Adiga et al. in Clin Drug Investig 29:821-825, 2009).We describe a case of a 55-year-old male, with peripheral vascular disease who after receiving Neupogen (G-CSF) developed a latent case of IAA. After further investigation and exclusion of other possible causative factors, we conclude that the most probable etiology is induction by G-CSF. PMID:27094941

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-primed leukocyte transfusions in candida tropicalis fungemia in neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Di Mario, A; Sica, S; Salutari, P; Ortu La Barbera, E; Marra, R; Leone, G

    1997-01-01

    Optimal management of fungemia in neutropenic patients is still controversial. Several reports have already stressed the poor prognosis in invasive candidiasis (80% mortality in several reports). Therefore granulocyte transfusions would appear to be useful in the management of these infections. We report the use of rhG-CSF-primed granulocyte transfusions plus amphotericin B in two neutropenic patients who developed life-threatening systemic fungal infections. This approach was successful and both patients fully recovered from the infection. PMID:9234594

  18. Reduced salmonella fecal shedding in swine administered porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health, food safety and public health. Key objectives of pre-harvest food safety programs are to detect asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, reduce colonization, and prevent transmission of Salmonella to other animals and ...

  19. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) improves memory and neurobehavior in an amyloid-β induced experimental model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ajay; Medhi, Bikash; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2013-09-01

    GCSF is an endogenous neuronal hematopoietic factor that displays robust in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective activity. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of GCSF on Aβ-induced memory loss in an Alzheimer's disease model of rats. A total of 42 male adult Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were used in the study and were divided into 7 experimental groups. Animals were subjected to intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection stereotaxically at day 0 to instill amyloid-β(1-42) (Aβ(1-42)) or PBS (sham operated group) at 10 μl (5 μl bilaterally). GCSF treatment was given from day 7 to 12 of Aβ injection. On day 21, behavioral tests (short term memory, exploratory behavior and motor coordination) in all groups were evaluated. Biochemical parameters and RNA expression were measured to ensure the efficacy of GCSF. GCSF (35 and 70 μg/kg, s.c.) showed statistically significant improvement in memory as compared to control and sham operated groups (p<0.05). Mean time spent in the platform placed quadrant was found to be significantly increased in the GCSF (70 μg/kg, s.c.) as compared to GCSF (35 μg/kg, s.c.) and GCSF (10 μg/kg, s.c.) groups (p<0.001). GCSF (35 and 70 μg/kg, s.c.) also improved motor coordination and exploratory behavior significantly as compared to naïve sham operated and GCSF (10 μg/kg, s.c.) groups (p<0.05). Improvement in memory by GCSF (35 and 70 μg/kg, s.c.) was coupled with marked reduction of lipid peroxidation, acetylcholinesterase levels and a significant increase in antioxidant enzymes as well as total RNA expression in the brain. Additionally, GCSF (35 and 70 μg/kg, s.c.) significantly increased progenitor cells (iPSCs) and surface marker CD34+ in the brain and hence induced neurogenesis. The present findings demonstrate an improvement of memory and neurobehavioral function with GCSF in Aβ-induced Alzheimer's disease model in rats. PMID:23756182

  20. Efficacy of deferred dosing of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in autologous hematopoietic transplantation for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cox, J E; Campos, S; Wu, J; May, R; Liu, H; Ramos, C A; Carrum, G; Heslop, H E; Brenner, M K; Kamble, R T

    2014-02-01

    Routine administration of G-CSF following autologous hematopoietic SCT (ASCT) expedites ANC recovery and reduces hospitalization by 1-2 days; it has no impact on febrile neutropenia, infections, morbidity, mortality, event-free survival or OS. To determine whether delayed G-CSF dosage could result in equivalent ANC recovery and thereby improve cost effectiveness, we deferred the administration of G-CSF until WBC recovery had begun. A total of 117 patients with multiple myeloma received ASCT from January 2005 to September 2012. Of these, 52 were in the conventional dosing group (CGD) and received G-CSF from Day +7 for a median of five doses. In the deferred dosing group (DGD), 65 patients received G-CSF from median day 14 post transplant for a median of zero doses. There was no difference between groups in the incidence or duration of febrile neutropenia, duration of grade III mucositis, weight gain, rash, engraftment syndrome or early death (100 days). The DGD group had a significantly longer time to neutrophil engraftment than the CGD group (15 days vs 12 days; P<0.0001), a longer period of severe neutropenia (<100/μL; 8 days vs 6 days; P<0.0001), longer treatment with intravenous antibiotics (7 days vs 5 days; P=0.016) and longer hospital stay (19 days vs 17 days; P=<0.0001). Although the cost of G-CSF was lower in the DGD group (mean $308 vs $2467), the additional hospitalization raised the median total cost of ASCT in this group by 17%. There was, however, no adverse effect of deferred dosing on the rate of febrile neuropenic episodes or Day 100 survival, so that deferred dosing of G-CSF may be suitable for patients receiving ASCT as outpatients, for whom longer hospital stay would not be an offsetting cost. PMID:24096822

  1. Case Report. Prevention of Clozapine-Induced Granulocytopenia/Agranulocytosis with Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in an Intellectually Disabled Patient with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopal, G.; Graham, J. G.; Haut, F. F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: While clozapine is an effective treatment for refractory schizophrenia, its use is limited by haematological side effects. Treatment options that allow continued prescription of clozapine by tackling these side effects will greatly aid patients for whom this medication is all too often their only hope of recovery. Method: In this case…

  2. Recovery of pulmonary structure and exercise capacity by treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Gustavo; Vidal, Daniel T A; Klein, Wilfried; Neto, Alberto; Angrizani, André; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Kaneto, Carla; Souza, Bruno Solano de Freitas; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B P; Macambira, Simone G

    2014-04-01

    Emphysema is a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease characterized abnormal dilatation of alveolar spaces, which impairs alveolar gas exchange, compromising the physical capacity of a patient due to airflow limitations. Here we tested the effects of G-CSF administration in pulmonary tissue and exercise capacity in emphysematous mice. C57Bl/6 female mice were treated with elastase intratracheally to induce emphysema. Their exercise capacities were evaluated in a treadmill. Lung histological sections were prepared to evaluate mean linear intercept measurement. Emphysematous mice were treated with G-CSF (3 cycles of 200 μg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days, with 7-day intervals) or saline and submitted to a third evaluation 8 weeks after treatment. Values of run distance and linear intercept measurement were expressed as mean ± SD and compared applying a paired t-test. Effects of treatment on these parameters were analyzed applying a Repeated Measures ANOVA, followed by Tukey's post hoc analysis. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Twenty eight days later, animals ran significantly less in a treadmill compared to normal mice (549.7 ± 181.2 m and 821.7 ± 131.3 m, respectively; p < 0.01). Treatment with G-CSF significantly increased the exercise capacity of emphysematous mice (719.6 ± 200.5 m), whereas saline treatment had no effect on distance run (595.8 ± 178.5 m). The PCR cytokines genes analysis did not detect difference between experimental groups. Morphometric analyses in the lung showed that saline-treated mice had a mean linear intercept significantly higher (p < 0.01) when compared to mice treated with G-CSF, which did not significantly differ from that of normal mice. Treatment with G-CSF promoted the recovery of exercise capacity and regeneration of alveolar structural alterations in emphysematous mice. PMID:23603459

  3. History of chronic comorbidity and risk of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma not receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun; Rodriguez, Roberto; Page, John H; Yang, Su-Jau; Huynh, Julie; Chia, Victoria M

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study to examine the association between a wide variety of chronic comorbidities and risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) from 2000 to 2009 treated with chemotherapy at Kaiser Permanente Southern California. History of comorbidities and FN events were identified using electronic medical records. Cox model adjusting for propensity score was used to determine the association between a comorbid condition and FN. Models that additionally adjusted for cancer stage, baseline absolute neutrophil count, chemotherapy regimen and dose reduction were also evaluated. A total of 2480 patients with NHL were included, and 60% received CHOP/R-CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, with or without rituximab). In total, 236 (9.5%) patients developed FN in the first chemotherapy cycle. Anemia (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6, 95% confidence interval [1.2-2.2]), HIV infection (HR = 3.8 [2.0-6.7]) and rheumatoid diseases (HR = 2.4 [1.3-4.0]) were associated with significantly increased risk of FN. These results provide evidence that chronic comorbidity increases the risk of FN. PMID:24684228

  4. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or lim...

  5. Establishment of the first international standard for PEGylated granulocyte colony stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF): report of an international collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Meenu; Bird, Chris; Dougall, Thomas; Rigsby, Peter; Bristow, Adrian; Thorpe, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of developing a suitable international reference standard for determination of in vitro biological activity of human sequence recombinant PEG-G-CSF products with a 20kD linear PEG linked to the N-terminal methionyl residue of G-CSF (INN Filgrastim), produced using a conjugation process and coupling chemistry similar to that employed for the lead PEGfilgrastim product. Based on initial data which showed that the current WHO 2nd international standard, IS for G-CSF (09/136) or alternatively, a PEG-G-CSF standard with a unitage traceable to the G-CSF IS may potentially serve as the IS for PEG-G-CSF products, two candidate preparations of PEG-G-CSF were formulated and lyophilized at NIBSC. These preparations were tested by 23 laboratories using in vitro bioassays in a multi-centre collaborative study. Results indicated that on the basis of parallelism, the current WHO 2nd IS for G-CSF or any of the PEG-G-CSF samples could be used as the international standard for PEG-G-CSF preparations. However, because of the variability in potency estimates seen when PEG-G-CSF preparations were compared with the current WHO 2nd IS for G-CSF, a candidate PEG-G-CSF was suitable as the WHO IS. The preparation 12/188 was judged suitable to serve as the WHO IS based on in vitro biological activity data. Therefore, the preparation coded 12/188 was established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) in 2013 as the WHO 1st IS for human PEGylated G-CSF with an assigned in vitro bioactivity of 10,000IU per ampoule. PMID:25450254

  6. Establishment of the first international standard for PEGylated granulocyte colony stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF): Report of an international collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Meenu; Bird, Chris; Dougall, Thomas; Rigsby, Peter; Bristow, Adrian; Thorpe, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of developing a suitable international reference standard for determination of in vitro biological activity of human sequence recombinant PEG-G-CSF products with a 20 kD linear PEG linked to the N-terminal methionyl residue of G-CSF (INN Filgrastim), produced using a conjugation process and coupling chemistry similar to that employed for the lead PEGfilgrastim product. Based on initial data which showed that the current WHO 2nd international standard, IS for G-CSF (09/136) or alternatively, a PEG-G-CSF standard with a unitage traceable to the G-CSF IS may potentially serve as the IS for PEG-G-CSF products, two candidate preparations of PEG-G-CSF were formulated and lyophilized at NIBSC. These preparations were tested by 23 laboratories using in vitro bioassays in a multi-centre collaborative study. Results indicated that on the basis of parallelism, the current WHO 2nd IS for G-CSF or any of the PEG-G-CSF samples could be used as the international standard for PEG-G-CSF preparations. However, because of the variability in potency estimates seen when PEG-G-CSF preparations were compared with the current WHO 2nd IS for G-CSF, a candidate PEG-G-CSF was suitable as the WHO IS. The preparation 12/188 was judged suitable to serve as the WHO IS based on in vitro biological activity data. Therefore, the preparation coded 12/188 was established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) in 2013 as the WHO 1st IS for human PEGylated G-CSF with an assigned in vitro bioactivity of 10,000 IU per ampoule. PMID:25450254

  7. Late Onset Agranulocytosis with Clozapine Associated with HLA DR4 Responding to Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aakanksha; Grover, Sandeep; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Agranulocytosis as a side effect of clozapine has been reported to be associated with initial phases of treatment, i.e., first six months. Agranulocytosis with clozapine during the initial phases of treatment has been linked to genetic vulnerability in the form of variations in the human leukocyte-antigen haplotypes. However, there is limited literature on late onset agranulocytosis with clozapine and this has very rarely been linked to human leukocyte-antigen haplotypes vulnerability. In this report we review the existing data on late onset agranulocytosis with clozapine and describe the case of a young man, who developed agranulocytosis with clozapine after 35 months of treatment and was found to have genetic vulnerability in form of being positive for HLA DR4. This case highlights underlying autoimmune immune mechanism in clozapine-induced agranulocytosis and the need for frequent blood count monitoring on clozapine even after the initial 6 months of starting treatment especially in patients with genetic vulnerability to develop this condition. PMID:27121434

  8. The granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) interacts with retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in the regulation of myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chee, Lynette C Y; Hendy, Jean; Purton, Louise E; McArthur, Grant A

    2013-02-01

    The key roles of RARs and G-CSFR in the regulation of granulopoiesis have been well-documented. In this study, we sought to investigate the interaction between G-CSFR and RARs in myeloid differentiation of adult mice through conditional deletion of RARα or RARγ on a G-CSFR(-/-) background and by pharmacological intervention of WT and G-CSFR(-/-) mice with a pan-RAR inverse agonist, NRX194310. Our findings show that residual granulopoiesis still persists in mice doubly null for G-CSFR and RARα or RARγ, confirming that RARs and G-CSFR are dispensable in maintaining residual granulopoiesis. Moreover, an increase in mature myeloid cells was seen in the conditional RARγ(Δ/Δ) mice and WT mice treated with NRX194310, likely mediated through increased G-CSF production. However, with the loss of G-CSFR, this expansion in granulopoiesis was attenuated, supporting the hypothesis that G-CSFR signaling interacts with RARs in the regulation of myeloid differentiation. PMID:23136256

  9. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not prevent disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain JXwn06 has been shown to produce high fevers, loss of body condition, respiratory distress and death in pigs. Necropsy reveals extensive interstitial pneumonia, multi-systemic pathology and a high occurrence of secondary bacterial infections. The ful...

  10. The role of biosimilar granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) Zarzio for progenitor cell mobilization and the treatment of therapy-induced neutropenia in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Severson, Cherie C

    2015-01-01

    Originator GCSF (Neupogen) has been used to mobilize progenitor stem cells and treat therapy-induced neutropenia in Canadian stem cell transplant settings for years. Although its benefit is not in question, viable alternatives are available. Biosimilar GCSF (Zarzio) is widely in use in Europe since 2009 and was recently approved in the U.S.for the same five indications as Neupogen. Zarzio is reported as safe, equally efficacious, more accessible and cost effective without negatively impacting patient outcomes. This paper summarizes the supporting evidence. PMID:26897866

  11. A combination of intravenous immunoglobulin and pulse methylprednisolone extended survival in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with chronic interstitial pneumonitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jirarattanasopa, Nongnapa; Tantikul, Chutsumarn; Vichyanond, Pakit; Pacharn, Punchama; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Suttinont, Panthep; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of lipoproteinaceous material. The severe chronic pulmonary disease and susceptibility to pulmonary infection is a prominent feature of the disease. We reported a case of postnatal-onset PAP and chronic interstitial pneumonitis in a girl with chronic respiratory distress since she was 5 months of age. A lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. The therapeutic bronchoalveolar lavages, a short trial of granulocyte colony-stimulation factor (G-CSF) and a combination of low dose methylprednisolone and hydroxychloroquine were used at different times without noting satisfactory improvement. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and pulse methylprednisolone were given monthly with gradual recovery. She did not require oxygen supplement after 21 months of this combination. Our report suggested that IVIG and pulse methylprednisolone might have a potential role in the treatment of PAP with chronic interstitial pneumonitis. PMID:21038791

  12. Enhancement of Analgesic Effect by Combination of Non-Noxious Stimulation and Noxious Stimulation in Humans.

    PubMed

    Fujii-Abe, Keiko; Umino, Masahiro; Fukayama, Haruhisa; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the this study was to investigate the combined effects of heterosegmental non-noxious and noxious stimulation on electrically induced tooth pain. The late component of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEP), induced by electrical tooth stimulation and pain intensity, were examined under electrical stimulation to forearms. Noxious, non-noxious, and combined non-noxious and noxious electrical stimulation were applied to median nerves on the forearms. Four experimental sessions (ie, control session, combined non-noxious and noxious stimulation session, non-noxious stimulation session, and noxious stimulation session were performed for each subject at each 10-minute interval for 30 minutes. The amplitudes of the SEP and VAS scores in the combined stimulation session decreased significantly compared with those in the control session and the reduction rates were 51.1% (13.4 μV) and 41.0% (23.5 mm), respectively. These results show that the combined stimulation has a more potent analgesic effect than that of either the non-noxious or the noxious stimulation. It is suggested that a potent analgesia was produced by an activated central mechanism, including endogenous opioid and descending pain inhibitory systems due to combined non-noxious and noxious stimulation. PMID:25490991

  13. Combined optical and electrical stimulation of neural tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Austin R.; Cayce, Jonathan M.; Malphrus, Jonathan D.; Konrad, Peter; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Jansen, E. Duco

    2009-11-01

    Low-intensity, pulsed infrared light provides a novel nerve stimulation modality that avoids the limitations of traditional electrical methods such as necessity of contact, presence of a stimulation artifact, and relatively poor spatial precision. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is, however, limited by a 2:1 ratio of threshold radiant exposures for damage to that for stimulation. We have shown that this ratio is increased to nearly 6:1 by combining the infrared pulse with a subthreshold electrical stimulus. Our results indicate a nonlinear relationship between the subthreshold depolarizing electrical stimulus and additional optical energy required to reach stimulation threshold. The change in optical threshold decreases linearly as the delay between the electrical and optical pulses is increased. We have shown that the high spatial precision of INS is maintained for this combined stimulation modality. Results of this study will facilitate the development of applications for infrared neural stimulation, as well as target the efforts to uncover the mechanism by which infrared light activates neural tissue.

  14. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34⁺ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  15. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  16. It takes two: noninvasive brain stimulation combined with neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Page, Stephen J; Cunningham, David A; Plow, Ela; Blazak, Brittani

    2015-04-01

    The goal of postacute neurorehabilitation is to maximize patient function, ideally by using surviving brain and central nervous system tissue when possible. However, the structures incorporated into neurorehabilitative approaches often differ from this target, which may explain why the efficacy of conventional clinical treatments targeting neurologic impairment varies widely. Noninvasive brain stimulation (eg, transcranial magnetic stimulation [TMS], transcranial direct current stimulation [tDCS]) offers the possibility of directly targeting brain structures to facilitate or inhibit their activity to steer neural plasticity in recovery and measure neuronal output and interactions for evaluating progress. The latest advances as stereotactic navigation and electric field modeling are enabling more precise targeting of patient's residual structures in diagnosis and therapy. Given its promise, this supplement illustrates the wide-ranging significance of TMS and tDCS in neurorehabilitation, including in stroke, pediatrics, traumatic brain injury, focal hand dystonia, neuropathic pain, and spinal cord injury. TMS and tDCS are still not widely used and remain poorly understood in neurorehabilitation. Therefore, the present supplement includes articles that highlight ready clinical application of these technologies, including their comparative diagnostic capabilities relative to neuroimaging, their therapeutic benefit, their optimal delivery, the stratification of likely responders, and the variable benefits associated with their clinical use because of interactions between pathophysiology and the innate reorganization of the patient's brain. Overall, the supplement concludes that whether provided in isolation or in combination, noninvasive brain stimulation and neurorehabilitation are synergistic in the potential to transform clinical practice. PMID:25813373

  17. Combined transcranial alternating current stimulation and continuous theta burst stimulation: a novel approach for neuroplasticity induction.

    PubMed

    Goldsworthy, Mitchell R; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Yang, Ruiting; Pitcher, Julia B; Ridding, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation can induce functionally relevant plasticity in the human cortex, making it potentially useful as a therapeutic tool. However, the induced changes are highly variable between individuals, potentially limiting research and clinical utility. One factor that might contribute to this variability is the level of cortical inhibition at the time of stimulation. The alpha rhythm (~ 8-13 Hz) recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) is thought to reflect pulsatile cortical inhibition; therefore, targeting non-invasive brain stimulation to particular phases of the alpha rhythm may provide an approach to enhance plasticity induction. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been shown to entrain cortical oscillations in a frequency-specific manner. We investigated whether the neuroplastic response to continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) was enhanced by timing bursts of stimuli to the peak or the trough of a tACS-imposed alpha rhythm. While motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were unaffected when cTBS was applied in-phase with the peak of the tACS-imposed oscillation, MEP depression was enhanced when cTBS was applied in-phase with the trough. This enhanced MEP depression was dependent on the individual peak frequency of the endogenous alpha rhythm recorded with EEG prior to stimulation, and was strongest in those participants classified as non-responders to standard cTBS. These findings suggest that tACS may be used in combination with cTBS to enhance the plasticity response. Furthermore, the peak frequency of endogenous alpha, as measured with EEG, may be used as a simple marker to pre-select those individuals likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:26663460

  18. Combined Spinal Cord Stimulation and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation for Brachial Plexopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hye; Choi, Shu Chung; Kim, Dong Kyu; Sung, Choon Ho; Chon, Jin Young; Hong, Sung Jin; Lee, Ji Young; Moon, Ho Sik

    2016-03-01

    Brachial plexopathy usually results from an iatrogenic brachial plexus injury and can sometimes cause severe chronic pain and disability. There are a number of possible treatments for this condition, including medication, physical therapy, nerve blocks, and neuromodulation, but they are not always successful. Recently, combined spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) have been tried for various chronic pain diseases because of their different mechanisms of action.Here, we describe the case of a 54-year-old man who was diagnosed with brachial plexopathy 8 years ago. He underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery to remove a superior mediastinal mass. However, his brachial plexus was damaged during the surgery. Although he had received various treatments, the pain did not improve. For the management of intractable severe pain, he underwent SCS 2 years ago, which initially reduced his pain from numeric rating scale (NRS) 10/10 to NRS 4 - 5/10, but the pain then gradually increased, reaching NRS 8/10, 6 months ago. At that time, he was refractory to other treatments, and we therefore applied PNS in combination with SCS. The PNS electrode was positioned on the radial nerve under ultrasound guidance. After combined PNS and SCS, his background pain disappeared, although a breakthrough pain (NRS 3 - 4/10) was caused intermittently by light touch. Furthermore, the patient's need for analgesics decreased, and he was satisfied with the outcome of this combined treatment. We concluded that combined SCS and PNS is a very useful treatment modality, which can stimulate the target nerve both directly and indirectly, and hence, relieve pain from brachial plexopathy. PMID:27008302

  19. Clinical curative effect of oxaliplatin combined with flurouracil in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Baodong; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Jinbang; Xu, Dongli; Feng, Weiyu; Zhuang, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Aiming at exploring clinical curative effect of oxaliplatin combined with flurouracil in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumor, this study divided 60 patients with gastrointestinal tumor into control and observation groups, each containing 30 patients. The observation group was treated with oxaliplatin combined with flurouracil, while the control was treated with FOLFOX4, i.e., intravenously dropping 85mg/m(2)Oxaliplatin (L-OHP), 200mg/m(2) calcium folinate (CF) and intravenously injecting 400mg/m(2) 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), and 600mg/m(2) 5-Fu; then continuously performing intravenous drop infusion for 22h, every two weeks for a cycle. Hypodermic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was conducted immediately when leukocytes occurred the III, IV degree of inhibition. The observation results of curative effect and negative reaction indicated higher effective rate with 83.33% in the observation and 50.00% in the control. Besides, in the observation, negative reactions possessed 10.00% that was much lower than 33.33% in the control. Thereby, the conclusion reached that the treatment of gastrointestinal tumor with oxaliplatin combined with flurouracil was worth promoting. PMID:26051738

  20. It Takes Two: Non Invasive Brain Stimulation Combined with Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephen J.; Cunningham, David A; Plow, Ela; Blazak, Brittani

    2015-01-01

    The goal of post-acute neurorehabilitation is to maximize patients' function, ideally by using surviving brain and central nervous system tissue when possible. Yet the structures incorporated into neurorehabilitative approaches often differ from this target, which may explain why efficacy of conventional clinical treatments targeting neurological impairments varies widely. Non-invasive brain stimulation such as with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) offers the possibility of directly targeting brain structures to facilitate or inhibit their activity so as to steer neural plasticity in recovery, and measure neuronal output and interactions for evaluating progress. Latest advances as stereotactic navigation and electric field modeling are enabling more precise targeting of patient's residual structures in diagnosis and therapy. Given its promise, this supplement illustrates the wide-ranging significance of TMS and tDCS in neurorehabilitation, including in stroke, pediatrics, traumatic brain injury, focal hand dystonia, neuropathic pain and spinal cord injury. TMS and tDCS are still not widely used and remain poorly understood in neurorehabilitation. Thus, the present supplement includes articles that highlight ready clinical application of these technologies, including their comparative diagnostic capabilities relative to neuroimaging, their therapeutic benefit, their optimal delivery, the stratification of likely responders, and the variable benefits associated with their clinical use due to interactions between pathophysiology and the innate reorganization of the patient's brain. Overall, the supplement concludes that whether provided in isolation or in combination, non-invasive brain stimulation with neuro-rehabilitation are synergistic in the potential to transform clinical practice. PMID:25813373

  1. Neuroprotective effect of Fn14 deficiency is associated with induction of the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) pathway in experimental stroke and enhanced by a pathogenic human antiphospholipid antibody.

    PubMed

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Bargiotas, Panagiotis; Bauer, Henrike; von Landenberg, Philipp; Schwaninger, Markus; Sommer, Clemens

    2010-10-01

    Using a transgenic mouse model of ischemic stroke we checked for a possible interaction of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) which often cause thromboses as well as central nervous system (CNS) involvement under non-thrombotic conditions and the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway known to be adversely involved in inflammatory and ischemic brain disease. After 7 days, infarct volumes were reduced in Fn14 deficient mice and were further decreased by aPL treatment. This was associated with strongest increase of the endogenous neuroprotective G-CSF/G-CSF receptor system. This unexpected beneficial action of aPL is an example for a non-thrombogenic action and the double-edged nature of aPL. PMID:20557950

  2. Safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor biosimilars in engraftment after autologous stem cell transplantation for haematological malignancies: a 4-year, single institute experience with different conditioning regimens

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Simona; Stroppa, Elisa M.; Moroni, Carlo F.; Arbasi, Maria C.; Trabacchi, Elena; Di Franco, Anna; Lazzaro, Antonio; Bernuzzi, Patrizia; Moretto, Mauro; Arcari, Annalisa; Bosi, Costanza; Riva, Alessandra; Cavanna, Luigi; Vallisa, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Background Filgrastim biosimilars have recently been introduced into clinical practice. To date biosimilars have demonstrated comparable efficacy and safety as the originator in chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Published experience in engraftment after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is limited and concerns relatively few patients. Materials and methods With the aim of assessing the efficacy and the safety of filgrastim biosimilars in post-ASCT bone marrow recovery, we conducted a single institution, retrospective study in 56 lymphoma and myeloma patients who received filgrastim biosimilars (Tevagrastim® and Zarzio®) at standard doses from day 5. We compared our results with recently published data on the originator. A cost analysis of each biosimilar was performed. Results Neutrophil counts recovered in 55 patients. The median number of filgrastim biosimilar vials injected was seven per patient. The median time to neutrophil and platelet recovery was 10 and 12 days, respectively. Twenty-six patients had febrile neutropenia, in half of whom the agent involved was identified. In the cost analysis, the use of Tevagrastim® and Zarzio® was associated with cost reductions of 56% and of 86%, respectively. Discussion Despite differences in CD34+ cell counts and time of starting filgrastim, our results in terms of time to engraftment and median number of vials injected are similar to published data. Comparing our results by single conditioning regimen to recent literature data, the time to engraftment and duration of hospitalisation were equivalent. Significant differences were observed in the incidence of febrile neutropenia, perhaps due to different preventive and prophylactic protocols for infections. Although prospective studies should be performed to confirm our results, filgrastim biosimilars were found to be effective and safe in engraftment after ASCT. PMID:25761321

  3. Efficacy and toxicity of decitabine versus CHG regimen (low-dose cytarabine, homoharringtonine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) in patients with higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang; Xu, Feng; He, Qi; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Zheng; Su, Jiying; Zhou, Liyu; Song, Luxi; Chao, Xiao; Zhao, Youshan

    2016-06-01

    Decitabine and CHG regimen (low-dose cytarabine and homoharringtonine with G-CSF) have been used for treating higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this study, we retrospectively compared the efficacy and toxicity of the two regimens in 132 MDS patients. Complete remission (CR) was not significantly different between the groups (27.1% with decitabine vs. 30.6% with CHG, p = 0.657). The CR rate with decitabine (58.8%) was significantly higher than that with CHG (7.7%) (p = 0.007) among the patients with poor karyotypes. Five of 23 (21.7%) patients who failed to respond to decitabine achieved CR with CHG, while one of two patients achieved CR with decitabine after failure with CHG. Overall and relapse-free survival were not different between the groups. In conclusion, both decitabine and CHG regimen are effective for higher risk MDS; there is no cross resistance between the regimens. Decitabine might be a better choice for patients with poor karyotypes. PMID:26397697

  4. Two is More Than One: How to Combine Brain Stimulation Rehabilitative Training for Functional Recovery?

    PubMed Central

    Koganemaru, Satoko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Mima, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that non-invasive brain stimulation has an additional effect in combination with rehabilitative therapy to enhance functional recovery than either therapy alone. The combination enhances use-dependent plasticity induced by repetitive training. The neurophysiological mechanism of the effects of this combination is based on associative plasticity. However, these effects were not reported in all cases. We propose a list of possible strategies to achieve an effective association between rehabilitative training with brain stimulation for plasticity: (1) control of temporal aspect between stimulation and task execution; (2) the use of a shaped task for the combination; (3) the appropriate stimulation of neuronal circuits where use-dependent plastic changes occur; and (4) phase synchronization between rhythmically patterned brain stimulation and task-related patterned activities of neurons. To better utilize brain stimulation in neuro-rehabilitation, it is important to develop more effective techniques to combine them. PMID:26617497

  5. Cochlear dead regions constrain the benefit of combining acoustic stimulation with electric stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Dorman, Michael F.; Gifford, Rene; Moore, Brian C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to (i) detect the presence and edge frequency (fe) of a cochlear dead region in the ear with residual acoustic hearing for bimodal cochlear implant (CI) users, and (ii) determine whether amplification based on the presence or absence of a dead region would improve speech understanding and sound quality. Design Twenty two listeners with a CI in one ear and residual acoustic hearing in the non-implanted ear were tested. Eleven listeners had a cochlear dead region in the acoustic-hearing ear and eleven did not. Dead regions were assessed with the threshold equalizing noise (TEN) and the sweeping noise, psychophysical tuning curve (SWPTC) tests. Speech understanding was assessed with monosyllabic words and the AzBio sentences at +10 dB signal-to-noise ratio. Speech and music quality judgments were obtained with the Judgment of Sound Quality questionnaire. Results For this population, using shifted tips of the PTCs as a basis for diagnosis, the TEN had high sensitivity (0.91) and poor specificity (0.55). The value of fe was lower when estimated with the SWPTC test than with the TEN test. For the listeners with cochlear dead regions, speech understanding, speech quality and music quality were best when no amplification was applied for frequencies within the dead region. For listeners without dead regions, speech understanding was best with full-bandwidth amplification and was reduced when amplification was not applied when the audiometric threshold exceeded 80 dB HL. Conclusion Our data suggest that, to improve bimodal benefit for listeners who combine electric and acoustic stimulation, audiologists should routinely test for the presence of cochlear dead regions and determine amplification bandwidth accordingly. PMID:24950254

  6. ["Dual Guidance"?- Parallel combination of ultrasound-guidance and nerve stimulation - Pro].

    PubMed

    Neuburger, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Combination of ultrasound and nerve stimulation technique could be useful under several conditions. Nerve stimulation canvarify the position of the nerve in case of bad preconditions during ultrasound. The knowledge of the importance of low and critical threshold currents could help to identify the needle tip. Thus the combination of ultrasound and nerve stimulation could lead to reduced unintentional intraneural injections and may result in a higher safety standard in peripheral regional anesthesia. PMID:26230888

  7. Combining Stimulants and Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: A Reexamination of the Literature and a Report of a New Treatment Combination

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    This report reviews the medical literature on combining stimulants with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. A case is also presented documenting successful treatment of major depressive disorder and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder using the previously undocumented combination of transdermal selegiline and lisdexamfetamine. This combination should be used cautiously and with ongoing monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure. PMID:27057401

  8. Combining Stimulants and Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: A Reexamination of the Literature and a Report of a New Treatment Combination.

    PubMed

    Israel, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    This report reviews the medical literature on combining stimulants with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. A case is also presented documenting successful treatment of major depressive disorder and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder using the previously undocumented combination of transdermal selegiline and lisdexamfetamine. This combination should be used cautiously and with ongoing monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure. PMID:27057401

  9. Synergistic combination of near-infrared irradiation and targeted gold nanoheaters for enhanced photothermal neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Kyungsik; Im, Changkyun; Hwang, Seoyoung; Eom, Seyoung; Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Hae Sun; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Byun, Kyung Min; Jun, Sang Beom; Kim, Sung June

    2016-01-01

    Despite a potential of infrared neural stimulation (INS) for modulating neural activities, INS suffers from limited light confinement and bulk tissue heating. Here, a novel methodology for an advanced optical stimulation is proposed by combining near-infrared (NIR) stimulation with gold nanorods (GNRs) targeted to neuronal cell membrane. We confirmed experimentally that in vitro and in vivo neural activation is associated with a local heat generation based on NIR stimulation and GNRs. Compared with the case of NIR stimulation without an aid of GNRs, combination with cell-targeted GNRs allows photothermal stimulation with faster neural response, lower delivered energy, higher stimulation efficiency and stronger behavior change. Since the suggested method can reduce a requisite radiant exposure level and alleviate a concern of tissue damage, it is expected to open up new possibilities for applications to optical neuromodulations for diverse excitable tissues and treatments of neurological disorders. PMID:27446678

  10. Inhibition of CD26 enzyme activity with pro-boropro stimulates rat granulocyte/macrophage colony formation and thymocyte proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bristol, L A; Bachovchin, W; Takács, L

    1995-06-15

    CD26 dipeptidyl peptidase (DPPIV) is involved in the regulation of proliferation of some hematopoietic and T-lineage cells. Here, we show that Pro-boropro a potent inhibitor of DPP activity has a costimulating effect in hematopoietic colony assays for macrophage and, to a lesser extent, for granulocyte colonies and has a stimulating effect in organ cultures of immature thymocytes. Based on these and other evidences, we propose that the mechanism by which CD26 regulates proliferation is associated with its DPP activity. PMID:7780144

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Combination of Scutellariae Radix and Liriopis Tuber Water Extract

    PubMed Central

    So, Mi-Hye; Choi, You-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Scutellariae Radix and Liriopis Tuber have been used to treat the inflammatory diseases in traditional Korean medicine and anti-inflammatory effect of each herb has been shown partially in several articles. However, the combined extract of these medicinal herbs (SL) has not been reported for its anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of SL on the creation of several proinflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 cell mouse macrophages induced by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). SL inhibited significantly the increase of NO, the release of intracellular calcium, the increase of interleukin-6 (IL-6), macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and MIP-2), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cell at the concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL, and SL inhibited significantly the increase of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) at the concentrations of 25 and 50 μg/mL, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) at the concentration of 25 μg/mL. These results implicate that SL has anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing the production of various inflammatory mediators in macrophages. But SL did not inhibit significantly the increase of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and Regulated on Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES); therefore, further study is demanded for the follow-up research to find out the possibility of SL as a preventive and therapeutic medicine for various inflammatory diseases. PMID:26604969

  12. Bridging peripheral nerves using a deacetyl chitin conduit combined with short-term electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongli; Li, Xin; Zuo, Songjie; Xin, Jie; Zhang, Peixun

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that deacetyl chitin conduit nerve bridging or electrical stimulation can effectively promote the regeneration of the injured peripheral nerve. We hypothesized that the combination of these two approaches could result in enhanced regeneration. Rats with right sciatic nerve injury were subjected to deacetyl chitin conduit bridging combined with electrical stimulation (0.1 ms, 3 V, 20 Hz, for 1 hour). At 6 and 12 weeks after treatment, nerve conduction velocity, myelinated axon number, fiber diameter, axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin sheath in the stimulation group were better than in the non-stimulation group. The results indicate that deacetyl chitin conduit bridging combined with temporary electrical stimulation can promote peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25206762

  13. Contributions to muscle force and EMG by combined neural excitation and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Crago, Patrick E; Makowski, Nathaniel S; Cole, Natalie M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stimulation of muscle for research or clinical interventions is often superimposed on ongoing physiological activity, without a quantitative understanding of the impact of the stimulation on the net muscle activity and the physiological response. Experimental studies show that total force during stimulation is less than the sum of the isolated voluntary and stimulated forces, but the occlusion mechanism is not understood. Approach We develop a model of efferent motor activity elicited by superimposing stimulation during a physiologically activated contraction. The model combines action potential interactions due to collision block, source resetting, and refractory periods with previously published models of physiological motor unit recruitment, rate modulation, force production, and EMG generation in human first dorsal interosseous muscle to investigate the mechanisms and effectiveness of stimulation on the net muscle force and EMG. Main Results Stimulation during a physiological contraction demonstrates partial occlusion of force and the neural component of the EMG, due to action potential interactions in motor units activated by both sources. Depending on neural and stimulation firing rates as well as on force-frequency properties, individual motor unit forces can be greater, smaller, or unchanged by the stimulation. In contrast, voluntary motor unit EMG potentials in simultaneously stimulated motor units show progressive occlusion with increasing stimulus rate. The simulations predict that occlusion would be decreased by a reverse stimulation recruitment order. Significance The results are consistent with and provide a mechanistic interpretation of previously published experimental evidence of force occlusion. The models also predict two effects that have not been reported previously - voluntary EMG occlusion and the advantages of a proximal stimulation site. This study provides a basis for the rational design of both future experiments and clinical

  14. Contributions to muscle force and EMG by combined neural excitation and electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.; Cole, Natalie M.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of muscle for research or clinical interventions is often superimposed on ongoing physiological activity without a quantitative understanding of the impact of the stimulation on the net muscle activity and the physiological response. Experimental studies show that total force during stimulation is less than the sum of the isolated voluntary and stimulated forces, but the occlusion mechanism is not understood. Approach. We develop a model of efferent motor activity elicited by superimposing stimulation during a physiologically activated contraction. The model combines action potential interactions due to collision block, source resetting, and refractory periods with previously published models of physiological motor unit recruitment, rate modulation, force production, and EMG generation in human first dorsal interosseous muscle to investigate the mechanisms and effectiveness of stimulation on the net muscle force and EMG. Main results. Stimulation during a physiological contraction demonstrates partial occlusion of force and the neural component of the EMG, due to action potential interactions in motor units activated by both sources. Depending on neural and stimulation firing rates as well as on force-frequency properties, individual motor unit forces can be greater, smaller, or unchanged by the stimulation. In contrast, voluntary motor unit EMG potentials in simultaneously stimulated motor units show progressive occlusion with increasing stimulus rate. The simulations predict that occlusion would be decreased by a reverse stimulation recruitment order. Significance. The results are consistent with and provide a mechanistic interpretation of previously published experimental evidence of force occlusion. The models also predict two effects that have not been reported previously—voluntary EMG occlusion and the advantages of a proximal stimulation site. This study provides a basis for the rational design of both future experiments and clinical

  15. A combined wireless neural stimulating and recording system for study of pain processing.

    PubMed

    Ativanichayaphong, Thermpon; He, Ji Wei; Hagains, Christopher E; Peng, Yuan B; Chiao, J-C

    2008-05-15

    Clinical studies have shown that spinal or cortical neurostimulation could significantly improve pain relief. The currently available stimulators, however, are used only to generate specific electrical signals without the knowledge of physiologically responses caused from the stimulation. We thus propose a new system that can adaptively generate the optimized stimulating signals base on the correlated neuron activities. This new method could significantly improve the efficiency of neurostimulation for pain relief. We have developed an integrated wireless recording and stimulating system to transmit the neuronal signals and to activate the stimulator over the wireless link. A wearable prototype has been developed consisting of amplifiers, wireless modules and a microcontroller remotely controlled by a Labview program in a computer to generate desired stimulating pulses. The components were assembled on a board with a size of 2.5 cm x 5 cm to be carried by a rat. To validate our system, lumbar spinal cord dorsal horn neuron activities of anesthetized rats have been recorded in responses to various types of peripheral graded mechanical stimuli. The stimulation at the periaqueductal gray and anterior cingulate cortex with different combinations of electrical parameters showed a comparable inhibition of spinal cord dorsal horns activities in response to the mechanical stimuli. The Labview program was also used to monitor the neuronal activities and automatically activate the stimulator with designated pulses. Our wireless system has provided an opportunity for further study of pain processing with closed-loop stimulation paradigm in a potential new pain relief method. PMID:18262282

  16. Colony-Stimulating Factors for Febrile Neutropenia during Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L.; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Norris, LeAnn B.; Armitage, James O.

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old, previously healthy woman received a diagnosis of diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma after the evaluation of an enlarged left axillary lymph node obtained on biopsy. She had been asymptomatic except for the presence of enlarged axillary lymph nodes, which she had found while bathing. She was referred to an oncologist, who performed a staging evaluation. A complete blood count and test results for liver and renal function and serum lactate dehydrogenase were normal. Positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET–CT) identified enlarged lymph nodes with abnormal uptake in the left axilla, mediastinum, and retroperitoneum. Results on bone marrow biopsy were normal. The patient’s oncologist recommends treatment with six cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone with rituximab (CHOP-R) at 21-day intervals. Is the administration of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) with the first cycle of chemotherapy indicated? PMID:23514290

  17. Complete inhibition of food-stimulated gastric acid secretion by combined application of pirenzepine and ranitidine.

    PubMed

    Londong, W; Londong, V; Ruthe, C; Weizert, P

    1981-07-01

    In a double-blind, placebo controlled and randomised secretory study the effectiveness of pirenzepine, ranitidine, and their combination was compared intraindividually in eight healthy subjects receiving intravenous bolus injections. Pirenzepine (0.15 mg/kg) plus ranitidine (0.6 mg/kg) suppressed peptone-stimulated gastric acid secretion from 69 +/- 11 to 2 +/- 0.4 mmol H+/3 h; the mean percentage inhibition was 97%. Postprandial gastrin was unaffected. There were only minor side-effects in a few experiments (reduction of salivation, brief blurring of vision), but no prolactin stimulation after ranitidine or ranitidine plus pirenzepine. The combined application of ranitidine and pirenzepine inhibited meal-stimulated acid secretion more effectively and produced fewer side-effects than the combination of cimetidine plus pirenzepine studied previously. PMID:6114900

  18. Antitumor effects of combining tumor radiation with the antivascular action of ultrasound stimulated microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: More and more evidence indicates tumor vasculature plays an important role in tumor radiation response. In this study, we investigated ultrasound stimulated microbubbles to enhance the effects of radiation. Methods: Human bladder cancer HT-1376 xenografts in severe combined immuno-deficient mice were used. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human bladder xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. Results: There existed a synergistic effect in vivo with combined single treatments of ultrasound-stimulated microbubble vascular perturbation and radiation inducing an over 10-fold greater cell kill with combined treatments. We further demonstrate that induction of ceramide-related endothelial cell apoptosis, leading to vascular disruption, is a causative mechanism. In vivo experiments with ultrasound and bubbles permit radiation doses to be decreased significantly for comparable effect. Conclusion: We envisage this unique combined ultrasound-based vascular perturbation and radiation treatment method being used to enhance the effects of radiation in a tumor, leading to greater tumor eradication. PMID:26617705

  19. The combined effect of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in rat tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Murakami, Shinichiro; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori; Fujino, Hidemi

    2011-05-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used to prevent muscle atrophy, but this method is different in many previous studies, appropriate stimulation protocol is still not decided. Although resistance exercise has also been shown to be an effective countermeasure on muscle atrophy, almost previous studies carried out an electrical stimulation without resistance. It was hypothesized that electrical stimulation without resistance is insufficient to contract skeletal muscle forcefully, and the combination of electrical stimulation and forceful resistance contraction is more effective than electrical stimulation without resistance to attenuate muscle atrophy. This study investigated the combined effects of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in the rat tibialis anterior muscle. The animals were divided into control, hindlimb unloading (HU), hindlimb unloading plus electrical stimulation (ES), and hindlimb unloading plus the combination of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction (ES+IC). Electrical stimulation was applied to the tibialis anterior muscle percutaneously for total 240 sec per day. In the ES+IC group, the ankle joint was fixed to produce resistance isometric contraction during electrical stimulation. After 7 days, the cross-sectional areas of each muscle fiber type in the HU group decreased. Those were prevented in the ES+IC group rather than the ES group. The expression of heat shock protein 72 was enhanced in the ES and ES+IC groups. These results indicated that although electrical stimulation is effective to prevent muscle atrophy, the combination of electrical stimulation and isometric contraction have further effect. PMID:21619551

  20. Effortful swallowing training combined with electrical stimulation in post-stroke dysphagia: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Youngsun; Oh, Jong-Chi; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2012-12-01

    We tested the effect of effortful swallow combined with surface electrical stimulation used as a form of resistance training in post-stroke patients with dysphagia. Twenty post-stroke dysphagic patients were randomly divided into two groups: those who underwent effortful swallow with infrahyoid motor electrical stimulation (experimental group, n = 10) and effortful swallow with infrahyoid sensory electrical stimulation (control group, n = 10). In the experimental group, electrical stimulation was applied to the skin above the infrahyoid muscle with the current was adjusted until muscle contraction occurred and the hyoid bone was depressed. In the control group, the stimulation intensity was applied just above the sensory threshold. The patients in both groups were then asked to swallow effortfully in order to elevate their hyolaryngeal complex when the stimulation began. A total of 12 sessions of 20 min of training for 4 weeks were performed. Blinded biomechanical measurements of the extent of hyolaryngeal excursion, the maximal width of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening, and the penetration-aspiration scale before and after training were performed. In the experimental group, the maximal vertical displacement of the larynx was increased significantly after the intervention (p < 0.05). The maximal vertical displacement of the hyoid bone and the maximal width of the UES opening increased but the increase was not found to be significant (p = 0.066). There was no increase in the control group. Effortful swallow training combined with electrical stimulation increased the extent of laryngeal excursion. This intervention can be used as a new treatment method in post-stroke patients with dysphagia. PMID:22447240

  1. Effect of tactile stimulation on primary motor cortex excitability during action observation combined with motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Megumi; Kubota, Shinji; Onmyoji, Yusuke; Hirano, Masato; Uehara, Kazumasa; Morishita, Takuya; Funase, Kozo

    2015-07-23

    We aimed to investigate the effects of the tactile stimulation to an observer's fingertips at the moment that they saw an object being pinched by another person on the excitability of observer's primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, the above effects were also examined during action observation combined with the motor imagery. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were evoked from the subjects' right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles. Electrical stimulation (ES) inducing tactile sensation was delivered to the subjects' first and second fingertips at the moment of pinching action performed by another person. Although neither the ES nor action observation alone had significant effects on the MEP amplitude of the FDI or ADM, the FDI MEP amplitude which acts as the prime mover during pinching was reduced when ES and action observation were combined; however, no such changes were seen in the ADM. Conversely, that reduced FDI MEP amplitude was increased during the motor imagery. These results indicated that the M1 excitability during the action observation of pinching action combined with motor imagery could be enhanced by the tactile stimulation delivered to the observer's fingertips at the moment corresponding to the pinching being observed. PMID:26033185

  2. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J.; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185–192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective. PMID:26752421

  3. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Diederich, Kai; Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185-192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective. PMID:26752421

  4. Dance combined with magnetic pulse stimulates the ability of walk and balance in elder people

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tao; Song, Qing-Hua; Xu, Rong-Mei; Guo, Yan-Hua; Wang, Feng; Hu, Jian-Ping; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Observe the treatment effect on elderly people’s waling and balance ability under the stimulation and intervention of waving dance combined with magnetic pulse. Method: 96 elderly people are Involved in the research and the random number table method is divided into observation group and control group; there are 48 people in each group. The control group on the basis of routine daily activities increase waving dance for training treatment; the observation group take training treatment together with the control group, plus magnetic pulse for stimulation treatment. Inspection and control shall be made to relevant indicators of subject’s walk and balance ability at the time when they are selected and after they go through 6-month treatment. Result: after 6-month treatment, we found that indicators of walk and balance ability of these two groups of patients have been improved to different extent compared to those indicators when selected (all P<0.05). While the observation group have more significant improvement effect when compared to the improvement effect made by the contract group. Most of indicators are obviously superior to that of the control group (P<0.05). The differences have statistics significance. Conclusion: waving dance could obviously improve elderly people’s walk and balance ability, and the improvement effect could be ever more significant when combined treatment with magnetic pulse stimulation. Such effect is obviously better than the effect improved only by waving dance. PMID:26064357

  5. Treatment of advanced soft-tissue sarcomas using a combined strategy of high-dose ifosfamide, high-dose doxorubicin and salvage therapies

    PubMed Central

    Leyvraz, S; Herrmann, R; Guillou, L; Honegger, H P; Christinat, A; Fey, M F; Sessa, C; Wernli, M; Cerny, T; Dietrich, D; Pestalozzi, B

    2006-01-01

    Having determined in a phase I study the maximum tolerated dose of high-dose ifosfamide combined with high-dose doxorubicin, we now report the long-term results of a phase II trial in advanced soft-tissue sarcomas. Forty-six patients with locally advanced or metastatic soft-tissue sarcomas were included, with age <60 years and all except one in good performance status (0 or 1). The chemotherapy treatment consisted of ifosfamide 10 g m−2 (continuous infusion for 5 days), doxorubicin 30 mg m−2 day−1 × 3 (total dose 90 mg m−2), mesna and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. Cycles were repeated every 21 days. A median of 4 (1–6) cycles per patient was administered. Twenty-two patients responded to therapy, including three complete responders and 19 partial responders for an overall response rate of 48% (95% CI: 33–63%). The response rate was not different between localised and metastatic diseases or between histological types, but was higher in grade 3 tumours. Median overall survival was 19 months. Salvage therapies (surgery and/or radiotherapy) were performed in 43% of patients and found to be the most significant predictor for favourable survival (exploratory multivariate analysis). Haematological toxicity was severe, including grade ⩾3 neutropenia in 59%, thrombopenia in 39% and anaemia in 27% of cycles. Three patients experienced grade 3 neurotoxicity and one patient died of septic shock. This high-dose regimen is toxic but nonetheless feasible in multicentre settings in non elderly patients with good performance status. A high response rate was obtained. Prolonged survival was mainly a function of salvage therapies. PMID:17031396

  6. Phase I trial of the oral PARP inhibitor olaparib in combination with paclitaxel for first- or second-line treatment of patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This Phase I study evaluated the safety, tolerability and efficacy of olaparib, a potent oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC). Methods Eligible patients who had received ≤1 prior cytotoxic regimen for mTNBC were treated with olaparib 200 mg bid continuously plus weekly paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 for three weeks per four-week cycle. Dose modifications in a large proportion of patients due to neutropenia resulted in enrollment of a second cohort of patients who, if they experienced grade ≥2 neutropenia in cycle 1, received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, which was continued prophylactically in subsequent cycles. All patients had measurable disease; tumor responses were evaluated according to RECIST (version 1.0). Results Nineteen patients (cohort 1, n = 9; cohort 2, n = 10) received treatment; 15 had received prior taxane chemotherapy. The most frequent adverse events were diarrhea (n = 12, 63%), nausea (n = 11, 58%) and neutropenia (n = 11, 58%). Seven neutropenia events were reported in cohort 1 (four grade ≥3) and four in cohort 2 (two grade ≥3, including one event of febrile neutropenia). The median (range) dose intensity of paclitaxel was 57% (26 to 100%) in cohort 1 and 73% (29 to 100%) in cohort 2. Seven patients (37%) had a confirmed partial response; one patient remains on olaparib monotherapy without progression. Conclusions The combination of olaparib and weekly paclitaxel was complicated by a significant clinical interaction, with higher-than-expected rates of neutropenia despite secondary prophylaxis. Given the encouraging response rate, alternative scheduling and dosing strategies should be considered (funded by AstraZeneca; ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00707707). PMID:24063698

  7. Combination and Switching of Stimulants in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Leila; Sikirica, Vanja; Cloutier, Martin; Lachaine, Jean; Guerin, Annie; Carter, Valerie; Hodgkins, Paul; van Stralen, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the one-year period prevalence of stimulant combination therapy and switching in children/ adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Quebec, Canada. Method: Patients aged 6–17 years, with at least two ADHD diagnosis codes documented in different visits and at least 30 days’ supply of a stimulant during their most recent one-year observation period were selected from the Regie de l’assurance maladie du Quebec database (03/2007–02/2012). Combination therapy was defined as at least 30 consecutive days of concomitant use of multiple stimulants with different active moieties, or use of a stimulant and another psychotropic medication. Therapy switching was defined as a prescription claim for a new psychotropic medication less than 30 days before or after the end of supply of a stimulant. The one-year period prevalence of therapy combination and switching was calculated. Results: The one-year period prevalence of combination therapy and switching among 9,431 children and adolescents with ADHD treated with stimulants was 19.8% and 18.7%, respectively. The most frequent combination categories were atypical antipsychotics (AAP: 10.8%), atomoxetine (ATX: 5.5%) and clonidine (5.3%). The most frequent switched-to categories were other stimulants (7.9%), AAP (5.5%) and ATX (4.7%). Conclusions: Approximately one in five children/adolescents with ADHD on a stimulant experienced combination therapy or therapy switching; however, the majority of the medications used in combination or switching were not label-indicated for the treatment of ADHD in Canada. These results highlight the need for further research to evaluate the risk-benefit of stimulant combination and switching in children and adolescents with ADHD. PMID:25320609

  8. Combined treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib with immune-stimulating antibodies for BRAF mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Homet Moreno, Blanca; Mok, Stephen; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The combination of targeted therapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors has become the standard of care in patients with BRAFV600E mutant melanoma, but responses are not durable. In addition, the impressive clinical benefits with anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies (Ab) in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic melanoma and the synergistic effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 compared with single therapy alone groups support the idea that combining dabrafenib, trametinib and immunotherapy based on PD-1 blockade could be an interesting approach in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. With our mouse model of syngeneic BRAFV600E driven melanoma (SM1), we tested whether the addition of an immunostimulatory Ab targeting CD137 (4-1BB) and/or CD134 (OX40) would enhance the antitumor effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy. In vitro studies showed that the combination group of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 increases CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), as well as CD4+ T cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). An upregulation of PD-L1 was observed in the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 therapy. Combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1, with either anti-CD137 or anti-CD134, showed a superior antitumor effect, but the five-agent combination was not superior to the four-agent combinations. In conclusion, the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib, anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy results in robust antitumor activity, which is further improved by adding the immune-stimulating Ab anti-CD137 or anti-CD134. Our findings support the testing of these combinations in patients with BRAFV600E mutant metastatic melanoma. PMID:27622011

  9. Combined treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib with immune-stimulating antibodies for BRAF mutant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Homet Moreno, Blanca; Mok, Stephen; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The combination of targeted therapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors has become the standard of care in patients with BRAF (V600E) mutant melanoma, but responses are not durable. In addition, the impressive clinical benefits with anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies (Ab) in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic melanoma and the synergistic effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 compared with single therapy alone groups support the idea that combining dabrafenib, trametinib and immunotherapy based on PD-1 blockade could be an interesting approach in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. With our mouse model of syngeneic BRAF (V600E) driven melanoma (SM1), we tested whether the addition of an immunostimulatory Ab targeting CD137 (4-1BB) and/or CD134 (OX40) would enhance the antitumor effect of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy. In vitro studies showed that the combination group of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 increases CD8(+) tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), as well as CD4(+) T cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). An upregulation of PD-L1 was observed in the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1 therapy. Combination of dabrafenib, trametinib and anti-PD-1, with either anti-CD137 or anti-CD134, showed a superior antitumor effect, but the five-agent combination was not superior to the four-agent combinations. In conclusion, the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib, anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy results in robust antitumor activity, which is further improved by adding the immune-stimulating Ab anti-CD137 or anti-CD134. Our findings support the testing of these combinations in patients with BRAF (V600E) mutant metastatic melanoma. PMID:27622011

  10. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S.; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3–5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein. PMID:27007499

  11. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3-5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein. PMID:27007499

  12. ["Dual Guidance"? - parallel combination of ultrasound-guidance and nerve stimulation - Contra].

    PubMed

    Maecken, Tim

    2015-07-01

    Sonography is a highly user-dependent technology. It presupposes a considerable degree of sonoanatomic and sonographic knowledge and requires good practical skills of the examiner. Sonography allows the identification of the puncture target, observes the needle feed and assesses the spread pattern of the local anesthetic in real time. Peripheral electrical nerve stimulation (PNS) cannot offer these advantages to the same degree, but may allow nerve localization under difficult sonographic conditions. The combination of the two locating techniques is complex in its practical implementation. Partially, the use of one location technique is made even more difficult by the combination with the second. PNS in parallel to sonography serves primarily as a warning technology in the case of an invisible cannula tip. It should not be construed as a compensation technique for the lack of sonographic skills or knowledge. However, PNS may be helpful in the sense of a bridging technology as long as the user is aware of its limitations. PMID:26230889

  13. Enhanced thrombopoietin but not G-CSF receptor stimulation induces self-renewing hematopoietic stem cell divisions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kovtonyuk, Larisa V; Manz, Markus G; Takizawa, Hitoshi

    2016-06-23

    In steady-state adult hematopoiesis, most hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are in the resting phase of the cell cycle. Upon enhanced hematopoietic demand, HSCs can be induced to divide and self-renew or differentiate. However, the cell-extrinsic signals inducing HSC cycling remain to be elucidated. Using in vivo high-resolution single HSC divisional tracking, we directly demonstrate that clinically applied thrombopoietin receptor but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor agonists drive HSCs into self-renewing divisions leading to quantitative expansion of functional HSC as defined by their in vivo serial multilineage and long-term repopulating potential. These results suggest that thrombopoietin mimetics might be applicable to expand HSCs in vivo and to sensitize thrombopoietin receptor-expressing HSCs to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxic agents. PMID:27146433

  14. Combined neuromodulatory interventions in acute experimental pain: assessment of melatonin and non-invasive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nádia Regina Jardim; Laste, Gabriela; Deitos, Alícia; Stefani, Luciana Cadore; Cambraia-Canto, Gustavo; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Brunoni, Andre R.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and melatonin can effectively treat pain. Given their potentially complementary mechanisms of action, their combination could have a synergistic effect. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that compared to the control condition and melatonin alone, tDCS combined with melatonin would have a greater effect on pain modulatory effect, as assessed by quantitative sensory testing (QST) and by the pain level during the Conditioned Pain Modulation (CPM)-task. Furthermore, the combined treatment would have a greater cortical excitability effect as indicated by the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and on the serum BDNF level. Healthy males (n = 20), (aged 18–40 years), in a blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover, clinical trial, were randomized into three groups: sublingual melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + a-tDCS, melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + sham-(s)-tDCS, or sublingual placebo+sham-(s)-tDCS. Anodal stimulation (2 mA, 20 min) was applied over the primary motor cortex. There was a significant difference in the heat pain threshold (°C) for melatonin+a-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean difference: 4.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 8.63) and melatonin+s-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean: 5.16, 95% CI: 0.84 to 8.36). There was no difference between melatonin+s-tDCS and melatonin+a-tDCS (mean difference: 0.29, 95% CI: −3.72 to 4.23). The mean change from the baseline on amplitude of motor evocate potential (MEP) was significantly higher in the melatonin+a-tDCS (−19.96% ± 5.2) compared with melatonin+s-tDCS group (−1.36% ± 5.35) and with placebo+s-tDCS group (3.61% ± 10.48), respectively (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). While melatonin alone or combined with a-tDCS did not significantly affect CPM task result, and serum BDNF level. The melatonin effectively reduced pain; however, its association with a-tDCS did not present an additional modulatory effect on acute induced pain. PMID:25873871

  15. Enhancing treatment effects by combining continuous theta burst stimulation with smooth pursuit training.

    PubMed

    Hopfner, Simone; Cazzoli, Dario; Müri, René M; Nef, Tobias; Mosimann, Urs P; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Vanbellingen, Tim; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) represents a promising approach in the treatment of neglect syndrome. However, it is not known whether cTBS in conjunction with another technique may enhance the therapeutic effects. In the present sham-controlled study, we aimed to combine cTBS with smooth pursuit training (SPT), another method known to effectively improve neglect symptoms, and to evaluate whether this combination would result in a stronger effect than SPT alone. Eighteen patients with left spatial neglect after right-hemispheric stroke were included in the study and performed a cancellation task on a large 54.6″ touchscreen monitor. A sequential application of cTBS and SPT induced a significantly greater improvement of neglect than SPT alone. After the combined application of these two methods, patients detected significantly more targets and their cancellation behaviour presented a significantly greater shift towards the contralesional hemispace. We suggest that a combined, sequential application of cTBS and SPT is a promising new approach to treat neglect. PMID:25455568

  16. The combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy using glycated chitosan as an immunological stimulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Chung-Yi; Chen, Wei R.; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-03-01

    Immunotherapy has been reported to effectively treat various cancers. In addition, scientists are dedicated in finding whether the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy can efficiently suppress cancer progression and recurrence. Although radiotherapy has been widely used for breast cancer, better strategies to overcome the latestage breast cancer remains explored. The glycated chitosan (GC), a novel immunological stimulant, was demonstrated to trigger local immune response facilitating the enhancement of radiosensitivity. Our previous study also revealed that the cell mortality and invasive ability were decreased under GC treatment, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we used 4T1-3R-L, a derived murine breast cancer cell line from the spontaneous metastasized liver lesion. We combined ionizing radiation with GC to treat 4T1-3R-L and found the expression of DNA damage-related genes such as gamma-H2AX was more than radiation alone In addition, the cell cycle distribution and colony forming assay showed an increased sub-G1 population and decreased cell survival rate after IR combined GC treatment. Taken together, we sought to elucidate the underlying mechanism by the investigation of DNA damage repair process when IR combined with GC, and to explore another advantage of GC to aid other cancer treatments. Based on our most updated results, the GC treatment is able to effectively increase the radiosensitivity through an immune-responsive signaling transduction, indicating that GC could be a valuable therapeutic strategy for treating against advanced breast cancers.

  17. Regulating knee joint position by combining electrical stimulation with a controllable friction brake.

    PubMed

    Durfee, W K; Hausdorff, J M

    1990-01-01

    Hybrid FES gait restoration systems which combine stimulation with controllable mechanical damping elements at the joints show promise for providing good control of limb motion despite variations in muscle properties. In this paper we compared three controllers for position tracking of the free swinging shank in able-bodied subjects. The controllers were open-loop (OL), proportional-derivative closed-loop (PD), and bang-bang plus controlled-brake control (CB). Both OL and PD controllers contained a forward path element, which inverted a model of the electrically stimulated muscle and limb system. The CB control was achieved by maximally activating the appropriate muscle group and controlling the brake to be a "moving-wall" against which the limb pushed. The CB control resulted in superior tracking performance for a wide range of position tracking tasks and muscle fatigue states but required no calibration or knowledge of muscle properties. The disadvantages of CB control include excess mechanical power dissipation in the brake and impact forces applied to the skeletal system. PMID:2281882

  18. Biomimetic scaffold combined with electrical stimulation and growth factor promotes tissue engineered cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoungshin; Larson, Benjamin L; Kolewe, Martin E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freed, Lisa E

    2014-02-15

    Toward developing biologically sound models for the study of heart regeneration and disease, we cultured heart cells on a biodegradable, microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffold designed with micro-structural features and anisotropic mechanical properties to promote cardiac-like tissue architecture. Using this biomimetic system, we studied individual and combined effects of supplemental insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and electrical stimulation (ES). On culture day 8, all tissue constructs could be paced and expressed the cardiac protein troponin-T. IGF-1 reduced apoptosis, promoted cell-to-cell connectivity, and lowered excitation threshold, an index of electrophysiological activity. ES promoted formation of tissue-like bundles oriented in parallel to the electrical field and a more than ten-fold increase in matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) gene expression. The combination of IGF-1 and ES increased 2D projection length, an index of overall contraction strength, and enhanced expression of the gap junction protein connexin-43 and sarcomere development. This culture environment, designed to combine cardiac-like scaffold architecture and biomechanics with molecular and biophysical signals, enabled functional assembly of engineered heart muscle from dissociated cells and could serve as a template for future studies on the hierarchy of various signaling domains relative to cardiac tissue development. PMID:24240126

  19. Efficacy of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation Combined with Biofeedback Therapy in Patients with Functional Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Bing Yan; Ma, Hong Mei; Zang, Xiao Ying; Wang, Si Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Xi Peng; Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A large number of studies have shown that function constipation (FC) has an extremely high incidence of mental and psychological disorders. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) was applied to the treatment of psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression. We explored the effects of CES combined with biofeedback therapy (BFT) on the psychological state, clinical symptoms, and anorectal function in patients with FC. Methods A total of 74 patients with FC were randomly divided into 2 groups. The control group received BFT. CES combined with BFT was carried out in the experiment group. All patients were assessed using the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), and Wexner constipation score at baseline and the end of each course. Anorectal manometry and balloon expulsion tests were performed before and after treatment. Results After treatment, the participants in the experiment group had significantly lower score SAS, SDS, and Wexner constipation scores than the control group (all P < 0.05). The number of successful expulsion in the experiment group was larger than the control group (P = 0.016). Conclusions CES combined with BFT was effective in improving the psychological status of anxiety, depression, and bowel symptoms in patients with FC. PMID:26932836

  20. A combined model of human erythropoiesis and granulopoiesis under growth factor and chemotherapy treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haematotoxicity of conventional chemotherapies often results in delays of treatment or reduction of chemotherapy dose. To ameliorate these side-effects, patients are routinely treated with blood transfusions or haematopoietic growth factors such as erythropoietin (EPO) or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). For the latter ones, pharmaceutical derivatives are available, which differ in absorption kinetics, pharmacokinetic and -dynamic properties. Due to the complex interaction of cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy and the stimulating effects of different growth factor derivatives, optimal treatment is a non-trivial task. In the past, we developed mathematical models of thrombopoiesis, granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis under chemotherapy and growth-factor applications which can be used to perform clinically relevant predictions regarding the feasibility of chemotherapy schedules and cytopenia prophylaxis with haematopoietic growth factors. However, interactions of lineages and growth-factors were ignored so far. Results To close this gap, we constructed a hybrid model of human granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis under conventional chemotherapy, G-CSF and EPO applications. This was achieved by combining our single lineage models of human erythropoiesis and granulopoiesis with a common stem cell model. G-CSF effects on erythropoiesis were also implemented. Pharmacodynamic models are based on ordinary differential equations describing proliferation and maturation of haematopoietic cells. The system is regulated by feedback loops partly mediated by endogenous and exogenous EPO and G-CSF. Chemotherapy is modelled by depletion of cells. Unknown model parameters were determined by fitting the model predictions to time series data of blood counts and cytokine profiles. Data were extracted from literature or received from cooperating clinical study groups. Our model explains dynamics of mature blood cells and cytokines after growth-factor applications in

  1. The combined depletion of monoamines alters the effectiveness of subthalamic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Faggiani, Emilie; Delaville, Claire; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid

    2015-10-01

    Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are under-studied and therefore not well treated. Here, we investigated the role of combined depletions of dopamine, norepinephrine and/or serotonin in the manifestation of motor and non-motor deficits in the rat. Then, we studied the impact of these depletions on the efficacy of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). We performed selective depletions of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, and the behavioral effects of different combined depletions were investigated using the open field, the elevated plus maze and the forced swim test. Bilateral dopamine depletion alone induced locomotor deficits associated with anxiety and mild "depressive-like" behaviors. Although additional depletions of norepinephrine and/or serotonin did not potentiate locomotor and anxiety disorders, combined depletions of the three monoamines dramatically exacerbated "depressive-like" behavior. STN-DBS markedly reversed locomotor deficits and anxiety behavior in animals with bilateral dopamine depletion alone. However, these improvements were reduced or lost by the additional depletion of norepinephrine and/or serotonin, indicating that the depletion of these monoamines may interfere with the antiparkinsonian efficacy of STN-DBS. Furthermore, our results showed that acute STN-DBS improved "depressive-like" disorder in animals with bilateral depletion of dopamine and also in animals with combined depletions of the three monoamines, which induced severe immobility in the forced swim test. Our data highlight the key role of monoamine depletions in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depressive-like disorders and provide the first evidence of their negative consequences on the efficacy of STN-DBS upon the motor and anxiety disorders in the context of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26206409

  2. Docetaxel in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11) in platinum-resistant paclitaxel-pretreated ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, Aristides; Kosmas, Christos; Toufexi, Helen; Malamos, Nicholas; Lagadas, Antonios; Kosmidis, Christos; Ginopoulos, Panagiotis; Ziras, Nicholas; Kandilis, Kostas; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2005-01-01

    The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in the management of ovarian cancer patients with tumors resistant to platinum compounds has not yet been defined. This multicenter prospective phase II study evaluated the activity and toxicity of the docetaxel-plus-irinotecan combination in ovarian cancer patients whose tumors were resistant to platinum compounds and who had been exposed to paclitaxel. Treatment consisted of docetaxel 60 mg/m2 i.v. followed by irinotecan 200 mg/m2 i.v. both on day 1 followed by prophylactic recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) support from days 2 to 6, every 3 weeks. Thirty-one patients were enrolled in the study. The median age was 60 years, and the median performance status (ECOG) was 1. Eight (26%) patients had primary tumors resistant to platinum, while the rest of the population had tumor recurrence within 6 months from the last cisplatin treatment. Four chemotherapy cycles per patient were administered, with the delivered dose intensity at 75% of the planned dose for both agents. Among 30 patients evaluable for response, there were 2 (7%) complete and 4 (14%) partial responses (overall response rate 20%; (95% confidence interval, CI, 11%-33%). Stable disease was recorded in 8 (28%) patients and progressive disease in 15 (51%). The median response duration was 4.5 months (range, 3-12), the median time to progression 5 months (range, 2-17) and the median survival 11 months (range, 1-40); the 1-year survival was almost 50%. Myelotoxicity was moderate, with grade 3 and 4 neutropenia occurring in 23% of the patients, grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia in 6% and febrile neutropenia in 13%. Grade 3 diarrhea was observed in 2% of the patients. There was one treatment-related death due to sepsis. In conclusion, the combination of docetaxel plus irinotecan with rhG-CSF support, appears to be a moderately effective regimen with acceptable toxicity for platinum-resistant, paclitaxel-pretreated ovarian cancer patients

  3. Prevention of radiation-induced bone pathology through combined pharmacologic cytoprotection and angiogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Donneys, Alexis; Nelson, Noah S; Perosky, Joseph E; Polyatskaya, Yekaterina; Rodriguez, Jose J; Figueredo, Christian; Vasseli, Cheyenne A; Ratliff, Hannah C; Deshpande, Sagar S; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Buchman, Steven R

    2016-03-01

    Pathologic fractures and associated non-unions arising in previously irradiated bone are severely debilitating diseases. Although radiation is known to have deleterious effects on healthy tissue cellularity and vascularity, no clinically accepted pharmacologic interventions currently exist to target these destructive mechanisms within osseous tissues. We utilized amifostine-a cellular radioprotectant-and deferoxamine-an angiogenic stimulant-to simultaneously target the cellular and vascular niches within irradiated bone in a rat model of mandibular fracture repair following irradiation. Rats treated with combined therapy were compared to those undergoing treatment with singular amifostine or deferoxamine therapy, nontreated/irradiated animals (XFx) and non-treated/non-irradiated animals (Fx). 3D angiographic modeling, histology, Bone Mineral Density Distribution and mechanical metrics were utilized to assess therapeutic efficacy. We observed diminished metrics for all outcomes when comparing XFx to Fx alone, indicating the damaging effects of radiation. Across all outcomes, only the combined treatment group improved upon XFx levels, normalized all metrics to Fx levels, and was consistently as good as, or superior to the other treatment options (p<0.05). Collectively, our data demonstrate that pharmacologically targeting the cellular and vascular environments within irradiated bone prevents bone injury and enhances fracture healing. PMID:26723578

  4. Best of both worlds: promise of combining brain stimulation and brain connectome.

    PubMed

    Luft, Caroline Di Bernardi; Pereda, Ernesto; Banissy, Michael J; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial current brain stimulation (tCS) is becoming increasingly popular as a non-pharmacological non-invasive neuromodulatory method that alters cortical excitability by applying weak electrical currents to the scalp via a pair of electrodes. Most applications of this technique have focused on enhancing motor and learning skills, as well as a therapeutic agent in neurological and psychiatric disorders. In these applications, similarly to lesion studies, tCS was used to provide a causal link between a function or behavior and a specific brain region (e.g., primary motor cortex). Nonetheless, complex cognitive functions are known to rely on functionally connected multitude of brain regions with dynamically changing patterns of information flow rather than on isolated areas, which are most commonly targeted in typical tCS experiments. In this review article, we argue in favor of combining tCS method with other neuroimaging techniques (e.g., fMRI, EEG) and by employing state-of-the-art connectivity data analysis techniques (e.g., graph theory) to obtain a deeper understanding of the underlying spatiotemporal dynamics of functional connectivity patterns and cognitive performance. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of using these combined techniques to investigate the neural correlates of human creativity and to enhance creativity. PMID:25126060

  5. Best of both worlds: promise of combining brain stimulation and brain connectome

    PubMed Central

    Luft, Caroline Di Bernardi; Pereda, Ernesto; Banissy, Michael J.; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial current brain stimulation (tCS) is becoming increasingly popular as a non-pharmacological non-invasive neuromodulatory method that alters cortical excitability by applying weak electrical currents to the scalp via a pair of electrodes. Most applications of this technique have focused on enhancing motor and learning skills, as well as a therapeutic agent in neurological and psychiatric disorders. In these applications, similarly to lesion studies, tCS was used to provide a causal link between a function or behavior and a specific brain region (e.g., primary motor cortex). Nonetheless, complex cognitive functions are known to rely on functionally connected multitude of brain regions with dynamically changing patterns of information flow rather than on isolated areas, which are most commonly targeted in typical tCS experiments. In this review article, we argue in favor of combining tCS method with other neuroimaging techniques (e.g., fMRI, EEG) and by employing state-of-the-art connectivity data analysis techniques (e.g., graph theory) to obtain a deeper understanding of the underlying spatiotemporal dynamics of functional connectivity patterns and cognitive performance. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of using these combined techniques to investigate the neural correlates of human creativity and to enhance creativity. PMID:25126060

  6. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  7. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  8. Bioreactor for modulation of cardiac microtissue phenotype by combined static stretch and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W; Nunes, Sara S; Sofla, Aarash; Reis, Lewis A; Pahnke, Aric; Xiao, Yun; Laschinger, Carol; Radisic, Milica

    2014-01-01

    We describe here a bioreactor capable of simultaneously applying mechanical and electrical field stimulation in conjunction with static strain and on-line force of contraction measurements. It consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tissue chamber and a pneumatically driven stretch platform. The chamber contained eight tissue microwells (8.05 mm in length and 2.5 mm in width) with a pair of posts (2.78 mm in height and 0.8 mm in diameter) in each well to serve as fixation points and for measurements of contraction force. Carbon rods, stimulating electrodes, were placed into the PDMS chamber such that one pair stimulated four microwells. For feasibility studies, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded in collagen gels into the microwells. Following three days of gel compaction, electrical field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm and 1Hz, mechanical stimulation of 5% static strain or electromechanical stimulation (field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm, 1Hz and 5% static strain) were applied for 3 days. Cardiac microtissues subjected to electromechanical stimulation exhibited elevated amplitude of contraction and improved sarcomere structure as evidenced by sarcomeric α-actinin, actin and troponin T staining compared to microtissues subjected to electrical or mechanical stimulation alone or non-stimulated controls. The expression of atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide was also elevated in the electromechanically stimulated group. PMID:24876342

  9. Combination of Eccentric Exercise and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to Improve Quadriceps Function Post-ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lepley, Lindsey K.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to reduce quadriceps activation failure (QAF), and eccentric exercise has been shown lessen muscle atrophy post-ACL reconstruction. Given that these are two critical components of quadriceps strength, intervention combining these therapies may be effective at reinstituting quadriceps function post-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined NMES and eccentric exercise intervention to improve the recovery of quadriceps activation and strength post-reconstruction. Design Parallel longitudinal design. Setting Laboratory. Participants Thirty-six individuals post-injury were placed into four treatment groups (N&E, NMES and eccentrics; E-only, eccentrics only; N-only, NMES-only; STND, standard of care) and ten healthy controls participated. Intervention N&E and N-only received the NMES protocol 2x per week for the first six weeks post-reconstruction. N&E and E-only received the eccentric exercise protocol 2x per week beginning six weeks post-reconstruction. Main outcome measure Quadriceps activation was assessed via the superimposed burst technique and quantified via the central activation ratio. Quadriceps strength was assessed via maximal voluntary isomeric contractions (Nm/kg). Data was gathered on three occasions: pre-operative, 12-weeks-post-surgery and at return-to-play. Results No differences in pre-operative measures existed (P>0.05). E-only recovered quadriceps activation better than N-only or STND (P<0.05). N&E and E-only recovered strength better than N-only or the STND (P<0.05) and had strength values that were similar to healthy individuals at return-to-play (P>0.05). Conclusion Eccentric exercise was capable of restoring levels of quadriceps activation and strength that were similar to those of healthy adults and better than NMES alone. PMID:25819154

  10. Combining cell transplants or gene therapy with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Nathan C; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S; Ostrem, Jill L; Marks, William J; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    Cell transplantation and gene therapy each show promise to enhance the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, because cell transplantation and gene therapy generally require direct delivery to the central nervous system, clinical trial design involves unique scientific, ethical, and financial concerns related to the invasive nature of the procedure. Typically, such biologics have been tested in PD patients who have not received any neurosurgical intervention. Here, we suggest that PD patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) device implantation are an ideal patient population for the clinical evaluation of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Randomizing subjects to an experimental group that receives the biologic concurrently with the DBS implantation-or to a control group that receives the DBS treatment alone-has several compelling advantages. First, this study design enables the participation of patients likely to benefit from DBS, many of whom simultaneously meet the inclusion criteria of biologic studies. Second, the need for a sham neurosurgical procedure is eliminated, which may reduce ethical concerns, promote patient recruitment, and enhance the blinding of surgical trials. Third, testing the biologic by "piggybacking" onto an established, reimbursable procedure should reduce the cost of clinical trials, which may allow a greater number of biologics to reach this critical stage of research translation. Finally, this clinical trial design may lead to combinatorial treatment strategies that provide PD patients with more durable control over disabling motor symptoms. By combining neuromodulation with biologics, we may also reveal important treatment paradigms relevant to other diseases of the brain. PMID:25521796

  11. Combined effect of relativistic and ponderomotive filamentation on coexisting stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Ashish Singh, Ram Kishor; Sharma, R. P.

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents a model to study the interplay between the stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin scattering (SBS) along with the combined effect of relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, at relativistic laser power. As the intense non-uniform laser beam propagates through the plasma, both the non-linearities are operative and modify the plasma refractive index in such a manner that one enhances the self-focusing (of the pump beam) caused by the other non-linearity. The interplay between the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) affects the pump filamentation process because of pump depletion and at the same time these scattering processes get modified due to this filamentation process. An impact of the filamentation process and coexistence of the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) on the back-reflectivity of scattered beams (SRS and SBS) has been explored and found that the back-reflectivity gets modified significantly. Results are also compared with the three wave interaction case (isolated SRS or SBS case)

  12. Combining near-infrared spectroscopy with electroencephalography and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näsi, Tiina; Kotilahti, Kalle; Mäki, Hanna; Nissilä, Ilkka; Meriläinen, Pekka

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the usability of a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device in multimodal measurements. We combined NIRS with electroencephalography (EEG) to record hemodynamic responses and evoked potentials simultaneously, and with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate hemodynamic responses to repetitive TMS (rTMS). Hemodynamic responses and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to 3, 6, and 12 s stimuli consisting of pattern-reversing checkerboards were successfully recorded in the NIRS/EEG measurement, and ipsi- and contralateral hemodynamic responses to 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz rTMS in the NIRS/TMS measurement. In the NIRS/EEG measurements, the amplitudes of the hemodynamic responses increased from 3- to 6-s stimulus, but not from 6- to 12-s stimulus, and the VEPs showed peaks N75, P100, and N135. In the NIRS/TMS measurements, the 2-Hz stimulus produced the strongest hemodynamic responses compared to the 0.5- and 1-Hz stimuli. In two subjects oxyhemoglobin concentration decreased and in one increased as a consequence of the 2-Hz rTMS. To locate the origin of the measured NIRS responses, methods have to be developed to investigate TMS-induced scalp muscle contractions. In the future, multimodal measurements may prove useful in monitoring or treating diseases such as stroke or Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Assessing consciousness in coma and related states using transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Gosseries, O; Thibaut, A; Boly, M; Rosanova, M; Massimini, M; Laureys, S

    2014-02-01

    Thanks to advances in medical care, an increased number of patients recover from coma. However, some remain in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome or in a minimally conscious state. Detection of awareness in severely brain-injured patients is challenging because it relies on behavioral assessments, which can be affected by motor, sensory and cognitive impairments of the patients. Other means of evaluation are needed to improve the accuracy of the diagnosis in this challenging population. We will here review the different altered states of consciousness occurring after severe brain damage, and explain the difficulties associated with behavioral assessment of consciousness. We will then describe a non-invasive technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG), which has allowed us to detect the presence or absence of consciousness in different physiological, pathological and pharmacological states. Some potential underlying mechanisms of the loss of consciousness will then be discussed. In conclusion, TMS-EEG is highly promising in identifying markers of consciousness at the individual level and might be of great value for clinicians in the assessment of consciousness. PMID:24393302

  14. Inhibition of bladder overactivity by duloxetine in combination with foot stimulation or WAY-100635 treatment in cats.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Zeyad; Matsuta, Yosuke; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether duloxetine [a serotonin (5-HT)-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor] combined with transcutaneous foot stimulation or WAY-100635 (a 5-HT1A antagonist) can enhance inhibition of bladder overactivity in cats. Cystometrograms were performed on eight cats under α-chloralose anesthesia by infusing saline and then 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to induce bladder overactivity. To inhibit bladder overactivity, foot stimulation (5 Hz) was applied via transcutaneous pad electrodes to the right hindfoot at two and four times the threshold intensity for inducing a toe twitch. Duloxetine (0.003-3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously to determine the effect of combination treatment. After the 3 mg/kg dose of duloxetine, WAY-100635 (0.5 mg/kg) was given intravenously. AA irritation significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced bladder capacity to 42.7 ± 7.4% of the saline control capacity. Foot stimulation alone at both two and four times the threshold intensity significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited bladder overactivity and increased bladder capacity to 66.7 ± 6.3% and 85.7 ± 6.5% of the saline control, respectively. Duloxetine alone dose dependently inhibited bladder overactivity and completely restored bladder capacity to the saline control (109 ± 15.5%) at 3 mg/kg. Although duloxetine combined with foot stimulation did not further enhance inhibition, WAY-100635 (0.5 mg/kg) given after 3 mg/kg duloxetine further increased (P = 0.008) bladder capacity to 162.2 ± 22.5% of the saline control. Although duloxetine and foot stimulation independently inhibited bladder overactivity, combined treatment did not enhance inhibition. Duloxetine combined with WAY-100635, however, synergistically enhanced bladder inhibition, indicating a potential novel treatment for overactive bladder if duloxetine is combined with a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist drug. PMID:24154699

  15. The influence of the combined treatment with Vadimezan (ASA404) and taxol on the growth of U251 glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the most important biological characteristics of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is high vascular density. Vadimezan (ASA404, DMXAA) belongs to the class of small molecule vascular disrupting agents (VDA) that cause disruption of established tumor vessels and subsequent tumor hemorrhagic necrosis. Its selective antivascular effect is mediated by intratumoral induction of several cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α). Preclinical studies have demonstrated that ASA404 acts synergistically with taxanes. In this study, we investigated if treatment of mice bearing U251 human glioblastoma xenografts with ASA404 and taxol may be synergistic. Therapy response was evaluated by measuring changes in tumor size and metabolic activity using 18F-FDG PET (Fluorodeoxyglucose - positron emision tomography) imaging. Methods U251 cells were inoculated s.c. in the right hind limb of NMRI-Foxn1nu athymic female nude mice. Animals were randomly assigned into 4 groups (7–9 animals/group) for treatment: control, taxol, ASA404, and ASA404 plus taxol. The animals received either a single dose of taxol (10 mg/kg), ASA404 (27.5 mg/kg), or taxol (10 mg/kg) plus ASA404 (27.5 mg/kg) administered i.p.; ASA404 was administred 24 h after the treatment with taxol. 4 and 24 h after treatment with ASA404 (28 and 48 h hours after treatment with taxol) 18 F-FDG PET scans were performed. Results The treatment with taxol did not affect the tumor growth in comparison to untreated controls. The treatment of animals with single dose ASA404 alone or in combination with taxol caused a significant delay in tumor growth. The combined treatment did not decrease the growth of the xenografts significantly more than ASA404 alone, but early changes in tumor 18 F-FDG uptake preceded subsequent growth inhibition. The tumor weights, which were

  16. Plerixafor plus G-CSF in combination with chemotherapy for stem cell mobilization in a pediatric patient with Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Vives, Susana; Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Almazán, Francisco; Juncà, Jordi; Grifols, Joan-Ramon; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2012-11-01

    Some malignant tumors in childhood require high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell support to achieve a cure. In patients heavily pretreated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy or irradiation, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may fail to mobilize stem cells from the bone marrow. Based on the experience with lymphoma and myeloma patients in whom peripheral blood-derived stem cell (PBSC) collection following mobilization with G-CSF failed, we successfully employed plerixafor in a 14-year-old female diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma in early relapse treated with three lines of chemotherapy in whom PBSC could not be mobilized using either G-CSF alone or G-CSF following chemotherapy. No side effects were observed. Plerixafor may be an effective and safe agent for stem cell collection in pediatric patients with solid tumors, although new studies addressed to evaluate its effectiveness and safety are needed. PMID:22566276

  17. The Combined Use of Hypnosis and Sensory and Motor Stimulation in Assisting Children with Developmental Learning Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jampolsky, Gerald G.

    Hypnosis was combined with sensory and motor stimulation to remediate reversal problems in five children (6 1/2- 9-years-old). Under hypnosis Ss were given the suggestion that they learn their numbers through feel and then given 1 hour of structured instruction daily for 10 days. Instruction stressed conditioning, vibratory memory, touch memory,…

  18. Ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract (IMUNOR) decreases nitric oxide formation and hematopoiesis-stimulating cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Lojek, Antonín; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa

    2007-10-01

    A low-molecular-weight (<12 kDa) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR, was tested in experiments in vitro on non-stimulated and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages in order to assess modulation of nitric oxide (NO) production (measured indirectly as the concentration of nitrites), hematopoiesis-stimulating activity of the supernatant of the macrophage cells (ascertained by counting cell colonies growing from progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in vitro), and the release of hematopoiesis-stimulating cytokines. No hematopoiesis-stimulating activity and cytokine or NO production were found in the supernatant of non-stimulated macrophages. It was found that IMUNOR does not influence this status. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated macrophages was characterized by hematopoiesis-stimulating activity, as well as by the presence of nitrites, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). A key role in the hematopoiesis-stimulating activity of the supernatant of LPS-stimulated macrophages could be ascribed to G-CSF since the formation of the colonies could be abrogated nearly completely by monoclonal antibodies against G-CSF. IMUNOR was found to suppress all the mentioned manifestations of the LPS-activated macrophages. When considering these results together with those from our previous in vivo study revealing stimulatory effects of IMUNOR on radiation-suppressed hematopoiesis, a hypothesis may be formulated which postulates a homeostatic role of IMUNOR, consisting in stimulation of impaired immune and hematopoietic systems but also in cutting back the production of proinflammatory mediators in cases of overstimulation which threats with undesirable consequences. PMID:17673152

  19. Detection of dead regions in the cochlea: relevance for combined electric and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Glasberg, Brian; Schlueter, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A dead region is a region in the cochlea where the inner hair cells and/or the auditory neurones are functioning very poorly, if at all. People who are being considered for a combination of a cochlear implant and a hearing aid typically have a dead region in the parts of the cochlea that normally respond to medium and high frequencies, but have some functional hearing at lower frequencies. For such people, it may be useful to determine the edge frequency, f(e), of any dead region. This may be relevant to choosing the most appropriate insertion depth of the electrode array, and to the way that frequencies in the input signal are mapped to acoustic and electric stimulation. It may also be helpful in interpreting the results of research studies. This paper reviews methods for diagnosing dead regions and defining the value of f(e). It is argued that the value of f(e) cannot be determined reliably from the audiogram, although a dead region is likely to be present at a given frequency when the hearing loss at that frequency is 70 dB or more. When a sinusoidal signal is reported as sounding highly distorted or noise-like, a dead region may be present at the signal frequency, but again this is not a reliable indicator. The TEN test is a simple clinical method for diagnosis of dead regions. Where this test gives a positive diagnosis, it is recommended that psychophysical tuning curves be measured to define the value of f(e) more precisely. PMID:19955720

  20. The role of corifollitropin alfa in controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF in combination with GnRH antagonist.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Ayse; Ata, Baris

    2011-01-01

    Corifollitropin alfa is a synthetic recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) molecule containing a hybrid beta subunit, which provides a plasma half-life of ∼65 hours while maintaining its pharmocodynamic activity. A single injection of corifollitropin alfa can replace daily FSH injections for the first week of ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization. Stimulation can be continued with daily FSH injections if the need arises. To date, more than 2500 anticipated normoresponder women have participated in clinical trials with corifollitropin alfa. It is noteworthy that one-third of women did not require additional gonadotropin injections and reached human chorionic gonadotropin criterion on day 8. The optimal corifollitropin dose has been calculated to be 100 μg for women with a body weight ≤60 kg and 150 μg for women with a body weight >60 kg, respectively. Combination of corifollitropin with daily gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist injections starting on stimulation day 5 seems to yield similar or significantly higher numbers of oocytes and good quality embryos, as well as similar ongoing pregnancy rates compared with women stimulated with daily rFSH injections. Stimulation characteristics, embryology, and clinical outcomes seem consistent with repeated corifollitropin-stimulated assisted reproductive technologies cycles. Multiple pregnancy or ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome rates with corifollitropin were not increased over daily FSH regimen. The corifollitropin alfa molecule does not seem to be immunogenic and does not induce neutralizing antibody formation. Drug hypersensitivity and injection-site reactions are not increased. Incidence and nature of adverse events and serious adverse events are similar to daily FSH injections. Current trials do not provide information regarding use of corifollitropin alfa in anticipated hyper- and poor responders to gonadotropin stimulation. Although corifollitropin alfa is unlikely to be teratogenic

  1. Psychophysics, fitting, and signal processing for combined hearing aid and cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    The addition of acoustic stimulation to electric stimulation via a cochlear implant has been shown to be advantageous for speech perception in noise, sound quality, music perception, and sound source localization. However, the signal processing and fitting procedures of current cochlear implants and hearing aids were developed independently, precluding several potential advantages of bimodal stimulation, such as improved sound source localization and binaural unmasking of speech in noise. While there is a large and increasing population of implantees who use a hearing aid, there are currently no generally accepted fitting methods for this configuration. It is not practical to fit current commercial devices to achieve optimal binaural loudness balance or optimal binaural cue transmission for arbitrary signals and levels. There are several promising experimental signal processing systems specifically designed for bimodal stimulation. In this article, basic psychophysical studies with electric acoustic stimulation are reviewed, along with the current state of the art in fitting, and experimental signal processing techniques for electric acoustic stimulation. PMID:24165299

  2. Feasibility of sensory tongue stimulation combined with task-specific therapy in people with spinal cord injury: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous evidence suggests the effects of task-specific therapy can be further enhanced when sensory stimulation is combined with motor practice. Sensory tongue stimulation is thought to facilitate activation of regions in the brain that are important for balance and gait. Improvements in balance and gait have significant implications for functional mobility for people with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). The aim of this case study was to evaluate the feasibility of a lab- and home-based program combining sensory tongue stimulation with balance and gait training on functional outcomes in people with iSCI. Methods Two male participants (S1 and S2) with chronic motor iSCI completed 12 weeks of balance and gait training (3 lab and 2 home based sessions per week) combined with sensory tongue stimulation using the Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator (PoNS). Laboratory based training involved 20 minutes of standing balance with eyes closed and 30 minutes of body-weight support treadmill walking. Home based sessions consisted of balancing with eyes open and walking with parallel bars or a walker for up to 20 minutes each. Subjects continued daily at-home training for an additional 12 weeks as follow-up. Results Both subjects were able to complete a minimum of 83% of the training sessions. Standing balance with eyes closed increased from 0.2 to 4.0 minutes and 0.0 to 0.2 minutes for S1 and S2, respectively. Balance confidence also improved at follow-up after the home-based program. Over ground walking speed improved by 0.14 m/s for S1 and 0.07 m/s for S2, and skilled walking function improved by 60% and 21% for S1 and S2, respectively. Conclusions Sensory tongue stimulation combined with task-specific training may be a feasible method for improving balance and gait in people with iSCI. Our findings warrant further controlled studies to determine the added benefits of sensory tongue stimulation to rehabilitation training. PMID:24906679

  3. Effects of withholding feed on thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test results and effects of combined testing on oral sugar test and thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test results in horses.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Melissa M; Frank, Nicholas; Hermida, Pilar; Sanchez-Londoño, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess effects of withholding feed on thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test results used in diagnosis of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction in horses and determine effects of combined testing on results of the TRH stimulation test and the oral sugar test (OST) used in diagnosis of equine metabolic syndrome. ANIMALS 30 adult horses. PROCEDURES All horses underwent TRH stimulation tests under fed and nonfed conditions, an OST alone, and an OST combined with TRH stimulation testing. For TRH stimulation tests, plasma ACTH concentrations were measured before (baseline) and 10 minutes after (poststimulation) IV TRH administration. For the OST, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before (baseline) and 60 and 90 minutes after oral corn syrup administration. For combined testing, the TRH stimulation test was initiated immediately after 60-minute posttreatment sample collection for the OST. Results were compared among methods by Wilcoxon matched-pairs, signed rank tests, paired t tests, and Bland-Altman analysis. RESULTS Feeding conditions did not affect median ACTH concentrations when TRH stimulation tests were performed alone. Median baseline ACTH concentration did not differ between TRH stimulation tests performed alone (under fed or nonfed conditions) and those combined with OSTs. Median poststimulation ACTH concentration was significantly lower for combined tests than for solitary TRH stimulation tests. Mean 60-minute plasma glucose concentration was significantly lower for solitary OSTs than for combined tests, but this difference could not be attributed to TRH administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Combined testing in the manner described impacted ACTH concentrations during TRH stimulation tests and is not recommended at this time. PMID:27347827

  4. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI) neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion (ROM) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related ROM and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton) in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. NMES was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD) and electromyography (EMG) activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p = 0.028) or EMG (p = 0.021) modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related ROM (p = 0.009) and the movement-related brain modulation (p = 0.019). Combining a hybrid BMI with neuromuscular stimulation

  5. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI) neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion (ROM) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related ROM and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton) in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. NMES was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD) and electromyography (EMG) activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p = 0.028) or EMG (p = 0.021) modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related ROM (p = 0.009) and the movement-related brain modulation (p = 0.019). Combining a hybrid BMI with neuromuscular stimulation

  6. A connectomics approach combining structural and effective connectivity assessed by intracranial electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Donos, Cristian; Mălîia, Mihai Dragoş; Mîndruţă, Ioana; Popa, Irina; Ene, Mirela; Bălănescu, Bogdan; Ciurea, Ana; Barborica, Andrei

    2016-05-15

    In the context of the human brain, the term "connectivity" can refer to structural, functional or effective connectivity. Intracranial electrical stimulation is perhaps the most direct way of investigating the effective connectivity. We propose a method of mapping the effective connectivity, revealed by the electrical stimulation of brain structures, over the structural connectome (SC), obtained through diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), to form a structural-effective connectome (SEC). A number of 24 patients with refractory epilepsy were implanted with depth electrodes for pre-surgical evaluation. Effective connectivity was assessed by analyzing the responses to single pulse electrical stimulation (SPES). Stimulation pulses having variable amplitude were applied to each pair of adjacent contacts and responses evoked by stimulation were recorded from other contacts located in other brain areas. Early responses (10-110 ms) on the stimulation-activated contacts located outside the epileptogenic zone were averaged for each patient, resulting in a patient-level physiological effective connectome (EC). The population level EC is computed by averaging the connections of the individual ECs, on a structure by structure basis. A fiber activation factor is used to weight the number of fibers connecting a pair of structures in the SC by its corresponding normalized EC value. The resulting number of effectively activated fibers describes the directional connection strength between two structures in the SEC. A physiological SEC comprising directional connections between 70 segmented brain areas in both hemispheres, was obtained by inclusion of structures outside the epileptogenic zone only. Over the entire structure set, the Spearman's correlation coefficient ρ between the number of fibers extracted from the DSI Atlas and the normalized RMS responses to SPES was ρ=0.21 (p<0.001), while Kendall's tau coefficients ranged -0.52-0.44 (p<0.05). The physiological structural

  7. Enhanced regeneration of rabbit mandibular defects through a combined treatment of electrical stimulation and rhBMP-2 application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghoon; Yang, Hoon Joo; Cho, Tae Hyung; Lee, Sung Eun; Park, Yong Doo; Kim, Hyun Man; Kim, In Sook; Seo, Young-kwon; Hwang, Soon Jung; Kim, Sung June

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the new bone regeneration of a rabbit mandibular defect using hBMSCs under electrical stimulation combined with rhBMP-2 in this study. An inner scaffold prepared by setting a collagen sponge with hBMSCs and hydrogel was placed into a polycaprolactone (PCL) outer box, and an electrical stimulation device was installed between the inner scaffold and the outer box. There were three experimental groups depending on electrical stimulation and application of rhBMP-2. The experimental group was divided into the following three groups. Group 1, in which rhBMP-2 (5 μg/defect) was added to hydrogel and electrical stimulation was not applied; Group 2, in which rhBMP-2 (5 μg/defect) was added as in Group 1 and electrical stimulation was applied; and Group 3, in which electrical stimulation was applied and rhBMP-2 (5 μg/defect) was injected directly into defect site. The delivered electrical stimulation was charge-balanced bi-phasic electric current pulses, and electrical stimulation was conducted for 7 days. The stimulation parameters of the bi-phasic electrical current set at an amplitude of 20 μA, a duration of 100 μs and a frequency of 100 Hz. Four weeks after surgery, new bone formation in each group was evaluated using radiography, histology, and micro-computed tomography (μCT). Groups 2 and 3 exhibited a significant increase in new bone formation compared to Group 1, while Group 3 showed the highest level of new bone regeneration. In a comparison between two groups, Group 2 showed a higher bone volume (BV) by 260 % (p < 0.01) compared with Group 1, and Group 3 showed a higher BV by 442 % (p < 0.01) compared with Group 1. The trend of the bone surface density (ratio of new bone to the real defect volume, BS/TV), trabecular number, and connectivity was identical to that of the BV. The total bone mineral density (BMD) of Groups 2 and 3 showed values higher by the ratios of 103 % (p < 0.01) and 107.5 % (p < 0.01) compared with Group 1

  8. Reconstructive Effects of Percutaneous Electrical Stimulation Combined with GGT Composite on Large Bone Defect in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tzung-Chi; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the electromagnetic stimulation improves bone remodeling and bone healing. However, the effect of percutaneous electrical stimulation (ES) was not directly explored. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effect of ES on improvement of bone repair. Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for cranial implantation. We used a composite comprising genipin cross-linked gelatin mixed with tricalcium phosphate (GGT). Bone defects of all rats were filled with the GGT composites, and the rats were assigned into six groups after operation. The first three groups underwent 4, 8, and 12 weeks of ES, and the anode was connected to the backward of the defect on the neck; the cathode was connected to the front of the defect on the head. Rats were under inhalation anesthesia during the stimulation. The other three groups only received inhalation anesthesia without ES, as control groups. All the rats were examined afterward at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Radiographic examinations including X-ray and micro-CT showed the progressive bone regeneration in the both ES and non-ES groups. The amount of the newly formed bone increased with the time between implantation and examination in the ES and non-ES groups and was higher in the ES groups. Besides, the new bone growth trended on bilateral sides in ES groups and accumulated in U-shape in non-ES groups. The results indicated that ES could improve bone repair, and the effect is higher around the cathode. PMID:23818928

  9. Combined effects of chemical priming and mechanical stimulation on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on nanofiber scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Subramony, Siddarth D.; Su, Amanda; Yeager, Keith; Lu, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    Functional tissue engineering of connective tissues such as the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remains a significant clinical challenge, largely due to the need for mechanically competent scaffold systems for grafting, as well as a reliable cell source for tissue formation. We have designed an aligned, polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanofiber-based scaffold with physiologically relevant mechanical properties for ligament regeneration. The objective of this study is to identify optimal tissue engineering strategies for fibroblastic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), testing the hypothesis that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) priming coupled with tensile loading will enhance hMSC-mediated ligament regeneration. It was observed that compared to the unloaded, as well as growth factor-primed but unloaded controls, bFGF stimulation followed by physiologically relevant tensile loading enhanced hMSC proliferation, collagen production and subsequent differentiation into ligament fibroblast-like cells, upregulating the expression of types I and III collagen, as well as tenasin-C and tenomodulin. The results of this study suggest that bFGF priming increases cell proliferation, while mechanical stimulation of the hMSCs on the aligned nanofiber scaffold promotes fibroblastic induction of these cells. In addition to demonstrating the potential of nanofiber scaffolds for hMSC-mediated functional ligament tissue engineering, this study yields new insights into the interactive effects of chemical and mechanical stimuli on stem cell differentiation. PMID:24267271

  10. Combining statistical and physics-based methods for predicting induced seismic hazard during reservoir stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischig, V. S.; Mena Cabrera, B.; Goertz-Allmann, B.; Wiemer, S.

    2012-12-01

    Improving the management of risk associated with induced seismicity during reservoir stimulation depends on real-time analysis and forecasting of time-dependent seismic hazard during a stimulation experiment. We present a forward-model based on a semi-stochastic approach that can be used in a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) framework, and calibrate it against observations of induced seismicity during the Basel EGS stimulation in 2006. The modeling strategy is based on two components: a non-linear fluid pressure diffusion model, and a stochastic seed model that includes basic geo-mechanical principles. The transient fluid pressure field is computed with a numerical continuum flow model, in which permeability can increase irreversibly above a certain pressure threshold. The flow model thus mimics permeability enhancement through shear-induced fracture dilation, and is capable of reproducing the wellhead pressure behavior during stimulation. The pressure field is used to trigger events at so-called seed points, locations of potential seismic events that are randomly distributed around an injection well. They are assigned principal stress magnitudes drawn from a normal distribution representative of the ambient stress field. Once the effective stress at a seed point meets a pre-defined Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion due to a fluid pressure increase a seismic event is induced. Inspired by observed event statistics of both tectonic earthquakes and acoustic emissions in laboratory experiments, we assume a negative linear relationship between b-values and differential stress. Thus, for each event a magnitude can be drawn from a frequency-magnitude distribution with a b-value corresponding to the differential stress at failure. The result is a synthetic event catalogue of a seismic cloud evolving in time and space. Computing a large number (several hundred) of such random synthetic catalogues allows a statistically sound comparison between model results and

  11. Acid and reduction stimulated logic "and"-type combinational release mode achieved in DOX-loaded superparamagnetic nanogel.

    PubMed

    Song, Meifang; Xue, Yanan; Chen, Lidi; Xia, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Long, Sihui; Huang, Shiwen; Yu, Faquan

    2016-08-01

    A superparamagnetic nanogel featured with a logic "and"-type pH/reduction combinational stimulated release mode was fabricated as a drug delivery system by virtue of parallel crosslinking. The disulfide bond and electrostatic interaction between thiolated alginate (SA-SH) and thiolated/aminated iron oxide nanoparticles (SH-MION-NH2) were employed to achieve the mechanism. The obtained DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel is 122.7±20.3nm in size with superparamagnetism. The combinational conditions of pH5.0/10mM glutathione (GSH) stimulated a significantly high accumulative release. However, either pH7.4/10mM (GSH) or pH5.0 alone induced much low release. This verified the typical logic "and"-type combinationally stimulated release mode. In vitro cytotoxicity tests clearly illustrated the effective selectivity of killing the human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) with IC50 of 1.01μg/mL and the human hepatoma cells (HepG2) with IC50 of 1.57μg/mL but significantly low cytotoxicity to the cercopithecus aethiops kidney cells (Vero). CLSM presented the internationalization of the nanogel into cytoplasm and nuclei with time. In vivo investigation revealed that the selective intratumoral accumulation and antitumor efficacy were considerably advantageous over free DOX whereas low systemic toxicity exhibited up-regulated security as compared to free DOX. Overall, the DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel with enhanced antitumor efficacy and down-regulated adverse effect was a promising nanoplatform for the clinical chemotherapy of malignancy. PMID:27157762

  12. Vestibular contributions to a right-hemisphere network for bodily awareness: combining galvanic vestibular stimulation and the "Rubber Hand Illusion".

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Berlot, Eva; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    An altered sense of one's own body is a common consequence of vestibular damage, and also of damage to vestibular networks in the right hemisphere. However, few experimental studies have investigated whether vestibular signals contribute to bodily awareness. We addressed this issue by combining an established experimental model of bodily awareness (Rubber Hand Illusion -RHI) with galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in healthy participants. Brief left anodal and right cathodal GVS (which predominantly activates vestibular networks in the right hemisphere), or right anodal and left cathodal GVS, or sham stimulation were delivered at random, while participants experienced either synchronous or asynchronous visuo-tactile stimulation of a rubber hand and their own hand. The drift in the perceived position of the participant's hand towards the rubber hand was used as a proxy measure of the resulting multisensory illusion of body ownership. GVS induced strong polarity-dependent effects on this measure of RHI: left anodal and right cathodal GVS produced significantly lower proprioceptive drift than right anodal and left cathodal GVS. We suggest that vestibular inputs influence the multisensory weighting functions that underlie bodily awareness: the right hemisphere vestibular projections activated by the left anodal and right cathodal GVS increased the weight of intrinsic proprioceptive signals about hand position, and decreased the weight of visual information responsible for visual capture during the RHI. PMID:25619847

  13. Combination therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and other antidepressants or stimulants: strategies for the management of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Samantha J; Shin, Mirae; McInnis, Melvin G; Bostwick, Jolene R

    2015-04-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is a major health concern. More than 40% of patients treated for major depressive disorder with an appropriate antidepressant dose for an adequate duration fail to respond. Further, approximately half of adults with major depressive disorder fail to achieve sustained remission despite various medication trials. The utilization of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for the treatment of depression in clinical practice today is low due to their widely known adverse effects, some of which may be life threatening, and the risk for dietary and drug interactions. For these reasons, MAOIs are not recommended to be prescribed along with other antidepressants or certain prescription or nonprescription drugs. Pharmacologic options are limited for individuals with TRD, however, and there is a paucity of data on the efficacy of MAOIs in combination with other antidepressants for the management of TRD. We performed a search of the PubMed database (inception through January 25, 2015) to identify cases that illustrate the potential utility, as well as risks, of combination treatment with MAOIs and other antidepressants for the management of TRD; 18 articles met the criteria for our search. In addition, we performed a retrospective case series by reviewing the medical records of 29 adults treated for depression with an MAOI plus another psychotropic agent (an antidepressant or stimulant medication) between 2003 and 2012 at a large Midwestern teaching hospital. We compared the findings of the published experience with our local experience to allow for more informed decisions regarding pharmacotherapy in patients with TRD. We separated the local experience into two groups: 15 cases with the selective MAO type B inhibitor selegiline combined with medications presumed to increase the risk of serotonin syndrome and 14 cases with nonselective MAOIs (phenelzine and tranylcypromine) combined with other contraindicated medications. Although risks of

  14. Schwann Cells Overexpressing FGF-2 Alone or Combined with Manual Stimulation Do Not Promote Functional Recovery after Facial Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Haastert, Kirsten; Grosheva, Maria; Angelova, Srebrina K.; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Skouras, Emmanouil; Michael, Joern; Grothe, Claudia; Dunlop, Sarah A.; Angelov, Doychin N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether transplantation of Schwann cells (SCs) overexpressing different isoforms of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) combined with manual stimulation (MS) of vibrissal muscles improves recovery after facial nerve transection in adult rat. Procedures. Transected facial nerves were entubulated with collagen alone or collagen plus naïve SCs or transfected SCs. Half of the rats received daily MS. Collateral branching was quantified from motoneuron counts after retrograde labeling from 3 facial nerve branches. Quality assessment of endplate reinnervation was combined with video-based vibrissal function analysis. Results. There was no difference in the extent of collateral axonal branching. The proportion of polyinnervated motor endplates for either naïve SCs or FGF-2 over-expressing SCs was identical. Postoperative MS also failed to improve recovery. Conclusions. Neither FGF-2 isoform changed the extent of collateral branching or polyinnervation of motor endplates; furthermore, this motoneuron response could not be overridden by MS. PMID:19830246

  15. Combining Robotic Training and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Severe Upper Limb-Impaired Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Capone, Fioravante; Di Pino, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Florio, Lucia; Zollo, Loredana; Simonetti, Davide; Ranieri, Federico; Brunelli, Nicoletta; Corbetto, Marzia; Miccinilli, Sandra; Bravi, Marco; Milighetti, Stefano; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Sterzi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that both robot-assisted rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation can produce a slight improvement in severe chronic stroke patients. It is still unknown whether their combination can produce synergistic and more consistent improvements. Safety and efficacy of this combination has been assessed within a proof-of-principle, double-blinded, semi-randomized, sham-controlled trial. Inhibitory continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) was delivered on the affected hemisphere, in order to improve the response to the following robot-assisted therapy via a homeostatic increase of learning capacity. Twenty severe upper limb-impaired chronic stroke patients were randomized to robot-assisted therapy associated with real or sham cTBS, delivered for 10 working days. Eight real and nine sham patients completed the study. Change in Fugl-Meyer was chosen as primary outcome, while changes in several quantitative indicators of motor performance extracted by the robot as secondary outcomes. The treatment was well-tolerated by the patients and there were no adverse events. All patients achieved a small, but significant, Fugl-Meyer improvement (about 5%). The difference between the real and the sham cTBS groups was not significant. Among several secondary end points, only the Success Rate (percentage of targets reached by the patient) improved more in the real than in the sham cTBS group. This study shows that a short intensive robot-assisted rehabilitation produces a slight improvement in severe upper-limb impaired, even years after the stroke. The association with homeostatic metaplasticity-promoting non-invasive brain stimulation does not augment the clinical gain in patients with severe stroke. PMID:27013950

  16. Combining Robotic Training and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Severe Upper Limb-Impaired Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Capone, Fioravante; Di Pino, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Florio, Lucia; Zollo, Loredana; Simonetti, Davide; Ranieri, Federico; Brunelli, Nicoletta; Corbetto, Marzia; Miccinilli, Sandra; Bravi, Marco; Milighetti, Stefano; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Sterzi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that both robot-assisted rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation can produce a slight improvement in severe chronic stroke patients. It is still unknown whether their combination can produce synergistic and more consistent improvements. Safety and efficacy of this combination has been assessed within a proof-of-principle, double-blinded, semi-randomized, sham-controlled trial. Inhibitory continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) was delivered on the affected hemisphere, in order to improve the response to the following robot-assisted therapy via a homeostatic increase of learning capacity. Twenty severe upper limb-impaired chronic stroke patients were randomized to robot-assisted therapy associated with real or sham cTBS, delivered for 10 working days. Eight real and nine sham patients completed the study. Change in Fugl-Meyer was chosen as primary outcome, while changes in several quantitative indicators of motor performance extracted by the robot as secondary outcomes. The treatment was well-tolerated by the patients and there were no adverse events. All patients achieved a small, but significant, Fugl-Meyer improvement (about 5%). The difference between the real and the sham cTBS groups was not significant. Among several secondary end points, only the Success Rate (percentage of targets reached by the patient) improved more in the real than in the sham cTBS group. This study shows that a short intensive robot-assisted rehabilitation produces a slight improvement in severe upper-limb impaired, even years after the stroke. The association with homeostatic metaplasticity-promoting non-invasive brain stimulation does not augment the clinical gain in patients with severe stroke. PMID:27013950

  17. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation combined with effortful swallowing on post-stroke oropharyngeal dysphagia: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, J-S; Oh, D-H; Hwang, N-K; Lee, J-H

    2016-06-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been used as a therapeutic intervention for dysphagia. However, the therapeutic effects of NMES lack supporting evidence. In recent years, NMES combined with traditional swallowing therapy has been used to improve functional recovery in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. This study aimed to investigate the effects of effortful swallowing combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation on hyoid bone movement and swallowing function in stroke patients. Fifty stroke patients with mild dysphagia who were able to swallow against the resistance applied by using NMES and cooperate actively in training were included. This study was designed as a 6-week single-blind, randomised, controlled study. In the experimental group, two pairs of electrodes were placed horizontally in the infrahyoid region to depress the hyoid bone. The NMES intensity was increased gradually until the participants felt a grabbing sensation in their neck and performed an effortful swallow during the stimulation. In the placebo group, the same procedure was followed except for the intensity, which was increased gradually until the participants felt an electrical sensation. All participants underwent this intervention for 30 min per session, 5 sessions per week, for 6 weeks. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were carried out before and after the intervention and kinematics of the hyoid bone and swallowing function were analysed based on the VFSS. The experimental group revealed a significant increase in anterior and superior hyoid bone movement and the pharyngeal phase of the swallowing function. This intervention can be used as a novel remedial approach in dysphagic stroke patients. PMID:26969528

  18. Modulating the Behaviors of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Via the Combination of High-Frequency Vibratory Stimulations and Fibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhixiang; Duncan, Randall L.

    2013-01-01

    We are interested in the in vitro engineering of artificial vocal fold tissues via the strategic combination of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), physiologically relevant mechanical stimulations, and biomimetic artificial matrices. We have constructed a vocal fold bioreactor that is capable of imposing vibratory stimulations on the cultured cells at human phonation frequencies. Separately, fibrous poly (ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds emulating the ligamentous structure of the vocal fold were prepared by electrospinning, were incorporated in the vocal fold bioreactor, and were driven into a wave-like motion in an axisymmetrical fashion by the oscillating air. MSC-laden PCL scaffolds were subjected to vibrations at 200 Hz with a normal center displacement of ∼40 μm for a total of 7 days. A continuous (CT) or a 1 h-on-1 h-off (OF) regime with a total dynamic culture time of 12 h per day was applied. The dynamic loading did not cause any physiological trauma to the cells. Immunohistotochemical staining revealed the reinforcement of the actin filament and the enhancement of α5β1 integrin expression under selected dynamic culture conditions. Cellular expression of essential vocal fold extracellular matrix components, such as elastin, hyaluronic acid, and matrix metalloproteinase-1, was significantly elevated as compared with the static controls, and the OF regime is more conducive to matrix production than the CT vibration mode. Analyses of genes of typical fibroblast hallmarks (tenascin-C, collagen III, and procollagen I) as well as markers for MSC differentiation into nonfibroblastic lineages confirmed MSCs' adaptation of fibroblastic behaviors. Overall, the high-frequency vibratory stimulation, when combined with a synthetic fibrous scaffold, serves as a potent modulator of MSC functions. The novel bioreactor system presented here, as a versatile, yet well-controlled model, offers an in vitro platform for understanding vibration

  19. Rejection of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer by attenuation of Treg cells in combination with immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Huang, Tian-Gui; Meseck, Marcia; Mandeli, John; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2007-12-01

    4T1 breast carcinoma is a highly malignant and poorly immunogenic murine tumor model that resembles advanced breast cancer in humans, and is refractory to most immune stimulation-based treatments. We hypothesize that the ineffectiveness of immune stimulatory treatment is mediated by the suppressive effects of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which can be attenuated by engaging the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related protein with its natural ligand (GITRL); further, combination treatment with existing immune stimulation regimens will augment anti-tumor immunity and eradicate metastatic 4T1 tumors in mice.A soluble homodimeric form of mouse GITRL (mIg-mGITRLs) was molecularly constructed and used to treat orthotopic 4T1 tumors established in immune-competent, syngeneic Balb/c mice. When applied in combination with adenovirus-mediated intratumoral murine granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene delivery plus systemic 4-1BB activation, mIg-mGITRLs attenuated the immune-suppressive function of splenic Treg cells, which led to elevated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production, tumor-specific cytolytic T-cell activities, tumor rejection and long-term survival in 65% of the animals without apparent toxicities. The results demonstrate that addition of mIg-mGITRLs to an immune-stimulatory treatment regimen significantly improved long-term survival without apparent toxicity, and could potentially be clinically translated into an effective and safe treatment modality for metastatic breast cancer in patients. PMID:17968355

  20. A pilot controlled trial of a combination of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation and body acupuncture for post-stroke depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous studies have demonstrated the treatment benefits of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS), a novel brain stimulation therapy in patients with major depression, postpartum depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of DCEAS combined with body acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). Methods In a single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 43 patients with PSD were randomly assigned to 12 sessions of DCEAS plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 23), or sham (non-invasive cranial electroacupuncture, n-CEA) plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 20) for 3 sessions per week over 4 weeks. Treatment outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), the Clinical Global Impression - Severity scale (CGI-S) and Barthel Index (BI), a measure used to evaluate movement ability associated with daily self-caring activity. Results DCEAS produced a significantly greater reduction of both HAMD-17 and CGI-S as early as week 1 and CGI-S at endpoint compared to n-CEA, but subjects of n-CEA group exhibited a significantly greater improvement on BI at week 4 than DCEAS. Incidence of adverse events was not different in the two groups. Conclusions These results indicate that DCEAS could be effective in reducing stroke patients’ depressive symptoms. Superficial electrical stimulation in n-CEA group may be beneficial in improving movement disability of stroke patients. A combination of DCEAS and body acupuncture can be considered a treatment option for neuropsychiatric sequelae of stroke. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01174394. PMID:25038733

  1. Combined nitrogen limitation and cadmium stress stimulate total carbohydrates, lipids, protein and amino acid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Chia, Mathias Ahii; Lombardi, Ana Teresa; da Graça Gama Melão, Maria; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-03-01

    Metals have interactive effects on the uptake and metabolism of nutrients in microalgae. However, the effect of trace metal toxicity on amino acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris as a function of varying nitrogen concentrations is not known. In this research, C. vulgaris was used to investigate the influence of cadmium (10(-7) and 2.0×10(-8)molL(-1) Cd) under varying nitrogen (2.9×10(-6), 1.1×10(-5) and 1.1×10(-3)molL(-1)N) concentrations on its growth rate, biomass and biochemical composition. Total carbohydrates, total proteins, total lipids, as well as individual amino acid proportions were determined. The combination of Cd stress and N limitation significantly inhibited growth rate and cell density of C. vulgaris. However, increasing N limitation and Cd stress stimulated higher dry weight and chlorophyll a production per cell. Furthermore, biomolecules like total proteins, carbohydrates and lipids increased with increasing N limitation and Cd stress. Ketogenic and glucogenic amino acids were accumulated under the stress conditions investigated in the present study. Amino acids involved in metal chelation like proline, histidine and glutamine were significantly increased after exposure to combined Cd stress and N limitation. We conclude that N limitation and Cd stress affects the physiology of C. vulgaris by not only decreasing its growth but also stimulating biomolecule production. PMID:25625522

  2. Targeted near infrared hyperthermia combined with immune stimulation for optimized therapeutic efficacy in thyroid cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Le; Zhang, Mengchao; Fu, Qingfeng; Li, Jingting; Sun, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of thyroid cancer has incurred much focus because of its high prevalency. As a new strategy treating thyroid cancer, hyperthermia takes several advantages compared with surgery or chemotherapy, including minimal invasion, low systematic toxicity and the ability to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer cells with the expression Hsp70 which serves as Toll-like receptors-4 (TLR-4 agonist). However, Hsp70 as a molecular chaperone can protect cells from heat induced apoptosis and therefore compromise the tumor killing effect of hyperthermia. In this study, to solve this problem, a combined hyperthermia therapy was employed to treat thyroid cancer. We prepared a probe with the tumor targeting agent AG to monitor thyroid tumor issue and generate heat to kill tumor cells in vivo. At the same time Quercetin (inhibitor of HSP70) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (agonist of TLR-4) were used for the combined hyperthermia therapy. The results showed that compared with free IR820, AG modification facilitated much enhanced cellular uptake and greatly pronounced tumor targeting ability. The combined therapy exhibited the most remarkable tumor inhibition compared with the single treatments both in vitro and in vivo. These findings verified that the new therapeutic combination could significantly improve the effect of hyperthermia and shed light on a novel clinical strategy in thyroid cancer treatment. PMID:26769848

  3. Development of a loudness normalisation strategy for combined cochlear implant and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2012-12-01

    Users of a cochlear implant together with a hearing aid in the non-implanted ear currently use devices that were developed separately and are often fitted separately. This results in very different growth of loudness with level in the two ears, potentially leading to decreased wearing comfort and suboptimal perception of interaural level differences. A loudness equalisation strategy, named 'SCORE bimodal', is proposed. It equalises loudness growth for the two modalities using existing models of loudness for acoustic and electric stimulation, and is suitable for implementation in wearable devices. Loudness balancing experiments were performed with six bimodal listeners to validate the strategy. In a first set of experiments, the function of each loudness model used was validated by balancing the loudness of four harmonic complexes of different bandwidths, ranging from 200 Hz to 1000 Hz, separately for each ear. Both the electric and acoustic loudness models predicted the data well. In a second set of experiments, binaural balancing was done for the same stimuli. It was found that SCORE significantly improved binaural balance. PMID:23000118

  4. Delayed G-CSF stimulation after PBSCT does not seem to modify the biological parameters of bone marrow recovery.

    PubMed

    Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Tempescul, Adrian; Delepine, Pascal; Guillerm, Gaelle; Hardy, Elisabeth; Eveillard, Jean-Richard; Berthou, Christian

    2011-04-01

    There are currently no recommendations indicating when stimulation should begin after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). We compared the outcome following between two treatment groups, in which daily granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration began on either the fifth or the eighth day after PBSCT in lymphoma and myeloma patients. We studied eight clinical parameters: number of G-CSF injections, number of days of hospitalization, of red blood cell or platelet transfusions; days when body temperature exceeds 38°C; days of parenteral nutrition; weight loss and hospitalization costs. We studied also four biological parameters: number of CD34+ cells, days with leucocytes less than 1 × 10(9) /L, days with hemoglobin less than 90 g/L or with less than 50 × 10(9) /L of platelets. There were no statistical significant differences between the study arms. It seems that delayed stimulation by G-CSF after PBSCT is safety and does not seem to modify bone marrow recovery timing. PMID:21442638

  5. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of a combination of cannabidiol and moringin in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Iori, Renato; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory response plays an important role in the activation and progress of many debilitating diseases. Natural products, like cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa, and moringin, an isothiocyanate obtained from myrosinase-mediated hydrolysis of the glucosinolate precursor glucomoringin present in Moringa oleifera seeds, are well known antioxidants also endowed with anti-inflammatory activity. This is due to a covalent-based mechanism for ITC, while non-covalent interactions underlie the activity of CBD. Since these two mechanisms are distinct, and the molecular endpoints are potentially complementary, we investigated in a comparative way the protective effect of these compounds alone or in combination on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. Our results show that the cannabidiol (5μM) and moringin (5μM) combination outperformed the single constituents that, at this dosage had only a moderate efficacy on inflammatory (Tumor necrosis factor-α, Interleukin-10) and oxidative markers (inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, nitrotyrosine). Significant upregulation of Bcl-2 and downregulation of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 was observed in cells treated with cannabidiol-moringin combination. Treatment with the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 antagonist was detrimental for the efficacy of cannabidiol, while no effect was elicited by cannabinoid receptor 1 and cannabinoid receptor 2 antagonists. None of these receptors was involved in the activity of moringin. Taken together, our in vitro results testify the anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects of the combination of cannabidiol and moringin. PMID:27215129

  6. Nerve Conduction Block Using Combined Thermoelectric Cooling and High Frequency Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Foldes, Emily L.; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Conduction block of peripheral nerves is an important technique for many basic and applied neurophysiology studies. To date, there has not been a technique which provides a quickly initiated and reversible “on-demand” conduction block which is both sustainable for long periods of time and does not generate activity in the nerve at the onset of the conduction block. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of a combined method of nerve block which utilizes two well established nerve blocking techniques in a rat and cat model: nerve cooling and electrical block using high frequency alternating currents (HFAC). This combined method effectively makes use of the contrasting features of both nerve cooling and electrical block using HFAC. The conduction block was initiated using nerve cooling, a technique which does not produce nerve “onset response” firing, a prohibitive drawback of HFAC electrical block. The conduction block was then readily transitioned into an electrical block. A long-term electrical block is likely preferential to a long-term nerve cooling block because nerve cooling block generates large amounts of exhaust heat, does not allow for fiber diameter selectivity and is known to be unsafe for prolonged delivery. PMID:20705099

  7. Enhancement of reverse transfection efficiency by combining stimulated DNA surface desorption and electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, Rhiannon; Hook, Andrew; Thissen, Helmut; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    Transfection cell microarrays (TCMs) are a high-throughput, miniaturised cell-culture system utilising reverse transfection, in which cells are seeded onto a DNA array resulting in localised regions of transfected cells. TCMs are useful for the analysis of gene expression, and can be used to identify genes involved in many cellular processes. This is of significant interest in fields such as tissue engineering, diagnostic screening, and drug testing [1, 2]. Low transfection efficiency has so far limited the application and utility of this technique. Recently, the transfection efficiency of TCMs was improved by an application of a high voltage for a short period of time to the DNA array resulting in the electroporation of cells attached to the surface [3, 4]. Furthermore, application of a low voltage for a longer period of time to the DNA array was shown to improve the transfection efficiency by stimulating the desorption of attached DNA, increasing the concentration of DNA available for cellular uptake [5]. In the present study, the optimisation of the uptake of adsorbed DNA vectors by adherent cells, utilising a voltage bias without compromising cell viability was investigated. This was achieved by depositing negatively charged DNA plasmids onto a positively charged allylamine plasma polymer (ALAPP) layer deposited on highly doped p-type silicon wafers either using a pipettor or a microarray contact printer. Surface-dependant human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 line) cells were cultured onto the DNA vector loaded ALAPP spots and the plasmid transfection events were detected by fluorescence microscopy. Cell viability assays, including fluorescein diacetate (FDA) / Hoechst DNA labelling, were carried out to determine the number of live adherent cells before and after application of a voltage. A protocol was developed to screen for voltage biases and exposure times in order to optimise transfection efficiency and cell viability. Cross-contamination between the microarray

  8. Combined Recording of Mechanically Stimulated Afferent Output and Nerve Terminal Labelling in Mouse Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Guy S; Cahusac, Peter M B; Banks, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for monitoring afferent firing evoked by mechanical displacement of hairs in the mouse pinna. The technique is very cost-effective and easily undertaken with materials commonly found in most electrophysiology laboratories, or easily purchased. The dissection is simple and fast, with the mechanical displacement provided by a generic electroceramic wafer controlled by proprietary software. The same software also records and analyses the electroneurogram output. The recording of the evoked nerve activity is through a commercial differential amplifier connected to fire-polished standard glass microelectrodes. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the stimulation and the recording conditions to optimize recording quality. The system is suitable for assaying the electrophysiological and optical properties of lanceolate terminals of palisade endings of hair follicles, as well as the outcomes from their pharmacological and/or genetic manipulation. An example of combining electrical recording with mechanical stimulation and labeling with a styryl pyridinium vital dye is given. PMID:27213522

  9. Analyses of chondrogenic induction of adipose mesenchymal stem cells by combined co-stimulation mediated by adenoviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the potential to differentiate into cartilage under stimulation with some reported growth and transcriptional factors, which may constitute an alternative for cartilage replacement approaches. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro chondrogenesis of ASCs transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) either alone or in combinations. Methods Aggregate cultures of characterized ovine ASCs were transduced with 100 multiplicity of infections of Ad.IGF-1, Ad.TGF-β1, Ad.FGF-2, and Ad.SOX9 alone or in combination. These were harvested at various time points for detection of cartilage-specific genes expression by quantitative real-time PCR or after 14 and 28 days for histologic and biochemical analyses detecting proteoglycans, collagens (II, I and X), and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen content, respectively. Results Expression analyses showed that co-expression of IGF-1 and FGF-2 resulted in higher significant expression levels of aggrecan, biglycan, cartilage matrix, proteoglycan, and collagen II (all P ≤0.001 at 28 days). Aggregates co-transduced with Ad.IGF-1/Ad.FGF-2 showed a selective expression of proteoglycans and collagen II, with limited expression of collagens I and × demonstrated by histological analyses, and had significantly greater glycosaminoglycan and collagen production than the positive control (P ≤0.001). Western blot analyses for this combination also demonstrated increased expression of collagen II, while expression of collagens I and × was undetectable and limited, respectively. Conclusion Combined overexpression of IGF-1/FGF-2 within ASCs enhances their chondrogenic differentiation inducing the expression of chondrogenic markers, suggesting that this combination is more beneficial than the other factors tested for the

  10. Treatment with a combination of intra-oral sensory stimulation and electropalatography in a child with severe developmental dyspraxia.

    PubMed

    Lundeborg, Inger; McAllister, Anita

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a combination of intra-oral sensory stimulation and electropalatography (EPG) in the treatment of a case with severe developmental verbal dyspraxia. A multiple-baseline design was used. The treatment duration was 11 months and started when the subject was 5 years old. The efficacy of the treatment was assessed by calculations of percentage of correctly articulated words, percentage of consonants correct, percentage of phonemes correct and percentage of words correct. Intelligibility assessments were conducted by both naïve and expert listeners. The experts also assessed visual deviances in articulatory gestures from video recordings. Qualitative analysis of EPG data was made. The subject's speech was significantly improved by the treatment in all aspects. The results and their generalization to other cases of developmental verbal dyspraxia are discussed. PMID:17613788

  11. Combining optogenetic stimulation and fMRI to validate a multivariate dynamical systems model for estimating causal brain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ryali, Srikanth; Ian Shih, Yen-Yu; Chen, Tianwen; Kochalka, John; Albaugh, Daniel; Fang, Zhongnan; Supekar, Kaustubh; Lee, Jin Hyung; Menon, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    State-space multivariate dynamical systems (MDS) (Ryali et al., 2011) and other causal estimation models are being increasingly used to identify directed functional interactions between brain regions. However, the validity and accuracy of such methods is poorly understood. Performance evaluation based on computer simulations of small artificial causal networks can address this problem to some extent, but they often involve simplifying assumptions that reduce biological validity of the resulting data. Here, we use a novel approach taking advantage of recently developed optogenetic fMRI (ofMRI) techniques to selectively stimulate brain regions while simultaneously recording high-resolution whole-brain fMRI data. ofMRI allows for a more direct investigation of causal influences from the stimulated site to brain regions activated downstream and is therefore ideal for evaluating causal estimation methods in vivo. We used ofMRI to investigate whether MDS models for fMRI can accurately estimate causal functional interactions between brain regions. Two cohorts of ofMRI data were acquired, one at Stanford University and the University of California Los Angeles (Cohort 1) and the other at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Cohort 2). In each cohort optical stimulation was delivered to the right primary motor cortex (M1). General linear model analysis revealed prominent downstream thalamic activation in Cohort 1, and caudate-putamen (CPu) activation in Cohort 2. MDS accurately estimated causal interactions from M1 to thalamus and from M1 to CPu in Cohort 1 and Cohort 2, respectively. As predicted, no causal influences were found in the reverse direction. Additional control analyses demonstrated the specificity of causal interactions between stimulated and target sites. Our findings suggest that MDS state-space models can accurately and reliably estimate causal interactions in ofMRI data and further validate their use for estimating causal interactions in fMRI. More

  12. Combining optogenetic stimulation and fMRI to validate a multivariate dynamical systems model for estimating causal brain interactions.

    PubMed

    Ryali, Srikanth; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Chen, Tianwen; Kochalka, John; Albaugh, Daniel; Fang, Zhongnan; Supekar, Kaustubh; Lee, Jin Hyung; Menon, Vinod

    2016-05-15

    State-space multivariate dynamical systems (MDS) (Ryali et al. 2011) and other causal estimation models are being increasingly used to identify directed functional interactions between brain regions. However, the validity and accuracy of such methods are poorly understood. Performance evaluation based on computer simulations of small artificial causal networks can address this problem to some extent, but they often involve simplifying assumptions that reduce biological validity of the resulting data. Here, we use a novel approach taking advantage of recently developed optogenetic fMRI (ofMRI) techniques to selectively stimulate brain regions while simultaneously recording high-resolution whole-brain fMRI data. ofMRI allows for a more direct investigation of causal influences from the stimulated site to brain regions activated downstream and is therefore ideal for evaluating causal estimation methods in vivo. We used ofMRI to investigate whether MDS models for fMRI can accurately estimate causal functional interactions between brain regions. Two cohorts of ofMRI data were acquired, one at Stanford University and the University of California Los Angeles (Cohort 1) and the other at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Cohort 2). In each cohort, optical stimulation was delivered to the right primary motor cortex (M1). General linear model analysis revealed prominent downstream thalamic activation in Cohort 1, and caudate-putamen (CPu) activation in Cohort 2. MDS accurately estimated causal interactions from M1 to thalamus and from M1 to CPu in Cohort 1 and Cohort 2, respectively. As predicted, no causal influences were found in the reverse direction. Additional control analyses demonstrated the specificity of causal interactions between stimulated and target sites. Our findings suggest that MDS state-space models can accurately and reliably estimate causal interactions in ofMRI data and further validate their use for estimating causal interactions in f

  13. Effect of alginate and alginate-cimetidine combination therapy on stimulated postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Denton, G

    1995-11-01

    This randomized, single-blind cross-over study compared the effectiveness of a conventional alginate reflux barrier formulation (20 mL single dose of Liquid Gaviscon; sodium alginate, sodium bicarbonate, calcium carbonate) with a 20 mL single dose of an alginate-cimetidine combination formulation (Algitec Suspension; sodium alginate, cimetidine) in the suppression of food and acid reflux into the oesophagus after a test meal in 12 healthy volunteers. Subjects were fasted overnight before the study. A pH electrode and gamma detector were accurately positioned 5 cm above the cardia. The volunteers received a 99mTc-labelled meal designed to provoke reflux and then either remained untreated, or 30 min later were given either Algitec Suspension or Liquid Gaviscon. Reflux of both food and acid into the oesophagus was measured for 3 h. There was a seven day wash-out period between each treatment. Food reflux in the control group was 22,878 +/- 14,385 counts x 10(3) and this was significantly suppressed by both Liquid Gaviscon (174 +/- 128 (s.e.) counts x 10(3); P = 0.003); however, although the reduction of food reflux to 3812 +/- 2322 counts x 10(3) observed after Algitec treatment was considerable, this did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05) due to the large intersubject variation. Liquid Gaviscon was significantly better at reducing food reflux than Algitec (P = 0.001). Gaviscon also significantly reduced acid reflux when compared with the control group (1.08 +/- 0.73 vs 5.87 +/- 3.27% recording time oesophageal pH < 4, respectively) (P = 0.03). The slight reduction in acid reflux after Algitec treatment (3.25 +/- 1.82% recording time oesophageal pH < 4) also did not reach statistical significance. The difference between Algitec and Gaviscon treatment was also not significant. PMID:8708979

  14. Establishment of a cell line of gallbladder carcinoma (GBK-1) producing human colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Egami, H; Sakamoto, K; Yoshimura, R; Kikuchi, H; Akagi, M

    1986-02-01

    A cell line designated GBK-1 was established from a patient with anaplastic carcinoma of the gallbladder, marked neutrophilia and fever, and has been propagated for the past 18 months. The cells grew as a monolayer sheet with a doubling time of 43 hr. The GBK-1 cells were of a pleomorphic polygonal epitheloid shape and they were transplantable into nude mice. Mice bearing the tumor developed marked granulocytosis. In the culture supernatant of GBK-1 cells, high colony stimulating factor (CSF) activity was evident with both human bone marrow cells and C57BL mouse bone marrow cells, and granulocytic colonies, macrophage colonies or granulocyte-macrophage mixed colonies were produced. The CSF activity was distributed in the molecular weight range of 25,000 to 60,000 with two distinct peaks at molecular weights of approximately 50,000 and 30,000. CSF activity was inactivated by heat treatment at 70 degrees for 30 min. GBK-1 is a new human cell line that produces heat-labile human GM-CSF. PMID:3082828

  15. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  16. The combined effect of erythropoietin and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor on liver regeneration after major hepatectomy in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The liver presents a remarkable capacity for regeneration after hepatectomy but the exact mechanisms and mediators involved are not yet fully clarified. Erythropoietin (EPO) and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) have been shown to promote liver regeneration after major hepatectomy. Aim of this experimental study is to compare the impact of exogenous administration of EPO, GM-CSF, as well as their combination on the promotion of liver regeneration after major hepatectomy. Methods Wistar rats were submitted to 70% major hepatectomy. The animals were assigned to 4 experimental groups: a control group (n = 21) that received normal saline, an EPO group (n = 21), that received EPO 500 IU/kg, a GM-CSF group (n = 21) that received 20 mcg/kg of GM-CSF and a EPO+GMCSF group (n = 21) which received a combination of the above. Seven animals of each group were killed on the 1st, 3rd and 7th postoperative day and their remnant liver was removed to evaluate liver regeneration by immunochemistry for PCNA and Ki 67. Results Our data suggest that EPO and GM-CSF increases liver regeneration following major hepatectomy when administered perioperatively. EPO has a more significant effect than GM-CSF (p < 0.01). When administering both, the effect of EPO seems to fade as EPO and GM-CSF treated rats have decreased regeneration compared to EPO administration alone (p < 0.01). Conclusion EPO, GM-CSF and their combination enhance liver regeneration after hepatectomy in rats when administered perioperatively. However their combination has a weaker effect on liver regeneration compared to EPO alone. Further investigation is needed to assess the exact mechanisms that mediate this finding. PMID:20604971

  17. Combining brain stimulation and video game to promote long-term transfer of learning and cognitive enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Looi, Chung Yen; Duta, Mihaela; Brem, Anna-Katharine; Huber, Stefan; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training offers the potential for individualised learning, prevention of cognitive decline, and rehabilitation. However, key research challenges include ecological validity (training design), transfer of learning and long-term effects. Given that cognitive training and neuromodulation affect neuroplasticity, their combination could promote greater, synergistic effects. We investigated whether combining transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with cognitive training could further enhance cognitive performance compared to training alone, and promote transfer within a short period of time. Healthy adults received real or sham tDCS over their dorsolateral prefrontal cortices during two 30-minute mathematics training sessions involving body movements. To examine the role of training, an active control group received tDCS during a non-mathematical task. Those who received real tDCS performed significantly better in the game than the sham group, and showed transfer effects to working memory, a related but non-numerical cognitive domain. This transfer effect was absent in active and sham control groups. Furthermore, training gains were more pronounced amongst those with lower baseline cognitive abilities, suggesting the potential for reducing cognitive inequalities. All effects associated with real tDCS remained 2 months post-training. Our study demonstrates the potential benefit of this approach for long-term enhancement of human learning and cognition. PMID:26902664

  18. Lactoferrin Combined with Retinoic Acid Stimulates B1 Cells to Express IgA Isotype and Gut-homing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Ho; Jin, Bo-Ra; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Seo, Goo-Young; Jang, Young-Saeng; Kim, Sun-Jin; An, Sun-Jin; Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Woan-Sub

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that TGF-β1 and retinoic acid (RA) cause IgA isotype switching in mice. We recently found that lactoferrin (LF) also has an activity of IgA isotype switching in spleen B cells. The present study explored the effect of LF on the Ig production by mouse peritoneal B cells. LF, like TGF-β1, substantially increased IgA production in peritoneal B1 cells but little in peritoneal B2 cells. In contrast, LF increased IgG2b production in peritoneal B2 cells much more strongly than in peritoneal B1 cells. LF in combination with RA further enhanced the IgA production and, interestingly, this enhancement was restricted to IgA isotype and B1 cells. Similarly, the combination of the two molecules also led to expression of gut homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9 on peritoneal B1 cells, but not on peritoneal B2 cells. Thus, these results indicate that LF and RA can contribute to gut IgA response through stimulating IgA isotype switching and expression of gut-homing molecules in peritoneal B1 cells. PMID:25713507

  19. Combining brain stimulation and video game to promote long-term transfer of learning and cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Looi, Chung Yen; Duta, Mihaela; Brem, Anna-Katharine; Huber, Stefan; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training offers the potential for individualised learning, prevention of cognitive decline, and rehabilitation. However, key research challenges include ecological validity (training design), transfer of learning and long-term effects. Given that cognitive training and neuromodulation affect neuroplasticity, their combination could promote greater, synergistic effects. We investigated whether combining transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with cognitive training could further enhance cognitive performance compared to training alone, and promote transfer within a short period of time. Healthy adults received real or sham tDCS over their dorsolateral prefrontal cortices during two 30-minute mathematics training sessions involving body movements. To examine the role of training, an active control group received tDCS during a non-mathematical task. Those who received real tDCS performed significantly better in the game than the sham group, and showed transfer effects to working memory, a related but non-numerical cognitive domain. This transfer effect was absent in active and sham control groups. Furthermore, training gains were more pronounced amongst those with lower baseline cognitive abilities, suggesting the potential for reducing cognitive inequalities. All effects associated with real tDCS remained 2 months post-training. Our study demonstrates the potential benefit of this approach for long-term enhancement of human learning and cognition. PMID:26902664

  20. Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation combined with transgene delivery of neurotrophin NT-3 and exercise: novel combination therapy for spinal contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Sisto, Sue A; Arvanian, Victor L

    2015-11-01

    Our recent terminal experiments revealed that administration of a single train of repetitive spinal electromagnetic stimulation (sEMS; 35 min) enhanced synaptic plasticity in spinal circuitry following lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. In the current study, we have examined effects of repetitive sEMS applied as a single train and chronically (5 wk, every other day) following thoracic T10 contusion. Chronic studies involved examination of systematic sEMS administration alone and combined with exercise training and transgene delivery of neurotrophin [adeno-associated virus 10-neurotrophin 3 (AAV10-NT3)]. Electrophysiological intracellular/extracellular recordings, immunohistochemistry, behavioral testing, and anatomical tracing were performed to assess effects of treatments. We found that administration of a single sEMS train induced transient facilitation of transmission through preserved lateral white matter to motoneurons and hindlimb muscles in chronically contused rats with effects lasting for at least 2 h. These physiological changes associated with increased immunoreactivity of GluR1 and GluR2/3 glutamate receptors in lumbar neurons. Systematic administration of sEMS alone for 5 wk, however, was unable to induce cumulative improvements of transmission in spinomuscular circuitry or improve impaired motor function following thoracic contusion. Encouragingly, chronic administration of sEMS, followed by exercise training (running in an exercise ball and swimming), induced the following: 1) sustained strengthening of transmission to lumbar motoneurons and hindlimb muscles, 2) better retrograde transport of anatomical tracer, and 3) improved locomotor function. Greatest improvements were seen in the group that received exercise combined with sEMS and AAV-NT3. PMID:26424579

  1. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  2. Long-term results of a clinical trial comparing isolated vaginal stimulation with combined treatment for women with stress incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Maria Cláudia Bicudo; de Mendonça, Rafaela Rosalba; Rodrigues, Alexandre Oliveira; de Matos, Leandro Luongo; Pompeo, Antônio Carlos Lima; Bezerra, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the efficacy of stress urinary incontinence treatments adding pelvic floor muscle training to vaginal electrical stimulation. Methods Forty-eight women with stress urinary incontinence were randomized into 2 groups: 24 underwent isolated vaginal electrical stimulation, and 24 vaginal electrical stimulation plus pelvic floor muscle training. History, physical examination, voiding diary, perineum strength test, and urodynamic study were assessed. Comparisons were made for adherence to treatment, muscle strength improvement, urinary symptoms, and degree of satisfaction immediately, 12 and 96 months after treatment. Results Patients' degree of satisfaction on vaginal electrical stimulation, and on vaginal electrical stimulation plus pelvic floor muscle training immediately, 12 and 96 months post treatment, were, respectively: 88.2% versus 88.9% 64.7% versus 61.1% and 42.9% versus 28.6% (p>0.05). Conclusion Vaginal electrical stimulation associated to pelvic floor muscle training did not show better results than vaginal electrical stimulation alone. PMID:25003921

  3. Pain Reduction in Myofascial Pain Syndrome by Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Standard Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakrajai, Piyaraid; Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Jensen, Mark P.; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tunkamnerdthai, Orathai; Keeratitanont, Keattichai; Auvichayapat, Paradee

    2014-01-01

    Background Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) in the shoulder is among the most prevalent pain problems in the middle-aged population worldwide. Evidence suggests that peripheral and central sensitization may play an important role in the development and maintenance of shoulder MPS. Given previous research supporting the potential efficacy of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for modulating pain-related brain activity in individuals with refractory central pain, we hypothesized that anodal tDCS when applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) combined with standard treatment will be more effective for reducing pain in patients with MPS than standard treatment alone. Method Study participants were randomized to receive either (1) standard treatment with 5-consecutive days of 1 mA anodal tDCS over M1 for 20 min or (2) standard treatment plus sham tDCS. Measures of pain intensity, shoulder passive range of motion, analgesic medication use, and self-reported physical functioning were administered before treatment and again at post-treatment and 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-week follow-up. Results Thirty-one patients with MPS were enrolled. Participants assigned to the active tDCS condition reported significantly more pre- to post-treatment reductions in pain intensity that were maintained at 1-week post-treatment, and significant improvement in shoulder adduction PROM at 1-week follow-up than participants assigned to the sham tDCS condition. Conclusion 5 consecutive days of anodal tDCS over M1 combined with standard treatment appears to reduce pain intensity, and may improve PROM, faster than standard treatment alone. Further tests of the efficacy and duration of effects of tDCS in the treatment of MPS are warranted. PMID:25373724

  4. Combined intermittent hypobaric hypoxia and muscle electro-stimulation: a method to increase circulating progenitor cell concentration?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our goal was to test whether short-term intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH) at a level well tolerated by healthy humans could, in combination with muscle electro-stimulation (ME), mobilize circulating progenitor cells (CPC) and increase their concentration in peripheral circulation. Methods Nine healthy male subjects were subjected, as the active group (HME), to a protocol involving IHH plus ME. IHH exposure consisted of four, three-hour sessions at a barometric pressure of 540 hPa (equivalent to an altitude of 5000 m). These sessions took place on four consecutive days. ME was applied in two separate 20-minute periods during each IHH session. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein on three consecutive days immediately before the experiment, and then 24 h, 48 h, 4 days, 7 days and 14 days after the last day of hypoxic exposure. Four months later a control study was carried out involving seven of the original subjects (CG), who underwent the same protocol of blood samples but without receiving any special stimulus. Results In comparison with the CG the HME group showed only a non-significant increase in the number of CPC CD34+ cells on the fourth day after the combined IHH and ME treatment. Conclusion CPC levels oscillated across the study period and provide no firm evidence to support an increased CPC count after IHH plus ME, although it is not possible to know if this slight increase observed is physiologically relevant. Further studies are required to understand CPC dynamics and the physiology and physiopathology of the hypoxic stimulus. PMID:24947505

  5. Paired-Pulse Parietal-Motor Stimulation Differentially Modulates Corticospinal Excitability across Hemispheres When Combined with Prism Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Arévalo, Elisa; Salemme, Romeo; Pisella, Laure; Farnè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Rightward prism adaptation ameliorates neglect symptoms while leftward prism adaptation (LPA) induces neglect-like biases in healthy individuals. Similarly, inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) induces neglect-like behavior, whereas on the left PPC it ameliorates neglect symptoms and normalizes hyperexcitability of left hemisphere parietal-motor (PPC-M1) connectivity. Based on this analogy we hypothesized that LPA increases PPC-M1 excitability in the left hemisphere and decreases it in the right one. In an attempt to shed some light on the mechanisms underlying LPA's effects on cognition, we investigated this hypothesis in healthy individuals measuring PPC-M1 excitability with dual-site paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS). We found a left hemisphere increase and a right hemisphere decrease in the amplitude of motor evoked potentials elicited by paired as well as single pulses on M1. While this could indicate that LPA biases interhemispheric connectivity, it contradicts previous evidence that M1-only MEPs are unchanged after LPA. A control experiment showed that input-output curves were not affected by LPA per se. We conclude that LPA combined with ppTMS on PPC-M1 differentially alters the excitability of the left and right M1. PMID:27418979

  6. Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds combined with static magnetic field in the stimulation of osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Ahn, Su-Jin; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Mi-Joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Jin, Guang-Zhen; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-04-01

    Magnetism has recently been implicated to play significant roles in the regulation of cell responses. Allowing cells to experience a magnetic field applied externally or scaffolding them in a material with intrinsic magnetic properties has been a possible way of utilizing magnetism. Here we aim to investigate the combined effects of the external static magnetic field (SMF) with magnetic nanocomposite scaffold made of polycaprolactone/magnetic nanoparticles on the osteoblastic functions and bone formation. The SMF synergized with the magnetic scaffolds in the osteoblastic differentiation of primary mouse calvarium osteoblasts, including the expression of bone-associated genes (Runx2 and Osterix) and alkaline phosphatase activity. The synergism was demonstrated in the activation of integrin signaling pathways, such as focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, RhoA, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-kappaB, as well as in the up-regulation of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. Furthermore, the SMF/magnetic scaffold-stimulated osteoblasts promoted the angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, including the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenin-1 genes and the formation of capillary tubes. When the magnetic scaffolds were implanted in mouse calvarium defects, the application of SMF significantly enhanced the new bone formation at 6 weeks, as revealed by the histological and micro-computed tomographic analyses. Current findings suggest that the combinatory application of external (SMF) and internal (scaffold) magnetism can be a promising tool to regenerative engineering of bone. PMID:26854394

  7. Transcranial direct current stimulation combined with integrative speech therapy in a child with cerebral palsy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Lima, Vania L C; Collange Grecco, Luanda A; Marques, Valéria C; Fregni, Felipe; Brandão de Ávila, Clara R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the results of the first case combining integrative speech therapy with anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over Broca's area in a child with cerebral palsy. The ABFW phonology test was used to analyze speech based on the Percentage of Correct Consonants (PCC) and Percentage of Correct Consonants - Revised (PCC-R). After treatment, increases were found in both PCC (Imitation: 53.63%-78.10%; Nomination: 53.19%-70.21%) and PPC-R (Imitation: 64.54%-83.63%; Nomination: 61.70%-77.65%). Moreover, reductions occurred in distortions, substitutions and improvement was found in oral performance, especially tongue mobility (AMIOFE-mobility before = 4 after = 7). The child demonstrated a clinically important improvement in speech fluency as shown in results of imitation number of correct consonants and phonemes acquire. Based on these promising findings, continuing research in this field should be conducted with controlled clinical trials. PMID:27210840

  8. Paired-Pulse Parietal-Motor Stimulation Differentially Modulates Corticospinal Excitability across Hemispheres When Combined with Prism Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Schintu, Selene; Martín-Arévalo, Elisa; Vesia, Michael; Rossetti, Yves; Salemme, Romeo; Pisella, Laure; Farnè, Alessandro; Reilly, Karen T

    2016-01-01

    Rightward prism adaptation ameliorates neglect symptoms while leftward prism adaptation (LPA) induces neglect-like biases in healthy individuals. Similarly, inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) induces neglect-like behavior, whereas on the left PPC it ameliorates neglect symptoms and normalizes hyperexcitability of left hemisphere parietal-motor (PPC-M1) connectivity. Based on this analogy we hypothesized that LPA increases PPC-M1 excitability in the left hemisphere and decreases it in the right one. In an attempt to shed some light on the mechanisms underlying LPA's effects on cognition, we investigated this hypothesis in healthy individuals measuring PPC-M1 excitability with dual-site paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS). We found a left hemisphere increase and a right hemisphere decrease in the amplitude of motor evoked potentials elicited by paired as well as single pulses on M1. While this could indicate that LPA biases interhemispheric connectivity, it contradicts previous evidence that M1-only MEPs are unchanged after LPA. A control experiment showed that input-output curves were not affected by LPA per se. We conclude that LPA combined with ppTMS on PPC-M1 differentially alters the excitability of the left and right M1. PMID:27418979

  9. Effect of Digital Frequency Compression (DFC) on Speech Recognition in Candidates for Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation (EAS)

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, René H.; Dorman, Michael F.; Spahr, Anthony J.; McKarns, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effects of conventional amplification (CA) and digital frequency compression (DFC) amplification on the speech recognition abilities of candidates for a partial-insertion cochlear implant, that is, candidates for combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS). Method The participants were 6 patients whose audiometric thresholds at 500 Hz and below were ≤60 dB HL and whose thresholds at 2000 Hz and above were ≥80 dB HL. Six tests of speech understanding were administered with CA and DFC. The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) was also administered following use of CA and DFC. Results Group mean scores were not statistically different in the CA and DFC conditions. However, 2 patients received substantial benefit in DFC conditions. APHAB scores suggested increased ease of communication, but also increased aversive sound quality. Conclusion Results suggest that a relatively small proportion of individuals who meet EAS candidacy will receive substantial benefit from a DFC hearing aid and that a larger proportion will receive at least a small benefit when speech is presented against a background of noise. This benefit, however, comes at a cost—aversive sound quality. PMID:17905905

  10. Profile of follitropin alpha/lutropin alpha combination for the stimulation of follicular development in women with severe luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Leonardo; Selman, Helmy

    2016-01-01

    A severe gonadotropin deficiency together with chronic estradiol deficiency leading to amenorrhea characterizes patients suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Administration of both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to these patients has been shown to be essential in achieving successful stimulation of follicular development, ovulation, and rescue of fertility. In recent years, the availability of both recombinant FSH (rFSH) and recombinant LH (rLH) has provided a new therapeutic option for the stimulation of follicular growth in hypopituitary–hypogonadotropic women (World Health Organization Group I). In this article, we review the data reported in the literature to highlight the role and the efficacy of using recombinant gonadotropins, rFSH and rLH, in the treatment of women with severe LH/FSH deficiency. Although the studies on this issue are limited and the experiences available in the literature are few due to the small number of such patients, it is clearly evident that the recombinant gonadotropins rFSH and rLH are efficient in treating patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The results observed in the studies reported in this review suggest that recombinant gonadotropins are able to induce proper follicular growth, oocyte maturation, and eventually pregnancy in this group of women. Moreover, the clinical use of recombinant gonadotropins in this type of patients has given more insight into some endocrinological aspects of ovarian function that have not yet been fully understood. PMID:27307766

  11. Shifts in connectivity during procedural learning after motor cortex stimulation: A combined transcranial magnetic stimulation/functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Steel, Adam; Song, Sunbin; Bageac, Devin; Knutson, Kristine M; Keisler, Aysha; Saad, Ziad S; Gotts, Stephen J; Wassermann, Eric M; Wilkinson, Leonora

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), of which continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) is a common form, has been used to inhibit cortical areas during investigations of their function. cTBS applied to the primary motor area (M1) depresses motor output excitability via a local effect and impairs procedural motor learning. This could be due to an effect on M1 itself and/or to changes in its connectivity with other nodes in the learning network. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure changes in brain activation and connectivity during implicit procedural learning after real and sham cTBS of M1. Compared to sham, real cTBS impaired motor sequence learning, but caused no local or distant changes in brain activation. Rather, it reduced functional connectivity between motor (M1, dorsal premotor & supplementary motor areas) and visual (superior & inferior occipital gyri) areas. It also increased connectivity between frontal associative (superior & inferior frontal gyri), cingulate (dorsal & middle cingulate), and temporal areas. This potentially compensatory shift in coupling, from a motor-based learning network to an associative learning network accounts for the behavioral effects of cTBS of M1. The findings suggest that the inhibitory TMS affects behavior via relatively subtle and distributed effects on connectivity within networks, rather than by taking the stimulated area "offline". PMID:26673946

  12. Combined CpG and poly I:C stimulation of monocytes results in unique signaling activation not observed with the individual ligands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind to components of microbes, activate cellular signal transduction pathways, and stimulate innate immune responses. Previously, we have shown in chicken monocytes that the combination of CpG, the ligand for TLR21 (the chicken equivalent of TLR9), and poly I:C, the liga...

  13. Combination of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Improves Gait Ability in a Patient in Chronic Stage of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Satow, Takeshi; Kawase, Tomotaka; Kitamura, Atsushi; Kajitani, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Tanabe, Nobuhiko; Otoi, Reiko; Komuro, Taro; Kobayashi, Akira; Nagata, Hirokazu; Mima, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background Walking ability is important in stroke patients to maintain daily life. Nevertheless, its improvement is limited with conventional physical therapy in chronic stage. We report the case of a chronic stroke patient showing a remarkable improvement in gait function after a new neurorehabilitation protocol using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Case Presentation A 62-year-old male with left putaminal hemorrhage suffered from severe right hemiparesis. He could move by himself with a wheelchair 1 year after the ictus. Anodal tDCS at the vertex (2 mA, 20 min) with NMES at the anterior tibialis muscle had been applied for 3 weeks. The Timed Up and Go test and 10-meter walk test improved after the intervention, which had been maintained for at least 1 month. Conclusion This single case suggests the possibility that tDCS with NMES could be a new rehabilitation approach to improve the gait ability in chronic stroke patients. PMID:27293403

  14. Improving motor performance without training: the effect of combining mirror visual feedback with transcranial direct current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    von Rein, Erik; Hoff, Maike; Kaminski, Elisabeth; Sehm, Bernhard; Steele, Christopher J.; Villringer, Arno

    2015-01-01

    Mirror visual feedback (MVF) during motor training has been shown to improve motor performance of the untrained hand. Here we thought to determine if MVF-induced performance improvements of the left hand can be augmented by upregulating plasticity in right primary motor cortex (M1) by means of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) while subjects trained with the right hand. Participants performed a ball-rotation task with either their left (untrained) or right (trained) hand on two consecutive days (days 1 and 2). During training with the right hand, MVF was provided concurrent with two tDCS conditions: group 1 received a-tDCS over right M1 (n = 10), whereas group 2 received sham tDCS (s-tDCS, n = 10). On day 2, performance was reevaluated under the same experimental conditions compared with day 1 but without tDCS. While baseline performance of the left hand (day 1) was not different between groups, a-tDCS exhibited stronger MVF-induced performance improvements compared with s-tDCS. Similar results were observed for day 2 (without tDCS application). A control experiment (n = 8) with a-tDCS over right M1 as outlined above but without MVF revealed that left hand improvement was significantly less pronounced than that induced by combined a-tDCS and MVF. Based on these results, we provide novel evidence that upregulating activity in the untrained M1 by means of a-tDCS is capable of augmenting MVF-induced performance improvements in young normal volunteers. Our findings suggest that concurrent MVF and tDCS might have synergistic and additive effects on motor performance of the untrained hand, a result of relevance for clinical approaches in neurorehabilitation and/or exercise science. PMID:25632079

  15. Improving motor performance without training: the effect of combining mirror visual feedback with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    von Rein, Erik; Hoff, Maike; Kaminski, Elisabeth; Sehm, Bernhard; Steele, Christopher J; Villringer, Arno; Ragert, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Mirror visual feedback (MVF) during motor training has been shown to improve motor performance of the untrained hand. Here we thought to determine if MVF-induced performance improvements of the left hand can be augmented by upregulating plasticity in right primary motor cortex (M1) by means of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) while subjects trained with the right hand. Participants performed a ball-rotation task with either their left (untrained) or right (trained) hand on two consecutive days (days 1 and 2). During training with the right hand, MVF was provided concurrent with two tDCS conditions: group 1 received a-tDCS over right M1 (n = 10), whereas group 2 received sham tDCS (s-tDCS, n = 10). On day 2, performance was reevaluated under the same experimental conditions compared with day 1 but without tDCS. While baseline performance of the left hand (day 1) was not different between groups, a-tDCS exhibited stronger MVF-induced performance improvements compared with s-tDCS. Similar results were observed for day 2 (without tDCS application). A control experiment (n = 8) with a-tDCS over right M1 as outlined above but without MVF revealed that left hand improvement was significantly less pronounced than that induced by combined a-tDCS and MVF. Based on these results, we provide novel evidence that upregulating activity in the untrained M1 by means of a-tDCS is capable of augmenting MVF-induced performance improvements in young normal volunteers. Our findings suggest that concurrent MVF and tDCS might have synergistic and additive effects on motor performance of the untrained hand, a result of relevance for clinical approaches in neurorehabilitation and/or exercise science. PMID:25632079

  16. Expression and function of hematopoiesis-stimulating factor receptors on the GPI− and GPI+ hematopoietic stem cells of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    FU, RONG; DING, SHAO-XUE; LIU, YI; LI, LI-JUAN; LIU, HUI; WANG, HONG-LEI; ZHANG, TIAN; SHAO, ZONG-HONG

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia (PNH/AA) syndrome presents a markedly increased population of cells deficient in glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI− cells) and signs of bone marrow failure, which requires treatment with hematopoiesis-stimulating factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF). However, little is known about the effects of these stimulating factors on GPI− cells. In order to explore the effects of stimulating factors in PNH/AA, G-CSF receptor (CD114) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression levels on GPI+ and GPI− hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and phosphorylated (P)-STAT5 were measured in GPI+ and GPI− HSCs by FCM following stimulation with G-CSF or SCF in vitro. The expression levels of CD114 and CD117 on GPI− HSCs were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those on GPI+ HSCs in PNH/AA patients and normal controls. The MFI values of STAT5 in the GPI− and GPI+ HSCs of PNH/AA patients and normal controls were not significantly different. However, the MFI values of P-STAT5 in the GPI− HSCs of PNH/AA patients were significantly lower than those in the GPI+ HSCs of PNH/AA patients and normal controls prior to and following stimulation with G-CSF or SCF (P<0.01). The GPI− HSCs of PNH/AA patients responded poorly to stimulation by hematopoiesis-stimulating factors, which indicates that these factors can be used safely in patients with PNH/AA. PMID:27168787

  17. Coherent beam combination using self-phase locked stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors with a rotating wedge for high power laser generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cha, Seongwoo; Oh, Jungsuk; Lee, Hwihyeong; Ahn, Heekyung; Churn, Kil Sung; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-04-18

    The self-phase locking of a stimulated Brillouin scattering-phase conjugate mirror (SBS-PCM) allows a simple and scalable coherent beam combination of existing lasers. We propose a simple optical system composed of a rotating wedge and a concave mirror to overcome the power limit of the SBS-PCM. Its phase locking ability and the usefulness on the beam-combination laser are demonstrated experimentally. A four-beam combination is demonstrated using this SBS-PCM scheme. The relative phases between the beams were measured to be less than λ/24.7. PMID:27137299

  18. Optimization of Parkinson Disease treatment combining anti-Parkinson drugs and deep brain stimulation using patient diaries.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jakub; Novak, Daniel; Jech, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease is increasing rapidly due to population aging. While traditional medications-based palliative therapy is successful in early stages, deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be used as an alternative treatment in later stages. After DBS implantation, the therapy typically consists of electrical stimulation and reduced medication. In order to provide good clinical outcome, a balance has to be found between medication and stimulation parameters, this is usually done as follows: First, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scoring is performed, second patients are supposed to fill subjective diaries during a specific period. This study shows that these diaries are useful as therapy progression indicator. Feel scores based on diaries and sleep time were examined with respect to DBS stimulation and medication. The results confirmed the positive effect of both therapy components--stimulation as well as medication--on patient feel scores. Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between stimulation energy and sleep duration. PMID:26737033

  19. A Systematic Review of Combination Therapy with Stimulants and Atomoxetine for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Including Patient Characteristics, Treatment Strategies, Effectiveness, and Tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Méndez, Luis; Montgomery, William; Monk, Julie A.; Altin, Murat; Wu, Shenghu; Lin, Chaucer C.H.; Dueñas, Héctor J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this article was to systematically review the literature on stimulant and atomoxetine combination therapy, in particular: 1) Characteristics of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) given combination therapy, 2) treatment strategies used, 3) efficacy and effectiveness, and 4) safety and tolerability. Methods Literature databases (MEDLINE®, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Science Citation Index Expanded, and SciVerse Scopus) were systematically searched using prespecified criteria. Publications describing stimulant and atomoxetine combination therapy in patients with ADHD or healthy volunteers were selected for review. Exclusion criteria were comorbid psychosis, bipolar disorder, epilepsy, or other psychiatric/neurologic diseases that could confound ADHD symptom assessment, or other concomitant medication(s) to treat ADHD symptoms. Results Of the 16 publications included for review, 14 reported findings from 3 prospective studies (4 publications), 7 retrospective studies, and 3 narrative reviews/medication algorithms of patients with ADHD. The other two publications reported findings from two prospective studies of healthy volunteers. The main reason for prescribing combination therapy was inadequate response to previous treatment. In the studies of patients with ADHD, if reported, 1) most patients were children/adolescents and male, and had a combined ADHD subtype; 2) methylphenidate was most often used in combination with atomoxetine for treatment augmentation or switch; 3) ADHD symptom control was improved in some, but not all, patients; and 4) there were no serious adverse events. Conclusions Published evidence of the off-label use of stimulant and atomoxetine combination therapy is limited because of the small number of publications, heterogeneous study designs (there was only one prospective, randomized controlled trial), small sample sizes, and geographic bias. Existing

  20. Closed-Loop Neuroprosthesis for Reach-to-Grasp Assistance: Combining Adaptive Multi-channel Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-joint Arm Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients with severe motor deficits cannot execute task-oriented rehabilitation exercises with their affected upper extremity. Advanced rehabilitation technology may support them in performing such reach-to-grasp movements. The challenge is, however, to provide assistance as needed, while maintaining the participants' commitment during the exercises. In this feasibility study, we introduced a closed-loop neuroprosthesis for reach-to-grasp assistance which combines adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton. Eighteen severely affected chronic stroke patients were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven-degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm for performing reach-to-grasp exercises resembling activities of daily living in a virtual environment. During the exercises, adaptive electrical stimulation was applied to seven different muscles of the upper extremity in a performance-dependent way to enhance the task-oriented movement trajectory. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. Closed-loop neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training, and increased the task-related range of motion (p = 0.0004) and movement velocity (p = 0.015), while preserving accuracy. The highest relative stimulation intensity was required to facilitate the grasping function. The facilitated range of motion correlated with the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment score of the patients (p = 0.028). Combining adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with antigravity assistance amplifies the residual motor capabilities of severely affected stroke patients during rehabilitation exercises and may thus provide a customized training environment for patient-tailored support while preserving the participants' engagement. PMID:27445658

  1. Closed-Loop Neuroprosthesis for Reach-to-Grasp Assistance: Combining Adaptive Multi-channel Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients with severe motor deficits cannot execute task-oriented rehabilitation exercises with their affected upper extremity. Advanced rehabilitation technology may support them in performing such reach-to-grasp movements. The challenge is, however, to provide assistance as needed, while maintaining the participants' commitment during the exercises. In this feasibility study, we introduced a closed-loop neuroprosthesis for reach-to-grasp assistance which combines adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton. Eighteen severely affected chronic stroke patients were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven-degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm for performing reach-to-grasp exercises resembling activities of daily living in a virtual environment. During the exercises, adaptive electrical stimulation was applied to seven different muscles of the upper extremity in a performance-dependent way to enhance the task-oriented movement trajectory. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. Closed-loop neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training, and increased the task-related range of motion (p = 0.0004) and movement velocity (p = 0.015), while preserving accuracy. The highest relative stimulation intensity was required to facilitate the grasping function. The facilitated range of motion correlated with the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment score of the patients (p = 0.028). Combining adaptive multi-channel neuromuscular stimulation with antigravity assistance amplifies the residual motor capabilities of severely affected stroke patients during rehabilitation exercises and may thus provide a customized training environment for patient-tailored support while preserving the participants' engagement. PMID:27445658

  2. The role of G-CSF and IL-6 in the granulopoiesis-stimulating activity of murine blood serum induced by perorally administered ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2007-05-01

    IMUNOR, a low-molecular weight (< 12 kD) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, has been previously found to have significant stimulatory effects on murine hematopoiesis supressed by ionizing radiation or cytotoxic drugs. This communication shows data on the mechanisms of these effects. Using ELISA assay, significantly increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed. On the contrary, no detectable levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFC) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) have been found in blood serum of IMUNOR-treated mice. Incubation of the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with antibodies against G-CSF caused abrogation of the ability of the sera to stimulate in vitro growth of colonies originating from granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC). In contrast, incubation of the serum with antibodies against IL-6 did not change its colony-stimulating activity. It may be inferred from these findings that G-CSF is probably the main cytokine responsible for the granulopoiesis-stimulating effects of IMUNOR. When the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with G-CSF inactivated by anti-G-CSF antibodies (but with elevated IL-6) was added to cultures of bone marrow cells together with a suboptimum concentration of IL-3, a significant increase in the numbers of GM-CFC colonies was found. Moreover, conjoint inactivation of G-CSF and IL-6 significantly decreased the numbers of GM-CFC colonies in comparison with those observed when only G-CSF was inactivated. This observation strongly suggests that though IMUNOR-induced IL-6 is not able to induce the growth of GM-CFC colonies alone, it is able to potentiate the hematopoiesis-stimulating effect of IL-3. These findings represent a new knowledge concerning the hematopoiesis-stimulating action of IMUNOR, a promising immunomodulatory agent. PMID:17386413

  3. Combined exercise and transcranial direct current stimulation intervention for knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Ju; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W; Hinman, Rana S; Liston, Matthew B; Schabrun, Siobhan M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major health problem and a leading cause of disability. The knee joint is commonly affected, resulting in pain and physical dysfunction. Exercise is considered the cornerstone of conservative management, yet meta-analyses indicate, at best, moderate effect sizes. Treatments that bolster the effects of exercise, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), may improve outcomes in knee OA. The aims of this pilot study are to (1) determine the feasibility, safety and perceived patient response to a combined tDCS and exercise intervention in knee OA, and (2) provide data to support a sample size calculation for a fully-powered trial should trends of effectiveness be present. Methods and analysis A pilot randomised, assessor-blind and participant-blind, sham-controlled trial. 20 individuals with knee OA who report a pain score of 40 or more on a 100 mm visual analogue scale on walking, and meet a priori selection criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either: (1) active tDCS plus exercise, or (2) sham tDCS plus exercise. All participants will receive 20 min of either active or sham tDCS immediately prior to 30 min of supervised muscle strengthening exercise twice a week for 8 weeks. Participants in both groups will also complete unsupervised home exercises twice per week. Outcome measures of feasibility, safety, pain, disability and pain system function will be assessed immediately before and after the 8-week intervention. Analyses of feasibility and safety will be performed using descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses will be used to determine trends of effectiveness and will be based on intention-to-treat as well as per protocol. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the institutional ethics committee (H10184). Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The results of this study will be submitted for peer-reviewed publication. Trial registration number ANZCTR

  4. Clinical Results of a Brindley Procedure: Sacral Anterior Root Stimulation in Combination with a Rhizotomy of the Dorsal Roots

    PubMed Central

    Martens, F. M. J.; Heesakkers, J. P. F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Brindley procedure consists of a stimulator for sacral anterior-root stimulation and a rhizotomy of the dorsal sacral roots to abolish neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Stimulation of the sacral anterior roots enables micturition, defecation, and erections. This overview discusses the technique, selection of patients and clinical results of the Brindley procedure. The Brindley procedure is suitable for a selected group of patients with complete spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity. Overall, the Brindley procedure shows good clinical results and improves quality of life. However, to remain a valuable treatment option for the future, the technique needs some adequate changes to enable analysis of the implanted parts, to improve revision techniques of the implanted parts, and to abolish the sacral dorsal rhizotomy. PMID:21738530

  5. Task-related training combined with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation promotes upper limb functions in patients with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; In, Tae Sung; Cho, Hwi-young

    2013-01-01

    Severe upper limb paresis is a major contributor to disability after stroke. This study investigated the efficacy of task-related training (TRT) with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on recovery of upper limb motor function in chronic-stroke survivors. Thirty patients with chronic stroke were randomly allocated two groups: the TRT+TENS group (n = 15) and the TRT+placebo (TRT+PLBO) group (n = 15). Patients in the TRT+TENS group received TENS stimulation (two to three times the sensory threshold), while subjects in the TRT+PLBO group received TENS without real electrical stimulation. TENS was applied to muscle belly of triceps and wrist extensors, while placebo (PLBO) stimulation was administrated without real electrical stimulation. Both interventions were given for 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week, for a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes were assessed with Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (FMA), Manual function test (MFT), Box and block test (BBT), and Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), each of which was performed one day before and one day after intervention. Both groups showed significant improvements in FMA, MFT, and BBT after intervention. When compared with the TRT+PLBO group, the TRT+TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in FMA (p = 0.034), MFT (p = 0.037), and BBT (p = 0.042). In MAS score, significant improvement was observed only in the TRT+TENS group (p = 0.011). Our findings indicate that TRT with TENS can reduce motor impairment and improve motor activity in stroke survivors with chronic upper limb paresis, highlighting the benefits of somatosensory stimulation from TENS. PMID:24097280

  6. Specific cellular signal-transduction responses to in vivo combination therapy with ATRA, valproic acid and theophylline in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Skavland, J; Jørgensen, K M; Hadziavdic, K; Hovland, R; Jonassen, I; Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T

    2011-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) frequently comprises mutations in genes that cause perturbation in intracellular signaling pathways, thereby altering normal responses to growth factors and cytokines. Such oncogenic cellular signal transduction may be therapeutic if targeted directly or through epigenetic regulation. We treated 24 selected elderly AML patients with all-trans retinoic acid for 2 days before adding theophylline and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00175812; EudraCT no. 2004-001663-22), and sampled 11 patients for peripheral blood at day 0, 2 and 7 for single-cell analysis of basal level and signal-transduction responses to relevant myeloid growth factors (granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, Flt3L, stem cell factor, erythropoietin, CXCL-12) on 10 signaling molecules (CREB, STAT1/3/5, p38, Erk1/2, Akt, c-Cbl, ZAP70/Syk and rpS6). Pretreatment analysis by unsupervised clustering and principal component analysis divided the patients into three distinguishable signaling clusters (non-potentiated, potentiated basal and potentiated signaling). Signal-transduction pathways were modulated during therapy and patients moved between the clusters. Patients with multiple leukemic clones demonstrated distinct stimulation responses and therapy-induced modulation. Individual signaling profiles together with clinical and hematological information may be used to early identify AML patients in whom epigenetic and signal-transduction targeted therapy is beneficial. PMID:22829110

  7. Specific cellular signal-transduction responses to in vivo combination therapy with ATRA, valproic acid and theophylline in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Skavland, J; Jørgensen, K M; Hadziavdic, K; Hovland, R; Jonassen, I; Bruserud, Ø; Gjertsen, B T

    2011-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) frequently comprises mutations in genes that cause perturbation in intracellular signaling pathways, thereby altering normal responses to growth factors and cytokines. Such oncogenic cellular signal transduction may be therapeutic if targeted directly or through epigenetic regulation. We treated 24 selected elderly AML patients with all-trans retinoic acid for 2 days before adding theophylline and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00175812; EudraCT no. 2004-001663-22), and sampled 11 patients for peripheral blood at day 0, 2 and 7 for single-cell analysis of basal level and signal-transduction responses to relevant myeloid growth factors (granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, Flt3L, stem cell factor, erythropoietin, CXCL-12) on 10 signaling molecules (CREB, STAT1/3/5, p38, Erk1/2, Akt, c-Cbl, ZAP70/Syk and rpS6). Pretreatment analysis by unsupervised clustering and principal component analysis divided the patients into three distinguishable signaling clusters (non-potentiated, potentiated basal and potentiated signaling). Signal-transduction pathways were modulated during therapy and patients moved between the clusters. Patients with multiple leukemic clones demonstrated distinct stimulation responses and therapy-induced modulation. Individual signaling profiles together with clinical and hematological information may be used to early identify AML patients in whom epigenetic and signal-transduction targeted therapy is beneficial. PMID:22829110

  8. Combination therapies prevent the neuropathic, proinflammatory characteristics of bone marrow in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, James M; Yorek, Mark A; Grant, Maria B

    2015-02-01

    We previously showed that peripheral neuropathy of the bone marrow was associated with loss of circadian rhythmicity of stem/progenitor cell release into the circulation. Bone marrow neuropathy results in dramatic changes in hematopoiesis that lead to microvascular complications, inflammation, and reduced endothelial repair. This series of events represents early pathogenesis before development of diabetic retinopathy. In this study we characterized early alterations within the bone marrow of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats following treatments that prevent experimental peripheral neuropathy. We asked whether bone marrow neuropathy and the associated bone marrow pathology were reversed with treatments that prevent peripheral neuropathy. Three strategies were tested: inhibition of neutral endopeptidase, inhibition of aldose reductase plus lipoic acid supplementation, and insulin therapy with antioxidants. All strategies prevented loss of nerve conduction velocity resulting from STZ-induced diabetes and corrected the STZ-induced diabetes-associated increase of immunoreactivity of neuropeptide Y, tyrosine hydroxylase, and somatostatin. The treatments also reduced concentrations of interleukin-1β, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in STZ-induced diabetic bone marrow supernatant and decreased the expression of NADPH oxidase 2, nitric oxide synthase 2, and nuclear factor-κB1 mRNA in bone marrow progenitor cells. These therapies represent novel approaches to attenuate the diabetic phenotype within the bone marrow and may constitute an important therapeutic strategy for diabetic microvascular complications. PMID:25204979

  9. A new approach for ovarian stimulation in IVF using Corifollitropin Alfa in combination with GnRH analogues to trigger final oocyte maturation. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Meganck, G.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A pilot study of 10 patients undergoing IVF stimulation, using the new combination of Corifollitropin Alfa with highly purified hMG and GnRH antagonists has been performed, whereas final oocyte maturation was induced by GnRH analogues. The hormonal profiles were analyzed, as well as the clinical outcome. All patients were recruited between March 1st 2013 and June 30th 2013. They were all younger than 38 years, had a normal BMI (between 18,0 and 32,0) and did not have more than three previous IVF stimulations. The combination of long acting FSH with hphMG, and under protection of GnRH antagonists against spontaneous LH-surge, provided a normal hormonal profile for estradiol, progesterone, LH, and FSH. The average oocyte quality and embryo quality were excellent, which resulted in four pregnancies out of ten. We conclude that the described combination is a safe, efficient, and patient friendly alternative for the classical IVF stimulation. PMID:25374659

  10. Transcriptional mechanisms underlying sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons by Granulocyte-/Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-associated pain is a major cause of poor quality of life in cancer patients and is frequently resistant to conventional therapy. Recent studies indicate that some hematopoietic growth factors, namely granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), are abundantly released in the tumor microenvironment and play a key role in regulating tumor-nerve interactions and tumor-associated pain by activating receptors on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Moreover, these hematopoietic factors have been highly implicated in postsurgical pain, inflammatory pain and osteoarthritic pain. However, the molecular mechanisms via which G-/GMCSF bring about nociceptive sensitization and elicit pain are not known. Results In order to elucidate G-/GMCSF mediated transcriptional changes in the sensory neurons, we performed a comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of changes in the transcriptome of DRG neurons brought about by exposure to GMCSF or GCSF. We present complete information on regulated genes and validated profiling analyses and report novel regulatory networks and interaction maps revealed by detailed bioinformatics analyses. Amongst these, we validate calpain 2, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and a RhoGTPase Rac1 as well as Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as transcriptional targets of G-/GMCSF and demonstrate the importance of MMP9 and Rac1 in GMCSF-induced nociceptor sensitization. Conclusion With integrative approach of bioinformatics, in vivo pharmacology and behavioral analyses, our results not only indicate that transcriptional control by G-/GMCSF signaling regulates a variety of established pain modulators, but also uncover a large number of novel targets, paving the way for translational analyses in the context of pain disorders. PMID:24067145

  11. The Observation of Manual Grasp Actions Affects the Control of Speech: A Combined Behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentilucci, Maurizio; Campione, Giovanna Cristina; Volta, Riccardo Dalla; Bernardis, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Does the mirror system affect the control of speech? This issue was addressed in behavioral and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) experiments. In behavioral experiment 1, participants pronounced the syllable /da/ while observing (1) a hand grasping large and small objects with power and precision grasps, respectively, (2) a foot interacting…

  12. Ovarian stimulation for in-vitro fertilization combining administration of gonadotrophins and blockade of the pituitary with D-Trp6-LHRH microcapsules: pilot studies with two protocols.

    PubMed

    Zorn, J R; Barata, M; Brami, C; Epelboin, S; Nathan, C; Papageorgiou, G; Quantin, P; Rolet, F; Savale, M; Boyer, P

    1988-02-01

    In women undergoing in-vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), a total of 408 IVF cycles were stimulated using human menopausal gonadotrophin (HMG) or pure follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) plus HMG in combination with a single injection of D-Trp6-LHRH microcapsules in order to enhance the ovarian response to gonadotrophins and to avoid spontaneous LH surges. Sixty-seven pregnancies were achieved. Two protocols were employed. In protocol 1 ('blocking protocol', n = 268), the pituitary was first inhibited with a full dose (3.75 mg) of D-Trp6-LHRH in microcapsules and ovarian stimulation was started after the hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal state was ascertained (E2 less than 50 pg/ml). In protocol 2 ('flare-up protocol', n = 140), the treatment with D-Trp6-LHRH microcapsules (half-dose = 1.80 mg) and the ovarian stimulation with gonadotrophins were started at the same time. Higher doses of gonadotrophins were needed (39.5 +/- 11.2 ampoules FSH and/or HMG) in protocol 1, in which the pituitary was blocked prior to and during the stimulation, than in protocol 2 (20 +/- 9 ampoules) where the exogenous gonadotrophin stimulation appeared to be augmented by the initial agonistic effect of the injection of D-Trp6-LHRH microcapsules. In patients with purely tubal infertility, under 38 years old and no male factor, the results obtained with protocols 1 and 2 were similar in terms of pregnancy rate per cycle or per embryo transfer: 22.6 versus 20.5% and 28.3 versus 27.4%, respectively. However, considering the cost benefit, 'flare-up' protocols appeared to be a better choice and could be recommended. PMID:2965712

  13. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Aerobic Exercise to Optimize Analgesic Responses in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Mariana E.; Simis, Marcel; Grecco, Luanda C.; Battistella, Linamara R.; Baptista, Abrahão F.; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome that is associated with maladaptive plasticity in neural central circuits. One of the neural circuits that are involved in pain in fibromyalgia is the primary motor cortex. We tested a combination intervention that aimed to modulate the motor system: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) and aerobic exercise (AE). In this phase II, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial, 45 subjects were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: tDCS + AE, AE only, and tDCS only. The following outcomes were assessed: intensity of pain, level of anxiety, quality of life, mood, pressure pain threshold, and cortical plasticity, as indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation. There was a significant effect for the group-time interaction for intensity of pain, demonstrating that tDCS/AE was superior to AE [F(13, 364) = 2.25, p = 0.007] and tDCS [F(13, 364) = 2.33, p = 0.0056] alone. Post-hoc adjusted analysis showed a difference between tDCS/AE and tDCS group after the first week of stimulation and after 1 month intervention period (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Further, after treatment there was a significant difference between groups in anxiety and mood levels. The combination treatment effected the greatest response. The three groups had no differences regarding responses in motor cortex plasticity, as assessed by TMS. The combination of tDCS with aerobic exercise is superior compared with each individual intervention (cohen's d effect sizes > 0.55). The combination intervention had a significant effect on pain, anxiety and mood. Based on the similar effects on cortical plasticity outcomes, the combination intervention might have affected other neural circuits, such as those that control the affective-emotional aspects of pain. Trial registration: (www.ClinicalTrials.gov), identifier NTC02358902. PMID:27014012

  14. Separate and combined impact of acute naltrexone and alprazolam on subjective and physiological effects of oral d-amphetamine in stimulant users

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Katherine R.; Lile, Joshua A.; Stoops, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Opioid antagonists (e.g., naltrexone) and positive modulators of γ-aminobutyric-acidA (GABAA) receptors (e.g., alprazolam) modestly attenuate the abuse-related effects of stimulants like amphetamine. The use of higher doses to achieve greater efficacy is precluded by side effects. Combining naltrexone and alprazolam might safely maximize efficacy while avoiding the untoward effects of the constituent compounds. Objectives The present pilot study tested the hypothesis that acute pretreatment with the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam would not produce clinically problematic physiological effects or negative subjective effects and would reduce the positive subjective effects of d-amphetamine to a greater extent than the constituent drugs alone. Methods Eight nontreatment-seeking, stimulant-using individuals completed an outpatient experiment in which oral d-amphetamine (0, 15, and 30 mg) was administered following acute pretreatment with naltrexone (0 and 50 mg) and alprazolam (0 and 0.5 mg). Subjective effects, psychomotor task performance, and physiological measures were collected. Results Oral d-amphetamine produced prototypical physiological and stimulant-like positive subjective effects (e.g., VAS ratings of Active/Alert/Energetic, Good Effect, and High). Pretreatment with naltrexone, alprazolam, and their combination did not produce clinically problematic acute physiological effects or negative subjective effects. Naltrexone and alprazolam each significantly attenuated some of the subjective effects of d-amphetamine. The combination attenuated a greater number of subjective effects than the constituent drugs alone. Conclusions The present results support the continued evaluation of an opioid receptor antagonist combined with a GABAA-positive modulator using more clinically relevant experimental conditions like examining the effect of chronic dosing with these drugs on methamphetamine self-administration. PMID:24464531

  15. Estimating nerve excitation thresholds to cutaneous electrical stimulation by finite element modeling combined with a stochastic branching nerve fiber model.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Hennings, Kristian; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2011-04-01

    Electrical stimulation of cutaneous tissue through surface electrodes is an often used method for evoking experimental pain. However, at painful intensities both non-nociceptive Aβ-fibers and nociceptive Aδ- and C-fibers may be activated by the electrical stimulation. This study proposes a finite element (FE) model of the extracellular potential and stochastic branching fiber model of the afferent fiber excitation thresholds. The FE model described four horizontal layers; stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and hypodermal used to estimate the excitation threshold of Aβ-fibers terminating in dermis and Aδ-fibers terminating in epidermis. The perception thresholds of 11 electrodes with diameters ranging from 0.2 to 20 mm were modeled and assessed on the volar forearm of healthy human volunteers by an adaptive two-alternative forced choice algorithm. The model showed that the magnitude of the current density was highest for smaller electrodes and decreased through the skin. The excitation thresholds of the Aδ-fibers were lower than the excitation thresholds of Aβ-fibers when current was applied through small, but not large electrodes. The experimentally assessed perception threshold followed the lowest excitation threshold of the modeled fibers. The model confirms that preferential excitation of Aδ-fibers may be achieved by small electrode stimulation due to higher current density in the dermoepidermal junction. PMID:21207174

  16. Murine Macrophages Secrete Interferon γ upon Combined Stimulation with Interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18: A Novel Pathway of Autocrine Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Munder, Markus; Mallo, Moisés; Eichmann, Klaus; Modolell, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ, a key immunoregulatory cytokine, has been thought to be produced solely by activated T cells and natural killer cells. In this study, we show that murine bone marrow– derived macrophages (BMMΦ) secrete large amounts of IFN-γ upon appropriate stimulation. Although interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 alone induce low levels of IFN-γ mRNA transcripts, the combined stimulation of BMMΦ with both cytokines leads to the efficient production of IFN-γ protein. The macrophage-derived IFN-γ is biologically active as shown by induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase as well as upregulation of CD40 in macrophages. Our findings uncover a novel pathway of autocrine macrophage activation by demonstrating that the macrophage is not only a key cell type responding to IFN-γ but also a potent IFN-γ–producing cell. PMID:9625771

  17. Effects of Amphetamine-CNS Depressant Combinations and of Other CNS Stimulants in Four-Choice Drug Discriminations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mi; Wessinger, William D.; McMillan, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    Three pigeons were trained to discriminate among 5 mg/kg pentobarbital, 2 mg/kg amphetamine, a combination of these two drugs at these doses, and saline using a four-choice procedure (amphetamine--pentobarbital group). Three other pigeons were trained to discriminate among 5 mg/kg morphine, 2 mg/kg methamphetamine, a combination of these two drugs…

  18. The potential synergism by combining external counterpulsation with intermittent theta burst stimulation in post-stroke motor function recovery.

    PubMed

    He, Weijia; Au-Yeung, Suk-Yin Stephanie; Mak, Margaret; Leung, Thomas Wai Hong; Leung, Howan; Wong, Lawrence Ka Sing

    2016-08-01

    Upper limb weakness and incoordination is a common disability following ischemic stroke. Previous studies have showed that the single application of external counterpulsation (ECP) and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) can effectively enhance the cortical motor excitability and facilitate recovery. However, it remains uncertain if sequential application of these therapies would further augment the recovery. We hypothesize a synergistic effect of ECP followed by iTBS to upper limb function may happen through improvements in both cerebral perfusion and neuron excitability. PMID:27372874

  19. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  20. Low-frequency electrical stimulation combined with a cooling vest improves recovery of elite kayakers following a simulated 1000-m race in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Borne, R; Hausswirth, C; Costello, J T; Bieuzen, F

    2015-06-01

    This study compared the effects of a low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFES; Veinoplus(®) Sport, Ad Rem Technology, Paris, France), a low-frequency electrical stimulation combined with a cooling vest (LFESCR ) and an active recovery combined with a cooling vest (ACTCR ) as recovery strategies on performance (racing time and pacing strategies), physiologic and perceptual responses between two sprint kayak simulated races, in a hot environment (∼32 wet-bulb-globe temperature). Eight elite male kayakers performed two successive 1000-m kayak time trials (TT1 and TT2), separated by a short-term recovery period, including a 30-min of the respective recovery intervention protocol, in a randomized crossover design. Racing time, power output, and stroke rate were recorded for each time trial. Blood lactate concentration, pH, core, skin and body temperatures were measured before and after both TT1 and TT2 and at mid- and post-recovery intervention. Perceptual ratings of thermal sensation were also collected. LFESCR was associated with a very likely effect in performance restoration compared with ACTCR (99/0/1%) and LFES conditions (98/0/2%). LFESCR induced a significant decrease in body temperature and thermal sensation at post-recovery intervention, which is not observed in ACTCR condition. In conclusion, the combination of LFES and wearing a cooling vest (LFESCR ) improves performance restoration between two 1000-m kayak time trials achieved by elite athletes, in the heat. PMID:25943673

  1. Speech Perception and Localisation with SCORE Bimodal: A Loudness Normalisation Strategy for Combined Cochlear Implant and Hearing Aid Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    A significant fraction of newly implanted cochlear implant recipients use a hearing aid in their non-implanted ear. SCORE bimodal is a sound processing strategy developed for this configuration, aimed at normalising loudness perception and improving binaural loudness balance. Speech perception performance in quiet and noise and sound localisation ability of six bimodal listeners were measured with and without application of SCORE. Speech perception in quiet was measured either with only acoustic, only electric, or bimodal stimulation, at soft and normal conversational levels. For speech in quiet there was a significant improvement with application of SCORE. Speech perception in noise was measured for either steady-state noise, fluctuating noise, or a competing talker, at conversational levels with bimodal stimulation. For speech in noise there was no significant effect of application of SCORE. Modelling of interaural loudness differences in a long-term-average-speech-spectrum-weighted click train indicated that left-right discrimination of sound sources can improve with application of SCORE. As SCORE was found to leave speech perception unaffected or to improve it, it seems suitable for implementation in clinical devices. PMID:23115622

  2. Encouraging overweight students with intellectual disability to actively perform walking activity using an air mouse combined with preferred stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Jui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    This study continues the research on using an air mouse as a physical activity detector. An air mouse is embedded with a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) gyro sensor, which can measure even the slightest movement in the air. The air mouse was strapped to one of each participant's calves to detect walking activity. This study was conducted to evaluate whether four students with intellectual disability who were overweight and disliked exercising could be motivated to engage in walking actively by linking the target response with preferred stimulation. Single-subject research with ABAB design was adopted in this study. The experimental data showed substantial increases in the participants' target responses (i.e. the performance of the activity of walking) during the intervention phases compared to the baseline phases. The practical and developmental implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:27037988

  3. Retroviral interleukin 1alpha gene transfer in bone marrow stromal cells in a primate model: induction of myelopoiesis stimulation.

    PubMed

    de Revel, Thierry; Becard, Nicolas; Sorg, Tania; Rousseau, Sandrine; Spano, Jean Philippe; Thiebot, Hugues; Methali, Magid; Gras, Gabriel; Le Grand, Roger; Dormont, Dominique

    2002-09-01

    Effects of interleukin 1-alpha (IL-1alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic activity, in the myelopoietic setting, is mainly linked to its ability to increase haematopoietic growth factor production by bone marrow stromal cells. In order to minimize systemic effects of IL-1alpha therapy, we proposed a model of retroviral IL-1alpha gene transfer within bone marrow stromal cells in the macaque cynomolgus. Invitro, 10-15% of bone marrow stromal cells was effectively transduced by retroviral vector (murine Moloney leukaemia virus-derived) expressing IL-1alpha/LacZ, or LacZ alone as control marker, as assessed by betaGal staining. IL-1alpha gene expression was upregulated [semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)] within the transduced cells and the cell supernatant showed an increased production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and an increased clonogenic activity (colony-forming cell assay). Ex vivo autologous expanded IL-1alpha/LacZ transduced bone marrow stromal cells were reinfused in two macaques (and two control animals for LacZ alone as controls), without clinical systemic toxicity; LacZ expression by RT-PCR was detected in one animal of each group between d 4 and 9. A slight increase of the peripheral blood leucocyte counts (both polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes) of the two animals transduced with IL-1alpha/LacZ was observed within 10 d, indicating stimulation of myelopoiesis. PMID:12181061

  4. Combining transcranial direct current stimulation and tailor-made notched music training to decrease tinnitus-related distress--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Teismann, Henning; Wollbrink, Andreas; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Schlaug, Gottfried; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2014-01-01

    The central auditory system has a crucial role in tinnitus generation and maintenance. Curative treatments for tinnitus do not yet exist. However, recent attempts in the therapeutic application of both acoustic stimulation/training procedures and electric/magnetic brain stimulation techniques have yielded promising results. Here, for the first time we combined tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT) with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in an effort to modulate TMNMT efficacy in the treatment of 32 patients with tonal tinnitus and without severe hearing loss. TMNMT is characterized by regular listening to so-called notched music, which is generated by digitally removing the frequency band of one octave width centered at the individual tinnitus frequency. TMNMT was applied for 10 subsequent days (2.5 hours of daily treatment). During the initial 5 days of treatment and the initial 30 minutes of TMNMT sessions, tDCS (current strength: 2 mA; anodal (N = 10) vs. cathodal (N = 11) vs. sham (N = 11) groups) was applied simultaneously. The active electrode was placed on the head surface over left auditory cortex; the reference electrode was put over right supra-orbital cortex. To evaluate treatment outcome, tinnitus-related distress and perceived tinnitus loudness were assessed using standardized tinnitus questionnaires and a visual analogue scale. The results showed a significant treatment effect reflected in the Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire that was largest after 5 days of treatment. This effect remained significant at the end of follow-up 31 days after treatment cessation. Crucially, tDCS did not significantly modulate treatment efficacy--it did not make a difference whether anodal, cathodal, or sham tDCS was applied. Possible explanations for the findings and functional modifications of the experimental design for future studies (e.g. the selection of control conditions) are discussed. PMID:24587113

  5. Stimulative Effects of Hominis Placental Pharmacopuncture Solution Combined with Zinc-oxide Nanoparticles on RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Tae-Keun; Kim, Jeehye; Woo, Juyoun; Ha, Ki-Tae; Joo, Myungsoo; Hahn, Yoon-Bong; Jeong, Han-Sol

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine whether Hominis Placental pharmacopuncture solution (HPPS) combined with zinc-oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NP) activates RAW 264.7 cells. Methods: We soaked ZnO nanoparticles in the Hominis Placenta pharmacopuncture solution, thereby making a combined form (ZnO NP HPPS). The effect of ZnO NP HPPS on the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. The effect of ZnO NP HPPS on NF-κ B was measured by using a luciferase assay. The effect of ZnO NP HPPS on the cytokine expression was assessed by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The cellular uptake of ZnO NP HPPS was measured by using a flow cytometric analysis, and cellular structural alterations were analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: Neither the HPPS nor the ZnO NPs induced intracellular ROS production in RAW 264.7 cells. Neither of the materials activated NF-κ B or it’s dependent genes, such as TNF-α, IL-1, and MCP-1. However, ZnO NP HPPS, the combined form of ZnO NPs and HPPS, did induce the intracellular ROS production, as well as prominently activating NF-κ B and it’s dependent genes. Also, compared to ZnO NPs, it effectively increased the uptake by RAW 264.7 cells. In addition, cellular structural alterations were observed in groups treated with ZnO NP HPPS. Conclusions: Neither ZnO NP nor HPPS activated RAW 264.7 cells, which is likely due to a low cellular uptake. The ZnO NP HPPS, however, significantly activated NF-κ B and up-regulated its dependent genes such as TNF-α, IL-1, and MCP-1. ZnO NP HPPS was also more easily taken into the RAW 264.7 cells than either ZnO NP or HPPS. PMID:25780643

  6. Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids combined with mobilization of bone marrow stem cells to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ming-san; Guo, Lin; Li, Rui-qi; Ma, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids have a neuroprotective effect, but it remains unclear whether Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids have a synergistic effect with the recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized bone marrow stem cell transplantation on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Rat ischemia models were administered 0.3, 0.15 and 0.075 g/kg Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids from 3 days before modeling to 2 days after injury. Results showed that Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids could reduce pathological injury in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. The number of Nissl bodies increased, Bax protein expression decreased, Bcl-2 protein expression increased and the number of CD34-positive cells increased. Therefore, Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids can improve the bone marrow stem cell mobilization effect, enhance the anti-apoptotic ability of nerve cells, and have a neuroprotective effect on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. PMID:27073381

  7. Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids combined with mobilization of bone marrow stem cells to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ming-San; Guo, Lin; Li, Rui-Qi; Ma, Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids have a neuroprotective effect, but it remains unclear whether Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids have a synergistic effect with the recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized bone marrow stem cell transplantation on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Rat ischemia models were administered 0.3, 0.15 and 0.075 g/kg Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids from 3 days before modeling to 2 days after injury. Results showed that Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids could reduce pathological injury in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. The number of Nissl bodies increased, Bax protein expression decreased, Bcl-2 protein expression increased and the number of CD34-positive cells increased. Therefore, Radix Ilicis Pubescentis total flavonoids can improve the bone marrow stem cell mobilization effect, enhance the anti-apoptotic ability of nerve cells, and have a neuroprotective effect on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. PMID:27073381

  8. Task-specific brain reorganization in motor recovery induced by a hybrid-rehabilitation combining training with brain stimulation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Koganemaru, Satoko; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Aso, Toshihiko; Sagara, Akiko; Ikkaku, Tomoko; Shimada, Kenji; Kanematsu, Madoka; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Domen, Kazuhisa; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Mima, Tatsuya

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we have developed a new hybrid-rehabilitation combining 5Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and extensor motor training of the paretic upper-limb for stroke patients with flexor hypertonia. We previously showed that the extensor-specific plastic change in M1 was associated with beneficial effects of our protocol (Koganemaru et al., 2010). Here, we investigated whether extensor-specific multiregional brain reorganization occurred after the hybrid-rehabilitation using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven chronic stroke patients were scanned while performing upper-limb extensor movements. Untrained flexor movements were used as a control condition. The scanning and clinical assessments were done before, immediately and 2 weeks after the hybrid-rehabilitation. As a result, during the trained extensor movements, the imaging analysis showed a significant reduction of brain activity in the ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex, the contralesional cingulate motor cortex and the contralesional premotor cortex in association with functional improvements of the paretic hands. The activation change was not found for the control condition. Our results suggested that use-dependent plasticity induced by repetitive motor training with brain stimulation might be related to task-specific multi-regional brain reorganization. It provides a key to understand why repetitive training of the target action is one of the most powerful rehabilitation strategies to help patients. PMID:25450315

  9. Combined Stimulation with the Tumor Necrosis Factor α and the Epidermal Growth Factor Promotes the Proliferation of Hepatocytes in Rat Liver Cultured Slices.

    PubMed

    Finot, Francis; Masson, Régis; Desmots, Fabienne; Ribault, Catherine; Bichet, Nicole; Vericat, Joan A; Lafouge, Patricia; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Loyer, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The culture liver slices are mainly used to investigate drug metabolism and xenobiotic-mediated liver injuries while apoptosis and proliferation remain unexplored in this culture model. Here, we show a transient increase in LDH release and caspase activities indicating an ischemic injury during the slicing procedure. Then, caspase activities decrease and remain low in cultured slices demonstrating a low level of apoptosis. The slicing procedure is also associated with the G0/G1 transition of hepatocytes demonstrated by the activation of stress and proliferation signalling pathways including the ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3 MAPKinases and the transient upregulation of c-fos. The cells further progress up to mid-G1 phase as indicated by the sequential induction of c-myc and p53 mRNA levels after the slicing procedure and at 24 h of culture, respectively. The stimulation by epidermal growth factor induces the ERK1/2 phosphorylation but fails to activate expression of late G1 and S phase markers such as cyclin D1 and Cdk1 indicating that hepatocytes are arrested in mid-G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, we found that combined stimulation by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α and the epidermal growth factor promotes the commitment to DNA replication as observed in vivo during the liver regeneration. PMID:23119170

  10. Combined Stimulation with the Tumor Necrosis Factor α and the Epidermal Growth Factor Promotes the Proliferation of Hepatocytes in Rat Liver Cultured Slices

    PubMed Central

    Finot, Francis; Masson, Régis; Desmots, Fabienne; Ribault, Catherine; Bichet, Nicole; Vericat, Joan A.; Lafouge, Patricia; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Loyer, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The culture liver slices are mainly used to investigate drug metabolism and xenobiotic-mediated liver injuries while apoptosis and proliferation remain unexplored in this culture model. Here, we show a transient increase in LDH release and caspase activities indicating an ischemic injury during the slicing procedure. Then, caspase activities decrease and remain low in cultured slices demonstrating a low level of apoptosis. The slicing procedure is also associated with the G0/G1 transition of hepatocytes demonstrated by the activation of stress and proliferation signalling pathways including the ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3 MAPKinases and the transient upregulation of c-fos. The cells further progress up to mid-G1 phase as indicated by the sequential induction of c-myc and p53 mRNA levels after the slicing procedure and at 24 h of culture, respectively. The stimulation by epidermal growth factor induces the ERK1/2 phosphorylation but fails to activate expression of late G1 and S phase markers such as cyclin D1 and Cdk1 indicating that hepatocytes are arrested in mid-G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, we found that combined stimulation by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α and the epidermal growth factor promotes the commitment to DNA replication as observed in vivo during the liver regeneration. PMID:23119170

  11. Combining the single-walled carbon nanotubes with low voltage electrical stimulation to improve accumulation of nanomedicines in tumor for effective cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Chi; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2016-03-10

    Effective delivery of biomolecules or functional nanoparticles into target sites has always been the primary objective for cancer therapy. We demonstrated that by combining single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with low-voltage (LV) electrical stimulation, biomolecule delivery can be effectively enhanced through reversible electroporation (EP). Clear pore formation in the cell membrane is observed due to LV (50V) pulse electrical stimulation amplified by SWNTs. The cell morphology remains intact and high cell viability is retained. This modality of SWNT + LV pulses can effectively transfer both small molecules and macromolecules into cells through reversible EP. The results of animal studies also suggest that treatment with LV pulses alone cannot increase vascular permeability in tumors unless after the injection of SWNTs. The nanoparticles can cross the permeable vasculature, which enhances their accumulation in the tumor tissue. Therefore, in cancer treatment, both SWNT + LV pulse treatment followed by the injection of LIPO-DOX® and SWNT/DOX + LV pulse treatment can increase tumor inhibition and delay tumor growth. This novel treatment modality applied in a human cancer xenograft model can provide a safe and effective therapy using various nanomedicines in cancer treatment. PMID:26812005

  12. Improving visual functions in adult amblyopia with combined perceptual training and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS): a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Gianluca; Camilleri, Rebecca; Pavan, Andrea; Veronese, Antonella; Lo Giudice, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Amblyopia is a visual disorder due to an abnormal pattern of functional connectivity of the visual cortex and characterized by several visual deficits of spatial vision including impairments of visual acuity (VA) and of the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). Despite being a developmental disorder caused by reduced visual stimulation during early life (critical period), several studies have shown that extensive visual perceptual training can improve VA and CSF in people with amblyopia even in adulthood. With the present study we assessed whether a much shorter perceptual training regime, in association with high-frequency transcranial electrical stimulation (hf-tRNS), was able to improve visual functions in a group of adult participants with amblyopia. Results show that, in comparison with previous studies where a large number sessions with a similar training regime were used (Polat et al., 2004), here just eight sessions of training in contrast detection under lateral masking conditions combined with hf-tRNS, were able to substantially improve VA and CSF in adults with amblyopia. PMID:25538653

  13. Developing patient-centered treatment protocols in brain stimulation: a rationale for combining quantitative and qualitative approaches in persons with HIV.

    PubMed

    Rosedale, Mary; Malaspina, Dolores; Malamud, Daniel; Strauss, Shiela M; Horne, Jaclyn D; Abouzied, Salman; Cruciani, Ricardo A; Knotkova, Helena

    2012-01-01

    This article reports and discusses how quantitative (physiological and behavioral) and qualitative methods are being combined in an open-label pilot feasibility study. The study evaluates safety, tolerability, and acceptability of a protocol to treat depression in HIV-infected individuals, using a 2-week block of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the second most prevalent psychiatric disorder after substance abuse among HIV-positive adults, and novel antidepressant treatments are needed for this vulnerable population. The authors describe the challenges and contributions derived from different research perspectives and methodological approaches and provide a philosophical framework for combining quantitative and qualitative measurements for a fuller examination of the disorder. Four methodological points are presented: (1) the value of combining quantitative and qualitative approaches; (2) the need for context-specific measures when studying patients with medical and psychiatric comorbidities; (3) the importance of research designs that integrate physiological, behavioral, and qualitative approaches when evaluating novel treatments; and (4) the need to explore the relationships between biomarkers, clinical symptom assessments, patient self-evaluations, and patient experiences when developing new, patient-centered protocols. The authors conclude that the complexity of studying novel treatments in complex and new patient populations requires complex research designs to capture the richness of data that inform translational research. PMID:22412085

  14. Combined Stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB Receptors Augments the Antitumor Activity of E7 DNA Vaccines by Increasing Ag-Specific CTL Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  15. Combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the antitumor activity of E7 DNA vaccines by increasing Ag-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  16. The capacity of a combined liposomal hepatitis B and C vaccine to stimulate humoral and cellular responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Khemka, V; See, D; See, J; Chang, J; Chou, S; Tilles, J

    1998-01-01

    Combined hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis C antigen were encapsulated into 1, 2, and 5 microm discrete liposomes and then lyophilized. Groups of adolescent CD-1 mice were given a single 0.3 mL oral dose of these liposomes containing 50 microg/mL hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis C antigen, 50 microg/mL of the same antigens or liposomes alone. Animals in each group were sacrificed every 2 weeks for 10 weeks and the humoral response investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the cellular response by splenic lymphocyte proliferation to 10 microg of either antigen. Seroconversion to both antigens in the mice receiving liposomal antigens occurred in 87.5% of animals sacrificed at 4 weeks and later. One animal (12.5%) receiving antigen alone seroconverted to hepatitis B virus at 6 weeks, but all animals receiving liposomes alone remained negative. Proliferation indexes (PI) greater than 3 were observed in all animals receiving liposomal antigens, with the greatest response seen at 10 weeks. PI was less than 2 for all animals in the other two groups. Thus, a single oral dose of liposomes of three sizes containing both hepatitis B and C antigens given to mice resulted in rapid seroconversion and a progressive robust cellular immune response, whereas the antigens alone or liposomes without antigen did not. PMID:9765029

  17. Tipping a favorable CNS intratumoral immune response using immune stimulation combined with inhibition of tumor-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Yuan; Wei, Jun; Fuller, Gregory N; Schrand, Brett; Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Zhou, Shouhao; Rao, Ganesh; Calin, George; Gilboa, Eli; Heimberger, Amy B

    2016-05-01

    High-grade gliomas are notoriously heterogeneous regarding antigen expression, effector responses, and immunosuppressive mechanisms. Therefore, combinational immune therapeutic approaches are more likely to impact a greater number of patients and result in longer, durable responses. We have previously demonstrated the monotherapeutic effects of miR-124, which inhibits the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) immune suppressive pathway, and immune stimulatory 4-1BB aptamers against a variety of malignancies, including genetically engineered immune competent high-grade gliomas. To evaluate potential synergy, we tested an immune stimulatory aptamer together with microRNA-124 (miRNA-124), which blocks tumor-mediated immune suppression, and found survival to be markedly enhanced, including beyond that produced by monotherapy. The synergistic activity appeared to be not only secondary to enhanced CD3(+) cell numbers but also to reduced macrophage immune tumor trafficking, indicating that a greater therapeutic benefit can be achieved with approaches that both induce immune activation and inhibit tumor-mediated immune suppression within the central nervous system (CNS) tumors. PMID:27467917

  18. Role of percutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation either alone or combined with an anticholinergic agent in treating patients with overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kızılyel, Sadık; Karakeçi, Ahmet; Ozan, Tunç; Ünüş, İhsan; Barut, Osman; Onur, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), either alone or combined with an anticholinergic agent, in treating patients with an overactive bladder (OAB) in whom previous conservative treatment failed. Material and methods In this study, we included a total of 30 female patients with OAB in whom all conventional therapies failed between January 2010 and April 2011. Patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1, PTNS group; Group 2, patients receiving an anticholinergic agent; and Group 3, patients receiving both PTNS and anticholinergic agent. PTNS treatment continued for 12 weeks with each session lasting 30 min. Results All parameters of the bladder diary significantly improved in all groups (p<0.05). Similarly, all scores measured by questionnaires (UDI-6, IIQ-7, and OABSS) revealed significant improvements in all groups. When the improvements in symptoms were compared among the groups, there was a statistically significantly higher improvement in groups 1 and 3 than in Group 2. Conclusion PTNS is a safe, simple, and minimally invasive treatment modality in patients with OAB, and it may be suggested either alone or in combination with anticholinergics when conventional treatments fail. PMID:26623150

  19. The evaluation of clinical therapy effects of oral western medicine combined with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation in treating elderly patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xin; Guo, Li; Jiang, Zheng-Ming; Xu, Ai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treat the patients suffered from coronary heart disease with oral western medicine, combining with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation, and observe the therapeutic effects of such combination therapy method. Methods: 56 old people with coronary heart disease are randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. Both groups of patients are treated by the routine drugs, in addition, the patients of the treatment group are treated by magnetic pulse therapy additionally. Compare clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the two groups when they are selected and after 30 days’ treatment. Results: after 30 days’ treatment, it is found that clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the treatment group are significantly improved compared with those when they are selected and those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: patients with coronary heart disease, treated by pulsed magnetic therapy and the conventional drug intervention, had relieved synptom, improve blood lipid and heart blood supply function. PMID:26309664

  20. Effect of combination of transcranial direct current stimulation and feedback training on visuospatial neglect in patients with subacute stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Bong, Soon-Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of a combination of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and feedback training (FT) on subacute stroke patients with unilateral visuospatial neglect. [Subjects] The subjects were randomly assigned to a tDCS + FT group (n=6) and a FT group (n=6). [Methods] Patients in the tDCS + FT group received tDCS for 20 minutes and then received FT for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. The control group received FT for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test (MVPT), line bisection test (LBT), and modified Barthel index (MBI) over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the rDCS + FT group showed more significant improvements in MVPT, LBT, and MBI. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that tDCS combined with FT has a positive effect on unilateral visuospatial neglect in patients with subacute stroke. PMID:26504287

  1. Mirror therapy combined with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation for motor recovery of upper extremities after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy in combination with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation (BF-FES) on motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke. Twenty-nine patients who suffered a stroke > 6 months prior participated in this study and were randomly allocated to three groups. The BF-FES + mirror therapy and FES + mirror therapy groups practiced training for 5 × 30 min sessions over a 4-week period. The control group received a conventional physical therapy program. The following clinical tools were used to assess motor recovery of the upper extremities: electrical muscle tester, electrogoniometer, dual-inclinometer, electrodynamometer, the Box and Block Test (BBT) and Jabsen Taylor Hand Function Test (JHFT), the Functional Independence Measure, the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) assessment. The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in wrist extension as revealed by the Manual Muscle Test and Range of Motion (p < 0.05). The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in the BBT, JTHT, and SSQOL compared with the FES + mirror therapy group and control group (p < 0.05). We found that BF-FES + mirror therapy induced motor recovery and improved quality of life. These results suggest that mirror therapy, in combination with BF-FES, is feasible and effective for motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke. PMID:25367222

  2. Colony-stimulating factors for the treatment of the hematopoietic component of the acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS): a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Newman, Victoria L; Seed, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest national security threats to the United States is the detonation of an improvised nuclear device or a radiological dispersal device in a heavily populated area. As such, this type of security threat is considered to be of relatively low risk, but one that would have an extraordinary high impact on health and well-being of the US citizenry. Psychological counseling and medical assessments would be necessary for all those significantly impacted by the nuclear/radiological event. Direct medical interventions would be necessary for all those individuals who had received substantial radiation exposures (e.g., >1 Gy). Although no drugs or products have yet been specifically approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) to treat the effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and pegylated G-CSF have been used off label for treating radiation accident victims. Recent threats of terrorist attacks using nuclear or radiologic devices makes it imperative that the medical community have up-to-date information and a clear understanding of treatment protocols using therapeutically effective recombinant growth factors and cytokines such as G-CSF and GM-CSF for patients exposed to injurious doses of ionizing radiation. Based on limited human studies with underlying biology, we see that the recombinants, G-CSF and GM-CSF appear to have modest, but significant medicinal value in treating radiation accident victims. In the near future, the US FDA may approve G-CSF and GM-CSF as ‘Emergency Use Authorization’ (EUA) for managing radiation-induced aplasia, an ARS-related pathology. In this article, we review the status of growth factors for the treatment of radiological/nuclear accident victims. PMID:25215458

  3. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, Cold, and a Combination Treatment on Pain, Decreased Range of Motion, and Strength Loss Associated with Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Perrin, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Athletic trainers have a variety of therapeutic agents at their disposal to treat musculoskeletal pain, but little objective evidence exists of the efficacy of the modalities they use. In this study, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) served as a model for musculoskeletal injury in order to: (1) compare the changes in perceived pain, elbow extension range of motion, and strength loss in subjects experiencing DOMS in the elbow flexor muscle group following a single treatment with either transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), cold, a combination of TENS and cold, sham TENS, or 20 minutes of rest; (2) compare the effects of combining static stretching with these treatments; and (3) determine if decreased pain is accompanied by a restoration of strength. DOMS was induced in the non-dominant elbow flexor muscle group in 40 females (age = 22.0 ± 4.3 yr) with repeated eccentric contractions. Forty-eight hours following exercise, all subjects presented with pain, decreased elbow extension range of motion, and decreased strength consistent with DOMS. Subjects were randomly assigned to 20-minute treatments followed by static stretching. Cold, TENS, and the combined treatment resulted in significant decreases in perceived pain. Treatments with cold resulted in a significant increase in elbow extension range of motion. Static stretching also significantly reduced perceived pain. Only small, nonsignificant changes in muscle strength were observed following treatment or stretching, regardless of the treatment group. These results suggest that the muscle weakness associated with DOMS is not the result of inhibition caused by pain. The results suggest that these modalities are effective in treating the pain and muscle spasm associated with DOMS, and that decreased pain may not be an accurate indicator of the recovery of muscle strength. PMID:16558162

  4. Combined stimulation of the glycine and polyamine sites of the NMDA receptor attenuates NMDA blockade-induced learning deficits of rats in a 14-unit T-maze.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R C; Knox, J; Purwin, D A; Spangler, E L; Ingram, D K

    1998-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of multi-site activation of the glycine and polyamine sites of the NMDA receptor on memory formation in rats learning a 14-unit T-maze task. The competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, (+/-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 9 mg/kg), was used to impair learning. The objectives were two-fold: (1) to investigate the effects of independent stimulation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site or the polyamine site; (2) to investigate the effects of simultaneous activation of these two sites. Male, Fischer-344 rats were pretrained to a criterion of 13 out of 15 shock avoidances in a straight runway, and 24 h later were trained in a 14-unit T-maze that also required shock avoidance. Prior to maze training, rats received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of saline, saline plus CPP, CPP plus the glycine agonist, D-cycloserine (DCS, 30 or 40 mg/kg), CPP plus the polyamine agonist, spermine (SPM, 2.5 or 5 mg/kg), or CPP plus a combination of DCS (7.5 mg/kg) and SPM (0.625 mg/kg). Individual administration of either DCS or SPM attenuated the CPP-induced maze learning impairment in a dose-dependent manner. However, the combined treatment with both DCS and SPM completely reversed the learning deficit at doses five-fold less than either drug given alone. These findings provide additional evidence that the glycine and polyamine modulatory sites of the NMDA receptor are involved in memory formation. Furthermore, the potent synergistic effect resulting from combined activation of the glycine and polyamine sites would suggest a stronger interaction between these two sites than previously considered, and might provide new therapeutic approaches for enhancing glutamatergic function. PMID:9498733

  5. Reducing The Cost of Transport and Increasing Walking Distance After Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Fast Locomotor Training Combined With Functional Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Awad, Louis N; Reisman, Darcy S; Pohlig, Ryan T; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2016-08-01

    Background Neurorehabilitation efforts have been limited in their ability to restore walking function after stroke. Recent work has demonstrated proof-of-concept for a functional electrical stimulation (FES)-based combination therapy designed to improve poststroke walking by targeting deficits in paretic propulsion. Objectives To determine the effects on the energy cost of walking (EC) and long-distance walking ability of locomotor training that combines fast walking with FES to the paretic ankle musculature (FastFES). Methods Fifty participants >6 months poststroke were randomized to 12 weeks of gait training at self-selected speeds (SS), fast speeds (Fast), or FastFES. Participants' 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance and EC at comfortable (EC-CWS) and fast (EC-Fast) walking speeds were measured pretraining, posttraining, and at a 3-month follow-up. A reduction in EC-CWS, independent of changes in speed, was the primary outcome. Group differences in the number of 6MWT responders and moderation by baseline speed were also evaluated. Results When compared with SS and Fast, FastFES produced larger reductions in EC (Ps ≤.03). FastFES produced reductions of 24% and 19% in EC-CWS and EC-Fast (Ps <.001), respectively, whereas neither Fast nor SS influenced EC. Between-group 6MWT differences were not observed; however, 73% of FastFES and 68% of Fast participants were responders, in contrast to 35% of SS participants. Conclusions Combining fast locomotor training with FES is an effective approach to reducing the high EC of persons poststroke. Surprisingly, differences in 6MWT gains were not observed between groups. Closer inspection of the 6MWT and EC relationship and elucidation of how reduced EC may influence walking-related disability is warranted. PMID:26621366

  6. The use of cytokine-stimulated healthy donors in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Marson, Piero; Gazzola, Maria Vittoria; De Silvestro, Giustina; Destro, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Calore, Elisabetta; Messina, Chiara; Zanesco, Luigi

    2002-08-01

    Treatment of healthy donors with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) allows the mobilization and peripheralization into circulating blood of an adequate number of CD34+ cells that can then be collected by leukapheresis (PBSC). This procedure avoids the invasiveness of bone marrow harvest and the risks related to general anesthesia. The main adverse effects of rhG-CSF are: bone pain, 84%, headache, 54%, fatigue, 31%, and nausea, 13%, which are usually scored by the donors as moderate to severe, resolving within 2-3 days after discontinuation of the cytokine. Analgesics, mainly acetaminophen, are sufficient to control the pain. Less than 5% of the donors experience non-cardiac chest pain, a local reaction at the injection site, insomnia, dizziness or a low-grade fever. Discontinuation of the PBSC procedure because of adverse effects of rhG-CSF or leukapheresis is rarely necessary (0.5%) but this good tolerability can be hampered by the need, in 5-20% of cases, for an adequate venous access that requires insertion of a central or venous catheter. There are no absolute contraindications to the stimulation of healthy donors with rhG-CSF but the description of cases of non-traumatic splenic rupture, iritis, cardiac ischemia, and gouty arthritis suggests that further precautionary restrictions are advisable when deciding eligibility for PBSC collection. The main advantages for patients receiving an allogeneic PBSC transplant are the faster hematologic and immunologic recovery and the potential for a greater efficacy in advanced disease by lowering the transplant-related mortality. One of the major concerns regarding the use of rhG-CSF in unrelated healthy donors is the uncertainty about its possible role in triggering malignancy, in particular myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. There are no studies with an adequate sample size and follow-up that can answer this question but two recent retrospective studies reported that in

  7. ORF3 of Hepatitis E Virus Inhibits the Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Chemotactic Factors in LPS-Stimulated Human PMA-THP1 Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lei, Qingsong; Li, Lin; Cai, Jia; Huang, Wenxiang; Qin, Bo; Zhang, Shujun

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the primary causative agents of acute hepatitis. It is noteworthy that HEV can develop chronic infection and even lead to liver cirrhosis; however, the mechanism has not been revealed. In this study, the ELISA assay was used to detect protein levels, and we found that HEV open reading frame 3 (ORF3) protein inhibited the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p40, and IL-18) and chemotactic factors (nitric oxide [NO], interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)] in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human PMA-THP1 cells. Further study showed that mRNA and protein levels of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2), decreased after infection of pLL3.7-ORF3 (pORF3); moreover, the inhibition produced corresponding upregulation of IκBα and downregulation of phosphorylated IκB kinase IKKɛ (p-IKKɛ) and phosphorylated nuclear factor (NF)-κB (p-NF-κB), but little variation was found in the concentration of IKKɛ and NF-κB. Taken together, our results demonstrated that HEV ORF3 attenuated LPS-induced cytokine production and chemotactic factors, predominantly by inhibiting various PRRs-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. The anti-inflammatory properties might be of great importance to clarify the role and mechanism of macrophages in chronic HEV infection and cirrhosis. PMID:26771290

  8. Source analysis of median nerve and finger stimulated somatosensory evoked potentials: multichannel simultaneous recording of electric and magnetic fields combined with 3D-MR tomography.

    PubMed

    Buchner, H; Fuchs, M; Wischmann, H A; Dössel, O; Ludwig, I; Knepper, A; Berg, P

    1994-01-01

    At the current state of technology, multichannel simultaneous recording of combined electric potentials and magnetic fields should constitute the most powerful tool for separation and localization of focal brain activity. We performed an explorative study of multichannel simultaneous electric SEPs and magnetically recorded SEFs. MEG only sees tangentially oriented sources, while EEG signals include the entire activity of the brain. These characteristics were found to be very useful in separating multiple sources with overlap of activity in time. The electrically recorded SEPs were adequately modelled by three equivalent dipoles located: (1) in the region of the brainstem, modelling the P14 peak at the scalp, (2) a tangentially oriented dipole, modelling the N20-P20 and N30-P30 peaks, and part of the P45, and (3) a radially oriented dipole, modelling the P22 peak and part of the P45, both located in the region of the somatosensory cortex. Magnetically recorded SEFs were adequately modelled by a single equivalent dipole, modelling the N20-P20 and N30-P30 peaks, located close to the posterior bank of the central sulcus, in area 3b (mean deviation: 3 mm). The tangential sources in the electrical data were located 6 mm on average from the area 3b. MEG and EEG was able to locate the sources of finger stimulated SEFs in accordance with the somatotopic arrangement along the central fissure. A combined analysis demonstrated that MEG can provide constraints to the orientation and location of sources and helps to stabilize the inverse solution in a multiple-source model of the EEG. PMID:7946929

  9. [Prognostic evaluation of patients with severe head injury by motor evoked potentials induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation--combined analysis with brainstem auditory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, M

    1995-05-01

    Prognostic evaluation of severe head injury was performed on the basis of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs). The subjects were 43 severe head injury patients with Glasgow Coma Scale Scores (GCS) of 9 or less. MEPs were recorded within 3 days after the injury. Patient outcome at 1, 6 and 12 months after the injury was correlated with the MEPs and BAEPs. Differences between MEP and BAEP findings in focal lesions and diffuse lesions also were analyzed. MEP wave latencies and inter-peak latencies between BAEP waves IV and V and between waves I and V were evaluated. There was a closer relationship between MEP latency and GOS, especially between the good recovery group and other outcome groups. At 1 month after the injury, there was a closer correlation between MEP latency and BAEP latency in those who died than in those who survived, and this tendency was more evident with regard to focal lesions. However, there was no significant correlation between MEP and patient outcome when the lesions were diffuse. There was no correlation between BAEP latencies and patient outcome, but there was a good, close correlation between prolonged MEP latency and unfavorable outcome at 1, 6, 12 months after injury. In conclusion, the combined use of BAEPs and MEPs induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation is useful in prognostic evaluation of acute head injury patients, especially when the brain lesions are focal. PMID:7786626

  10. Induction of Specific Cellular and Humoral Responses against Renal Cell Carcinoma after Combination Therapy with Cryoablation and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Littrup, Peter; Paul, Elyse N.; Adam, Barbara; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Cryotherapy offers a minimally invasive treatment option for the management of both irresectable and localized prostate, liver, pulmonary and renal tumors. The anti-neoplastic effects of cryotherapy are mediated by direct tumor lysis and by indirect effects such as intracellular dehydration, pH changes, and microvascular damage resulting in ischemic necrosis. In this study, we investigated whether percutaneous cryoablation of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in combination with aerosolized granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce systemic cellular and humoral immune responses in 6 RCC patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were sequentially studied up to 63 days post cryoimmunotherapy (CI). PBMC from pre and post CI were phenotyped for lymphocyte subsets and tested for cytotoxicity and IFNγ Elispots directed at RCC cells. Humoral responses were measured by in vitro antibody synthesis assay directed at RCC cells. The immune monitoring data showed that CI induced tumor specific CTL, specific in vitro anti-tumor antibody responses, and enhanced Th1 cytokine production in 4 out of 6 patients. More importantly, the magnitude of cellular and humoral anti-tumor response appears to be associated with clinical responses. These pilot data show that CI can induce robust and brisk cellular and humoral immune responses in metastatic RCC patients, but requires further evaluation in optimized protocols. PMID:21577139

  11. Effect of a single session of transcranial direct-current stimulation combined with virtual reality training on the balance of children with cerebral palsy: a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Roberta Delasta; Politti, Fabiano; Santos, Cibele Alimedia; Dumont, Arislander Jonathan Lopes; Rezende, Fernanda Lobo; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Braun Ferreira, Luiz Alfredo; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single session of transcranial direct current stimulation combined with virtual reality training on the balance of children with cerebral palsy. [Subjetcs and Methods] Children with cerebral palsy between four and 12 years of age were randomly allocated to two groups: an experimental group which performed a single session of mobility training with virtual reality combined with active transcranial direct current stimulation; and a control group which performed a single session of mobility training with virtual reality combined with placebo transcranial direct current stimulation. The children were evaluated before and after the training protocols. Static balance (sway area, displacement, velocity and frequency of oscillations of the center of pressure on the anteroposterior and mediolateral axes) was evaluated using a force plate under four conditions (30-second measurements for each condition): feet on the force plate with the eyes open, and with the eyes closed; feet on a foam mat with the eyes open, and with the eyes closed. [Results] An increase in sway velocity was the only significant difference found. [Conclusion] A single session of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation combined with mobility training elicited to lead to an increase in the body sway velocity of children with cerebral palsy. PMID:25931726

  12. Mononuclear cells from the cord blood and granulocytecolony stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood: is there a potential for treatment of cerebral palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Hani; Hwang, Kyoujung; Lim, Hae-Young; Kim, Yong-Joo; Lee, Young-Ho

    2015-01-01

    To investigate a possible therapeutic mechanism of cell therapy in the field of cerebral palsy using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMCs), we compared the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophic factors in PBMCs and mPBMCs from children with cerebral palsy to those from healthy adult donors and to cord blood mononuclear cells donated from healthy newborns. No significant differences in expression of neurotrophic factors were found between PBMCs and mPBMCs. However, in cerebral palsy children, the expression of interleukin-6 was significantly increased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs, and the expression of interleukin-3 was significantly decreased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs. In healthy adults, the expression levels of both interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 were significantly increased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factors in mPBMC from cerebral palsy children was significantly higher than that in the cord blood or mPBMCs from healthy adults. The expression of G-CSF in mPBMCs from cerebral palsy children was comparable to that in the cord blood but significantly higher than that in mPBMCs from healthy adults. Lower expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-3, and -6) and higher expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-8 and interleukin-9) were observed from the cord blood and mPBMCs from cerebral palsy children rather than from healthy adults. These findings indicate that mPBMCs from cerebral palsy and cord blood mononuclear cells from healthy newborns have the potential to become seed cells for treatment of cerebral palsy. PMID:26889193

  13. The Factors Associated with Good Responses to Speech Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Post-stroke Aphasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Il-Young; Lim, Jong Youb; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Sohn, Hae Min

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine factors associated with good responses to speech therapy combined with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in aphasic patients after stroke. Method The language function was evaluated using Korean version of Western aphasia battery (K-WAB) before and after speech therapy with tDCS in 37 stroke patients. Patients received speech therapy for 30 minutes over 2 to 3 weeks (10 sessions) while the cathodal tDCS was performed to the Brodmann area 45 with 1 mA for 20 minutes. We compared the improvement of aphasia quotient % (AQ%) between two evaluation times according to age, sex, days after onset, stroke type, aphasia type, brain lesion confirmed by magnetic resonance image and initial severity of aphasia. The factors related with good responses were also checked. Results AQ% improved from pre- to post-therapy (14.94±6.73%, p<0.001). AQ% improvement was greater in patients with less severe, fluent type of aphasia who received treatment before 30 days since stroke was developed (p<0.05). The adjusted logistic regression model revealed that patients with hemorrhagic stroke were more likely to achieve good responses (odds ratio=4.897, p<0.05) relative to infarction. Initial severity over 10% in AQ% was also found to be significantly associated with good improvement (odds ratio=8.618, p<0.05). Conclusion Speech therapy with tDCS was established as a treatment tool for aphasic patients after stroke. Lower initial severity was associated with good responses. PMID:22506160

  14. A novel combinational approach of microstimulation and bioluminescence imaging to study the mechanisms of action of cerebral electrical stimulation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Dany; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Saint-Pierre, Martine; Petrou, Petros; Dubois, Marilyn; Kriz, Jasna; Barker, Roger A; Cicchetti, Antonio; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Key points We have developed a unique prototype to perform brain stimulation in mice. This system presents a number of advantages and new developments: 1) all stimulation parameters can be adjusted, 2) both positive and negative current pulses can be generated, guaranteeing electrically balanced stimulation regimen, 3) which can be produced with both low and high impedance electrodes, 4) the developed electrodes ensure localized stimulation and 5) can be used to stimulate and/or record brain potential and 6) in vivo recording of electric pulses allows the detection of defective electrodes (wire breakage or short circuits). This new micro-stimulator device further allows simultaneous live bioluminescence imaging of the mouse brain, enabling real time assessment of the impact of stimulation on cerebral tissue. The use of this novel tool in various transgenic mouse models of disease opens up a whole new range of possibilities in better understanding brain stimulation. Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to treat a number of neurological conditions and is currently being tested to intervene in neuropsychiatric conditions. However, a better understanding of how it works would ensure that side effects could be minimized and benefits optimized. We have thus developed a unique device to perform brain stimulation (BS) in mice and to address fundamental issues related to this methodology in the pre-clinical setting. This new microstimulator prototype was specifically designed to allow simultaneous live bioluminescence imaging of the mouse brain, allowing real time assessment of the impact of stimulation on cerebral tissue. We validated the authenticity of this tool in vivo by analysing the expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), corresponding to the microglial response, in the stimulated brain regions of TLR2-fluc-GFP transgenic mice, which we further corroborated with post-mortem analyses in these animals as well as in human brains of patients who underwent DBS

  15. Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease with Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Cognitive Training: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juyoun; Choi, Byong Hee; Oh, Eungseok; Sohn, Eun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been examined as a potential treatment for many neurological disorders. High-frequency rTMS in particular improves cognitive functions such as verbal fluency and memory. This study explored the effect of rTMS combined with cognitive training (rTMS-COG) on patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed with 27 AD patients (18 and 8 in the treatment and sham groups, respectively, and 1 drop-out). The participants were categorized into mild [Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score=21-26] and moderate (MMSE score=18-20) AD groups. The rTMS protocols were configured for six cortical areas (both dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal somatosensory associated cortices and Broca's and Wernicke's areas; 10 Hz, 90-110% intensity, and 5 days/week for 6 weeks). Neuropsychological assessments were performed using the AD Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC), and MMSE before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after the end of rTMS-COG treatment. Results Data from 26 AD patients were analyzed in this study. There was no significant interactive effect of time between the groups. The ADAS-cog score in the treatment group was significantly improved compared to the sham group (4.28 and 5.39 in the treatment group vs. 1.75 and 2.88 in the sham group at immediately and 6 weeks after treatment, respectively). The MMSE and CGIC scores were also improved in the treatment group. Based on subgroup analysis, the effect of rTMS-COG was superior for the mild group compared to the total patients, especially in the domains of memory and language. Conclusions The present results suggest that rTMS-COG represents a useful adjuvant therapy with cholinesterase inhibitors, particularly during the mild stage of AD. The effect of rTMS-COG was remarkable in the memory and language domains, which

  16. The effect of polyol-combinant saliva stimulants on S. mutans levels in plaque and saliva of patients with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Kauko K; Isotupa, Kauko P; Kivilompolo, Taina; Mäkinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Murtomaa, Satu; Petäjä, Juhani; Toivanen, Jukka; Söderling, Eva

    2002-01-01

    The effect of chewable saliva-stimulants on Streptococcus mutans levels in dental plaque and paraffin-stimulated whole saliva among participants who were mentally disabled was investigated. Over 64-days, 98 participants chewed one of four saliva-stimulating tablets five times/day. The tablets contained one of the following: xylitol (X) or sorbitol (S), or 1:1 mixtures of xylitol and erythritol (XE) or sorbitol and erythritol (SE). Consumption of xylitol and sorbitol in Groups X and S was 5.4 grams/day/ subject, and of each polyol in Groups XE and SE, consumption was 2.7 g/day/subject. Interproximal dental plaque and stimulated whole saliva were sampled at baseline, at Day 36, and Day 64. There was a statistically significant reduction of S. mutans in plaque and saliva counts in Groups X and XE. The percentage of S. mutans in total streptococci increased significantly in dental plaque in Group S but decreased in the other groups. The results suggest that xylitol-containing saliva stimulants may be more effective than sorbitol-containing products in controlling some caries-associated parameters in people who are mentally disabled. Also a relationship may exist between the pentitol-type xylitol and S. mutans, and erythritol may exert a specific biochemical effect on this organism, although further studies are needed. PMID:12580357

  17. The Beneficial Effects of Postinfarct Cytokine Combination Therapy are Sustained During Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Sanganalmath, Santosh K.; Stein, Adam B.; Guo, Yiru; Tiwari, Sumit; Hunt, Greg; Vincent, Robert J.; Huang, Yiming; Rezazadeh, Arash; Ildstad, Suzanne T.; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Bolli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)+Flt-3 ligand (FL) or G-CSF+stem cell factor (SCF) improves left ventricular (LV) function and halts LV remodeling at 35 days after myocardial infarction (MI). In the current study, we investigated whether these beneficial effects are sustained in the long term - an issue of fundamental importance for clinical translation. Mice undergoing a 30-min coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion received vehicle (group I), G-CSF+FL (group II), G-CSF+SCF (group III), or G-CSF alone (group IV) starting 4 h after reperfusion and were euthanized 48 weeks later. LV structure and function were assessed by serial echocardiography before and at 48 h and 4, 8, 16, 32, and 48 wk after MI. During follow-up, mice in group I exhibited worsening of LV function and progressive LV remodeling. Compared with group I, both groups II and III exhibited improved LV EF at 4 wk after MI; however, only in group II was this improvement sustained at 48 wk. Group II was also the only group in which the decrease in infarct wall thickening fraction, the LV dilatation, and the increase in LV mass were attenuated vs. group I. We conclude that the beneficial effect of G-CSF+FL on postinfarction LV dysfunction and remodeling is sustained for at least 11 months, and thus is likely to be permanent. In contrast, the effect of G-CSF+SCF was not sustained beyond the first few weeks, and G-CSF alone is ineffective. To our knowledge, this is the first long-term study of cytokines in postinfarction LV remodeling. The results reveal heretofore unknown differential actions of cytokines and have important translational implications. PMID:19616005

  18. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation combined with gait and mobility training on functionality in children with cerebral palsy: study protocol for a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The project proposes three innovative intervention techniques (treadmill training, mobility training with virtual reality and transcranial direct current stimulation that can be safely administered to children with cerebral palsy. The combination of transcranial stimulation and physical therapy resources will provide the training of a specific task with multiple rhythmic repetitions of the phases of the gait cycle, providing rich sensory stimuli with a modified excitability threshold of the primary motor cortex to enhance local synaptic efficacy and potentiate motor learning. Methods/design A prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled, analytical, clinical trial will be carried out.Eligible participants will be children with cerebral palsy classified on levels I, II and III of the Gross Motor Function Classification System between four and ten years of age. The participants will be randomly allocated to four groups: 1) gait training on a treadmill with placebo transcranial stimulation; 2) gait training on a treadmill with active transcranial stimulation; 3) mobility training with virtual reality and placebo transcranial stimulation; 4) mobility training with virtual reality and active transcranial stimulation. Transcranial direct current stimulation will be applied with the anodal electrode positioned in the region of the dominant hemisphere over C3, corresponding to the primary motor cortex, and the cathode positioned in the supraorbital region contralateral to the anode. A 1 mA current will be applied for 20 minutes. Treadmill training and mobility training with virtual reality will be performed in 30-minute sessions five times a week for two weeks (total of 10 sessions). Evaluations will be performed on four occasions: one week prior to the intervention; one week following the intervention; one month after the end of the intervention;and 3 months after the end of the intervention. The evaluations will involve three-dimensional gait analysis

  19. Effect of a combined continuous and intermittent transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain perception of burn patients evaluated by visual analog scale: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruvalcaba, Irma; Sánchez-Hernández, Viridiana; Mercado-Sesma, Arieh R

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the effect of continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the perception of pain in patients with burns of different types. Materials and methods A pilot study was conducted in 14 patients (age 30.9±7.5 years) with second- and third-degree burns of different types. The burn types included electrical, fire/flame, and chemical. All patients received continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation sessions three times per week for 4 weeks. Each session had a duration of 30 minutes. A pair of electrodes were placed around the burn. The primary efficacy endpoint was the perception of pain assessed by a visual analog scale at baseline and at the 30th day. Results A significant reduction of pain perception was reported (8.0±1.7 vs 1.0±0.5; P=0.027) by all patients after electrical stimulation therapy. There were no reports of adverse events during the intervention period. Conclusion Electrical stimulation could be a potential nonpharmacological therapeutic option for pain management in burn patients. PMID:26719723

  20. Encouraging obese students with intellectual disabilities to engage in pedaling an exercise bike by using an air mouse combined with preferred environmental stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Lin, Yen-Chung

    2014-12-01

    This study extended research into the application of high-tech products in the field of special education, using a standard air mouse with a newly developed pedal detection program (PDP) software. PDP is a new software program used to turn a standard air mouse into a pedal detector in order to evaluate whether two obese students with intellectual disabilities (ID) would be able to actively perform the activity of pedaling an exercise bike in order to control their preferred environmental stimulation. This study was performed according to an ABAB design. The data showed that both participants had more willingness to engage in the pedaling activity to activate the environmental stimulation in the intervention phases than in the baseline phase. The practical and developmental implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25181361

  1. [IDA-FLAG regimen in treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Qian, Si-Xuan; Li, Jian-Yong; Wu, Han-Xin; Zhang, Run; Hong, Ming; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Hong-Xia

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the fludarabine combination with high-dose cytarabine (Ara C), idarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (IDA-FLAG regimen) in treatment of refractory/relapsed acute leukemia (AL) patients. 4 patients were male aged from 32 to 44 years, consisted of 3 cases of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 1 cases of acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL). All the patients were treated with idarubicin (10 - 12 mg/m(2)/d, days 1 to 3), fludarabine (50 mg/d, days 1 to 5), cytarabine (2 g/m(2)/d, days 1 to 5) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, 300 microg/d, days 0 to 5). The results showed that after one course of induction therapy, 4 patients all achieved complete remission (CR), in which 2 patients were in continuous CR after a follow-up of 3 and 4 months; 1 patient relapsed after 10 months and another one patient died of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura at 4 months after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Myelosuppression and infections due to neutropenia were the most frequent adverse effects, severe nonhematologic toxicity and the early death were not observed in these patients. In conclusion, the IDA-FLAG regimen is effective in treatment of patients with refractory and relapsed AL, the adverse effects from this regimen were well tolerated by patients, which gains time for further treatment. PMID:19379589

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells stimulate EaHy926 endothelial cell migration: combined proteomic and in vitro analysis of the influence of donor-donor variability

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Merlin N.M.; Kohli, Nupur; Khan, Neelam; Major, Triin; Fuller, Heidi; Wright, Karina T.; Kuiper, Jan-Herman; Johnson, William E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) stimulate angiogenesis within a wound environment and this effect is mediated through paracrine interactions with the endothelial cells present. Here we report that human MSC-conditioned medium (n=3 donors) significantly increased EaHy-926 endothelial cell adhesion and cell migration, but that this stimulatory effect was markedly donor-dependent. MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry demonstrated that whilst collagen type I and fibronectin were secreted by all of the MSC cultures, the small leucine rich proteoglycan, decorin was secreted only by the MSC culture that was least effective upon EaHy-926 cells. These individual extracellular matrix components were then tested as culture substrata. EaHy-926 cell adherence was greatest on fibronectin-coated surfaces with least adherence on decorin-coated surfaces. Scratch wound assays were used to examine cell migration. EaHy-926 cell scratch wound closure was quickest on substrates of fibronectin and slowest on decorin. However, EaHy-926 cell migration was stimulated by the addition of MSC-conditioned medium irrespective of the types of culture substrates. These data suggest that whilst the MSC secretome may generally be considered angiogenic, the composition of the secretome is variable and this variation probably contributes to donor-donor differences in activity. Hence, screening and optimizing MSC secretomes will improve the clinical effectiveness of pro-angiogenic MSC-based therapies. PMID:26195891

  3. Human mesenchymal stem cells stimulate EaHy926 endothelial cell migration: combined proteomic and in vitro analysis of the influence of donor-donor variability.

    PubMed

    Walter, Merlin N M; Kohli, Nupur; Khan, Neelam; Major, Triin; Fuller, Heidi; Wright, Karina T; Kuiper, Jan-Herman; Johnson, William E B

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) stimulate angiogenesis within a wound environment and this effect is mediated through paracrine interactions with the endothelial cells present. Here we report that human MSC-conditioned medium (n=3 donors) significantly increased EaHy-926 endothelial cell adhesion and cell migration, but that this stimulatory effect was markedly donor-dependent. MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry demonstrated that whilst collagen type I and fibronectin were secreted by all of the MSC cultures, the small leucine rich proteoglycan, decorin was secreted only by the MSC culture that was least effective upon EaHy-926 cells. These individual extracellular matrix components were then tested as culture substrata. EaHy-926 cell adherence was greatest on fibronectin-coated surfaces with least adherence on decorin-coated surfaces. Scratch wound assays were used to examine cell migration. EaHy-926 cell scratch wound closure was quickest on substrates of fibronectin and slowest on decorin. However, EaHy-926 cell migration was stimulated by the addition of MSC-conditioned medium irrespective of the types of culture substrates. These data suggest that whilst the MSC secretome may generally be considered angiogenic, the composition of the secretome is variable and this variation probably contributes to donor-donor differences in activity. Hence, screening and optimizing MSC secretomes will improve the clinical effectiveness of pro-angiogenic MSC-based therapies. PMID:26195891

  4. Combined omega-3 fatty acids, aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation prevents decline in gray matter volume of the frontal, parietal and cingulate cortex in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Köbe, Theresa; Witte, A Veronica; Schnelle, Ariane; Lesemann, Anne; Fabian, Sonja; Tesky, Valentina A; Pantel, Johannes; Flöel, Agnes

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies in older adults suggested beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid (FA) supplementation, aerobic exercise, or cognitive stimulation on brain structure and function. However, combined effects of these interventions in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are unknown. Using a randomized interventional design, we evaluated the effect of combined omega-3 FA supplementation, aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation (target intervention) versus omega-3 FA supplementation and non-aerobic exercise (control intervention) on cognitive function and gray matter volume in patients with MCI. Moreover, we analyzed potential vascular, metabolic or inflammatory mechanisms underlying these effects. Twenty-two MCI patients (8 females; 60-80years) successfully completed six months of omega-3 FA intake, aerobic cycling training and cognitive stimulation (n=13) or omega-3 FA intake and non-aerobic stretching and toning (n=9). Before and after the interventions, cognitive performance, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain at 3T (n=20), intima-media thickness of the internal carotid artery and serum markers of glucose control, lipid and B-vitamin metabolism, and inflammation were assessed. Intervention-related changes in gray matter volume of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related brain regions, i.e., frontal, parietal, temporal and cingulate cortex were examined using voxel-based morphometry of high resolution T1-weighted images. After the intervention period, significant differences emerged in brain structure between groups: Gray matter volume decreased in the frontal, parietal and cingulate cortex of patients in the control intervention, while gray matter volume in these areas was preserved or even increased after the target intervention. Decreases in homocysteine levels in the target intervention group were associated with increases in gray matter volume in the middle frontal cortex (p=0.010). No significant differences in cognitive performance or

  5. Combined Insulin Deficiency and Endotoxin Exposure Stimulate Lipid Mobilization and Alter Adipose Tissue Signaling in an Experimental Model of Ketoacidosis in Subjects With Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Svart, Mads; Kampmann, Ulla; Voss, Thomas; Pedersen, Steen B; Johannsen, Mogens; Rittig, Nikolaj; Poulsen, Per L; Nielsen, Thomas S; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Most often, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in adults results from insufficient insulin administration and acute infection. DKA is assumed to release proinflammatory cytokines and stress hormones that stimulate lipolysis and ketogenesis. We tested whether this perception of DKA can be reproduced in an experimental human model by using combined insulin deficiency and acute inflammation and tested which intracellular mediators of lipolysis are affected in adipose tissue. Nine subjects with type 1 diabetes were studied twice: 1) insulin-controlled euglycemia and 2) insulin deprivation and endotoxin administration (KET). During KET, serum tumor necrosis factor-α, cortisol, glucagon, and growth hormone levels increased, and free fatty acids and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations and the rate of lipolysis rose markedly. Serum bicarbonate and pH decreased. Adipose tissue mRNA contents of comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) increased and G0/G1 switch 2 gene (G0S2) mRNA decreased robustly. Neither protein levels of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) nor phosphorylations of hormone-sensitive lipase were altered. The clinical picture of incipient DKA in adults can be reproduced by combined insulin deficiency and endotoxin-induced acute inflammation. The precipitating steps involve the release of proinflammatory cytokines and stress hormones, increased lipolysis, and decreased G0S2 and increased CGI-58 mRNA contents in adipose tissue, compatible with latent ATGL stimulation. PMID:26884439

  6. Early rehabilitation with weight-bearing standing-shaking-board exercise in combination with electrical muscle stimulation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kingo; Hayashi, Masamichi; Fujii, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Kenji; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of early rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to increase the muscle strength of the lower extremities. Closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise induces co-contraction of the agonist and antagonist muscles. The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative muscle strength/mass of subjects who performed our new CKC exercise (new rehabilitation group:group N) from week 4, and subjects who received traditional rehabilitation alone (traditional rehabilitation group:group T). The subjects stood on the device and maintained balance. Then, low-frequency stimulation waves were applied to 2 points each in the anterior and posterior region of the injured thigh 3 times a week for 3 months. Measurement of muscle strength was performed 4 times (before the start, and then once a month). Muscle mass was evaluated in CT images of the extensor and flexor muscles of 10 knees (10 subjects) in each group. The injured legs of group N showed significant improvement after one month compared to group T. The cross-sectional area of the extensor muscles of the injured legs tended to a show a greater increase at 3 months in group N. This rehabilitation method makes it possible to contract fast-twitch muscles, which may be a useful for improving extensor muscle strength after ACL reconstruction. PMID:22729103

  7. Feedback control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation

    PubMed Central

    Klauer, Christian; Schauer, Thomas; Reichenfelser, Werner; Karner, Jakob; Zwicker, Sven; Gandolla, Marta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Hack, Marco; Jedlitschka, Andreas; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Gföhler, Margit; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) to enable reaching functions in people with no residual voluntary control of the arm and shoulder due to high level spinal cord injury. NMES is applied to the deltoids and the biceps muscles and integrated with a three degrees of freedom (DoFs) passive exoskeleton, which partially compensates gravitational forces and allows to lock each DOF. The user is able to choose the target hand position and to trigger actions using an eyetracker system. The target position is selected by using the eyetracker and determined by a marker-based tracking system using Microsoft Kinect. A central controller, i.e., a finite state machine, issues a sequence of basic movement commands to the real-time arm controller. The NMES control algorithm sequentially controls each joint angle while locking the other DoFs. Daily activities, such as drinking, brushing hair, pushing an alarm button, etc., can be supported by the system. The robust and easily tunable control approach was evaluated with five healthy subjects during a drinking task. Subjects were asked to remain passive and to allow NMES to induce the movements. In all of them, the controller was able to perform the task, and a mean hand positioning error of less than five centimeters was achieved. The average total time duration for moving the hand from a rest position to a drinking cup, for moving the cup to the mouth and back, and for finally returning the arm to the rest position was 71 s. PMID:25228853

  8. Feedback control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation.

    PubMed

    Klauer, Christian; Schauer, Thomas; Reichenfelser, Werner; Karner, Jakob; Zwicker, Sven; Gandolla, Marta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Hack, Marco; Jedlitschka, Andreas; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Gföhler, Margit; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) to enable reaching functions in people with no residual voluntary control of the arm and shoulder due to high level spinal cord injury. NMES is applied to the deltoids and the biceps muscles and integrated with a three degrees of freedom (DoFs) passive exoskeleton, which partially compensates gravitational forces and allows to lock each DOF. The user is able to choose the target hand position and to trigger actions using an eyetracker system. The target position is selected by using the eyetracker and determined by a marker-based tracking system using Microsoft Kinect. A central controller, i.e., a finite state machine, issues a sequence of basic movement commands to the real-time arm controller. The NMES control algorithm sequentially controls each joint angle while locking the other DoFs. Daily activities, such as drinking, brushing hair, pushing an alarm button, etc., can be supported by the system. The robust and easily tunable control approach was evaluated with five healthy subjects during a drinking task. Subjects were asked to remain passive and to allow NMES to induce the movements. In all of them, the controller was able to perform the task, and a mean hand positioning error of less than five centimeters was achieved. The average total time duration for moving the hand from a rest position to a drinking cup, for moving the cup to the mouth and back, and for finally returning the arm to the rest position was 71 s. PMID:25228853

  9. Toxicity Assessment of a Phase III Study Evaluating FEC-Doc and FEC-Doc Combined with Gemcitabine as an Adjuvant Treatment for High-Risk Early Breast Cancer: the SUCCESS-A Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, L.; Rack, B.; Sommer, H.; Koch, J. G.; Weissenbacher, T.; Janni, W.; Schneeweiss, A.; Rezai, M.; Lorenz, R.; Jäger, B.; Schramm, A.; Häberle, L.; Fasching, P. A.; Friedl, T. W. P.; Beckmann, M. W.; Scholz, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper aims to evaluate the toxicity profile of additive gemcitabine to adjuvant taxane-based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients enrolled in this open-label randomized controlled Phase III study were treated with 3 cycles of epirubicin-fluorouracil-cyclophosphamide (FEC) chemotherapy followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel with those receiving 3 cycles of FEC followed by 3 cycles of gemcitabine-docetaxel (FEC-DG). 3690 patients were evaluated according to National Cancer Institute (NCI) toxicity criteria (CTCAE). The study medications were assessed by the occurrence of grade 3–4 adverse events, dose reductions, postponements of treatment cycles and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. Results: No differences in neutropenia or febrile neutropenia were demonstrated. However, thrombocytopenia was significantly increased with FEC-DG treatment (2.0 vs. 0.5 %, p < 0.001), as was leukopenia (64.1 vs. 58.5 %, p < 0.001). With FEC-DG significantly more G-CSF support in cycles 4 to 6 (FEC-DG: 57.8 %, FEC-D: 36.3 %, p < 0.001) was provided. Transaminase elevation was significantly more common with FEC-DG (SGPT: 6.3 %, SGOT: 2 %), whereas neuropathy (1.2 %), arthralgia (1.6 %) and bone pain (2.6 %) were more common using FEC-D. Dose reductions > 20 % (4 vs. 2.4 %) and postponement of treatment cycles (0.9 vs. 0.4 %) were significantly more frequent in the FEC-DG arm. Eight deaths occurred during treatment in the FEC-DG arm and four in the FEC-D arm. Conclusion: The addition of gemcitabine increased hematological toxicity and was associated with more dose reductions and postponements of treatment cycles. PMID:27239063

  10. Infant Stimulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on infant stimulation. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, educators and primary care personnel, academics and professionals, and for health administrators and family-planning organizations. The contents cover infant needs; infant…

  11. Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, increases the level of serum G-CSF and might be usable as an auxiliary means in G-CSF therapy.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Znojil, V; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Streitová, D

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoiesis-modulating action of meloxicam, a cyclooxyge-nase-2 inhibitor, has been evaluated in mice. Increased serum level of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after meloxicam administration has been found in sublethally gamma-irradiated animals. In further experiments hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of meloxicam and G-CSF given alone or in combination have been investigated. Granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells counts were used to monitor these effects. Meloxicam and exogenous G-CSF did not act synergistically when given in combination, but could be mutually substituted during their repeated administration. The results suggest a promising possibility of using meloxicam as an auxiliary drug reducing the high costs of G-CSF therapy of myelosuppression. PMID:17552878

  12. Ursolic acid and rosiglitazone combination improves insulin sensitivity by increasing the skeletal muscle insulin-stimulated IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Arjunan; Radhiga, Thangaiyan; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of ursolic acid (UA) and rosiglitazone (RSG) on insulin sensitivity and proximal insulin signaling pathways in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57/BL/6J mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either normal diet or HFD for 10 weeks, after which animals in each dietary group were divided into the following six groups (normal diet, normal diet plus UA and RSG, HFD alone, HFD plus UA, HFD plus RSG, and HFD plus UA and RSG) for the next 5 weeks. UA (5 mg/kg BW) and RSG (4 mg/kg BW) were administered as suspensions directly into the stomach using a gastric tube. The HFD diet elevated fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment index. The expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), Akt, and glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 were determined by Western blot analyses. The results demonstrated that combination treatment (UA/RSG) ameliorated HFD-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance by improving the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index. Further, combination treatment (UA/RSG) stimulated the IRS-1, PI3-kinase, Akt, and GLUT 4 translocation. These results strongly suggest that combination treatment (UA/RSG) activates IRS-PI3-kinase-Akt-dependent signaling pathways to induce GLUT 4 translocation and increases the expression of insulin receptor to improve glucose intolerance. PMID:27090933

  13. Hybrid use of combined and sequential delivery of growth factors and ultrasound stimulation in porous multilayer composite scaffolds to promote both vascularization and bone formation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoran; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Minghua; Luo, Guilin; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Taijun; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Keliang; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a multilayer coating technology would be adopted to prepare a porous composite scaffold and the growth factor release and ultrasound techniques were introduced into bone tissue engineering to finally solve the problems of vascularization and bone formation in the scaffold whilst the designed multilayer composite with gradient degradation characteristics in the space was used to match the new bone growth process better. The results of animal experiments showed that the use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with growth factors demonstrated excellent capabilities and advantages in both vascularization and new bone formation in bone tissue engineering. The degradation of the used scaffold materials could match new bone formation very well. The results also showed that only RGD-promoted cell adhesion was insufficient to satisfy the needs of new bone formation while growth factors and LIPUS stimulation were the key factors in new bone formation. PMID:26282063

  14. [Combined application of electric myo-stimulation and meso-therapy for the correction of age-related changes of the facial skin].

    PubMed

    Rozhanets, A R; Turova, E A; Kul'chitskaia, D B

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate effects of mesotherapy (MT) and electrostimulation (EMS) on age-related changes of the facial skin. The secondary objective was to identify factors influencing the therapeutic efficiency of these methods. The study included 60 women aged from 30 to 59 years. All the patients were examined prior to the onset and in the end (after one month) of the corrective treatment. Facial skin conditions were assessed using a Skin XP Pro system and skin microcirculation by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). The psychological status of the patients was evaluated with the help of the Well-being-Activity-Mood test. After the primary examination, the participants of the study were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 (n=30) included women treated by MT and EMS, the control group 2 (n=30) was comprised of the patients who did not receive the above treatment. The results of the study indicate that combine MT + EMS therapy significantly improves the state of facial skin, decreases its pigmentation, reduces the number and depth of wrinkles, enhances skin moisture, improves its elasticity and decreases porosity. Dynamics of these parameters and overall effect of correction were shown to correlate with the severity of skin changes before the treatment. Age-related changes in the facial skin were especially well-apparent in women with the lowered activity level and impaired mood. Characteristics of mood in the course of therapeutic correction correlated with dynamics of skin smoothness and elasticity. PMID:21086592

  15. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    noted with the intervention protocol. All subjects responded positively to the intervention and reported quality of life was improved for each subject. The results of this case series show promising outcomes for the combination of SE and DN in the treatment of chronic RTCT. Level of Evidence Level 4 PMID:27274427

  16. Oocyte and cumulus cell transcripts from cultured mouse follicles are induced to deviate from normal in vivo conditions by combinations of insulin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Flor; Romero, Sergio; Smitz, Johan

    2011-09-01

    Gonadotropins and insulin are major regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in cultured mouse ovarian follicles. Applications of variable doses of insulin in combination with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were studied at the gene expression level in oocytes and cumulus cells. Early preantral follicles grown over 9 days were sequentially exposed to combinations of doses of insulin, FSH, and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). From culture Day 1 to 6 (preantral stage), two insulin concentrations (5 ng/ml and 5 μg/ml) were combined with 10 mIU/ml FSH. From Days 6 to 9 (antral stage), the three variable gonadotropin treatments set under each insulin condition were 10 mIU/ml FSH, 25 mIU/ml FSH, and 25 mIU/ml FSH plus 3 mIU/ml hCG. The Gdf9, Bmp15, Fgf8, Dazl, Pou5f1, and Pik3ca mRNA transcripts were quantified in oocytes, and the Amh, Lhcgr, Hsd3b1, Vegfa, and Insig1 mRNA transcripts were quantified in cumulus cells. In vivo controls were unprimed and eCG (equine chorionic gonadotropin)-primed prepubertal female mice. During the preantral stage, none except the Amh transcripts was regulated by insulin. Oocyte transcripts were not affected by the variable gonadotropin treatments on the last culture day but were upregulated in the combination of high insulin plus 25 mIU/ml FSH. Under low insulin conditions, high FSH levels increased levels of Lhcgr and Vegfa expression, and hCG abated this effect. However, under high insulin conditions, hCG upregulated levels of Lhcgr, Vegfa, and Insig1 mRNA. High insulin concentrations upregulated Hsd3b1 transcripts. These results demonstrate that in an in vitro follicle culture, a near physiological insulin background yields oocyte and cumulus cell transcript levels that are more similar to those in vivo. PMID:21565993

  17. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  18. Utility of the clinical practice of administering thrombophilic screening and antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin to healthy donors treated with G-CSF for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Luise, Francesca; Oriana, Vincenzo; Console, Giuseppe; Moscato, Tiziana; Mammì, Corrado; Messina, Giuseppe; Massara, Elisabetta; Irrera, Giuseppe; Piromalli, Angela; Lombardo, Vincenzo Trapani; Laganà, Carmelo; Iacopino, Pasquale

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the utility of the clinical practice of administering thrombophilic screening and antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin to healthy donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells. Thrombophilia screening comprised of testing for factor V Leiden G1691A, prothrombin G20210A, the thermolabile variant (C677T) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene, protein C, protein S, factor VIII and homocysteine plasmatic levels, antithrombin III activity, and acquired activated protein C resistance. We investigated prospectively 72 white Italian healthy donors, 39 men and 33 women, with a median age of 42 years (range, 18-65). Five donors (6.9%) were heterozygous carriers of Factor V Leiden G1691A; two healthy donors had the heterozygous prothrombin G20210A gene mutation; C677T mutation in the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene was present in 34 (47.2%) donors in heterozygous and in 7 donors (9.7%) in homozygous. Acquired activated protein C resistance was revealed in 8 donors of the study (11.1%). The protein C plasmatic level was decreased in 3 donors (4.2%); the protein S level was decreased in 7 donors (9.7%). An elevated factor VIII dosage was shown in 10 donors (13.9%) and hyperhomocysteinemia in 9 donors (12.5%). Concentration of antithrombin III was in the normal range for all study group donors. The factor V Leiden mutation was combined with the heterozygous prothrombin G20210A in 2 cases and with protein S deficiency in one case; 2 healthy donors presented an associated deficiency of protein C and protein S. Although none of these healthy subjects had a previous history of thrombosis, low-molecular-weight heparin was administered to all donors during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to prevent thrombotic events. No donor experienced short or long-term thrombotic diseases after a median follow-up of 29.2 months. Our data do not

  19. Biochemical assays on plasminogen activators and hormones from kidney sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were established for the purpose of analyzing the conditioned media from human embryonic kidney cell subpopulations separated in space by electrophoresis. This data is based on the experiments performed on STS-8 on the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The primary biological activity that was analyzed was plasminogen activator activity, but some assays for erythropoeitin and human granulocyte colony stimulating activity were also performed. It is concluded that a battery of assays are required to completely define the plasminogen activator profile of a conditioned media from cell culture. Each type of assay measures different parts of the mixture and are influenced by different parameters. The functional role of each assay is given along with an indication of which combination of assays are required to answer specific questions. With this type of information it is possible by combinations of assays with mathematical analysis to pinpoint a specific component of the system.

  20. The IVF Outcome Counseling Based on the Model Combining DHEAS and Age in Patients with Low AMH Prior to the First Cycle of GnRH Antagonist Protocol of Ovarian Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Alebić, Miro Šimun; Žuvić-Butorac, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the endocrine and/or clinical characteristics of women with low anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) that could improve the accuracy of IVF outcome prediction based on the female age alone prior to the first GnRH antagonist IVF cycle. Methods. Medical records of 129 patients with low AMH level (<6.5 pmol/L) who underwent their first GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol for IVF/ICSI were retrospectively analyzed. The main outcome measure was the area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) for the models combining age and other potential predictive factors for the clinical pregnancy. Results. Clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) per initiated cycles was 11.6%. For the prediction of clinical pregnancy, DHEAS and age showed AUC-ROC of 0.726 (95%CI 0.641–0.801) and 0.662 (95%CI 0.573–0.743), respectively (P = 0.522). The predictive accuracy of the model combining age and DHEAS (AUC-ROC 0.796; 95%CI 0.716–0.862) was significantly higher compared to that of age alone (P = 0.013). In patients <37.5 years with DHEAS >5.7 pmol/L, 60% (9/15) of all pregnancies were achieved with CPR of 37.5%. Conclusions. DHEAS appears to be predictive for clinical pregnancy in younger women (<37.5 years) with low AMH after the first GnRH antagonist IVF cycle. Therefore, DHEAS-age model could refine the pretreatment counseling on pregnancy prospects following IVF. PMID:23509455

  1. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  2. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  3. New developments in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia: focus on balugrastim.

    PubMed

    Ghidini, Michele; Hahne, Jens Claus; Trevisani, Francesco; Panni, Stefano; Ratti, Margherita; Toppo, Laura; Tomasello, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia are two major complications of chemotherapy. Dose reductions, delays in treatment administration, and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors are equally recommended options to preserve absolute neutrophil count in case of chemotherapy regimens bringing a risk of febrile neutropenia of 20% or higher. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim and lenograstim, have a short elimination half-life (t1/2) and need to be used daily, while others, like pegfilgrastim and lipegfilgrastim, are characterized by a long t1/2 requiring only a single administration per cycle. Balugrastim is a novel long-acting recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor obtained by means of a genetic fusion between recombinant human serum albumin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Albumin binding increases the molecular weight and determines a high plasmatic stability leading to a t1/2 of ~19 days. Balugrastim's efficacy, safety, and tolerability have been assessed in four different clinical trials involving breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin and docetaxel. Pegfilgrastim was chosen as a comparator. Balugrastim was noninferior to pegfilgrastim with regard to the reduction of mean duration of severe neutropenia during cycle 1. Moreover, both treatments were comparable in terms of efficacy and safety profile. Balugrastim was well tolerated, with the only related adverse event being mild to moderate bone pain. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature data on balugrastim. PMID:27445479

  4. G-CSF Analogue Treatment Increases Peripheral Neutrophil Numbers in Pigs - a Potential Alternative for In-Feed Antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunomodulators is a promising area for therapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease during periods of peak disease incidence. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhances neutrophil production and release from the bone marrow and is already li...

  5. New developments in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia: focus on balugrastim

    PubMed Central

    Ghidini, Michele; Hahne, Jens Claus; Trevisani, Francesco; Panni, Stefano; Ratti, Margherita; Toppo, Laura; Tomasello, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia are two major complications of chemotherapy. Dose reductions, delays in treatment administration, and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors are equally recommended options to preserve absolute neutrophil count in case of chemotherapy regimens bringing a risk of febrile neutropenia of 20% or higher. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim and lenograstim, have a short elimination half-life (t1/2) and need to be used daily, while others, like pegfilgrastim and lipegfilgrastim, are characterized by a long t1/2 requiring only a single administration per cycle. Balugrastim is a novel long-acting recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor obtained by means of a genetic fusion between recombinant human serum albumin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Albumin binding increases the molecular weight and determines a high plasmatic stability leading to a t1/2 of ~19 days. Balugrastim’s efficacy, safety, and tolerability have been assessed in four different clinical trials involving breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin and docetaxel. Pegfilgrastim was chosen as a comparator. Balugrastim was noninferior to pegfilgrastim with regard to the reduction of mean duration of severe neutropenia during cycle 1. Moreover, both treatments were comparable in terms of efficacy and safety profile. Balugrastim was well tolerated, with the only related adverse event being mild to moderate bone pain. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature data on balugrastim. PMID:27445479

  6. NAMPT is essential for the G-CSF-induced myeloid differentiation via a NAD+-sirtuin-1-dependent pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also known as pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF), as an essential enzyme mediating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-triggered granulopoiesis in healthy individuals and in individuals with severe congenital neutropenia....

  7. Refractory Bacillus cereus infection in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, R; Patole, S K; Koh, T H; Norton, R; Whitehall, J S

    2000-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic spore-forming rod, which usually causes food poisoning. Its recognition as a pathogen in neonates has increased over the past two decades. The clinical course of a neonate (gestation 24 weeks) with B. cereus infection refractory to therapy is described. Death occurred after withdrawal of support following persistently positive blood and bone marrow cultures despite therapy with vancomycin, gentamicin, imipenum, clindamycin, ciprofloxacillin, immunoglobulin and granulocyte colony stimulating factor over a period of 49 days. No obvious focus of sepsis was identified. Contamination from the environment into the hospital and clinics occurs because of the ubiquitous presence of B. cereus. Combination therapy with vancomycin and gentamycin is appropriate for meningitis/severe systemic infections related to most bacillus species. The significance of repeated isolation of B. cereus in neonates with compromised host defences is emphasised. PMID:10954966

  8. Treatment of periodontitis as a manifestation of neutropenia with or without systemic antibiotics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Julia C; Walter, Clemens; Rischewski, Johannes R; Weiger, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this paper were to systematically review the clinical presentations and management of periodontitis patients with neutropenia and present a patient with severe autoimmune neutropenia. Twenty-four case reports describing a total of 33 patients were identified. The reported signs and symptoms occurred in either a generalized or localized pattern. Improvements in periodontal condition were observed in 86% of patients who were administered adjuvant systemic antibiotics compared to 47% of patients who were not given supplemental therapy. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor was administered to 67% of the neutropenic patients, and both improvement and progression of the hematological condition were monitored. Scaling and root planing, in combination with systemic antibiotics to supplement therapy for the underlying disease, have been successful in most cases. PMID:23635971

  9. Effects of acute feed restriction combined with targeted use of increasing luteinizing hormone content of follicle-stimulating hormone preparations on ovarian superstimulation, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bender, R W; Hackbart, K S; Dresch, A R; Carvalho, P D; Vieira, L M; Crump, P M; Guenther, J N; Fricke, P M; Shaver, R D; Combs, D K; Wiltbank, M C

    2014-02-01

    Multiple metabolic and hormonal factors can affect the success of protocols for ovarian superstimulation. In this study, the effect of acute feed restriction and increased LH content in the superstimulatory FSH preparation on numbers of ovulations, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows was evaluated. Two experiments were performed using a Latin square design with treatments arranged as a 2 × 2 factorial: feed restriction (FR; 25% reduction in dry matter intake) compared with ad libitum (AL) feeding, combined with high (H) versus low (L) LH in the last 4 injections of the superstimulatory protocol. As expected, FR decreased circulating insulin concentrations (26.7 vs. 46.0 μU/mL). Two analyses were performed: one that evaluated the complete Latin square in experiment 2 and a second that evaluated only the first periods of experiments 1 and 2. For both analyses, follicle numbers, ovulation rates, and corpora lutea on d 7 were not different. In the first period analysis of experiments 1 and 2, we observed an interaction between feed allowance and amount of LH on fertilization rates, percentage of embryos or oocytes that were quality 1 and 2 embryos, and number of embryos or oocytes that were degenerate. Fertilization rates were greater for the AL-L (89.4%) and FR-H (80.1%) treatments compared with the AL-H (47.9%) and FR-L (59.9%) treatments. Similarly, the proportion of total embryos or oocytes designated as quality 1 and 2 embryos was greater for AL-L (76.7%) and FR-H (73.4%) treatments compared with AL-H (35.6%) and FR-L (47.3%) treatments. In addition, the number of degenerate embryos was decreased for AL-L (1.3) and FR-H (0.4) treatments compared with the AL-H (2.6) and FR-L (2.3) treatments. Thus, cows with either too low (FR-L) or too high (AL-H) insulin and LH stimulation had lesser embryo production after superstimulation because of reduced fertilization rate and increased percentage of degenerate embryos. Therefore, interaction of the

  10. Murine Anti-GD2 Monoclonal Antibody 3F8 Combined With Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and 13-Cis-Retinoic Acid in High-Risk Patients With Stage 4 Neuroblastoma in First Remission

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Cheung, Irene Y.; Kushner, Brian H.; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Chamberlain, Elizabeth; Kramer, Kim; Modak, Shakeel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) combined with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown efficacy against neuroblastoma (NB). Prognostic variables that could influence clinical outcome were explored. Patients and Methods One hundred sixty-nine children diagnosed with stage 4 NB (1988 to 2008) were enrolled onto consecutive anti-GD2 murine MoAb 3F8 ± GM-CSF ± 13-cis-retinoic acid (CRA) protocols after achieving first remission (complete remission/very good partial remission). Patients enrolled in regimen A (n = 43 high-risk [HR] patients) received 3F8 alone; regimen B (n = 41 HR patients), 3F8 + intravenous GM-CSF + CRA, after stem-cell transplantation (SCT); and regimen C (n = 85), 3F8 + subcutaneous GM-CSF + CRA, 46 of 85 after SCT, whereas 28 of 85 required additional induction therapy and were deemed ultra high risk (UHR). Marrow minimal residual disease (MRD) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Survival probability was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and prognostic variables were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression model. Results At 5 years from the start of immunotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS) improved from 44% for HR patients receiving regimen A to 56% and 62% for those receiving regimens B and C, respectively. Overall survival (OS) was 49%, 61%, and 81%, respectively. PFS and OS of UHR patients were 36% and 75%, respectively. Relapse was mostly at isolated sites. Independent adverse prognostic factors included UHR (PFS) and post–cycle two MRD (PFS and OS), whereas the prognostic factors for improved outcome were missing killer immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand (PFS and OS), human antimouse antibody response (OS), and regimen C (OS). Conclusion Retrospective analysis of consecutive trials from a single center demonstrated that MoAb 3F8 + GM-CSF + CRA is effective against chemotherapy-resistant marrow MRD. Its positive impact on long-term survival can only

  11. Paclitaxel and carboplatin in early phase studies: Roswell Park Cancer Institute experience in the subset of patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Creaven, P J; Raghavan, D; Pendyala, L; Loewen, G; Kindler, H L; Berghorn, E J

    1997-08-01

    The combination of paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) given by 3-hour infusion followed by carboplatin infused over 30 minutes has been evaluated in a series of phase I studies and is currently being explored in a phase II study in patients with limited- and extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Pharmacokinetic measurements were performed at all dose levels in the phase I studies, in which the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in previously treated patients enabled more than twice the dose of paclitaxel to be given with low to moderate doses of carboplatin (dosed to a target area under the concentration-time curve of 4.0 mg x min x mL[-1]). Treatment-naive patients tolerated high paclitaxel doses (270 mg/m2) with carboplatin (dosed to a target area under the curve of 4.5 mg x min x mL[-1]) without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support. Twenty-three patients (including previously treated and untreated) with non-small cell lung cancer were entered at a variety of paclitaxel doses in the phase I studies. At 100 to 205 mg/m2 paclitaxel, none of nine treated patients responded; at 230 to 290 mg/m2, four (29%) of 14 responded. In the phase II study of paclitaxel 250 mg/m2 in previously untreated patients with small cell lung cancer, two of five evaluable patients with extensive-stage disease have shown a partial response. In a preliminary analysis of the pharmacodynamics of paclitaxel in relation to neurotoxicity (dose limiting in two of three phase I studies), neurotoxicity correlated with the total dose of paclitaxel, the area under the curve, and the peak paclitaxel concentration, but not with the length of time plasma paclitaxel levels remained above 0.05 micromol/L. These correlations were not strong, however, and analysis of these data is ongoing. PMID:9331139

  12. Laser stimulation for pain research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stuart; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.; Jones, Anthony; Chen, Andrew; Derbyshire, Stuart; Townsend, D. W.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Mintun, M. A.; Nichols, T.

    1996-01-01

    Pain is a serious medical problem; it inflicts huge economic loss and personal suffering. Pain signals are conducted via small, non- and partially myelinated A-delta and C nerve fibers and lasers are particularly well suited to stimulating these fibers. Large myelinated fibers convey touch and vibration information and these fibers are also discharged when contact thermodes and other touch pain stimuli are used and this would give a more muddled signal for functional imaging experiments. The advantages of lasers over conventional methods of pain stimulation are good temporal resolution, no variable parameters are involved such as contact area and they give very reproducible results. Accurate inter-stimulus changes can be achieved by computer control of the laser pulse duration, pulse height and repetition rate and this flexibility enables complex stimulation paradigms to be realized. We present a flexible carbon dioxide laser system designed to generate these stimuli for the study of human cerebral pain responses. We discuss the advantages within research of this system over other methods of pain stimulation such as thermal, electrical and magnetic. The stimulator is used in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and electrophysiological methods of imaging the brain's activity. This combination is a powerful tool for the study of pain-induced activity in different areas of the brain. An accurate understanding of the brain's response to pain will help in research into the areas of rheumatoid arthritis and chronic back pain.

  13. Optical Stimulation of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to interface with the nervous system remains overwhelmingly reliant on electrical stimulation devices, such as electrode arrays and cuff electrodes that can stimulate both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, electrical stimulation has to deal with multiple challenges, including selectivity, spatial resolution, mechanical stability, implant-induced injury and the subsequent inflammatory response. Optical stimulation techniques may avoid some of these challenges by providing more selective stimulation, higher spatial resolution and reduced invasiveness of the device, while also avoiding the electrical artefacts that complicate recordings of electrically stimulated neuronal activity. This review explores the current status of optical stimulation techniques, including optogenetic methods, photoactive molecule approaches and infrared neural stimulation, together with emerging techniques such as hybrid optical-electrical stimulation, nanoparticle enhanced stimulation and optoelectric methods. Infrared neural stimulation is particularly emphasised, due to the potential for direct activation of neural tissue by infrared light, as opposed to techniques that rely on the introduction of exogenous light responsive materials. However, infrared neural stimulation remains imperfectly understood, and techniques for accurately delivering light are still under development. While the various techniques reviewed here confirm the overall feasibility of optical stimulation, a number of challenges remain to be overcome before they can deliver their full potential. PMID:26322269

  14. Development of a tactile stimulator with simultaneous visual and auditory stimulation using E-Prime software.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Sik; Yeon, Hong-Won; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Hye; Choi, Jin-Seung; Park, Jang-Yeon; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Yi, Jeong-Han; Tack, Gye-Rae; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a tactile stimulator was developed, which can stimulate visual and auditory senses simultaneously by using the E-Prime software. This study tried to compensate for systematic stimulation control and other problems that occurred with previously developed tactile stimulators. The newly developed system consists of three units: a control unit, a drive unit and a vibrator. Since the developed system is a small, lightweight, simple structure with low electrical consumption, a maximum of 35 stimulation channels and various visual and auditory stimulation combinations without delay time, the previous systematic problem is corrected in this study. The system was designed to stimulate any part of the body including the fingers. Since the developed tactile stimulator used E-Prime software, which is widely used in the study of visual and auditory senses, the stimulator is expected to be highly practical due to a diverse combination of stimuli, such as tactile-visual, tactile-auditory, visual-auditory and tactile-visual-auditory stimulation. PMID:22149159

  15. ACTH (cosyntropin) stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The ACTH stimulation test measures how well the adrenal glands respond to adrenocorticotropic hormone ( ACTH ). ACTH is a ... produced in the pituitary gland that stimulates the adrenal glands to release a hormone called cortisol. How the ...

  16. EOR by stimulated microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Svarovskaya, L.I.; Altunina, L.K.; Rozhenkova, Z.A.; Bulavin, V.D.

    1995-12-31

    A combined microbiological and physico-chemical method for EOR has been developed for flooded West Siberia oil fields with formation temperature of 45{degrees}-95{degrees}C (318-365K). Formation water includes rich and various biocenoses numbering up to 2 x 10{sup 7} cells per ml. Representatives of genera, i.e, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Sarcina, etc. were found to be the most widely distributed microorganisms. The method is based on injection of systems exhibiting high oil displacing capacity and at the same time being an additional nitrous nutrient for endemic populations of microorganisms. Their injection into formation water favors biomass growth by 4-6 orders and promotes syntheses of biosurfactants, biopolymers, acids, etc., and gaseous products. The features of residual oil displacement have been studied on laboratory models using a combined microbiological and physico-chemical method. A curve for the yield of residual oil is presented by two peaks. The first peak is stipulated by the washing action of oil displacement system, and the second one by the effect of metabolites produced at stimulation of biogenic processes. Oil displacement index increases by 15%-30%.

  17. Optical stimulation of peripheral nerves in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon D.

    This dissertation documents the emergence and validation of a new clinical tool that bridges the fields of biomedical optics and neuroscience. The research herein describes an innovative method for direct neurostimulation with pulsed infrared laser light. Safety and effectiveness of this technique are first demonstrated through functional stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve in vivo. The Holmium:YAG laser (lambda = 2.12 mum) is shown to operate at an optimal wavelength for peripheral nerve stimulation with advantages over standard electrical neural stimulation; including contact-free stimulation, high spatial selectivity, and lack of a stimulation artifact. The underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for transient optical nerve stimulation appears to be a small, absorption driven thermal gradient sustained at the axonal layer of nerve. Results explicitly prove that low frequency optical stimulation can reliably stimulate without resulting in tissue thermal damage. Based on the positive results from animal studies, these optimal laser parameters were utilized to move this research into the clinic with a combined safety and efficacy study in human subjects undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy. The clinical Holmium:YAG laser was used to effectively stimulate human dorsal spinal roots and elicit functional muscle responses recorded during surgery without evidence of nerve damage. Overall these results predict that this technology can be a valuable clinical tool in various neurosurgical applications.

  18. Advances in functional electrical stimulation (FES).

    PubMed

    Popović, Dejan B

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the advancements that are needed to enhance the effects of electrical stimulation for restoring or assisting movement in humans with an injury/disease of the central nervous system. A complex model of the effects of electrical stimulation of peripheral systems is presented. The model indicates that both the motor and sensory systems are activated by electrical stimulation. We propose that a hierarchical hybrid controller may be suitable for functional electrical stimulation (FES) because this type of controller acts as a structural mimetic of its biological counterpart. Specific attention is given to the neural systems at the periphery with respect to the required electrodes and stimulators. Furthermore, we note that FES with surface electrodes is preferred for the therapy, although there is a definite advantage associated with implantable technology for life-long use. The last section of the review discusses the potential need to combine FES and robotic systems to provide assistance in some cases. PMID:25287528

  19. Multisensory Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Barbro Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post-stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation. It is proposed that we should pay more attention to age, gender, and laterality in clinical studies. PMID:22509159

  20. Stimulant Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Park, Taryn M; Haning, William F

    2016-07-01

    Compared with other illicit substances, stimulants are not commonly used by adolescents; however, they represent a serious concern regarding substance use among youths. This article uses methamphetamine as a model for stimulant use in adolescents; cocaine and prescription stimulants are also mentioned. Methamphetamine use among adolescents and young adults is a serious health concern with potentially long-term physical, cognitive, and psychiatric consequences. Brain development and the effects of misusing stimulants align such that usage in adolescents can more dangerous than during adulthood. It seems helpful to keep in mind the differences between adolescents and young adults when implementing interventions. PMID:27338967

  1. Bimodal stimulation: benefits for music perception and sound quality.

    PubMed

    Sucher, Catherine M; McDermott, Hugh J

    2009-01-01

    With recent expansions in cochlear implantation candidacy criteria, increasing numbers of implantees can exploit their remaining hearing by using bimodal stimulation (combining electrical stimulation via the implant with acoustic stimulation via hearing aids). This study examined the effect of bimodal stimulation on music perception and perceived sound quality. The perception of music and sound quality by nine post-lingually deafened adult implantees was examined in three conditions: implant alone, hearing aid alone and bimodal stimulation. On average, bimodal stimulation provided the best results for music perception and perceived sound quality when compared with results obtained with electrical stimulation alone. Thus, for implantees with usable acoustic hearing, bimodal stimulation may be advantageous when listening to music and other non-speech sounds. PMID:19230032

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of egg white combined with chalcanthite in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglia through the inhibition of NF-κB, MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun A; Park, Hye Young; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Egg white-chalcanthite (EWCC) is a mixture of egg white and chalcanthite prepared by roasting chalcanthite (which is a natural mineral mainly composed of CuSO4•5H2O) to the point of dehydration, pulverizing the dehydrated chalcanthite and then mixing the pulverized chalcanthite to react with egg white to trigger a reaction. When egg white-chalcanthite is prepared in this manner, the toxicity of chalcanthite is neutralized by the egg white, so that the toxicity is reduced or removed and the pharmaceutical properties are increased. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pharmacological activity of EWCC remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EWCC on the production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory mediators in BV2 microglia. Our data indicated that the EWCC treatment significantly inhibited the excessive production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia in a concentration-dependent manner without causing cytotoxicity. It also attenuated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, EWCC exhibited anti-inflammatory properties by the suppression of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) activation by blocking IκB-α degradation, downregulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Our results indicate that the inhibitory effects of EWCC on LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediator production in BV2 microglia are associated with the suppression of the NF-κB, MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These findings suggest that EWCC may offer a substantial therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that are accompanied by microglial activation. PMID:23128312

  3. Ring-shaped backward stimulated Raman scattering driven by stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chengyong; Diels, Jean-Claude; Xu, Xiaozhen; Arissian, Ladan

    2015-06-29

    Backward stimulated Raman scattering is generated in water, pumped by pre-compressed pulses from a single-cell stimulated Brillouin scattering pulse compressor. The maximum energy efficiency of 9% is achieved by employing a circularly-polarized pump pulse at its energy of 50 mJ, around which point the backward stimulated Raman scattering also exhibits a ring-shaped profile. The correlations between spatial and temporal profiles as well as the intensities of the backward stimulated Raman and the stimulated Brillouin scattering generated from Raman cell indicate that the ring-shaped backward stimulated Raman is driven by intense stimulated Brillouin scattering. We demonstrate the latter process to be much more efficient for the backward Raman generation than the conventional process in which the laser itself pumps a backward stimulated Raman beam. It is shown that a further increase in pump energy leads to a drop in efficiency, combined with a break-up of the ring pattern of backward stimulated Raman. These effects are associated with filament generation above a certain threshold. PMID:26191712

  4. New insights into the functional significance of the frontal aslant tract: an anatomo-functional study using intraoperative electrical stimulations combined with diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tracking.

    PubMed

    Vassal, François; Boutet, Claire; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Nuti, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    We used the method of direct electrostimulation combined with navigated tractography to map the frontal "aslant" tract, enabling us to perform reliable anatomo-functional correlation in a patient undergoing awake surgery to remove a left frontal glioma. The findings enhanced our understanding of the organization of language within the human brain. PMID:24552256

  5. Stimulants for the Control of Hedonic Appetite

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Alison S.; Hibbert, Emily J.; Champion, Bernard L.; Nanan, Ralph K. H.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is treatment of obesity in relation to the management of hedonic appetite. Obesity is a complex condition which may be potentiated by excessive reward seeking in combination with executive functioning deficits that impair cognitive control of behavior. Stimulant medications address both reward deficiency and enhance motivation, as well as suppressing appetite. They have long been recognized to be effective for treating obesity. However, stimulants can be abused for their euphoric effect. They induce euphoria via the same neural pathway that underlies their therapeutic effect in obesity. For this reason they have generally not been endorsed for use in obesity. Among the stimulants, only phentermine (either alone or in combination with topiramate) and bupropion (which has stimulant-like properties and is used in combination with naltrexone), are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for obesity, although dexamphetamine and methylpenidate are approved and widely used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. Experience gained over many years in the treatment of ADHD demonstrates that with careful dose titration, stimulants can be used safely. In obesity, improvement in mood and executive functioning could assist with the lifestyle changes necessary for weight control, acting synergistically with appetite suppression. The obesity crisis has reached the stage that strong consideration should be given to adequate utilization of this effective and inexpensive class of drug. PMID:27199749

  6. Stimulants for the Control of Hedonic Appetite.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Alison S; Hibbert, Emily J; Champion, Bernard L; Nanan, Ralph K H

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is treatment of obesity in relation to the management of hedonic appetite. Obesity is a complex condition which may be potentiated by excessive reward seeking in combination with executive functioning deficits that impair cognitive control of behavior. Stimulant medications address both reward deficiency and enhance motivation, as well as suppressing appetite. They have long been recognized to be effective for treating obesity. However, stimulants can be abused for their euphoric effect. They induce euphoria via the same neural pathway that underlies their therapeutic effect in obesity. For this reason they have generally not been endorsed for use in obesity. Among the stimulants, only phentermine (either alone or in combination with topiramate) and bupropion (which has stimulant-like properties and is used in combination with naltrexone), are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for obesity, although dexamphetamine and methylpenidate are approved and widely used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. Experience gained over many years in the treatment of ADHD demonstrates that with careful dose titration, stimulants can be used safely. In obesity, improvement in mood and executive functioning could assist with the lifestyle changes necessary for weight control, acting synergistically with appetite suppression. The obesity crisis has reached the stage that strong consideration should be given to adequate utilization of this effective and inexpensive class of drug. PMID:27199749

  7. Music acupuncture stimulation method.

    PubMed

    Brătilă, F; Moldovan, C

    2007-01-01

    Harmonic Medicine is the model using the theory that the body rhythms synchronize to an outer rhythm applied for therapeutic purpose, can restores the energy balance in acupuncture channels and organs and the condition of well-being. The purpose of this scientific work was to demonstrate the role played by harmonic sounds in the stimulation of the Lung (LU) Meridian (Shoutaiyin Feijing) and of the Kidney (KI) Meridian (Zushaoyin Shenjing). It was used an original method that included: measurement and electronic sound stimulation of the Meridian Entry Point, measurement of Meridian Exit Point, computer data processing, bio feed-back adjustment of the music stimulation parameters. After data processing, it was found that the sound stimulation of the Lung Meridian Frequency is optimal between 122 Hz and 128 Hz, with an average of 124 Hz (87% of the subjects) and for Kidney Meridian from 118 Hz to 121 Hz, with an average of 120 Hz (67% of the subjects). The acupuncture stimulation was more intense for female subjects (> 7%) than for the male ones. We preliminarily consider that an informational resonance phenomenon can be developed between the acupuncture music stimulation frequency and the cellular dipole frequency, being a really "resonant frequency signature" of an acupoint. The harmonic generation and the electronic excitation or low-excitation status of an acupuncture point may be considered as a resonance mechanism. By this kind of acupunctural stimulation, a symphony may act and play a healer role. PMID:18767418

  8. Deep brain stimulation: new directions.

    PubMed

    Ostergard, T; Miller, J P

    2014-12-01

    The role of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of movement disorders is well established, but there has recently been a proliferation of additional indications that have been shown to be amenable to this technology. The combination of innovative approaches to neural interface technology with novel target identification based on previously discovered clinical effects of lesioning procedures has led to a fundamental paradigm for new directions in the application of DBS. The historical use of neurosurgical lesioning procedures in the treatment of psychiatric diseases such as obsessive compulsive disorder provided an initial opportunity to expand the use of DBS. The list is rapidly expanding and now includes major depressive disorder, Tourette's syndrome, addiction disorders, and eating disorders. Keen observations by neurosurgeons using these devices have lead to the incidental discovery of treatments for diseases without previous neurosurgical treatments. These discoveries are breaking new ground in the treatment of disorders of cognition, headache syndromes, disorders of consciousness, and epilepsy. Two features of DBS make it well-suited for treatment of disorders of nervous system function. First, the reversible, non-lesional nature of DBS allows for investigation of new targets without the morbidity of permanent side effects. Second, the programmable nature of DBS allows practitioners to alter stimulation patterns to minimize side effects and potentially improve efficacy through reprogramming. More importantly, proper scientific evaluation of new targets is aided by the ability to turn stimulation on and off with evaluators blinded to the stimulation status. Knowledge of these emerging therapies is important for practitioners, as there are many situations where a single target can effectively treat the symptoms of more than one disease. The intersection of advances in neuromodulation, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and functional neuroanatomy has

  9. Stimulating Children to Write.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roy

    1985-01-01

    Special education students can be stimulated to write through a variety of activities, including representation, publicity and display tasks, activities featuring photographs, use of music and poetry, and projects in which students finish stories and describe novel materials. (CL)

  10. Deep brain stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain The neurostimulator, which puts out the electric current. The stimulator is similar to a heart pacemaker . It is usually placed under the skin near the collarbone, but may be ... pulses travel from the neurostimulator, along the extension ...

  11. Spinal cord stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a mild electric current to block nerve impulses ... stretched into the space on top of your spinal cord. These wires will be connected to a small ...

  12. Growth hormone stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of the body to produce GH. ... killing medicine (antiseptic). The first sample is drawn early in the morning. Medicine is given through the ...

  13. 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol Promotes Recovery of Immature Hematopoietic Cells Following Myelosuppressive Radiation and Synergizes With Thrombopoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts-Kaya, Fatima S.F.; Visser, Trudi P.; Arshad, Shazia; Frincke, James; Stickney, Dwight R.; Reading, Chris L.; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol (5-AED) stimulates recovery of hematopoiesis after exposure to radiation. To elucidate its cellular targets, the effects of 5-AED alone and in combination with (pegylated) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and thrombopoietin (TPO) on immature hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated following total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were exposed to radiation delivered as a single or as a fractionated dose, and recovery of bone marrow progenitors and peripheral blood parameters was assessed. Results: BALB/c mice treated with 5-AED displayed accelerated multilineage blood cell recovery and elevated bone marrow (BM) cellularity and numbers of progenitor cells. The spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) assay, representing the life-saving short-term repopulating cells in BM of irradiated donor mice revealed that combined treatment with 5-AED plus TPO resulted in a 20.1-fold increase in CFU-S relative to that of placebo controls, and a 3.7 and 3.1-fold increase in comparison to 5-AED and TPO, whereas no effect was seen of Peg-G-CSF with or without 5-AED. Contrary to TPO, 5-AED also stimulated reconstitution of the more immature marrow repopulating (MRA) cells. Conclusions: 5-AED potently counteracts the hematopoietic effects of radiation-induced myelosuppression and promotes multilineage reconstitution by stimulating immature bone marrow cells in a pattern distinct from, but synergistic with TPO.

  14. Combination pharmacotherapy for adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lenard A; Reingold, Lisa S; Morrill, Melinda S; Wilens, Timothy E

    2006-10-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders of adulthood. Although clinical guidelines recommend monotherapy with stimulants or atomoxetine, combination pharmacotherapy is a common practice among clinicians. There are four main situations in which combination medications may be necessary: partial response, dose-limiting side effects, associated disorders, and comorbid diagnoses. We present data from two chart reviews that support existing research on combination pharmacotherapy. Adjunct treatment of d-methylphenidate to stimulant medications extended the duration of therapeutic effect. Adjunct treatment of mirtazapine to stimulant medications reduced associated insomnia. These data support previous research that validates the use of combination pharmacotherapy for adults with ADHD. PMID:16968624

  15. RasGRP1 Transgenic Mice Develop Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Response to Skin Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Federico R.; Garrido, Ann A.; Sharma, Amrish; Luke, Courtney T.; Stone, James C.; Dower, Nancy A.; Cline, J. Mark; Lorenzo, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Models of epidermal carcinogenesis have demonstrated that Ras is a critical molecule involved in tumor initiation and progression. Previously, we have shown that RasGRP1 increases the susceptibility of mice to skin tumorigenesis when overexpressed in the epidermis by a transgenic approach, related to its ability to activate Ras. Moreover, RasGRP1 transgenic mice develop spontaneous papillomas and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, some of which appear to originate in sites of injury, suggesting that RasGRP1 may be responding to signals generated during the wound-healing process. In this study, we examined the response of the RasGRP1 transgenic animals to full-thickness incision wounding of the skin, and demonstrated that they respond by developing tumors along the wounded site. The tumors did not present mutations in the H-ras gene, but Rasgrp1 transgene dosage correlated with tumor susceptibility and size. Analysis of serum cytokines showed increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in transgenic animals after wounding. Furthermore, in vitro experiments with primary keratinocytes showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulated Ras activation, although RasGRP1 was dispensable for this effect. Since granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has been recently associated with proliferation of skin cancer cells, our results may help in the elucidation of pathways that activate Ras in the epidermis during tumorigenesis in the absence of oncogenic ras mutations. PMID:19497993

  16. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) has been tested from the point of view of potentiating the effects of hematopoietic growth factors interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in suspension of normal mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. IB-MECA alone induced no GM-CFC growth. Significant elevation of numbers of GM-CFC evoked by the combinations of IB-MECA with IL-3, SCF, or GM-CSF as compared with these growth factors alone has been noted. Combination of IB-MECA with G-CSF did not induce significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with G-CSF alone. Joint action of three drugs, namely of IB-MECA + IL-3 + GM-CSF, produced significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with the combinations of IB-MECA + IL-3, IB-MECA + GM-CSF, or IL-3 + GM-CSF. These results give evidence of a significant role of selective activation of adenosine A(3) receptors in stimulation of the growth of granulocyte/ macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:18380545

  17. Graphene electrodes for stimulation of neuronal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerbitzer, Berit; Krauss, Peter; Nick, Christoph; Yadav, Sandeep; Schneider, Joerg J.; Thielemann, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Graphene has the ability to improve the electrical interface between neuronal cells and electrodes used for recording and stimulation purposes. It provides a biocompatible coating for common electrode materials such as gold and improves the electrode properties. Graphene electrodes are also prepared on SiO2 substrate to benefit from its optical properties like transparency. We perform electrochemical and Raman characterization of gold electrodes with graphene coating and compare them with graphene on SiO2 substrate. It was found that the substrate plays an important role in the performance of graphene and show that graphene on SiO2 substrate is a very promising material combination for stimulation electrodes.

  18. Non-invasive neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions: an educational review.

    PubMed

    Schuhfried, Othmar; Crevenna, Richard; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this educational review is to provide an overview of the clinical application of transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the extremities in patients with upper motor neurone lesions. In general two methods of electrical stimulation can be distinguished: (i) therapeutic electrical stimulation, and (ii) functional electrical stimulation. Therapeutic electrical stimulation improves neuromuscular functional condition by strengthening muscles, increasing motor control, reducing spasticity, decreasing pain and increasing range of motion. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation may be used for neuromuscular electrical stimulation inducing repetitive muscle contraction, electromyography-triggered neuromuscular electrical stimulation, position-triggered electrical stimulation and subsensory or sensory transcutaneous electric stimulation. Functional electrical stimulation provokes muscle contraction and thereby produces a functionally useful movement during stimulation. In patients with spinal cord injuries or stroke, electrical upper limb neuroprostheses are applied to enhance upper limb and hand function, and electrical lower limb neuroprostheses are applied for restoration of standing and walking. For example, a dropped foot stimulator is used to trigger ankle dorsiflexion to restore gait function. A review of the literature and clinical experience of the use of therapeutic electrical stimulation as well as of functional electrical stimulation in combination with botulinum toxin, exercise therapy and/or splinting are presented. Although the evidence is limited we conclude that neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions can be an effective modality to improve function, and that combination with other treatments has an additive therapeutic effect. PMID:22334346

  19. Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has provided remarkable benefits for people with a variety of neurologic conditions. Stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus can dramatically relieve tremor associated with essential tremor or Parkinson disease (PD). Similarly, stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or the internal segment of the globus pallidus can substantially reduce bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and gait difficulties in people with PD. Multiple groups are attempting to extend this mode of treatment to other conditions. Yet, the precise mechanism of action of DBS remains uncertain. Such studies have importance that extends beyond clinical therapeutics. Investigations of the mechanisms of action of DBS have the potential to clarify fundamental issues such as the functional anatomy of selected brain circuits and the relationship between activity in those circuits and behavior. Although we review relevant clinical issues, we emphasize the importance of current and future investigations on these topics. PMID:16776585

  20. Brain stimulation and inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Juan, Chi-Hung; Muggleton, Neil G

    2012-04-01

    Inhibitory control mechanisms are important in a range of behaviours to prevent execution of motor acts which, having been planned, are no longer necessary or appropriate. Examples of this can be seen in a range of sports, such as cricket and baseball, where the choice between execution and inhibition of a bat swing must be made in a very brief time window. Deficits in inhibitory control have been associated with problems in behavioural regulation in impulsive violence as well as a range of clinical disorders. The roles of various areas, including the frontal eye fields (FEF), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the inferior frontal gyrus, in inhibitory control have been investigated using an inhibitory control task and both transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Typically effects on response inhibition but no effects on response generation have been seen. The contributions of these areas to performance seem to differ with, for example, pre-SMA being involved when the task is relatively novel whereas this is not the case for FEF. The findings from brain stimulation studies offer both insight into which areas are necessary for effective inhibitory control and recent extension of findings for the role of the inferior frontal gyrus illustrate how the specific functions by which these areas contribute may be further clarified. Future work, including making use of the temporal specificity of TMS and combination of TMS/tDCS with other neuroimaging techniques, may further clarify the nature and functions played by the network of areas involved in inhibitory control. PMID:22494830

  1. New York Canyon Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Raemy, Bernard

    2012-06-21

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "No Go" decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  2. Muscle Stimulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Goddard Space Flight Center contract, Electrologic of America was able to refine the process of densely packing circuitry on personal computer boards, providing significant contributions to the closed-loop systems for the Remote Manipulator System Simulator. The microcircuitry work was then applied to the StimMaster FES Ergometer, an exercise device used to stimulate muscles suffering from paralysis. The electrical stimulation equipment was developed exclusively for V-Care Health Systems, Inc. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  3. Neural stimulation with optical radiation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Wells, Jonathon D.; Jansen, E. Duco; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the existing research on infrared neural stimulation, a means of artificially stimulating neurons that has been proposed as an alternative to electrical stimulation. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is defined as the direct induction of an evoked potential in response to a transient targeted deposition of optical energy. The foremost advantage of using optical radiation for neural stimulation is its spatial resolution. Exogenously applied or trans-genetically synthesized fluorophores are not used to achieve stimulation. Here, current work on INS is presented for motor nerves, sensory nerves, central nervous system, and in vitro preparations. A discussion follows addressing the mechanism of INS and its potential use in neuroprostheses. A brief review of neural depolarization involving other optical methods is also presented. Topics covered include optical stimulation concurrent with electrical stimulation, optical stimulation using exogenous fluorophores, and optical stimulation by transgenic induction of light-gated ion channels. PMID:23082105

  4. Neural stimulation with optical radiation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Wells, Jonathon D; Jansen, E Duco; Walsh, Joseph T

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the existing research on infrared neural stimulation, a means of artificially stimulating neurons that has been proposed as an alternative to electrical stimulation. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is defined as the direct induction of an evoked potential in response to a transient targeted deposition of optical energy. The foremost advantage of using optical radiation for neural stimulation is its spatial resolution. Exogenously applied or trans-genetically synthesized fluorophores are not used to achieve stimulation. Here, current work on INS is presented for motor nerves, sensory nerves, central nervous system, and in vitro preparations. A discussion follows addressing the mechanism of INS and its potential use in neuroprostheses. A brief review of neural depolarization involving other optical methods is also presented. Topics covered include optical stimulation concurrent with electrical stimulation, optical stimulation using exogenous fluorophores, and optical stimulation by transgenic induction of light-gated ion channels. PMID:23082105

  5. Epidural cortical stimulation and aphasia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Harvey, Richard L.; Babbitt, Edna M.; Hurwitz, Rosalind; Kaye, Rosalind C.; Lee, Jaime B.; Small, Steven. L.

    2013-01-01

    . When effect sizes were compared for individual subject pairs on discourse measures of content and rate, effects were typically larger for the investigational subjects receiving CS/LT than for the control subjects receiving LT alone. These analyses support previous findings regarding therapeutic efficacy of CS/LT compared to LT i.e. epidural stimulation of ipsilesional premotor cortex may augment behavioral speech-language therapy, with the largest effects after completion of therapy. Conclusions Continued investigation of epidural cortical stimulation in combination with language training in post-stroke aphasia should proceed cautiously. Carefully planned studies that customize procedures to individual profiles are warranted. Information from research on non-invasive methods of CS/LT may also inform future studies of epidural cortical stimulation. PMID:23667287

  6. Effects of combined treatment with complex S. typhimurium antigens and factors stimulating osteogenesis (curettage, BMP-2) on multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and serum concentration of cytokines in CBA mice.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Karyagina, A S; Lunin, V G; Grabko, V I; Bartov, M S; Gromov, A V; Grunina, T M; Soboleva, L A; Shapoval, I M; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-02-01

    The content of multipotent stromal cells (MSC) in the bone marrow and efficiency of their cloning (ECF-MSC) increased by 3 times 1 day after administration of complex S. typhimurium antigens to CBA mice, while the relative content of alkaline phosphatase-positive MSC colonies (marker of osteogenesis; P(+) colonies) decreased from 14% (control) to 3%. After administration of the complex S. typhimurium antigens to CBA mice 3 h after (or 3 h before) curettage or treatment with morphogenetic protein (BMP-2), the content of MSC and ECF-MSC decreased on the next day by ~3 times in comparison with animals receiving antigens alone and approached the control level. The relative content of P(+) colonies increased to 20 and 35%, respectively, in comparison with animals receiving antigens (3%), but was significantly lower than after curettage (34%) or BMP-2 (42%) administration. Expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ genes in the primary cultures of stromal bone marrow cells induced by antigen administration was suppressed, while the concentrations of IL-12 and TNF-α in the culture medium sharply decreased after antigen treatment in combination with curettage or BMP-2 administration. Administration of complex S. typhimurium antigens after pretreatment with BMP-2 (3 h before) was associated with a decrease in serum levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α in mice receiving BMP-2+S. typhimurium group 4 h after treatment in comparison with the animals receiving only S. typhimurium antigens alone by 1.9, 4.4, 1.5, and 6 times, respectively, i.e. to normal level or below it, while the concentration of IL-10 increased by almost 2 times, which probably reflected anti-inflammatory properties of BMP-2. These data probably attest to competitive relations between osteogenesis and immune response at the level of MSC. PMID:25708327

  7. Somatosensory Event-related Potentials from Orofacial Skin Stretch Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takayuki; Ostry, David J; Gracco, Vincent L

    2015-01-01

    Cortical processing associated with orofacial somatosensory function in speech has received limited experimental attention due to the difficulty of providing precise and controlled stimulation. This article introduces a technique for recording somatosensory event-related potentials (ERP) that uses a novel mechanical stimulation method involving skin deformation using a robotic device. Controlled deformation of the facial skin is used to modulate kinesthetic inputs through excitation of cutaneous mechanoreceptors. By combining somatosensory stimulation with electroencephalographic recording, somatosensory evoked responses can be successfully measured at the level of the cortex. Somatosensory stimulation can be combined with the stimulation of other sensory modalities to assess multisensory interactions. For speech, orofacial stimulation is combined with speech sound stimulation to assess the contribution of multi-sensory processing including the effects of timing differences. The ability to precisely control orofacial somatosensory stimulation during speech perception and speech production with ERP recording is an important tool that provides new insight into the neural organization and neural representations for speech. PMID:26709504

  8. Copeptin under glucagon stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Krzysztof C; Lewiński, Andrzej; Skowrońska-Jóźwiak, Elżbieta; Stasiak, Magdalena; Horzelski, Wojciech; Brabant, Georg

    2016-05-01

    Stimulation of growth hormone (GH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion by glucagon is a standard procedure to assess pituitary dysfunction but the pathomechanism of glucagon action remains unclear. As arginine vasopressin (AVP) may act on the release of both, GH and ACTH, we tested here the role of AVP in GST by measuring a stable precursor fragment, copeptin, which is stoichiometrically secreted with AVP in a 1:1 ratio. ACTH, cortisol, GH, and copeptin were measured at 0, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 min during GST in 79 subjects: healthy controls (Group 1, n = 32), subjects with pituitary disease, but with adequate cortisol and GH responses during GST (Group 2, n = 29), and those with overt hypopituitarism (Group 3, n = 18). Copeptin concentrations significantly increased over baseline 150 and 180 min following glucagon stimulation in controls and patients with intact pituitary function but not in hypopituitarism. Copeptin concentrations were stimulated over time and the maximal increment correlated with ACTH, while correlations between copeptin and GH were weaker. Interestingly, copeptin as well as GH secretion was significantly attenuated when comparing subjects within the highest to those in the lowest BMI quartile (p < 0.05). Copeptin is significantly released following glucagon stimulation. As this release is BMI-dependent, the time-dependent relation between copeptin and GH may be obscured, whereas the close relation to ACTH suggests that AVP/copeptin release might be linked to the activation of the adrenal axis. PMID:26578365

  9. Brain stimulation in migraine.

    PubMed

    Brighina, Filippo; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Fierro, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a very prevalent disease with great individual disability and socioeconomic burden. Despite intensive research effort in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of the disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, much importance has been given to mechanisms underlying the cortical excitability that has been suggested to be dysfunctional in migraine. In recent years, noninvasive brain stimulation techniques based on magnetic fields (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS) and on direct electrical currents (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) have been shown to be safe and effective tools to explore the issue of cortical excitability, activation, and plasticity in migraine. Moreover, TMS, repetitive TMS (rTMS), and tDCS, thanks to their ability to interfere with and/or modulate cortical activity inducing plastic, persistent effects, have been also explored as potential therapeutic approaches, opening an interesting perspective for noninvasive neurostimulation for both symptomatic and preventive treatment of migraine and other types of headache. In this chapter we critically review evidence regarding the role of noninvasive brain stimulation in the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine, delineating the advantages and limits of these techniques together with potential development and future application. PMID:24112926

  10. Heliostat Stimulator operator's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The Heliostat Stimulator is a portable test tool, housed in a suitcase, which can be used to perform the following functions: (1) acceptance testing of newly manufactured Heliostat Controllers (HC) and Heliostat Field Controllers (HFC); (2) aid in the installation and alignment of Heliostats; and (3) provide diagnostic troubleshooting capability in the event of Heliostat failure in the field.

  11. Local glutamate release in the rat ventral lateral thalamus evoked by high-frequency stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Blaha, Charles D.; Lin, Jessica; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-04-01

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is proven therapy for essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency electrical stimulation results in local thalamic glutamate release. Enzyme-linked glutamate amperometric biosensors were implanted in anesthetized rat thalamus adjacent to the stimulating electrode. Electrical stimulation was delivered to investigate the effect of frequency, pulse width, voltage-controlled or current-controlled stimulation, and charge balancing. Monophasic electrical stimulation-induced glutamate release was linearly dependent on stimulation frequency, intensity and pulse width. Prolonged stimulation evoked glutamate release to a plateau that subsequently decayed back to baseline after stimulation. Glutamate release was less pronounced with voltage-controlled stimulation and not present with charge balanced current-controlled stimulation. Using fixed potential amperometry in combination with a glutamate bioprobe and adjacent microstimulating electrode, the present study has shown that monophasic current-controlled stimulation of the thalamus in the anesthetized rat evoked linear increases in local extracellular glutamate concentrations that were dependent on stimulation duration, frequency, intensity and pulse width. However, the efficacy of monophasic voltage-controlled stimulation, in terms of evoking glutamate release in the thalamus, was substantially lower compared to monophasic current-controlled stimulation and entirely absent with biphasic (charge balanced) current-controlled stimulation. It remains to be determined whether similar glutamate release occurs with human DBS electrodes and similar charge balanced stimulation. As such, the present results indicate the importance of evaluating local neurotransmitter dynamics in studying the mechanism of action of DBS.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits stem cell factor-induced proliferation of human bone marrow progenitor cells in vitro. Role of p55 and p75 tumor necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Rusten, L S; Smeland, E B; Jacobsen, F W; Lien, E; Lesslauer, W; Loetscher, H; Dubois, C M; Jacobsen, S E

    1994-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), a key regulator of hematopoiesis, potently synergizes with a number of hematopoietic growth factors. However, little is known about growth factors capable of inhibiting the actions of SCF. TNF-alpha has been shown to act as a bidirectional regulator of myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation. This study was designed to examine interactions between TNF-alpha and SCF. Here, we demonstrate that TNF-alpha potently and directly inhibits SCF-stimulated proliferation of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, TNF-alpha blocked all colony formation stimulated by SCF in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF) or CSF-1. The synergistic effect of SCF observed in combination with GM-CSF or IL-3 was also inhibited by TNF-alpha, resulting in colony numbers similar to those obtained in the absence of SCF. These effects of TNF-alpha were mediated through the p55 TNF receptor, whereas little or no inhibition was signaled through the p75 TNF receptor. Finally, TNF-alpha downregulated c-kit cell-surface expression on CD34+ bone marrow cells, and this was predominantly a p55 TNF receptor-mediated event as well. Images PMID:7518828

  13. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. Recent findings Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to ‘standardize’ the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. Summary Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable potential to establish noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation as interventional therapeutic tool. PMID:27224087

  14. An implantable neural stimulator for intraspinal microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Troyk, Philip R; Mushahwar, Vivian K; Stein, Richard B; Suh, Sungjae; Everaert, Dirk; Holinski, Brad; Hu, Zhe; DeMichele, Glenn; Kerns, Douglas; Kayvani, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a wireless stimulator device for use in animal experiments as part of an ongoing investigation into intraspinal stimulation (ISMS) for restoration of walking in humans with spinal cord injury. The principle behind using ISMS is the activation of residual motor-control neural networks within the spinal cord ventral horn below the level of lesion following a spinal cord injury. The attractiveness to this technique is that a small number of electrodes can be used to induce bilateral walking patterns in the lower limbs. In combination with advanced feedback algorithms, ISMS has the potential to restore walking for distances that exceed that produced by other types of functional electrical stimulation. Recent acute animal experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of using ISMS to produce the coordinated walking patterns. Here we described a wireless implantable stimulation system to be used in chronic animal experiments and for providing the basis for a system suitable for use in humans. Electrical operation of the wireless system is described, including a demonstration of reverse telemetry for monitoring the stimulating electrode voltages. PMID:23366038

  15. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  16. Occipital nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mammis, Antonios; Agarwal, Nitin; Mogilner, Alon Y

    2015-01-01

    Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) is a form of neuromodulation therapy aimed at treating intractable headache and craniofacial pain. The therapy utilizes neurostimulating electrodes placed subcutaneously in the occipital region and connected to a permanently implanted programmable pulse generator identical to those used for dorsal column/spinal cord stimulation. The presumed mechanisms of action involve modulation of the trigeminocervical complex, as well as closure of the physiologic pain gate. ONS is a reversible, nondestructive therapy, which can be tailored to a patient's individual needs. Typically, candidates for successful ONS include those patients with migraines, Chiari malformation, or occipital neuralgia. However, recent MRSA infections, unrealistic expectations, and psychiatric comorbidities are generally contraindications. As with any invasive procedure, complications may occur including lead migration, infection, wound erosion, device failure, muscle spasms, and pain. The success of this therapy is dependent on careful patient selection, a preimplantation trial, meticulous implantation technique, programming strategies, and complication avoidance. PMID:25411143

  17. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  18. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  19. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Neural Stimulation and Chemical Detection: The Era of Smart Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable "smart" therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  20. Broadband stimulated Raman backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, B.; Aurand, B.; Lehmann, G.; Gangolf, T.; Schnell, M.; Kühl, T.; Spielmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    Broadband amplification employing stimulated Raman backscattering is demonstrated. Using seed pulses with a bandwidth of about 200 nm, we study the amplification in a wide spectral range in a single laser shot. With chirped pump pulses and a Ne gas jet, we observed under optimized conditions, amplification in a range of about 80 nm, which is sufficient to support the amplification of sub-20 fs pulses. This broad amplification range is also in excellent agreement with PIC simulations. The conversion efficiency is at certain wavelengths as high as 1.2% and was measured to be better than 6 × 10‑3 on average.

  1. Geothermal well stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

  2. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, October, November and December 1987. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Partial contents include: The mast cell granule: A phospholipid source for prostaglandin synthesis; Research issues for radiation protection for man during prolonged spaceflight; Quantification of gut injury with diamine oxidase activity; Development of a fission-neutron RBE and measurements with combined injury in mouse models; Rat monocytes in a model of combined injury express the OX8 antigen; Involvement of histamine H1 and H2 receptors in hypothermia induced by ionizing radiation in guinea pigs; Locomotor behavior in mice following exposure to fission-neutron irradiation and trauma; Alterations in locomotor activity induced by radioprotective doses of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2; Fetal hypothalamic brain grafts reduce the obesity produced by ventromedial hypothalamic lesions; The rhesus monkey: A primate model for hemopoietic stem cell studies; Interdependence of the radioprotective effects of human recombinant interleukin 1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and murine recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; Radiation-induced hematologic and nonspecific immunologic effects in the canine.

  3. Mammalian cell production and purification of progenipoietin, a dual-agonist chimaeric haematopoietic growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wood, David C; Mathis, Karl J; Joy, William D; Minnerly, John C; Pegg, Lyle E; Welply, Joseph K

    2003-02-01

    One member of the progenipoietin (ProGP) family of engineered proteins, ProGP-2, is a chimaeric dual cytokine receptor agonist, expressed in mammalian cells, that stimulates both human fetal liver tyrosine kinase-3 (Flt3) and the granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) receptor. The production of ProGP-2 on a small and large scale using either anti-(Flt3 ligand) antibody-affinity chromatography, or a combination of (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and preparative reverse-phase chromatography is described. ProGP-2 was produced in hollow-fibre reactors containing stably transfected NS0 cells. The productivity of ProGP-2 was initially high, but was found to decrease 3-4-fold over time. When the yield of ProGP-2 decreased, the combination of three conventional chromatography steps was required to meet protein purity similar to that achieved by the anti-(Flt3 ligand) chromatography method. In addition, a protease activity was observed in conditioned media from the hollow-fibre reactors that resulted in increased degradation of ProGP-2 that was removed by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography at higher pH. Together the results demonstrated a method for production and purification of ProGP-2 for additional studies on its haematopoietic activity. PMID:12578549

  4. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  5. Therapeutic stimulation versus ablation.

    PubMed

    Hariz, Marwan I; Hariz, Gun-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery was pioneered in the mid 1980s by Laitinen's introduction of Leksell's posteroventral pallidotomy for Parkinson´s disease (PD). This ablative procedure experienced a worldwide spread in the 1990s, owing to its excellent effect on dyskinesias and other symptoms of post-l-dopa PD. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS), pioneered by Benabid and Pollak in 1987 for the treatment of tremor, first became popular when it was applied to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mid 1990s, where it demonstrated a striking effect on all cardinal symptoms of advanced PD, and permitted reduced dosages of medication. DBS, as a nondestructive, adaptable, and reversible procedure that is proving safe in bilateral surgery on basal ganglia, has great appeal to clinicians and patients alike, despite the fact that it is expensive, laborious, and relies on very strict patient selection criteria, especially for STN DBS. Psychiatric surgery has experienced the same phenomenon, with DBS supplanting completely stereotactic ablative procedures. This chapter discusses the pros and cons of ablation versus stimulation and investigates the reasons why DBS has overshadowed proven efficient ablative procedures such as pallidotomy for PD, and capsulotomy and cingulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. PMID:24112885

  6. BIOPHYSICAL STIMULATION FOR NONUNIONS.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, E; Tschon, M; Stagni, C; Dallari, D; Fini, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonunions account for 5-10% on the total number of fractures. Biophysical stimulation is a non-surgical, conservative, frequently used therapy in nonunions and a greater efficacy has been demonstrated for pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF). The mechanisms of action of PEMF at cellular and molecular levels are still under debate and no dose-response study is available. Moreover, the vast majority of in vitro studies were conducted on healthy cells. The primary aim of the research was to investigate the capacity of PEMF with different exposure times to stimulate the osteogenic process in cells from the callus of a nonunion patient. Another important objective was the characterization of nonunion cells in terms of clonogenicity, cluster of differentiation expression and the tri-lineage differentiation capacity. Overall, the results indicated the presence of osteochondroprogenitor cells in the callus of a nonunion, with an impairment in the osteogenic differentiation process. PEMF may enhance cell viability, the formation of osteoid matrix and accelerate the process of osteogenic differentiation. BMP-4 production, TIMP1 and TIMP2 expression were influenced, as well as VEGFA, whose early upregulation may account for a possible improvement in both the osteogenic and vasculogenic processes. In conclusion, even with some discussed limitations, these preliminary data showed the presence of a multipotent progenitor population and suggested some hints of the effect of PEMF on nonunion cells. PMID:26652488

  7. Enhancing duration processing with parietal brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dormal, Valérie; Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Pesenti, Mauro; Walsh, Vincent; Cappelletti, Marinella

    2016-05-01

    Numerosity and duration are thought to share common magnitude-based mechanisms in brain regions including the right parietal and frontal cortices like the supplementary motor area, SMA. Numerosity and duration are, however, also different in several intrinsic features. For instance, in a quantification context, numerosity is known for being more automatically accessed than temporal events, and durations are by definition sequential whereas numerosity can be both sequential and simultaneous. Moreover, numerosity and duration processing diverge in terms of their neuronal correlates. Whether these observed neuronal specificities can be accounted for by differences in automaticity or presentation-mode is however not clear. To address this issue, we used brain stimulation (transcranial random noise stimulation, tRNS) to the right parietal cortex or the SMA combined with experimental stimuli differing in their level of automaticity (numerosity and duration) and presentation mode (sequential or simultaneous). Compared to a no stimulation group, performance changed in duration but not in numerosity categorisation following right parietal but not SMA stimulation. These results indicate that the right parietal cortex is critical for duration processing, and suggest that tRNS has a stronger effect on less automatic processes such as duration. PMID:27037043

  8. A linearized current stimulator for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ding-Lan; Chu, Yu-Jung

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops the front end of the stimulator which is applied in the implantable deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the therapy of Parkinson's disease. This stimulator adopts the low power switched-capacitor DAC accompanying with voltage-to-current transconductance amplifiers to obtain the adjustable output currents. The proposed distortion cancellation technique improves the linearity of the current stimulator. Multiple transconductance amplifiers sharing a single DAC save the circuit area. The biphasic stimulation waveform is generated from the bridge switching technique and the programmable pulse. This stimulation circuit provides the 0 approximately 165 microA current for a typical loading of 10 kΩ, 8 approximately 120 micros pulse width, and 126 approximately 244 Hz frequencies with a 0.35 microm CMOS technology at 3.3 V supply voltage. PMID:21096724

  9. Exploring Selective Neural Electrical Stimulation for Upper Limb Function Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Tigra, Wafa; Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Coulet, Bertrand; Gelis, Anthony; Fattal, Charles; Maciejasz, Pawel; Picq, Chloé; Rossel, Olivier; Teissier, Jacques; Coste, Christine Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach of selective neural electrical stimulation of the upper limb nerves. Median and radial nerves of individuals with tetraplegia are stimulated via a multipolar cuff electrode to elicit movements of wrist and hand in acute conditions during a surgical intervention. Various configurations corresponding to various combinations of a 12-poles cuff electrode contacts are tested. Video recording and electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded via sterile surface electrodes are used to evaluate the selectivity of each stimulation configuration in terms of activated muscles. In this abstract we introduce the protocol and preliminary results will be presented during the conference. PMID:27478571

  10. Engagement Sensitive Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepesh; Dutta, Anirban; Das, Abhijit; Lahiri, Uttama

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one’s performance. PMID:27478569

  11. Stimulated radiative laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muys, P.

    2008-04-01

    Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to the radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

  12. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  13. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  14. Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Daniel R; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is an ultrafast nonlinear optical technique that provides vibrational structural information with high temporal (sub-50 fs) precision and high spectral (10 cm(-1) ) resolution. Since the first full demonstration of its capabilities ≈15 years ago, FSRS has evolved into a mature technique, giving deep insights into chemical and biochemical reaction dynamics that would be inaccessible with any other technique. It is now being routinely applied to virtually all possible photochemical reactions and systems spanning from single molecules in solution to thin films, bulk crystals and macromolecular proteins. This review starts with an historic overview and discusses the theoretical and experimental concepts behind this technology. Emphasis is put on the current state-of-the-art experimental realization and several variations of FSRS that have been developed. The unique capabilities of FSRS are illustrated through a comprehensive presentation of experiments to date followed by prospects. PMID:26919612

  15. Engagement Sensitive Visual Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepesh; Dutta, Anirban; Das, Abhijit; Lahiri, Uttama

    2016-06-13

    Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one's performance. PMID:27478569

  16. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  17. Usage possibilities of laser stimulation in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switka-Wieclawska, Iwona; Kecik, Tadeusz

    1996-03-01

    The laser stimulation is used in ophthalmology as a supplement toother way of therapy. Nowadays, the following types of procedures are being performed: eyeball anterior segment stimulation, lacrimal gland stimulation, eyeball posterior pole stimulation, trigeminal nerve opening stimulation. Laser stimulation can be used as an independent procedure or together with pharmacological treatment.

  18. Power combiner

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  19. Effect of electromagnetic stimulation of alfalfa seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćwintal, M.; Dziwulska-Hunek, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the conducted experiments the effect of presowing He-Ne laser light, magnetic field stimulation or the combination of these two factors of alfalfa seeds on the field emergence, structure and yields in the year of sowing and during three following years of full land use were studied. The examined factors had a significant effect on the number of shoots per 1 m2, plant height, mass of shoots, fresh and dry mass. Electromagnetic stimulation resulted in a significant increase in alfalfa seeds emergence (from 35% - control to 47.8% - magnetic field), number of shoots per 1m2 (from 608 - control to 813 - laser light in cut), but a decrease of the mass of the shoots (from 0.61 g - control to 0.50 g - laser light).

  20. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light