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Sample records for combining dna pooling

  1. Combination fence and solar heater for swimming pools

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, D.L.

    1981-07-28

    A combination fence and solar heater for swimming pools comprises a fence shaped for extending about the periphery of the pool to restrict ingress and egress therefrom. A tubular heat exchanger is formed in at least one section of the fence, includes an exterior surface adapted to absorb solar energy, and communicates with the water in the swimming pool. The number of heat exchanger fence sections can be varied in accordance with the climate in which the pool is located. A pump flows the water in the swimming pool through the heat exchanger fence sections during daylight hours, thereby simultaneously heating the water in the pool, and providing an attractive and protective safety barrier about the swimming pool.

  2. vipR: variant identification in pooled DNA using R

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Andre; Weber, Peter; Quast, Carina; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput-sequencing (HTS) technologies are the method of choice for screening the human genome for rare sequence variants causing susceptibility to complex diseases. Unfortunately, preparation of samples for a large number of individuals is still very cost- and labor intensive. Thus, recently, screens for rare sequence variants were carried out in samples of pooled DNA, in which equimolar amounts of DNA from multiple individuals are mixed prior to sequencing with HTS. The resulting sequence data, however, poses a bioinformatics challenge: the discrimination of sequencing errors from real sequence variants present at a low frequency in the DNA pool. Results: Our method vipR uses data from multiple DNA pools in order to compensate for differences in sequencing error rates along the sequenced region. More precisely, instead of aiming at discriminating sequence variants from sequencing errors, vipR identifies sequence positions that exhibit significantly different minor allele frequencies in at least two DNA pools using the Skellam distribution. The performance of vipR was compared with three other models on data from a targeted resequencing study of the TMEM132D locus in 600 individuals distributed over four DNA pools. Performance of the methods was computed on SNPs that were also genotyped individually using a MALDI-TOF technique. On a set of 82 sequence variants, vipR achieved an average sensitivity of 0.80 at an average specificity of 0.92, thus outperforming the reference methods by at least 0.17 in specificity at comparable sensitivity. Availability: The code of vipR is freely available via: http://sourceforge.net/projects/htsvipr/ Contact: altmann@mpipsykl.mpg.de PMID:21685105

  3. Impaired DNA replication within progenitor cell pools promotes leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Marusyk, Andriy; Porter, Christopher C; Cardiff, Robert D; DeGregori, James

    2005-12-01

    Impaired cell cycle progression can be paradoxically associated with increased rates of malignancies. Using retroviral transduction of bone marrow progenitors followed by transplantation into mice, we demonstrate that inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation impairs competition, promoting the expansion of progenitors that acquire oncogenic mutations which restore cell cycle progression. Conditions that impair DNA replication dramatically enhance the proliferative advantage provided by the expression of Bcr-Abl or mutant p53, which provide no apparent competitive advantage under conditions of healthy replication. Furthermore, for the Bcr-Abl oncogene the competitive advantage in contexts of impaired DNA replication dramatically increases leukemogenesis. Impaired replication within hematopoietic progenitor cell pools can select for oncogenic events and thereby promote leukemia, demonstrating the importance of replicative competence in the prevention of tumorigenesis. The demonstration that replication-impaired, poorly competitive progenitor cell pools can promote tumorigenesis provides a new rationale for links between tumorigenesis and common human conditions of impaired DNA replication such as dietary folate deficiency, chemotherapeutics targeting dNTP synthesis, and polymorphisms in genes important for DNA metabolism. PMID:16277552

  4. Association mapping of disease loci, by use of a pooled DNA genomic screen.

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos, L F; Klitz, W; Field, L L; Tobias, R; Bowcock, A M; Wilson, R; Nelson, M P; Nagatomi, J; Thomson, G

    1997-01-01

    Genomic screening to map disease loci by association requires automation, pooling of DNA samples, and 3,000-6,000 highly polymorphic, evenly spaced microsatellite markers. Case-control samples can be used in an initial screen, followed by family-based data to confirm marker associations. Association mapping is relevant to genetic studies of complex diseases in which linkage analysis may be less effective and to cases in which multigenerational data are difficult to obtain, including rare or late-onset conditions and infectious diseases. The method can also be used effectively to follow up and confirm regions identified in linkage studies or to investigate candidate disease loci. Study designs can incorporate disease heterogeneity and interaction effects by appropriate subdivision of samples before screening. Here we report use of pooled DNA amplifications-the accurate determination of marker-disease associations for both case-control and nuclear family-based data-including application of correction methods for stutter artifact and preferential amplification. These issues, combined with a discussion of both statistical power and experimental design to define the necessary requirements for detecting of disease loci while virtually eliminating false positives, suggest the feasibility and efficiency of association mapping using pooled DNA screening. PMID:9326338

  5. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  6. Genetic linkage analysis using pooled DNA and infrared detection of tailed STRP primer patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetting, William S.; Wildenberg, Scott C.; King, Richard A.

    1996-04-01

    The mapping of a disease locus to a specific chromosomal region is an important step in the eventual isolation and analysis of a disease causing gene. Conventional mapping methods analyze large multiplex families and/or smaller nuclear families to find linkage between the disease and a chromosome marker that maps to a known chromosomal region. This analysis is time consuming and tedious, typically requiring the determination of 30,000 genotypes or more. For appropriate populations, we have instead utilized pooled DNA samples for gene mapping which greatly reduces the amount of time necessary for an initial chromosomal screen. This technique assumes a common founder for the disease locus of interest and searches for a region of a chromosome shared between affected individuals. Our analysis involves the PCR amplification of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRP) to detect these shared regions. In order to reduce the cost of genotyping, we have designed unlabeled tailed PCR primers which, when combined with a labeled universal primer, provides for an alternative to synthesizing custom labeled primers. The STRP pattern is visualized with an infrared fluorescence based automated DNA sequencer and the patterns quantitated by densitometric analysis of the allele pattern. Differences in the distribution of alleles between pools of affected and unaffected individuals, including a reduction in the number of alleles in the affected pool, indicate the sharing of a region of a chromosome. We have found this method effective for markers 10 - 15 cM away from the disease locus for a recessive genetic disease.

  7. Selective DNA pooling for determination of linkage between a molecular marker and a quantitative trait locus

    SciTech Connect

    Darvasi, A.; Soller, M.

    1994-12-01

    Selective genotyping is a method to reduce costs in marker-quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage determination by genotyping only those individuals with extreme, and hence most informative, quantitative trait values. The DNA pooling strategy (termed: {open_quotes}selective DNA pooling{close_quotes}) takes this one step further by pooling DNA from the selected individuals at each of the two phenotypic extremes, and basing the test for linkage on marker allele frequencies as estimated from the pooled samples only. This can reduce genotyping costs of marker-QTL linkage determination by up to two orders of magnitude. Theoretical analysis of selective DNA pooling shows that for experiments involving backcross, F{sub 2} and half-sib designs, the power of selective DNA pooling for detecting genes with large effect can be the same as that obtained by individual selective genotyping. Power for detecting genes with small effect, however, was found to decrease strongly with increase in the technical error of estimating allele frequencies in the pooled samples. The effect of technical error, however, can be markedly reduced by replication of technical procedures. It is also shown that a proportion selected of 0.1 at each tail will be appropriate for a wide range of experimental conditions. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Selective DNA Pooling for Determination of Linkage between a Molecular Marker and a Quantitative Trait Locus

    PubMed Central

    Darvasi, A.; Soller, M.

    1994-01-01

    Selective genotyping is a method to reduce costs in marker-quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage determination by genotyping only those individuals with extreme, and hence most informative, quantitative trait values. The DNA pooling strategy (termed: ``selective DNA pooling'') takes this one step further by pooling DNA from the selected individuals at each of the two phenotypic extremes, and basing the test for linkage on marker allele frequencies as estimated from the pooled samples only. This can reduce genotyping costs of marker-QTL linkage determination by up to two orders of magnitude. Theoretical analysis of selective DNA pooling shows that for experiments involving backcross, F(2) and half-sib designs, the power of selective DNA pooling for detecting genes with large effect, can be the same as that obtained by individual selective genotyping. Power for detecting genes with small effect, however, was found to decrease strongly with increase in the technical error of estimating allele frequencies in the pooled samples. The effect of technical error, however, can be markedly reduced by replication of technical procedures. It is also shown that a proportion selected of 0.1 at each tail will be appropriate for a wide range of experimental conditions. PMID:7896115

  9. Origin, dynamics, and implications of extracellular DNA pools in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Torti, Andrea; Lever, Mark Alexander; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-12-01

    In marine sediments, DNA occurs both inside and outside living organisms. DNA not enclosed in living cells may account for the largest fraction of total DNA, and include molecules locked within dead cells, organic and inorganic aggregates, adsorbed onto mineral matrices, and viral DNA. This DNA comprises genetic material released in situ from sediment microbial communities, as well as DNA of pelagic and terrestrial origin deposited to the seafloor. DNA not enclosed in living cells undermines the assumption of a direct link between the overall DNA pool and the local, currently living microbial assemblages, in terms of both microbial cell abundance and diversity. At the same time, the extracellular DNA may provide an integrated view of the biodiversity and ecological processes occurring on land, in marine water columns, and sediments themselves, thereby acting as an archive of genetic information which can be used to reconstruct past changes in source environments. In this review, we identify and discuss DNA pools in marine sediments, with special focus on DNA not enclosed in living cells, its origin, dynamics, and ecological and methodological implications. Achievements in deciphering the genetic information held within each DNA pool are presented along with still-standing challenges and major gaps in current knowledge. PMID:26452301

  10. DNA--a molecule in search of additional functions: recipient of pool wave emissions? A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Almost the entire nucleotide sequence of human DNA is functionally unaccounted for, although large parts of the human genome are transcribed. The genes, as defined by current molecular biology, comprise about 1.5-2% of the DNA molecule. It is proposed that DNA encodes additional, hitherto unrecognized functions. In this discussion, the total information inside and outside the universe we live in is termed the pool or the sum total, known or unknown, of all laws, matter, energy, concepts and events. In a hypothetical model, a Gedankenexperiment, it is suggested that the total of all information emits pool waves of an unknown physical nature. They could be related to black energy or have completely different qualities. The designation pool waves should not imply any similarity to electromagnetism. Further, DNA is suggested to have the capability of interacting with the pool waves and thus permit humans - to some partly genetically determined and yet very limited extent - to perceive information from the pool. Pool emissions might be one of the forces that have been instrumental in and are still driving evolution from simple oligonucleotides to DNA with ever more complex recipient capacities. It will be a major challenge for researchers in the field to unravel these and less hypothetical undetected coding principles in DNA. It is uncertain whether the current trend to search the available DNA sequences with ever more refined computer technology on the basis of our present understanding of biology will detect unknown coding systems. For molecular medicine, research into the genetics of the most common human diseases could profit from the elucidation of presently still ephemeral codes in human DNA. Young scientists with a proven record of original research deserve support for the pursuit of unconventional ideas. This concept of granting priorities will be of the utmost importance in advancing the field beyond current concepts in molecular biology. PMID:20356684

  11. Combined roles of buoyancy and orientation in nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents results obtained during pool boiling from flat surfaces over body force levels of a/g = -1 to 0 to 20 for LN2 and R-113 under steady and transient conditions. Pyrex and metal surfaces are used. Particular attention is given to the case where the effective gravity is perpendicular to the heating surface. At the lower levels of heat flux with nucleate boiling, the heater surface superheat first increases and then decreases as the body force increases above a/g = 1. This is due to the greater contribution of nonboiling convection.

  12. Deoxyribonucleotide pool imbalance stimulates deletions in HeLa cell mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiwei; Wheeler, Linda J; Mathews, Christopher K

    2003-11-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with multiple mutations in mitochondrial DNA, both deletions and point mutations, and mutations in the nuclear gene for thymidine phosphorylase. Spinazzola et al. (Spinazzola, A., Marti, R., Nishino, I., Andreu, A., Naini, A., Tadesse, S., Pela, I., Zammarchi, E., Donati, M., Oliver, J., and Hirano, M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 4128-4133) showed that MNGIE patients have elevated circulating thymidine levels and they hypothesized that this generates imbalanced mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools, which in turn are responsible for mitochondrial (mt) DNA mutagenesis. We tested this hypothesis by culturing HeLa cells in medium supplemented with 50 microM thymidine. After 8-month growth, mtDNA in the thymidine-treated culture, but not the control, showed multiple deletions, as detected both by Southern blotting and by long extension polymerase chain reaction. After 4-h growth in thymidine-supplemented medium, we found the mitochondrial dTTP and dGTP pools to expand significantly, the dCTP pool to drop significantly, and the dATP pool to drop slightly. In whole-cell extracts, dTTP and dGTP pools also expanded, but somewhat less than in mitochondria. The dCTP pool shrank by about 50%, and the dATP pool was essentially unchanged. These results are discussed in terms of the recent report by Nishigaki et al. (Nishigaki, Y., Marti, R., Copeland, W. C., and Hirano, M. (2003) J. Clin. Invest. 111, 1913-1921) that most mitochondrial point mutations in MNGIE patients involve T --> C transitions in sequences containing two As to the 5' side of a T residue. Our finding of dTTP and dGTP elevations and dATP depletion in mitochondrial dNTP pools are consistent with a mutagenic mechanism involving T-G mispairing followed by a next-nucleotide effect involving T insertion opposite A. PMID:13679382

  13. Evaluation of DNA pooling for the estimation of microsatellite allele frequencies: a case study using striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Skalski, Garrick T; Couch, Charlene R; Garber, Amber F; Weir, Bruce S; Sullivan, Craig V

    2006-06-01

    Using striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and six multiplexed microsatellite markers, we evaluated procedures for estimating allele frequencies by pooling DNA from multiple individuals, a method suggested as cost-effective relative to individual genotyping. Using moment-based estimators, we estimated allele frequencies in experimental DNA pools and found that the three primary laboratory steps, DNA quantitation and pooling, PCR amplification, and electrophoresis, accounted for 23, 48, and 29%, respectively, of the technical variance of estimates in pools containing DNA from 2-24 individuals. Exact allele-frequency estimates could be made for pools of sizes 2-8, depending on the locus, by using an integer-valued estimator. Larger pools of size 12 and 24 tended to yield biased estimates; however, replicates of these estimates detected allele frequency differences among pools with different allelic compositions. We also derive an unbiased estimator of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium coefficients that uses multiple DNA pools and analyze the cost-efficiency of DNA pooling. DNA pooling yields the most potential cost savings when a large number of loci are employed using a large number of individuals, a situation becoming increasingly common as microsatellite loci are developed in increasing numbers of taxa. PMID:16582444

  14. The deoxynucleotide triphosphohydrolase SAMHD1 is a major regulator of DNA precursor pools in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Franzolin, Elisa; Pontarin, Giovanna; Rampazzo, Chiara; Miazzi, Cristina; Ferraro, Paola; Palumbo, Elisa; Reichard, Peter; Bianchi, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Sterile alpha motif and HD-domain containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a triphosphohydrolase converting deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) to deoxynucleosides. The enzyme was recently identified as a component of the human innate immune system that restricts HIV-1 infection by removing dNTPs required for viral DNA synthesis. SAMHD1 has deep evolutionary roots and is ubiquitous in human organs. Here we identify a general function of SAMHD1 in the regulation of dNTP pools in cultured human cells. The protein was nuclear and variably expressed during the cell cycle, maximally during quiescence and minimally during S-phase. Treatment of lung or skin fibroblasts with specific siRNAs resulted in the disappearence of SAMHD1 accompanied by loss of the cell-cycle regulation of dNTP pool sizes and dNTP imbalance. Cells accumulated in G1 phase with oversized pools and stopped growing. Following removal of the siRNA, the pools were normalized and cell growth restarted, but only after SAMHD1 had reappeared. In quiescent cultures SAMHD1 down-regulation leads to a marked expansion of dNTP pools. In all cases the largest effect was on dGTP, the preferred substrate of SAMHD1. Ribonucleotide reductase, responsible for the de novo synthesis of dNTPs, is a cytosolic enzyme maximally induced in S-phase cells. Thus, in mammalian cells the cell cycle regulation of the two main enzymes controlling dNTP pool sizes is adjusted to the requirements of DNA replication. Synthesis by the reductase peaks during S-phase, and catabolism by SAMHD1 is maximal during G1 phase when large dNTP pools would prevent cells from preparing for a new round of DNA replication. PMID:23858451

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Replication Defects Disturb Cellular dNTP Pools and Remodel One-Carbon Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nikkanen, Joni; Forsström, Saara; Euro, Liliya; Paetau, Ilse; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Wang, Liya; Chilov, Dmitri; Viinamäki, Jenni; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamäki, Päivi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Ahola, Sofia; Buzkova, Jana; Terzioglu, Mügen; Khan, Nahid A; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Paetau, Anders; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Sajantila, Antti; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna; Nomura, Daniel K; Battersby, Brendan J; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Suomalainen, Anu

    2016-04-12

    Mitochondrial dysfunction affects cellular energy metabolism, but less is known about the consequences for cytoplasmic biosynthetic reactions. We report that mtDNA replication disorders caused by TWINKLE mutations-mitochondrial myopathy (MM) and infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA)-remodel cellular dNTP pools in mice. MM muscle shows tissue-specific induction of the mitochondrial folate cycle, purine metabolism, and imbalanced and increased dNTP pools, consistent with progressive mtDNA mutagenesis. IOSCA-TWINKLE is predicted to hydrolyze dNTPs, consistent with low dNTP pools and mtDNA depletion in the disease. MM muscle also modifies the cytoplasmic one-carbon cycle, transsulfuration, and methylation, as well as increases glucose uptake and its utilization for de novo serine and glutathione biosynthesis. Our evidence indicates that the mitochondrial replication machinery communicates with cytoplasmic dNTP pools and that upregulation of glutathione synthesis through glucose-driven de novo serine biosynthesis contributes to the metabolic stress response. These results are important for disorders with primary or secondary mtDNA instability and offer targets for metabolic therapy. PMID:26924217

  16. Sequences From First Settlers Reveal Rapid Evolution in Icelandic mtDNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Helgason, Agnar; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Ghosh, Shyamali; Sigurðardóttir, Sigrún; Sampietro, Maria Lourdes; Gigli, Elena; Baker, Adam; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Árnadóttir, Lilja; Þorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefánsson, Kári

    2009-01-01

    A major task in human genetics is to understand the nature of the evolutionary processes that have shaped the gene pools of contemporary populations. Ancient DNA studies have great potential to shed light on the evolution of populations because they provide the opportunity to sample from the same population at different points in time. Here, we show that a sample of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 68 early medieval Icelandic skeletal remains is more closely related to sequences from contemporary inhabitants of Scotland, Ireland, and Scandinavia than to those from the modern Icelandic population. Due to a faster rate of genetic drift in the Icelandic mtDNA pool during the last 1,100 years, the sequences carried by the first settlers were better preserved in their ancestral gene pools than among their descendants in Iceland. These results demonstrate the inferential power gained in ancient DNA studies through the application of population genetics analyses to relatively large samples. PMID:19148284

  17. Unbalanced deoxynucleotide pools cause mitochondrial DNA instability in thymidine phosphorylase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    López, Luis C; Akman, Hasan O; García-Cazorla, Angeles; Dorado, Beatriz; Martí, Ramón; Nishino, Ichizo; Tadesse, Saba; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Shungu, Dikoma; Bonilla, Eduardo; Tanji, Kurenai; Hirano, Michio

    2009-02-15

    Replication and repair of DNA require equilibrated pools of deoxynucleoside triphosphate precursors. This concept has been proven by in vitro studies over many years, but in vivo models are required to demonstrate its relevance to multicellular organisms and to human diseases. Accordingly, we have generated thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and uridine phosphorylase (UP) double knockout (TP(-/-)UP(-/-)) mice, which show severe TP deficiency, increased thymidine and deoxyuridine in tissues and elevated mitochondrial deoxythymidine triphosphate. As consequences of the nucleotide pool imbalances, brains of mutant mice developed partial depletion of mtDNA, deficiencies of respiratory chain complexes and encephalopathy. These findings largely account for the pathogenesis of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE), the first inherited human disorder of nucleoside metabolism associated with somatic DNA instability. PMID:19028666

  18. Pooling optimal combinations of energy thresholds in spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Runz, Armin; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-03-01

    Photon counting detectors used in spectroscopic CT are often based on small pixels and therefore offer only limited space to include energy discriminators and their associated counters in each pixel cell. For this reason, it is important to make efficient use of the available energy discriminators in order to achieve an optimized material contrast at a radiation dose as low as possible. Unfortunately, the complexity of evaluating every possible combination of energy thresholds, given a fixed number of counters, rapidly increases with the resolution at which this search is performed, and makes brute-force approaches to this problem infeasible. In this work, we introduce methods from machine learning, in particular sparse regression, to perform a feature selection to determine optimal combinations of energy thresholds. We will demonstrate how methods enforcing row-sparsity on a linear regression's coefficient matrix can be applied to the multiple response problem in spectroscopic CT, i.e. the case in which a single set of energy thresholds is sought to simultaneously retrieve concentrations pertaining to a multitude of materials in an optimal way. These methods are applied to CT images experimentally obtained with a Medipix3RX detector operated in charge summing mode and with a CdTe sensor at a pixel pitch of 110μm. We show that the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso), generalized to the multiple response case, chooses four out of 20 possible threshold positions that allow discriminating PMMA, iodine and gadolinium in a contrast agent phantom at a higher accuracy than with equally spaced thresholds. Finally, we illustrate why it might be unwise to use a higher number of energy thresholds than absolutely necessary.

  19. Modulation of mutagenesis in eukaryotes by DNA replication fork dynamics and quality of nucleotide pools

    PubMed Central

    Waisertreiger, Irina S.-R.; Liston, Victoria G.; Menezes, Miriam R.; Kim, Hyun-Min; Lobachev, Kirill S.; Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Rogozin, Igor B.; Pavlov, Youri. I.

    2014-01-01

    The rate of mutations in eukaryotes depends on a plethora of factors and is not immediately derived from the fidelity of DNA polymerases (Pols). Replication of chromosomes containing the anti-parallel strands of duplex DNA occurs through the copying of leading and lagging strand templates by a trio of Pols α, δ and ε, with the assistance of Pol ζ and Y-family Pols at difficult DNA template structures or sites of DNA damage. The parameters of the synthesis at a given location are dictated by the quality and quantity of nucleotides in the pools, replication fork architecture, transcription status, regulation of Pol switches, and structure of chromatin. The result of these transactions is a subject of survey and editing by DNA repair. PMID:23055184

  20. Pyrimidine Pool Disequilibrium Induced by a Cytidine Deaminase Deficiency Inhibits PARP-1 Activity, Leading to the Under Replication of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gemble, Simon; Ahuja, Akshay; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Dairou, Julien; Biard, Denis S. F.; Lambert, Sarah; Lopes, Massimo; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2015-01-01

    Genome stability is jeopardized by imbalances of the dNTP pool; such imbalances affect the rate of fork progression. For example, cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency leads to an excess of dCTP, slowing the replication fork. We describe here a novel mechanism by which pyrimidine pool disequilibrium compromises the completion of replication and chromosome segregation: the intracellular accumulation of dCTP inhibits PARP-1 activity. CDA deficiency results in incomplete DNA replication when cells enter mitosis, leading to the formation of ultrafine anaphase bridges between sister-chromatids at “difficult-to-replicate” sites such as centromeres and fragile sites. Using molecular combing, electron microscopy and a sensitive assay involving cell imaging to quantify steady-state PAR levels, we found that DNA replication was unsuccessful due to the partial inhibition of basal PARP-1 activity, rather than slower fork speed. The stimulation of PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells restores replication and, thus, chromosome segregation. Moreover, increasing intracellular dCTP levels generates under-replication-induced sister-chromatid bridges as efficiently as PARP-1 knockdown. These results have direct implications for Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare genetic disease combining susceptibility to cancer and genomic instability. BS results from mutation of the BLM gene, encoding BLM, a RecQ 3’-5’ DNA helicase, a deficiency of which leads to CDA downregulation. BS cells thus have a CDA defect, resulting in a high frequency of ultrafine anaphase bridges due entirely to dCTP-dependent PARP-1 inhibition and independent of BLM status. Our study describes previously unknown pathological consequences of the distortion of dNTP pools and reveals an unexpected role for PARP-1 in preventing DNA under-replication and chromosome segregation defects. PMID:26181065

  1. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  2. Extra-binomial variation approach for analysis of pooled DNA sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The invention of next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to study the rare variants that are more likely to pinpoint causal disease genes. To make such experiments financially viable, DNA samples from several subjects are often pooled before sequencing. This induces large between-pool variation which, together with other sources of experimental error, creates over-dispersed data. Statistical analysis of pooled sequencing data needs to appropriately model this additional variance to avoid inflating the false-positive rate. Results: We propose a new statistical method based on an extra-binomial model to address the over-dispersion and apply it to pooled case-control data. We demonstrate that our model provides a better fit to the data than either a standard binomial model or a traditional extra-binomial model proposed by Williams and can analyse both rare and common variants with lower or more variable pool depths compared to the other methods. Availability: Package ‘extraBinomial’ is on http://cran.r-project.org/ Contact: chris.wallace@cimr.cam.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics Online. PMID:22976083

  3. Mitochondrial DNA depletion and thymidine phosphate pool dynamics in a cellular model of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pontarin, Giovanna; Ferraro, Paola; Valentino, Maria L; Hirano, Michio; Reichard, Peter; Bianchi, Vera

    2006-08-11

    Mitochondrial (mt) neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disease associated with depletion, deletions, and point mutations of mtDNA. Patients lack a functional thymidine phosphorylase and their plasma contains high concentrations of thymidine and deoxyuridine; elevation of the corresponding triphosphates probably impairs normal mtDNA replication and repair. To study metabolic events leading to MNGIE we used as model systems skin and lung fibroblasts cultured in the presence of thymidine and/or deoxyuridine at concentrations close to those in the plasma of the patients, a more than 100-fold excess relative to controls. The two deoxynucleosides increased the mt and cytosolic dTTP pools of skin fibroblasts almost 2-fold in cycling cells and 8-fold in quiescent cells. During up to a two-month incubation of quiescent fibroblasts with thymidine (but not with deoxyuridine), mtDNA decreased to approximately 50% without showing deletions or point mutations. When we removed thymidine, but maintained the quiescent state, mtDNA recovered rapidly. With thymidine in the medium, the dTTP pool of quiescent cells turned over rapidly at a rate depending on the concentration of thymidine, due to increased degradation and resynthesis of dTMP in a substrate (=futile) cycle between thymidine kinase and 5'-deoxyribonucleotidase. The cycle limited the expansion of the dTTP pool at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. We propose that the substrate cycle represents a regulatory mechanism to protect cells from harmful increases of dTTP. Thus MNGIE patients may increase their consumption of ATP to counteract an unlimited expansion of the dTTP pool caused by circulating thymidine. PMID:16774911

  4. A Molecular Bar-Coded DNA Repair Resource for Pooled Toxicogenomic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, John P.; Patil, Ashish; Zappala, Maria R.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Cunningham, Richard P.; Begley, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage from exogenous and endogenous sources can promote mutations and cell death. Fortunately, cells contain DNA repair and damage signalling pathways to reduce the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of DNA damage. The identification of specific DNA repair proteins and the coordination of DNA repair pathways after damage has been a central theme to the field of Genetic Toxicology and we have developed a tool for use in this area. We have produced 99 molecular bar-coded Escherichia coli gene-deletion mutants specific to DNA repair and damage signalling pathways, and each bar-coded mutant can be tracked in pooled format using bar-code specific microarrays. Our design adapted bar-codes developed for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gene Deletion Project, which allowed us to utilize an available microarray product for pooled gene-exposure studies. Microarray-based screens were used for en masse identification of individual mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). As expected, gene deletion mutants specific to direct, base excision, and recombinational DNA repair pathways were identified as MMS-sensitive in our pooled assay, thus validating our resource. We have demonstrated that molecular bar-codes designed for S. cerevisiae are transferable to E. coli, and that they can be used with pre-existing microarrays to perform competitive growth experiments. Further, when comparing microarray to traditional plate-based screens both over-lapping and distinct results were obtained, which is a novel technical finding, with discrepancies between the two approaches explained by differences in output measurements (DNA content verse cell mass). The microarray-based classification of Δtag and ΔdinG cells as depleted after MMS exposure, contrary to plate-based methods, led to the discovery that Δtag and ΔdinG cells show a filamentation phenotype after MMS exposure, thus accounting for the discrepancy. A novel biological finding is the observation that while ΔdinG cells

  5. Finding Markers That Make a Difference: DNA Pooling and SNP-Arrays Identify Population Informative Markers for Genetic Stock Identification

    PubMed Central

    Ozerov, Mikhail; Vasemägi, Anti; Wennevik, Vidar; Diaz-Fernandez, Rogelio; Kent, Matthew; Gilbey, John; Prusov, Sergey; Niemelä, Eero; Vähä, Juha-Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Genetic stock identification (GSI) using molecular markers is an important tool for management of migratory species. Here, we tested a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping, known as allelotyping, for identification of highly informative SNPs for accurate genetic stock identification. We estimated allele frequencies of 2880 SNPs from DNA pools of 23 Atlantic salmon populations using Illumina SNP-chip. We evaluated the performance of four common strategies (global FST, pairwise FST, Delta and outlier approach) for selection of the most informative set of SNPs and tested their effectiveness for GSI compared to random sets of SNP and microsatellite markers. For the majority of cases, SNPs selected using the outlier approach performed best followed by pairwise FST and Delta methods. Overall, the selection procedure reduced the number of SNPs required for accurate GSI by up to 53% compared with randomly chosen SNPs. However, GSI accuracy was more affected by populations in the ascertainment group rather than the ranking method itself. We demonstrated for the first time the compatibility of different large-scale SNP datasets by compiling the largest population genetic dataset for Atlantic salmon to date. Finally, we showed an excellent performance of our top SNPs on an independent set of populations covering the main European distribution range of Atlantic salmon. Taken together, we demonstrate how combination of DNA pooling and SNP arrays can be applied for conservation and management of salmonids as well as other species. PMID:24358184

  6. Finding markers that make a difference: DNA pooling and SNP-arrays identify population informative markers for genetic stock identification.

    PubMed

    Ozerov, Mikhail; Vasemägi, Anti; Wennevik, Vidar; Diaz-Fernandez, Rogelio; Kent, Matthew; Gilbey, John; Prusov, Sergey; Niemelä, Eero; Vähä, Juha-Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Genetic stock identification (GSI) using molecular markers is an important tool for management of migratory species. Here, we tested a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping, known as allelotyping, for identification of highly informative SNPs for accurate genetic stock identification. We estimated allele frequencies of 2880 SNPs from DNA pools of 23 Atlantic salmon populations using Illumina SNP-chip. We evaluated the performance of four common strategies (global F ST, pairwise F ST, Delta and outlier approach) for selection of the most informative set of SNPs and tested their effectiveness for GSI compared to random sets of SNP and microsatellite markers. For the majority of cases, SNPs selected using the outlier approach performed best followed by pairwise F ST and Delta methods. Overall, the selection procedure reduced the number of SNPs required for accurate GSI by up to 53% compared with randomly chosen SNPs. However, GSI accuracy was more affected by populations in the ascertainment group rather than the ranking method itself. We demonstrated for the first time the compatibility of different large-scale SNP datasets by compiling the largest population genetic dataset for Atlantic salmon to date. Finally, we showed an excellent performance of our top SNPs on an independent set of populations covering the main European distribution range of Atlantic salmon. Taken together, we demonstrate how combination of DNA pooling and SNP arrays can be applied for conservation and management of salmonids as well as other species. PMID:24358184

  7. The efficacy of detecting variants with small effects on the Affymetrix 6.0 platform using pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Gajdos, Zofia K. Z.; Butler, Johannah L.; Hackett, Rachel; Guiducci, Candace; Nguyen, Thutrang T.; Wilks, Rainford; Forrester, Terrence; Henderson, Katherine D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cooper, Richard S.; Lyon, Helen N.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; McKenzie, Colin A.; Palmer, Mark R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide genotyping of a cohort using pools rather than individual samples has long been proposed as a cost-saving alternative for performing genome-wide association (GWA) studies. However, successful disease gene mapping using pooled genotyping has thus far been limited to detecting common variants with large effect sizes, which tend not to exist for many complex common diseases or traits. Therefore, for DNA pooling to be a viable strategy for conducting GWA studies, it is important to determine whether commonly used genome-wide SNP array platforms such as the Affymetrix 6.0 array can reliably detect common variants of small effect sizes using pooled DNA. Taking obesity and age at menarche as examples of human complex traits, we assessed the feasibility of genome-wide genotyping of pooled DNA as a single-stage design for phenotype association. By individually genotyping the top associations identified by pooling, we obtained a 14- to 16-fold enrichment of SNPs nominally associated with the phenotype, but we likely missed the top true associations. In addition, we assessed whether genotyping pooled DNA can serve as an inexpensive screen as the second stage of a multi-stage design with a large number of samples by comparing the most cost-effective 3-stage designs with 80% power to detect common variants with genotypic relative risk of 1.1, with and without pooling. Given the current state of the specific technology we employed and the associated genotyping costs, we showed through simulation that a design involving pooling would be 1.07 times more expensive than a design without pooling. Thus, while a significant amount of information exists within the data from pooled DNA, our analysis does not support genotyping pooled DNA as a means to efficiently identify common variants contributing small effects to phenotypes of interest. While our conclusions were based on the specific technology and study design we employed, the approach presented here will be useful for

  8. Detection of obesity QTLs on mouse chromosomes 1 and 7 by selective DNA pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.A.; Phillips, S.J.

    1996-06-15

    The inheritance of obesity has been analyzed in an intercross between the lean 129/Sv mouse strain and the obesity-prone EL/Suz mouse strain. The weights of three major fat pads were determined on 4-month-old mice, and the sum of these weights, divided by body weight, was used as an adiposity index. The strategy of selective DNA pooling was used as a primary screen to identify putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting adiposity index. DNA pools representing the leanest 15% and fattest 15% of the F2 progeny were compared for differential allelic enrichment using widely dispersed microsatellite variants. To evaluate putative QTLs, individual genotyping and interval mapping were employed to estimate QTL effects and assess statistical significance. One QTL affecting adiposity index, which accounted for 12.3% of phenotypic variance in gender-merged data, was mapped to the central region of Chromosome (Chr) 7. The QTL allele inherited from EL conferred increased adiposity. A second QTL that accounts for 6.3% of phenotypic variance was identified on Chr 1 near D1Mitt211. At both QTLs, the data are consistent with dominant inheritance of the allele contributing to obesity. The possible relationships between these QTLs and previously described obesity QYLs, major obesity mutations, and candidate genes are discussed. 42 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples

    PubMed Central

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties. PMID:24031959

  10. Cost-effective genome-wide estimation of allele frequencies from pooled DNA in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New sequencing technologies have tremendously increased the number of known molecular markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) in a variety of species. Concurrently, improvements to genotyping technology have now made it possible to efficiently genotype large numbers of genome-wide distributed SNPs enabling genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, genotyping significant numbers of individuals with large number of SNPs remains prohibitively expensive for many research groups. A possible solution to this problem is to determine allele frequencies from pooled DNA samples, such ‘allelotyping’ has been presented as a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping and has become popular in human GWAS. In this article we have tested the effectiveness of DNA pooling to obtain accurate allele frequency estimates for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) populations using an Illumina SNP-chip. Results In total, 56 Atlantic salmon DNA pools from 14 populations were analyzed on an Atlantic salmon SNP-chip containing probes for 5568 SNP markers, 3928 of which were bi-allelic. We developed an efficient quality control filter which enables exclusion of loci showing high error rate and minor allele frequency (MAF) close to zero. After applying multiple quality control filters we obtained allele frequency estimates for 3631 bi-allelic loci. We observed high concordance (r > 0.99) between allele frequency estimates derived from individual genotyping and DNA pools. Our results also indicate that even relatively small DNA pools (35 individuals) can provide accurate allele frequency estimates for a given sample. Conclusions Despite of higher level of variation associated with array replicates compared to pool construction, we suggest that both sources of variation should be taken into account. This study demonstrates that DNA pooling allows fast and high-throughput determination of allele frequencies in Atlantic salmon enabling cost

  11. International Lung Cancer Consortium: Pooled Analysis of Sequence Variants in DNA Repair and Cell Cycle Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Rayjean J.; Christiani, David C.; Risch, Angela; Popanda, Odilia; Haugen, Aage; Zienolddiny, Shan; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Lan, Qing; Spitz, Margaret R.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; LeMarchand, Loic; Vineis, Paolo; Matullo, Giuseppe; Kiyohara, Chikako; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Pezeshki, Benhnaz; Harris, Curtis; Mechanic, Leah; Seow, Adeline; Ng, Daniel P.K.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Zaridze, David; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Bencko, Vladimir; Caporaso, Neil; Chen, Chu; Duell, Eric J.; Goodman, Gary; Field, John K.; Houlston, Richard S.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua; McLaughlin, John; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shen, Hongbing; Stucker, Isabelle; Tajima, Kazuo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Thun, Michael; Yang, Ping; Wiencke, John; Andrew, Angeline S.; Monnier, Stephanie; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background The International Lung Cancer Consortium was established in 2004. To clarify the role of DNA repair genes in lung cancer susceptibility, we conducted a pooled analysis of genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, whose associations have been investigated by at least 3 individual studies. Methods Data from 14 studies were pooled for 18 sequence variants in 12 DNA repair genes, including APEX1, OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, ERCC1, XPD, XPF, XPG, XPA, MGMT, and TP53. The total number of subjects included in the analysis for each variant ranged from 2,073 to 13,955 subjects. Results Four of the variants were found to be weakly associated with lung cancer risk with borderline significance: these were XRCC3 T241M [heterozygote odds ratio (OR), 0.89; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.79–0.99 and homozygote OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.71–1.00] based on 3,467 cases and 5,021 controls from 8 studies, XPD K751Q (heterozygote OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.89–1.10 and homozygote OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02–1.39) based on 6,463 cases and 6,603 controls from 9 studies, and TP53 R72P (heterozygote OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00–1.29 and homozygote OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02–1.42) based on 3,610 cases and 5,293 controls from 6 studies. OGG1 S326C homozygote was suggested to be associated with lung cancer risk in Caucasians (homozygote OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01–1.79) based on 2,569 cases and 4,178 controls from 4 studies but not in Asians. The other 14 variants did not exhibit main effects on lung cancer risk. Discussion In addition to data pooling, future priorities of International Lung Cancer Consortium include coordinated genotyping and multistage validation for ongoing genome-wide association studies. PMID:18990748

  12. Tracing European Founder Lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Martin; Macaulay, Vincent; Hickey, Eileen; Vega, Emilce; Sykes, Bryan; Guida, Valentina; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; Cruciani, Fulvio; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Thomas, Mark; Rychkov, Serge; Rychkov, Oksana; Rychkov, Yuri; Gölge, Mukaddes; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Hill, Emmeline; Bradley, Dan; Romano, Valentino; Calì, Francesco; Vona, Giuseppe; Demaine, Andrew; Papiha, Surinder; Triantaphyllidis, Costas; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Hatina, Jiři; Belledi, Michele; Di Rienzo, Anna; Oppenheim, Ariella; Nørby, Søren; Al-Zaheri, Nadia; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana; Scozzari, Rosaria; Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    Founder analysis is a method for analysis of nonrecombining DNA sequence data, with the aim of identification and dating of migrations into new territory. The method picks out founder sequence types in potential source populations and dates lineage clusters deriving from them in the settlement zone of interest. Here, using mtDNA, we apply the approach to the colonization of Europe, to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived during each major phase of settlement. To estimate the Palaeolithic and Neolithic contributions to European mtDNA diversity more accurately than was previously achievable, we have now extended the Near Eastern, European, and northern-Caucasus databases to 1,234, 2,804, and 208 samples, respectively. Both back-migration into the source population and recurrent mutation in the source and derived populations represent major obstacles to this approach. We have developed phylogenetic criteria to take account of both these factors, and we suggest a way to account for multiple dispersals of common sequence types. We conclude that (i) there has been substantial back-migration into the Near East, (ii) the majority of extant mtDNA lineages entered Europe in several waves during the Upper Palaeolithic, (iii) there was a founder effect or bottleneck associated with the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago, from which derives the largest fraction of surviving lineages, and (iv) the immigrant Neolithic component is likely to comprise less than one-quarter of the mtDNA pool of modern Europeans. PMID:11032788

  13. Admixture Aberration Analysis: Application to Mapping in Admixed Population Using Pooled DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Sivan; Geiger, Dan

    Admixture mapping is a gene mapping approach used for the identification of genomic regions harboring disease susceptibility genes in the case of recently admixed populations such as African Americans. We present a novel method for admixture mapping, called admixture aberration analysis (AAA), that uses a DNA pool of affected admixed individuals. We demonstrate through simulations that AAA is a powerful and economical mapping method under a range of scenarios, capturing complex human diseases such as hypertension and end stage kidney disease. The method has a low false-positive rate and is robust to deviation from model assumptions. Finally, we apply AAA on 600 prostate cancer-affected African Americans, replicating a known risk locus. Simulation results indicate that the method can yield over 96% reduction in genotyping. Our method is implemented as a Java program called AAAmap and is freely available.

  14. Polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation using high-throughput DNA sequencing of target-enriched pooled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The central role of the somatotrophic axis in animal post-natal growth, development and fertility is well established. Therefore, the identification of genetic variants affecting quantitative traits within this axis is an attractive goal. However, large sample numbers are a pre-requisite for the identification of genetic variants underlying complex traits and although technologies are improving rapidly, high-throughput sequencing of large numbers of complete individual genomes remains prohibitively expensive. Therefore using a pooled DNA approach coupled with target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms and estimate allele frequency differences across 83 candidate genes of the somatotrophic axis, in 150 Holstein-Friesian dairy bulls divided into two groups divergent for genetic merit for fertility. Results In total, 4,135 SNPs and 893 indels were identified during the resequencing of the 83 candidate genes. Nineteen percent (n = 952) of variants were located within 5' and 3' UTRs. Seventy-two percent (n = 3,612) were intronic and 9% (n = 464) were exonic, including 65 indels and 236 SNPs resulting in non-synonymous substitutions (NSS). Significant (P < 0.01) mean allele frequency differentials between the low and high fertility groups were observed for 720 SNPs (58 NSS). Allele frequencies for 43 of the SNPs were also determined by genotyping the 150 individual animals (Sequenom® MassARRAY). No significant differences (P > 0.1) were observed between the two methods for any of the 43 SNPs across both pools (i.e., 86 tests in total). Conclusions The results of the current study support previous findings of the use of DNA sample pooling and high-throughput sequencing as a viable strategy for polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation. Using this approach we have characterised the genetic variation within genes of the somatotrophic axis and related pathways, central to mammalian post

  15. Effective High-Throughput Blood Pooling Strategy before DNA Extraction for Detection of Malaria in Low-Transmission Settings

    PubMed Central

    Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Shein, Thinzer; Han, Soe Soe; Zaw, Ni Ni; Han, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Muh, Fauzi; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Sang-Eun; Yang, Eun-Jeong; Chang, Chulhun L.; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    In the era of (pre) elimination setting, the prevalence of malaria has been decreasing in most of the previously endemic areas. Therefore, effective cost- and time-saving validated pooling strategy is needed for detection of malaria in low transmission settings. In this study, optimal pooling numbers and lowest detection limit were assessed using known density samples prepared systematically, followed by genomic DNA extraction and nested PCR. Pooling strategy that composed of 10 samples in 1 pool, 20 µl in 1 sample, was optimal, and the parasite density as low as 2 p/µl for both falciparum and vivax infection was enough for detection of malaria. This pooling method showed effectiveness for handling of a huge number of samples in low transmission settings (<9% positive rate). The results indicated that pooling of the blood samples before DNA extraction followed by usual nested PCR is useful and effective for detection of malaria in screening of hidden cases in low-transmission settings. PMID:27417078

  16. Effective High-Throughput Blood Pooling Strategy before DNA Extraction for Detection of Malaria in Low-Transmission Settings.

    PubMed

    Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Shein, Thinzer; Han, Soe Soe; Zaw, Ni Ni; Han, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Muh, Fauzi; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Sang-Eun; Yang, Eun-Jeong; Chang, Chulhun L; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-06-01

    In the era of (pre) elimination setting, the prevalence of malaria has been decreasing in most of the previously endemic areas. Therefore, effective cost- and time-saving validated pooling strategy is needed for detection of malaria in low transmission settings. In this study, optimal pooling numbers and lowest detection limit were assessed using known density samples prepared systematically, followed by genomic DNA extraction and nested PCR. Pooling strategy that composed of 10 samples in 1 pool, 20 µl in 1 sample, was optimal, and the parasite density as low as 2 p/µl for both falciparum and vivax infection was enough for detection of malaria. This pooling method showed effectiveness for handling of a huge number of samples in low transmission settings (<9% positive rate). The results indicated that pooling of the blood samples before DNA extraction followed by usual nested PCR is useful and effective for detection of malaria in screening of hidden cases in low-transmission settings. PMID:27417078

  17. Combining of different data pools for calculating a reliable POD for real defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzler, Daniel; Müller, Christina; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-01

    Real defects are essential for the evaluation of the reliability of non destructive testing (NDT) methods, especially in relation to the integrity of components. But in most of the cases the amount of available real defects is not sufficient to evaluate the system. Model-assisted and transfer functions are one way to handle that challenge. This study is focused on a combination of different data pools to create a sufficient amount of data for the reliability estimation. A widespread approach for calculating the Probability of Detection (POD) was used on a radiographic testing (RT) method. The highest contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of each indication is usually selected as the signal in the "â vs. a" (signal-response) approach for RT. By combining real and artificial defects (flat bottom holes, side drill holes, flat bottom squares, notches, etc) in RT the highest signals are close to each other, but the process of creating and evaluating real defects is much more complex. The solution is seen in the combination of real and artificial data using a weighted least square approach. The weights for real or artificial data were based on the importance, the value and the different detection behavior of the different data. For comparison, the alternative combination through the Bayesian Updating was also applied. As verification, a data pool with a large amount of real data was available. In an advanced approach for evaluating the digital RT data, the size of the indication (perpendicular to the X-ray beam) was introduced as additional information. The signal now consists of the CNR and the area of the indication. The detectability is changing depending on the area of the indication, a fact that was ignored in the previous POD calculations for RT. This points out that a weighted least square approach to pool the data might no longer be adequate. The Bayesian Updating of the estimated parameters of the relationship between the signal field (the area of the indication) and

  18. Combining of different data pools for calculating a reliable POD for real defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzler, Daniel E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de; Müller, Christina E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-31

    Real defects are essential for the evaluation of the reliability of non destructive testing (NDT) methods, especially in relation to the integrity of components. But in most of the cases the amount of available real defects is not sufficient to evaluate the system. Model-assisted and transfer functions are one way to handle that challenge. This study is focused on a combination of different data pools to create a sufficient amount of data for the reliability estimation. A widespread approach for calculating the Probability of Detection (POD) was used on a radiographic testing (RT) method. The highest contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of each indication is usually selected as the signal in the 'â vs. a' (signal-response) approach for RT. By combining real and artificial defects (flat bottom holes, side drill holes, flat bottom squares, notches, etc) in RT the highest signals are close to each other, but the process of creating and evaluating real defects is much more complex. The solution is seen in the combination of real and artificial data using a weighted least square approach. The weights for real or artificial data were based on the importance, the value and the different detection behavior of the different data. For comparison, the alternative combination through the Bayesian Updating was also applied. As verification, a data pool with a large amount of real data was available. In an advanced approach for evaluating the digital RT data, the size of the indication (perpendicular to the X-ray beam) was introduced as additional information. The signal now consists of the CNR and the area of the indication. The detectability is changing depending on the area of the indication, a fact that was ignored in the previous POD calculations for RT. This points out that a weighted least square approach to pool the data might no longer be adequate. The Bayesian Updating of the estimated parameters of the relationship between the signal field (the area of the indication) and

  19. Microarray-based estimation of SNP allele-frequency in pooled DNA using the Langmuir kinetic model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bin-Cheng; Li, Honghua; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2008-01-01

    Background High throughput genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genome-wide association requires technologies for generating millions of genotypes with relative ease but also at a reasonable cost and with high accuracy. In this work, we have developed a theoretical approach to estimate allele frequency in pooled DNA samples, based on the physical principles of DNA immobilization and hybridization on solid surface using the Langmuir kinetic model and quantitative analysis of the allelic signals. Results This method can successfully distinguish allele frequencies differing by 0.01 in the actual pool of clinical samples, and detect alleles with a frequency as low as 2%. The accuracy of measuring known allele frequencies is very high, with the strength of correlation between measured and actual frequencies having an r2 = 0.9992. These results demonstrated that this method could allow the accurate estimation of absolute allele frequencies in pooled samples of DNA in a feasible and inexpensive way. Conclusion We conclude that this novel strategy for quantitative analysis of the ratio of SNP allelic sequences in DNA pools is an inexpensive and feasible alternative for detecting polymorphic differences in candidate gene association studies and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium scans. PMID:19087310

  20. Disinfection of herbal spa pool using combined chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pathogenic microorganisms in public spa pools poses a serious threat to human health. The problem is particularly acute in herbal spas, in which the herbs and microorganisms may interact and produce undesirable consequences. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effectiveness of a combined disinfectant containing chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite in improving the water quality of a public herbal spa in Taiwan. Water samples were collected from the spa pool and laboratory tests were then performed to measure the variation over time of the microorganism content (total CFU and total coliforms) and residual disinfectant content given a single disinfection mode (SDM) with disinfectant concentrations of 5.2 × 10, 6.29 × 10, 7.4 × 10, and 11.4 × 10(-5) N, respectively. Utilizing the experience gained from the laboratory tests, a further series of on-site investigations was performed using three different disinfection modes, namely SDM, 3DM (once every 3 h disinfection mode), and 2DM (once every 2 h disinfection mode). The laboratory results showed that for all four disinfectant concentrations, the CFU concentration reduced for the first 6 h following SDM treatment, but then increased. Moreover, the ANOVA results showed that the sample treated with the highest disinfectant concentration (11.4 × 10(-5) N) exhibited the lowest rate of increase in the CFU concentration. In addition, the on-site test results showed that 3DM and 2DM treatments with disinfectant concentrations in excess of 9.3 × 10 and 5.5 × 10(-5) N, respectively, provided an effective reduction in the total CFU concentration. In conclusion, the experimental results presented in this study provide a useful source of reference for spa businesses seeking to improve the water quality of their spa pools. PMID:25632897

  1. Detection of deep vein thrombosis: combined flow and blood pool radionuclide venography vs contrast venography.

    PubMed

    Caner, B; Ozmen, M; Dincer, A; Kapucu, O; Bekdik, C

    1991-10-01

    This study was performed to validate the combined study of flow radionuclide venography (FRV) with subsequent 99mTc-red blood cell(RBC) blood pool radionuclide venography(BRV) for the detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Findings in 32 patients with suspected DVT of lower extremities (n = 52) were compared with those of corresponding contrast venograms (CV) serving as a reference method. FRV was performed by using three separate doses of a large 99mTc04-bolus (10-12 cc) injection. The findings were as follows: concerning the detection of DVT in calf veins, agreement between FRV and CV, FRV+BRV and CV, and BRV and CV were 67%, 73% and 60%, respectively. For femoral veins, agreement between FRV and CV was 96%, while it was 87% between BRV and CV. When FRV and BRV of femoral veins were evaluated in combination, 100% agreement between radionuclide and radiologic method was observed. For iliac veins there was no disagreement in comparison of the methods either singly or in combination. In 7.6% of the extremities, collaterals not demonstrated by CV and BRV were visualized only by FRV. Although the radioactive agent was injected in a relatively large volume, all of the calf veins could not be filled even when they were completely patent. It was concluded that a combined study of FRV with BRV improved the diagnostic value of radionuclide venography for the detection of DVT in calf and femoral veins. PMID:1659257

  2. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  3. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  4. Clines of nuclear DNA markers suggest a largely neolithic ancestry of the European gene pool.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, L; Destro-Bisol, G; Bertorelle, G; Pascali, V; Barbujani, G

    1998-07-21

    Comparisons between archaeological findings and allele frequencies at protein loci suggest that most genes of current Europeans descend from populations that have been expanding in Europe in the last 10, 000 years, in the Neolithic period. Recent mitochondrial data have been interpreted as indicating a much older, Paleolithic ancestry. In a spatial autocorrelation study at seven hypervariable loci in Europe (four microsatellites, two larger, tandem-repeat loci, and a sequence polymorphism) broad clinal patterns of DNA variation were recognized. The observed clines closely match those described at the protein level, in agreement with a possible Near Eastern origin for the ancestral population. Separation times between populations were estimated on the basis of a stepwise mutation model. Even assuming low mutation rates and long generation times, we found no evidence for population splits older than 10,000 years, with the predictable exception of Saami (Lapps). The simplest interpretation of these results is that the current nuclear gene pool largely reflects the westward and northward expansion of a Neolithic group. This conclusion is now supported by purely genetic evidence on the levels and patterns of microsatellite diversity, rather than by correlations of biological and nonbiological data. We argue that many mitochondrial lineages whose origin has been traced back to the Paleolithic period probably reached Europe at a later time. PMID:9671803

  5. DNA Profiling of Convicted Offender Samples for the Combined DNA Index System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    The cornerstone of forensic chemistry is that a perpetrator inevitably leaves trace evidence at a crime scene. One important type of evidence is DNA, which has been instrumental in both the implication and exoneration of thousands of suspects in a wide range of crimes. The Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), a network of DNA databases, provides…

  6. Reduced Representation Libraries from DNA Pools Analysed with Next Generation Semiconductor Based-Sequencing to Identify SNPs in Extreme and Divergent Pigs for Back Fat Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Bovo, Samuele; Bertolini, Francesca; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Dall'Olio, Stefania; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that could be associated with back fat thickness (BFT) in pigs. To achieve this goal, we evaluated the potential and limits of an experimental design that combined several methodologies. DNA samples from two groups of Italian Large White pigs with divergent estimating breeding value (EBV) for BFT were separately pooled and sequenced, after preparation of reduced representation libraries (RRLs), on the Ion Torrent technology. Taking advantage from SNAPE for SNPs calling in sequenced DNA pools, 39,165 SNPs were identified; 1/4 of them were novel variants not reported in dbSNP. Combining sequencing data with Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip genotyping results on the same animals, 661 genomic positions overlapped with a good approximation of minor allele frequency estimation. A total of 54 SNPs showing enriched alleles in one or in the other RRLs might be potential markers associated with BFT. Some of these SNPs were close to genes involved in obesity related phenotypes. PMID:25821781

  7. Reduced Representation Libraries from DNA Pools Analysed with Next Generation Semiconductor Based-Sequencing to Identify SNPs in Extreme and Divergent Pigs for Back Fat Thickness.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Samuele; Bertolini, Francesca; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Dall'Olio, Stefania; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that could be associated with back fat thickness (BFT) in pigs. To achieve this goal, we evaluated the potential and limits of an experimental design that combined several methodologies. DNA samples from two groups of Italian Large White pigs with divergent estimating breeding value (EBV) for BFT were separately pooled and sequenced, after preparation of reduced representation libraries (RRLs), on the Ion Torrent technology. Taking advantage from SNAPE for SNPs calling in sequenced DNA pools, 39,165 SNPs were identified; 1/4 of them were novel variants not reported in dbSNP. Combining sequencing data with Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip genotyping results on the same animals, 661 genomic positions overlapped with a good approximation of minor allele frequency estimation. A total of 54 SNPs showing enriched alleles in one or in the other RRLs might be potential markers associated with BFT. Some of these SNPs were close to genes involved in obesity related phenotypes. PMID:25821781

  8. A genome-wide study of preferential amplification/hybridization in microarray-based pooled DNA experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.-C.; Liang, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-C.; Li, L.-H.; Lin, C.-H.; Wu, J.-Y.; Chen, Y.-T.; Fann, C.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based pooled DNA methods overcome the cost bottleneck of simultaneously genotyping more than 100 000 markers for numerous study individuals. The success of such methods relies on the proper adjustment of preferential amplification/hybridization to ensure accurate and reliable allele frequency estimation. We performed a hybridization-based genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping analysis to dissect preferential amplification/hybridization. The majority of SNPs had less than 2-fold signal amplification or suppression, and the lognormal distributions adequately modeled preferential amplification/hybridization across the human genome. Comparative analyses suggested that the distributions of preferential amplification/hybridization differed among genotypes and the GC content. Patterns among different ethnic populations were similar; nevertheless, there were striking differences for a small proportion of SNPs, and a slight ethnic heterogeneity was observed. To fulfill appropriate and gratuitous adjustments, databases of preferential amplification/hybridization for African Americans, Caucasians and Asians were constructed based on the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set. The robustness of allele frequency estimation using this database was validated by a pooled DNA experiment. This study provides a genome-wide investigation of preferential amplification/hybridization and suggests guidance for the reliable use of the database. Our results constitute an objective foundation for theoretical development of preferential amplification/hybridization and provide important information for future pooled DNA analyses. PMID:16931491

  9. SNP discovery using Paired-End RAD-tag sequencing on pooled genomic DNA of Sisymbrium austriacum (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Vandepitte, K; Honnay, O; Mergeay, J; Breyne, P; Roldán-Ruiz, I; De Meyer, T

    2013-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms SNPs are rapidly replacing anonymous markers in population genomic studies, but their use in non model organisms is hampered by the scarcity of cost-effective approaches to uncover genome-wide variation in a comprehensive subset of individuals. The screening of one or only a few individuals induces ascertainment bias. To discover SNPs for a population genomic study of the Pyrenean rocket (Sisymbrium austriacum subsp. chrysanthum), we undertook a pooled RAD-PE (Restriction site Associated DNA Paired-End sequencing) approach. RAD tags were generated from the PstI-digested pooled genomic DNA of 12 individuals sampled across the species distribution range and paired-end sequenced using Illumina technology to produce ~24.5 Mb of sequences, covering ~7% of the specie's genome. Sequences were assembled into ~76 000 contigs with a mean length of 323 bp (N(50)  = 357 bp, sequencing depth = 24x). In all, >15 000 SNPs were called, of which 47% were annotated in putative genic regions based on homology with the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Gene ontology (GO) slim categorization demonstrated that the identified SNPs covered extant genic variation well. The validation of 300 SNPs on a larger set of individuals using a KASPar assay underpinned the utility of pooled RAD-PE as an inexpensive genome-wide SNP discovery technique (success rate: 87%). In addition to SNPs, we discovered >600 putative SSR markers. PMID:23231662

  10. Sequence evaluation of four pooled-tissue normalized bovine cDNA libraries and construction of a gene index for cattle.

    PubMed

    Smith, T P; Grosse, W M; Freking, B A; Roberts, A J; Stone, R T; Casas, E; Wray, J E; White, J; Cho, J; Fahrenkrug, S C; Bennett, G L; Heaton, M P; Laegreid, W W; Rohrer, G A; Chitko-McKown, C G; Pertea, G; Holt, I; Karamycheva, S; Liang, F; Quackenbush, J; Keele, J W

    2001-04-01

    An essential component of functional genomics studies is the sequence of DNA expressed in tissues of interest. To provide a resource of bovine-specific expressed sequence data and facilitate this powerful approach in cattle research, four normalized cDNA libraries were produced and arrayed for high-throughput sequencing. The libraries were made with RNA pooled from multiple tissues to increase efficiency of normalization and maximize the number of independent genes for which sequence data were obtained. Target tissues included those with highest likelihood to have impact on production parameters of animal health, growth, reproductive efficiency, and carcass merit. Success of normalization and inter- and intralibrary redundancy were assessed by collecting 6000-23,000 sequences from each of the libraries (68,520 total sequences deposited in GenBank). Sequence comparison and assembly of these sequences was performed in combination with 56,500 other bovine EST sequences present in the GenBank dbEST database to construct a cattle Gene Index (available from The Institute for Genomic Research at http://www.tigr.org/tdb/tgi.shtml). The 124,381 bovine ESTs present in GenBank at the time of the analysis form 16,740 assemblies that are listed and annotated on the Web site. Analysis of individual library sequence data indicates that the pooled-tissue approach was highly effective in preparing libraries for efficient deep sequencing. PMID:11282978

  11. Cost-Effective Pooling of DNA from Nasopharyngeal Swab Samples for Large-Scale Detection of Bacteria by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Edouard, Sophie; Prudent, Elsa; Gautret, Philippe; Memish, Ziad A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the potential of pooling DNA from nasopharyngeal specimens to reduce the cost of real-time PCR (RT-PCR) for bacterial detection. Lyophilization is required to reconcentrate DNA. This strategy yields a high specificity (86%) and a high sensitivity (96%). We estimate that compared to individual testing, 37% fewer RT-PCR tests are needed. PMID:25552360

  12. Fish scales and SNP chips: SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in individual and pooled DNA from historical samples of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA extracted from historical samples is an important resource for understanding genetic consequences of anthropogenic influences and long-term environmental change. However, such samples generally yield DNA of a lower amount and quality, and the extent to which DNA degradation affects SNP genotyping success and allele frequency estimation is not well understood. We conducted high density SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in both individual DNA samples and pooled DNA samples extracted from dried Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) scales stored at room temperature for up to 35 years, and assessed genotyping success, repeatability and accuracy of allele frequency estimation using a high density SNP genotyping array. Results In individual DNA samples, genotyping success and repeatability was very high (> 0.973 and > 0.998, respectively) in samples stored for up to 35 years; both increased with the proportion of DNA of fragment size > 1000 bp. In pooled DNA samples, allele frequency estimation was highly repeatable (Repeatability = 0.986) and highly correlated with empirical allele frequency measures (Mean Adjusted R2 = 0.991); allele frequency could be accurately estimated in > 95% of pooled DNA samples with a reference group of at least 30 individuals. SNPs located in polyploid regions of the genome were more sensitive to DNA degradation: older samples had lower genotyping success at these loci, and a larger reference panel of individuals was required to accurately estimate allele frequencies. Conclusions SNP genotyping was highly successful in degraded DNA samples, paving the way for the use of degraded samples in SNP genotyping projects. DNA pooling provides the potential for large scale population genetic studies with fewer assays, provided enough reference individuals are also genotyped and DNA quality is properly assessed beforehand. We provide recommendations for future studies intending to conduct high-throughput SNP

  13. Uniparental Genetic Heritage of Belarusians: Encounter of Rare Middle Eastern Matrilineages with a Central European Mitochondrial DNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Kushniarevich, Alena; Sivitskaya, Larysa; Danilenko, Nina; Novogrodskii, Tadeush; Tsybovsky, Iosif; Kiseleva, Anna; Kotova, Svetlana; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Metspalu, Ene; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Reidla, Maere; Rootsi, Siiri; Parik, Jüri; Reisberg, Tuuli; Achilli, Alessandro; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Gandini, Francesca; Olivieri, Anna; Behar, Doron M.; Torroni, Antonio; Davydenko, Oleg; Villems, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Ethnic Belarusians make up more than 80% of the nine and half million people inhabiting the Republic of Belarus. Belarusians together with Ukrainians and Russians represent the East Slavic linguistic group, largest both in numbers and territory, inhabiting East Europe alongside Baltic-, Finno-Permic- and Turkic-speaking people. Till date, only a limited number of low resolution genetic studies have been performed on this population. Therefore, with the phylogeographic analysis of 565 Y-chromosomes and 267 mitochondrial DNAs from six well covered geographic sub-regions of Belarus we strove to complement the existing genetic profile of eastern Europeans. Our results reveal that around 80% of the paternal Belarusian gene pool is composed of R1a, I2a and N1c Y-chromosome haplogroups – a profile which is very similar to the two other eastern European populations – Ukrainians and Russians. The maternal Belarusian gene pool encompasses a full range of West Eurasian haplogroups and agrees well with the genetic structure of central-east European populations. Our data attest that latitudinal gradients characterize the variation of the uniparentally transmitted gene pools of modern Belarusians. In particular, the Y-chromosome reflects movements of people in central-east Europe, starting probably as early as the beginning of the Holocene. Furthermore, the matrilineal legacy of Belarusians retains two rare mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, N1a3 and N3, whose phylogeographies were explored in detail after de novo sequencing of 20 and 13 complete mitogenomes, respectively, from all over Eurasia. Our phylogeographic analyses reveal that two mitochondrial DNA lineages, N3 and N1a3, both of Middle Eastern origin, might mark distinct events of matrilineal gene flow to Europe: during the mid-Holocene period and around the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, respectively. PMID:23785503

  14. Exome sequencing in pooled DNA samples to identify maternal pre-eclampsia risk variants

    PubMed Central

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Wang, Jingwen; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Gerdhem, Paul; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common pregnancy disorder that is a major cause for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Variants predisposing to pre-eclampsia might be under negative evolutionary selection that is likely to keep their population frequencies low. We exome sequenced samples from a hundred Finnish pre-eclamptic women in pools of ten to screen for low-frequency, large-effect risk variants for pre-eclampsia. After filtering and additional genotyping steps, we selected 28 low-frequency missense, nonsense and splice site variants that were enriched in the pre-eclampsia pools compared to reference data, and genotyped the variants in 1353 pre-eclamptic and 699 non-pre-eclamptic women to test the association of them with pre-eclampsia and quantitative traits relevant for the disease. Genotypes from the SISu project (n = 6118 exome sequenced Finnish samples) were included in the binary trait association analysis as a population reference to increase statistical power. In these analyses, none of the variants tested reached genome-wide significance. In conclusion, the genetic risk for pre-eclampsia is likely complex even in a population isolate like Finland, and larger sample sizes will be necessary to detect risk variants. PMID:27384325

  15. Exome sequencing in pooled DNA samples to identify maternal pre-eclampsia risk variants.

    PubMed

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Wang, Jingwen; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Gerdhem, Paul; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common pregnancy disorder that is a major cause for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Variants predisposing to pre-eclampsia might be under negative evolutionary selection that is likely to keep their population frequencies low. We exome sequenced samples from a hundred Finnish pre-eclamptic women in pools of ten to screen for low-frequency, large-effect risk variants for pre-eclampsia. After filtering and additional genotyping steps, we selected 28 low-frequency missense, nonsense and splice site variants that were enriched in the pre-eclampsia pools compared to reference data, and genotyped the variants in 1353 pre-eclamptic and 699 non-pre-eclamptic women to test the association of them with pre-eclampsia and quantitative traits relevant for the disease. Genotypes from the SISu project (n = 6118 exome sequenced Finnish samples) were included in the binary trait association analysis as a population reference to increase statistical power. In these analyses, none of the variants tested reached genome-wide significance. In conclusion, the genetic risk for pre-eclampsia is likely complex even in a population isolate like Finland, and larger sample sizes will be necessary to detect risk variants. PMID:27384325

  16. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA and lung cancer: a pooled analysis of three prospective cohorts.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Jie; Cawthon, Richard M; Purdue, Mark P; Hu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Huang, Wen-Yi; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Ji, Bu-Tian; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hosgood, H Dean; Bassig, Bryan A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Min, Shen; Chow, Wong-Ho; Berndt, Sonja I; Kim, Christopher; Lim, Unhee; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E; Chanock, Stephen; Zheng, Wei; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the relationship between telomere length and lung cancer in a pooled analysis from three prospective cohort studies: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, conducted among men and women in the United States, and previously published data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial conducted among male smokers in Finland, and the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), which is comprised primarily of never-smokers. The pooled population included 847 cases and 847 controls matched by study, age, and sex. Leukocyte telomere length was measured by a monochrome multiplex qPCR assay. We used conditional logistic regression models to calculate ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between telomere length and lung cancer risk, adjusted for age and pack-years of smoking. Longer telomere length was associated with increased lung cancer risk in the pooled analysis [OR (95% CI) by quartile: 1.00; 1.24 (0.90-1.71); 1.27 (0.91-1.78); and 1.86 (1.33-2.62); P trend = 0.000022]. Findings were consistent across the three cohorts and strongest for subjects with very long telomere length, i.e., lung cancer risks for telomere length [OR (95% CI)] in the upper half of the fourth quartile were 2.41 (1.28-4.52), 2.16 (1.11-4.23), and 3.02(1.39-6.58) for the PLCO trial, the ATBC trial, and the SWHS, respectively. In addition, the association persisted among cases diagnosed more than 6 years after blood collection and was particularly evident for female adenocarcinoma cases. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA may be a biomarker of future increased risk of lung cancer in diverse populations. PMID:24853549

  17. DNA methyltransferase detection based on digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine DNA with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Wang, Dandan; Zhou, Yunlei; Wang, Haiyan; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-06-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) has received a large amount of attention due to its catalyzation of DNA methylation in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. Herein, a novel electrochemical strategy based on Dpn I digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine (polyA) DNA with a gold nanoparticles functioned glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/GCE), is developed for the simple and efficient detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. Only one methylene blue (MB)-labeled DNA hairpin probe and two enzymes are involved in this designed method. In the presence of Dam MTase, the hairpin probe can be methylated and then cleaved by the restriction endonuclease. Thus, a MB-labeled polyA signal-stranded DNA product is introduced to the surface of AuNPs/GCE through the effect between polyA and AuNPs, resulting in an obvious electrochemical signal. On the contrary, in the absence of Dam MTase, the DNA probe cannot be cleaved and a relatively small electrochemical response can be observed. As a result, the as-proposed biosensor offered an efficient way for Dam MTase activity monitoring with a low detection of 0.27U/mL, a wide linear range and good stability. Additionally, this assay holds great potential for further application in real biological matrices and inhibitors screening, which is expected to be useful in disease diagnosis and drug discovery. PMID:26807517

  18. Quantitative trait locus mapping in chickens by selective DNA pooling with dinucleotide microsatellite markers by using purified DNA and fresh or frozen red blood cells as applied to marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, E; Fulton, J; Cheng, H; Yonash, N; Soller, M

    2002-03-01

    Many large, half-sib sire families are an integral component of chicken genetic improvement programs. These family structures include a sufficient number of individuals for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) at high statistical power. However, realizing this statistical power through individual or selective genotyping is yet too costly to be feasible under current genotyping methodologies. Genotyping costs can be greatly reduced through selective DNA pooling, involving densitometric estimates of marker allele frequencies in pooled DNA samples. When using dinucleotide microsatellite markers, however, such estimates are often confounded by overlapping "shadow" bands and can be confounded further by differential amplification of alleles. In the present study a shadow correction procedure provided accurate densitometric estimates of allele frequency for dinucleotide microsatellite markers in pools made from chicken purified DNA samples, fresh blood samples, and frozen-thawed blood samples. In a retrospective study, selective DNA pooling with thawed blood samples successfully identified two QTL previously shown by selective genotyping to affect resistance in chickens to Marek's disease. It is proposed that use of selective DNA pooling can provide relatively low-cost mapping and use in marker-assisted selection of QTL that affect production traits in chickens. PMID:11902402

  19. Detection of Onchocerca volvulus in Latin American black flies for pool screening PCR using high-throughput automated DNA isolation for transmission surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Gopal, Hemavathi; Adeleke, Monsuru Adebayo; De Luna-Santillana, Erick Jesús; Gurrola-Reyes, J Natividad; Guo, Xianwu

    2013-11-01

    The posttreatment entomological surveillance (ES) of onchocerciasis in Latin America requires quite large numbers of flies to be examined for parasite infection to prove that the control strategies have worked and that the infection is on the path of elimination. Here, we report a high-throughput automated DNA isolation of Onchocerca volvulus for PCR using a major Latin American black fly vector of onchocerciasis. The sensitivity and relative effectiveness of silica-coated paramagnetic beads was evaluated in comparison with phenol chloroform (PC) method which is known as the gold standard of DNA extraction for ES in Latin America. The automated method was optimized in the laboratory and validated in the field to detect parasite DNA in Simulium ochraceum sensu lato flies in comparison with PC. The optimization of the automated method showed that it is sensitive to detect O. volvulus with a pool size of 100 flies as compared with PC which utilizes 50 flies pool size. The validation of the automated method in comparison with PC in an endemic community showed that 5/67 and 3/134 heads pools were positive for the two methods, respectively. There was no statistical variation (P < 0.05) in the estimation of transmission indices generated by automated method when compared with PC method. The fact that the automated method is sensitive to pool size up to 100 confers advantage over PC method and can, therefore, be employed in large-scale ES of onchocerciasis transmission in endemic areas of Latin America. PMID:24030195

  20. Quantify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ratio in pooled DNA based on normalized fluorescence real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Airong; Geng, Haifeng; Zhou, Xuerui

    2006-01-01

    Background Conventional real-time PCR to quantify the allele ratio in pooled DNA mainly depends on PCR amplification efficiency determination and Ct value, which is defined as the PCR cycle number at which the fluorescence emission exceeds the fixed threshold. Because of the nature of exponential calculation, slight errors are multiplied and the variations of the results seem too large. We have developed a new PCR data point analysis strategy for allele ratio quantification based on normalized fluorescence ratio. Results In our method, initial reaction background fluorescence was determined based upon fitting of raw fluorescence data to four-parametric sigmoid function. After that, each fluorescence data point was first subtracted by respective background fluorescence and then each subtracted fluorescence data point was divided by the specific background fluorescence to get normalized fluorescence. By relating the normalized fluorescence ratio to the premixed known allele ratio of two alleles in standard samples, standard linear regression equation was generated, from which unknown specimens allele ratios were extrapolated using the measured normalized fluorescence ratio. In this article, we have compared the results of the proposed method with those of baseline subtracted fluorescence ratio method and conventional Ct method. Conclusion Results demonstrated that the proposed method could improve the reliability, precision, and repeatability for quantifying allele ratios. At the same time, it has the potential of fully automatic allelic ratio quantification. PMID:16764712

  1. Simple combined model for nonlinear excitations in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hien, D L; Nhan, N T; Ngo, V Thanh; Viet, N A

    2007-08-01

    We propose a simple model for DNA denaturation bases on the pendulum model of Englander [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 7222 (1980)] and the microscopic model of Peyrard and Bishop [Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2755 (1989)], so-called "combined model." The main parameters of our model are the coupling constant k along each strand, the mean stretching y* of the hydrogen bonds, the ratio of the damping constant and driven force gamma/F. We show that both the length L of unpaired bases and the velocity v of kinks depend on not only the coupling constant k but also the temperature T. Our results are in good agreement with previous works. PMID:17930079

  2. Mutation analysis with random DNA identifiers (MARDI) catalogs Pig-a mutations in heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Revollo, Javier R; Crabtree, Nathaniel M; Pearce, Mason G; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N

    2016-03-01

    Identification of mutations induced by xenotoxins is a common task in the field of genetic toxicology. Mutations are often detected by clonally expanding potential mutant cells and genotyping each viable clone by Sanger sequencing. Such a "clone-by-clone" approach requires significant time and effort, and sometimes is even impossible to implement. Alternative techniques for efficient mutation identification would greatly benefit both basic and regulatory genetic toxicology research. Here, we report the development of Mutation Analysis with Random DNA Identifiers (MARDI), a novel high-fidelity Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach that circumvents clonal expansion and directly catalogs mutations in pools of mutant cells. MARDI uses oligonucleotides carrying Random DNA Identifiers (RDIs) to tag progenitor DNA molecules before PCR amplification, enabling clustering of descendant DNA molecules and eliminating NGS- and PCR-induced sequencing artifacts. When applied to the Pig-a cDNA analysis of heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats, MARDI detected nearly all Pig-a mutations that were previously identified by conventional clone-by-clone analysis and discovered many additional ones consistent with DMBA exposure: mostly A to T transversions, with the mutated A located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. PMID:26683280

  3. Genome-wide Association Study of Subtype-Specific Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Alleles Using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Swenerton, Kenneth D.; Chenevix–Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T.; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia–Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Flanagan, James M.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Narod, Steven A.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks–Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS (56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC), selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging 6 loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P<0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR=1.17, P=0.029, n=1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P=0.014, n=2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR=0.86, P=0.0043, n=892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR=0.84, P=0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P<0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  4. A combined DNA vaccine provides protective immunity against Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xi-Dan; Yu, Da-Hai; Chen, Su-Ting; Li, Shu-Xia; Cai, Hong

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a combined DNA vaccine containing six genes encoding immunodominant antigens from Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus. The number of lymph node and spleen cultures positive for M. bovis and B. abortus from calves immunized with the combined DNA vaccine was significantly reduced (p < 0.01) compared with unvaccinated calves after challenge with virulent M. bovis and B. abortus 544. The combined DNA vaccine group displayed stronger antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses and antigen-specific IFN-gamma ELISPOT activities 2 months after final immunization and after challenge. Antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in the combined DNA vaccine group were higher than either the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-positive or S19-positive control group. Likewise, more calves in the DNA vaccine group exhibited antigen-specific IgG titers and had higher IgG titers than those in the BCG- or S19-immunized groups 2 months after the final immunization. Moreover, two antigens in the combined DNA vaccine induced significant antigen-specific IFN-gamma responses 6 months after challenge (p < 0.05). Bacterial counts and pathological analyses of the challenged animals indicated that the combined DNA vaccine provided significantly better protection than the BCG vaccine against M. bovis, and the protection level induced by the combined DNA vaccine was comparable to S19 against B. abortus. This is the first report to demonstrate that a single combined DNA vaccine protects cattle against two infectious diseases. PMID:19364278

  5. Combinative exposure effect of radio frequency signals from CDMA mobile phones and aphidicolin on DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, R; Lakshmi, N K; Surender, V; Rajesh, A D V; Bhargava, S C; Ahuja, Y R

    2008-01-01

    The aim of present study is to assess DNA integrity on the effect of exposure to a radio frequency (RF) signal from Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) mobile phones. Whole blood samples from six healthy male individuals were exposed for RF signals from a CDMA mobile phone for 1 h. Alkaline comet assay was performed to assess the DNA damage. The combinative exposure effect of the RF signals and APC at two concentrations on DNA integrity was studied. DNA repair efficiency of the samples was also studied after 2 h of exposure. The RF signals and APC (0.2 microg/ml) alone or in synergism did not have any significant DNA damage as compared to sham exposed. However, univariate analysis showed that DNA damage was significantly different among combinative exposure of RF signals and APC at 0.2 microg/ml (p < 0.05) and at 2 microg/ml (p < 0.02). APC at 2 microg/ml concentration also showed significant damage levels (p < 0.05) when compared to sham exposed. DNA repair efficiency also varied in a significant way in combinative exposure sets (p < 0.05). From these results, it appears that the repair inhibitor APC enhances DNA breaks at 2 microg/ml concentration and that the damage is possibly repairable. Thus, it can be inferred that the in vitro exposure to RF signals induces reversible DNA damage in synergism with APC. PMID:19037791

  6. Enhancement of anti-proliferative activities of Metformin, when combined with Celecoxib, without increasing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Asad; Ashraf, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Attiq, Ali; Ali, Sarwat

    2016-07-01

    Pathophysiological changes in diabetes like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia predispose cells to malignant transformation and damage DNA repair mechanism. This study was designed to explore the potential synergistic toxic effects of anti-diabetic drug (Metformin), and an analgesic drug (Celecoxib) at cellular level. MTT assay run on Vero cell line revealed that the combinations of Metformin and Celecoxib augment the anti-proliferative effects, whereas Single cell gel electrophoresis spotlighted that Metformin produce non-significant DNA damage with the threshold concentration of 400μg/ml in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (lymphocytes and monocytes), while Celecoxib produced significant (P<0.05) DNA damage (class III comets) above the concentration of 75μg/ml, however the DNA damage or DNA tail protrusions by combinations of both drugs were less than what was observed with Celecoxib alone. Metformin or Celecoxib did not appear mutagenic against any mutant strains (TA 100 and TA 98) but their combination exhibited slight mutagenicity at much higher concentration. The results obtained at concentrations higher than the therapeutic level of drugs and reflect that Metformin in combination with Celecoxib synergistically inhibits the cell proliferation in a concentration dependent pattern. Since, this increase in cytotoxicity did not confer an increase in DNA damage; this combination could be adopted to inhibit the growth of malignant cell without producing any genotoxic or mutagenic effects at cellular level. PMID:27327526

  7. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  8. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing for DNA using quantum dots combined with restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Lou, Jing; Tu, Wenwen; Bao, Jianchun; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-01-21

    A universal and sensitive electrochemical biosensing platform for the detection and identification of DNA using CdSe quantum dots (CdSe QDs) as signal markers was designed. The detection mechanism was based on the specific recognition of MspI endonuclease combined with the signal amplification of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). MspI endonuclease could recognize its specific sequence in the double-strand DNA (dsDNA) and cleave the dsDNA fragments linked with CdSe QDs from the electrode. The remaining attached CdSe QDs can be easily read out by square-wave voltammetry using an electrodeposited bismuth (Bi) film-modified glass carbon electrode. The concentrations of target DNA could be simultaneously detected by the signal of metal markers. Using mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) DNA as a model, under the optimal conditions, the proposed biosensor could detect Mtb DNA down to 8.7 × 10(-15) M with a linear range of 5 orders of magnitude (from 1.0 × 10(-14) to 1.0 × 10(-9) M) and discriminate mismatched DNA with high selectivity. This strategy presented a universal and convenient biosensing platform for DNA assay, and its satisfactory performances make it a potential candidate for the early diagnosis of gene-related diseases. PMID:25408952

  9. Constructing the parental linkage phase and the genetic map over distances <1 cM using pooled haploid DNA.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Dario; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2006-02-01

    A new statistical approach for construction of the genetic linkage map and estimation of the parental linkage phase based on allele frequency data from pooled gametic (sperm or egg) samples is introduced. This method can be applied for estimation of recombination fractions (over distances <1 cM) and ordering of large numbers (even hundreds) of closely linked markers. This method should be extremely useful in species with a long generation interval and a large genome size such as in dairy cattle or in forest trees; the conifer species have haploid tissues available in megagametophytes. According to Mendelian expectation, two parental alleles should occur in gametes in 1:1 proportions, if segregation distortion does not occur. However, due to mere sampling variation, the observed proportions may deviate from their expected value in practice. These deviations and their dependence along the chromosome can provide information on the parental linkage phase and on the genetic linkage map. Usefulness of the method is illustrated with simulations. The role of segregation distortion as a source of these deviations is also discussed. The software implementing this method is freely available for research purposes from the authors. PMID:16301209

  10. Deep Sequencing of the Nicastrin Gene in Pooled DNA, the Identification of Genetic Variants That Affect Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lupton, Michelle K.; Proitsi, Petroula; Danillidou, Makrina; Tsolaki, Magda; Hamilton, Gillian; Wroe, Richard; Pritchard, Megan; Lord, Kathryn; Martin, Belinda M.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Harold, Denise; Hollingworth, Paul; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Nicastrin is an obligatory component of the γ-secretase; the enzyme complex that leads to the production of Aβ fragments critically central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Analyses of the effects of common variation in this gene on risk for late onset AD have been inconclusive. We investigated the effect of rare variation in the coding regions of the Nicastrin gene in a cohort of AD patients and matched controls using an innovative pooling approach and next generation sequencing. Five SNPs were identified and validated by individual genotyping from 311 cases and 360 controls. Association analysis identified a non-synonymous rare SNP (N417Y) with a statistically higher frequency in cases compared to controls in the Greek population (OR 3.994, CI 1.105–14.439, p = 0.035). This finding warrants further investigation in a larger cohort and adds weight to the hypothesis that rare variation explains some of genetic heritability still to be identified in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21364883

  11. Single DNA molecule grafting and manipulation using a combined atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.; Libchaber, A.

    1997-12-01

    In this letter, we report on spatially selecting and grafting a DNA-tethered bead to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, using an optical tweezer. To quantify this technique, we measure force versus extension of a single DNA molecule using AFM. For such studies, we have developed a micromanipulation approach by combining an AFM, an optical tweezer, and visualization setup. The ability to select a single DNA polymer and specifically graft it to a localized position on a substrate opens up new possibilities in biosensors and bioelectronic devices.

  12. Oxidized dNTPs and the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases combine to induce CAG/CTG repeat instability.

    PubMed

    Cilli, Piera; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Meccia, Ettore; Martire, Alberto; Wilson, Samuel H; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2016-06-20

    DNA trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underlies several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease (HD). Accumulation of oxidized DNA bases and their inefficient processing by base excision repair (BER) are among the factors suggested to contribute to TNR expansion. In this study, we have examined whether oxidation of the purine dNTPs in the dNTP pool provides a source of DNA damage that promotes TNR expansion. We demonstrate that during BER of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) in TNR sequences, DNA polymerase β (POL β) can incorporate 8-oxodGMP with the formation of 8-oxodG:C and 8-oxodG:A mispairs. Their processing by the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases generates closely spaced incisions on opposite DNA strands that are permissive for TNR expansion. Evidence in HD model R6/2 mice indicates that these DNA glycosylases are present in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration. Consistent with prevailing oxidative stress, the same brain areas contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and expression of the p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model where an oxidized dNTPs pool together with aberrant BER processing contribute to TNR expansion in non-replicating cells. PMID:26980281

  13. Oxidized dNTPs and the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases combine to induce CAG/CTG repeat instability

    PubMed Central

    Cilli, Piera; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Meccia, Ettore; Martire, Alberto; Wilson, Samuel H.; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    DNA trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underlies several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease (HD). Accumulation of oxidized DNA bases and their inefficient processing by base excision repair (BER) are among the factors suggested to contribute to TNR expansion. In this study, we have examined whether oxidation of the purine dNTPs in the dNTP pool provides a source of DNA damage that promotes TNR expansion. We demonstrate that during BER of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) in TNR sequences, DNA polymerase β (POL β) can incorporate 8-oxodGMP with the formation of 8-oxodG:C and 8-oxodG:A mispairs. Their processing by the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases generates closely spaced incisions on opposite DNA strands that are permissive for TNR expansion. Evidence in HD model R6/2 mice indicates that these DNA glycosylases are present in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration. Consistent with prevailing oxidative stress, the same brain areas contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and expression of the p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model where an oxidized dNTPs pool together with aberrant BER processing contribute to TNR expansion in non-replicating cells. PMID:26980281

  14. Evaluation of large-scale genetic structure in complex demographic and historical scenarios: the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome pools of the Iberian Atlantic façade.

    PubMed

    Pardiñas, Antonio F; Roca, Agustín; García-Vazquez, Eva; López, Belén

    2014-04-01

    Genetic structural patterns of human populations are usually a combination of long-term evolutionary forces and short-term social, cultural, and demographic processes. Recently, using mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome loci, various studies in northern Spain have found evidence that the geographical distribution of Iron Age tribal peoples might have influenced current patterns of genetic structuring in several autochthonous populations. Using the wealth of data that are currently available from the whole territory of the Iberian Peninsula, we have evaluated its genetic structuring in the spatial scale of the Atlantic façade. Hierarchical tree modeling procedures, combined with a classic analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), were used to model known sociocultural divisions from the third century BCE to the eighth century CE, contrasting them with uniparental marker data. Our results show that, while mountainous and abrupt areas of the Iberian North bear the signals of long-term isolation in their maternal and paternal gene pools, the makeup of the Atlantic façade as a whole can be related to tribal population groups that predate the Roman conquest of the Peninsula. The maintenance through time of such a structure can be related to the numerous geographic barriers of the Iberian mainland, which have historically conditioned its settlement patterns and the occurrence of genetic drift processes. PMID:24375152

  15. Low-density lipoprotein peptide-combined DNA nanocomplex as an efficient anticancer drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Tao, Jun; Hua, Haiying; Sun, Pengchao; Zhao, Yongxing

    2015-08-01

    DNA is a type of potential biomaterials for drug delivery due to its nanoscale geometry, loading capacity of therapeutics, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Unfortunately, DNA is easily degraded by DNases in the body circulation and has low intracellular uptake. In the present study, we selected three cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor targeted peptide (RLT), to modify DNA and improve the issues. A potent anti-tumor anthracycline-doxorubicin (DOX) was intercalated into DNA non-covalently and the DOX/DNA was then combined with PEI, CTAB, and RLT, respectively. Compact nanocomplexes were formed by electrostatic interaction and could potentially protect DNA from DNases. More importantly, RLT had the potential to enhance intracellular uptake by LDL receptor mediated endocytosis. In a series of in vitro experiments, RLT complexed DNA enhanced intracellular delivery of DOX, increased tumor cell death and intracellular ROS production, and reduced intracellular elimination of DOX. All results suggested that the easily prepared and targeted RLT/DNA nanocomplexes had great potential to be developed into a formulation for doxorubicin with enhanced anti-tumor activity. PMID:25960329

  16. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    SciTech Connect

    Barends, Thomas R. M.; Brosi, Richard W. W.; Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten; Seidel, Ralf; Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine; Bittl, Robert; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal part of T. thermophilus DnaJ unexpectedly showed an ordered GF domain and guided the design of a construct enabling the first structure determination of a complete DnaJ cochaperone molecule. By combining the crystal structures with spin-labelling EPR and cross-linking in solution, a dynamic view of this flexible molecule was developed. Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ.

  17. Genome-wide SNP scan of pooled DNA reveals nonsense mutation in FGF20 in the scaleless line of featherless chickens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scaleless (sc/sc) chickens carry a single recessive mutation that causes a lack of almost all body feathers, as well as foot scales and spurs, due to a failure of skin patterning during embryogenesis. This spontaneous mutant line, first described in the 1950s, has been used extensively to explore the tissue interactions involved in ectodermal appendage formation in embryonic skin. Moreover, the trait is potentially useful in tropical agriculture due to the ability of featherless chickens to tolerate heat, which is at present a major constraint to efficient poultry meat production in hot climates. In the interests of enhancing our understanding of feather placode development, and to provide the poultry industry with a strategy to breed heat-tolerant meat-type chickens (broilers), we mapped and identified the sc mutation. Results Through a cost-effective and labour-efficient SNP array mapping approach using DNA from sc/sc and sc/+ blood sample pools, we map the sc trait to chromosome 4 and show that a nonsense mutation in FGF20 is completely associated with the sc/sc phenotype. This mutation, common to all sc/sc individuals and absent from wild type, is predicted to lead to loss of a highly conserved region of the FGF20 protein important for FGF signalling. In situ hybridisation and quantitative RT-PCR studies reveal that FGF20 is epidermally expressed during the early stages of feather placode patterning. In addition, we describe a dCAPS genotyping assay based on the mutation, developed to facilitate discrimination between wild type and sc alleles. Conclusions This work represents the first loss of function genetic evidence supporting a role for FGF ligand signalling in feather development, and suggests FGF20 as a novel central player in the development of vertebrate skin appendages, including hair follicles and exocrine glands. In addition, this is to our knowledge the first report describing the use of the chicken SNP array to map genes based on

  18. STED nanoscopy combined with optical tweezers reveals protein dynamics on densely covered DNA (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Iddo; Sitters, Gerrit; Broekmans, Onno D.; Farge, Géraldine; Menges, Carolin; Wende, Wolfgang; Hell, Stefan W.; Peterman, Erwin J.; Wuite, Gijs J.

    2014-09-01

    Dense coverage of DNA by proteins is a ubiquitous feature of cellular processes such as DNA organization, replication and repair. We present a single-molecule approach capable of visualizing individual DNA-binding proteins on densely covered DNA and in the presence of high protein concentrations. Our approach combines optical tweezers with multicolor confocal and stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy. Proteins on DNA are visualized at a resolution of 50 nm, a sixfold resolution improvement over that of confocal microscopy. High temporal resolution (<50 ms) is ensured by fast one-dimensional beam scanning. Individual trajectories of proteins translocating on DNA can thus be distinguished and tracked with high precision. We demonstrate our multimodal approach by visualizing the assembly of dense nucleoprotein filaments with unprecedented spatial resolution in real time. Experimental access to the force-dependent kinetics and motility of DNA-associating proteins at biologically relevant protein densities is essential for linking idealized in vitro experiments with the in vivo situation.

  19. A whole genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting milk protein percentage in Israeli-Holstein cattle, by means of selective milk DNA pooling in a daughter design, using an adjusted false discovery rate criterion.

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, M O; Lipkin, E; Khutoreskaya, G; Tchourzyna, E; Soller, M; Friedmann, A

    2001-01-01

    Selective DNA pooling was employed in a daughter design to screen all bovine autosomes for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting estimated breeding value for milk protein percentage (EBVP%). Milk pools prepared from high and low daughters of each of seven sires were genotyped for 138 dinucleotide microsatellites. Shadow-corrected estimates of sire allele frequencies were compared between high and low pools. An adjusted false discovery rate (FDR) method was employed to calculate experimentwise significance levels and empirical power. Significant associations with milk protein percentage were found for 61 of the markers (adjusted FDR = 0.10; estimated power, 0.68). The significant markers appear to be linked to 19--28 QTL. Mean allele substitution effects of the putative QTL averaged 0.016 (0.009--0.028) in units of the within-sire family standard deviation of EBVP% and summed to 0.460 EBVP%. Overall QTL heterozygosity was 0.40. The identified QTL appear to account for all of the variation in EBVP% in the population. Through use of selective DNA pooling, 4400 pool data points provided the statistical power of 600,000 individual data points. PMID:11290723

  20. Synergistic antitumor efficacy of combined DNA vaccines targeting tumor cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yu; Wu, Shuai; Wang, Zicheng; Wang, Lin; Du, Zhiyan; Gao, Jiangping; Yu, Jiyun

    2015-09-18

    To further enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA vaccine, we proposed a synergistic strategy that targeted tumor cells and angiogenesis simultaneously. In this study, a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon DNA vaccine expressing 1-4 domains of murine VEGFR2 and IL12 was constructed, and was named pSVK-VEGFR2-GFc-IL12 (CAVE). The expression of VEGFR2 antigen and IL12 adjuvant molecule in 293T cells in vitro were verified by western blot and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Then CAVE was co-immunized with CAVA, a SFV replicon DNA vaccine targeting survivin and β-hCG antigens constructed previously. The antitumor efficacy of our combined replicon vaccines was evaluated in mice model and the possible mechanism was further investigated. The combined vaccines could elicit efficient humoral and cellular immune responses against survivin, β-hCG and VEGFR2 simultaneously. Compared with CAVE or CAVA vaccine alone, the combined vaccines inhibited the tumor growth and improved the survival rate in B16 melanoma mice model more effectively. Furthermore, the intratumoral microvessel density was lowest in combined vaccines group than CAVE or CAVA alone group. Therefore, this synergistic strategy of DNA vaccines for tumor treatment results in an increased antitumor efficacy, and may be more suitable for translation to future research and clinic. PMID:26253468

  1. Combined antibody and DNA detection for early diagnosis of leptospirosis after a disaster.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Hiroko; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Leano, Prisca Susan A; Koizumi, Nobuo; Nakajima, Chie; Taurustiati, Delsi; Hanan, Firmanto; Lacuesta, Talitha Lea; Ashino, Yugo; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Gloriani, Nina G; Telan, Elizabeth Freda O; Hattori, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    Early diagnosis based on laboratory confirmation is essential for managing leptospirosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel method of detecting leptospirosis that combines measurement of anti-Leptospira antibodies by the microscopic agglutination test (MAT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunochromatographic test (ICT) and leptospiral DNA by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and real-time PCR in plasma and 2 types of urine pellets. Of 113 suspected cases, 68.1%, 76.1%, and 60.2% were positive by MAT, ELISA, and ICT, respectively. Real-time PCR using DNA purified from urine pellets collected by low-speed centrifugation yielded positive signals for patients in late acute as well as early phase who were positive by LAMP using plasma DNA or urine pellets. Among antibody-negative patients, 9.5% were positive by DNA detection. These findings indicate that the leptospirosis detection rate is increased by combining antibody and DNA detection, providing a new tool for timely diagnosis of infection. PMID:26860351

  2. The Updated Phylogenies of the Phasianidae Based on Combined Data of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yong-Yi; Dai, Kun; Cao, Xue; Murphy, Robert W.; Shen, Xue-Juan; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of species in the Phasianidae, Order Galliformes, are the object of intensive study. However, convergent morphological evolution and rapid species radiation result in much ambiguity in the group. Further, matrilineal (mtDNA) genealogies conflict with trees based on nuclear DNA retrotransposable elements. Herein, we analyze 39 nearly complete mitochondrial genomes (three new) and up to seven nuclear DNA segments. We combine these multiple unlinked, more informative genetic markers to infer historical relationships of the major groups of phasianids. The nuclear DNA tree is largely congruent with the tree derived from mt genomes. However, branching orders of mt/nuclear trees largely conflict with those based on retrotransposons. For example, Gallus/Bambusicola/Francolinus forms the sister-group of Coturnix/Alectoris in the nuclear/mtDNA trees, yet the tree based on retrotransposable elements roots the former at the base of the tree and not with the latter. Further, while peafowls cluster with Gallus/Coturnix in the mt tree, they root at the base of the phasianids following Gallus in the tree based on retrotransposable elements. The conflicting branch orders in nuclear/mtDNA and retrotransposons-based trees in our study reveal the complex topology of the Phasianidae. PMID:24748132

  3. Functional Flow Patterns and Static Blood Pooling in Tumors Revealed by Combined Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Yin, Melissa; Adam, Dan; Foster, F Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in tumor perfusion and microenvironment have been shown to be associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes, raising the need for noninvasive methods of tracking these changes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging serve as promising candidates-one has the ability to measure tissue perfusion, whereas the other can be used to monitor tissue oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the different functional parameters measured with DCEUS and PA imaging, using two morphologically different hind-limb tumor models and drug-induced alterations in an orthotopic breast tumor model. Imaging results showed some correlation between perfusion and oxygen saturation maps and the ability to sensitively monitor antivascular treatment. In addition, DCEUS measurements revealed different vascular densities in the core of specific tumors compared with their rims. Noncorrelated perfusion and hemoglobin concentration measurements facilitated discrimination between blood lakes and necrotic areas. Taken together, our results illustrate the utility of a combined contrast-enhanced ultrasound method with photoacoustic imaging to visualize blood flow patterns in tumors. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4320-31. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325651

  4. Effect of Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Administration on the Residual Virus Pool in a Model of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy-Mediated Suppression in SIVmac239-Infected Indian Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Trubey, Charles M.; Fast, Randy; Schneider, Douglas K.; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Freemire, Brandi; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Quiñones, Octavio A.; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Sanchez, Rosa I.; Wai, John S.; Tan, Christopher M.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Hazuda, Daria J.; Piatak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman primate models are needed for evaluations of proposed strategies targeting residual virus that persists in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) models of cART-mediated suppression have proven challenging to develop. We used a novel three-class, six-drug cART regimen to achieve durable 4.0- to 5.5-log reductions in plasma viremia levels and declines in cell-associated viral RNA and DNA in blood and tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected Indian-origin rhesus macaques, then evaluated the impact of treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat) on the residual virus pool. Ex vivo SAHA treatment of CD4+ T cells obtained from cART-suppressed animals increased histone acetylation and viral RNA levels in culture supernatants. cART-suppressed animals each received 84 total doses of oral SAHA. We observed SAHA dose-dependent increases in acetylated histones with evidence for sustained modulation as well as refractoriness following prolonged administration. In vivo virologic activity was demonstrated based on the ratio of viral RNA to viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a presumptive measure of viral transcription, which significantly increased in SAHA-treated animals. However, residual virus was readily detected at the end of treatment, suggesting that SAHA alone may be insufficient for viral eradication in the setting of suppressive cART. The effects observed were similar to emerging data for repeat-dose SAHA treatment of HIV-infected individuals on cART, demonstrating the feasibility, utility, and relevance of NHP models of cART-mediated suppression for in vivo assessments of AIDS virus functional cure/eradication approaches. PMID:25182644

  5. [Release of Extracellular DNA after Administration of Radioprotective Combination of α-Tocopherol and Ascorbic Acid].

    PubMed

    Vasilyeval, I N; Bespalov, V G

    2015-01-01

    Radioprotective and apoptotic activities of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) have been studied in 180 Wistar male rats. Rats were administered a single oral dose with vitamin E, vitamin C or their combination at prophylactic doses before or after the single whole body exposure to irradiation at the doses of 2 or 8 Gy. The radioprotective effect was evaluated by the frequency of chromosomal aberrations at metaphase plates of the bone marrow cells, apoptotic--by the level of circulating low-molecular-weight DNA (ImwDNA) in the blood plasma of irradiated rats. Administration of the combination of vitamins E and C before and after the irradiation at the dose of 2 Gy reduced the number of the cells with chromosomal aberrations thus providing the radioprotective effect, but separately administration of these vitamins did not show the significant radioprotective activity. Administration of the combination of vitamins E and C before irradiation with 8 Gy increased the lmwDNA in blood thus providing the apoptotic effect. So, synergy of radioprotective activities has been revealed in vitamins E and C action at prophylactic doses. Radioprotective effect of the combination of vitamins E and C can be associated with the apoptotic activity and can be explained by elimination of the least viable irradiated cells from the cell population. PMID:26863779

  6. A DNA-based system for selecting and displaying the combined result of two input variables

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huajie; Wang, Jianbang; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Gothelf, Kurt V.

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based technologies for biosensing or bio-regulation produce huge amounts of rich high-dimensional information. There is a consequent need for flexible means to combine diverse pieces of such information to form useful derivative outputs, and to display those immediately. Here we demonstrate this capability in a DNA-based system that takes two input numbers, represented in DNA strands, and returns the result of their multiplication, writing this as a number in a display. Unlike a conventional calculator, this system operates by selecting the result from a library of solutions rather than through logic operations. The multiplicative example demonstrated here illustrates a much more general capability—to generate a unique output for any distinct pair of DNA inputs. The system thereby functions as a lookup table and could be a key component in future, more powerful data-processing systems for diagnostics and sensing. PMID:26646059

  7. A DNA-based system for selecting and displaying the combined result of two input variables.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huajie; Wang, Jianbang; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based technologies for biosensing or bio-regulation produce huge amounts of rich high-dimensional information. There is a consequent need for flexible means to combine diverse pieces of such information to form useful derivative outputs, and to display those immediately. Here we demonstrate this capability in a DNA-based system that takes two input numbers, represented in DNA strands, and returns the result of their multiplication, writing this as a number in a display. Unlike a conventional calculator, this system operates by selecting the result from a library of solutions rather than through logic operations. The multiplicative example demonstrated here illustrates a much more general capability--to generate a unique output for any distinct pair of DNA inputs. The system thereby functions as a lookup table and could be a key component in future, more powerful data-processing systems for diagnostics and sensing. PMID:26646059

  8. Dual Targeting Biomimetic Liposomes for Paclitaxel/DNA Combination Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xia; Fang, Gui-Qing; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs with nucleic acid has shown great promise in cancer therapy. In the present study, paclitaxel (PTX) and DNA were co-loaded in the hyaluronic acid (HA) and folate (FA)-modified liposomes (HA/FA/PPD), to obtain the dual targeting biomimetic nanovector. The prepared HA/FA/PPD exhibited nanosized structure and narrow size distributions (247.4 ± 4.2 nm) with appropriate negative charge of −25.40 ± 2.7 mV. HA/FA/PD (PTX free HA/FA/PPD) showed almost no toxicity on murine malignant melanoma cell line (B16) and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) (higher than 80% cell viability), demonstrating the safety of the blank nanovector. In comparison with the FA-modified PTX/DNA co-loaded liposomes (FA/PPD), HA/FA/PPD showed significant superiority in protecting the nanoparticles from aggregation in the presence of plasma and degradation by DNase I. Moreover, HA/FA/PPD could also significantly improve the transfection efficiency and cellular internalization rates on B16 cells comparing to that of FA/PPD (p < 0.05) and PPD (p < 0.01), demonstrating the great advantages of dual targeting properties. Furthermore, fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry results showed that PTX and DNA could be effectively co-delivered into the same tumor cell via HA/FA/PPD, contributing to PTX/DNA combination cancer treatment. In conclusion, the obtained HA/FA/PPD in the study could effectively target tumor cells, enhance transfection efficiency and subsequently achieve the co-delivery of PTX and DNA, displaying great potential for optimal combination therapy. PMID:25177862

  9. Nanoparticles and DNA - a powerful and growing functional combination in bionanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-04-01

    Functionally integrating DNA and other nucleic acids with nanoparticles in all their different physicochemical forms has produced a rich variety of composite nanomaterials which, in many cases, display unique or augmented properties due to the synergistic activity of both components. These capabilities, in turn, are attracting greater attention from various research communities in search of new nanoscale tools for diverse applications that include (bio)sensing, labeling, targeted imaging, cellular delivery, diagnostics, therapeutics, theranostics, bioelectronics, and biocomputing to name just a few amongst many others. Here, we review this vibrant and growing research area from the perspective of the materials themselves and their unique capabilities. Inorganic nanocrystals such as quantum dots or those made from gold or other (noble) metals along with metal oxides and carbon allotropes are desired as participants in these hybrid materials since they can provide distinctive optical, physical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties. Beyond this, synthetic polymer-based and proteinaceous or viral nanoparticulate materials are also useful in the same role since they can provide a predefined and biocompatible cargo-carrying and targeting capability. The DNA component typically provides sequence-based addressability for probes along with, more recently, unique architectural properties that directly originate from the burgeoning structural DNA field. Additionally, DNA aptamers can also provide specific recognition capabilities against many diverse non-nucleic acid targets across a range of size scales from ions to full protein and cells. In addition to appending DNA to inorganic or polymeric nanoparticles, purely DNA-based nanoparticles have recently surfaced as an excellent assembly platform and have started finding application in areas like sensing, imaging and immunotherapy. We focus on selected and representative nanoparticle-DNA materials and highlight their

  10. Nanoparticles and DNA - a powerful and growing functional combination in bionanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Anirban; Medintz, Igor L

    2016-04-28

    Functionally integrating DNA and other nucleic acids with nanoparticles in all their different physicochemical forms has produced a rich variety of composite nanomaterials which, in many cases, display unique or augmented properties due to the synergistic activity of both components. These capabilities, in turn, are attracting greater attention from various research communities in search of new nanoscale tools for diverse applications that include (bio)sensing, labeling, targeted imaging, cellular delivery, diagnostics, therapeutics, theranostics, bioelectronics, and biocomputing to name just a few amongst many others. Here, we review this vibrant and growing research area from the perspective of the materials themselves and their unique capabilities. Inorganic nanocrystals such as quantum dots or those made from gold or other (noble) metals along with metal oxides and carbon allotropes are desired as participants in these hybrid materials since they can provide distinctive optical, physical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties. Beyond this, synthetic polymer-based and proteinaceous or viral nanoparticulate materials are also useful in the same role since they can provide a predefined and biocompatible cargo-carrying and targeting capability. The DNA component typically provides sequence-based addressability for probes along with, more recently, unique architectural properties that directly originate from the burgeoning structural DNA field. Additionally, DNA aptamers can also provide specific recognition capabilities against many diverse non-nucleic acid targets across a range of size scales from ions to full protein and cells. In addition to appending DNA to inorganic or polymeric nanoparticles, purely DNA-based nanoparticles have recently surfaced as an excellent assembly platform and have started finding application in areas like sensing, imaging and immunotherapy. We focus on selected and representative nanoparticle-DNA materials and highlight their

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy combining biochemical, immunocytochemical and DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Maier, E M; Roscher, A A; Kammerer, S; Mehnert, K; Conzelmann, E; Holzinger, A

    1999-04-01

    Amniocentesis was performed at 17 weeks' gestation on a 39-year-old woman at risk of being a carrier for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Her first son had been affected with childhood cerebral X-ALD and had died at the age of nine years. DNA analysis had not been performed nor was any material available. The amniotic fluid cells (AFC) karyotype was found to be male and initial determination of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in cultured amniocytes revealed borderline values. As an alternative strategy the complete coding region of the ALD gene was amplified and sequenced using DNA isolated from both AFC and maternal leukocytes as templates. Sequencing of the mother's DNA revealed the heterozygous pattern of a 2 bp deletion in exon 5, the most frequent individual mutation leading to X-ALD. It has previously been described to result in a complete loss of protein. This deletion was excluded in the fetus. Accordingly, ALDP was readily detected in AFC by immunofluorescence. We conclude that under circumstances of incomplete data about the index case the combination of methods, namely DNA analysis of the heterozygous mother, and biochemical, immunocytochemical and DNA analyses in fetal cells can secure a reliable prenatal diagnosis of X-ALD. PMID:10327143

  12. Combining Single-molecule Manipulation and Imaging for the Study of Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Monico, Carina; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.; Capitanio, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the combination of optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence detection for the study of protein-DNA interaction. The method offers the opportunity of investigating interactions occurring in solution (thus avoiding problems due to closeby surfaces as in other single molecule methods), controlling the DNA extension and tracking interaction dynamics as a function of both mechanical parameters and DNA sequence. The methods for establishing successful optical trapping and nanometer localization of single molecules are illustrated. We illustrate the experimental conditions allowing the study of interaction of lactose repressor (lacI), labeled with Atto532, with a DNA molecule containing specific target sequences (operators) for LacI binding. The method allows the observation of specific interactions at the operators, as well as one-dimensional diffusion of the protein during the process of target search. The method is broadly applicable to the study of protein-DNA interactions but also to molecular motors, where control of the tension applied to the partner track polymer (for example actin or microtubules) is desirable. PMID:25226304

  13. A Platform for Combined DNA and Protein Microarrays Based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel microarray technology based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) in combination with DNA and protein bioassays immobilized at the TIRF surface. Unlike conventional microarrays that exhibit reduced signal-to-background ratio, require several stages of incubation, rinsing and stringency control, and measure only end-point results, our TIRF microarray technology provides several orders of magnitude better signal-to-background ratio, performs analysis rapidly in one step, and measures the entire course of association and dissociation kinetics between target DNA and protein molecules and the bioassays. In many practical cases detection of only DNA or protein markers alone does not provide the necessary accuracy for diagnosing a disease or detecting a pathogen. Here we describe TIRF microarrays that detect DNA and protein markers simultaneously, which reduces the probabilities of false responses. Supersensitive and multiplexed TIRF DNA and protein microarray technology may provide a platform for accurate diagnosis or enhanced research studies. Our TIRF microarray system can be mounted on upright or inverted microscopes or interfaced directly with CCD cameras equipped with a single objective, facilitating the development of portable devices. As proof-of-concept we applied TIRF microarrays for detecting molecular markers from Bacillus anthracis, the pathogen responsible for anthrax. PMID:22438738

  14. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/. PMID:26482832

  15. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  16. Gene expression profiling of breast cancer survivability by pooled cDNA microarray analysis using logistic regression, artificial neural networks and decision trees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microarray technology can acquire information about thousands of genes simultaneously. We analyzed published breast cancer microarray databases to predict five-year recurrence and compared the performance of three data mining algorithms of artificial neural networks (ANN), decision trees (DT) and logistic regression (LR) and two composite models of DT-ANN and DT-LR. The collection of microarray datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus, four breast cancer datasets were pooled for predicting five-year breast cancer relapse. After data compilation, 757 subjects, 5 clinical variables and 13,452 genetic variables were aggregated. The bootstrap method, Mann–Whitney U test and 20-fold cross-validation were performed to investigate candidate genes with 100 most-significant p-values. The predictive powers of DT, LR and ANN models were assessed using accuracy and the area under ROC curve. The associated genes were evaluated using Cox regression. Results The DT models exhibited the lowest predictive power and the poorest extrapolation when applied to the test samples. The ANN models displayed the best predictive power and showed the best extrapolation. The 21 most-associated genes, as determined by integration of each model, were analyzed using Cox regression with a 3.53-fold (95% CI: 2.24-5.58) increased risk of breast cancer five-year recurrence… Conclusions The 21 selected genes can predict breast cancer recurrence. Among these genes, CCNB1, PLK1 and TOP2A are in the cell cycle G2/M DNA damage checkpoint pathway. Oncologists can offer the genetic information for patients when understanding the gene expression profiles on breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23506640

  17. Augmentation of French grunt diet description using combined visual and DNA-based analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hargrove, John S.; Parkyn, Daryl C.; Murie, Debra J.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Austin, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Trophic linkages within a coral-reef ecosystem may be difficult to discern in fish species that reside on, but do not forage on, coral reefs. Furthermore, dietary analysis of fish can be difficult in situations where prey is thoroughly macerated, resulting in many visually unrecognisable food items. The present study examined whether the inclusion of a DNA-based method could improve the identification of prey consumed by French grunt, Haemulon flavolineatum, a reef fish that possesses pharyngeal teeth and forages on soft-bodied prey items. Visual analysis indicated that crustaceans were most abundant numerically (38.9%), followed by sipunculans (31.0%) and polychaete worms (5.2%), with a substantial number of unidentified prey (12.7%). For the subset of prey with both visual and molecular data, there was a marked reduction in the number of unidentified sipunculans (visual – 31.1%, combined &ndash 4.4%), unidentified crustaceans (visual &ndash 15.6%, combined &ndash 6.7%), and unidentified taxa (visual &ndash 11.1%, combined &ndash 0.0%). Utilising results from both methodologies resulted in an increased number of prey placed at the family level (visual &ndash 6, combined &ndash 33) and species level (visual &ndash 0, combined &ndash 4). Although more costly than visual analysis alone, our study demonstrated the feasibility of DNA-based identification of visually unidentifiable prey in the stomach contents of fish.

  18. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  19. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  20. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  1. Assessment of a magnet system combining the advantages of cable-in-conduit forced-flow and pool-boiling magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Felker, B.; Chaplin, M.

    1993-10-06

    This paper presents an idea for a magnet system that could be used to advantage in tokamaks and other fusion engineering devices. Higher performance designs, specifically newer tokamaks such as those for the international Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) use Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) forced flow coils to advantage to meet field and current density requirements. Pool boiling magnets lack structural integrity to resist high magnetic forces since helium cooling areas must surround each conductor. A second problem is that any leak can threaten the voltage standoff integrity of the magnet system. This is because a leak can result in low-pressure helium gas becoming trapped by limited conductance in the magnet bundle and low-pressure helium has poor dielectric strength. The system proposed here is basically a CICC system, with it`s inherent advantages, but bathed in higher pressure supercritical helium to eliminate the leak and voltage break-down problems. Schemes to simplify helium coolant plumbing with the proposed system are discussed. A brief historical review of related magnet systems is included. The advantages and disadvantages of using higher pressure, supercritical helium in combination with solid electrical insulation in a CICC system are discussed. Related electrical data from some previous works are compiled and discussed.

  2. Combining allele frequency uncertainty and population substructure corrections in forensic DNA calculations.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In forensic DNA calculations of relatedness of individuals and in DNA mixture analyses, at least two sources of uncertainty are present concerning the allele frequencies used for evaluating genotype probabilities when evaluating likelihoods. They are: (i) imprecision in the estimates of the allele frequencies in the population by using an inevitably finite database of DNA profiles to estimate them; and (ii) the existence of population substructure. Green and Mortera [6] showed that these effects may be taken into account individually using a common Dirichlet model within a Bayesian network formulation, but that when taken in combination this is not the case; however they suggested an approximation that could be used. Here we develop a slightly different approximation that is shown to be exact in the case of a single individual. We demonstrate the numerical closeness of the approximation using a published database of allele counts, and illustrate the effect of incorporating the approximation into calculations of a recently published statistical model of DNA mixtures. PMID:27231804

  3. Safety and Comparative Immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Combination with Plasmid Interleukin 12 and Impact of Intramuscular Electroporation for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kalams, Spyros A.; Parker, Scott D.; Elizaga, Marnie; Metch, Barbara; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Hural, John; De Rosa, Stephen; Carter, Donald K.; Rybczyk, Kyle; Frank, Ian; Fuchs, Jonathan; Koblin, Beryl; Kim, Denny H.; Joseph, Patrice; Keefer, Michael C.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Eldridge, John; Boyer, Jean; Sherwat, Adam; Cardinali, Massimo; Allen, Mary; Pensiero, Michael; Butler, Chris; Khan, Amir S.; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kublin, James G.; Weiner, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Background. DNA vaccines have been very poorly immunogenic in humans but have been an effective priming modality in prime-boost regimens. Methods to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are needed. Methods. HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) studies 070 and 080 were multicenter, randomized, clinical trials. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PENNVAX®-B DNA vaccine (PV) is a mixture of 3 expression plasmids encoding HIV-1 Clade B Env, Gag, and Pol. The interleukin 12 (IL-12) DNA plasmid expresses human IL-12 proteins p35 and p40. Study subjects were healthy HIV-1–uninfected adults 18–50 years old. Four intramuscular vaccinations were given in HVTN 070, and 3 intramuscular vaccinations were followed by electroporation in HVTN 080. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular cytokine staining after stimulation with HIV-1 peptide pools. Results. Vaccination was safe and well tolerated. Administration of PV plus IL-12 with electroporation had a significant dose-sparing effect and provided immunogenicity superior to that observed in the trial without electroporation, despite fewer vaccinations. A total of 71.4% of individuals vaccinated with PV plus IL-12 plasmid with electroporation developed either a CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell response after the second vaccination, and 88.9% developed a CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell response after the third vaccination. Conclusions. Use of electroporation after PV administration provided superior immunogenicity than delivery without electroporation. This study illustrates the power of combined DNA approaches to generate impressive immune responses in humans. PMID:23840043

  4. DISSOLVED FREE AMINO ACIDS, COMBINED AMINO ACIDS, AND DNA AS SOURCES OF CARBON AND NITROGEN TO MARINE BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilization of naturally-occurring dissolved free and combined mino cids (DFAA and DCAA) and dissolved DNA FD-DNA) was studied in batch cultures of bacteria from 2 shallow marine environments. anta Rosa Sound (SRS), Florida, USA, and Flax Pond (FP), Long Island, New York, USA. n ...

  5. 53BP1 deficiency combined with telomere dysfunction activates ATR-dependent DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Paula; Flores, Juana M; Blasco, Maria A

    2012-04-16

    TRF1 protects mammalian telomeres from fusion and fragility. Depletion of TRF1 leads to telomere fusions as well as accumulation of γ-H2AX foci and activation of both the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related (ATR)-mediated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage response (DDR) pathways. 53BP1, which is also present at dysfunctional telomeres, is a target of ATM that accumulates at DNA double-strand breaks and favors nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair over ATM-dependent resection and homology-directed repair (homologous recombination [HR]). To address the role of 53BP1 at dysfunctional telomeres, we generated mice lacking TRF1 and 53BP1. 53BP1 deficiency significantly rescued telomere fusions in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking TRF1, but they showed evidence of a switch from the NHEJ- to HR-mediated repair of uncapped telomeres. Concomitantly, double-mutant MEFs showed evidence of hyperactivation of the ATR-dependent DDR. In intact mice, combined 53BP1/TRF1 deficiency in stratified epithelia resulted in earlier onset of DNA damage and increased CHK1 phosphorylation during embryonic development, leading to aggravation of skin phenotypes. PMID:22508511

  6. Determination of DNA adducts by combining acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and chromatographic analysis of the carcinogen-modified nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elvis M K; Deng, Kailin; Wong, Tin-Yan; Chan, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used method of analyzing carcinogen-induced DNA adducts involves the hydrolysis of carcinogen-modified DNA samples by using a mixture of enzymes, followed by (32)P-postlabeling or liquid chromatography (LC)-based analyses of carcinogen-modified mononucleotides/nucleosides. In the present study, we report the development and application of a new approach to DNA adduct analysis by combining the H(+)/heat-catalyzed release of carcinogen-modified nucleobases and the use of LC-based methods to analyze DNA adducts. Results showed that heating the carcinogen-modified DNA samples at 70 °C for an extended period of 4 to 6 h in the presence of 0.05% HCl can efficiently induce DNA depurination, releasing the intact carcinogen-modified nucleobases for LC analyses. After optimizing the hydrolysis conditions, DNA samples with C8- and N (2) -modified 2'-deoxyguanosine, as well as N (6) -modified 2'-deoxyadenosine, were synthesized by reacting DNA with 1-nitropyrene, acetaldehyde, and aristolochic acids, respectively. These samples were then hydrolyzed, and the released nucleobase adducts were analyzed using LC-based analytical methods. Analysis results demonstrated a dose-dependent release of target DNA adducts from carcinogen-modified DNA samples, indicating that the developed H(+)/heat-catalyzed hydrolysis method was quantitative. Comparative studies with enzymatic digestion method on carcinogen-modified DNA samples revealed that the two hydrolysis methods did not yield systematically different results. PMID:26581621

  7. Combined sequencing of mRNA and DNA from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mertes, Florian; Kuhl, Heiner; Wruck, Wasco; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2016-06-01

    Combined transcriptome and whole genome sequencing of the same ultra-low input sample down to single cells is a rapidly evolving approach for the analysis of rare cells. Besides stem cells, rare cells originating from tissues like tumor or biopsies, circulating tumor cells and cells from early embryonic development are under investigation. Herein we describe a universal method applicable for the analysis of minute amounts of sample material (150 to 200 cells) derived from sub-colony structures from human embryonic stem cells. The protocol comprises the combined isolation and separate amplification of poly(A) mRNA and whole genome DNA followed by next generation sequencing. Here we present a detailed description of the method developed and an overview of the results obtained for RNA and whole genome sequencing of human embryonic stem cells, sequencing data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE69471. PMID:27275414

  8. Combining natural and man-made DNA tracers to advance understanding of hydrologic flow pathway evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Walter, M. T.; Lyon, S. W.; Rosqvist, G. N.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying and characterizing the sources, pathways and residence times of water and associated constituents is critical to developing improved understanding of watershed-stream connections and hydrological/ecological/biogeochemical models. To date the most robust information is obtained from integrated studies that combine natural tracers (e.g. isotopes, geochemical tracers) with controlled chemical tracer (e.g., bromide, dyes) or colloidal tracer (e.g., carboxilated microspheres, tagged clay particles, microorganisms) applications. In the presented study we explore how understanding of sources and flow pathways of water derived from natural tracer studies can be improved and expanded in space and time by simultaneously introducing man-made, synthetic DNA-based microtracers. The microtracer used were composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated. Tracer experiments using both natural tracers and the DNA-based microtracers were conducted in the sub-arctic, glacierized Tarfala (21.7 km2) catchment in northern Sweden. Isotopic hydrograph separations revealed that even though storm runoff was dominated by pre-event water the event water (i.e. rainfall) contributions to streamflow increased throughout the summer season as glacial snow cover decreased. This suggests that glaciers are a major source of the rainwater fraction in streamflow. Simultaneous injections of ten unique DNA-based microtracers confirmed this hypothesis and revealed that the transit time of water traveling from the glacier surface to the stream decreased fourfold over the summer season leading to instantaneous rainwater contributions during storm events. These results highlight that integrating simultaneous tracer injections (injecting tracers at multiple places at one time) with traditional tracer methods (sampling multiple times at one place) rather than using either approach in isolation can

  9. Distribution of a limited Sir2 protein pool regulates the strength of yeast rDNA silencing and is modulated by Sir4p.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J S; Brachmann, C B; Pillus, L; Boeke, J D

    1998-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs at the silent mating-type loci HML and HMR, at telomeres, and at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus RDN1. Silencing in the rDNA occurs by a novel mechanism that depends on a single Silent Information Regulator (SIR) gene, SIR2. SIR4, essential for other silenced loci, paradoxically inhibits rDNA silencing. In this study, we elucidate a regulatory mechanism for rDNA silencing based on the finding that rDNA silencing strength directly correlates with cellular Sir2 protein levels. The endogenous level of Sir2p was shown to be limiting for rDNA silencing. Furthermore, small changes in Sir2p levels altered rDNA silencing strength. In rDNA silencing phenotypes, sir2 mutations were shown to be epistatic to sir4 mutations, indicating that SIR4 inhibition of rDNA silencing is mediated through SIR2. Furthermore, rDNA silencing is insensitive to SIR3 overexpression, but is severely reduced by overexpression of full-length Sir4p or a fragment of Sir4p that interacts with Sir2p. This negative effect of SIR4 overexpression was overridden by co-overexpression of SIR2, suggesting that SIR4 directly inhibits the rDNA silencing function of SIR2. Finally, genetic manipulations of SIR4 previously shown to promote extended life span also resulted in enhanced rDNA silencing. We propose a simple model in which telomeres act as regulators of rDNA silencing by competing for limiting amounts of Sir2 protein. PMID:9649515

  10. A Pooling Genome-Wide Association Study Combining a Pathway Analysis for Typical Sporadic Parkinson's Disease in the Han Population of Chinese Mainland.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yakun; Deng, Libing; Zhang, Jie; Fang, Xin; Mei, Puming; Cao, Xuebing; Lin, Jiari; Wei, Yi; Zhang, Xiong; Xu, Renshi

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD) are mainly conducted in European and American populations at present, and the Han populations of Chinese mainland (HPCM) almost have not been studied yet. Here, we conducted a pooling GWAS combining a pathway analysis with 862,198 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms of IlluminaHumanOmniZhongHua-8 in 250 sPD and 250 controls from HPCM precluded toxicant exposure, age, and heavy coffee drinking habit interference. We revealed that among the 22 potential loci implicated, PRDM2/KIAA1026 (kgp8090149), TSG1/MANEA (kgp154172), PDE10A (kgp8130520), MDGA2 (rs9323124), ATPBD4/LOC100288892 (kgp11333367), ZFP64/TSHZ2 (kgp4156164), PAQR3/ARD1B (kgp9482779), FLJ23172/FNDC3B (kgp760898), C18orf1 (kgp348599), FLJ43860/NCRNA00051 (kgp4105983), CYP1B1/C2orf58 (kgp11353523), WNT9A/LOC728728 (rs849898), ANXA1/LOC100130911 (rs10746953), FLJ35379/LOC100132423 (kgp9550589), PLEKHN1 (kgp7172368), DMRT2/SMARCA2 (kgp10769919), ZNF396/INO80C (rs1362858), C3orf67/LOC339902 (rs6783485), LOC285194/IGSF11 (rs1879553), FGF10/MRPS30 (rs13153459), BARX1/PTPDC1 (kgp6542803), and COL5 A2 (rs11186), the peak significance was at the kgp4105983 of FLJ43860 gene in chromosome 8, the first top strongest associated locus with sPD was PRDM2 (kgp8090149) in chromosome 1, and the 24 pathways including 100 significantly associated genes were strongly associated with sPD from HPCM. The 40 genes were shared by at least two pathways. The most possible associated pathways with sPD were axon guidance, ECM-receptor interaction, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, tight junction, focal adhesion, gap junction, long-term depression, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, adherens junction, endocytosis, and protein digestion and absorption. Our results indicated that these loci, pathways, and their related genes might be involved in the pathogenesis of sPD from HPCM and provided some novel evidences for further searching the genetic

  11. A combination treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and suramin decreases invasiveness of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sahra; Döppler, Heike R.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of patients with invasive breast cancer remains a major issue because of the acquisition of drug resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Here we propose a new therapeutic strategy by combining DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DMTIs) with suramin. Cytotoxic effects of suramin or combination treatment with DMTIs were determined in highly invasive breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, BT-20 and HCC1954, or control cells. In addition, effects on cell invasion were determined in 3-dimensional cell culture assays. DMTI-mediated upregulation of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) expression was shown by Western blotting. Effects of suramin on PKD1 activity was determined in vitro and in cells. The importance of PKD1 in mediating the effects of such combination treatment in cell invasion was demonstrated using 3D cell culture assays. A proof of principal animal experiment was performed showing that PKD1 is critical for breast cancer growth. We show that when used in combination, suramin and DMTIs impair the invasive phenotype of breast cancer cells. We show that PKD1, a kinase that previously has been described as a suppressor of tumor cell invasion, is an interface for both FDA-approved drugs, since the additive effects observed are due to DMTI-mediated re-expression and suramin-induced activation of PKD1. Our data reveal a mechanism of how a combination treatment with non-toxic doses of suramin and DMTIs may be of therapeutic benefit for patients with aggressive, multi-drug resistant breast cancer. PMID:24510012

  12. DNA bases assembled on the Au(110)/electrolyte interface: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Princia; Nazmutdinov, Renat R; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-02-19

    Among the low-index single-crystal gold surfaces, the Au(110) surface is the most active toward molecular adsorption and the one with fewest electrochemical adsorption data reported. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemically controlled scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been employed in the present study to address the adsorption of the four nucleobases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T), on the Au(110)-electrode surface. Au(110) undergoes reconstruction to the (1 × 3) surface in electrochemical environment, accompanied by a pair of strong voltammetry peaks in the double-layer region in acid solutions. Adsorption of the DNA bases gives featureless voltammograms with lower double-layer capacitance, suggesting that all the bases are chemisorbed on the Au(110) surface. Further investigation of the surface structures of the adlayers of the four DNA bases by EC-STM disclosed lifting of the Au(110) reconstruction, specific molecular packing in dense monolayers, and pH dependence of the A and G adsorption. DFT computations based on a cluster model for the Au(110) surface were performed to investigate the adsorption energy and geometry of the DNA bases in different adsorbate orientations. The optimized geometry is further used to compute models for STM images which are compared with the recorded STM images. This has provided insight into the physical nature of the adsorption. The specific orientations of A, C, G, and T on Au(110) and the nature of the physical adsorbate/surface interaction based on the combination of the experimental and theoretical studies are proposed, and differences from nucleobase adsorption on Au(111)- and Au(100)-electrode surfaces are discussed. PMID:25611676

  13. Radiation damage to a DNA-binding protein. Combined circular dichroism and molecular dynamics simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mazier, S; Villette, S; Goffinont, S; Renouard, S; Maurizot, J C; Genest, D; Spotheim-Maurizot, M

    2008-11-01

    The E. coli lactose operon, the paradigm of gene expression regulation systems, is the best model for studying the effect of radiation on such systems. The operon function requires the binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have previously shown that upon irradiation the repressor loses its operator binding ability. The main radiation-induced lesions of the headpiece have been identified by mass spectrometry. All tyrosine residues are oxidized into 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). In the present study we report a detailed characterization of the headpiece radiation-induced modification. An original approach combining circular dichroism measurements and the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation of headpieces bearing DOPA-s instead of tyrosines has been applied. The CD measurements reveal an irreversible modification of the headpiece structure and stability. The molecular dynamics simulation shows a loss of stability shown by an increase in internal dynamics and allows the estimation of the modifications due to tyrosine oxidation for each structural element of the protein. The changes in headpiece structure and stability can explain at least in part the radiation-induced loss of binding ability of the repressor to the operator. This conclusion should hold for all proteins containing radiosensitive amino acids in their DNA-binding site. PMID:18959464

  14. DNA damage and radiosensitizers: M. luteus sensitive sites for misonidazole-TAN combination

    SciTech Connect

    Skov, K.A.; Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1982-10-01

    It has been shown previously that TAN does not enhance production of single-strand breaks (SSB) in DNA of Chinese hamster cells irradiated under hypoxia. In contrast, misonidazole does enhance the yield of SSB, but this SSB enhancement by misonidazole is reduced if TAN is present with misonidazole during irradiation. It was also shown that each of these sensitizers enhances base/sugar damage, measured with the aid of bacterial enzymes (MLS). The results presented here for MLS damage in mammalian cells irradiated in the presence of the misonidazole-TAN combination indicate that the two drugs act independently in enhancing MLS damage, and hence they interact with different types of lesions to produce base/sugar damage. It is proposed that the protection by TAN in mammalian cells observed at the survival level is due to repair of some of that type of damage which would otherwise become a misonidazole-enhanced SSB.

  15. Swimming Pool Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... insist that the following rules are followed: Keep toys away from the pool when the pool is ... after each use. No tricycles or other riding toys at poolside. No electrical appliances near the pool. ...

  16. Combined metformin and resveratrol confers protection against UVC-induced DNA damage in A549 lung cancer cells via modulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Syu; Doonan, Barbara B; Wu, Joseph M; Hsieh, Tze-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Aging in humans is a multi-factorial cellular process that is associated with an increase in the risk of numerous diseases including diabetes, coronary heart disease and cancer. Aging is linked to DNA damage, and a persistent source of DNA damage is exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. As such, identifying agents that confer protection against DNA damage is an approach that could reduce the public health burden of age-related disorders. Metformin and resveratrol have both shown effectiveness in preventing several age-related diseases; using human A549 cells, we investigated whether metformin or resveratrol, alone or combined, prevent UVC-induced DNA damage. We found that metformin inhibited UVC-induced upregulation of p53, as well as downregulated the expression of two DNA damage markers: γH2AX and p-chk2. Metformin also upregulated DNA repair as evidenced by the increase in expression of p53R2. Treatment with metformin also induced cell cycle arrest in UVC-induced cells, in correlation with a reduction in the levels of cyclin E/cdk2/Rb and cyclin B1/cdk1. Compared to metformin, resveratrol as a single agent showed less effectiveness in counteracting UVC-elicited cellular responses. However, resveratrol displayed synergism when combined with metformin as shown by the downregulation of p53/γH2AX/p-chk2. In conclusion, the results of the present study validate the effectiveness of metformin, alone or with the addition of resveratrol, in reducing the risk of aging by conferring protection against UV-induced DNA damage. PMID:27109601

  17. LinguisticBelief and PoolEvidence

    SciTech Connect

    DARBY, JOHN

    2008-03-11

    LinguisticBelief allows the creation and analysis of combinations of linguistic variables with epistemic uncertainty for decision making. The model is solved using approximate reasoning to implement the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for combinations of variables expressed as purely linguistic fuzzy sets. PoolEvidence pools evidence for linguistic variables from many experts for input into LinguisticBelief.

  18. Biological evaluation of new nickel(II) metallates: Synthesis, DNA/protein binding and mitochondrial mediated apoptosis in human lung cancer cells (A549) via ROS hypergeneration and depletion of cellular antioxidant pool.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, P; Saranya, S; Poornima, P; Prabhakaran, R; Dallemer, F; Vijaya Padma, V; Natarajan, K

    2014-07-23

    A series of novel nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes(1-4) have been prepared and characterized by various spectral, analytical techniques and X-ray crystallography. Further, their efficacy to interact with CT-DNA/BSA has been explored. From the binding studies, it is inferred that complex 4 found to be more active than other complexes. The complexes bound with CT-DNA by intercalation mode. Moreover, static quenching was observed for their interaction with BSA. The new complexes were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity against human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cell line. The results showed that the new complexes exhibited significant degree of cytotoxicity at given experimental condition. Further, the results of LDH and NO release supported the cytotoxic nature of the complexes. The observed cytotoxicity of the complexes may be routed through ROS-hypergeneration and lipid-peroxidation with subsequent depletion of cellular antioxidant pool (GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx and GST) resulted in the reduction of mitochondrial-membrane potential, caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation. Thus, the data from the present study disclose that the complexes could induce apoptosis in A549 cells through mitochondrial mediated fashion and inhibited the migration of lung cancer cells and by metastasis. PMID:24946146

  19. DNA Diagnostics of Hereditary Hearing Loss: A Targeted Resequencing Approach Combined with a Mutation Classification System.

    PubMed

    Sommen, Manou; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Vandeweyer, Geert; Boeckx, Nele; Corneveaux, Jason J; van den Ende, Jenneke; Boudewyns, An; De Leenheer, Els; Janssens, Sandra; Claes, Kathleen; Verstreken, Margriet; Strenzke, Nicola; Predöhl, Friederike; Wuyts, Wim; Mortier, Geert; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Moser, Tobias; Coucke, Paul; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Although there are nearly 100 different causative genes identified for nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL), Sanger sequencing-based DNA diagnostics usually only analyses three, namely, GJB2, SLC26A4, and OTOF. As this is seen as inadequate, there is a need for high-throughput diagnostic methods to detect disease-causing variations, including single-nucleotide variations (SNVs), insertions/deletions (Indels), and copy-number variations (CNVs). In this study, a targeted resequencing panel for hearing loss was developed including 79 genes for NSHL and selected forms of syndromic hearing loss. One-hundred thirty one presumed autosomal-recessive NSHL (arNSHL) patients of Western-European ethnicity were analyzed for SNVs, Indels, and CNVs. In addition, we established a straightforward variant classification system to deal with the large number of variants encountered. We estimate that combining prescreening of GJB2 with our panel leads to a diagnosis in 25%-30% of patients. Our data show that after GJB2, the most commonly mutated genes in a Western-European population are TMC1, MYO15A, and MYO7A (3.1%). CNV analysis resulted in the identification of causative variants in two patients in OTOA and STRC. One of the major challenges for diagnostic gene panels is assigning pathogenicity for variants. A collaborative database collecting all identified variants from multiple centers could be a valuable resource for hearing loss diagnostics. PMID:27068579

  20. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies DNA Repair Pathways that Sensitize Cancer Cells to Combined ATR Inhibition and Cisplatin Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Thompson, Petria S.; Luzwick, Jessica W.; Glick, Gloria G.; Pendleton, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR may be a useful cancer therapeutic target. ATR inhibition synergizes with loss of ERCC1, ATM, XRCC1 and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents. Clinical trials have begun using ATR inhibitors in combination with cisplatin. Here we report the first synthetic lethality screen with a combination treatment of an ATR inhibitor (ATRi) and cisplatin. Combination treatment with ATRi/cisplatin is synthetically lethal with loss of the TLS polymerase ζ and 53BP1. Other DNA repair pathways including homologous recombination and mismatch repair do not exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with ATRi/cisplatin, even though loss of some of these repair pathways sensitizes cells to cisplatin as a single-agent. We also report that ATRi strongly synergizes with PARP inhibition, even in homologous recombination-proficient backgrounds. Lastly, ATR inhibitors were able to resensitize cisplatin-resistant cell lines to cisplatin. These data provide a comprehensive analysis of DNA repair pathways that exhibit synthetic lethality with ATR inhibitors when combined with cisplatin chemotherapy, and will help guide patient selection strategies as ATR inhibitors progress into the cancer clinic. PMID:25965342

  1. A Preclinical Study Combining the DNA Repair Inhibitor Dbait with Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Melanoma1

    PubMed Central

    Biau, Julian; Devun, Flavien; Jdey, Wael; Kotula, Ewa; Quanz, Maria; Chautard, Emmanuel; Sayarath, Mano; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Verrelle, Pierre; Dutreix, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Melanomas are highly radioresistant tumors, mainly due to efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Dbait (which stands for DNA strand break bait) molecules mimic DSBs and trap DNA repair proteins, thereby inhibiting repair of DNA damage induced by radiation therapy (RT). First, the cytotoxic efficacy of Dbait in combination with RT was evaluated in vitro in SK28 and 501mel human melanoma cell lines. Though the extent of RT-induced damage was not increased by Dbait, it persisted for longer revealing a repair defect. Dbait enhanced RT efficacy independently of RT doses. We further assayed the capacity of DT01 (clinical form of Dbait) to enhance efficacy of “palliative” RT (10 × 3 Gy) or “radical” RT (20 × 3 Gy), in an SK28 xenografted model. Inhibition of repair of RT-induced DSB by DT01 was revealed by the significant increase of micronuclei in tumors treated with combined treatment. Mice treated with DT01 and RT combination had significantly better tumor growth control and longer survival compared to RT alone with the “palliative” protocol [tumor growth delay (TGD) by 5.7-fold; median survival: 119 vs 67 days] or the “radical” protocol (TGD by 3.2-fold; median survival: 221 vs 109 days). Only animals that received the combined treatment showed complete responses. No additional toxicity was observed in any DT01-treated groups. This preclinical study provides encouraging results for a combination of a new DNA repair inhibitor, DT01, with RT, in the absence of toxicity. A first-in-human phase I study is currently under way in the palliative management of melanoma in-transit metastases (DRIIM trial). PMID:25379020

  2. Combined shared and distributed memory ab-initio computations of molecular-hydrogen systems in the correlated state: Process pool solution and two-level parallelism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biborski, Andrzej; Kądzielawa, Andrzej P.; Spałek, Józef

    2015-12-01

    An efficient computational scheme devised for investigations of ground state properties of the electronically correlated systems is presented. As an example, (H2)n chain is considered with the long-range electron-electron interactions taken into account. The implemented procedure covers: (i) single-particle Wannier wave-function basis construction in the correlated state, (ii) microscopic parameters calculation, and (iii) ground state energy optimization. The optimization loop is based on highly effective process-pool solution - specific root-workers approach. The hierarchical, two-level parallelism was applied: both shared (by use of Open Multi-Processing) and distributed (by use of Message Passing Interface) memory models were utilized. We discuss in detail the feature that such approach results in a substantial increase of the calculation speed reaching factor of 300 for the fully parallelized solution. The scheme elaborated in detail reflects the situation in which the most demanding task is the single-particle basis optimization.

  3. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  4. Combined DNA extraction and antibody elution from filter papers for the assessment of malaria transmission intensity in epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Informing and evaluating malaria control efforts relies on knowledge of local transmission dynamics. Serological and molecular tools have demonstrated great sensitivity to quantify transmission intensity in low endemic settings where the sensitivity of traditional methods is limited. Filter paper blood spots are commonly used a source of both DNA and antibodies. To enhance the operational practicability of malaria surveys, a method is presented for combined DNA extraction and antibody elution. Methods Filter paper blood spots were collected as part of a large cross-sectional survey in the Kenyan highlands. DNA was extracted using a saponin/chelex method. The eluate of the first wash during the DNA extraction process was used for antibody detection and compared with previously validated antibody elution procedures. Antibody elution efficiency was assessed by total IgG ELISA for malaria antigens apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and merozoite-surface protein-1 (MSP-142). The sensitivity of nested 18S rRNA and cytochrome b PCR assays and the impact of doubling filter paper material for PCR sensitivity were determined. The distribution of cell material and antibodies throughout filter paper blood spots were examined using luminescent and fluorescent reporter assays. Results Antibody levels measured after the combined antibody/DNA extraction technique were strongly correlated to those measured after standard antibody elution (p < 0.0001). Antibody levels for both AMA-1 and MSP-142 were generally slightly lower (11.3-21.4%) but age-seroprevalence patterns were indistinguishable. The proportion of parasite positive samples ranged from 12.9% to 19.2% in the different PCR assays. Despite strong agreement between outcomes of different PCR assays, none of the assays detected all parasite-positive individuals. For all assays doubling filter paper material for DNA extraction increased sensitivity. The concentration of cell and antibody material was not

  5. Laser microbeam - kinetic studies combined with molecule - structures reveal mechanisms of DNA repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberg, B.; Greulich, K. O.

    2011-10-01

    Kinetic studies on double strand DNA damages induced by a laser microbeam have allowed a precise definition of the temporal order of recruitment of repair molecules. The order is KU70 / KU80 - XRCC4 --NBS1 -- RAD51. These kinetic studies are now complemented by studies on molecular structures of the repair proteins, using the program YASARA which does not only give molecular structures but also physicochemical details on forces involved in binding processes. It turns out that the earliest of these repair proteins, the KU70 / KU80 heterodimer, has a hole with high DNA affinity. The next molecule, XRCC4, has a body with two arms, the latter with extremely high DNA affinity at their ends and a binding site for Ligase 4. Together with the laser microbeam results this provides a detailed view on the early steps of DNA double strand break repair. The sequence of DNA repair events is presented as a movie.

  6. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi's individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  7. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi’s individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  8. Validation of Pooled Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing in Arabidopsis lyrata

    PubMed Central

    Fracassetti, Marco; Griffin, Philippa C.; Willi, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing pooled DNA of multiple individuals from a population instead of sequencing individuals separately has become popular due to its cost-effectiveness and simple wet-lab protocol, although some criticism of this approach remains. Here we validated a protocol for pooled whole-genome re-sequencing (Pool-seq) of Arabidopsis lyrata libraries prepared with low amounts of DNA (1.6 ng per individual). The validation was based on comparing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies obtained by pooling with those obtained by individual-based Genotyping By Sequencing (GBS). Furthermore, we investigated the effect of sample number, sequencing depth per individual and variant caller on population SNP frequency estimates. For Pool-seq data, we compared frequency estimates from two SNP callers, VarScan and Snape; the former employs a frequentist SNP calling approach while the latter uses a Bayesian approach. Results revealed concordance correlation coefficients well above 0.8, confirming that Pool-seq is a valid method for acquiring population-level SNP frequency data. Higher accuracy was achieved by pooling more samples (25 compared to 14) and working with higher sequencing depth (4.1× per individual compared to 1.4× per individual), which increased the concordance correlation coefficient to 0.955. The Bayesian-based SNP caller produced somewhat higher concordance correlation coefficients, particularly at low sequencing depth. We recommend pooling at least 25 individuals combined with sequencing at a depth of 100× to produce satisfactory frequency estimates for common SNPs (minor allele frequency above 0.05). PMID:26461136

  9. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  10. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin infection. It is caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium marinum . ... A swimming pool granuloma occurs when water containing Mycobacterium marinum bacteria enters a break in the skin. Signs of ...

  11. The science of pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  12. Combined Immunofluorescence and DNA FISH on 3D-preserved Interphase Nuclei to Study Changes in 3D Nuclear Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Julie; Micsinai, Mariann; Skok, Jane A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization using DNA probes on 3-dimensionally preserved nuclei followed by 3D confocal microscopy (3D DNA FISH) represents the most direct way to visualize the location of gene loci, chromosomal sub-regions or entire territories in individual cells. This type of analysis provides insight into the global architecture of the nucleus as well as the behavior of specific genomic loci and regions within the nuclear space. Immunofluorescence, on the other hand, permits the detection of nuclear proteins (modified histones, histone variants and modifiers, transcription machinery and factors, nuclear sub-compartments, etc). The major challenge in combining immunofluorescence and 3D DNA FISH is, on the one hand to preserve the epitope detected by the antibody as well as the 3D architecture of the nucleus, and on the other hand, to allow the penetration of the DNA probe to detect gene loci or chromosome territories 1-5. Here we provide a protocol that combines visualization of chromatin modifications with genomic loci in 3D preserved nuclei. PMID:23407477

  13. Enhancement of DNA cancer vaccine efficacy by combination with anti-angiogenesis in regression of established subcutaneous B16 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ray Chun-Fai; Gutierrez, Benjamin; Ichim, Thomas E; Lin, Feng

    2009-11-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer offers great promise, however translation into human studies has yielded relatively poor results to date. The concept of combining cancer vaccination with angiogenesis inhibition is appealing, due to favorable safety profile of both approaches, as well as possible biological synergies. Here we studied the anti-tumor effects of combining plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccination and anti-angiogenesis in B16F10 murine model. By using electroporation-mediated gene/pDNA delivery, the anti-tumor efficacy of vaccination with pDNAs encoding gp100, TRP2 and Ii-PADRE was facilitated by administration of soluble form of EphB4 fused with human serum albumin (sEphB4-HSA), or by co-delivery of pDNAs encoding Angiostatin and/or Endostatin. In an optimized administration protocol, melanoma vaccination together with intratumoral delivery of pDNAs encoding Angiostatin and Endostatin resulted in 57% tumor-free survival over 90 days after challenge. These data support the general concept that suppression of angiogenesis may allow for enhanced efficacy of anti-tumor immunity, suggesting the synergetic effects of therapeutic pDNA vaccination and angiogenesis inhibition in cancer therapy. PMID:19787240

  14. Simultaneous measurement of DNA motor protein conformation and activity with combined optical trap and single-molecule fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, Yann

    2013-03-01

    We present single-molecule measurements of Superfamily 1 UvrD helicase DNA unwinding that reveal directly how helicase stoichiometry and conformation regulate motor activity. Using a new instrument that combines high resolution optical tweezers with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, we record DNA unwinding activity with base pair-scale resolution (via optical tweezers) simultaneously with helicase stoichiometry and conformation (via fluorescence). Quantifying the fluorescence signal from labeled UvrD, we observe that pairs of UvrD molecules are required for long distance unwinding but that individual molecules exhibit limited, non-processive unwinding activity. UvrD is also known to exhibit two different conformations, `closed' and `open', based on the orientation of its 2B regulatory domain. The function of these conformations has remained elusive. Measuring the fluorescence of FRET labeled proteins, we detect directly the conformation of the 2B domain of individual UvrD molecules during unwinding activity. We observe that UvrD is in the `closed' conformation during DNA unwinding but surprisingly switches to the `open' conformation upon reversal of helicase direction, i.e. when UvrD switches strands and translocates on the opposing strand with the DNA junction rezipping behind it. We hypothesize that the 2B domain acts as a conformational switch that controls DNA unwinding vs. re-annealing. Work supported by NSF (PHY-082261, Center for the Physics of Living Cells) and NIH (R21 RR025341A)

  15. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2. PMID:26629954

  16. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e.

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4- [4-(N-methyl)styrene] -benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2.

  17. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    PubMed Central

    Barends, Thomas R. M.; Brosi, Richard W. W.; Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten; Seidel, Ralf; Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine; Bittl, Robert; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ. PMID:23897477

  18. Indolicidin targets duplex DNA: structural and mechanistic insight through a combination of spectroscopy and microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anirban; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Jana, Jagannath; Saha, Abhijit; Jana, Batakrishna; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Kumar, Dinesh; Ghosh, Surajit; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Bhunia, Anirban

    2014-09-01

    Indolicidin (IR13), a 13-residue antimicrobial peptide from the cathelicidin family, is known to exhibit a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. This peptide inhibits bacterial DNA synthesis resulting in cell filamentation. However, the precise mechanism remains unclear and requires further investigation. The central PWWP motif of IR13 provides a unique structural element that can wrap around, and thus stabilize, duplex B-type DNA structures. Replacements of the central Trp-Trp pair with Ala-Ala, His-His, or Phe-Phe residues in the PxxP motif significantly affects the ability of the peptide to stabilize duplex DNA. Results of microscopy studies in conjunction with spectroscopic data confirm that the DNA duplex is stabilized by IR13, thereby inhibiting DNA replication and transcription. In this study we provide high-resolution structural information on the interaction between indolicidin and DNA, which will be beneficial for the design of novel therapeutic antibiotics based on peptide scaffolds. PMID:25044630

  19. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants.

    PubMed

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M; Sullivan, John L; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  20. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Sullivan, John L.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  1. Enhancement of reverse transfection efficiency by combining stimulated DNA surface desorption and electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, Rhiannon; Hook, Andrew; Thissen, Helmut; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    Transfection cell microarrays (TCMs) are a high-throughput, miniaturised cell-culture system utilising reverse transfection, in which cells are seeded onto a DNA array resulting in localised regions of transfected cells. TCMs are useful for the analysis of gene expression, and can be used to identify genes involved in many cellular processes. This is of significant interest in fields such as tissue engineering, diagnostic screening, and drug testing [1, 2]. Low transfection efficiency has so far limited the application and utility of this technique. Recently, the transfection efficiency of TCMs was improved by an application of a high voltage for a short period of time to the DNA array resulting in the electroporation of cells attached to the surface [3, 4]. Furthermore, application of a low voltage for a longer period of time to the DNA array was shown to improve the transfection efficiency by stimulating the desorption of attached DNA, increasing the concentration of DNA available for cellular uptake [5]. In the present study, the optimisation of the uptake of adsorbed DNA vectors by adherent cells, utilising a voltage bias without compromising cell viability was investigated. This was achieved by depositing negatively charged DNA plasmids onto a positively charged allylamine plasma polymer (ALAPP) layer deposited on highly doped p-type silicon wafers either using a pipettor or a microarray contact printer. Surface-dependant human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 line) cells were cultured onto the DNA vector loaded ALAPP spots and the plasmid transfection events were detected by fluorescence microscopy. Cell viability assays, including fluorescein diacetate (FDA) / Hoechst DNA labelling, were carried out to determine the number of live adherent cells before and after application of a voltage. A protocol was developed to screen for voltage biases and exposure times in order to optimise transfection efficiency and cell viability. Cross-contamination between the microarray

  2. Combined DNA-RNA Fluorescent In situ Hybridization (FISH) to Study X Chromosome Inactivation in Differentiated Female Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Gribnau, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique which enables the detection of nucleic acids in cells. DNA FISH is often used in cytogenetics and cancer diagnostics, and can detect aberrations of the genome, which often has important clinical implications. RNA FISH can be used to detect RNA molecules in cells and has provided important insights in regulation of gene expression. Combining DNA and RNA FISH within the same cell is technically challenging, as conditions suitable for DNA FISH might be too harsh for fragile, single stranded RNA molecules. We here present an easily applicable protocol which enables the combined, simultaneous detection of Xist RNA and DNA encoded by the X chromosomes. This combined DNA-RNA FISH protocol can likely be applied to other systems where both RNA and DNA need to be detected. PMID:24961515

  3. The Molecular Dissection of mtDNA Haplogroup H Confirms That the Franco-Cantabrian Glacial Refuge Was a Major Source for the European Gene Pool

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Alessandro; Rengo, Chiara; Magri, Chiara; Battaglia, Vincenza; Olivieri, Anna; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio; Zeviani, Massimo; Briem, Egill; Carelli, Valerio; Moral, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Roostalu, Urmas; Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Kivisild, Toomas; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Richards, Martin; Villems, Richard; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Semino, Ornella; Torroni, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Complete sequencing of 62 mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) belonging (or very closely related) to haplogroup H revealed that this mtDNA haplogroup—by far the most common in Europe—is subdivided into numerous subhaplogroups, with at least 15 of them (H1–H15) identifiable by characteristic mutations. All the haplogroup H mtDNAs found in 5,743 subjects from 43 populations were then screened for diagnostic markers of subhaplogroups H1 and H3. This survey showed that both subhaplogroups display frequency peaks, centered in Iberia and surrounding areas, with distributions declining toward the northeast and southeast—a pattern extremely similar to that previously reported for mtDNA haplogroup V. Furthermore, the coalescence ages of H1 and H3 (∼11,000 years) are close to that previously reported for V. These findings have major implications for the origin of Europeans, since they attest that the Franco-Cantabrian refuge area was indeed the source of late-glacial expansions of hunter-gatherers that repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe from ∼15,000 years ago. This has also some implications for disease studies. For instance, the high occurrence of H1 and H3 in Iberia led us to re-evaluate the haplogroup distribution in 50 Spanish families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation. The survey revealed that the previously reported excess of H among these families is caused entirely by H3 and is due to a major, probably nonrecent, founder event. PMID:15382008

  4. Sensitive Zn(2+) sensor based on biofunctionalized nanopores via combination of DNAzyme and DNA supersandwich structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nannan; Hou, Ruizuo; Gao, Pengcheng; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2016-06-21

    The sensitivity of detection based on biofunctionalized nanopores is limited since the target-to-signal ratio is 1 : 1. Isothermal amplification is a promising amplification strategy at constant temperature due to its easy operation, quick results, PCR-like sensitivity, low cost and energy efficiency. In the present work, the isothermally amplified detection of Zn(2+) is achieved by using a DNA supersandwich structure and Zn(2+)-requiring DNAzymes. The DNA supersandwich structures, due to the multiple amplification of nucleic acids, heavily plug the nanopore. Simultaneously, the DNA supersandwich structures bond with the sessile probe (SP) of the substrate in the nanopore which partially hybridizes with DNAzymes. In the presence of Zn(2+), the Zn(2+)-requiring DNAzyme cleaves the SP into two fragments, while the DNA supersandwich structures are peeled off and the ionic pathway is unimpeded. A steep drop and a sequential complete recovery of the current occur in the I-V plot when the DNA supersandwich structures are decorated and peeled off. In the present system, the reliable detection limit of Zn(2+) is as low as 1 nM. Discrimination between different types of ions (Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+)) is achieved. PMID:26911926

  5. Combined hopping?superexchange model of a hole transfer in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhno, V. D.; Sultanov, V. B.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2004-12-01

    Relative hole transfer rates in DNA have been investigated in a number of nucleotide sequences experimentally. Calculation of the transfer rates in DNA is performed relying on the assumption that the transfer is realized as hopping of a hole on guanine sites, each hop being calculated on the basis of superexchange theory. It is shown that the medium reorganization energy and free energy changes play an important role in determining the transfer rate and the type of a nucleotide sequence. The results of the calculations are compared with experimental data covering a range of available sequences.

  6. Fabrication of DNA/RNA Hybrids Through Sequence-Specific Scission of Both Strands by pcPNA-S1 Nuclease Combination.

    PubMed

    Futai, Kazuki; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    By combining two strands of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acid (pcPNA) with S1 nuclease, a tool for site-selective and dual-strand scission of DNA/RNA hybrids has been developed. Both of the DNA and the RNA strands in the hybrids are hydrolyzed at desired sites to provide unique sticky ends. The scission fragments are directly ligated with other DNA/RNA hybrids by using T4 DNA ligase, resulting in the formation of desired recombinant DNA/RNA hybrids. PMID:27057646

  7. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  8. Combination of Gefitinib and DNA Methylation Inhibitor Decitabine Exerts Synergistic Anti-Cancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-jia; Huang, Guo-bin; Li, Bin; Zheng, De-qing; Yu, Xiu-rong; Luo, Xiao-yong

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of human colon cancer, the chemotherapy efficacy against colon cancer is still unsatisfactory. In the present study, effects of concomitant inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and DNA methyltransferase were examined in human colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that decitabine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor) synergized with gefitinib (an EGFR inhibitor) to reduce cell viability and colony formation in SW1116 and LOVO cells. However, the combination of the two compounds displayed minimal toxicity to NCM460 cells, a normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line. The combination was also more effective at inhibiting the AKT/mTOR/S6 kinase pathway. In addition, the combination of decitabine with gefitinib markedly inhibited colon cancer cell migration. Furthermore, gefitinib synergistically enhanced decitabine-induced cytotoxicity was primarily due to apoptosis as shown by Annexin V labeling that was attenuated by z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor. Concomitantly, cell apoptosis resulting from the co-treatment of gefitinib and decitabine was accompanied by induction of BAX, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP, along with reduction of Bcl-2 compared to treatment with either drug alone. Interestingly, combined treatment with these two drugs increased the expression of XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1) which play an important role in cell apoptosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion of XAF1 significantly attenuated colon cancer cells apoptosis induced by the combination of the two drugs. Our findings suggested that gefitinib in combination with decitabine exerted enhanced cell apoptosis in colon cancer cells were involved in mitochondrial-mediated pathway and induction of XAF1 expression. In conclusion, based on the observations from our study, we suggested that the combined administration of these two drugs might be considered as a novel therapeutic regimen for treating colon cancer. PMID

  9. Quantitation of DNA methyltransferase activity via chronocoulometry in combination with rolling chain amplification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jingjing; Liu, Yuanjian; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, a rolling chain amplification (RCA) strategy was proposed for chronocoulometric detection of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity. Briefly, after the double DNA helix structure was assembled on the surface of gold electrode, it was first methylated by M. SssI MTase and then RCA was realized in the presence of E. coli and phi29 DNA polymerase. Successively, numerous hexaammineruthenium (III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6)(3+), RuHex) were adsorbed on replicons by electrostatic interaction and generated a large electrochemical readout, the signal was "on". On the contrary, in the absence of M. SssI MTase, the methylated CpG site in the unmethylated double DNA helix structure could be specifically recognized and cleaved by HpaII, resulting in a disconnection of RCA from the electrode. This led seldom RuHex to be absorbed onto the surface of electrode, the signal was "off". Based on the proposed strategy, the activity of M. SssI MTase was assayed in the range of 0.5-60U/mL with a detection limit of 0.09U/mL (S/N=3). In addition, the inhibition of procaine and epicatechin on M. SssI MTase activity was evaluated. When the proposed method was applied in complex matrix such as human serum samples, acceptable accuracy, precision and high sensitivity were achieved. Therefore, the proposed method was a potential useful mean for clinical diagnosis and drug development. PMID:27155113

  10. Self-reproduction of supramolecular giant vesicles combined with the amplification of encapsulated DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Kensuke; Tamura, Mieko; Shohda, Koh-Ichiroh; Toyota, Taro; Suzuki, Kentaro; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2011-10-01

    The construction of a protocell from a materials point of view is important in understanding the origin of life. Both self-reproduction of a compartment and self-replication of an informational substance have been studied extensively, but these processes have typically been carried out independently, rather than linked to one another. Here, we demonstrate the amplification of DNA (encapsulated guest) within a self-reproducible cationic giant vesicle (host). With the addition of a vesicular membrane precursor, we observe the growth and spontaneous division of the giant vesicles, accompanied by distribution of the DNA to the daughter giant vesicles. In particular, amplification of the DNA accelerated the division of the giant vesicles. This means that self-replication of an informational substance has been linked to self-reproduction of a compartment through the interplay between polyanionic DNA and the cationic vesicular membrane. Our self-reproducing giant vesicle system therefore represents a step forward in the construction of an advanced model protocell.

  11. Self-reproduction of supramolecular giant vesicles combined with the amplification of encapsulated DNA.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Kensuke; Tamura, Mieko; Shohda, Koh-Ichiroh; Toyota, Taro; Suzuki, Kentaro; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2011-10-01

    The construction of a protocell from a materials point of view is important in understanding the origin of life. Both self-reproduction of a compartment and self-replication of an informational substance have been studied extensively, but these processes have typically been carried out independently, rather than linked to one another. Here, we demonstrate the amplification of DNA (encapsulated guest) within a self-reproducible cationic giant vesicle (host). With the addition of a vesicular membrane precursor, we observe the growth and spontaneous division of the giant vesicles, accompanied by distribution of the DNA to the daughter giant vesicles. In particular, amplification of the DNA accelerated the division of the giant vesicles. This means that self-replication of an informational substance has been linked to self-reproduction of a compartment through the interplay between polyanionic DNA and the cationic vesicular membrane. Our self-reproducing giant vesicle system therefore represents a step forward in the construction of an advanced model protocell. PMID:21941249

  12. Modified method for combined DNA and RNA isolation from peanut and other oil seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolation of good quality RNA and DNA from seeds is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols, and lipids that can degrade or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Standard RNA extraction methods utilizing guanidinium-phenol-chloroform extraction has not shown to be successful. RNA...

  13. Proposed Strategy for Selection Against Recessive Genetic Defects Through a Combination of Inbreeding and DNA Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recessive genetic defects are currently on the minds of many cattle breeders. The relatively rapid development of diagnostic DNA tests for recessive defects appears to be a major recent technological advancement. However, the attitude of breeders and breed associations toward recessive defects seems...

  14. Immune responses induced by DNA vaccines bearing Spike gene of PEDV combined with porcine IL-18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is the causative agent of porcine epidemic diarrhea, a highly contagious enteric disease of swine. The Spike (S) protein is one of the main structural proteins of PEDV capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies in vivo. Herein, we generated three distinct DNA ...

  15. Combined effect of Cd and Pb spiked field soils on bioaccumulation, DNA damage, and peroxidase activities in Trifolium repens.

    PubMed

    Lanier, C; Bernard, F; Dumez, S; Leclercq, J; Lemière, S; Vandenbulcke, F; Nesslany, F; Platel, A; Devred, I; Cuny, D; Deram, A

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the combined effects of Cd and Pb on accumulation and genotoxic potential in white clover (Trifolium repens). For this purpose, T. repens was exposed to contaminated soils (2.5-20 mg kg(-1) cadmium (Cd), 250-2000 mg kg(-1) lead (Pb) and a mixture of these two heavy metals) for 3, 10 and 56 days. The resulting bioaccumulation of Cd and Pb, DNA damage (comet assay) and peroxidase activities (APOX and GPOX) were determined. The exposure time is a determinant factor in experiments designed to measure the influence of heavy metal contamination. The accumulation of Cd or Pb resulting from exposure to the two-metal mixture does not appear to depend significantly on whether the white clover is exposed to soil containing one heavy metal or both. However, when T. repens is exposed to a Cd/Pb mixture, the percentage of DNA damage is lower than when the plant is exposed to monometallic Cd. DNA damage is close to that observed in the case of monometallic Pb exposure. Peroxidase activity cannot be associated with DNA damage under these experimental conditions. PMID:26396009

  16. Combined analysis of DNA methylome and transcriptome reveal novel candidate genes with susceptibility to bovine Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minyan; He, Yanghua; Zhou, Huangkai; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xizhi; Yu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical mastitis is a widely spread disease of lactating cows. Its major pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In this study, we performed genome-wide integrative analysis of DNA methylation and transcriptional expression to identify candidate genes and pathways relevant to bovine S. aureus subclinical mastitis. The genome-scale DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in cows with S. aureus subclinical mastitis (SA group) and healthy controls (CK) were generated by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with microarrays. We identified 1078 differentially methylated genes in SA cows compared with the controls. By integrating DNA methylation and transcriptome data, 58 differentially methylated genes were shared with differently expressed genes, in which 20.7% distinctly hypermethylated genes showed down-regulated expression in SA versus CK, whereas 14.3% dramatically hypomethylated genes showed up-regulated expression. Integrated pathway analysis suggested that these genes were related to inflammation, ErbB signalling pathway and mismatch repair. Further functional analysis revealed that three genes, NRG1, MST1 and NAT9, were strongly correlated with the progression of S. aureus subclinical mastitis and could be used as powerful biomarkers for the improvement of bovine mastitis resistance. Our studies lay the groundwork for epigenetic modification and mechanistic studies on susceptibility of bovine mastitis. PMID:27411928

  17. Aggravated DNA damage as a basis for enhanced glioma cell killing by MJ-66 in combination with minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hour, Mann-Jen; Liu, Wei-Ting; Lu, I-Chen; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Gean, Po-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of malignant glomas, the prognosis of patients remains very poor and more efficient therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. In the present study, we investigated whether 2-(naphthalene-1-yl)-6-pyrrolidinyl-4-quinazolinone (MJ-66), a synthetic quinazolinone analog, induces glioma cell death through DNA damage. Treatment of C6 glioma cells with MJ-66 resulted in a time-dependent increase in γ-H2AX and increased the appearance of nuclear γ-H2AX foci. MJ-66 interfered with G2/M DNA damage checkpoint through increasing phosphorylated levels of Chk1 and Cdc25C. UCN-01, a Chk1 inhibitor, reversed MJ-66-induced activation of Cdc25C and caspase 3. MJ-66 inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival time in intracranial glioma xenograft model. The combination of MJ-66 and Mino enhanced DNA damage and synergistically inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival time in intracranial glioma xenograft model. These results suggest that the combination of MJ-66 and Mino may be developed as a new therapeutic strategy against malignant gliomas. PMID:25232489

  18. Molecular phylogeny of Diabrotica beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) inferred from analysis of combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Clark, T L; Meinke, L J; Foster, J E

    2001-08-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of thirteen Diabrotica (representing virgifera and fucata species groups) and two outgroup Acalymma beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were inferred from the phylogenetic analysis of a combined data set of 1323 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and the entire second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA of 362 characters. Species investigated were D. adelpha, D. balteata, D. barberi, D. cristata, D. lemniscata, D. longicornis, D. porracea, D. speciosa, D. undecimpunctata howardi, D. u. undecimpunctata, D. virgifera virgifera, D. v. zeae, D. viridula, and outgroup A. blandulum and A. vittatum. Maximum parsimony (MP), minimum evolution (ME), and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of combined COI and ITS-2 sequences clearly place species into their traditional morphological species groups with MP and ME analyses resulting in identical topologies. Results generally confer with a prior work based on allozyme data, but within the virgifera species group, D. barberi and D. longicornis strongly resolve as sister taxa as well as monophyletic with the neotropical species, D. viridula, D. cristata and D. lemniscata also resolve as sister taxa. Both relationships are not in congruence with the prior allozyme-based hypothesis. Within the fucata species group, D. speciosa and D. balteata resolve as sister taxa. Results also strongly supported the D. virgifera and D. undecimpunctata subspecies complexes. Our proposed phylogeny provides some insight into current hypotheses regarding distribution status and evolution of various life history traits for Diabrotica. PMID:11520353

  19. Genetic variants in combination with early partial improvement as a clinical utility predictor of treatment outcome in major depressive disorder: the result of two pooled RCTs.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Serretti, A; Nonen, S; Takekita, Y; Wakeno, M; Azuma, J; Kinoshita, T

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics may allow for a personalized treatment, but a combination with clinical variables may further enhance prediction. In particular, in the present paper, we investigated early partial improvement (EPI) defined as 20% or more improvement by rating scales 2  weeks after treatment, in combination with selected gene variants as a predictor of treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. Two randomized controlled trials with 168 Japanese depressed patients were used. A stepwise multiple linear regression model with HAM-D score change at week 6 as the dependent variable and genotypes, EPI, baseline HAM-D score, age and sex as independent variables was performed in paroxetine, fluvoxamine and milnacipran, respectively, to estimate the prediction of HAM-D change at week 6. In the paroxetine sample, only EPI (P<0.001) was significantly associated with HAM-D change (n=81, R(2)=0.25, P<0.001). In the fluvoxamine sample, 5-HTTLPR La/Lg, S (P=0.029), FGF2 rs1449683C/T (P=0.013) and EPI (P=0.003) were associated with HAM-D change (n=42, R(2)=0.43, P<0.001). In the milnacipran sample, HTR-1A-1019C/G (P=0.001), ADRA2A-1297C/G (P=0.028) and EPI (P<0.001) were associated with outcome (n=45, R(2)=0.71, P<0.001). EPI in combination with genetic variants could be a useful predictor of treatment outcome and could strengthen the practical use of pharmacogenetic data in clinical practice. PMID:25710119

  20. Genetic variants in combination with early partial improvement as a clinical utility predictor of treatment outcome in major depressive disorder: the result of two pooled RCTs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, M; Serretti, A; Nonen, S; Takekita, Y; Wakeno, M; Azuma, J; Kinoshita, T

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics may allow for a personalized treatment, but a combination with clinical variables may further enhance prediction. In particular, in the present paper, we investigated early partial improvement (EPI) defined as 20% or more improvement by rating scales 2  weeks after treatment, in combination with selected gene variants as a predictor of treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. Two randomized controlled trials with 168 Japanese depressed patients were used. A stepwise multiple linear regression model with HAM-D score change at week 6 as the dependent variable and genotypes, EPI, baseline HAM-D score, age and sex as independent variables was performed in paroxetine, fluvoxamine and milnacipran, respectively, to estimate the prediction of HAM-D change at week 6. In the paroxetine sample, only EPI (P<0.001) was significantly associated with HAM-D change (n=81, R2=0.25, P<0.001). In the fluvoxamine sample, 5-HTTLPR La/Lg, S (P=0.029), FGF2 rs1449683C/T (P=0.013) and EPI (P=0.003) were associated with HAM-D change (n=42, R2=0.43, P<0.001). In the milnacipran sample, HTR-1A-1019C/G (P=0.001), ADRA2A-1297C/G (P=0.028) and EPI (P<0.001) were associated with outcome (n=45, R2=0.71, P<0.001). EPI in combination with genetic variants could be a useful predictor of treatment outcome and could strengthen the practical use of pharmacogenetic data in clinical practice. PMID:25710119

  1. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  2. Berberine in combination with cisplatin suppresses breast cancer cell growth through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuwan; Jing, Zuolei; Li, Yan; Mao, Weifeng

    2016-07-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from medicinal plants such as Hydrastis canadensis, Berberis aristata and Coptis chinensis. BBR displays a number of beneficial roles in the treatment of various types of cancers, yet the precise mechanisms of its action remain unclear. Cisplatin is an effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent and functions by generating DNA damage, promoting DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis; however, its efficacy is challenged by the resistance of tumor cells in clinical application. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of BBR in combination with cisplatin on human breast cancer cells. MTT assay showed that BBR inhibited breast cancer MCF-7 cell growth with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 52.178±1.593 µM and the IC50 value of cisplatin was 49.541±1.618 µM, while in combination with 26 µM BBR, the IC50 value of cisplatin was 5.759±0.76 µM. BBR sensitized the MCF-7 cells to cisplatin in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After treatment of BBR and cisplatin, the cellular pro-apoptotic capase-3 and cleaved capspase-3 and caspase-9 were upregulated and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was downregulated. Importantly, BBR restrained the expression of cellular PCNA, and immunofluoresence analysis of γH2AX showed that BBR increased the DNA damages induced by cisplatin. Taken together, the results demonstrated that BBR sensitized MCF-7 cells to cisplatin through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27177238

  3. Combined first pass and gated blood pool radionuclide studies in the hemodynamic-cardiac evaluation of patients with low cardiac output

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Mansour, P.; Fouad, F.M.; Sheeler, L.R.; Bravo, E.L.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Tarazi, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) is frequently used in the evaluation of cardiac function but low CO does not necessarily reflect heart failure. Similarly, low ejection fraction (EF) can be present in compensated heart diseases. In order to evaluate cardiac performance in relation to systematic hemodynamics, the authors used a multifactorial approach for the determination of CO, EF, pulmonary mean transit time (MTT), ratio of cardiopulmonary volume over total blood volume (CPV/TBV as an index of venous tone) all obtained from a single injection of 99m Tc-HSA. Four different conditions associated with low CO (less than or equal to 2.1 L/min/m/sup 2/) were evaluated. The combined use of CO, EF, MTT and CPV/TBV allowed a better understanding of the myocardial and peripheral circulatory factors associated with low CO states. This is helpful in the selection and follow-up of appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  4. Enhanced Performance of Plasmid DNA Polyplexes Stabilized by a Combination of Core Hydrophobicity and Surface PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Elizabeth J.; Nelson, Christopher E.; Werfel, Thomas A.; Guo, Ruijing; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy has high potential for safely promoting tissue restoration and for treating various genetic diseases. One current limitation is that conventional transfection reagents such as polyethylenimine (PEI) form electrostatically stabilized plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes with poor colloidal stability. In this study, a library of poly(ethylene glycol-b-(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-co-butyl methacrylate)) [poly(EG-b-(DMAEMA-co-BMA))] polymers were synthesized and screened for improved colloidal stability and nucleic acid transfection following lyophilization. When added to pDNA in the appropriate pH buffer, the DMAEMA moieties initiate formation of electrostatic polyplexes that are internally stabilized by hydrophobic interactions of the core BMA blocks and sterically stabilized against aggregation by a PEG corona. The BMA content was varied from 0% to 60% in the second polymer block in order to optimally tune the balance of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in the polyplex core, and polymers with 40 and 50 mol% BMA achieved the highest transfection efficiency. Diblock copolymers were more stable than PEI in physiologic buffers. Consequently, diblock copolymer polyplexes aggregated more slowly and followed a reaction-limited colloidal aggregation model, while fast aggregation of PEI polyplexes was governed by a diffusion-limited model. Polymers with 40% BMA did not aggregate significantly after lyophilization and produced up to 20-fold higher transfection efficiency than PEI polyplexes both before and after lyophilization. Furthermore, poly(EG-b-(DMAEMA-co-BMA)) polyplexes exhibited pH-dependent membrane disruption in a red blood cell hemolysis assay and endosomal escape as observed by confocal microscopy.Lyophilized polyplexes made with the lead candidate diblock copolymer (40% BMA) also successfully transfected cells in vitro following incorporation into gas-foamed polymeric scaffolds. In summary, the enhanced colloidal stability

  5. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  6. A Fatal Combination: A Thymidylate Synthase Inhibitor with DNA Damaging Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ligasová, Anna; Strunin, Dmytro; Friedecký, David; Adam, Tomáš; Koberna, Karel

    2015-01-01

    2′-deoxy-5-ethynyluridine (EdU) has been previously shown to be a cell poison whose toxicity depends on the particular cell line. The reason is not known. Our data indicates that different efficiency of EdU incorporation plays an important role. The EdU-mediated toxicity was elevated by the inhibition of 2′-deoxythymidine 5′-monophosphate synthesis. EdU incorporation resulted in abnormalities of the cell cycle including the slowdown of the S phase and a decrease in DNA synthesis. The slowdown but not the cessation of the first cell division after EdU administration was observed in all of the tested cell lines. In HeLa cells, a 10 μM EdU concentration led to the cell death in the 100% of cells probably due to the activation of an intra S phase checkpoint in the subsequent S phase. Our data also indicates that this EdU concentration induces interstrand DNA crosslinks in HeLa cells. We suppose that these crosslinks are the primary DNA damage resulting in cell death. According to our results, the EdU-mediated toxicity is further increased by the inhibition of thymidylate synthase by EdU itself at its higher concentrations. PMID:25671308

  7. Effects of combinations of ROS scavengers on oxidative DNA damage caused by visible-light-activated camphorquinone/N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungbum; Pagoria, Dustin; Raigrodski, Ariel; Geurtsen, Werner

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this investigation was to analyze whether various combinations of the ROS scavengers glutathione (GSH), N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), and vitamins C and E decrease DNA damage due to visible-light-irradiated (VL-irradiated) camphorquinone/N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (CQ/DMT) compared with individual vitamin C or E. PhiX-174 RF plasmid DNA was used to determine single and double strand breaks as parameters of DNA damage. Individual ROS scavengers and combinations of the antioxidants were added to plasmid DNA treated with VL-irradiated CQ/DMT/Cu (II). After incubation, DNA was loaded into a 1% agarose gel. Following electrophoresis, gels stained with 0.5 microg/mL ethidium bromide were photographed under ultraviolet illumination and analyzed with NIH ImageJ software. Results were evaluated between groups for statistical significance using Student's paired t-test (p < 0.05). Glutathione significantly reduced oxidative DNA damage at all test concentrations when combined with vitamin C or vitamin E. The concentration of damaged DNA observed in the presence of combinations of GSH with vitamin C or vitamin E was significantly lower compared with all other combinations of antioxidants investigated in our study (p < 0.05). In contrast to GSH, NAC was not able to compensate the pro-oxidative effects of vitamin C and vitamin E. Only at a concentration of 2 mM, NAC combined with vitamin C efficiently prevented CQ/DMT/Cu (II)-associated DNA damage. Our data indicate that solely the combinations of GSH with vitamin C or vitamin E significantly reduce the severity of oxidative DNA damage caused by CQ/DMT, whereas NAC may even increase the pro-oxidant activity of vitamin C and vitamin E. PMID:17443666

  8. Combined inhibition of DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase restores caspase-8 expression and sensitizes SCLC cells to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Kaminskyy, Vitaliy O; Surova, Olga V; Vaculova, Alena; Zhivotovsky, Boris

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising drug for the treatment of tumors; however, a number of cancer cells are resistant to this cytokine. Among the mechanisms of resistance of small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) to TRAIL is the lack of caspase-8 expression. Although methylation of the caspase-8 promoter has been suggested as the main mechanism of caspase-8 silencing, we showed that reduction of the enzymes involved in DNA methylation, DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) 1, 3a and 3b, was not sufficient to significantly restore caspase-8 expression in SCLC cells, signifying that other mechanisms are involved in caspase-8 silencing. We found that combination of the DNMT inhibitor decitabine with an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC) significantly increased caspase-8 expression in SCLC cells at the RNA and protein levels. Among all studied HDAC inhibitors, valproic acid (VPA) and CI-994 showed prolonged effects on histone acetylation, while combination with decitabine produced the most prominent effects on caspase-8 re-expression. Moreover, a significant reduction of survivin and cIAP-1 proteins level was observed after treatment with VPA. The combination of two drugs sensitized SCLC cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, involving mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and was accompanied by Bid cleavage, activation of Bax, and release of cytochrome c. Both initiator caspase-8 and -9 were required for the sensitization of SCLC cells to TRAIL. Thus, efficient restoration of caspase-8 expression in SCLC cells is achieved when a combination of DNMT and HDAC inhibitors is used, suggesting a combination of decitabine and VPA or CI-994 as a potential treatment for sensitization of SCLC cells lacking caspase-8 to TRAIL. PMID:21771726

  9. Electrochemiluminescence signal amplification combined with a conformation-switched hairpin DNA probe for determining the methylation level and position in the Hsp53 tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Meixing; Fan, Mengxing; Gu, Jinxing; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2014-03-18

    We report a new strategy for detection of the methylation level and position in the Hsp53 tumor suppressor gene based on the electrochemiluminescence signal amplification combined with a conformation-switched hairpin DNA probe for improving selectivity. PMID:24501739

  10. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates. 120.611 Section 120.611 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As...

  11. Combination of cascade chemical reactions with graphene-DNA interaction to develop new strategy for biosensor fabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Sun, Liya; Chen, Yangyang; Ye, Zonghuang; Shen, Zhongming; Li, Genxi

    2013-09-15

    Graphene, a single atom thick and two dimensional carbon nano-material, has been proven to possess many unique properties, one of which is the recent discovery that it can interact with single-stranded DNA through noncovalent π-π stacking. In this work, we demonstrate that a new strategy to fabricate many kinds of biosensors can be developed by combining this property with cascade chemical reactions. Taking the fabrication of glucose sensor as an example, while the detection target, glucose, may regulate the graphene-DNA interaction through three cascade chemical reactions, electrochemical techniques are employed to detect the target-regulated graphene-DNA interaction. Experimental results show that in a range from 5μM to 20mM, the glucose concentration is in a natural logarithm with the logarithm of the amperometric response, suggesting a best detection limit and detection range. The proposed biosensor also shows favorable selectivity, and it has the advantage of no need for labeling. What is more, by controlling the cascade chemical reactions, detection of a variety of other targets may be achieved, thus the strategy proposed in this work may have a wide application potential in the future. PMID:23542067

  12. A computer programme for estimation of genetic risk in X linked disorders, combining pedigree and DNA probe data with other conditional information.

    PubMed Central

    Sarfarazi, M; Williams, H

    1986-01-01

    A computer programme is presented for calculating the recurrence risk in X linked disorders, combining pedigree and DNA probe data with other conditional information such as carrier detection tests. The methods of computation are shown in the given examples. The programme can be used with either a single DNA probe or two 'flanking' DNA probes for both familial and isolated case pedigrees. For isolated case families the mutation rate at the disease locus can be taken into account in conjunction with the DNA probe data. PMID:3754009

  13. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

    PubMed

    Coghlan, Megan L; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C; White, Nicole E; Byard, Roger W; Bellgard, Matthew I; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J N; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F; Bunce, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines. PMID:26658160

  14. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

    PubMed Central

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Byard, Roger W.; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J. N.; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines. PMID:26658160

  15. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Byard, Roger W.; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J. N.; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines.

  16. Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating area. Non-original spa pool is partially visible on right. - Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. The combination of FLT3 and DNA methyltransferase inhibition is synergistically cytotoxic to FLT3/ITD acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, E; Ganguly, S; Rajkhowa, T; Gocke, C D; Levis, M; Konig, H

    2016-05-01

    Effective treatment regimens for elderly acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients harboring internal tandem duplication mutations in the FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) gene (FLT3/ITD) are lacking and represent a significant unmet need. Recent data on the effects of FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors on FLT3/ITD(+) AML showed promising clinical activity, including in elderly patients. DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors such as decitabine (5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, DEC) and 5-azacitidine (AZA) demonstrated clinical benefit in AML, are well tolerated and are associated with minimal increases in FLT3 ligand, which can represent a potential resistance mechanism to FLT3 inhibitors. In addition, both FLT3 and DNMT inhibition are associated with the induction of terminal differentiation of myeloid blasts. Consequently, there is a strong theoretical rationale for combining FLT3 and DNMT inhibition for FLT3/ITD(+) AML. We therefore sought to study the anti-leukemic effects of DEC, AZA and FLT3 inhibitors, either as single agents or in combination, on AML cell lines and primary cells derived from newly diagnosed and relapsed AML patients. Our studies indicate that combined treatment using FLT3 inhibition and hypomethylation confers synergistic anti-leukemic effects, including apoptosis, growth inhibition and differentiation. The simultaneous administration of AZA and FLT3 inhibition appears to be the most efficacious combination in this regard. These drugs may provide a novel therapeutic approach for FLT3/ITD(+) AML, in particular for older patients. PMID:26686245

  18. Synthesis of DNA containing the simian virus 40 origin of replication by the combined action of DNA polymerases alpha and delta.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S H; Eki, T; Hurwitz, J

    1989-01-01

    Proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) mediates the replication of simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA by reversing the effects of a protein that inhibits the elongation reaction. Two other protein fractions, activator I and activator II, were also shown to play important roles in this process. We report that activator II isolated from HeLa cell extracts is a PCNA-dependent DNA polymerase delta that is required for efficient replication of DNA containing the SV40 origin of replication. PCNA-dependent DNA polymerase delta on a DNA singly primed phi X174 single-stranded circular DNA template required PCNA, a complex of the elongation inhibitor and activator I, and the single-stranded DNA-binding protein essential for SV40 DNA replication. DNA polymerase delta, in contrast to DNA polymerase alpha, hardly used RNA-primed DNA templates. These results indicate that both DNA polymerase alpha and delta are involved in SV40 DNA replication in vitro and their activity depends on PCNA, the elongation inhibitor, and activator I. Images PMID:2571990

  19. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Cancer.gov

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  20. Pools for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  1. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  2. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    Aquarium granuloma; Fish tank granuloma ... Risks include exposure to swimming pools, salt water aquariums, or ocean fish. ... Wash hands and arms thoroughly after cleaning aquariums. Or, wear rubber gloves when cleaning.

  3. The energetic basis of the DNA double helix: a combined microcalorimetric approach

    PubMed Central

    Vaitiekunas, Paulius; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Privalov, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Microcalorimetric studies of DNA duplexes and their component single strands showed that association enthalpies of unfolded complementary strands into completely folded duplexes increase linearly with temperature and do not depend on salt concentration, i.e. duplex formation results in a constant heat capacity decrement, identical for CG and AT pairs. Although duplex thermostability increases with CG content, the enthalpic and entropic contributions of an AT pair to duplex formation exceed that of a CG pair when compared at the same temperature. The reduced contribution of AT pairs to duplex stabilization comes not from their lower enthalpy, as previously supposed, but from their larger entropy contribution. This larger enthalpy and particularly the greater entropy results from water fixed by the AT pair in the minor groove. As the increased entropy of an AT pair exceeds that of melting ice, the water molecule fixed by this pair must affect those of its neighbors. Water in the minor groove is, thus, orchestrated by the arrangement of AT groups, i.e. is context dependent. In contrast, water hydrating exposed nonpolar surfaces of bases is responsible for the heat capacity increment on dissociation and, therefore, for the temperature dependence of all thermodynamic characteristics of the double helix. PMID:26304541

  4. Circular Dichroism of DNA G-Quadruplexes: Combining Modeling and Spectroscopy To Unravel Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Gattuso, Hugo; Spinello, Angelo; Terenzi, Alessio; Assfeld, Xavier; Barone, Giampaolo; Monari, Antonio

    2016-03-31

    We report on the comparison between the computational and experimental determination of electronic circular dichroism spectra of different guanine quadruplexes obtained from human telomeric sequences. In particular the difference between parallel, antiparallel, and hybrid structures is evidenced, as well as the induction of transitions between the polymorphs depending on the solution environment. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations (MD) are used to probe the conformational space of the different quadruplexes, and subsequently state-of-the-art hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques coupled with excitonic semiempirical Hamiltonian are used to simulate the macromolecular induced circular dichroism. The coupling of spectroscopy and molecular simulation allows an efficient one-to-one mapping between structures and optical properties, offering a way to disentangle the rich, yet complicated, quantity of information embedded in circular dichroism spectra. We show that our methodology is robust and efficient and allows us to take into account subtle conformational changes. As such, it could be used as an efficient tool to investigate structural modification upon DNA/drug interactions. PMID:26943487

  5. Pool-riffle Maintenance in Mountain Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Pool-riffles are maintained through a combination of at least several mechanisms that operate and interact over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Velocity or shear reversal is subsumed within several of these mechanisms, however a growing body of work suggests that (1) flow convergence into pools, (2) structuring of riffle crest sediments, and (3) local feedbacks between flood stage bedform evolution and hydrodynamics may be disproportionately important. We additionally propose that temporal and spatial patterns of sediment sorting across pool-riffles may also provide some level of bedform maintenance. A comprehensive understanding of these maintenance mechanisms is needed. We will report results of several flume experiments for autogenic pool-riffles. The experiments examined pool-riffle maintenance processes under variable flood and sediment supply conditions. A focus of our work is to characterize spatial and temporal patterns of pool-riffle sediment sorting, and to examine this in relation to temporal patterns of bedform evolution. The experiments represent a 5:1 scale-model of a prototype reach of a pool-riffle stream located within the University of British Columbia Malcolm Knapp Research Forest, Maple Ridge, BC.

  6. Synergistic effects of combined DNA methyltransferase inhibition and MBD2 depletion on breast cancer cells; MBD2 depletion blocks 5-aza-2ʹ-deoxycytidine-triggered invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cheishvili, David; Chik, Flora; Li, Chen Chen; Bhattacharya, Bishnu; Suderman, Matthew; Arakelian, Ani; Hallett, Michael; Rabbani, Shafaat A.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    5-Aza-2ʹ-deoxycytidine (5-azaCdR) not only inhibits growth of non-invasive breast cancer cells but also increases their invasiveness through induction of pro-metastatic genes. Methylated DNA binding protein 2 (MBD2) is involved in silencing methylated tumor suppressor genes as well as activation of pro-metastatic genes. In this study, we show that a combination of MBD2 depletion and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) inhibition in breast cancer cells results in a combined effect in vitro and in vivo, enhancing tumor growth arrest on one hand, while inhibiting invasiveness triggered by 5-azaCdR on the other hand. The combined treatment of MBD2 depletion and 5-azaCdR suppresses and augments distinct gene networks that are induced by DNMT inhibition alone. These data point to a potential new approach in targeting the DNA methylation machinery by combination of MBD2 and DNMT inhibitors. PMID:25178277

  7. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines. PMID:25265876

  8. Epigenetic age predictions based on buccal swabs are more precise in combination with cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures.

    PubMed

    Eipel, Monika; Mayer, Felix; Arent, Tanja; Ferreira, Marcelo R P; Birkhofer, Carina; Gerstenmaier, Uwe; Costa, Ivan G; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Aging is reflected by highly reproducible DNA methylation (DNAm) changes that open new perspectives for estimation of chronological age in legal medicine. DNA can be harvested non-invasively from cells at the inside of a person's cheek using buccal swabs - but these specimens resemble heterogeneous mixtures of buccal epithelial cells and leukocytes with different epigenetic makeup. In this study, we have trained an age predictor based on three age-associated CpG sites (associated with the genesPDE4C, ASPA, and ITGA2B) for swab samples to reach a mean absolute deviation (MAD) between predicted and chronological age of 4.3 years in a training set and of 7.03 years in a validation set. Subsequently, the composition of buccal epithelial cells versus leukocytes was estimated by two additional CpGs (associated with the genes CD6 and SERPINB5). Results of this "Buccal-Cell-Signature" correlated with cell counts in cytological stains (R2 = 0.94). Combination of cell type-specific and age-associated CpGs into one multivariate model enabled age predictions with MADs of 5.09 years and 5.12 years in two independent validation sets. Our results demonstrate that the cellular composition in buccal swab samples can be determined by DNAm at two cell type-specific CpGs to improve epigenetic age predictions. PMID:27249102

  9. Epigenetic age predictions based on buccal swabs are more precise in combination with cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures

    PubMed Central

    Eipel, Monika; Mayer, Felix; Arent, Tanja; Ferreira, Marcelo R. P.; Birkhofer, Carina; Gerstenmaier, Uwe; Costa, Ivan G.; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is reflected by highly reproducible DNA methylation (DNAm) changes that open new perspectives for estimation of chronological age in legal medicine. DNA can be harvested non-invasively from cells at the inside of a person's cheek using buccal swabs – but these specimens resemble heterogeneous mixtures of buccal epithelial cells and leukocytes with different epigenetic makeup. In this study, we have trained an age predictor based on three age-associated CpG sites (associated with the genes PDE4C, ASPA, and ITGA2B) for swab samples to reach a mean absolute deviation (MAD) between predicted and chronological age of 4.3 years in a training set and of 7.03 years in a validation set. Subsequently, the composition of buccal epithelial cells versus leukocytes was estimated by two additional CpGs (associated with the genes CD6 and SERPINB5). Results of this “Buccal-Cell-Signature” correlated with cell counts in cytological stains (R2 = 0.94). Combination of cell type-specific and age-associated CpGs into one multivariate model enabled age predictions with MADs of 5.09 years and 5.12 years in two independent validation sets. Our results demonstrate that the cellular composition in buccal swab samples can be determined by DNAm at two cell type-specific CpGs to improve epigenetic age predictions. PMID:27249102

  10. SHAMS: Combining chemical modification of RNA with mass spectrometry to examine polypurine tract-containing RNA/DNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kevin B.; Yi-Brunozzi, Hye Young; Brinson, Robert G.; Marino, John P.; Fabris, Daniele; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) has gained popularity as a facile method of examining RNA structure both in vitro and in vivo, exploiting accessibility of the ribose 2′-OH to acylation by N-methylisatoic anhydride (NMIA) in unpaired or flexible configurations. Subsequent primer extension terminates at the site of chemical modification, and these products are fractionated by high-resolution gel electrophoresis. When applying SHAPE to investigate structural features associated with the wild-type and analog-substituted polypurine tract (PPT)–containing RNA/DNA hybrids, their size (20–25 base pairs) rendered primer extension impractical. As an alternative method of detection, we reasoned that chemical modification could be combined with tandem mass spectrometry, relying on the mass increment of RNA fragments containing the NMIA adduct (Mr = 133 Da). Using this approach, we demonstrate both specific modification of the HIV-1 PPT RNA primer and variations in its acylation pattern induced by replacing template nucleotides with a non-hydrogen-bonding thymine isostere. Our selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by mass spectrometry strategy (SHAMS) should find utility when examining the structure of small RNA fragments or RNA/DNA hybrids where primer extension cannot be performed. PMID:19535461

  11. Nonsense mutation at Tyr-4046 in the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit of severe combined immune deficiency mice

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Ryoko; Fujimori, Akira; Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Mita, Kazuei; Saito, Toshiyuki; Mori, Masahiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Morimyo, Mitsuoki; Muto, Masahiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Tatsumi, Kouichi; Abe, Masumi

    1997-01-01

    The severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mouse was reported as an animal model for human immune deficiency. Through the course of several studies, the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) gene came to be considered a candidate for the SCID-responsible gene. We isolated an ORF of the murine DNA-PKcs gene from SCID mice and their parent strain C.B-17 mice and determined the DNA sequences. The ORF of the murine DNA-PKcs gene contained 4128-aa residues and had 78.9% homology with the human DNA-PKcs gene. A particularly important finding is that a T to A transversion results in the substitution of termination codon in SCID mice for the Tyr-4046 in C.B-17 mice. No other mutation was detected in the ORF of the gene. The generality of this transversion was confirmed using four individual SCID and wild-type mice. The substitution took place in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase domain, and the mutated gene encodes the truncated products missing 83 residues of wild-type DNA-PKcs products. Furthermore, the quantity of DNA-PKcs transcript in wild-type and SCID cells was almost equal. These observations indicate that the DNA-PKcs gene is the SCID-responsible gene itself and that the detected mutation leads to the SCID aberration. PMID:9122213

  12. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  13. Targeting DNA repair with combination veliparib (ABT-888) and temozolomide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carducci, Michael A.; Slovin, Susan; Cetnar, Jeremy; Qian, Jiang; McKeegan, Evelyn M.; Refici-Buhr, Marion; Chyla, Brenda; Shepherd, Stacie P.; Giranda, Vincent L.; Alumkal, Joshi J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Androgen receptor-mediated transcription is directly coupled with the induction of DNA damage, and castration-resistant tumor cells exhibit increased activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1, a DNA repair enzyme. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of low dose oral PARP inhibitor veliparib (ABT-888) and temozolomide (TMZ) in docetaxel-pretreated patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in a single-arm, open-label, pilot study. Patients with mCRPC progressing on at least one docetaxel-based therapy and prostate specific antigen (PSA) ≥2 ng/mL were treated with veliparib 40 mg twice daily on days 1–7 and TMZ once daily (150 mg/m2/day cycle 1; if well tolerated then 200 mg/m2/day cycle 2 onwards) on days 1–5 q28 days. Patients received 2 (median) treatment cycles (range, 1–9). The primary end-point was confirmed PSA response rate (decline≥30 %). Twenty-six eligible patients were enrolled, 25 evaluable for PSA response. Median baseline PSA was 170 ng/mL. Two patients had a confirmed PSA response (8.0 %; 95 % CI: 1.0– 26.0), 13 stable PSA, and 10 PSA progression. The median progression-free survival was 9 weeks (95 % CI: 7.9–17) and median overall survival 39.6 weeks (95 % CI: 26.6–not estimable). The most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were thrombocytopenia (77 %), anemia (69 %), fatigue (50 %), neutropenia (42 %), nausea (38 %), and constipation (23 %). Grade 3/4 AEs occurring in >10 % of patients were thrombocytopenia (23 %) and anemia (15 %). Veliparib and TMZ combination was well tolerated but with modest activity. Biomarker analysis supported the proof of concept that this combination has some antitumor activity in mCRPC. PMID:24764124

  14. Acoustic detection of DNA conformation in genetic assays combined with PCR.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, G; Tsortos, A; Kordas, A; Tiniakou, I; Morou, E; Vontas, J; Kardassis, D; Gizeli, E

    2013-01-01

    Application of PCR to multiplexing assays is not trivial; it requires multiple fluorescent labels for amplicon detection and sophisticated software for data interpretation. Alternative PCR-free methods exploiting new concepts in nanotechnology exhibit high sensitivities but require multiple labeling and/or amplification steps. Here, we propose to simplify the problem of simultaneous analysis of multiple targets in genetic assays by detecting directly the conformation, rather than mass, of target amplicons produced in the same PCR reaction. The new methodology exploits acoustic wave devices which are shown to be able to characterize in a fully quantitative manner multiple double stranded DNAs of various lengths. The generic nature of the combined acoustic/PCR platform is shown using real samples and, specifically, during the detection of SNP genotyping in Anopheles gambiae and gene expression quantification in treated mice. The method possesses significant advantages to TaqMan assay and real-time PCR regarding multiplexing capability, speed, simplicity and cost. PMID:23778520

  15. Acoustic detection of DNA conformation in genetic assays combined with PCR

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, G.; Tsortos, A.; Kordas, A.; Tiniakou, I.; Morou, E.; Vontas, J.; Kardassis, D.; Gizeli, E.

    2013-01-01

    Application of PCR to multiplexing assays is not trivial; it requires multiple fluorescent labels for amplicon detection and sophisticated software for data interpretation. Alternative PCR-free methods exploiting new concepts in nanotechnology exhibit high sensitivities but require multiple labeling and/or amplification steps. Here, we propose to simplify the problem of simultaneous analysis of multiple targets in genetic assays by detecting directly the conformation, rather than mass, of target amplicons produced in the same PCR reaction. The new methodology exploits acoustic wave devices which are shown to be able to characterize in a fully quantitative manner multiple double stranded DNAs of various lengths. The generic nature of the combined acoustic/PCR platform is shown using real samples and, specifically, during the detection of SNP genotyping in Anopheles gambiae and gene expression quantification in treated mice. The method possesses significant advantages to TaqMan assay and real-time PCR regarding multiplexing capability, speed, simplicity and cost. PMID:23778520

  16. Genetic variants in DNA repair pathways and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers: combined analysis of data from two genome-wide association studies in European populations.

    PubMed

    Babron, Marie-Claude; Kazma, Rémi; Gaborieau, Valérie; McKay, James; Brennan, Paul; Sarasin, Alain; Benhamou, Simone

    2014-07-01

    DNA repair pathways are good candidates for upper aerodigestive tract cancer susceptibility because of their critical role in maintaining genome integrity. We have selected 13 pathways involved in DNA repair representing 212 autosomal genes. To assess the role of these pathways and their associated genes, two European data sets from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium were pooled, totaling 1954 cases and 3121 controls, with documented demographic, lifetime alcohol and tobacco consumption information. We applied an innovative approach that tests single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-sets within DNA repair pathways and then within genes belonging to the significant pathways. We showed an association between the polymerase pathway and oral cavity/pharynx cancers (P-corrected = 4.45 × 10(-) (2)), explained entirely by the association with one SNP, rs1494961 (P = 2.65 × 10(-) (4)), a missense mutation V306I in the second exon of HELQ gene. We also found an association between the cell cycle regulation pathway and esophagus cancer (P-corrected = 1.48 × 10(-) (2)), explained by three SNPs located within or near CSNK1E gene: rs1534891 (P = 1.27 × 10(-) (4)), rs7289981 (P = 3.37 × 10(-) (3)) and rs13054361 (P = 4.09 × 10(-) (3)). As a first attempt to investigate pathway-level associations, our results suggest a role of specific DNA repair genes/pathways in specific upper aerodigestive tract cancer sites. PMID:24658182

  17. Vernal Pool Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nancy; Colburn, Betsy

    This curriculum guide accompanies Certified: A Citizen's Step-by-Step Guide to Protecting Vernal Pools which is designed to train volunteers in the process of identifying vernal pool habitat so that as many of these pools as possible can be certified by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program. Vernal pools are a kind of…

  18. Treatment of metastatic breast cancer by combination of chemotherapy and photothermal ablation using doxorubicin-loaded DNA wrapped gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dangge; Xu, Zhiai; Yu, Haijun; Chen, Xianzhi; Feng, Bing; Cui, Zhirui; Lin, Bin; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Chen, Chunying; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Wen; Li, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Despite the exciting advances in cancer therapy over past decades, tumor metastasis remains the dominate reason for cancer-related mortality. In present work, DNA-wrapped gold nanorods with doxorubicin (DOX)-loading (GNR@DOX) were developed for treatment of metastatic breast cancer via a combination of chemotherapy and photothermal ablation. The GNR@DOX nanoparticles induced significant temperature elevation and DOX release upon irradiation with near infrared (NIR) light as shown in the test tube studies. It was found that GNR@DOX nanoparticles in combination with laser irradiation caused higher cytotoxicity than free DOX in 4T1 breast cancer cells. Animal experiment with an orthotropic 4T1 mammary tumor model demonstrated that GNR@DOX nanoplatform significantly reduced the growth of primary tumors and suppressed their lung metastasis. The Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining assays confirmed that the tumor growth inhibition and metastasis prevention of GNR@DOX nanoparticles were attributed to their abilities to induce cellular apoptosis/necrosis and ablate intratumoral blood vessels. All these results suggested a considerable potential of GNR@DOX nanoplatform for treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24996756

  19. Determining the Architecture of a Protein-DNA Complex by Combining FeBABE Cleavage Analyses, 3-D Printed Structures, and the ICM Molsoft Program.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Knipling, Leslie; Hinton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Determining the structure of a protein-DNA complex can be difficult, particularly if the protein does not bind tightly to the DNA, if there are no homologous proteins from which the DNA binding can be inferred, and/or if only portions of the protein can be crystallized. If the protein comprises just a part of a large multi-subunit complex, other complications can arise such as the complex being too large for NMR studies, or it is not possible to obtain the amounts of protein and nucleic acids needed for crystallographic analyses. Here, we describe a technique we used to map the position of an activator protein relative to the DNA within a large transcription complex. We determined the position of the activator on the DNA from data generated using activator proteins that had been conjugated at specific residues with the chemical cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). These analyses were combined with 3-D models of the available structures of portions of the activator protein and B-form DNA to obtain a 3-D picture of the protein relative to the DNA. Finally, the Molsoft program was used to refine the position, revealing the architecture of the protein-DNA within the transcription complex. PMID:26404142

  20. Ultra-low Doping on Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides using DNA Nanostructure Doped by a Combination of Lanthanide and Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Park, Hyung-Youl; Shim, Jaewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Jeon, Jaeho; Lee, Sungjoo; Roh, Yonghan; Park, Sung Ha; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we propose a novel DNA-based doping method on MoS2 and WSe2 films, which enables ultra-low n- and p-doping control and allows for proper adjustments in device performance. This is achieved by selecting and/or combining different types of divalent metal and trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions on DNA nanostructures, using the newly proposed concept of Co-DNA (DNA functionalized by both divalent metal and trivalent Ln ions). The available n-doping range on the MoS2 by Ln-DNA is between 6 × 109 and 2.6 × 1010 cm−2. The p-doping change on WSe2 by Ln-DNA is adjusted between −1.0 × 1010 and −2.4 × 1010 cm−2. In Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA doping, a light p-doping is observed on MoS2 and WSe2 (~1010 cm−2). However, in the devices doped by Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA, a light n-doping (~1010 cm−2) occurs. A significant increase in on-current is also observed on the MoS2 and WSe2 devices, which are, respectively, doped by Tb3+- and Gd3+-Co-DNA, due to the reduction of effective barrier heights by the doping. In terms of optoelectronic device performance, the Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA (n-doping) and the Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA (p-doping) improve the MoS2 and WSe2 photodetectors, respectively. We also show an excellent absorbing property by Tb3+ ions on the TMD photodetectors. PMID:26838524

  1. Ultra-low Doping on Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides using DNA Nanostructure Doped by a Combination of Lanthanide and Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Park, Hyung-Youl; Shim, Jaewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Jeon, Jaeho; Lee, Sungjoo; Roh, Yonghan; Park, Sung Ha; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we propose a novel DNA-based doping method on MoS2 and WSe2 films, which enables ultra-low n- and p-doping control and allows for proper adjustments in device performance. This is achieved by selecting and/or combining different types of divalent metal and trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions on DNA nanostructures, using the newly proposed concept of Co-DNA (DNA functionalized by both divalent metal and trivalent Ln ions). The available n-doping range on the MoS2 by Ln-DNA is between 6 × 10(9) and 2.6 × 10(10 ) cm(-2). The p-doping change on WSe2 by Ln-DNA is adjusted between -1.0 × 10(10) and -2.4 × 10(10 ) cm(-2). In Eu(3+) or Gd(3+)-Co-DNA doping, a light p-doping is observed on MoS2 and WSe2 (~10(10 ) cm(-2)). However, in the devices doped by Tb(3+) or Er(3+)-Co-DNA, a light n-doping (~10(10 ) cm(-2)) occurs. A significant increase in on-current is also observed on the MoS2 and WSe2 devices, which are, respectively, doped by Tb(3+)- and Gd(3+)-Co-DNA, due to the reduction of effective barrier heights by the doping. In terms of optoelectronic device performance, the Tb(3+) or Er(3+)-Co-DNA (n-doping) and the Eu(3+) or Gd(3+)-Co-DNA (p-doping) improve the MoS2 and WSe2 photodetectors, respectively. We also show an excellent absorbing property by Tb(3+) ions on the TMD photodetectors. PMID:26838524

  2. Ultra-low Doping on Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides using DNA Nanostructure Doped by a Combination of Lanthanide and Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Park, Hyung-Youl; Shim, Jaewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Jeon, Jaeho; Lee, Sungjoo; Roh, Yonghan; Park, Sung Ha; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we propose a novel DNA-based doping method on MoS2 and WSe2 films, which enables ultra-low n- and p-doping control and allows for proper adjustments in device performance. This is achieved by selecting and/or combining different types of divalent metal and trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions on DNA nanostructures, using the newly proposed concept of Co-DNA (DNA functionalized by both divalent metal and trivalent Ln ions). The available n-doping range on the MoS2 by Ln-DNA is between 6 × 109 and 2.6 × 1010 cm-2. The p-doping change on WSe2 by Ln-DNA is adjusted between -1.0 × 1010 and -2.4 × 1010 cm-2. In Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA doping, a light p-doping is observed on MoS2 and WSe2 (~1010 cm-2). However, in the devices doped by Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA, a light n-doping (~1010 cm-2) occurs. A significant increase in on-current is also observed on the MoS2 and WSe2 devices, which are, respectively, doped by Tb3+- and Gd3+-Co-DNA, due to the reduction of effective barrier heights by the doping. In terms of optoelectronic device performance, the Tb3+ or Er3+-Co-DNA (n-doping) and the Eu3+ or Gd3+-Co-DNA (p-doping) improve the MoS2 and WSe2 photodetectors, respectively. We also show an excellent absorbing property by Tb3+ ions on the TMD photodetectors.

  3. Evidence of Subclinical mtDNA Alterations in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Compared to HIV-Negative Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Money, Deborah M.; Wagner, Emily C.; Maan, Evelyn J.; Chaworth-Musters, Tessa; Gadawski, Izabelle; van Schalkwyk, Julie E.; Forbes, John C.; Burdge, David R.; Albert, Arianne Y. K.; Lohn, Zoe; Côté, Hélène C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) can effectively prevent vertical transmission of HIV but there is potential risk of adverse maternal, foetal or infant effects. Specifically, the effect of cART use during pregnancy on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in HIV-positive (HIV+) women is unclear. We sought to characterize subclinical alterations in peripheral blood mtDNA levels in cART-treated HIV+ women during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Methods This prospective longitudinal observational cohort study enrolled both HIV+ and HIV-negative (HIV-) pregnant women. Clinical data and blood samples were collected at three time points in pregnancy (13-<23 weeks, 23-<30 weeks, 30–40 weeks), and at delivery and six weeks post-partum in HIV+ women. Peripheral blood mtDNA to nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio was measured by qPCR. Results Over a four year period, 63 HIV+ and 42 HIV- women were enrolled. HIV+ women showed significantly lower mtDNA/nDNA ratios compared to HIV- women during pregnancy (p = 0.003), after controlling for platelet count and repeated measurements using a multivariable mixed-effects model. Ethnicity, gestational age (GA) and substance use were also significantly associated with mtDNA/nDNA ratio (p≤0.02). Among HIV+ women, higher CD4 nadir was associated with higher mtDNA/nDNA ratios (p<0.0001), and these ratio were significantly lower during pregnancy compared to the postpartum period (p<0.0001). Conclusions In the context of this study, it was not possible to distinguish between mtDNA effects related to HIV infection versus cART therapy. Nevertheless, while mtDNA levels were relatively stable over time in both groups during pregnancy, they were significantly lower in HIV+ women compared to HIV- women. Although no immediate clinical impact was observed on maternal or infant health, lower maternal mtDNA levels may exert long-term effects on women and children and remain a concern. Improved knowledge of such subclinical alterations is

  4. The use of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles in combination with a low-pressure gene gun for transdermal DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Wei; Peng, Shu-Fen; Su, Chun-Jen; Mi, Fwu-Long; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Wei, Ming-Cheng; Lin, Hao-Jan; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2008-02-01

    Gold particles have been used as a carrier for transdermal gene delivery, which may cause adverse side effects when accumulated. In this study, biodegradable nanoparticles, composed of chitosan (CS) and poly-gamma-glutamic acid (gamma-PGA), were prepared by an ionic-gelation method for transdermal DNA delivery (CS/gamma-PGA/DNA) using a low-pressure gene gun. The conventional CS/DNA without the incorporation of gamma-PGA was used as a control. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to examine the internal structures of test nanoparticles, while identification of their constituents was conducted by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The CS/gamma-PGA/DNA were spherical in shape with a relatively homogeneous size distribution. In contrast, CS/DNA had a heterogeneous size distribution with a donut, rod or pretzel shape. Both test nanoparticles were able to effectively retain the encapsulated DNA and protect it from nuclease degradation. As compared with CS/DNA, CS/gamma-PGA/DNA improved their penetration depth into the mouse skin and enhanced gene expression. These observations may be attributed to the fact that CS/gamma-PGA/DNA were more compact in their internal structures and had a greater density than their CS/DNA counterparts, thus having a larger momentum to penetrate into the skin barrier. The results revealed that CS/gamma-PGA/DNA may substitute gold particles as a DNA carrier for transdermal gene delivery. PMID:18001831

  5. Data Pool Description

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-04-29

    ... "Internet Options", "Advanced" tab, "Enable FTP folder view (outside of Internet Explorer)" under "Browsing"  • Use IE7 for FTP ... FTP mode is required to access the Data Pool from the command line as "ftp -p l5eil01.larc.nasa.gov" , where the system translates ...

  6. Thread Pool Interface (TPI)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-04-01

    Thread Pool Interface (TpI) provides a simple interface for running functions written in C or C++ in a thread-parallel mode. Application or library codes may need to perform operations thread-parallel on machines with multicore processors. the TPI library provides a simple mechanism for managing thread activation, deactivation, and thread-parallel execution of application-provided subprograms.

  7. The Future of Pooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  8. Combined immunization using DNA-Sm14 and DNA-Hsp65 increases CD8+ memory T cells, reduces chronic pathology and decreases egg viability during Schistosoma mansoni infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most important neglected diseases found in developing countries and affects 249 million people worldwide. The development of an efficient vaccination strategy is essential for the control of this disease. Previous work showed partial protection induced by DNA-Sm14 against Schistosoma mansoni infection, whereas DNA-Hsp65 showed immunostimulatory properties against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer and antifibrotic properties in an egg-induced granuloma model. Methods C57BL/6 mice received 4 doses of DNA-Sm14 (100 μg/dose) and DNA-Hsp65 (100 μg/dose), simultaneously administrated, or DNA-Sm14 alone, once a week, during four weeks. Three groups were included: 1- Control (no immunization); 2- DNA-Sm14; 3- DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65. Two weeks following last immunization, animals were challenged subcutaneously with 30 cercariae. Fifteen, 48 and 69 days after infection splenocytes were collected to evaluate the number of CD8+ memory T cells (CD44highCD62low) using flow cytometry. Forty-eight days after challenge adult worms were collected by portal veins perfusion and intestines were collected to analyze the intestinal egg viability. Histological, immunohistochemical and soluble quantification of collagen and α-SMA accumulation were performed on the liver. Results In the current work, we tested a new vaccination strategy using DNA-Sm14 with DNA-Hsp65 to potentiate the protection against schistosomiasis. Combined vaccination increased the number of CD8+ memory T cells and decreased egg viability on the intestinal wall of infected mice. In addition, simultaneous vaccination with DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65 reduced collagen and α-SMA accumulation during the chronic phase of granuloma formation. Conclusion Simultaneous vaccination with DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65 showed an immunostimulatory potential and antifibrotic property that is associated with the reduction of tissue damage on Schistosoma mansoni experimental infection. PMID

  9. Site-specific T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis thaliana mediated by the combined action of CRE recombinase and ϕC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Annelies; De Buck, Sylvie; Nolf, Jonah; Van Lerberge, Els; Depicker, Ann

    2013-07-01

    Random T-DNA integration into the plant host genome can be problematic for a variety of reasons, including potentially variable transgene expression as a result of different integration positions and multiple T-DNA copies, the risk of mutating the host genome and the difficulty of stacking well-defined traits. Therefore, recombination systems have been proposed to integrate the T-DNA at a pre-selected site in the host genome. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of the ϕC31 integrase (INT) for efficient targeted T-DNA integration. Moreover, we show that the iterative site-specific integration system (ISSI), which combines the activities of the CRE recombinase and INT, enables the targeting of genes to a pre-selected site with the concomitant removal of the resident selectable marker. To begin, plants expressing both the CRE and INT recombinase and containing the target attP site were constructed. These plants were supertransformed with a T-DNA vector harboring the loxP site, the attB sites, a selectable marker and an expression cassette encoding a reporter protein. Three out of the 35 transformants obtained (9%) showed transgenerational site-specific integration (SSI) of this T-DNA and removal of the resident selectable marker, as demonstrated by PCR, Southern blot and segregation analysis. In conclusion, our results show the applicability of the ISSI system for precise and targeted Agrobacterium-mediated integration, allowing the serial integration of transgenic DNA sequences in plants. PMID:23574114

  10. Combined chemoassay and mass spectrometric approach to study the reactive potential of electrophiles towards deoxynucleosides as model for DNA.

    PubMed

    Schmied-Tobies, Maria I H; Paschke, Heidrun; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2016-05-01

    The modification of DNA by adduct formation is a potential molecular initiating event of genotoxicity. A chemoassay was established to study adduct formation of electrophiles with deoxynucleosides. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine the reactivity of the model electrophiles para-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and 1,4-naphthoquinone with deoxynucleoside (deoxyadenosine (dA), deoxyguanosine (dG), deoxycytidine (dC) and thymidine (dT)) to detect formation of adducts via constant neutral loss scan of deoxyribose (116 Da), and to elucidate adduct structures using high resolution mass spectrometry. Of the four deoxynucleosides dG was most susceptible, followed by dC and para-benzoquinone was the most reactive electrophile. With this approach five dG and four dC adducts were detected, formed by Michael addition and subsequent condensation. Also oxidation occurred with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Three of the adducts formed by benzoquinone have not been reported before. This chemoassay combined with mass spectrometry offers a way (a) to screen a large number of chemicals for their genotoxic potential, (b) to determine novel adducts that may be searched for in in vitro and in vivo studies and thus (c) to better understand the reaction of electrophiles with nucleobases. PMID:26945242

  11. Preclinical evaluation of antineoplastic activity of inhibitors of DNA methylation (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and histone deacetylation (trichostatin A, depsipeptide) in combination against myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Sepideh; Bernstein, Mark; Momparler, Louise F; Momparler, Richard L

    2003-05-01

    During the development of leukemia, genes that suppress growth and induce differentiation can be silenced by aberrant DNA methylation and by changes in chromatin structure that involve histone deacetylation. It has been reported that a positive interaction between DNA methylation and histone deacetylation takes place to inhibit transcription. Based on this observation, our working hypothesis was that a combination of inhibitors of these processes should produce an enhancement of their antineoplastic activity on leukemic cells. The cytosine nucleoside analog, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AZA), is a potent inhibitor of DNA methylation, which can activate tumor suppressor genes in leukemic cells that have been silenced by aberrant methylation. In clinical trials, 5AZA was demonstrated to be an active antileukemic agent. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI) can also activate gene expression in leukemic cell lines by producing changes in chromatin configuration, and show antineoplastic activity in preclinical studies. In this report, we investigated the in vitro antineoplastic activity of 5AZA, alone and in combination with the HDI, trichostatin A (TSA) and depsipeptide (FR901228, depsi), on the human myeloid leukemic cell lines, HL-60 and KG1a. The results showed that the combination of 5AZA with TSA or depsi produced a greater inhibition of growth and DNA synthesis and a greater loss of clonogenicity than either agent alone. These results suggest that 5AZA used in combination with HDI may be an interesting chemotherapeutic regimen to investigate in patients with acute myeloid leukemia that is resistant to conventional chemotherapy. PMID:12620295

  12. A combined DNA vaccine encoding BCSP31, SOD, and L7/L12 confers high protection against Brucella abortus 2308 by inducing specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da-Hai; Hu, Xi-Dan; Cai, Hong

    2007-06-01

    We constructed a combined DNA vaccine comprising genes encoding the antigens BCSP31, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and L7/L12 and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Immunization of mice with the combined DNA vaccine offered high protection against Brucella abortus (B. abortus) infection. The vaccine induced a vigorous specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) response, with higher IgG2a than IgG1 titers. Cytokine profiling performed at the same time showed a biased Th1-type immune response with significantly increased interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulation. CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T cells accumulated at significantly higher levels after administration of the vaccine. Granzyme B-producing CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher in number in samples prepared from combined DNA-vaccinated mice compared with S19-vaccinated mice, demonstrating that the cytotoxicity lysis pathway is involved in the response to Brucella infection. The success of our combined DNA vaccine in a mouse model suggests its potential efficacy against brucellosis infection in large animals. PMID:17570767

  13. A strategy of tumor treatment in mice with doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide combination based on dendritic cell activation by human double-stranded DNA preparation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunization of mice with tumor homogenate after combined treatment with cyclophosphamide (CP) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) preparation is effective at inhibition of growth of tumor challenged after the treatment. It was assumed that this inhibition might be due to activation of the antigen-presenting cells. The purpose was to develop improved antitumor strategy using mice. We studied the combined action of cytostatics doxorubicin (Dox) plus CP with subsequent dsDNA preparation on tumor growth. Methods Three-month old CBA/Lac mice were used in the experiments. Mice were injected with CP and human dsDNA preparation. The percentage of mature dendritic cells (DCs) was estimated by staining of mononuclear cells isolated from spleen and bone marrow 3, 6, and 9 days later with monoclonal antibodies CD34, CD80, and CD86. In the next set of experiments, mice were given intramuscularly injections of 1-3 × 105 tumor cells. Four days later, they were injected intravenously with 6-6.7 mg/kg Dox and intraperitoneally with 100-200 mg/kg CP; 200 mkg human DNA was injected intraperitoneally after CP administration. Differences in tumor size between groups were analyzed for statistical significance by Student's t-test. The MTT-test was done to determine the cytotoxic index of mouse leucocytes from treated groups. Results The conducted experiments showed that combined treatment with CP and dsDNA preparation produce an increase in the total amount of mature DCs in vivo. Treatment of tumor bearers with preparation of fragmented dsDNA on the background of pretreatment with Dox plus CP demonstrated a strong suppression of tumor growth in two models. RLS, a weakly immunogenic, resistant to alkalyting cytostatics tumor, grew 3.4-fold slower when compared with the control (p < 0.001). In experiment with Krebs-2 tumor, only 2 of the 10 mice in the Dox+CP+DNA group had a palpable tumor on day 16. The cytotoxic index of leucocytes was 86.5% in the Dox+CP+DNA group, but it was 0

  14. Allergic to Pool Water

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To identify the allergy problem of a 36-year old swimming instructor, who experiences heavy itching and rashes whenever she comes in contact with pool water. Patch tests were performed with European standard series and materials from the work floor. A positive patch test to aluminum chloride and flocculant was observed. Occupational dermatitis is, based on a contact allergy to aluminum chloride in the flocculant. PMID:22993713

  15. 17 CFR 4.22 - Reporting to pool participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... strategy. Unrealized gains or losses on open regulated commodity positions presented in the Statement of...-commodity positions, provided that the gains or losses to be combined are part of a related trading strategy... particular pool, it shall be presumed that the particular pool continues to invest in another...

  16. 17 CFR 4.22 - Reporting to pool participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... are part of a related trading strategy. Unrealized gains or losses on open regulated commodity... combined are part of a related trading strategy. (f)(1)(i) In the event the commodity pool operator finds... continues to invest in another collective investment vehicle and the commodity pool operator may claim...

  17. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travelers' Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  18. Using minimum DNA marker loci for accurate population classification in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using few DNA markers to classify genetic background of a germplasm pool will help breeders make a quick decision while saving time and resources. WHICHLOCI is a computer program that selects the best combination of loci for population assignment through empiric analysis of molecular marker data. Th...

  19. Novel strategy combining SYBR Green I with carbon nanotubes for highly sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium DNA.

    PubMed

    Mao, Pingdao; Ning, Yi; Li, Wenkai; Peng, Zhihui; Chen, Yongzhe; Deng, Le

    2014-01-10

    A simple, selective, sensitive and label-free fluorescent method for detecting trpS-harboring Salmonella typhimurium was developed in this study. This assay used the non-covalent interaction of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes with SWNTs, since SWNTs can quench fluorescence. Fluorescence recovery (78% with 1.8 nM target DNA) was detected in the presence of target DNA as ssDNA probes detached from SWNTs hybridized with target DNA, and the resulting double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) intercalated with SYBR Green I (SG) dyes. The increasing fluorescence intensity reached 4.54-fold. In contrast, mismatched oligonucleotides (1- or 3-nt difference to the target DNA) did not contribute to significant fluorescent recovery, which demonstrated the specificity of the assay. The increasing fluorescence intensity increased 3.15-fold when purified PCR products containing complementary sequences of trpS gene were detected. These results confirmed the ability to use this assay for detecting real samples. PMID:24267562

  20. Sampling and Pooling Methods for Capturing Herd Level Antibiotic Resistance in Swine Feces using qPCR and CFU Approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gunilla Veslemøy; Mellerup, Anders; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Ståhl, Marie; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Angen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to define the sampling level and method combination that captures antibiotic resistance at pig herd level utilizing qPCR antibiotic resistance gene quantification and culture-based quantification of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria. Fourteen qPCR assays for commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes were developed, and used to quantify antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA from swine fecal samples that were obtained using different sampling and pooling methods. In parallel, the number of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria was determined in the same swine fecal samples. The results showed that the qPCR assays were capable of detecting differences in antibiotic resistance levels in individual animals that the coliform bacteria colony forming units (CFU) could not. Also, the qPCR assays more accurately quantified antibiotic resistance genes when comparing individual sampling and pooling methods. qPCR on pooled samples was found to be a good representative for the general resistance level in a pig herd compared to the coliform CFU counts. It had significantly reduced relative standard deviations compared to coliform CFU counts in the same samples, and therefore differences in antibiotic resistance levels between samples were more readily detected. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe sampling and pooling methods for qPCR quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA extracted from swine feces. PMID:26114765

  1. Sampling and Pooling Methods for Capturing Herd Level Antibiotic Resistance in Swine Feces using qPCR and CFU Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mellerup, Anders; Ståhl, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to define the sampling level and method combination that captures antibiotic resistance at pig herd level utilizing qPCR antibiotic resistance gene quantification and culture-based quantification of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria. Fourteen qPCR assays for commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes were developed, and used to quantify antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA from swine fecal samples that were obtained using different sampling and pooling methods. In parallel, the number of antibiotic resistant coliform indicator bacteria was determined in the same swine fecal samples. The results showed that the qPCR assays were capable of detecting differences in antibiotic resistance levels in individual animals that the coliform bacteria colony forming units (CFU) could not. Also, the qPCR assays more accurately quantified antibiotic resistance genes when comparing individual sampling and pooling methods. qPCR on pooled samples was found to be a good representative for the general resistance level in a pig herd compared to the coliform CFU counts. It had significantly reduced relative standard deviations compared to coliform CFU counts in the same samples, and therefore differences in antibiotic resistance levels between samples were more readily detected. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe sampling and pooling methods for qPCR quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in total DNA extracted from swine feces. PMID:26114765

  2. Energy pooling upconversion in organic molecular systems.

    PubMed

    LaCount, Michael D; Weingarten, Daniel; Hu, Nan; Shaheen, Sean E; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Walba, David M; Lusk, Mark T

    2015-04-30

    A combination of molecular quantum electrodynamics, perturbation theory, and ab initio calculations was used to create a computational methodology capable of estimating the rate of three-body singlet upconversion in organic molecular assemblies. The approach was applied to quantify the conditions under which such relaxation rates, known as energy pooling, become meaningful for two test systems, stilbene-fluorescein and hexabenzocoronene-oligothiophene. Both exhibit low intramolecular conversion, but intermolecular configurations exist in which pooling efficiency is at least 90% when placed in competition with more conventional relaxation pathways. For stilbene-fluorescein, the results are consistent with data generated in an earlier experimental investigation. Exercising these model systems facilitated the development of a set of design rules for the optimization of energy pooling. PMID:25793313

  3. Combined Stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB Receptors Augments the Antitumor Activity of E7 DNA Vaccines by Increasing Ag-Specific CTL Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  4. Combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the antitumor activity of E7 DNA vaccines by increasing Ag-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  5. Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient breast cancer by ATM or DNA-PKcs blockade either alone or in combination with cisplatin for personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Albarakati, Nada; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Doherty, Rachel; Russell, Roslin; Agarwal, Devika; Moseley, Paul; Perry, Christina; Arora, Arvind; Alsubhi, Nouf; Seedhouse, Claire; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, a key factor in homologous recombination (HR) repair may also regulate base excision repair (BER). Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient cells by blockade of ATM and DNA-PKcs could be a promising strategy in breast cancer. We investigated BRCA1, XRCC1 and pol β protein expression in two cohorts (n = 1602 sporadic and n = 50 germ-line BRCA1 mutated) and mRNA expression in two cohorts (n = 1952 and n = 249). Artificial neural network analysis for BRCA1-DNA repair interacting genes was conducted in 249 tumours. Pre-clinically, BRCA1 proficient and deficient cells were DNA repair expression profiled and evaluated for synthetic lethality using ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitors either alone or in combination with cisplatin. In human tumours, BRCA1 negativity was strongly associated with low XRCC1, and low pol β at mRNA and protein levels (p < 0.0001). In patients with BRCA1 negative tumours, low XRCC1 or low pol β expression was significantly associated with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analysis compared to high XRCC1 or high pol β expressing BRCA1 negative tumours (ps < 0.05). Pre-clinically, BRCA1 negative cancer cells exhibit low mRNA and low protein expression of XRCC1 and pol β. BRCA1-BER deficient cells were sensitive to ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitor treatment either alone or in combination with cisplatin and synthetic lethality was evidenced by DNA double strand breaks accumulation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We conclude that XRCC1 and pol β expression status in BRCA1 negative tumours may have prognostic significance. BRCA1-BER deficient cells could be targeted by ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors for personalized therapy. PMID:25205036

  6. Combinatorial Pooling Enables Selective Sequencing of the Barley Gene Space

    PubMed Central

    Lonardi, Stefano; Duma, Denisa; Alpert, Matthew; Cordero, Francesca; Beccuti, Marco; Bhat, Prasanna R.; Wu, Yonghui; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Alsaihati, Burair; Ma, Yaqin; Wanamaker, Steve; Resnik, Josh; Bozdag, Serdar; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Close, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    For the vast majority of species – including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution) so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding. PMID:23592960

  7. DNA Damage and Inhibition of Akt Pathway in MCF-7 Cells and Ehrlich Tumor in Mice Treated with 1,4-Naphthoquinones in Combination with Ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Ourique, Fabiana; Kviecinski, Maicon R.; Felipe, Karina B.; Correia, João Francisco Gomes; Farias, Mirelle S.; Castro, Luiza S. E. P. W.; Grinevicius, Valdelúcia M. A. S.; Valderrama, Jaime; Rios, David; Benites, Julio; Buc Calderon, Pedro; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enhance the understanding of the antitumor mechanism of 1,4-naphthoquinones and ascorbate. Juglone, phenylaminonaphthoquinone-7, and 9 (Q7/Q9) were evaluated for effects on CT-DNA and DNA of cancer cells. Evaluations in MCF-7 cells are DNA damage, ROS levels, viability, and proliferation. Proteins from MCF-7 lysates were immunoblotted for verifying PARP integrity, γH2AX, and pAkt. Antitumor activity was measured in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice. The same markers of molecular toxicity were assessed in vivo. The naphthoquinones intercalate into CT-DNA and caused oxidative cleavage, which is increased in the presence of ascorbate. Treatments caused DNA damage and reduced viability and proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Effects were potentiated by ascorbate. No PARP cleavage was observed. Naphthoquinones, combined with ascorbate, caused phosphorylation of H2AX and inhibited pAkt. ROS were enhanced in MCF-7 cells, particularly by the juglone and Q7 plus ascorbate. Ehrlich carcinoma was inhibited by juglone, Q7, or Q9, but the potentiating effect of ascorbate was reproduced in vivo only in the cases of juglone and Q7, which caused up to 60% inhibition of tumor and the largest extension of survival. Juglone and Q7 plus ascorbate caused enhanced ROS and DNA damage and inhibited pAkt also in Ehrlich carcinoma cells. PMID:25793019

  8. Combined exposure to nano-silica and lead induced potentiation of oxidative stress and DNA damage in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Feng; Yuan, Xiao-Yan; Li, Li-Zhong; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yi-Mei; Peng, Shuang-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidence has confirmed that exposure to ambient particulate matters (PM) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Ambient PM is a complex mixture of particles and air pollutants. Harmful effects of PM are specifically associated with ultrafine particles (UFPs) that can adsorb high concentrations of toxic air pollutants and are easily inhaled into the lungs. However, combined effects of UFPs and air pollutants on human health remain unclear. In the present study, we elucidated the combined toxicity of silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO2), a typical UFP, and lead acetate (Pb), a typical air pollutant. Lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were exposed to nano-SiO2 and Pb alone or their combination, and their combined toxicity was investigated by focusing on cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage. Factorial analyses were performed to determine the potential interactions between nano-SiO2 and Pb. Our results showed that exposure of A549 cells to a modest cytotoxic concentration of Pb alone induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by elevated reactive oxygen species generation and lipid peroxidation, and reduced glutathione content and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. In addition, exposure of A549 cells to Pb alone induced DNA damage, as evaluated by alkaline comet assay. Exposure of A549 cells to non-cytotoxic concentration of nano-SiO2 did not induce cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, exposure to the combination of nano-SiO2 and Pb potentiated oxidative stress and DNA damage in A549 cells. Factorial analyses indicated that the potentiation of combined toxicity of nano-SiO2 and Pb was induced by additive or synergistic interactions. PMID:26432026

  9. Quantifying the effect of surface ligands on dendron-DNA interactions: insights into multivalency through a combined experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon P; Pavan, Giovanni M; Danani, Andrea; Pricl, Sabrina; Smith, David K

    2010-04-19

    We report the synthesis, DNA binding ability and preliminary gene delivery profiles of dendrons with different amine surface groups, 1,3-diaminopropane (DAP), N,N-di-(3-aminopropyl)-N-(methyl)amine (DAPMA) and spermine (SPM). By using a combination of ethidium bromide displacement, gel electrophoresis and transfection assays, it is shown that the dendrons with SPM groups are the most effective DNA binders, while the DAPMA-functionalised dendrons were the most effective systems for gene delivery (although the gene delivery profiles were still modest). In order to provide deeper insight into the experimental data, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation of the interactions between the dendrons and DNA. The results of these simulations demonstrated that, in general terms, the enthalpic contribution to binding was roughly proportional to the dendron surface charge, but that dendrons with DAP (and DAPMA) surface amines had significant entropic costs of binding to DNA. In the case of DAP, this is a consequence of the fact that the entire dendron structure has to be organised in order for each individual monoamine charge to make effective contact with DNA. For SPM, however, each surface ligand is already a multivalent triamine, therefore, each individual charge has a much lower entropic cost of binding. For DAPMA, we observed that strong binding of the hindered tertiary amine to the DNA double helix led to ligand back-folding and significant geometric distortion of DNA. Although this weakens the overall binding, we suggest that this distortion might be an explanation for the experimentally observed enhanced gene delivery, in which DNA compaction is an important step. Overall, this paper demonstrates how structure-activity relationships can be developed for multivalent dendritic ligands and provides insights into the thermodynamics of multivalent interactions. PMID:20235240

  10. A dual amplification strategy for DNA detection combining bio-barcode assay and metal-enhanced fluorescence modality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Li, Tian; Huang, Hongduan; Chen, Yang; Liu, Feng; Huang, Chengzhi; Li, Na

    2014-11-11

    Silver-enhanced fluorescence was coupled with a bio-barcode assay to facilitate a dual amplification assay to demonstrate a non-enzymatic approach for simple and sensitive detection of DNA. In the assay design, magnetic nanoparticles seeded with silver nanoparticles were modified with the capture DNA, and silver nanoparticles were modified with the binding of ssDNA and the fluorescently labeled barcode dsDNA. Upon introduction of the target DNA, a sandwich structure was formed because of the hybridization reaction. By simple magnetic separation, silver-enhanced fluorescence of barcode DNAs could be readily measured without the need of a further step to liberate barcode DNAs from silver nanoparticles, endowing the method with simplicity and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 1 pM. PMID:25233044

  11. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using (13)C and (15)N labeling.

    PubMed

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA - the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method - has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to (13)C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the (13)C (14)N (-) recombinant ion and the use of the (13)C: (12)C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  12. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using 13C and 15N labeling

    PubMed Central

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA – the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method – has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to 13C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the 13C 14N - recombinant ion and the use of the 13C: 12C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  13. Combining denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA V3 region and 16S-23S rDNA spacer region polymorphism analyses for the identification of staphylococci from Italian fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Pennacchia, Carmelina; Ercolini, Danilo; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Villani, Francesco

    2003-09-01

    Separation of amplified V3 region from 16S rDNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region polymorphism (ISR-PCR) analyses were tested as tool for differentiation of staphylococcal strains commonly isolated from fermented sausages. Variable V3 regions of 25 staphylococcal reference strains and 96 wild strains of species belonging to the genera Staphylococcus, Micrococcus and Kocuria were analyzed. PCR-DGGE profiles obtained were species-specific for S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. auricularis, S. condimenti, S. kloosi, S. vitulus, S. succinus, S. pasteuri, S. capitis and S. (Macrococcus) caseolyticus. Moreover, 7 groups could be distinguished gathering the remaining species as result of the separation of the V3 rDNA amplicons in DGGE. Furthermore, the combination of the results obtained by PCR-DGGE and ISR-PCR analyses allowed a clear differentiation of all the staphylococcal species analysed, with exception of the pairs S. equorum-S. cohnii and S. carnosus-S. schleiferi. The suitability of both molecular techniques and of the combination their results for the identification of staphylococci was validated analysing partial nucleotide sequence of the 16S rDNA of a representative number of wild strains. PMID:14529185

  14. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  15. Combination of MIDGE-Th1 DNA vaccines with the cationic lipid SAINT-18: studies on formulation, biodistribution and vector clearance.

    PubMed

    Endmann, Anne; Oswald, Detlef; Riede, Oliver; Talman, Eduard G; Vos, Roelien E; Schroff, Matthias; Kleuss, Christiane; Ruiters, Marcel H J; Juhls, Christiane

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that the combination of MIDGE-Th1 DNA vectors with the cationic lipid SAINT-18 increases the immune response to the encoded antigen in mice. Here, we report on experiments to further optimize and characterize this approach. We evaluated different formulations of MIDGE-Th1 vectors with SAINT-18 by assessing their influence on the transfection efficiency in cell culture and on the immune response in mice. We found that high amounts of SAINT-18 in formulations with a w/w ratio MIDGE Th1/SAINT-18 of 1:4.8 are beneficial for cell transfection in vitro. In contrast, the formulation of HBsAg-encoding MIDGE-Th1 DNA vectors with the lowest amount of SAINT-18 (w/w ratio MIDGE Th1/SAINT-18 of 1:0.5) resulted in the highest serum IgG1 and IgG2a levels after intradermal immunization of mice. Consequently, latter formulation was selected for a comparative biodistribution study in rats. Following intradermal administration of both naked and formulated MIDGE-Th1 DNA, the vectors localized primarily at the site of injection. Vector DNA levels decreased substantially over the two months duration of the study. When administered in combination with SAINT-18, the vectors were found in significantly higher amounts in draining lymph nodes in comparison to administration of naked MIDGE-Th1 DNA. We propose that the high immune responses induced by MIDGE-Th1/SAINT-18 lipoplexes are mediated by enhanced transfection of cells in vivo, resulting in stronger antigen expression and presentation. Importantly, the combination of MIDGE-Th1 vectors with SAINT-18 was well tolerated in mice and rats and is expected to be safe in human clinical applications. PMID:24681271

  16. Identification of invasive fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients by combining an Aspergillus specific PCR with a multifungal DNA-microarray from primary clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Boch, T; Reinwald, M; Postina, P; Cornely, O A; Vehreschild, J J; Heußel, C P; Heinz, W J; Hoenigl, M; Eigl, S; Lehrnbecher, T; Hahn, J; Claus, B; Lauten, M; Egerer, G; Müller, M C; Will, S; Merker, N; Hofmann, W-K; Buchheidt, D; Spiess, B

    2015-12-01

    The increasing incidence of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), most of all invasive aspergillosis (IA) in immunocompromised patients emphasises the need to improve the diagnostic tools for detection of fungal pathogens. We investigated the diagnostic performance of a multifungal DNA-microarray detecting 15 different fungi [Aspergillus, Candida, Fusarium, Mucor, Rhizopus, Scedosporium and Trichosporon species (spp.)] in addition to an Aspergillus specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Biopsies, bronchoalveolar lavage and peripheral blood samples of 133 immunocompromised patients (pts) were investigated by a multifungal DNA-microarray as well as a nested Aspergillus specific PCR assay. Patients had proven (n = 18), probable (n = 29), possible (n = 48) and no IFD (n = 38) and were mostly under antifungal therapy at the time of sampling. The results were compared to culture, histopathology, imaging and serology, respectively. For the non-Aspergillus IFD the microarray analysis yielded in all samples a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 80%. Best results for the detection of all IFD were achieved by combining DNA-microarray and Aspergillus specific PCR in biopsy samples (sensitivity 79%; specificity 71%). The molecular assays in combination identify genomic DNA of fungal pathogens and may improve identification of causative pathogens of IFD and help overcoming the diagnostic uncertainty of culture and/or histopathology findings, even during antifungal therapy. PMID:26497302

  17. One simple DNA extraction device and its combination with modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid on-field detection of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Yinan; Chen, Lili; Quan, Sheng; Jiang, Shimeng; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Quickness, simplicity, and effectiveness are the three major criteria for establishing a good molecular diagnosis method in many fields. Herein we report a novel detection system for genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which can be utilized to perform both on-field quick screening and routine laboratory diagnosis. In this system, a newly designed inexpensive DNA extraction device was used in combination with a modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (vLAMP) assay. The main parts of the DNA extraction device included a silica gel membrane filtration column and a modified syringe. The DNA extraction device could be easily operated without using other laboratory instruments, making it applicable to an on-field GMO test. High-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and isothermal amplification could be quickly isolated from plant tissues using this device within 15 min. In the modified vLAMP assay, a microcrystalline wax encapsulated detection bead containing SYBR green fluorescent dye was introduced to avoid dye inhibition and cross-contaminations from post-LAMP operation. The system was successfully applied and validated in screening and identification of GM rice, soybean, and maize samples collected from both field testing and the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) proficiency test program, which demonstrated that it was well-adapted to both on-field testing and/or routine laboratory analysis of GMOs. PMID:23181490

  18. The effect of two pre-cryopreservation single layer colloidal centrifugation protocols in combination with different freezing extenders on the fragmentation dynamics of thawed equine sperm DNA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variability among stallions in terms of semen cryopreservation quality renders it difficult to arrive at a standardized cryopreservation method. Different extenders and processing techniques (such us colloidal centrifugation) are used in order to optimize post-thaw sperm quality. Sperm chromatin integrity analysis is an effective tool for assessing such quality. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two single layer colloidal centrifugation protocols (prior to cryopreservation) in combination with three commercial freezing extenders on the post-thaw chromatin integrity of equine sperm samples at different post-thaw incubation (37°C) times (i.e., their DNA fragmentation dynamics). Results Post-thaw DNA fragmentation levels in semen samples subjected to either of the colloidal centrifugation protocols were significantly lower (p<0.05) immediately after thawing and after 4 h of incubation at 37°C compared to samples that underwent standard (control) centrifugation. The use of InraFreeze® extender was associated with significantly less DNA fragmentation than the use of Botu-Crio® extender at 6 h of incubation, and than the use of either Botu-Crio® or Gent® extender at 24 h of incubation (p<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that single layer colloidal centrifugation performed with extended or raw semen prior to cryopreservation reduces DNA fragmentation during the first four hours after thawing. Further studies are needed to determine the influence of freezing extenders on equine sperm DNA fragmentation dynamics. PMID:23217215

  19. Vernal pool hydroperiod: simulations of long-term dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyke, C. R.; Chadwick, O.

    2001-12-01

    Vernal pools are shallow, seasonal wetlands formed by the accumulation of seasonal rains on impermeable substrates. Vernal pools are part of a large set of ephemeral wetlands including prairie potholes, karst sinks, playa lakes, and savanna rain-pools. Research has shown the ecological importance of hydroperiod in the species richness of crustacean communities, the persistence and spatial distribution of amphibians, and plant community composition. Despite the well-known ecological importance of vernal pool hydroperiod, existing observational records are very short (typically < 5 years), unreplicated, and frequently lost in the informal gray literature. These issues suggest the need for a process-based model of vernal pool hydroperiod that can be applied to hind-cast historical patterns of hydroperiod variability based on meteorological records. This research developed a water balanced-based model for the simulation of vernal pool hydrology based on historical meteorological records for coastal vernal pools in Santa Barbara, California. Stochastic weather generation was also applied to evaluate the potential statistical distribution of vernal pool hydroperiod over long periods of time. The model suggests that hydroperiod is particularly sensitive to maximum pool depth, soil thickness, and soil water holding capacity. Results suggest that combinations of these factors can change flooding duration and return interval by more than 50% under identical weather conditions. These findings have significant implications for wetland restoration and management.

  20. Pathways controlling dNTP pools to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Sean G; Valerie, Nicholas C K; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Artificially modified nucleotides, in the form of nucleoside analogues, are widely used in the treatment of cancers and various other diseases, and have become important tools in the laboratory to characterise DNA repair pathways. In contrast, the role of endogenously occurring nucleotide modifications in genome stability is little understood. This is despite the demonstration over three decades ago that the cellular DNA precursor pool is orders of magnitude more susceptible to modification than the DNA molecule itself. More recently, underscoring the importance of this topic, oxidation of the cellular nucleotide pool achieved through targeting the sanitation enzyme MTH1, appears to be a promising anti-cancer strategy. This article reviews our current understanding of modified DNA precursors in genome stability, with a particular focus upon oxidised nucleotides, and outlines some important outstanding questions. PMID:27311542

  1. DNA: Polymer and molecular code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    The thesis work focusses upon two aspects of DNA, the polymer and the molecular code. Our approach was to bring single molecule micromanipulation methods to the study of DNA. It included a home built optical microscope combined with an atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer. This combined approach led to a novel method to graft a single DNA molecule onto a force cantilever using the optical tweezer and local heating. With this method, a force versus extension assay of double stranded DNA was realized. The resolution was about 10 picoN. To improve on this force measurement resolution, a simple light backscattering technique was developed and used to probe the DNA polymer flexibility and its fluctuations. It combined the optical tweezer to trap a DNA tethered bead and the laser backscattering to detect the beads Brownian fluctuations. With this technique the resolution was about 0.1 picoN with a millisecond access time, and the whole entropic part of the DNA force-extension was measured. With this experimental strategy, we measured the polymerization of the protein RecA on an isolated double stranded DNA. We observed the progressive decoration of RecA on the l DNA molecule, which results in the extension of l , due to unwinding of the double helix. The dynamics of polymerization, the resulting change in the DNA entropic elasticity and the role of ATP hydrolysis were the main parts of the study. A simple model for RecA assembly on DNA was proposed. This work presents a first step in the study of genetic recombination. Recently we have started a study of equilibrium binding which utilizes fluorescence polarization methods to probe the polymerization of RecA on single stranded DNA. In addition to the study of material properties of DNA and DNA-RecA, we have developed experiments for which the code of the DNA is central. We studied one aspect of DNA as a molecular code, using different techniques. In particular the programmatic use of template specificity makes

  2. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42-44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  3. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42–44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  4. Synaptic vesicle pools: an update.

    PubMed

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or "pools". We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are "fixed". Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  5. Solar heater for swimming pools

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, H.W.

    1984-12-04

    A solar heater for swimming pools is provided having one or more heating panels installable on a roof or the like and arranged to discharge into a pool equipped with an apron without need for disturbing or obstructing the apron. This is accomplished by the provision of an elevated bistable dumper adjacent the perimeter of the apron having a dispensing spout normally inclined upwardly but pivoting at intervals to discharge into the pool across the apron without obstructing it. Water to be heated is diverted from the pool filtering system to the solar heater via a pressure regulator and a solar responsive flow control.

  6. Comet assay combined with p53 detection as a sensitive approach for DNA photoprotection assessment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marrot, Laurent; Belaïdi, Jean-Philippe; Meunier, Jean-Roch

    2002-01-01

    A simple in vitro approach where sun formulations are spread on a quartz slide and placed over human skin cells in culture is proposed as a convenient test for photoprotection assessment at the DNA level. Using the comet assay, DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage were detected. Then, accumulation of p53 protein was studied as a marker for UV-induced genotoxic stress. Such a method was used to compare formulations with different photostability. Spectroradiometry showed that a photo-unstable formulation lost its effectiveness in UVA screening when pre-irradiated by simulated sunlight. As a consequence, such a formulation was not as protective as a photostable one at the genomic level. PMID:12444957

  7. Efficacy and safety of combined prolonged-release oxycodone and naloxone in the management of moderate/severe chronic non-malignant pain: results of a prospectively designed pooled analysis of two randomised, double-blind clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two randomised 12-week, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter studies comparing oxycodone PR/naloxone PR and oxycodone PR alone on symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in patients with moderate/severe non-malignant pain have been conducted. Methods These studies were prospectively designed to be pooled and the primary outcome measure of the pooled data analysis was to demonstrate non-inferiority in 12-week analgesic efficacy of oxycodone PR/naloxone PR versus oxycodone PR alone. Patients with opioid-induced constipation were switched to oxycodone PR and then randomised to fixed doses of oxycodone PR/naloxone PR (n = 292) or oxycodone PR (n = 295) for 12 weeks (20-80 mg/day). Results No statistically significant differences in analgesic efficacy were observed for the two treatments (p = 0.3197; non-inferiority p < 0.0001; 95% CI -0.07, 0.23) and there was no statistically significant difference in frequency of analgesic rescue medication use. Improvements in Bowel Function Index score were observed for oxycodone PR/naloxone PR by Week 1 and at every subsequent time point (-15.1; p < 0.0001; 95% CI -17.3, -13.0). AE incidence was similar for both groups (61.0% and 57.3% of patients with oxycodone PR/naloxone PR and oxycodone PR alone, respectively). Conclusions Results of this pooled analysis confirm that oxycodone PR/naloxone PR provides effective analgesia and suggest that oxycodone PR/naloxone PR improves bowel function without compromising analgesic efficacy. Trial registration numbers ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00412100 and NCT00412152 PMID:20920236

  8. Integrated process for purification of plasmid DNA using aqueous two-phase systems combined with membrane filtration and lid bead chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kepka, Cecilia; Lemmens, Raf; Vasi, Jozsef; Nyhammar, Tomas; Gustavsson, Per-Erik

    2004-11-19

    An integrated process for purifying a 6.1 kilo base pair (kbp) plasmid from a clarified Escherichia coli cell lysate based on an ultra/diafiltration step combined with polymer/polymer aqueous two-phase system and a new type of chromatography is described. The process starts with a volume reduction (ultrafiltration) and buffer exchange (diafiltration) of the clarified lysate using a hollow fibre membrane system. The concentrated and desalted plasmid solution is then extracted in a thermoseparating aqueous two-phase system, where the contaminants (RNA and proteins) to a large extent are removed. While the buffer exchange (diafiltration) is necessary in order to extract the plasmid DNA exclusively to the top phase, experiments showed that the ultrafiltration step increased the productivity of the aqueous two-phase system by a factor of more than 10. The thermoseparated water phase was then subjected to a polishing step using lid bead chromatography. Lid beads are a new type of restricted access chromatography beads, here with a positively charged inner core that adsorbed the remaining RNA while its inert surface layer prevented adsorption of the plasmid DNA thus passing in the flow-through of the column. Differently-sized plasmid DNA in the range of 2.7-20.5 kbp were also partitioned in the aqueous two-phase system. Within this size range, all plasmid DNA was exclusively extracted to the top phase. The complete process is free of additives and easy scalable for use in large scale production of plasmid DNA. The overall process yield for plasmid DNA was 69%. PMID:15584230

  9. Erbb2 DNA vaccine combined with regulatory T cell deletion enhances antibody response and reveals latent low-avidity T cells: potential and limits of its therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rolla, Simona; Ria, Francesco; Occhipinti, Sergio; Di Sante, Gabriele; Iezzi, Manuela; Spadaro, Michela; Nicolò, Chiara; Ambrosino, Elena; Merighi, Irene Fiore; Musiani, Piero; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica

    2010-06-01

    Rat (r)Erbb2 transgenic BALB-neuT mice genetically predestined to develop multiple invasive carcinomas allow an assessment of the potential of a vaccine against the stages of cancer progression. Because of rErbb2 expression in the thymus and its overexpression in the mammary gland, CD8(+) T cell clones reacting at high avidity with dominant rErbb2 epitopes are deleted in these mice. In BALB-neuT mice with diffuse and invasive in situ lesions and almost palpable carcinomas, a temporary regulatory T cells depletion combined with anti-rErbb2 vaccine markedly enhanced the anti-rErbb2 Ab response and allowed the expansion of latent pools of low-avidity CD8(+) T cells bearing TCRs repertoire reacting with the rErbb2 dominant peptide. This combination of a higher Ab response and activation of a low-avidity cytotoxic response persistently blocked tumor progression at stages in which the vaccine alone was ineffective. However, when diffuse and invasive microscopic cancers become almost palpable, this combination was no longer able to secure a significant extension of mice survival. PMID:20435927

  10. Fetal Gene Therapy for Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency by Intrahepatic Plasmid DNA-Micro-Bubble Injection Combined with Hepatic Ultrasound Insonation.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yoshie; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yuan, Wenji; Kuno, Shuichi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of hepatic transfection of plasmid DNA using micro-bubbles and ultrasound insonation for fetal correction of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency in mice. Twenty-three sparse-fur heterozygous pregnant mice (day 16 of gestation) were divided into three groups: injection of plasmid-DNA micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with ultrasound insonation (Tr, n = 11); control group 1 (C1), injection of plasmid-DNA micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with no insonation (n = 5); and control group 2 (C2), injection of saline-micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with ultrasound insonation (n = 7). Levels of blood ammonia and urinary orotic acid were significantly lower in the Tr group than in the C1 and C2 groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively), whereas OTC activity was not different between groups. Therefore, ultrasound insonation with micro-bubbles enhanced plasmid DNA transfection into fetal mouse liver, leading to one of the therapeutic methods in ammonia metabolism. This might provide more time for OTC-deficient infants until liver transplantation. PMID:26995155