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Sample records for commercial microbial culture

  1. Continuous microbial cultures maintained by electronically-controlled device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisler, W. J., Jr.; Webb, R. B.

    1967-01-01

    Photocell-controlled instrument maintains microbial culture. It uses commercially available chemostat glassware, provides adequate aeration through bubbling of the culture, maintains the population size and density, continuously records growth rates over small increments of time, and contains a simple, sterilizable nutrient control mechanism.

  2. Microbial assessment of cabin air quality on commercial airliners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Duc, Myron T.; Stuecker, Tara; Bearman, Gregory; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2005-01-01

    The microbial burdens of 69 cabin air samples collected from commercial airliners were assessed via conventional culture-dependent, and molecular-based microbial enumeration assays. Cabin air samples from each of four separate flights aboard two different carriers were collected via air-impingement. Microbial enumeration techniques targeting DNA, ATP, and endotoxin were employed to estimate total microbial burden. The total viable microbial population ranged from 0 to 3.6 x10 4 cells per 100 liters of air, as assessed by the ATP-assay. When these same samples were plated on R2A minimal medium, anywhere from 2% to 80% of these viable populations were cultivable. Five of the 29 samples examined exhibited higher cultivable counts than ATP derived viable counts, perhaps a consequence of the dormant nature (and thus lower concentration of intracellular ATP) of cells inhabiting these air cabin samples. Ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis showed these samples to consist of a moderately diverse group of bacteria, including human pathogens. Enumeration of ribosomal genes via quantitative-PCR indicated that population densities ranged from 5 x 10 1 ' to IO 7 cells per 100 liters of air. Each of the aforementioned strategies for assessing overall microbial burden has its strengths and weaknesses; this publication serves as a testament to the power of their use in concert.

  3. Potential commercial applications of microbial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Banat, I M; Makkar, R S; Cameotra, S S

    2000-05-01

    Surfactants are surface-active compounds capable of reducing surface and interfacial tension at the interfaces between liquids, solids and gases, thereby allowing them to mix or disperse readily as emulsions in water or other liquids. The enormous market demand for surfactants is currently met by numerous synthetic, mainly petroleum-based, chemical surfactants. These compounds are usually toxic to the environment and non-biodegradable. They may bio-accumulate and their production, processes and by-products can be environmentally hazardous. Tightening environmental regulations and increasing awareness for the need to protect the ecosystem have effectively resulted in an increasing interest in biosurfactants as possible alternatives to chemical surfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic compounds of microbial origin with considerable potential in commercial applications within various industries. They have advantages over their chemical counterparts in biodegradability and effectiveness at extreme temperature or pH and in having lower toxicity. Biosurfactants are beginning to acquire a status as potential performance-effective molecules in various fields. At present biosurfactants are mainly used in studies on enhanced oil recovery and hydrocarbon bioremediation. The solubilization and emulsification of toxic chemicals by biosurfactants have also been reported. Biosurfactants also have potential applications in agriculture, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, detergents, personal care products, food processing, textile manufacturing, laundry supplies, metal treatment and processing, pulp and paper processing and paint industries. Their uses and potential commercial applications in these fields are reviewed. PMID:10855707

  4. The DOE Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Balkwill, David L.

    2006-05-23

    The primary activities associated with maintenance of the Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC) were designed to ensure that the collection served as a valuable resource to DOE-funded and other scientists, especially DOE-funded scientists associated with the NABIR Program. These activities were carried out throughout the period covered by this report and in-cluded: (1) assistance in the selection of cultures for research, (2) distribution of cultures and/or data on request, (3) incorporation of newly isolated microbial strains, (4) preservation of newly isolated strains, (5) partial characterization of newly isolated strains, (6) development and main-tenance of representative subsets of cultures, (6) screening of SMCC strains for specific charac-teristics, (7) phylogenetic characterization of SMCC strains, (8) development and maintenance of a SMCC website, (9) maintenance of the SMCC databases, (10) archiving of SMCC records, and (11) quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) activities. We describe in the Final Technical Report our accomplishments related to these activities during the period covered by this report.

  5. Film forming microbial biopolymers for commercial applications--a review.

    PubMed

    Vijayendra, S V N; Shamala, T R

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms synthesize intracellular, structural and extracellular polymers also referred to as biopolymers for their function and survival. These biopolymers play specific roles as energy reserve materials, protective agents, aid in cell functioning, the establishment of symbiosis, osmotic adaptation and support the microbial genera to function, adapt, multiply and survive efficiently under changing environmental conditions. Viscosifying, gelling and film forming properties of these have been exploited for specific significant applications in food and allied industries. Intensive research activities and recent achievements in relevant and important research fields of global interest regarding film forming microbial biopolymers is the subject of this review. Microbial polymers such as pullulan, kefiran, bacterial cellulose (BC), gellan and levan are placed under the category of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and have several other functional properties including film formation, which can be used for various applications in food and allied industries. In addition to EPS, innumerable bacterial genera are found to synthesis carbon energy reserves in their cells known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), microbial polyesters, which can be extruded into films with excellent moisture and oxygen barrier properties. Blow moldable biopolymers like PHA along with polylactic acid (PLA) synthesized chemically in vitro using lactic acid (LA), which is produced by LA bacteria through fermentation, are projected as biodegradable polymers of the future for packaging applications. Designing and creating of new property based on requirements through controlled synthesis can lead to improvement in properties of existing polysaccharides and create novel biopolymers of great commercial interest and value for wider applications. Incorporation of antimicrobials such as bacteriocins or silver and copper nanoparticles can enhance the functionality of polymer films especially in food packaging

  6. Unpasteurised commercial boza as a source of microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Osimani, Andrea; Garofalo, Cristiana; Aquilanti, Lucia; Milanović, Vesna; Clementi, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    Boza is a cereal-based fermented beverage widely consumed in many countries of the Balkans. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbiota of three Bulgarian boza samples through a combination of culture-dependent and -independent methods with the long-term objective of formulating a multi-strain starter culture specifically destined for the manufacture of new cereal-based drinks. The isolation campaign for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) allowed the identification of Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus coryniformis, Lactobacillus buchneri, Pediococcus parvulus and members of the Lactobacillus casei group. Concerning yeasts, the following isolates were identified: Pichia fermentans, Pichia norvegensis, Pichia guilliermondii (synonym Meyerozyma guilliermondii) and Torulaspora spp. A high intra-species diversity was revealed by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. In parallel, microbial DNA was directly extracted from the three boza samples, and portions of the rrn operons were analysed through Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The molecular fingerprinting partially confirmed the results of culturing. Among LAB, the species Weissella confusa, Weissella oryzae, Leuconostoc citreum, Lactococcus lactis, Pediococcus parvulus and Pediococcus ethanolidurans were detected together with members of the Lb. casei group. Among the yeasts, the species P. fermentans, M. guilliermondii, Galactomyces geotrichum and Geotrichum fragrans were found. The overall results confirmed boza as having a rich and heterogeneous biodiversity both in terms of species and genetically diverse strains, thus encouraging its exploitation for the isolation and future technological characterisation of cultures to be selected for the manufacture of innovative cereal-based drinks. PMID:25437059

  7. The United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN): Enhancing Microbial Genomics Research through Living Microbe Culture Collections

    PubMed Central

    Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Hess, Matthias; Bennett, A. Rick; Ryan, Matthew; Kang, Seogchan; Nobles, David; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Torok, Tamas; Brown, Daniel R.; Cho, Juliana; Wertz, John E.; Mukherjee, Supratim; Cady, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN; http://usccn.org) is “to facilitate the safe and responsible utilization of microbial resources for research, education, industry, medicine, and agriculture for the betterment of human kind.” Microbial culture collections are a key component of life science research, biotechnology, and emerging global biobased economies. Representatives and users of several microbial culture collections from the United States and Europe gathered at the University of California, Davis, to discuss how collections of microorganisms can better serve users and stakeholders and to showcase existing resources available in public culture collections. PMID:26092453

  8. The United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN): Enhancing Microbial Genomics Research through Living Microbe Culture Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Boundy-Mills, K.; Hess, Matthias; Bennett, A. R.; Ryan, Matthew; Kang, Seogchan; Nobles, David; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Torok, Tamas; Brown, Daniel R; Cho, Juliana; Wertz, John E.; Mukherjee, Supratim; Cady, Sherry L.; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN; http://usccn.org) is "to facilitate the safe and responsible utilization of microbial resources for research, education, industry, medicine, and agriculture for the betterment of human kind." Microbial culture collections are a key component of life science research, biotechnology, and emerging global biobased economies. Representatives and users of several microbial culture collections from the United States and Europe gathered at the University of California, Davis, to discuss how collections of microorganisms can better serve users and stakeholders and to showcase existing resources available in public culture collections.

  9. The United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN): Enhancing Microbial Genomics Research through Living Microbe Culture Collections.

    PubMed

    Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Hess, Matthias; Bennett, A Rick; Ryan, Matthew; Kang, Seogchan; Nobles, David; Eisen, Jonathan A; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Torok, Tamas; Brown, Daniel R; Cho, Juliana; Wertz, John E; Mukherjee, Supratim; Cady, Sherry L; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN; http://usccn.org) is "to facilitate the safe and responsible utilization of microbial resources for research, education, industry, medicine, and agriculture for the betterment of human kind." Microbial culture collections are a key component of life science research, biotechnology, and emerging global biobased economies. Representatives and users of several microbial culture collections from the United States and Europe gathered at the University of California, Davis, to discuss how collections of microorganisms can better serve users and stakeholders and to showcase existing resources available in public culture collections. PMID:26092453

  10. Microbial production of surfactants and their commercial potential.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, J D; Banat, I M

    1997-01-01

    Many microorganisms, especially bacteria, produce biosurfactants when grown on water-immiscible substrates. Biosurfactants are more effective, selective, environmentally friendly, and stable than many synthetic surfactants. Most common biosurfactants are glycolipids in which carbohydrates are attached to a long-chain aliphatic acid, while others, like lipopeptides, lipoproteins, and heteropolysaccharides, are more complex. Rapid and reliable methods for screening and selection of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms and evaluation of their activity have been developed. Genes involved in rhamnolipid synthesis (rhlAB) and regulation (rhlI and rhlR) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are characterized, and expression of rhlAB in heterologous hosts is discussed. Genes for surfactin production (sfp, srfA, and comA) in Bacillus spp. are also characterized. Fermentative production of biosurfactants depends primarily on the microbial strain, source of carbon and nitrogen, pH, temperature, and concentration of oxygen and metal ions. Addition of water-immiscible substrates to media and nitrogen and iron limitations in the media result in an overproduction of some biosurfactants. Other important advances are the use of water-soluble substrates and agroindustrial wastes for production, development of continuous recovery processes, and production through biotransformation. Commercialization of biosurfactants in the cosmetic, food, health care, pulp- and paper-processing, coal, ceramic, and metal industries has been proposed. However, the most promising applications are cleaning of oil-contaminated tankers, oil spill management, transportation of heavy crude oil, enhanced oil recovery, recovery of crude oil from sludge, and bioremediation of sites contaminated with hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and other pollutants. Perspectives for future research and applications are also discussed. PMID:9106364

  11. Recent advances towards development and commercialization of plant cell culture processes for synthesis of biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah A.; Roberts, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    (1) Summary Plant cell culture systems were initially explored for use in commercial synthesis of several high value secondary metabolites, allowing for sustainable production that was not limited by the low yields associated with natural harvest or the high cost associated with complex chemical synthesis. Although there have been some commercial successes, most notably paclitaxel production from Taxus sp., process limitations exist with regards to low product yields and inherent production variability. A variety of strategies are being developed to overcome these limitations including elicitation strategies, in situ product removal and metabolic engineering with single genes and transcription factors. Recently, the plant cell culture production platform has been extended to pharmaceutically active heterologous proteins. Plant systems are beneficial because they are able to produce complex proteins that are properly glycosylated, folded and assembled without the risk of contamination by toxins that are associated with mammalian or microbial production systems. Additionally, plant cell culture isolates transgenic material from the environment, allows for more controllable conditions over field grown crops and promotes secretion of proteins to the medium, reducing downstream purification costs. Despite these benefits, the increase in cost of heterologous protein synthesis in plant cell culture as opposed to field grown crops is significant and therefore processes must be optimized with regards to maximizing secretion and enhancing protein stability in the cell culture media. This review discusses recent advancements in plant cell culture processing technology, focusing on progress towards overcoming the problems associated with commercialization of these production systems and highlighting recent commercial successes. PMID:22059985

  12. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment. PMID:23485423

  13. 7 CFR 504.2 - Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures... cultures. (a) Depositors of microbial cultures must pay a one-time $500 user fee for each culture deposited on or after November 1, 1983. (b) For cultures deposited on or after November 1, 1983,...

  14. 7 CFR 504.2 - Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures... cultures. (a) Depositors of microbial cultures must pay a one-time $500 user fee for each culture deposited on or after November 1, 1983. (b) For cultures deposited on or after November 1, 1983,...

  15. 7 CFR 504.2 - Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures... cultures. (a) Depositors of microbial cultures must pay a one-time $500 user fee for each culture deposited on or after November 1, 1983. (b) For cultures deposited on or after November 1, 1983,...

  16. 7 CFR 504.2 - Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures... cultures. (a) Depositors of microbial cultures must pay a one-time $500 user fee for each culture deposited on or after November 1, 1983. (b) For cultures deposited on or after November 1, 1983,...

  17. 7 CFR 504.2 - Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fees for deposit and requisition of microbial cultures... cultures. (a) Depositors of microbial cultures must pay a one-time $500 user fee for each culture deposited on or after November 1, 1983. (b) For cultures deposited on or after November 1, 1983,...

  18. Microbial population dynamics during fed-batch operation of commercially available garbage composters.

    PubMed

    Narihiro, T; Abe, T; Yamanaka, Y; Hiraishi, A

    2004-09-01

    Microbial populations in terms of quantity, quality, and activity were monitored during 2 months of start-up operation of commercially available composters for fed-batch treatment of household biowaste. All the reactors, operated at a waste-loading rate of 0.7 kg day(-1) (wet wt), showed a mass reduction efficiency of 88-93%. The core temperature in the reactors fluctuated between 31 degrees C and 58 degrees C due to self-heating. The pH declined during the early stage of operation and steadied at pH 7.4-9.3 during the fully acclimated stage. The moisture content was 48-63% early in the process and 30-40% at the steady state. Both direct total counts and plate counts of bacteria increased via two phases (designated phases I, II) and reached an order of magnitude of 10(11) cells g(-1) (dry wt) at the steady state. Microbial community changes during the start-up period were studied by culture-independent quinone profiling and denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA. In all the reactors, ubiquinones predominated during phase I, whereas partially saturated menaquinones became predominant during phase II. This suggested that there was a drastic population shift from ubiquinone-containing Proteobacteria to Actinobacteria during the start-up period. The DGGE analysis of the bacterial community in one of the reactors also demonstrated a drastic population shift during phase I and the predominance of members of the phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes during the overall period. But this molecular analysis failed to detect actinobacterial clones from the reactor at any stage. PMID:15480624

  19. Microbial lipid production by oleaginous Rhodococci cultured in lignocellulosic autohydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Fang; Kosa, Matyas; Sun, Qining; Meng, Xianzhi; Huang, Danlian; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic synthesis of single cell oils (SCOs) for biodiesel application by heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms is being hampered by the high cost of culture media. This study investigated the possibility of using loblolly pine and sweetgum autohydrolysates as economic feedstocks for microbial lipid production by oleaginous Rhodococcus opacus (R. opacus) PD630 and DSM 1069. Results revealed that when the substrates were detoxified by the removal of inhibitors (such as HMF-hydroxymethyl-furfural), the two strains exhibited viable growth patterns after a short adaptation/lag phase. R. opacus PD630 accumulated as much as 28.6 % of its cell dry weight (CDW) in lipids while growing on detoxified sweetgum autohydrolysate (DSAH) that translates to 0.25 g/l lipid yield. The accumulation of SCOs reached the level of oleagenicity in DSM 1069 cells (28.3 % of CDW) as well, while being cultured on detoxified pine autohydrolysate (DPAH), with the maximum lipid yield of 0.31 g/l. The composition of the obtained microbial oils varied depending on the substrates provided. These results indicate that lignocellulosic autohydrolysates can be used as low-cost fermentation substrates for microbial lipid production by wild-type R. opacus species. Consequently, the variety of applications for aqueous liquors from lignocellulosic pretreatment has been expanded, allowing for the further optimization of the integrated biorefinery. PMID:26142385

  20. Polyhydroxybutyrate production from lactate using a mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Marang, Leonie; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Muyzer, Gerard; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-09-01

    In this study we investigated the use of lactate and a lactate/acetate mixture for enrichment of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) producing mixed cultures. The mixed cultures were enriched in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) that established a feast-famine regime. The SBRs were operated under conditions that were previously shown to enable enrichment of a superior PHB producing strain on acetate (i.e., 12 h cycle length, 1 day SRT and 30°C). Two new mixed cultures were eventually enriched from activated sludge. The mixed culture enriched on lactate was dominated by a novel gammaproteobacterium. This enrichment can accumulate over 90 wt% PHB within 6 h, which is currently the best result reported for a bacterial culture in terms of the final PHB content and the biomass specific PHB production rate. The second mixed culture enriched on a mixture of acetate and lactate can produce up to 84 wt% PHB in just over 8 h. The predominant bacterial species in this culture were Plasticicumulans acidivorans and Thauera selenatis, which have both been reported to accumulate large amounts of PHB. The data suggest that P. acidivorans is a specialist on acetate conversion, whereas Thauera sp. is a specialist on lactate conversion. The main conclusion of this work is that the use of different substrates has a direct impact on microbial composition, but has no significant effect on the functionality of PHB production process. PMID:21455932

  1. Bacterial Cellulose as a Substrate for Microbial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Na; Santos, Thiago M. A.; Auer, George K.; Crooks, John A.; Oliver, Piercen M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has a range of structural and physicochemical properties that make it a particularly useful material for the culture of bacteria. We studied the growth of 14 genera of bacteria on BC substrates produced by Acetobacter xylinum and compared the results to growth on the commercially available biopolymers agar, gellan, and xanthan. We demonstrate that BC produces rates of bacterial cell growth that typically exceed those on the commercial biopolymers and yields cultures with higher titers of cells at stationary phase. The morphology of the cells did not change during growth on BC. The rates of nutrient diffusion in BC being higher than those in other biopolymers is likely a primary factor that leads to higher growth rates. Collectively, our results suggest that the use of BC may open new avenues in microbiology by facilitating bacterial cell culture and isolation. PMID:24441155

  2. Investigation of the microbial ecology of Ciauscolo, a traditional Italian salami, by culture-dependent techniques and PCR-DGGE.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Gloria; Santarelli, Sara; Aquilanti, Lucia; Beccaceci, Alessandra; Osimani, Andrea; Tonucci, Franco; Clementi, Francesca

    2007-11-01

    The microbial ecology of 22 samples of commercially available Ciauscolo salami were investigated using a polyphasic approach, based on culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The viable counts of pathogen and hygiene indicator microorganisms highlighted the adequate application of good manufacturing practices, while the viable counts of the lactic acid bacteria, coagulase negative cocci, and yeasts showed dominance of the first of these microbial groups. Bacterial and fungal DNA were extracted directly from the salami and amplified by PCR, using two primer sets targeting the 16S and 28S rRNA genes, respectively. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of selected bands were used to investigate the microbial ecology of these Ciauscolo salami. The most frequently found bacterial species were Lactobacillus sakei and Lb. curvatus, while Debaryomyces hansenii was the prevalent yeast species detected. Cluster analysis of the DGGE profiles and calculation of biodiversity indices allowed the degree of microbial similarity across these salami to be determined. PMID:22061795

  3. Microbial dynamics of commercial makgeolli depending on the storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Ae Ran; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Hak

    2012-08-01

    Market fresh makgeolli was stored at different temperatures of 4°C and 25°C to assess the change of the microbial diversity according to the storage temperature and period. Yeast counts increased until day 3 of storage and decreased thereafter. General and lactic acid bacterial counts continuously increased during storage. The data indicated that the control of growth of microorganisms, particularly general bacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), is essential. Total acid levels started to decrease in the makgeolli stored at 4°C, and increased from day 6 of storage in the makgeolli stored at 25°C. The increase of total acid in the non-refrigerated condition greatly affected the quality of makgeolli. In both the fresh makgeolli samples stored at 4°C and 25°C, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and molds (Aspergillus tubingensis, Candida glaebosa, and Aspergillus niger) were noted. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band patterns were almost constant regardless of the storage period. As for bacteria, Lactobacillus crustorum, L. brevis, and Microlaena stipoides were found in the makgeolli stored at 4°C, and L. crustorum, Lactobacillus sp., L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. rhamnosus, and L. similis were found in the makgeolli stored at 25°C. In particular, in the makgeolli stored at 25°C, L. crustorum and L. plantarum presented dark bands and were identified as the primary microorganisms that affected spoilage of fresh makgeolli. PMID:22713986

  4. Culturability as an indicator of succession in microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Garland, J L; Cook, K L; Adams, J L; Kerkhof, L

    2001-08-01

    Successional theory predicts that opportunistic species with high investment of energy in reproduction and wide niche width will be replaced by equilibrium species with relatively higher investment of energy in maintenance and narrower niche width as communities develop. Since the ability to rapidly grow into a detectable colony on nonselective agar medium could be considered as characteristic of opportunistic types of bacteria, the percentage of culturable cells may be an indicator of successional state in microbial communities. The ratios of culturable cells (colony forming units on R2A agar) to total cells (acridine orange direct microscopic counts) and culturable cells to active cells (reduction of 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride) were measured over time in two types of laboratory microcosms (the rhizosphere of hydroponically grown wheat and aerobic, continuously stirred tank reactors containing plant biomass) to determine the effectiveness of culturabilty as an index of successional state. The culturable cell:total cell ratio in the rhizosphere decreased from approximately 0.25 to less than 0.05 during the first 30-50 days of plant growth, and from 0.65 to 0.14 during the first 7 days of operation of the bioreactor. The culturable cell:active cell ratio followed similar trends, but the values were consistently greater than the culturable cell:total cell ratio, and even exceeded I in early samples. Follow-up studies used a cultivation-independent method, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (TRFLP) from whole community DNA, to assess community structure. The number of TRFLP peaks increased with time, while the number of culturable types did not, indicating that the general decrease in culturability is associated with a shift in community structure. The ratio of respired to assimilated C-14-labeled amino acids increased with the age of rhizosphere communities, supporting the hypothesis that a shift in resource allocation from growth to

  5. Culturability as an indicator of succession in microbial communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, J. L.; Cook, K. L.; Adams, J. L.; Kerkhof, L.

    2001-01-01

    Successional theory predicts that opportunistic species with high investment of energy in reproduction and wide niche width will be replaced by equilibrium species with relatively higher investment of energy in maintenance and narrower niche width as communities develop. Since the ability to rapidly grow into a detectable colony on nonselective agar medium could be considered as characteristic of opportunistic types of bacteria, the percentage of culturable cells may be an indicator of successional state in microbial communities. The ratios of culturable cells (colony forming units on R2A agar) to total cells (acridine orange direct microscopic counts) and culturable cells to active cells (reduction of 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride) were measured over time in two types of laboratory microcosms (the rhizosphere of hydroponically grown wheat and aerobic, continuously stirred tank reactors containing plant biomass) to determine the effectiveness of culturabilty as an index of successional state. The culturable cell:total cell ratio in the rhizosphere decreased from approximately 0.25 to less than 0.05 during the first 30-50 days of plant growth, and from 0.65 to 0.14 during the first 7 days of operation of the bioreactor. The culturable cell:active cell ratio followed similar trends, but the values were consistently greater than the culturable cell:total cell ratio, and even exceeded I in early samples. Follow-up studies used a cultivation-independent method, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (TRFLP) from whole community DNA, to assess community structure. The number of TRFLP peaks increased with time, while the number of culturable types did not, indicating that the general decrease in culturability is associated with a shift in community structure. The ratio of respired to assimilated C-14-labeled amino acids increased with the age of rhizosphere communities, supporting the hypothesis that a shift in resource allocation from growth to

  6. [Microbial maps and blood cultures in acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Roberti, M G; Paolino, F

    1976-12-29

    Microbial maps were performed taking swabs from nose, pharinx, external auditory meatus, groin, vagina, sputum and urine cultures in 69 cases of acute leukaemia, in order: to assess the germs' incidence in an "open ward" department; to eliminate the most dangerous pathogens with local treatment or with a selective therapy without broad-specturm antibiotics; to check, in the 43 cases followed from onset, the changes occurring during the admission and the disease progression; to collect data for comparison with a "sterile" ward. The local decontamination had only a temporary effect. During the course of the disease new, particularly dangerous, pathogens were cultured. Blood cultures were positive in 15% of the patients with fever at the onset of the disease, and in 36.9% of the patients with fever during the disease progression. These values were virtually the same as those observed in the acute stage of C.M.L. (35.7%). In akute leukaemia E. coli (35%) was the most common, followed by P. aeruginosa (20%), Klebsiella (15%), S. alpha haemolyticus (10%) and others. There was little or no relationship between the germs in the maps and those in the blood cultures, though it must be remembered that no stool cultures were examined. PMID:1035410

  7. Commercializing plant tissue culture processes: economics, problems and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, O.; Knuth, M.

    1985-03-01

    Novel tissue culture techniques and a range of process schemes may be considered for commercial production of plant derived drugs, chemicals, flavors and cosmetics. Plant cell immobilization, in conjunction with strain selection and product leakage, represents a major technological advancement, with significant economic implications. Conventional batch processes produce high value products at low production capacities, whereas continuous biocatalytic processes can potentially enable production of plant derived chemicals in the $20-$25/kg price range.

  8. Petroleum storage tank cleaning using commercial microbial culture products

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D.R.; Entzeroth, L.C.; Timmis, A.; Whiteside, A.; Hoskins, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    The removal of paraffinic bottom accumulations from refinery storage tanks represents an increasingly costly area of petroleum storage management. Microorganisms can be used to reduce paraffinic bottoms by increasing the solubility of bottom material and by increasing the wax-carrying capacity of carrier oil used in the cleaning process. The economic savings of such treatments are considerable. The process is also intrinsically safer than alternative methods, as it reduces and even eliminates the need for personnel to enter the tank during the cleaning process. Both laboratory and field sample analyses can be used to document changes in tank material during the treatment process. These changes include increases in volatile content and changes in wax distribution. Several case histories illustrating these physical and chemical changes are presented along with the economics of treatment.

  9. Bioaugmentation treatment of PV wafer manufacturing wastewater by microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Chen, Maoxia; He, Xin; Xiao, Zili; Zhou, Houzhen; Tan, Zhouliang

    2015-01-01

    The wastewater of silicon photovoltaic (PV) battery manufacturing contained polyethylene glycol (PEG) and detergents, which possessed the characteristics of high content of organics and low bioavailability, and then resulted in high treatment costs. To address the difficulties of existing treatment facilities in stably meeting discharge standards, eight tons of microbial culture (consisting of Bacillus sp. and Rhodococcus sp.) were added into the aerobic treatment unit. Subsequently, the effectiveness of the microbial culture in small-scale biological wastewater treatment was evaluated, and the operating conditions for engineering applications were optimized. The application study showed that the average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency reached 95.0% when the pH value was 7, the gas-water ratio was 28:1, the reflux ratio was 50%, which indicated an increase of 51.2% contrasting with the situation without bioaugmentation. The volume load of the treatment facilities after augmentation increased by 127.9% and could tolerate the COD shock load reached 2,340 mg·L(-1). At last, the effluence met the class I standard of the Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996). PMID:26287834

  10. Microbial community dynamics in thermophilic undefined milk starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Parente, Eugenio; Guidone, Angela; Matera, Attilio; De Filippis, Francesca; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Ricciardi, Annamaria

    2016-01-18

    Model undefined thermophilic starter cultures were produced from raw milk of nine pasta-filata cheesemaking plants using a selective procedure based on pasteurization and incubation at high temperature with the objective of studying the microbial community dynamics and the variability in performances under repeated (7-13) reproduction cycles with backslopping. The traditional culture-dependent approach, based on random isolation and molecular characterization of isolates was coupled to the determination of pH and the evaluation of the ability to produce acid and fermentation metabolites. Moreover, a culture-independent approach based on amplicon-targeted next-generation sequencing was employed. The microbial diversity was evaluated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (V1-V3 regions), while the microdiversity of Streptococcus thermophilus populations was explored by using novel approach based on sequencing of partial amplicons of the phosphoserine phosphatase gene (serB). In addition, the occurrence of bacteriophages was evaluated by qPCR and by multiplex PCR. Although it was relatively easy to select for a community dominated by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) within a single reproduction cycle, final pH, LAB populations and acid production activity fluctuated over reproduction cycles. Both culture-dependent and -independent methods showed that the cultures were dominated by either S. thermophilus or Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis or by both species. Nevertheless, subdominant mesophilic species, including lactococci and spoilage organisms, persisted at low levels. A limited number of serB sequence types (ST) were present in S. thermophilus populations. L. delbrueckii and Lactococcus lactis bacteriophages were below the detection limit of the method used and high titres of cos type S. thermophilus bacteriophages were detected in only two cases. In one case a high titre of bacteriophages was concurrent with a S. thermophilus biotype shift in the culture

  11. Microbial diversity of a Camembert-type cheese using freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture as starter culture by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jun; Guo, Qizhen; Wu, Yan; Li, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates). Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates) represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates). However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved) cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese. PMID:25360757

  12. Microbial Diversity of a Camembert-Type Cheese Using Freeze-Dried Tibetan Kefir Coculture as Starter Culture by Culture-Dependent and Culture-Independent Methods

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jun; Guo, Qizhen; Wu, Yan; Li, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates). Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates) represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates). However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved) cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese. PMID:25360757

  13. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, Filip; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, Andrea; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar) and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar. PMID:26610516

  14. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, Filip; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, Andrea; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar) and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar. PMID:26610516

  15. Controlled clinical comparison of three commercial blood culture systems.

    PubMed

    Frank, U; Malkotsis, D; Mlangeni, D; Daschner, F D

    1999-04-01

    In a controlled clinical comparison, three commercial blood culture systems--the standard aerobic BacT/Alert bottle (STD), the aerobic BacT/Alert FAN bottle (FAN) and the Isolator system (ISO; Wampole Laboratories, USA) were compared for their ability to detect aerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms. A total of 945 BacT/Alert (STD and FAN) blood culture sets were compared. Of these, 110 blood culture sets (11.6%) yielded growth of 116 clinically significant bacterial and fungal isolates. Microorganisms were recovered from 10.7% (101/945) of the FAN bottles compared to 8.9% (84/945) of the STD bottles. Of the significant isolates, 78 (67.2%) were recovered by both bottles, 29 (25%) by the FAN bottle only and nine (7.8%) by the STD bottle only (P<0.01). Along with 56.1% (530/945) of BacT/Alert blood culture sets, a concomitant ISO tube was obtained. Of the triple (STD + FAN + ISO) blood culture sets, 54 (10.2%) yielded growth of 59 clinically relevant isolates. Microorganisms were detected in 9.1% (48/530) of the FAN bottles, 8.3% (44/530) of the STD bottles and 4% (21/530) of the ISO tubes (P<0.001). Overall, the BacT/Alert system detected more clinically significant microorganisms than the ISO tube; the STD and the FAN bottle each recovered significantly more staphylococci (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively) and gram-negative rods (P<0.01, both). In conclusion, the BacT/Alert FAN bottle performed better than the BacT/Alert STD bottle; both BacT/Alert bottles, however, were superior to the ISO tube in terms of recovery of clinically significant microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. PMID:10385012

  16. Comparative testing of tangential microfiltration for microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Naja, Ghinwa; Volesky, Bohumil; Schnell, Andre

    2006-11-01

    In an attempt to extend and intensify the productive periods of bioprocesses, a self-cleaning tangential filtration device was examined. Built into a special-design bioreactor, its cell retention was evaluated for continuous-flow operation with selected examples of bacteria (Escherichia coli), yeasts (Sacharomyces cerevisiae), and filamentous fungi (Aspergillus niger). Performance characteristics such as filtration rates and cell accumulation were assessed as a function of filter rotational speed, operating pressure, cultivation time, and microfilter type (i.e., membrane or porous metallic). The highest flux of cell-free filtrate for each culture type was achieved using a 0.45-micron membrane-covered microfilter. While the respective yeast (S. cerevisiae) and bacterial (E. coli) cell concentrations were enhanced by as much as 16- and 8-fold over the batch growth levels, the representative A. niger fungal cultivation was less satisfactory because of progressively declining filtration rates limited by hydraulically resistant layers of microbial surface growth quite resistant to in situ filter backflushing with gas. Maximum steady-state flux was independent of operating pressure, yet was enhanced at rotational speeds up to about 800 rpm. Higher speeds offered no further improvements. The overall fermentation process was limited by the moderate levels of attainable flux which restricted the feed and dilution rates. The maximum attainable stabilized fluxes were 26-40 L/m(2) x h. PMID:16958140

  17. Biodeterioration of epoxy resin: a microbial survey through culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches.

    PubMed

    Pangallo, Domenico; Bučková, Maria; Kraková, Lucia; Puškárová, Andrea; Šaková, Nikoleta; Grivalský, Tomaš; Chovanová, Katarina; Zemánková, Milina

    2015-02-01

    During the 20th century, synthetic polymers were greatly used in the field of art. In particular, the epoxy resins were used for both conservation and for creating sculptures. The biodeterioration of these polymers has not been adequately studied. The aim of this investigation was to examine the microflora responsible for the deterioration of an epoxy statue exposed to outdoor conditions. Fungal and bacterial microflora were isolated from the art object, clustered by fluorescence-ITS (internal transcribed spacer), identified by ITS and 16S rRNA sequencing and tested for their lipolytic abilities by three agar assays. Different algal, bacterial, cyanobacterial and fungal clone libraries were constructed. The surrounding airborne microflora was analyzed using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The results indicated the presence, on the statue surface, of an interesting and differentiate microbial community composed of rock-inhabiting members, algal photobionts (Trebouxia spp., Chloroidium ellipsoideum and Chlorella angustoellipsoidea), Cyanobacteria (Leptolyngbya sp., Phormidium sp., Cylindrospermum stagnale, Hassallia byssoidea and Geitlerinema sp.), black yeasts related to the species Friedmanniomyces endolithicus, Pseudotaeniolina globosa, Phaeococcomyces catenatus and Catenulostroma germanicum and several plant-associated fungi. This investigation provides new information on the potential microfloral inhabitants of epoxy resin discovering a new ecological niche, occupied mainly by several members of rock-colonizing microbial species. PMID:24903534

  18. DNA-based, culture-independent strategies for evaluating microbial communities in food-associated ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Giraffa, G; Neviani, E

    2001-07-20

    Culture-independent molecular techniques are now available to study microbial ecosystems. They are opening interesting perspectives to problems related to composition and population dynamics of microbial communities in various environmental niches (e.g., soil, water) and foods. In fermented food products, estimates of true microbial diversity is often difficult chiefly on account of the inability to cultivate most of the viable bacteria. The increasing knowledge of gene sequences and the concomitant development of new culture-independent molecular techniques are providing new and effective tools to compare the diversity of microbial communities and to monitor population dynamics in minimally disturbed samples. In this review, recent advances in these techniques are reported. Possible applications to food-associated microbial ecosystems are emphasised. PMID:11482566

  19. The Commercial Revitalization of Southern Appalachian Culture: Some Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vossler, Kathryn B.

    The paper examines the varied cultures of Appalachia in terms of the cultural images currently being projected by tourist and land development advertisers in the area. Because these industries have not clearly defined the culture they are trying to sell, they promote conflicting public images and thereby violate the ethnic and cultural heritage of…

  20. Vers une culture des affaires? Mentalites, comportements, representations dans la classe de francais commercial (Toward a Business Culture? Attitudes, Behaviors, and Representations in the Commercial French Classroom).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bousquet, Gilles

    1993-01-01

    An exploration of the nature and range of international expertise necessary for students and users of commercial French attempts to note the points where knowledge of law, politics, culture, and business practice takes over from mere accumulation of facts or linguistic competence to facilitate genuine, productive, and culturally appropriate…

  1. Rapid culture-independent microbial analysis aboard the international space station (ISS) stage two: quantifying three microbial biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Morris, Heather C; Damon, Michael; Maule, Jake; Monaco, Lisa A; Wainwright, Norm

    2012-09-01

    Abstract A portable, rapid, microbial detection unit, the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) as a technology demonstration unit in December 2006. Results from the first series of experiments designed to detect Gram-negative bacteria on ISS surfaces by quantifying a single microbial biomarker lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were reported in a previous article. Herein, we report additional technology demonstration experiments expanding the on-orbit capabilities of the LOCAD-PTS to detecting three different microbial biomarkers on ISS surfaces. Six different astronauts on more than 20 occasions participated in these experiments, which were designed to test the new beta-glucan (fungal cell wall molecule) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacterial cell wall component) cartridges individually and in tandem with the existing Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL; Gram-negative bacterial LPS detection) cartridges. Additionally, we conducted the sampling side by side with the standard culture-based detection method currently used on the ISS. Therefore, we present data on the distribution of three microbial biomarkers collected from various surfaces in every module present on the ISS at the time of sampling. In accordance with our previous experiments, we determined that spacecraft surfaces known to be frequently in contact with crew members demonstrated higher values of all three microbial molecules. Key Words: Planetary protection-Spaceflight-Microbiology-Biosensor. Astrobiology 12, 830-840. PMID:22984871

  2. Subaerial biofilms on granitic historic buildings: microbial diversity and development of phototrophic multi-species cultures.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nion, D; Rodríguez-Castro, J; López-Rodríguez, M C; Fernández-Silva, I; Prieto, B

    2016-07-01

    Microbial communities of natural subaerial biofilms developed on granitic historic buildings of a World Heritage Site (Santiago de Compostela, NW Spain) were characterized and cultured in liquid BG11 medium. Environmental barcoding through next-generation sequencing (Pacific Biosciences) revealed that the biofilms were mainly composed of species of Chlorophyta (green algae) and Ascomycota (fungi) commonly associated with rock substrata. Richness and diversity were higher for the fungal than for the algal assemblages and fungi showed higher heterogeneity among samples. Cultures derived from natural biofilms showed the establishment of stable microbial communities mainly composed of Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria. Although most taxa found in these cultures were not common in the original biofilms, they are likely common pioneer colonizers of building stone surfaces, including granite. Stable phototrophic multi-species cultures of known microbial diversity were thus obtained and their reliability to emulate natural colonization on granite should be confirmed in further experiments. PMID:27192622

  3. Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture with a competition model.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture was studied with a competition model that we had developed recently. The model, which is composed of the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model, is shown to successfully describe the microbial growth of two species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. With the parameter values of the model obtained from the experimental data on monoculture and mixed culture with two species, it then succeeded in predicting the simultaneous growth of the three species in mixed culture inoculated with various cell concentrations. To our knowledge, it is the first time for a prediction model for multiple (three) microbial species to be reported. The model, which is not built on any premise for specific microorganisms, may become a basic competition model for microorganisms in food and food materials. PMID:24975413

  4. Reconstituted yogurt from yogurt cultured milk powder mix has better overall characteristics than reconstituted yogurt from commercial yogurt powder.

    PubMed

    Song, Lijie; Aryana, Kayanush J

    2014-10-01

    For manufacture of commercial yogurt powder, yogurt has to go through a drying process, which substantially lowers the yogurt culture counts, so the potential health benefits of the yogurt culture bacteria are reduced. Also, upon reconstitution, commercial yogurt powder does not taste like yogurt and has an off-flavor. The objective was to study the microbial, physicochemical, and sensory characteristics of reconstituted yogurt from yogurt cultured milk powder (YCMP) mix and reconstituted yogurt from commercial yogurt powder (CYP). The CYP reconstituted yogurt was the control and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt was the treatment. Microbial and physicochemical characteristics of the CYP reconstituted yogurt and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt were analyzed daily for the first week and then weekly for a period of 8 wk. Sensory consumer testing of CYP reconstituted yogurt and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt was conducted with 100 consumers. At 56 d, YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt had 5 log cfu/mL higher counts of Streptococcus thermophilus than the control (CYP reconstituted yogurt). Also, Lactobacillus bulgaricus counts of YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt were 6.55 log cfu/mL at 28 d and were 5.35 log cfu/mL at 56 d, whereas the CYP reconstituted yogurt from 28 d onwards had a count of <10 cfu/mL. The YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt also had significantly higher apparent viscosity and sensory scores for appearance, color, aroma, taste, thickness, overall liking, consumer acceptability, and purchase intent than CYP reconstituted yogurt. Overall, YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt had more desirable characteristics than CYP reconstituted yogurt. PMID:25151880

  5. Chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on acetate utilization kinetics and population dynamics of fast growing microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Kor-Bicakci, G; Pala-Ozkok, I; Rehman, A; Jonas, D; Ubay-Cokgor, E; Orhon, D

    2014-08-01

    The study evaluated the chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on metabolic activities of fast growing microbial culture. It focused on changes induced on utilization kinetics of acetate and composition of the microbial community. The experiments involved a fill and draw reactor, fed with acetate and continuous sulfamethoxazole dosing of 50 mg/L. The evaluation relied on model evaluation of the oxygen uptake rate profiles, with parallel assessment of microbial community structure by 454-pyrosequencing. Continuous sulfamethoxazole dosing inflicted a retardation effect on acetate utilization in a way commonly interpreted as competitive inhibition, blocked substrate storage and accelerated endogenous respiration. A fraction of acetate was utilized at a much lower rate with partial biodegradation of sulfamethoxazole. Results of pyrosequencing with a replacement mechanism within a richer more diversified microbial culture, through inactivation of vulnerable fractions in favor of species resistant to antibiotic, which made them capable of surviving and competing even with a slower metabolic response. PMID:24908607

  6. Production of microbial medium from defatted brebra (Milletia ferruginea) seed flour to substitute commercial peptone agar

    PubMed Central

    Andualem, Berhanu; Gessesse, Amare

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate and optimize microbial media that substitute peptone agar using brebra seed defatted flour. Methods 'Defatted process, inoculums preparation, evaluation of bacterial growth, preparation of cooked and hydrolyzed media and growth turbidity of tested bacteria were determined. Results Two percent defatted flour was found to be suitable concentration for the growth of pathogenic bacteria: Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Salmonella (NCTC 8385) and Shigella flexneri (ATCC 12022) (S. flexneri), while 3% defatted flour was suitable for Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) (S. aureus). E. coli (93±1) and S. flexneri (524±1) colony count were significantly (P≤0.05) greater in defatted flour without supplement than in supplemented medium. E. coli [(3.72×109±2) CFU/mL], S. aureus [(7.4×109±2) CFU/mL], S. flexneri [(4.03×109±2) CFU/mL] and Salmonella [(2.37×109±1) CFU/mL] in non-hydrolyzed sample were statistically (P≤0.05) greater than hydrolyzed one and commercial peptone agar. Colony count of Salmonella [(4.55×109±3) CFU/mL], S. flexneri [(5.40×109±3) CFU/mL] and Lyesria moncytogenes (ATCC 19116) [(5.4×109±3) CFU/mL] on raw defatted flour agar was significantly (P≤0.05) greater than cooked defatted flour and commercial peptone agar. Biomass of E. coli, S. aureus, Salmonella and Enterococcus faecalis in non-hydrolyzed defatted flour is highly increased over hydrolyzed defatted flour and commercial peptone broth. Conclusions The defatted flour agar was found to be better microbial media or comparable with peptone agar. The substances in it can serve as sources of carbon, nitrogen, vitamins and minerals that are essential to support the growth of microorganisms without any supplements. Currently, all supplements of peptone agar are very expensive in the market. PMID:24075344

  7. Culture-Independent Metagenomic Surveillance of Commercially Available Probiotics with High-Throughput Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Patro, Jennifer N; Ramachandran, Padmini; Barnaba, Tammy; Mammel, Mark K; Lewis, Jada L; Elkins, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people consume dietary supplements either following a doctor's recommendation or at their own discretion to improve their overall health and well-being. This is a rapidly growing trend, with an associated and expanding manufacturing industry to meet the demand for new health-related products. In this study, we examined the contents and microbial viability of several popular probiotic products on the United States market. Culture-independent methods are proving ideal for fast and efficient analysis of foodborne pathogens and their associated microbial communities but may also be relevant for analyzing probiotics containing mixed microbial constituents. These products were subjected to next-generation whole-genome sequencing and analyzed by a custom in-house-developed k-mer counting method to validate manufacturer label information. In addition, the batch variability of respective products was examined to determine if any changes in their formulations and/or the manufacturing process occurred. Overall, the products we tested adhered to the ingredient claims and lot-to-lot differences were minimal. However, there were a few discrepancies in the naming of closely related Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species, whereas one product contained an apparent Enterococcus contaminant in two of its three lots. With the microbial contents of the products identified, we used traditional PCR and colony counting methods to comparatively assess our results and verify the viability of the microbes in these products with regard to the labeling claims. Of all the supplements examined, only one was found to be inaccurate in viability. Our use of next-generation sequencing as an analytical tool clearly demonstrated its utility for quickly analyzing commercially available products containing multiple microbes to ensure consumer safety. IMPORTANCE The rapidly growing supplement industry operates without a formal premarket approval process. Consumers rely on product labels to

  8. Culture-Independent Metagenomic Surveillance of Commercially Available Probiotics with High-Throughput Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Patro, Jennifer N.; Ramachandran, Padmini; Barnaba, Tammy; Mammel, Mark K.; Lewis, Jada L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Millions of people consume dietary supplements either following a doctor’s recommendation or at their own discretion to improve their overall health and well-being. This is a rapidly growing trend, with an associated and expanding manufacturing industry to meet the demand for new health-related products. In this study, we examined the contents and microbial viability of several popular probiotic products on the United States market. Culture-independent methods are proving ideal for fast and efficient analysis of foodborne pathogens and their associated microbial communities but may also be relevant for analyzing probiotics containing mixed microbial constituents. These products were subjected to next-generation whole-genome sequencing and analyzed by a custom in-house-developed k-mer counting method to validate manufacturer label information. In addition, the batch variability of respective products was examined to determine if any changes in their formulations and/or the manufacturing process occurred. Overall, the products we tested adhered to the ingredient claims and lot-to-lot differences were minimal. However, there were a few discrepancies in the naming of closely related Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species, whereas one product contained an apparent Enterococcus contaminant in two of its three lots. With the microbial contents of the products identified, we used traditional PCR and colony counting methods to comparatively assess our results and verify the viability of the microbes in these products with regard to the labeling claims. Of all the supplements examined, only one was found to be inaccurate in viability. Our use of next-generation sequencing as an analytical tool clearly demonstrated its utility for quickly analyzing commercially available products containing multiple microbes to ensure consumer safety. IMPORTANCE The rapidly growing supplement industry operates without a formal premarket approval process. Consumers rely on

  9. Short communication: Microbial quality of raw milk following commercial long-distance hauling.

    PubMed

    Darchuk, Emily M; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth; Waite-Cusic, Joy

    2015-12-01

    Hauling is a critical part of the commercial milk supply chain, yet very few studies have aimed to understand its effect on raw milk quality. This study focused on the effect of extended-duration tanker use during hauling on raw milk quality at a commercial facility. Standard tanker use [cleaned-in-place (CIP) once per 24h] served as a control and an incremental between-load water rinse with sanitizer treatment (RS) was evaluated to mitigate any effect from extended duration hauling. During this study, 1 commercial truck with 2 trailers was monitored for 10d. The truck collected milk at a large dairy farm, transported the milk to a manufacturing facility, and then returned to the same farm for a second load. Each round-trip journey took between 10 and 12h, allowing for 2 loads per 24-h use period. Following the second delivery, the truck was cleaned by CIP treatment starting a new treatment day. Producer samples were collected from the raw milk bulk tank on the farm before loading milk into the tanker. The same milk was sampled directly out of the tanker truck before unloading at the manufacturer. Effect on individual bacteria count, thermophilic spore count, and preliminary incubation count was quantified through common industry tests. Surface sponge swabs were also used to monitor tanker sanitation and the efficacy of cleaning treatments. Results did not identify a negative effect on raw milk quality due to extended duration hauling. Whereas the addition of RS did not provide any measurable quality benefits for the microbial milk quality, swab results demonstrated that the RS treatment was able to reduce surface bacteria in the tanker, although not to the same level as the full CIP treatment. Based on this study, current CIP practices for long distance milk hauling appear to be effective in mitigating any measurable effect on raw milk quality. PMID:26506549

  10. [Progress in microbial co-culture--A review].

    PubMed

    Xu, Deyang; Wang, Lili; Du, Chunmei

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed the history and applications of microorganism co-cultivation in food, agriculture, industry and sewage purification, and summarized ecology relationships between co-culture microorganisms. Joint mixed culture, sequence mixed culture and immobilized cells mixed culture have been used widely and lots of achievements have been made, for example, obtaining metabolites that are difficult to achieve or too low production in pure culture, transforming traditional fermentation industry, producing energy substance, improving substrate utilization ratio, expanding the scope of substrates and degrading toxic substances. Research reports indicate there are many ecology relationships between microorganisms, such as collaborative metabolism, induction effect, quorum sensing and gene transfer. The ecological interplay mechanism of co-culture microorganisms should have a further research, which will lay the foundation for developing applications of microorganism co-culture. PMID:26762021

  11. Effects of Leuconostoc mesenteroides starter cultures on microbial communities and metabolites during kimchi fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Lee, Hyo Jung; Seo, Hye-Young; Park, Wan-Soo; Jeon, Che Ok

    2012-02-15

    Kimchi fermentation usually relies upon the growth of naturally-occurring various heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB). This sometimes makes it difficult to produce kimchi with uniform quality. The use of Leuconostoc mesenteroides as a starter has been considered to produce commercial fermented kimchi with uniform and good quality in Korea. In this study, a combination of a barcoded pyrosequencing strategy and a (1)H NMR technique was used to investigate the effects of Leu. mesenteroides strain B1 as a starter culture for kimchi fermentation. Baechu (Chinese cabbage) and Chonggak (radish) kimchi with and without Leu. mesenteroides inoculation were prepared, respectively and their characteristics that included pH, cell number, bacterial community, and metabolites were monitored periodically for 40 days. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis showed that the numbers of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTU) in starter kimchi decreased more quickly than that in non-starter kimchi. Members of the genera Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella were dominant LAB regardless of the kimchi type or starter inoculation. Among the three genera, Leuconostoc was the most abundant, followed by Lactobacillus and Weissella. The use of Leu. mesenteroides as a starter increased the Leuconostoc proportions and decreased the Lactobacillus proportions in both type of kimchi during kimchi fermentation. However, interestingly, the use of the kimchi starter more highly maintained the Weissella proportions of starter kimchi compared to that in the non-starter kimchi until fermentation was complete. Metabolite analysis using the (1)H NMR technique showed that both Baechu and Chonggak kimchi with the starter culture began to consume free sugars earlier and produced a little greater amounts of lactic and acetic acids and mannitol. Metabolite analysis demonstrated that kimchi fermentation using Leu. mesenteroides as a starter was completed earlier with more production of kimchi

  12. Innate immune responses to microbial agonist stimulations in heterophils and monocytes from young commercial turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The innate immune system recognizes microbial pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns and incites inflammatory immune responses to control the infection. Here, we examined functional innate immune responses of turkey heterophils and monocytes to microbial agonist stimulations by measur...

  13. Inflight Microbial Monitoring-An Alternative Method to Culture Based Detection Currently Used on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Roman, Monsi; Hummerick, Mary E.; Smith, David J.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that microorganisms and potential human pathogens have been detected on the International Space Station (ISS). The potential to introduce new microorganisms occurs with every exchange of crew or addition of equipment or supplies. Previous research has shown that microorganisms introduced to the ISS are readily transferred between crew and subsystems and back (i.e. ECLSS, environmental control and life support systems). Current microbial characterization methods require enrichment of microorganisms and a 48-hour incubation time. This increases the microbial load while detecting a limited number of microorganisms. The culture based method detects approximately 1-10% of the total organisms present and provides no identification, To identify and enumerate ISS samples requires that samples to be returned to Earth for complete analysis. Therefore, a more expedient, low-cost, in-flight method of microbial detection, identification, and enumeration is warranted. The RAZOR EX, a ruggedized, commercial off the shelf, real-time PCR field instrument was tested for its ability to detect microorganism at low concentrations within one hour. Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected at low levels using real-time DNA amplification. Total heterotrophic counts could also be detected using a 16S gene marker that can identify up to 98% of all bacteria. To reflect viable cells found in the samples, RNA was also detectable using a modified, single-step reverse transcription reaction.

  14. Inflight Microbial Monitoring- An Alternative Method to Culture Based Detection Currently Used on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Roman, Monsi; Hummerick, Mary E.; Smith, David J.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that potentially destructive microorganisms and human pathogens have been detected on the International Space Station (ISS). The likelihood of introducing new microorganisms occurs with every exchange of crew or addition of equipment or supplies. Microorganisms introduced to the ISS are readily transferred between crew and subsystems (i.e. ECLSS, environmental control and life support systems). Current microbial characterization methods require enrichment of microorganisms and at least a 48-hour incubation time. This increases the microbial load while detecting only a limited number of the total microorganisms. The culture based method detects approximately 1-10% of the total organisms present and provides no identification. To identify and enumerate ISS microbes requires that samples be returned to Earth for complete analysis. Therefore, a more expedient, low-cost, in-flight method of microbial detection, identification, and enumeration is warranted. The RAZOR EX, a ruggedized, commercial off the shelf, real-time PCR field instrument was tested for its ability to detect microorganisms at low concentrations within one hour. Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected at low levels using real-time DNA amplification. Total heterotrophic counts could also be detected using a 16S gene marker that can identify up to 98% of all bacteria. To reflect viable cells found in the samples, RNA was also detectable using a modified, single-step reverse transcription reaction.

  15. [Seasonal variation of functional diversity of aquatic microbial community in Apostichopus japonicus cultural pond].

    PubMed

    Yan, Fa-Jun; Tian, Xiang-Li; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Yang, Gang

    2014-05-01

    The functional diversity of aquatic microbial communities in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) cultural ponds was examined in this paper. The Biolog plate technique and redundancy analysis (RDA) method were used to evaluate seasonal changes and their relationships with environmental factors. The results showed that both total amount and types of carbon sources utilized by microbes in the sea cucumber cultural ponds varied seasonally, and were the highest in summer and lowest in winter, with polymers being the main type of carbon sources. Principal component analysis revealed that the carbon utilization diversity of the microbial communities varied significantly over the seasonal courses. A total of 10 categories of carbon sources were significantly related to the principal component 1, among which were polymers, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, amino acids, and amines. Significant seasonal changes were detected for all carbon utilization diversity indices of the microbial communities, including Shannon, McIntosh, Simpson, and S-E. However, seasonal variations were different among the microbial diversity indices. RDA analysis revealed that TP, NO(3-)-N, TN, and PO4(3-)-P were the critical environmental factors influencing the seasonal changes in functional diversity of aquatic microbial community in sea cucumber cultural ponds. PMID:25129954

  16. Evaluation of selected direct-fed microbial candidates on live performance and Salmonella reduction in commercial turkey brooding houses.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, R E; Pumford, N R; Morgan, M J; Shivaramaiah, S; Wolfenden, A D; Pixley, C M; Green, J; Tellez, G; Hargis, B M

    2011-11-01

    As effective probiotic Bacillus isolates that can increase BW gain (BWG) are identified, they may offer advantages in terms of stability, cost, and feed application over probiotics limited to drinking water application. Additionally, an effective direct-fed microbial (DFM) may offer an effective alternative to antibiotic growth promoters. Previously, 4 Bacillus isolates were identified and evaluated in our laboratory as potential DFM candidates. These isolates were shown to significantly increase BWG as well as reduce recovery of Salmonella after experimental infection. In the first experiment, isolates PHL-MM65 (a Bacillus laterosporus) and PHL-NP122 (a Bacillus subtilis) were evaluated using poults raised under commercial conditions. After 7 d of conventional brooding, poults were tagged, weighed, and placed in 1 of 4 replicate pens for each treatment group [negative control, 0.019% nitarsone, PHL-MM65 (10(6) spores/g of feed), or PHL-NP122 (10(6) spores/g of feed)] within the commercial turkey barn. At 23 d, poults were weighed and BW was calculated. Treatment with PHL-NP122 (853 g) or nitarsone (852 g) increased BW (P ≤ 0.05) compared with control (784 g), whereas treatment with PHL-MM65 (794 g) did not significantly improve BW. Also on d 23 of the trial, ceca were aseptically removed from 10 poults per pen and cultured for recovery of Salmonella. Both Bacillus isolates PHL-NP122 and PHL-MM65 resulted in a significant reduction (P ≤ 0.05) in the frequency of Salmonella by more than 25% compared with the controls. In a second experiment on a different farm, isolates PHL-NP122, PHL-RW33 (a B. subtilis), and PHL-B1 (a Bacillus licheniformis) were evaluated. None of the candidate Bacillus DFM or the group fed nitarsone had significantly different BW or BWG than untreated control. These data suggest that isolate PHL-NP122, when added as a DFM to turkey diets, may increase BW gain as well as nitarsone during the brooding phase of commercial turkey production

  17. Temporal and spatial assessment of microbial communities in commercial silages from bunker silos.

    PubMed

    Kraut-Cohen, J; Tripathi, V; Chen, Y; Gatica, J; Volchinski, V; Sela, S; Weinberg, Z; Cytryn, E

    2016-08-01

    Ensiling is a feed preservation method of moist forage crops that generally depends on naturally developing lactic acid bacteria to convert water-soluble carbohydrates into organic acids. While bacterial community dynamics have been previously assessed in bench-scale and pilot ensiling facilities, almost no studies have assessed the microbiomes of large-scale silage facilities. This study analyzed bacterial community composition in mature silage from bunker silos in three commercial production centers as related to pH, organic matter, volatile fatty acid composition, and spatial distribution within the ensiling bunker. It revealed significant physicochemical differences between "preserved" regions situated in the center and along the walls of the silage bunkers that were characterized by high concentrations of lactic acid and other volatiles and pH values below 5, and "spoiled" regions in the corners (shoulders) of the bunkers that had low lactic acid concentrations and high pH values. Preserved silage was dominated (>90 %) by lactic acid bacteria and characterized by high similarity and low taxonomic diversity, whereas spoiled silage had highly diverse microbiomes with low abundances of lactic acid bacteria (<5 %) that were sometimes characterized by high levels of Enterobacteriaceae. Spatial position had a much stronger impact on the microbial community composition than feedstock type, sampling date, or production center location supporting previous studies demonstrating that ecology and not geography is a major driver of environmental microbiomes. PMID:27075739

  18. Beyond Commercialization: Science, Higher Education and the Culture of Neoliberalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Daniel Lee; Feinstein, Noah Weeth; Downey, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s, scholars and others have been engaged in a lively debate about the virtues and dangers of mingling commerce with university science. In this paper, we contend that the commercialization of academic science, and higher education more broadly, are best understood as pieces of a larger story. We use two cases of institutional change…

  19. Comparative analysis of microbial community of novel lactic acid fermentation inoculated with different undefined mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Settles, Matthew L; Forney, Larry J; Coats, Erik R; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-03-01

    Three undefined mixed cultures (activated sludge) from different municipal wastewater treatment plants were used as seeds in a novel lactic acid fermentation process fed with potato peel waste (PPW). Anaerobic sequencing batch fermenters were run under identical conditions to produce predominantly lactic acid. Illumina sequencing was used to examine the 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in the three seeds and fermenters. Results showed that the structure of microbial communities of three seeds were different. All three fermentation products had unique community structures that were dominated (>96%) by species of the genus Lactobacillus, while members of this genus constituted <0.1% in seeds. The species of Lactobacillus sp. differed among the three fermentations. Results of this study suggest the structure of microbial communities in lactic acid fermentation of PPW with undefined mixed cultures were robust and resilient, which provided engineering prospects for the microbial utilization of carbohydrate wastes to produce lactic acid. PMID:25545096

  20. The DOE subsurface microbial culture collection at Florida State University. Final technical report, January 16, 1996--February 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Balkwill, D.L.

    1998-05-25

    This report describes the research that supports the Subsurface Science Program by maintaining a culture collection of microorganisms isolated from deep terrestrial subsurface environments (the Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection, or SMCC). The general distribution of cultures and data was identified as an important function of the SMCC. The accomplishments related to this function of the culture collection are described.

  1. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  2. Toward Microbioreactor Arrays: A Slow-Responding Oxygen Sensor for Monitoring of Microbial Cultures in Standard 96-Well Plates.

    PubMed

    Glauche, Florian; John, Gernot T; Arain, Sarina; Knepper, Andreas; Neubauer, Antje; Goelling, Detlef; Lang, Christine; Violet, Norman; King, Rudibert; Neubauer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a slow-responding chemo-optical sensor for dissolved oxygen (DO) integrated into a 96-well plate was developed. The slow response time ensures that the measured oxygen value does not change much during plate transport to the microplate reader. The sensor therefore permits at-line DO measurement of microbial cultures. Moreover, it eliminates the necessity of individual optical measurement systems for each culture plate, as many plates can be measured successively. Combined with the 96-well format, this increases the experimental throughput enormously. The novel sensor plate (Slow OxoPlate) consists of fluorophores suspended in a polymer matrix that were placed into u-bottom 96-well plates. Response time was measured using sodium sulfite, and a t90 value of 9.7 min was recorded. For application, DO values were then measured in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures grown under fed-batch-like conditions. Depending on the DO sensor's response time, different information on the oxygenation state of the culture plate was obtained: a fast sensor variant detects disturbance through sampling, whereas the slow sensor indicates oxygen limitation during incubation. A combination of the commercially available OxoPlate and the Slow OxoPlate enables operators of screening facilities to validate their cultivation procedures with regard to oxygen availability. PMID:25720599

  3. Volatile Compounds Originating from Mixed Microbial Cultures on Building Materials under Various Humidity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Korpi, Anne; Pasanen, Anna-Liisa; Pasanen, Pertti

    1998-01-01

    We examined growth of mixed microbial cultures (13 fungal species and one actinomycete species) and production of volatile compounds (VOCs) in typical building materials in outside walls, separating walls, and bathroom floors at various relative humidities (RHs) of air. Air samples from incubation chambers were adsorbed on Tenax TA and dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridges and were analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Metabolic activity was measured by determining CO2 production, and microbial concentrations were determined by a dilution plate method. At 80 to 82% RH, CO2 production did not indicate that microbial activity occurred, and only 10% of the spores germinated, while slight increases in the concentrations of some VOCs were detected. All of the parameters showed that microbial activity occurred at 90 to 99% RH. The microbiological analyses revealed weak microbial growth even under drying conditions (32 to 33% RH). The main VOCs produced on the building materials studied were 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octen-3-ol. In some cases fungal growth decreased aldehyde emissions. We found that various VOCs accompany microbial activity but that no single VOC is a reliable indicator of biocontamination in building materials. PMID:9687450

  4. Beyond Commercialization: Science, Higher Education and the Culture of Neoliberalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, Daniel Lee; Feinstein, Noah Weeth; Downey, Greg

    2013-10-01

    Since the 1980s, scholars and others have been engaged in a lively debate about the virtues and dangers of mingling commerce with university science. In this paper, we contend that the commercialization of academic science, and higher education more broadly, are best understood as pieces of a larger story. We use two cases of institutional change at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to shed light on the implications of neoliberalism for public research universities in the United States. We conclude that instead of neoliberalization being a timely strategy for the specific fiscal and other problems facing public universities today, it has become an omnibus solution available to be employed when any opportunity arises and, in fact, helps to define the "problems" of the university in the first place.

  5. Synergetic effects of microbial binary cultures on microbial fuel cell performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A binary culture of Lactococcus lactis and Shewanella oneidensis was studied for an efficient conversion of glucose into electricity in a continuously-operated chemostatic electrochemical reactor. The homolactic fermentation bacterium L. lactis fermented glucose almost exclusively to lactate – the ...

  6. Discrimination among iron sulfide species formed in microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Popa, R; Kinkle, B K

    2000-10-01

    A quantitative method for the study of iron sulfides precipitated in liquid cultures of bacteria is described. This method can be used to quantify and discriminate among amorphous iron sulfide (FeS(amorph)), iron monosulfide minerals such as mackinawite or greigite (FeS(min)), and iron disulfide minerals such as pyrite or marcasite (FeS(2min)) formed in liquid cultures. Degradation of iron sulfides is performed using a modified Cr(2+) reduction method with reflux distillation. The basic steps of the method are: first, separation of FeS(amorph); second, elimination of interfering species of S such as colloidal sulfur (S(c) degrees ), thiosulphate (S(2)O(3)(2-)) and polysulfides (S(x)(2-)); third, separation of FeS(min); and fourth, separation of FeS(2min). The final product is H(2)S which is determined after trapping. The efficiency of recovery is 96-99% for FeS(amorph), 76-88% for FeS(min), and >97% for FeS(2min). This method has a high reproducibility if the experimental conditions are rigorously applied and only glass conduits are used. A well ventilated fume hood must be used because of the toxicity and volatility of several reagents and products. The advantage relative to previously described methods are better resolution for iron sulfide species and use of the same bottles for both incubation of cultures and acid degradation. The method can also be used for Fe/S stoichiometry with sub-sampling and Fe analysis. PMID:11018273

  7. A three-dimensional culture system recapitulates placental syncytiotrophoblast development and microbial resistance

    PubMed Central

    McConkey, Cameron A.; Delorme-Axford, Elizabeth; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kim, Kwang Sik; Sadovsky, Yoel; Boyle, Jon P.; Coyne, Carolyn B.

    2016-01-01

    In eutherians, the placenta acts as a barrier and conduit at the maternal-fetal interface. Syncytiotrophoblasts, the multinucleated cells that cover the placental villous tree surfaces of the human placenta, are directly bathed in maternal blood and are formed by the fusion of progenitor cytotrophoblasts that underlie them. Despite their crucial role in fetal protection, many of the events that govern trophoblast fusion and protection from microbial infection are unknown. We describe a three-dimensional (3D)–based culture model using human JEG-3 trophoblast cells that develop syncytiotrophoblast phenotypes when cocultured with human microvascular endothelial cells. JEG-3 cells cultured in this system exhibit enhanced fusogenic activity and morphological and secretory activities strikingly similar to those of primary human syncytiotrophoblasts. RNASeq analyses extend the observed functional similarities to the transcriptome, where we observed significant overlap between syncytiotrophoblast-specific genes and 3D JEG-3 cultures. Furthermore, JEG-3 cells cultured in 3D are resistant to infection by viruses and Toxoplasma gondii, which mimics the high resistance of syncytiotrophoblasts to microbial infections in vivo. Given that this system is genetically manipulatable, it provides a new platform to dissect the mechanisms involved in syncytiotrophoblast development and microbial resistance. PMID:26973875

  8. Enhanced power production from microbial fuel cells with high cell density culture.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Dan-Dan; Li, Bing; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Sun, De-Zhen; Si, Rong-Wei; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Improvement of power production in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a high cell density culture strategy was developed. By using high cell density culture, the voltage output and power density output of the MFC were enhanced about 0.6 and 1.6 times compared to the control, respectively. Further analysis showed that riboflavin concentration in the MFC was dramatically increased from 0.1 mg/L to 1.2 mg/L by high cell density culture. Moreover, the biofilm formation on the anode surface was significantly enhanced by this new strategy. The increased accumulation of electron shuttle (riboflavin) as well as enhanced biofilm formation contributed to the improvement in anodic electrochemical activity and these factors were the underlying mechanism for MFC performance improvement by high cell density culture. This work demonstrated that high cell density culture would be a simple and practical strategy for MFC manipulation. PMID:27148719

  9. Effects of dietary cellulose and psyllium husk on monkey colonic microbial metabolism in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Costa, M A; Mehta, T; Males, J R

    1989-07-01

    The effects of inoculating an in vitro continuous culture system with primate colon contents compared to fecal material, and the effect of feeding these cultures psyllium husk, a fermentable, or cellulose, a less fermentable, dietary fiber were tested. Modified 500-ml Bellco culture chambers were continuously infused with buffered medium containing vitamin mix, deoxycholate, urea, hemin, casein and mucin. Cultures were fed a mixture of minerals, sucrose, starch and either psyllium husk or cellulose twice daily. Chambers were inoculated with fecal or colonic samples obtained from adult male African green monkeys fed the respective fiber source in a purified diet for more than 3 yr. After a 5-d stabilization period, samples were collected for total viable anaerobe and aerobe counts, microbial beta-glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) activity, volatile fatty acid (VFA) and ammonia nitrogen concentrations, dry matter, pH and oxidation-reduction potential. Inoculation with fecal material or colon contents produced similar results for the above mentioned characteristics; major differences were found due to the fiber treatments. Psyllium-fed cultures had lower pH (P less than 0.01) and higher VFA concentration (P less than 0.01) and beta-glucuronidase activity (P less than 0.10) than cellulose-fed cultures. The ratio of anaerobes to aerobes was lower (P less than 0.01) in psyllium-fed than in cellulose-fed cultures. These results indicate that feces can be used as an inoculum source for in vitro studies of changes in colonic microbial metabolism due to diet, and that dietary fiber source affects the colonic microbial population and metabolism. PMID:2547037

  10. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Franck O. P.; Bell, Terrence H.; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E.; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26053848

  11. On the way to commercializing plant cell culture platform for biopharmaceuticals: present status and prospect

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ningning

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell culture is emerging as an alternative bioproduction system for recombinant pharmaceuticals. Growing plant cells in vitro under controlled environmental conditions allows for precise control over cell growth and protein production, batch-to-batch product consistency and a production process aligned with current good manufacturing practices. With the recent US FDA approval and commercialization of the world’s first plant cell-based recombinant pharmaceutical for human use, β-glucocerebrosidase for treatment of Gaucher’s disease, a new era has come in which plant cell culture shows high potential to displace some established platform technologies in niche markets. This review updates the progress in plant cell culture processing technology, highlights recent commercial successes and discusses the challenges that must be overcome to make this platform commercially viable. PMID:25621170

  12. The effect of electromagnetic fields, from two commercially available water treatment devices, on bacterial culturability.

    PubMed

    Piyadasa, Chathuri; Yeager, Thomas R; Gray, Stephen R; Stewart, Matthew B; Ridgway, Harry F; Pelekani, Con; Orbell, John D

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available pulsed-electromagnetic field (PEMF) devices are currently being marketed and employed to ostensibly manage biofouling. The reliable application and industry acceptance of such technologies require thorough scientific validation - and this is currently lacking. We have initiated proof-of-principle research in an effort to investigate whether such commercially available PEMF devices can influence the viability (culturability) of planktonic bacteria in an aqueous environment. Thus two different commercial PEMF devices were investigated via a static (i.e. non-flowing) treatment system. 'Healthy' Escherichia coli cells, as well as cultures that were physiologically compromised by silver nano-particles, were exposed to the PEMFs from both devices under controlled conditions. Although relatively minor, the observed effects were nevertheless statistically significant and consistent with the hypothesis that PEMF exposure under controlled conditions may result in a decrease in cellular viability and culturability. It has also been observed that under certain conditions bacterial growth is actually stimulated. PMID:27003078

  13. A Winogradsky-based culture system shows an association between microbial fermentation and cystic fibrosis exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Robert A; Whiteson, Katrine; Lim, Yan-Wei; Salamon, Peter; Bailey, Barbara; Mienardi, Simone; Sanchez, Savannah E; Blake, Don; Conrad, Doug; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    There is a poor understanding of how the physiology of polymicrobial communities in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs contributes to pulmonary exacerbations and lung function decline. In this study, a microbial culture system based on the principles of the Winogradsky column (WinCF system) was developed to study the physiology of CF microbes. The system used glass capillary tubes filled with artificial sputum medium to mimic a clogged airway bronchiole. Chemical indicators were added to observe microbial physiology within the tubes. Characterization of sputum samples from seven patients showed variation in pH, respiration, biofilm formation and gas production, indicating that the physiology of CF microbial communities varied among patients. Incubation of homogenized tissues from an explant CF lung mirrored responses of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa pure culture, supporting evidence that end-stage lungs are dominated by this pathogen. Longitudinal sputum samples taken through two exacerbation events in a single patient showed that a two-unit drop in pH and a 30% increase in gas production occurred in the tubes prior to exacerbation, which was reversed with antibiotic treatment. Microbial community profiles obtained through amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed that fermentative anaerobes became more abundant during exacerbation and were then reduced during treatment where P. aeruginosa became the dominant bacterium. Results from the WinCF experiments support the model where two functionally different CF microbial communities exist, the persistent Climax Community and the acute Attack Community. Fermentative anaerobes are hypothesized to be the core members of the Attack Community and production of acidic and gaseous products from fermentation may drive developing exacerbations. Treatment targeting the Attack Community may better resolve exacerbations and resulting lung damage. PMID:25514533

  14. Microbial pollution indicators and culturable heterotrophic bacteria in a Mediterranean area (Southern Adriatic Sea Italian coasts)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabili, L.; Cavallo, R. A.

    2011-05-01

    In the present study we evaluated the degree of microbial water pollution along the coast line between Brindisi and Santa Maria di Leuca (Southern Adriatic Sea) as well as the culturable heterotrophic bacteria abundances and biodiversity in relation to the microbiological quality of the water. A total of 3773 colonies were isolated, subcultured and identified by several morphological, cultural and biochemical methods including the standardized API 20 E and API 20 NE tests. Along the examined coastal tract the microbial pollution indicators were always below the tolerance limits for bathing waters defined by the CEE directive, suggesting a good sanitary quality. Concerning culturable heterotrophic bacteria, different temporal density trends were observed in the four sites in relation to their geographical position. A positive relationship between the bacterial abundances and the temperature was observed in S. Cataldo and Otranto. The culturable bacterial community was mainly composed of the genera Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Photobacterium and Flavobacterium. The Enterobacteriaceae family represented a conspicuous component of the bacterial community too. Bacilli were predominant among the Gram-positive bacteria. Of interest is the isolation of yeasts (2% at the surface and 1% at the bottom) taking into account their capability of biodegradation of various materials. Because of the low level of microbial pollution recorded, our results are indicative of the natural variation and diversity of the culturable bacterial community in such an oligotrophic ecosystem and could represent a good point of comparison with other ecosystems as well as a baseline for long term studies aimed to evaluate the effects of environmental fluctuations and human impacts on this aspect of biodiversity in coastal areas.

  15. Phenolic profiles of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial samples of Melissa officinalis L. infusions.

    PubMed

    Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Dias, Maria Inês; Sousa, Maria João; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) is normally consumed as an infusion and presents therapeutic properties, such as sedative, carminative and antispasmodic, also being included in some pharmaceutical preparations. The phenolic profiles of different samples of lemon balm, prepared as infusions, were evaluated by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS. The profiles were compared in order to understand the differences between cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial (bags and granulated) samples. All the samples showed a similar phenolic profile, presenting differences only in the quantities found of each compound. Rosmarinic acid was the most abundant compound, being higher in commercial samples, especially in tea bag sample (55.68mg/g of infusion) and lower in in vitro cultured sample (15.46mg/g). Moreover, dimers, trimers and tetramers of caffeic acid were identified and quantified for the first time in lemon balm. Only one flavonoid, luteolin-3'-O-glucuronide was found in all the samples, ranging from 8.43mg/g in commercial granulate sample to 1.22mg/g in in vitro cultured sample. Overall, cultivated and in vitro cultured samples presented the lowest amounts of phenolic compounds (59.59 and 30.21mg/g, respectively); otherwise, commercial samples showed the highest contents (109.24mg/g for tea bag and 101.03mg/g for granulate sample). The present study shows that infusion of lemon balm can be a source of phenolic compounds, known for their bioactive effects. PMID:23017385

  16. Comparison of Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) Tuber with Commercialized Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) in Terms of Physiology, Fermentation Products and Intestinal Microbial Communities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Utami, Ni Wayan Arya; Sone, Teruo; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Saito, Akihiko; Asano, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    The yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) tuber was examined with regard to its prebiotic effects compared with commercialized fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). A feed containing 10% yacon tuber, which is equivalent to 5% commercialized FOS in terms of the amount of fructo-oligosaccharides (GF2, GF3 and GF4), was administrated to rats for 28 days. The yacon diet changed the intestinal microbial communities beginning in the first week, resulting in a twofold greater concentration of cecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The SCFA composition differed, but the cecal pH in rats fed yacon tuber was equal to that in rats fed FOS. Serum triglycerides were lower in rats fed yacon compared with rats fed FOS and the control diet. Cecal size was greater with the yacon tuber diet compared with the control diet. The abundant fermentation in the intestines created a selective environment for the intestinal microbiota, which included Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, Bifidobacterium animalis and Barnesiella spp. according to identification with culture-independent analysis, 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE combined with cloning and sequencing. Barnesiella spp. and B. pseudolongum were only found in the rats fed the yacon diet, while L. acidophilus and B. animalis were found in abundance in rats fed both the yacon and FOS diets. The genus Barnesiella has not previously been reported to be associated with yacon or FOS fermentation. We concluded that the physiological and microbiological effects of the yacon tuber were different from those of FOS. Differences in cecal size, blood triglycerides and microbial community profiles including their metabolites (SCFAs) between the yacon tuber and FOS were shown to be more greatly affected by the yacon tuber rather than FOS. PMID:24936376

  17. Comparison of Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) Tuber with Commercialized Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) in Terms of Physiology, Fermentation Products and Intestinal Microbial Communities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    UTAMI, Ni Wayan Arya; SONE, Teruo; TANAKA, Michiko; NAKATSU, Cindy H; SAITO, Akihiko; ASANO, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    The yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) tuber was examined with regard to its prebiotic effects compared with commercialized fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). A feed containing 10% yacon tuber, which is equivalent to 5% commercialized FOS in terms of the amount of fructo-oligosaccharides (GF2, GF3 and GF4), was administrated to rats for 28 days. The yacon diet changed the intestinal microbial communities beginning in the first week, resulting in a twofold greater concentration of cecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The SCFA composition differed, but the cecal pH in rats fed yacon tuber was equal to that in rats fed FOS. Serum triglycerides were lower in rats fed yacon compared with rats fed FOS and the control diet. Cecal size was greater with the yacon tuber diet compared with the control diet. The abundant fermentation in the intestines created a selective environment for the intestinal microbiota, which included Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, Bifidobacterium animalis and Barnesiella spp. according to identification with culture-independent analysis, 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE combined with cloning and sequencing. Barnesiella spp. and B. pseudolongum were only found in the rats fed the yacon diet, while L. acidophilus and B. animalis were found in abundance in rats fed both the yacon and FOS diets. The genus Barnesiella has not previously been reported to be associated with yacon or FOS fermentation. We concluded that the physiological and microbiological effects of the yacon tuber were different from those of FOS. Differences in cecal size, blood triglycerides and microbial community profiles including their metabolites (SCFAs) between the yacon tuber and FOS were shown to be more greatly affected by the yacon tuber rather than FOS. PMID:24936376

  18. From cultured to uncultured genome sequences: metagenomics and modeling microbial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Garza, Daniel R; Dutilh, Bas E

    2015-11-01

    Microorganisms and the viruses that infect them are the most numerous biological entities on Earth and enclose its greatest biodiversity and genetic reservoir. With strength in their numbers, these microscopic organisms are major players in the cycles of energy and matter that sustain all life. Scientists have only scratched the surface of this vast microbial world through culture-dependent methods. Recent developments in generating metagenomes, large random samples of nucleic acid sequences isolated directly from the environment, are providing comprehensive portraits of the composition, structure, and functioning of microbial communities. Moreover, advances in metagenomic analysis have created the possibility of obtaining complete or nearly complete genome sequences from uncultured microorganisms, providing important means to study their biology, ecology, and evolution. Here we review some of the recent developments in the field of metagenomics, focusing on the discovery of genetic novelty and on methods for obtaining uncultured genome sequences, including through the recycling of previously published datasets. Moreover we discuss how metagenomics has become a core scientific tool to characterize eco-evolutionary patterns of microbial ecosystems, thus allowing us to simultaneously discover new microbes and study their natural communities. We conclude by discussing general guidelines and challenges for modeling the interactions between uncultured microorganisms and viruses based on the information contained in their genome sequences. These models will significantly advance our understanding of the functioning of microbial ecosystems and the roles of microbes in the environment. PMID:26254872

  19. Dipeptidase activity and growth of heat-treated commercial dairy starter culture.

    PubMed

    Garbowska, Monika; Pluta, Antoni; Berthold-Pluta, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Growing expectations of consumers of fermented dairy products urge the search for novel solutions that would improve their organoleptic properties and in the case of rennet cheeses-that would also accelerate their ripening process. The aim of this study was to determine the peptidolytic activities and growth of heat-treated commercial culture of lactic acid bacteria. The analyzed culture was characterized by a relatively high peptidolytic activity. The growth of bacterial culture subjected to heat treatment at 50-80 °C for 15 s, 10 and 3 min was delayed by a few or 10-20 h compared to the control culture. Based on the results achieved, it may be concluded that in the production of rennet cheeses, the application of additional, fermentation-impaired starter cultures (via heating for ten or so minutes) may serve to accelerate their ripening and to improve their sensory attributes. PMID:25542242

  20. Immune modulation by Bacillus subtilus-based direct-fed microbials in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct-fed microbials (DFMs), also known as probiotics, have been successfully used to improve the balance of gut microbiota. Spores of Bacillus subtilis, have been used as DFMs for food animals and humans and our previous studies showed that dietary supplementation of broiler chickens with a B. su...

  1. Starter Culture Selection for Making Chinese Sesame-Flavored Liquor Based on Microbial Metabolic Activity in Mixed-Culture Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qun; Ling, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Selection of a starter culture with excellent viability and metabolic activity is important for inoculated fermentation of traditional food. To obtain a suitable starter culture for making Chinese sesame-flavored liquor, the yeast and bacterium community structures were investigated during spontaneous and solid-state fermentations of this type of liquor. Five dominant species in spontaneous fermentation were identified: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranaefaciens, Issatchenkia orientalis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The metabolic activity of each species in mixed and inoculated fermentations of liquor was investigated in 14 different cocultures that used different combinations of these species. The relationships between the microbial species and volatile metabolites were analyzed by partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. We found that S. cerevisiae was positively correlated to nonanal, and B. licheniformis was positively associated with 2,3-butanediol, isobutyric acid, guaiacol, and 4-vinyl guaiacol, while I. orientalis was positively correlated to butyric acid, isovaleric acid, hexanoic acid, and 2,3-butanediol. These three species are excellent flavor producers for Chinese liquor. Although P. membranaefaciens and B. amyloliquefaciens were not efficient flavor producers, the addition of them alleviated competition among the other three species and altered their growth rates and flavor production. As a result, the coculture of all five dominant species produced the largest amount of flavor compounds. The result indicates that flavor producers and microbial interaction regulators are important for inoculated fermentation of Chinese sesame-flavored liquor. PMID:24814798

  2. Evaluation of microbial diversity in sulfite-added and sulfite-free wine by culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohta, Tami; Masaki, Kazuo; Mizuno, Akihiro; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami

    2014-05-01

    The difference in microbiota including non-lactic acid bacteria, non-acetic acid bacteria, and wild yeast during winemaking and in the end-products between sulfite-added and sulfite-free wine, was investigated using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and a culture-dependent method. There were differences between the microorganisms detected by PCR-DGGE and those detected by the culture-dependent method, probably because of the selectivity of culture medium and the characteristics of PCR-based method. In both the red wine and white wine, the microbial diversity of the sulfite-added wine was lower than that of the sulfite-free wine during fermentation. Tatumella terrea was detected from the fermenting must by PCR-DGGE and by the culture-dependent method, even though sulfite inhibited its growth to some extent. We confirmed that the addition of sulfite plays an important role in winemaking by inhibiting the growth of unexpected microorganisms, but on the other hand, it was revealed that some microorganisms can survive and grow in sulfite-added fermenting must. We also analyzed 15 samples of commercial wines by the PCR-DGGE method and detected various microorganisms. Among them, Sphingomonas sp., Pseudozyma sp., Ochromonas sp. and Methylophilus sp. were found for the first time in wine as far as we know. We did not identify a specific microorganism that was detected only from wines without sulfite addition. Thus, the microbiota of end-products seemed to be influenced by other factors, such as filtration before bottling, the production equipment and the storage environment. PMID:24239025

  3. Microbial diversity in sugarcane ethanol production in a Brazilian distillery using a culture-independent method.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ohana Yonara Assis; Souto, Betulia Morais; Tupinambá, Daiva Domenech; Bergmann, Jessica Carvalho; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; Quirino, Betania Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane ethanol production occurs in non-sterile conditions, and microbial contamination can decrease productivity. In this study, we assessed the microbial diversity of contaminants of ethanol production in an industrial facility in Brazil. Samples obtained at different stages were analyzed by pyrosequencing-based profiling of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer region. A total of 355 bacterial groups, 22 archaeal groups, and 203 fungal groups were identified, and community changes were related to temperature changes at certain stages. After fermentation, Lactobacillus and unclassified Lactobacillaceae accounted for nearly 100 % of the bacterial sequences. Predominant Fungi groups were "unclassified Fungi," Meyerozyma, and Candida. The predominant Archaea group was unclassified Thaumarchaeota. This is the first work to assess the diversity of Bacteria, and Archaea and Fungi associated with the industrial process of sugarcane-ethanol production using culture-independent techniques. PMID:25404204

  4. Assessment of microbial diversity in biofilms recovered from endotracheal tubes using culture dependent and independent approaches.

    PubMed

    Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Matthijs, Nele; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Vosters, Peter; De Bus, Liesbet; Nelis, Hans J; Depuydt, Pieter; Coenye, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection in mechanically ventilated patients. Biofilm formation is one of the mechanisms through which the endotracheal tube (ET) facilitates bacterial contamination of the lower airways. In the present study, we analyzed the composition of the ET biofilm flora by means of culture dependent and culture independent (16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and pyrosequencing) approaches. Overall, the microbial diversity was high and members of different phylogenetic lineages were detected (Actinobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, Candida spp., Clostridia, epsilon-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria). Culture dependent analysis, based on the use of selective growth media and conventional microbiological tests, resulted in the identification of typical aerobic nosocomial pathogens which are known to play a role in the development of VAP, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other opportunistic pathogens were also identified, including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Kocuria varians. In general, there was little correlation between the results obtained by sequencing 16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and by cultivation. Pyrosequencing of PCR amplified 16 S rRNA genes of four selected samples resulted in the identification of a much wider variety of bacteria. The results from the pyrosequencing analysis suggest that these four samples were dominated by members of the normal oral flora such as Prevotella spp., Peptostreptococcus spp. and lactic acid bacteria. A combination of methods is recommended to obtain a complete picture of the microbial diversity of the ET biofilm. PMID:22693635

  5. Assessment of Microbial Diversity in Biofilms Recovered from Endotracheal Tubes Using Culture Dependent and Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Matthijs, Nele; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Vosters, Peter; De Bus, Liesbet; Nelis, Hans J.; Depuydt, Pieter; Coenye, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection in mechanically ventilated patients. Biofilm formation is one of the mechanisms through which the endotracheal tube (ET) facilitates bacterial contamination of the lower airways. In the present study, we analyzed the composition of the ET biofilm flora by means of culture dependent and culture independent (16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and pyrosequencing) approaches. Overall, the microbial diversity was high and members of different phylogenetic lineages were detected (Actinobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, Candida spp., Clostridia, epsilon-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria). Culture dependent analysis, based on the use of selective growth media and conventional microbiological tests, resulted in the identification of typical aerobic nosocomial pathogens which are known to play a role in the development of VAP, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other opportunistic pathogens were also identified, including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Kocuria varians. In general, there was little correlation between the results obtained by sequencing 16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and by cultivation. Pyrosequencing of PCR amplified 16 S rRNA genes of four selected samples resulted in the identification of a much wider variety of bacteria. The results from the pyrosequencing analysis suggest that these four samples were dominated by members of the normal oral flora such as Prevotella spp., Peptostreptococcus spp. and lactic acid bacteria. A combination of methods is recommended to obtain a complete picture of the microbial diversity of the ET biofilm. PMID:22693635

  6. Optimizing culture medium for meristem tissue culture of several Saccharum species and commercial hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimal range of medium nutrients and plant growth regulators (PGR) was investigated for in vitro culture of diverse sugarcane species and cultivars. Macro-nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K), were essential for growth of leaf primordia. Although the best concentration of ...

  7. Effect of oenological practices on microbial populations using culture-independent techniques.

    PubMed

    Andorrà, Imma; Landi, Sara; Mas, Albert; Guillamón, José M; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2008-10-01

    Sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) addition and yeast inoculation are well-established practices in winemaking for restricting the growth of indigenous yeasts and bacterial populations. The effect of these oenological practices on wine microbial populations has been evaluated using culture-independent methods. These are quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the enumeration of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB), and PCR-DGGE to determine the yeast and bacteria species diversity. The PCR-DGGE method detected a low yeast and bacteria species diversity. On the contrary, the specificity of the primers designed for the qPCR allowed that minor microbial groups such as Hanseniaspora were accurately quantified regardless of a large presence of other microbial groups such as Saccharomyces. From an oenological point of view, inoculation increased the proportion of Saccharomyces vs. non-Saccharomyces in a shorter time. Hanseniaspora increased during the first phase and decreased during the latter phases of the process, especially in the sulphited fermentations. Both yeast inoculation and SO(2) kept the LAB populations at very low level, while the AAB populations were hardly affected by these two practices. PMID:18721672

  8. A Moderately Thermophilic Mixed Microbial Culture for Bioleaching of Chalcopyrite Concentrate at High Pulp Density

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuguang; Zeng, Weimin; Qiu, Guanzhou; Chen, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of samples (acid mine drainage, coal mine wastewater, and thermal spring) derived from different sites were collected in China. Thereafter, these samples were combined and then inoculated into a basal salts solution in which different substrates (ferrous sulfate, elemental sulfur, and chalcopyrite) served as energy sources. After that, the mixed cultures growing on different substrates were pooled equally, resulting in a final mixed culture. After being adapted to gradually increasing pulp densities of chalcopyrite concentrate by serial subculturing for more than 2 years, the final culture was able to efficiently leach the chalcopyrite at a pulp density of 20% (wt/vol). At that pulp density, the culture extracted 60.4% of copper from the chalcopyrite in 25 days. The bacterial and archaeal diversities during adaptation were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and constructing clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. The results show that the culture consisted mainly of four species, including Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus caldus, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Ferroplasma thermophilum, before adapting to a pulp density of 4%. However, L. ferriphilum could not be detected when the pulp density was greater than 4%. Real-time quantitative PCR was employed to monitor the microbial dynamics during bioleaching at a pulp density of 20%. The results show that A. caldus was the predominant species in the initial stage, while S. acidophilus rather than A. caldus became the predominant species in the middle stage. F. thermophilum accounted for the greatest proportion in the final stage. PMID:24242252

  9. Biotransformation of oral contraceptive ethynodiol diacetate with microbial and plant cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biotransformation by using microbial and plant cell cultures has been applied effectively for the production of fine chemicals on large scale. Inspired by the wealth of literature available on the biotransformation of steroids, we decided to investigate the biotransformation of ethynodiol diacetate (1) by using plant and microbial cultures. Results The biotransformation of ethynodiol diacetate (1) with Cunninghamella elegans and plant cell suspension cultures of Ocimum basilicum and Azadirachta indica is being reported here for the first time. Biotransformation of 1 with Cunninghamella elegans yielded three new hydroxylated compounds, characterized as 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-6α-ol (2), 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-6β-ol (3), and 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-10β-ol (4) and a known metabolite, 17α-ethynyl-17β-acetoxyestr-4-en-3-one (5). The biotransformation of 1 with Ocimum basilicum included hydrolysis of the ester group, oxidation of alcohol into ketone, and rearrangement of the hydroxyl group. Thus four major known metabolites were characterized as 17α-ethynyl-17β-acetoxyestr-4-en-3-one (5), 17α-ethynyl-17β-hydroxyestr-4-en-3-one (6), 17α-ethynyl-3 β-hydroxy-17β-acetoxyestr-4-ene (7) and 17α-ethynyl-5α,17β-dihydroxyestr-3-ene (8). Biotransformation of 1 with Azadirachta indica culture yielded compounds 5 and 6. Spectroscopic data of compound 8 is being reported for the first time. Structure of compound 6 was unambiguously deduced through single-crystal x-ray diffraction studies. Conclusion Biotransformation of an oral contraceptive, ethynodiol diacetate (1), by using microbial and plant cell cultures provides an efficient route to the synthesis of a library of new steroids with potential contraceptive properties. These methods can be employed in the production of such compounds with high stereoselectivity. PMID:23021311

  10. Rumen degradable protein supply affects microbial efficiency in continuous culture and growth in steers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, M A; Harvey, R M; Johnson, N F; Kerley, M S

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesized that microbial efficiency and output from fermentation in the rumen would be optimized when peptide supply was balanced with peptide requirement of ruminal microflora. This study was conducted to measure response of varying rumen degradable peptide (RDPep) supply on ruminal fermentation characteristics and steer growth. A continuous culture experiment was conducted with diets formulated to achieve a predicted RDPep balance (RDPep supplied above RDPep required) of -0.30 to 1.45% CP with rumen degradable N (RDN) balance (RDN supplied above RDN required) above dietary ammonia-N requirement of microbes. Two additional treatments had RDPep balances of -0.30 and 0.78% CP with insufficient ammonia-N supply to meet microbial requirements. Single-flow fermenters (N = 24; n = 6) were inoculated with rumen fluid and maintained anaerobically at 39°C with a 0.06 h(-1) dilution rate. Inadequate RDN decreased OM digestion and microbial N flow, and increased rumen undegradable N (P < 0.01). Microbial efficiency decreased in RDN-deficient diets and was greatest when RDPep balance did not excessively exceed microbial requirement of RDPep predicted (P < 0.01). A growth study was conducted with 49 yearling, crossbred, Angus steers (initial BW 370 ± 34 kg). Animals were assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups by BW and further divided into 3 pens with 4 steers per pen to achieve similar initial pen weights. Treatments consisted of 4 isonitrogenous diets balanced for RDN but varying in predicted RDPep balance (0.55%, -0.02%, -0.25%, and -0.65% CP). Animals were maintained on treatment for 70 d with individual BW taken on d 0, 1, 21, 42, 70, and 71. Final BW decreased linearly with decreasing RDPep (P = 0.05). Average daily gain and G:F displayed a quadratic effect with greater ADG and G:F at greater and lesser RDPep levels (P = 0.02). We concluded that balancing RDPep supply to predicted requirement improved fermentation efficiency and microbial output, which in turn

  11. Functional studies of rat, porcine, and human pancreatic islets cultured in ten commercially available media.

    PubMed

    Holmes, M A; Clayton, H A; Chadwick, D R; Bell, P R; London, N J; James, R F

    1995-10-27

    There have been no extensive studies investigating the effect of tissue culture media on the in vitro functional characteristics of rat, porcine and human Islets of Langerhans. We therefore aimed to compare ten commercially available tissue culture media on the basis of their ability to maintain islet viability. Following isolation, islets were cultured free-floating in the ten media (RPMI 1640-11mM glucose (control), RPMI 1640-2.2mM glucose, Dulbecco's MEM, TCM 199, CMRL 1066, Iscove's MEM, Waymouth's MEM, Serum-Free medium, Ex-cell 300, Ham's F-12) and viability was assessed after 24 hr, 3 days, and 7 days on the basis of macroscopic appearance, cell membrane integrity, and insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation both by dynamic incubation and by perifusion. Each islet species demonstrated physiological insulin release characteristics in all media--however, it was possible to distinguish between the media by comparing the stimulation indices calculated from the insulin release studies. Significantly higher stimulation indices were produced in Iscove's MEM for rat islets, in Ham's F-12 for porcine islets and in CMRL 1066 for human islets. Over the entire culture period a significant deterioration in function was observed in all species cultured in the control media, although this was reversed when islets were cultured in the optimal media. Furthermore, in the case of porcine and human islets a significant improvement in function over the seven-day period was noted in the optimal media. In conclusion, of the commercially available media, the optimal tissue culture medium for rat islets is Iscove's MEM, for porcine islets is Ham's F-12, and for human islets is CMRL 1066. PMID:7482747

  12. Modeling PHA-producing microbial enrichment cultures--towards a generalized model with predictive power.

    PubMed

    Tamis, Jelmer; Marang, Leonie; Jiang, Yang; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kleerebezem, Robbert

    2014-06-25

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production from waste streams using microbial enrichment cultures is a promising option for cost price reduction of this biopolymer. For proper understanding and successful optimization of the process, a consistent mechanistic model for PHA conversion by microbial enrichment cultures is needed. However, there is still a lack of mechanistic expressions describing the dynamics of the feast-famine process. The scope of this article is to provide an overview of the current models, investigate points of improvement, and contribute concepts for creation of a generalized model with more predictive value for the feast-famine process. Based on experimental data available in literature we have proposed model improvements for (i) modeling mixed substrates uptake, (ii) growth in the feast phase, (iii) switching between feast and famine phase, (iv) PHA degradation and (v) modeling the accumulation phase. Finally, we provide an example of a simple uniform model. Herewith we aim to give an impulse to the establishment of a generalized model. PMID:24333144

  13. Microchemostat-microbial continuous culture in a polymer-based, instrumented microbioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Boccazzi, Paolo; Choi, Hyun-Goo; Perozziello, Gerardo; Sinskey, Anthony J; Jensen, Klavs F

    2006-07-01

    In a chemostat, microbial cells reach a steady state condition at which cell biomass production, substrates and the product concentrations remain constant. These features make continuous culture a unique and powerful tool for biological and physiological research. We present a polymer-based microbioreactor system integrated with optical density (OD), pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO) real-time measurements for continuous cultivation of microbial cells. Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells are continuously cultured in a 150 microL, membrane-aerated, well-mixed microbioreactor fed by a pressure-driven flow of fresh medium through a microchannel. Chemotaxisial back growth of bacterial cells into the medium feed channel is prevented by local heating. Using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) copolymer films, the inner surfaces of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) of the microbioreactor are modified to generate bio-inert surfaces resistant to non-specific protein adsorption and cell adhesion. The modified surfaces of microbioreactor effectively reduce wall growth of E. coli for a prolonged period of cultivation. Steady state conditions at different dilution rates are demonstrated and characterized by steady OD, pH, and DO levels. PMID:16804595

  14. Development of a competition model for microbial growth in mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Munakata, Kanako; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model for describing bacterial growth in mixed culture was developed in this study. Several model candidates were made with our logistic growth model that precisely describes the growth of a monoculture of bacteria. These candidates were then evaluated for the usefulness in describing growth of two competing species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacterial cells of two species grew at initial doses of 10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) CFU/g at 28ºC. Among the candidates, a model where the Lotka-Volterra model, a general competition model in ecology, was incorporated as a new term in our growth model was the best for describing all types of growth of two competitors in mixed culture. Moreover, the values for the competition coefficient in the model were stable at various combinations of the initial populations of the species. The Baranyi model could also successfully describe the above types of growth in mixed culture when it was coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model. However, the values for the competition coefficients in the competition model varied with the conditions. The present study suggested that our model could be a basic model for describing microbial competition. PMID:24975409

  15. Bulk tank technology: Acidification of commercially fermented cucumbers in bulk tanks to increase microbial stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten commercial fiberglass tanks (8,000 gal) of size no. 1 fermented cucumbers were acidified with 5.46N HCl to lower the brine pH to 3.5 from the pH that resulted at the end of fermentation (3.65-3.70). The volume of hydrochloric acid required to do this varied from 8.9-14.8 gal per tank. The rate...

  16. Biodegradation Of Thiocyanate Using Microbial Consortia Cultured From Gold Mine Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, J. W.; Watts, M. P.; Spurr, L. P.; Vu, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Some bacteria possess the capability to degrade SCN-; therefore, harnessing this metabolic trait offers a biotechnological remediation strategy for SCN- produced in gold ore processing. A tailings storage facility (TSF) at a gold mine in Victoria, Australia holds large quantities of thiocyanate (SCN-) contaminated mine waste. The surface water in the TSF typically contains SCN- concentrations of >800 mg L-1, and seepage from the facility has contaminated the groundwater at the site. This study aimed to culture SCN-degrading microbes from the TSF, characterize the microbial consortia and test its operational parameters for use in a thiocyanate-degrading bioreactor. Surface samples were obtained from several locations around the TSF facility and used to inoculate medium reflective of the moderately saline and alkaline tailings water at the TSF, in the absence of organic carbon but subject to additions of phosphate and trace metals. Four microbial consortia capable of rapid SCN- degradation were successfully cultured. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes found that the consortia were dominated by Thiobacillus species, a genus of known SCN- degraders. Lower abundances of other SCN- degraders; Sphingopyxis and Rhodobacter, were also identified. The impact of a number of geochemical conditions, including pH, temperature and SCN- concentration, upon the growth and SCN- degrading capacity of these consortia was determined. These results informed the optimization of a lab-scale thiocyanate degrading bioreactor. In summary, the cultured bacterial consortia proved effective towards SCN- degradation at the prevailing geochemical conditions of the TSF, requiring minimal nutrient additions. These consortia were dominated by genera of known autotrophic SCN- degraders. The comprehensive characterisation of these SCN- degrading consortia will provide the fundamental operational parameters required for deployment of this technique at the field scale.

  17. Microbial oxidation of elemental selenium in soil slurries and bacterial cultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowdle, P.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    The microbial oxidation of elemental selenium [Se(O)] was studied by employing 75Se(O) as a tracer. Live, oxic soil slurries demonstrated a linear production of mostly Se(IV), with the formation of smaller quantities of Se(VI). Production of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was inhibited by autoclaving, formalin, antibiotics, azide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, thereby indicating the involvement of microbes. Oxidation of Se(O) in slurries was enhanced by addition of acetate, glucose, or sulfide, which implied involvement of chemoheterotrophs as well as chemoautotrophic thiobacilli. Cultures of Thiobacillus ASN-1, Leptothrix MnB1, and a heterotrophic soil enrichment all oxidized Se(O) with Se(VI) observed as the major product rather than Se(IV). This indicated that microbial oxidation in soils is partly constrained by the adsorption of Se(IV) onto soil surfaces. Rate constants for unamended soil slurry Se(O) oxidation ranged from 0.0009 to 0.0117 day-1 which were 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for dissimilatory Se(VI) reduction in organic-rich, anoxic sediments.The microbial oxidation of elemental selenium [Se(0)] was studied by employing 75Se(0) as a tracer. Live, oxic soil slurries demonstrated a linear production of mostly Se(IV), with the formation of smaller quantities of Se(VI). Production of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was inhibited by autoclaving, formalin, antibiotics, azide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, thereby indicating the involvement of microbes. Oxidation of Se(O) in slurries was enhanced by addition of acetate, glucose, or sulfide, which implied involvement of chemoheterotrophs as well as chemoautotrophic thiobacilli. Cultures of Thiobacillus ASN-1, Leptothrix MnB1, and a heterotrophic soil enrichment all oxidized Se(O) with Se(VI) observed as the major product rather than Se(IV). This indicated that microbial oxidation in soils is partly constrained by the adsorption of Se(IV) onto soil surfaces. Rate constants for unamended soil slurry Se(O) oxidation

  18. Commercial product exploitation from marine microbial biodiversity: some legal and IP issues

    PubMed Central

    Tichet, Camille; Nguyen, Hong Khanh; Yaakoubi, Sefia El; Bloch, Jean‐François

    2010-01-01

    Summary The biodiversity found in the marine environment is remarkable and yet largely unknown compared with the terrestrial one. The associated genetic resource, also wide and unrevealed, has raised a strong interest from the scientific and industrial community. However, despite this growing interest, the discovery of new compounds extracted from marine organisms, more precisely from microorganisms, is ruled by a complex legislation. The access and transfer of genetic resource are ruled by the Convention on Biological Diversity. One of the three core objectives of this convention is to ensure the fair and equitable sharing of benefits generated by the use of genetic resources and to split these benefits between the different stakeholders. From the discovery of a microorganism to the commercialization of a product, three main stakeholders are involved: providers of microorganisms, e.g. academic institutes, the scientists who will perform R&D on biodiversity, and the industrial companies which will commercialize the final product arising from the R&D results. This article describes how difficult and complex it might be to ensure a fair distribution of benefits of this research between the parties. PMID:21255350

  19. A Continuous Culture System for Assessing Microbial Activities in the Piezosphere

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Continuous culture under elevated pressures is an important technique for expanding the exploration of microbial growth and survival in extreme environments associated with the deep biosphere. Here we present a benchtop stirred continuous culture bioreactor capable of withstanding temperatures ranging from 25 to 120°C and pressures as high as 69 MPa. The system is configured to allow the employment of media enriched in dissolved gases, under oxic or anoxic conditions, while permitting periodic sampling of the incubated organisms with minimal physical/chemical disturbance inside the reactor. In a pilot experiment, the fermentative growth of the thermopiezophilic bacterium Marinitoga piezophila was investigated continuously for 382 h at 65°C and at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 40 MPa while the medium flow rate was varied from 2 to 0.025 ml/min. The enhanced growth observed at 30 and 40 MPa and 0.025 ml/min supports the pressure preferences of M. piezophila when grown fermentatively. This assay successfully demonstrates the capabilities of the bioreactor for continuous culturing at a variety of dilution rates, pressures, and temperatures. We anticipate that this technology will accelerate our understanding of the physiological and metabolic status of microorganisms under temperature, pressure, and energy regimes resembling those of the Earth's piezosphere. PMID:26209666

  20. A Continuous Culture System for Assessing Microbial Activities in the Piezosphere.

    PubMed

    Foustoukos, Dionysis I; Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana

    2015-10-01

    Continuous culture under elevated pressures is an important technique for expanding the exploration of microbial growth and survival in extreme environments associated with the deep biosphere. Here we present a benchtop stirred continuous culture bioreactor capable of withstanding temperatures ranging from 25 to 120°C and pressures as high as 69 MPa. The system is configured to allow the employment of media enriched in dissolved gases, under oxic or anoxic conditions, while permitting periodic sampling of the incubated organisms with minimal physical/chemical disturbance inside the reactor. In a pilot experiment, the fermentative growth of the thermopiezophilic bacterium Marinitoga piezophila was investigated continuously for 382 h at 65°C and at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 40 MPa while the medium flow rate was varied from 2 to 0.025 ml/min. The enhanced growth observed at 30 and 40 MPa and 0.025 ml/min supports the pressure preferences of M. piezophila when grown fermentatively. This assay successfully demonstrates the capabilities of the bioreactor for continuous culturing at a variety of dilution rates, pressures, and temperatures. We anticipate that this technology will accelerate our understanding of the physiological and metabolic status of microorganisms under temperature, pressure, and energy regimes resembling those of the Earth's piezosphere. PMID:26209666

  1. Microbial oxidation of elemental selenium in soil slurries and bacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdle, P.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-12-01

    The microbial oxidation of elemental selenium [Se(0)] was studied by employing {sup 75}Se(0) as a tracer. Live, oxic soil slurries demonstrated a linear production of mostly Se(IV), with the formation of smaller quantities of Se(VI). Production of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was inhibited by autoclaving, formalin, antibiotics, azide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, thereby indicating the involvement of microbes. Oxidation of Se(0) in slurries was enhanced by addition of acetate, glucose, or sulfide, which implied involvement of chemoheterotrophs as well as chemoautotrophic thiobacilli. Cultures of Thiobacillus ASN-1, Leptothrix MnB1, and a heterotrophic soil enrichment all oxidized Se(0) with Se(VI) observed as the major product rather than Se(IV). This indicated that microbial oxidation in soils is partly constrained by the adsorption of Se(IV) onto soil surfaces. Rate constants for unamended soil slurry Se(0) oxidation ranged from 0.0009 to 0.0117 day{sup {minus}1} which were 3--4 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for dissimilatory Se(VI) reduction in organic-rich, anoxic sediments.

  2. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods To Investigate the Microbial Ecology of Italian Fermented Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Urso, Rosalinda; Iacumin, Lucilla; Cantoni, Carlo; Cattaneo, Patrizia; Comi, Giuseppe; Cocolin, Luca

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the microbial ecology of three naturally fermented sausages produced in northeast Italy was studied by culture-dependent and -independent methods. By plating analysis, the predominance of lactic acid bacteria populations was pointed out, as well as the importance of coagulase-negative cocci. Also in the case of one fermentation, the fecal enterocci reached significant counts, highlighting their contribution to the particular transformation process. Yeast counts were higher than the detection limit (>100 CFU/g) in only one fermented sausage. Analysis of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns and sequencing of the bands allowed profiling of the microbial populations present in the sausages during fermentation. The bacterial ecology was mainly characterized by the stable presence of Lactobacillus curvatus and Lactobacillus sakei, but Lactobacillus paracasei was also repeatedly detected. An important piece of evidence was the presence of Lactococcus garvieae, which clearly contributed in two fermentations. Several species of Staphylococcus were also detected. Regarding other bacterial groups, Bacillus sp., Ruminococcus sp., and Macrococcus caseolyticus were also identified at the beginning of the transformations. In addition, yeast species belonging to Debaryomyces hansenii, several Candida species, and Willopsis saturnus were observed in the DGGE gels. Finally, cluster analysis of the bacterial and yeast DGGE profiles highlighted the uniqueness of the fermentation processes studied. PMID:15812029

  3. Retention and transport of an anaerobic trichloroethene dechlorinating microbial culture in anaerobic porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huixin; Ulrich, Ania C; Liu, Yang

    2015-06-01

    The influence of solution chemistry on microbial transport was examined using the strictly anaerobic trichloroethene (TCE) bioaugmentation culture KB-1(®). A column was employed to determine transport behaviors and deposition kinetics of three distinct functional species in KB-1(®), Dehalococcoides, Geobacter, and Methanomethylovorans, over a range of ionic strengths under a well-controlled anaerobic condition. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was utilized to enumerate cell concentration and complementary techniques were implemented to evaluate cell surface electrokinetic potentials. Solution chemistry was found to positively affect the deposition rates, which was consistent with calculated Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies. Retained microbial profiles showed spatially constant colloid deposition rate coefficients, in agreement with classical colloid filtration theory (CFT). It was interesting to note that the three KB-1(®) species displayed similar transport and retention behaviors under the defined experimental conditions despite their different cell electrokinetic properties. A deeper analysis of cell characteristics showed that factors, such as cell size and shape, concentration, and motility were involved in determining adhesion behavior. PMID:25935560

  4. Improvement of Ayran quality by the selection of autochthonous microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Baruzzi, Federico; Quintieri, Laura; Caputo, Leonardo; Cocconcelli, PierSandro; Borcakli, Mehlika; Owczarek, Lubomiła; Jasińska, Urszula T; Skąpska, Sylwia; Morea, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Ayran is a traditional Turkish milk drink which is fermented and salted. Inadequate production and storage conditions contribute to its variable organoleptic quality and stability during shelf-life. A thorough physico-chemical, nutritional and microbial characterization of artisanal Ayran was carried out in order to standardize its overall quality without altering its original traits. Ayran microbial ecosystem was largely dominated by Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (LDB). High counts of other lactic acid bacteria species, including Lactobacillus helveticus (LH), Lactobacillus fermentum (LF), and Lactobacillus paracasei (LP), were also found. Selected LDB, LP and LH strains grew well in milk displaying fast acidification and high proteolysis, differently from ST and LF strains that did not cause noticeable changes. A selected autochthonous three-strain culture (TSC), composed of one strain of LDB, LP and ST, was applied for the pilot-scale production of traditional Ayran. The Ayran produced with this TSC resulted in the most extensive shelf-life (one month) and in the best terms of its nutritional and sensory quality nevertheless altering its typical pleasant yogurt and cottage cheese notes. This TSC is at disposal of SMEs who need to standardize the overall quality of this traditional fermented milk, preserving its typical traits. PMID:27554150

  5. Culture-dependent and -independent methods to investigate the microbial ecology of Italian fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Urso, Rosalinda; Iacumin, Lucilla; Cantoni, Carlo; Cattaneo, Patrizia; Comi, Giuseppe; Cocolin, Luca

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the microbial ecology of three naturally fermented sausages produced in northeast Italy was studied by culture-dependent and -independent methods. By plating analysis, the predominance of lactic acid bacteria populations was pointed out, as well as the importance of coagulase-negative cocci. Also in the case of one fermentation, the fecal enterocci reached significant counts, highlighting their contribution to the particular transformation process. Yeast counts were higher than the detection limit (> 100 CFU/g) in only one fermented sausage. Analysis of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns and sequencing of the bands allowed profiling of the microbial populations present in the sausages during fermentation. The bacterial ecology was mainly characterized by the stable presence of Lactobacillus curvatus and Lactobacillus sakei, but Lactobacillus paracasei was also repeatedly detected. An important piece of evidence was the presence of Lactococcus garvieae, which clearly contributed in two fermentations. Several species of Staphylococcus were also detected. Regarding other bacterial groups, Bacillus sp., Ruminococcus sp., and Macrococcus caseolyticus were also identified at the beginning of the transformations. In addition, yeast species belonging to Debaryomyces hansenii, several Candida species, and Willopsis saturnus were observed in the DGGE gels. Finally, cluster analysis of the bacterial and yeast DGGE profiles highlighted the uniqueness of the fermentation processes studied. PMID:15812029

  6. Biochar as a novel niche for culturing microbial communities in composting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daquan; Lan, Yu; Xu, Elvis Genbo; Meng, Jun; Chen, Wenfu

    2016-08-01

    Biochar has been applied as a bulk agent or an additive to compost. The mixture of biochar and compost has been considered to exert synergistic effect as a soil amendment. In a composting system, the macro-porous sites of biochar may act as a novel niche that selects and cultures the microorganisms from the bulk compost. A variety of volatile organic carbons (VOCs) such as aromatic hydrocarbons and aliphatics were detected in biochar pellets (BC) pyrolyzed at 100°C. In the mesosphilic phase, the water-soluble carbon (WSC) and water-soluble phenols (WSP) in biochar increased from 2.1 to 26mgkg(-1) and 5.9 to 101μgkg(-1), respectively. These labile carbons however, were subjected to a rapid metabolism over the composting course. We further compared the responses of microbial community in BC to those in the bulk organic matter. Both Shannon-Wiener and Richness indexes of bacterial communities were higher in BC than in the adjacent compost (ADJ) and the bulk organic matter (control). As for fungal communities, the two indexes were higher in BC than ADJ and control only in the mature phase. During the composting course, the bacterial activity was higher than the fungal counterpart in terms of the changes of corresponding biomarkers, glucosamine and muramic acids. The results suggested that the diversified labile carbons sources including VOCs and WSC in BC could influence the structure of microbial community and resulted in an enhanced carbon catabolic capacity. PMID:27184446

  7. Proteomic profiling of an undefined microbial consortium cultured in fermented dairy manure: Methods development.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrea J; Paszczynski, Andrzej J; Coats, Erik R

    2016-03-01

    The production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA; bioplastics) from waste or surplus feedstocks using mixed microbial consortia (MMC) and aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) is a growing field within mixed culture biotechnology. This study aimed to optimize a 2DE workflow to investigate the proteome dynamics of an MMC synthesizing PHA from fermented dairy manure. To mitigate the challenges posed to effective 2DE by this complex sample matrix, the bacterial biomass was purified using Accudenz gradient centrifugation (AGC) before protein extraction. The optimized 2DE method yielded high-quality gels suitable for quantitative comparative analysis and subsequent protein identification by LC-MS/MS. The optimized 2DE method could be adapted to other proteomic investigations involving MMC in complex organic or environmental matrices. PMID:26790989

  8. Extraction of polyhydroxyalkanoates from mixed microbial cultures: Impact on polymer quality and recovery.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Chiara; Abbondanzi, Federica; Galletti, Paola; Giorgini, Loris; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Torri, Cristian; Tagliavini, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) can be extracted from mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) by means of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) or combination of DMC and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO). The protocol based on DMC, a green solvent never used before for the extraction of PHAs from MMC, allows an overall polymer recovery of 63%; also the purity and the molecular weight of the recovered polymers are good (98% and 1.2 MDa, respectively). The use of NaClO pretreatment before DMC extraction increases the overall PHA recovery (82%) but lowers the mean molecular weight to 0.6-0.2 MDa. A double extraction with DMC results to be the method of choice for the recovery of high quality PHAs from attractive but challenging MMCs. PMID:25889806

  9. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  10. Chemical, microbial and physical evaluation of commercial bottled waters in greater Houston area of Texas.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mahmoud A; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia H; Woodard, Brooke B; Clark, Shavon; Wallace, Cecil; Aboaba, Adetoun; Zhang, Wenluo; Nance, James H

    2008-03-01

    Due to the increased demand and consumption of bottled water in the United States, there has been a growing concern about the quality of this product. Retail outlets sell local as well as imported bottled water to consumers. Three bottles for each of 35 different brands of bottled water were randomly collected from local grocery stores in the greater Houston area. Out of the 35 different brands, 16 were designated as spring water, 11 were purified and/or fortified tap water, 5 were carbonated water and 3 were distilled water. Chemical, microbial and physical properties of all samples were evaluated including pH, conductivity, bacteria counts, anion concentration, trace metal concentration, heavy metal and volatile organics concentration were determined in all samples. Inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was used for elemental analysis, gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GCECD) as well as gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) were used for analysis of volatile organics, ion chromatography (IC) and selective ion electrodes were used for the analysis of anions. Bacterial identification was performed using the Biolog software (Biolog, Inc., Hayward, Ca, USA). The results obtained were compared with guidelines of drinking water recommended by the International Bottled Water Association (IBWA), United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) drinking water standard. The majority of the analyzed chemicals were below their respective drinking water standards for maximum admissible concentrations (MAC). Volatile organic chemicals were found to be below detection limits. Four of the 35 brands of the bottled water samples analyzed were found to be contaminated with bacteria. PMID:18273738

  11. Plant Germplasm Centers and Microbial Culture Collections: A User’s Guide to Key Genetic Resources for Plant Pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This User's Guide to microbial culture collections and collections of germplasm of higher plants contains a variety of instructional material. It specifies to potential users amongst the plant science community, but especially plant pathologists, how to locate collections on line or via corresponde...

  12. Effects of BioChlor and Fermenten on microbial protein synthesis in continuous culture fermenters.

    PubMed

    Lean, I J; Webster, T K Miller; Hoover, W; Chalupa, W; Sniffen, C J; Evans, E; Block, E; Rabiee, A R

    2005-07-01

    Meta analysis models were constructed from a data-set of 15 continuous culture fermenter trials and 118 observations on studies with either BioChlor (n = 23 observations) or Fermenten (n = 95) included at 10 and 3%, respectively, of dietary dry matter (DM) to evaluate effects of the ingredients BioChlor and Fermenten (B/F) on rumen function. Digestibility of crude protein was significantly increased by 11% with B/F treatment. This was reflected in significant increases in digestibility of DM and organic matter (OM) by 3.6 and 7.9%, respectively. Increased amounts of sugar in the diet in the presence of B/F tended to reduce digestibility of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC); however, the net effect on NSC digestion was small. There was no effect of treatment on most individual volatile fatty acids (VFA) or total VFA production. Propionate production, however, was significantly reduced in treated fermenters. The main effect of B/F as well as of starch and soluble fiber when combined with the treatment was to increase propionate production; however, the interaction between B/F treatment and sugar decreased propionate production markedly, resulting in a net decrease. The acetate-to-propionate ratio increased by 6% with B/F, largely as a result of the decrease in propionate. Production of nonammonia nitrogen was 1% less in B/F-treated fermenters, and interactions between treatment and starch, sugar, or soluble fiber were significant. Treated fermenters produced 15.7% more microbial nitrogen, in association with a significant 37% increase in rumen protein digestion. Interactions between treatment and starch, soluble fiber, or sugar influenced these results. The interaction of B/F and sugar resulted in a decrease in undegradable protein N and an increase in microbial nitrogen production. Ammonia nitrogen concentrations were increased by 24.6% in treated fermenters. Efficiency of microbial nitrogen production from DM, OM, or carbohydrate was significantly increased by B

  13. Long-term dinoflagellate culture performance in a commercial photobioreactor: Amphidinium carterae case.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Grünewald, C; Bayliss, C; Fonlut, F; Chapuli, E

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the culture performance of a dinoflagellate in a commercial photobioreactor. The results obtained during this long-term experiment allow to confirm that Amphidinium carterae is a promising dinoflagellate that can be exploited successfully in closed systems, in semi-continuous mode in indoor and outdoor environments. The average results in an indoor 5cm light-path 320L photobioreactor were, in terms of specific growth rate (0.29d(-1)), duplication time (3.1d(-1)) and dry biomass productivity (78mgL(-1)d(-1)). Specific compounds production was found including ω3 and ω6 fatty acids and, pigments (Peridinin, β-carotene). These promising results, besides unique characteristics found during the exploitation period such as resistance to mechanical stress, self-control of contaminant organisms, and quick cells aggregation when the culture is not in turbulence conditions, makes A. carterae one of the new target species suitable for commercially exploitation on an industrial scale. PMID:27395001

  14. Impact of operating history on mixed culture fermentation microbial ecology and product mixture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Slater, F R; Mohd-Zaki, Z; Pratt, S; Batstone, D J

    2011-01-01

    Mixed culture fermentation is an alternative to pure culture fermentation for production of biofuels and valuable products. A glucose-fed, continuous reactor was operated cyclically to a central pH of 5.5 from a number of precedent pHs, from 4.5 to 7.5. At each pH, stable chemical production was reached after 2 retention times and was held for least 2 further retention times prior to the next change. Bacterial groups were identified by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene clones. Bacterial community dynamics were monitored by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. More ethanol was produced at high pH, and more butyrate at lower pH. At pH 5.5, the product spectrum was not measurably influenced by precedent pH but showed seemingly random changes. The impact of precedent pH on community structure was more systematic, with clear indications that when the pH was returned to 5.5, the bacterial group that was dominant at the precedent pH remained at high abundance. This result is important, since it indicates a decoupling between microbial function (as indicated by product spectrum), and community structure. More work is needed to determine the longevity of this hysteresis effect. There was evidence that groups retained their ability to re-emerge even after times of low abundance. PMID:22097058

  15. Transient concentrations of NaCl affect the PHA accumulation in mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro-Sánchez, T; Fra-Vázquez, A; Rey-Martínez, N; Campos, J L; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2016-04-01

    The present study explores the feasibility of the accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under the presence of transient concentrations of added sodium chloride, by means of a mixed microbial culture (MMC). This culture was enriched on a mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) containing 0.8g Na(+)/L as NaOH. This MMC presented a maximum PHA accumulation capacity of 53wt% with 27Cmol% HV. Accumulation experiments performed with added NaCl at concentrations of 7, 13 and 20g/L shown that this salt provoked a decrease of the biomass PHA production rate, with an IC50 value close to 7gNaCl/L. The accumulated PHA was lower than the corresponding value of the assay without the addition of salt. Furthermore, the composition of the biopolymer, in terms of HB:HV ratio, changed from 2.71 to 6.37Cmol/Cmol, which means a HV decrease between 27 and 14Cmol%. Summarizing, the PHA accumulation by a MMC non-adapted to saline conditions affected the polymer composition and lead to lower production yields and rates than in absence of added NaCl. PMID:26780589

  16. Microbial diversity in an Armenian geothermal spring assessed by molecular and culture-based methods.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Hovik; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2014-11-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the prokaryotic community thriving in the Arzakan hot spring in Armenia was studied using molecular and culture-based methods. A sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries demonstrated the presence of a diversity of microorganisms belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes phyla, and Cyanobacteria. Proteobacteria was the dominant group, representing 52% of the bacterial clones. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments also indicated the abundance of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Cyanobacteria populations. Most of the sequences were most closely related to uncultivated microorganisms and shared less than 96% similarity with their closest matches in GenBank, indicating that this spring harbors a unique community of novel microbial species or genera. The majority of the sequences of an archaeal 16S rRNA gene library, generated from a methanogenic enrichment, were close relatives of members of the genus Methanoculleus. Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria mainly belonging to Bacillus and Geobacillus were detected only by culture-dependent methods. Three isolates were successfully obtained having 99, 96, and 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to Arcobacter sp., Methylocaldum sp., and Methanoculleus sp., respectively. PMID:24740751

  17. Harnessing the landscape of microbial culture media to predict new organism-media pairings.

    PubMed

    Oberhardt, Matthew A; Zarecki, Raphy; Gronow, Sabine; Lang, Elke; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Culturing microorganisms is a critical step in understanding and utilizing microbial life. Here we map the landscape of existing culture media by extracting natural-language media recipes into a Known Media Database (KOMODO), which includes >18,000 strain-media combinations, >3300 media variants and compound concentrations (the entire collection of the Leibniz Institute DSMZ repository). Using KOMODO, we show that although media are usually tuned for individual strains using biologically common salts, trace metals and vitamins/cofactors are the most differentiating components between defined media of strains within a genus. We leverage KOMODO to predict new organism-media pairings using a transitivity property (74% growth in new in vitro experiments) and a phylogeny-based collaborative filtering tool (83% growth in new in vitro experiments and stronger growth on predicted well-scored versus poorly scored media). These resources are integrated into a web-based platform that predicts media given an organism's 16S rDNA sequence, facilitating future cultivation efforts. PMID:26460590

  18. Harnessing the landscape of microbial culture media to predict new organism–media pairings

    PubMed Central

    Oberhardt, Matthew A.; Zarecki, Raphy; Gronow, Sabine; Lang, Elke; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Culturing microorganisms is a critical step in understanding and utilizing microbial life. Here we map the landscape of existing culture media by extracting natural-language media recipes into a Known Media Database (KOMODO), which includes >18,000 strain–media combinations, >3300 media variants and compound concentrations (the entire collection of the Leibniz Institute DSMZ repository). Using KOMODO, we show that although media are usually tuned for individual strains using biologically common salts, trace metals and vitamins/cofactors are the most differentiating components between defined media of strains within a genus. We leverage KOMODO to predict new organism–media pairings using a transitivity property (74% growth in new in vitro experiments) and a phylogeny-based collaborative filtering tool (83% growth in new in vitro experiments and stronger growth on predicted well-scored versus poorly scored media). These resources are integrated into a web-based platform that predicts media given an organism's 16S rDNA sequence, facilitating future cultivation efforts. PMID:26460590

  19. Towards generation of bioactive peptides from meat industry waste proteins: Generation of peptides using commercial microbial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Kate; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; McConnell, Michelle; Carne, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Five commercially available food-grade microbial protease preparations were evaluated for their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts to produce bioactive peptides. A bacterial-derived protease (HT) extensively hydrolysed both meat protein extracts, producing peptide hydrolysates with significant in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. The hydrolysates retained bioactivity after simulated gastrointestinal hydrolysis challenge. Gel permeation chromatography sub-fractionation of the crude protein hydrolysates showed that the smaller peptide fractions exhibited the highest antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. OFFGEL electrophoresis of the small peptides of both hydrolysates showed that low isoelectric point peptides had antioxidant activity; however, no consistent relationship was observed between isoelectric point and ACE inhibition. Cell-based assays indicated that the hydrolysates present no significant cytotoxicity towards Vero cells. The results indicate that HT protease hydrolysis of meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts produces bioactive peptides that are non-cytotoxic, should be stable in the gastrointestinal tract and may contain novel bioactive peptide sequences. PMID:27132822

  20. Skew-Laplace and Cell-Size Distribution in Microbial Axenic Cultures: Statistical Assessment and Biological Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Julià, Olga; Vidal-Mas, Jaume; Panikov, Nicolai S.; Vives-Rego, Josep

    2010-01-01

    We report a skew-Laplace statistical analysis of both flow cytometry scatters and cell size from microbial strains primarily grown in batch cultures, others in chemostat cultures and bacterial aquatic populations. Cytometry scatters best fit the skew-Laplace distribution while cell size as assessed by an electronic particle analyzer exhibited a moderate fitting. Unlike the cultures, the aquatic bacterial communities clearly do not fit to a skew-Laplace distribution. Due to its versatile nature, the skew-Laplace distribution approach offers an easy, efficient, and powerful tool for distribution of frequency analysis in tandem with the flow cytometric cell sorting. PMID:20592754

  1. Skew-laplace and cell-size distribution in microbial axenic cultures: statistical assessment and biological interpretation.

    PubMed

    Julià, Olga; Vidal-Mas, Jaume; Panikov, Nicolai S; Vives-Rego, Josep

    2010-01-01

    We report a skew-Laplace statistical analysis of both flow cytometry scatters and cell size from microbial strains primarily grown in batch cultures, others in chemostat cultures and bacterial aquatic populations. Cytometry scatters best fit the skew-Laplace distribution while cell size as assessed by an electronic particle analyzer exhibited a moderate fitting. Unlike the cultures, the aquatic bacterial communities clearly do not fit to a skew-Laplace distribution. Due to its versatile nature, the skew-Laplace distribution approach offers an easy, efficient, and powerful tool for distribution of frequency analysis in tandem with the flow cytometric cell sorting. PMID:20592754

  2. Microbial β-glucosidases from cow rumen metagenome enhance the saccharification of lignocellulose in combination with commercial cellulase cocktail

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A complete saccharification of plant polymers is the critical step in the efficient production of bio-alcohols. Beta-glucosidases acting in the degradation of intermediate gluco-oligosaccharides produced by cellulases limit the yield of the final product. Results In the present work, we have identified and then successfully cloned, expressed, purified and characterised 4 highly active beta-glucosidases from fibre-adherent microbial community from the cow rumen. The enzymes were most active at temperatures 45–55°C and pH 4.0-7.0 and exhibited high affinity and activity towards synthetic substrates such as p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (pNPbetaG) and pNP-beta-cellobiose, as well as to natural cello-oligosaccharides ranging from cellobiose to cellopentaose. The apparent capability of the most active beta-glucosidase, herein named LAB25g2, was tested for its ability to improve, at low dosage (31.25 units g-1 dry biomass, using pNPbetaG as substrate), the hydrolysis of pre-treated corn stover (dry matter content of 20%; 350 g glucan kg-1 dry biomass) in combination with a beta-glucosidase-deficient commercial Trichoderma reseei cellulase cocktail (5 units g-1 dry biomass in the basis of pNPbetaG). LAB25g2 increased the final hydrolysis yield by a factor of 20% (44.5 ± 1.7% vs. 34.5 ± 1.5% in control conditions) after 96–120 h as compared to control reactions in its absence or in the presence of other commercial beta-glucosidase preparations. The high stability (half-life higher than 5 days at 50°C and pH 5.2) and 2–38000 fold higher (as compared with reported beta-glucosidases) activity towards cello-oligosaccharides may account for its performance in supplementation assays. Conclusions The results suggest that beta-glucosidases from yet uncultured bacteria from animal digestomes may be of a potential interest for biotechnological processes related to the effective bio-ethanol production in combination with low dosage of commercial cellulases

  3. Molybdenum limitation of microbial nitrogen assimilation in aquatic ecosystems and pure cultures

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Jennifer B.; Axler, Richard P.; Chandra, Sudeep; Goldman, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential micronutrient for biological assimilation of nitrogen gas and nitrate because it is present in the cofactors of nitrogenase and nitrate reductase enzymes. Although Mo is the most abundant transition metal in seawater (107 nM), it is present in low concentrations in most freshwaters, typically <20 nM. In 1960, it was discovered that primary productivity was limited by Mo scarcity (2–4 nM) in Castle Lake, a small, meso-oligotrophic lake in northern California. Follow up studies demonstrated that Mo also limited primary productivity in lakes in New Zealand, Alaska, and the Sierra Nevada. Research in the 1970s and 1980s showed that Mo limited primary productivity and nitrate uptake in Castle Lake only during periods of the growing season when nitrate concentrations were relatively high because ammonium assimilation does not require Mo. In the years since, research has shifted to investigate whether Mo limitation also occurs in marine and soil environments. Here we review studies of Mo limitation of nitrogen assimilation in natural microbial communities and pure cultures. We also summarize new data showing that the simultaneous addition of Mo and nitrate causes increased activity of proteins involved in nitrogen assimilation in the hypolimnion of Castle Lake when ammonium is scarce. Furthermore, we suggest that meter-scale Mo and oxygen depth profiles from Castle Lake are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in freshwater periphyton communities have higher Mo requirements than other microbial communities. Finally, we present topics for future research related to Mo bioavailability through time and with changing oxidation state. PMID:22993512

  4. Molybdenum limitation of microbial nitrogen assimilation in aquatic ecosystems and pure cultures.

    PubMed

    Glass, Jennifer B; Axler, Richard P; Chandra, Sudeep; Goldman, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential micronutrient for biological assimilation of nitrogen gas and nitrate because it is present in the cofactors of nitrogenase and nitrate reductase enzymes. Although Mo is the most abundant transition metal in seawater (107 nM), it is present in low concentrations in most freshwaters, typically <20 nM. In 1960, it was discovered that primary productivity was limited by Mo scarcity (2-4 nM) in Castle Lake, a small, meso-oligotrophic lake in northern California. Follow up studies demonstrated that Mo also limited primary productivity in lakes in New Zealand, Alaska, and the Sierra Nevada. Research in the 1970s and 1980s showed that Mo limited primary productivity and nitrate uptake in Castle Lake only during periods of the growing season when nitrate concentrations were relatively high because ammonium assimilation does not require Mo. In the years since, research has shifted to investigate whether Mo limitation also occurs in marine and soil environments. Here we review studies of Mo limitation of nitrogen assimilation in natural microbial communities and pure cultures. We also summarize new data showing that the simultaneous addition of Mo and nitrate causes increased activity of proteins involved in nitrogen assimilation in the hypolimnion of Castle Lake when ammonium is scarce. Furthermore, we suggest that meter-scale Mo and oxygen depth profiles from Castle Lake are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in freshwater periphyton communities have higher Mo requirements than other microbial communities. Finally, we present topics for future research related to Mo bioavailability through time and with changing oxidation state. PMID:22993512

  5. Chronic impact of tetracycline on nitrification kinetics and the activity of enriched nitrifying microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Merlin, Christophe; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Ubay-Cokgor, Emine; Orhon, Derin

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the chronic impact of tetracycline on biomass with enriched nitrifying community sustained in a lab-scale activated sludge system. For this purpose, a fill and draw reactor fed with 100 mg COD/L of peptone mixture and 50 mg N/L of ammonia was sustained at a sludge age of 15 days. At steady-state, the reactor operation was continued with a daily tetracycline dosing of 50 mg/L for more than 40 days, with periodic monitoring of the microbial composition, the nitrifying bacteria abundance, as well as the amoA and 16S rRNA gene activity, using molecular techniques. Changes in the kinetics of nitrification were quantified by modelling concentration profiles of major nitrogen fractions and oxygen uptake rate profiles derived from parallel batch experiments. Activated sludge modeling results indicated inhibitory impact of tetracycline on the growth of nitrifiers with a significant increase of the half saturation coefficients in corresponding rate equations. Tetracycline also inactivated biomass components of the enriched culture at a gradually increasing rate with time of exposure, leading to total collapse of nitrification. Molecular analyses revealed significant changes in the composition of the microbial community throughout the observation period. They also showed that continuous exposure to tetracycline inflicted significant reduction in amoA mRNA and 16S rRNA levels directly affecting nitrification. The chronic impact was much more pronounced on the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community. These observations explained the basis of numerical changes identified in the growth kinetics of nitrifiers under stress conditions. PMID:25616640

  6. Studying Microbial Mat Functioning Amidst "Unexpected Diversity": Methodological Approaches and Initial Results from Metatranscriptomes of Mats Over Diel cycles, iTags from Long Term Manipulations, and Biogeochemical Cycling in Simplified Microbial Mats Constructed from Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Lee, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial mats are famously amongst the most diverse microbial ecosystems on Earth, inhabiting some of the most inclement environments known, including hypersaline, dry, hot, cold, nutrient poor, and high UV environments. The high microbial diversity of microbial mats makes studies of microbial ecology notably difficult. To address this challenge, we have been using a combination of metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, iTags and culture-based simplified microbial mats to study biogeochemical cycling (H2 production, N2 fixation, and fermentation) in microbial mats collected from Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, California. Metatranscriptomes of microbial mats incubated over a diel cycle have revealed that a number of gene systems activate only during the day in Cyanobacteria, while the remaining appear to be constitutive. The dominant cyanobacterium in the mat (Microcoleus chthonoplastes) expresses several pathways for nitrogen scavenging undocumented in cultured strains, as well as the expression of two starch storage and utilization cycles. Community composition shifts in response to long term manipulations of mats were assessed using iTags. Changes in community diversity were observed as hydrogen fluxes increased in response to a lowering of sulfate concentrations. To produce simplified microbial mats, we have isolated members of 13 of the 15 top taxa from our iTag libraries into culture. Simplified microbial mats and simple co-cultures and consortia constructed from these isolates reproduce many of the natural patterns of biogeochemical cycling in the parent natural microbial mats, but against a background of far lower overall diversity, simplifying studies of changes in gene expression (over the short term), interactions between community members, and community composition changes (over the longer term), in response to environmental forcing.

  7. Temperature effects on microbial respiration assessed with CO2-exchange and continuous culture techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, C.; Min, K.; Song, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent work attempts to incorporate requirements of soil microorganisms for carbon and other resources, and how these requirements may respond to temperature, into theoretical concepts of soil organic matter decomposition and climate change. Because of the difficulties of measuring resource fluxes in natural soils, empirical data to guide these concepts remain scarce. Here, we present an experimental system that combines continuous culture techniques with CO2 measurements to study carbon fluxes through microbes in a reductionist, controlled environment amenable to experimental manipulation. In this pilot study, we quantified mass specific respiration rates (MSR) and δ13C of respired CO2 of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a Gram-negative bacterium common to soils, grown at 15°C and 25°C with otherwise identical environmental conditions. The microbes were grown in a 1.9 L bioreactor, in 0.9 L of nutrient medium with C:N:P atomic ratios of 100:10:3, and with 10 mM cellobiose as the carbon source. A peristaltic pump continuously supplied the bioreactor with sterile medium, and removed medium from the bioreactor, at a rate of 63 mL h-1. Both vessels were contained within a temperature incubator, and stir bars provided continuously well mixed volumes. CO2-free air was continuously bubbled through the reactor medium so to provide the microbes with O2; a cavity ring down spectrometer withdrew reactor headspace air and measured concentration and δ13C of the CO2. Air supply was regulated with a pressure/mass flow controller to approx. 27 mL min-1. In both temperature regimes, the pH of the bioreactor as well as concentration and δ13C of the CO2 in the head space air were constant over the course of 1 d, such that any imbalances in the CO2-H2CO3 equilibrium were considered negligible in the assessment of microbial respiration rates and the δ13C of respired CO2. After this time period, reactor medium was passed through a 0.22 μm filter and the filtrate dried for 24 h to obtain

  8. Biocrude production by activated sludge microbial cultures using pulp and paper wastewaters as fermentation substrate.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Kamal Lamichhane; Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; Green, Magan; McFarland, Linda; Holmes, William

    2013-01-01

    Municipal wastewater activated sludge contains a mixed microbial community, which can be manipulated to produce biocrude, a lipid feedstock for biodiesel production. In this study, the potential of biocrude production by activated sludge microorganisms grown in three different types of pulp and paper mill wastewaters was investigated. A 20% (v/v) activated sludge was inoculated into pulp and paper wastewater, supplemented with glucose (60 g/L) and nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) to obtain a high carbon to nitrogen ratio (70:1). The culture was incubated aerobically for seven days. The results showed that the activated sludge microorganisms were able to grow and accumulate lipids when cultivated in amended wastewaters. Microorganisms growing in anaerobic settling pond effluent water showed the highest lipid accumulation of up to 40.6% cell dry weight (CDW) after five days of cultivation compared with pulp wash wastewater (PuWW) (11.7% CDW) and mixed wastewater (MWW) (8.2% CDW) after seven days of cultivation. The lipids mostly contained C16-C18 fatty acids groups with oleic acid and palmitic acid being the dominant fatty acids. The maximum biodiesel yield was about 6-8% CDW for all the wastewaters. The results showed the potential of utilizing pulp and paper mill effluents and other waste streams, such as activated sludge for the sustainable production of lipids for biofuel production. PMID:24350471

  9. Characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesized from microbial mixed cultures and of their nanobiocomposites with bacterial cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Marta; Villano, Marianna; Oliveira, Catarina; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Majone, Mauro; Reis, Maria; Lopez-Rubio, Amparo; Lagaron, Jose M

    2014-06-25

    The present work reports on the production and characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with different valerate contents, which were synthesized from microbial mixed cultures, and the subsequent development of nanocomposites incorporating bacterial cellulose nanowhiskers (BCNW) via solution casting processing. The characterization of the pure biopolyesters showed that the properties of PHAs may be strongly modified by varying the valerate ratio in the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) copolymer, as expected. Increasing the valerate content was seen to greatly decrease the melting temperature and enthalpy of the material, as well as its rigidity and stiffness, resulting in a more ductile behaviour. Additionally, the higher valerate PHA displayed higher permeability to water and oxygen and higher moisture sensitivity. Subsequently, BCNW were incorporated into both PHA grades, achieving a high level of dispersion for a 1 wt.-% loading, whereas some agglomeration took place for 3 wt.-% BCNW. As evidenced by DSC analyses, BCNW presented a nucleating effect on the PHA matrices. BCNW also increased the thermal stability of the polymeric matrices when properly dispersed due to strong matrix-filler interactions. Barrier properties were seen to depend on relative humidity and improved at low nanofiller loadings and low relative humidity. PMID:23827196

  10. Dynamic metabolic modelling of volatile fatty acids conversion to polyhydroxyalkanoates by a mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Pardelha, Filipa; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Reis, Maria A M; Oliveira, Rui; Dias, João M L

    2014-06-25

    In this work, we present a dynamic metabolic model that describes the uptake of complex mixtures of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and respective conversion into PHA by mixed microbial cultures (MMC). This model builds upon a previously published flux balance analysis model [1] that identified the minimization of TCA cycle activity as the key metabolic objective to predict PHA storage fluxes and respective composition. The model was calibrated either with experimental data of PHA production from fermented sugar cane molasses or from synthetic mixtures of VFA. All PHA production experiments were performed using a MMC selected with fermented sugar cane molasses under feast and famine regimen. The model was able to capture the process dynamics denoted by an excellent fit between experimental and computed time profiles of concentrations with the regression coefficients always above 0.92. The introduced VFA uptake regulatory factor reflects the decrease of acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA available to TCA cycle in conformity with the hypothesis that the minimization of TCA cycle is a key metabolic objective for MMC subjected to feast and famine regimen for the maximization of PHA production. PMID:23933561

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production from fermented cheese whey by using a mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bianca; Pepè Sciarria, Tommy; Reis, Maria; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Two fermented cheese wheys (FCW), FCW1 composed of lactic, acetic and butyric acids in the proportion of 58/16/26 (% CODOrganic Acid (OA)) and FCW2 composed of acetic, propionic, butyric, lactic and valeric acids in the proportion of 58/19/13/6/4 (% CODOA) were used to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by using a pre-selected mixed microbial culture (MMC). PHA accumulation gave for fermented FCW1 a PHA yield (Ytot) of 0.24±0.02mgCODPHAmgCODSolubleSubstrate(SS)(-1) and a total PHA production, referred to the substrate used, of 60gPHAkgcheesewheyTotalSolids(TS)(-1). For fermented FCW2 results were: PHA yield (Ytot) of 0.42±0.03mgCODPHAmgCODSS(-1) and PHA from a substrate of 70gPHAkgcheesewheyTS(-1). Qualitatively, PHAs from FCW1 was made up exclusively of 3-hydroxybutyrate (HB), while those obtained from FCW2 were composed of 40% of 3-hydroxyvalerate (HV) and 60% of HB. PMID:27420156

  12. Analysis of microbial community variation during the mixed culture fermentation of agricultural peel wastes to produce lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Gerritsen, Alida T; McDonald, Armando G

    2016-05-01

    Mixed cultures fermentation can be used to convert organic wastes into various chemicals and fuels. This study examined the fermentation performance of four batch reactors fed with different agricultural (orange, banana, and potato (mechanical and steam)) peel wastes using mixed cultures, and monitored the interval variation of reactor microbial communities with 16S rRNA genes using Illumina sequencing. All four reactors produced similar chemical profile with lactic acid (LA) as dominant compound. Acetic acid and ethanol were also observed with small fractions. The Illumina sequencing results revealed the diversity of microbial community decreased during fermentation and a community of largely lactic acid producing bacteria dominated by species of Lactobacillus developed. PMID:26913642

  13. How commercial and ``violent'' video games can promote culturally sensitive science learning: some questions and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwah, Helen

    2012-12-01

    In their paper, Muñoz and El-Hani propose to bring video games into science classrooms to promote culturally sensitive ethics and citizenship education. Instead of bringing "educational" games, Muñoz and El-Hani take a more creative route and include games such as Fallout 3® precisely because they are popular and they reproduce ideological and violent representations of gender, race, class, nationality, science and technology. However, there are many questions that arise in bringing these commercial video games into science classrooms, including the questions of how students' capacities for critical reflection can be facilitated, whether traditional science teachers can take on the role of using such games in their classrooms, and which video games would be most appropriate to use. In this response, I raise these questions and consider some of the challenges in order to further the possibility of implementing Muñoz and El-Hani's creative proposal for generating culturally sensitive science classrooms.

  14. Aeration remediation of a polluted waterway increases near-surface coarse and culturable microbial aerosols.

    PubMed

    Dueker, M Elias; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2014-04-15

    Aeration remediation is currently used in polluted urban waterways to increase oxygen levels in the water column. Recent studies have provided increasing evidence that the bursting of bubbles at water surfaces introduced by aeration, or other surface disturbances, can transfer viable bacteria to the air. In heavily sewage-polluted waterways these water-originated bacterial aerosols may pose as a health risk to recreators in small boats or residents inhabiting the shoreline. Nonetheless, few studies have explored aerosols above active aeration remediation projects in waterways or investigated how bacterial aerosols change with vertical distance from aeration activities. This study, conducted at the Newtown Creek superfund site in Brooklyn, NY, USA, measured coarse aerosol particles and culturable bacteria in near-surface air above waters undergoing aeration remediation. Regardless of aeration operation culturable bacterial fallout was greater near-surface (0.6m above water) than previously-reported measurements made at 2.5m. Molecular analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences from isolated bacteria demonstrates that water and air shared a large number of bacterial genera and that the genera present in the near-surface aerosols (0.6m) contained water-associated Vibrio and Caulobacter, which were not present at 2.5m, despite the smaller sequence library size from the near-surface. Also, the near-surface microbial assemblage had significantly greater association with sequences detected previously in aquatic environments compared to the 2.5m library. We found compelling evidence that aeration activity contributed to this vertical gradient in bacterial aerosol concentrations and identity. Similar to results from 2.5m, concentrations of near-surface respirable coarse aerosols (<10 um) increased significantly when aeration was occurring. Culturable bacterial aerosol fallout was also greater near-surface when the aerator was on compared to simultaneous measurements made at 2

  15. [Investigation and culture of microbial contaminants of Caulerpa lentillifera (Sea Grape)].

    PubMed

    Kudaka, Jun; Itokazu, Kiyomasa; Taira, Katsuya; Nidaira, Minoru; Okano, Sho; Nakamura, Masaji; Iwanaga, Setsuko; Tominaga, Masaya; Ohno, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Caulerpa lentillifera is a kind of edible seaweed, known as 'sea grape' or 'green caviar'. It is used in fresh salads. However, it is sensitive to low temperature and osmotic pressure, and is easily spoilt by storage in a refrigerator or washing with tap water. That is the reason why it is difficult to prevent food poisoning, especially due to Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In this study we investigated of marine bacteria and V. parahaemolyticus in C. lentillifera and cultured them in order to develop effective control of bacteria in commercial farms. The sixteen farms in the Okinawa Islands were investigated from August to September in 2006. A total of 176 samples were collected from eleven points during the cultivation processes and from the products. About 10(3) cfu/mL of marine bacteria were detected in the seawater used in the tank culture, but after cultivation of C. lentillifera the number had increased to about 10(6) cfu/mL. The number of marine bacteria in C. lentillifera did not change significantly through the process of planting to the final product (about 10(7) cfu/g). V. parahaemolyticus was detected in seawater from all processes and C. lentillifera was isolated from 56% of seawater, 25% of seed-stocks, and 18.8% of product samples, though but thermostable direct hemolysin gene was not detected from enrichment cultures or isolated V. parahaemolyticus strains. These results indicate that for prevention of food poisoning by V. parahaemolyticus in C. lentillifera, it is important to establish a suitable sterilization procedure for each process. PMID:18344653

  16. Benchmarking of commercially available CHO cell culture media for antibody production.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, David; Damjanovic, Lukas; Kaisermayer, Christian; Kunert, Renate

    2015-06-01

    In this study, eight commercially available, chemically defined Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture media from different vendors were evaluated in batch culture using an IgG-producing CHO DG44 cell line as a model. Medium adaptation revealed that the occurrence of even small aggregates might be a good indicator of cell growth performance in subsequent high cell density cultures. Batch experiments confirmed that the culture medium has a significant impact on bioprocess performance, but high amino acid concentrations alone were not sufficient to ensure superior cell growth and high antibody production. However, some key amino acids that were limiting in most media could be identified. Unbalanced glucose and amino acids led to high cell-specific lactate and ammonium production rates. In some media, persistently high glucose concentrations probably induced the suppression of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation, known as Crabtree effect, which resulted in high cell-specific glycolysis rates along with a continuous and high lactate production. In additional experiments, two of the eight basal media were supplemented with feeds from two different manufacturers in six combinations, in order to understand the combined impact of media and feeds on cell metabolism in a CHO fed-batch process. Cell growth, nutrient consumption and metabolite production rates, antibody production, and IgG quality were evaluated in detail. Concentrated feed supplements boosted cell concentrations almost threefold and antibody titers up to sevenfold. Depending on the fed-batch strategy, fourfold higher peak cell concentrations and eightfold increased IgG titers (up to 5.8 g/L) were achieved. The glycolytic flux was remarkably similar among the fed-batches; however, substantially different specific lactate production rates were observed in the different media and feed combinations. Further analysis revealed that in addition to the feed additives, the basal medium can make a considerable

  17. Teaching the Microbial Growth Curve Concept Using Microalgal Cultures and Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forget, Nathalie; Belzile, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Nozais, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The microbial growth curve is widely studied within microbiology classes and bacteria are usually the microbial model used. Here, we describe a novel laboratory protocol involving flow cytometry to assess the growth dynamics of the unicellular microalgae "Isochrysis galbana." The algal model represents an appropriate alternative to bacteria…

  18. Furry pet allergens, fungal DNA and microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) in the commercial aircraft cabin environment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xi; Lindgren, Torsten; Guo, Moran; Cai, Gui-Hong; Lundgren, Håkan; Norbäck, Dan

    2013-06-01

    There has been concern about the cabin environment in commercial aircraft. We measured cat, dog and horse allergens and fungal DNA in cabin dust and microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) in cabin air. Samples were collected from two European airline companies, one with cabins having textile seats (TSC) and the other with cabins having leather seats (LSC), 9 airplanes from each company. Dust was vacuumed from seats and floors in the flight deck and different parts of the cabin. Cat (Fel d1), dog (Can f1) and horse allergens (Equ cx) were analyzed by ELISA. Five sequences of fungal DNA were analyzed by quantitative PCR. MVOCs were sampled on charcoal tubes in 42 TSC flights, and 17 compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selective ion monitoring (SIM). MVOC levels were compared with levels in homes from Nordic countries. The weight of dust was 1.8 times larger in TSC cabins as compared to LSC cabins (p < 0.001). In cabins with textile seats, the geometric mean (GM) concentrations of Fel d1, Can f1 and Equ cx were 5359 ng g(-1), 6067 ng g(-1), and 13 703 ng g(-1) (GM) respectively. Levels of Fel d1, Can f1 and Equ cx were 50 times, 27 times and 75 times higher respectively, in TSC cabins as compared to LSC cabins (p < 0.001). GM levels of Aspergillus/Penicillium DNA, Aspergillus versicolor DNA, Stachybotrys chartarum DNA and Streptomyces DNA were all higher in TSC as compared to LSC (p < 0.05). The sum of MVOCs in cabin air (excluding butanols) was 3192 ng m(-3) (GM), 3.7 times higher than in homes (p < 0.001) and 2-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol concentrations were 15-17 times higher as compared to homes (p < 0.001). Concentrations of isobutanol, 1-butanol, dimethyldisulfide, 2-hexanone, 2-heptanone, 3-octanone, isobutyl acetate and ethyl-2-methylbutyrate were lower in cabin air as compared to homes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, textile seats are much more contaminated by pet allergens and fungal DNA than leather

  19. Rapid Culture-Independent Microbial Analysis Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Monaco, Lisa; Morris, Heather; Gunter, Daniel; Damon, Michael; Wells, Mark

    2009-10-01

    A new culture-independent system for microbial monitoring, called the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). LOCAD-PTS was launched to the ISS aboard Space Shuttle STS-116 on December 9, 2006, and has since been used by ISS crews to monitor endotoxin on cabin surfaces. Quantitative analysis was performed within 15 minutes, and sample return to Earth was not required. Endotoxin (a marker of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi) was distributed throughout the ISS, despite previous indications that most bacteria on ISS surfaces were Gram-positive. Endotoxin was detected at 24 out of 42 surface areas tested and at every surface site where colony-forming units (cfu) were observed, even at levels of 4-120 bacterial cfu per 100 cm2, which is below NASA in-flight requirements (<10,000 bacterial cfu per 100 cm2). Absent to low levels of endotoxin (<0.24 to 1.0 EU per 100 cm2; defined in endotoxin units, or EU) were found on 31 surface areas, including on most panels in Node 1 and the US Lab. High to moderate levels (1.01 to 14.7 EU per 100 cm2) were found on 11 surface areas, including at exercise, hygiene, sleeping, and dining facilities. Endotoxin was absent from airlock surfaces, except the Extravehicular Hatch Handle (>3.78 EU per 100 cm2). Based upon data collected from the ISS so far, new culture-independent requirements (defined in EU) are suggested, which are verifiable in flight with LOCAD-PTS yet high enough to avoid false alarms. The suggested requirements are intended to supplement current ISS requirements (defined in cfu) and would serve a dual purpose of safeguarding crew health (internal spacecraft surfaces <20 EU per 100 cm2) and monitoring forward contamination during Constellation missions (surfaces periodically exposed to the external environment, including the airlock and space suits, <0.24 EU per 100 cm2).

  20. Effects of dietary changes and yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on rumen microbial fermentation of Holstein heifers.

    PubMed

    Moya, D; Calsamiglia, S; Ferret, A; Blanch, M; Fandiño, J I; Castillejos, L; Yoon, I

    2009-09-01

    The effects of a dietary challenge to induce digestive upsets and supplementation with yeast culture on rumen microbial fermentation were studied using 12 Holstein heifers (277 +/- 28 kg of BW) fitted with a ruminal cannula, in a crossover design with 2 periods of 5 wk. In each period, after 3 wk of adaptation to a 100% forage diet, the dietary challenge consisted of increasing the amount of grain at a rate of 2.5 kg/d (as-fed basis) over a period of 4 d, until a 10:90 forage:concentrate diet was reached, and then it was maintained for 10 d. Between periods, animals were fed again the 100% forage diet without any treatment for 1 wk as a wash-out period. Treatments started the first day of each period, and they were a control diet (CL) or the same diet with addition of yeast culture (YC, Diamond V XPCLS). Digestive upsets were determined by visual observation of bloat or by a reduction in feed intake (as-fed basis) of 50% or more compared with intake on the previous day. Feed intake was determined daily at 24-h intervals during the adaptation period and daily at 2, 6, and 12 h postfeeding during the dietary challenge. Ruminal liquid samples were collected daily during the dietary challenge to determine ruminal pH at 0, 3, 6, and 12 h postfeeding, and total and individual VFA, lactic acid, ammonia-N, and rumen fluid viscosity at 0 and 6 h postfeeding. The 16s rRNA gene copies of Streptococcus bovis and Megasphaera elsdenii were determined by quantitative PCR. Foam height and strength of the rumen fluid were also determined the day after the digestive upset to evaluate potential foam production. A total of 20 cases (83.3%) of digestive upsets were recorded in both periods during the dietary challenge, all diagnosed due to a reduction in feed intake. Rumen fermentation profile at 0 h on the digestive upset day was characterized by low ruminal pH, which remained under 6.0 for 18 h, accompanied by elevated total VFA concentration and, in some cases, by elevated lactate

  1. Systematic comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial Melissa officinalis samples.

    PubMed

    Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Sousa, Maria João; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-06-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) infusions are used worldwide for digestive, analgesic and other pharmaceutical applications. Herein, the nutraceuticals production and antioxidant potential in garden cultivated, in vitro cultured and two commercial samples (bags and granulated) of lemon balm was compared. The profile of in vitro cultured lemon balm is closer of garden cultivated sample than of both commercial samples (bag or granulate). It presented the highest levels of proteins and ash, and the lowest energetic value. The most favorable n6/n3 ration, as also the highest PUFA (mostly α-linolenic acid), tocopherols (including α-, γ- and δ-isoforms) and ascorbic acid contents were also observed in this sample. Nevertheless, it was the commercial bag lemon balm that gave the highest antioxidant activity and the highest levels of phenolics and flavonoids. As far as we kwon, this is the first comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial lemon balm samples. Moreover, it proved that in vitro culture might be used to stimulate vitamins production. PMID:22445737

  2. Microbial diversity analysis of fermented mung beans (Lu-Doh-Huang) by using pyrosequencing and culture methods.

    PubMed

    Chao, Shiou-Huei; Huang, Hui-Yu; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung; Yang, Chih-Hsien; Cheng, Wei-Shen; Kang, Ya-Huei; Watanabe, Koichi; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    In Taiwanese alternative medicine Lu-doh-huang (also called Pracparatum mungo), mung beans are mixed with various herbal medicines and undergo a 4-stage process of anaerobic fermentation. Here we used high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to profile the bacterial community structure of Lu-doh-huang samples. Pyrosequencing of samples obtained at 7 points during fermentation revealed 9 phyla, 264 genera, and 586 species of bacteria. While mung beans were inside bamboo sections (stages 1 and 2 of the fermentation process), family Lactobacillaceae and genus Lactobacillus emerged in highest abundance; Lactobacillus plantarum was broadly distributed among these samples. During stage 3, the bacterial distribution shifted to family Porphyromonadaceae, and Butyricimonas virosa became the predominant microbial component. Thereafter, bacterial counts decreased dramatically, and organisms were too few to be detected during stage 4. In addition, the microbial compositions of the liquids used for soaking bamboo sections were dramatically different: Exiguobacterium mexicanum predominated in the fermented soybean solution whereas B. virosa was predominant in running spring water. Furthermore, our results from pyrosequencing paralleled those we obtained by using the traditional culture method, which targets lactic acid bacteria. In conclusion, the microbial communities during Lu-doh-huang fermentation were markedly diverse, and pyrosequencing revealed a complete picture of the microbial consortium. PMID:23700436

  3. Microbial Diversity Analysis of Fermented Mung Beans (Lu-Doh-Huang) by Using Pyrosequencing and Culture Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shiou-Huei; Huang, Hui-Yu; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung; Yang, Chih-Hsien; Cheng, Wei-Shen; Kang, Ya-Huei; Watanabe, Koichi; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    In Taiwanese alternative medicine Lu-doh-huang (also called Pracparatum mungo), mung beans are mixed with various herbal medicines and undergo a 4-stage process of anaerobic fermentation. Here we used high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to profile the bacterial community structure of Lu-doh-huang samples. Pyrosequencing of samples obtained at 7 points during fermentation revealed 9 phyla, 264 genera, and 586 species of bacteria. While mung beans were inside bamboo sections (stages 1 and 2 of the fermentation process), family Lactobacillaceae and genus Lactobacillus emerged in highest abundance; Lactobacillus plantarum was broadly distributed among these samples. During stage 3, the bacterial distribution shifted to family Porphyromonadaceae, and Butyricimonas virosa became the predominant microbial component. Thereafter, bacterial counts decreased dramatically, and organisms were too few to be detected during stage 4. In addition, the microbial compositions of the liquids used for soaking bamboo sections were dramatically different: Exiguobacterium mexicanum predominated in the fermented soybean solution whereas B. virosa was predominant in running spring water. Furthermore, our results from pyrosequencing paralleled those we obtained by using the traditional culture method, which targets lactic acid bacteria. In conclusion, the microbial communities during Lu-doh-huang fermentation were markedly diverse, and pyrosequencing revealed a complete picture of the microbial consortium. PMID:23700436

  4. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Eder, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hayes, John M.; Cady, Sherry L.; DesMarais, David J.; Hope, Janet M.; Summons, Roger E.

    2001-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic microbial communities associated with the siliceous vent walls and outflow channel of Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, have been examined for lipid biomarker and carbon isotopic signatures. These data were compared with that obtained from representatives of three Aquificales genera. Thermocrinis ruber, Thermocrinis sp. HI, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus, Aquifex pyrophilus and Aquifex aeolicus all contained phospholipids composed not only of the usual ester-linked fatty acids, but also ether-linked alkyl moieties. The fatty acids of all cultured organisms were dominated by very distinct pattern of n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21 compounds. The alkyl glycerol ethers were present primarily as C-18:0 monoethers with the exception of the Aquifex spp. in which dialkyl glycerol ethers with a boarder carbon-number distribution were also present. These Aquificales biomarker lipids were the major constituents in the lipid extracts of the Octopus Spring microbial samples. Two natural samples, a microbial biofilm growing in association with deposition of amorphous silica on the vent walls at 92 C, and the well-known "pink-streamer community" (PSC), siliceous filaments of a microbial consortia growing in the outflow channel at 87 C were analyzed. Both the biofilm and PSC samples contained mono- and dialkyl glycerol ethers with a prevalence of C-18 and C-20 alkyls. Phospholipid fatty acids were comprised of both the characteristic. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Cross-cultural perception of six commercial olive oils: A study with Spanish and US consumers.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Araújo, L; Adhikari, K; Chambers, E; Chambers, D H; Carbonell-Barrachina, A A

    2015-09-01

    A cross-cultural study was conducted with Spanish and US consumers to gain an insight into the preferred characteristics of olive oils in both countries. Six commercial olive oils (four samples from Spain and two samples from the US) were analyzed by a highly trained panel (descriptive analysis) and also by two consumers' groups (100 consumers from Spain and 100 from the US). Demographic, acceptability, and Just-About-Right data were collected to study the preferences of both groups, and the relationships with descriptive data were explored to determine the drivers of like/dislike. The Spanish extra virgin olive oils and the imported US extra virgin olive oil were characterized by having bitter, pungent, and more green notes, and were preferred by the Spanish consumers. The US consumers liked the bland Spanish refined olive oil, and the Californian olive oil that was characterized by fruity, floral, and sweet notes. The results showed that the Spanish consumers were more aware about olive oil quality in general than their US counterparts, maybe because of a higher usage of the product in Spain. The present study provides essential data which might help producers in designing and promoting olive oils matching US consumers' requirements, an emerging market for this Mediterranean product. PMID:25028154

  6. Microbial succession in response to pollutants in batch-enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shuo; Chen, Weimin; Wang, Entao; Wang, Junman; Liu, Zhenshan; Li, Yining; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    As a global problem, environmental pollution is an important factor to shape the microbial communities. The elucidation of the succession of microbial communities in response to pollutants is essential for developing bioremediation procedures. In the present study, ten batches of soil-enrichment subcultures were subjected to four treatments: phenanthrene, n-octadecane, phenanthrene + n-octadecane, or phenanthrene + n-octadecane + CdCl2. Forty pollutant-degrading consortia, corresponding to each batch of the four treatments were obtained. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the diversity, richness and evenness of the consortia decreased throughout the subculturing procedure. The well-known hydrocarbon degraders Acinetobacter, Gordonia, Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis, and Castellaniella and several other genera, including Niabella and Naxibacter, were detected in the enriched consortia. The predominant microbes varied and the microbial community in the consortia gradually changed during the successive subculturing depending on the treatment, indicating that the pollutants influenced the microbial successions. Comparison of the networks in the treatments indicated that organic pollutants and CdCl2 affected the co-occurrence patterns in enriched consortia. In conclusion, single environmental factors, such as the addition of nutrients or selection pressure, can shape microbial communities and partially explain the extensive differences in microbial community structures among diverse environments. PMID:26905741

  7. Microbial succession in response to pollutants in batch-enrichment culture

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Shuo; Chen, Weimin; Wang, Entao; Wang, Junman; Liu, Zhenshan; Li, Yining; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    As a global problem, environmental pollution is an important factor to shape the microbial communities. The elucidation of the succession of microbial communities in response to pollutants is essential for developing bioremediation procedures. In the present study, ten batches of soil-enrichment subcultures were subjected to four treatments: phenanthrene, n-octadecane, phenanthrene + n-octadecane, or phenanthrene + n-octadecane + CdCl2. Forty pollutant-degrading consortia, corresponding to each batch of the four treatments were obtained. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the diversity, richness and evenness of the consortia decreased throughout the subculturing procedure. The well-known hydrocarbon degraders Acinetobacter, Gordonia, Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis, and Castellaniella and several other genera, including Niabella and Naxibacter, were detected in the enriched consortia. The predominant microbes varied and the microbial community in the consortia gradually changed during the successive subculturing depending on the treatment, indicating that the pollutants influenced the microbial successions. Comparison of the networks in the treatments indicated that organic pollutants and CdCl2 affected the co-occurrence patterns in enriched consortia. In conclusion, single environmental factors, such as the addition of nutrients or selection pressure, can shape microbial communities and partially explain the extensive differences in microbial community structures among diverse environments. PMID:26905741

  8. Microbial Mediation of Dolomite Precipitation in Natural Environments, Culture Experiments and Molecular Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, P.; Nealson, K.; McKenzie, J. A.; Warthmann, R.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2005-12-01

    Although dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] is a common carbonate mineral in sedimentary rocks, it is rarely observed forming in modern environments, and, until recently, experimental precipitation under Earth surface conditions proved impossible. With the discovery of microbial mediated dolomite formation in culture experiments with sulfate-reducing bacteria, it has become apparent that microbes play an important role in overcoming the kinetic barrier of mineral precipitation and, thus, may represent a key factor controlling early diagenetic processes throughout Earth history. The detailed mechanisms of these processes, however, remain poorly understood. Recent studies of dolomite layers in organic carbon-rich hemipelagic sediments recovered on the Peru margin during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201 (Meister et al., in prep.) indicate precipitation at the interface between the sulphate reduction and methanogenic zones. At this chemical front, alkalinity is strongly increased, sulphate ions, a possible inhibitor of dolomite precipitation, are efficiently removed, and highest total cell densities were counted (up to 10 to the 9 cells / cm3; Shipboard Scientific Party, 2003). These results strengthen the model that microbes are involved in dolomite formation, providing the appropriate chemical conditions, whereas the high cell density may kinetically control the strictly focused precipitation process. We are currently conducting a systematic study of the precipitation of dolomite and other carbonate minerals in the Ca-Mg-bicarbonate-system. In preliminary experiments under aerobic conditions we used agar plates with a marine medium to grow a bacterium isolated from sediments of the San Pedro basin (California), an upwelling area similar to the Peru margin. We observed that the crystals formed only inside of the colonies and showed a dumbbell-shaped morphology similar to dolomite produced in anaerobic experiments. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed, however, that the product was

  9. Culture dependent and independent genomic identification of Alicyclobacillus species in contaminated commercial fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Osopale, Babasola Adewunmi; Witthuhn, Cornelia Regina; Albertyn, Jacobus; Oguntoyinbo, Folarin Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Alicyclobacillus is a genus of thermo-acidophilic, endospore-forming, bacteria species which occasionally cause spoilage of heat-processed fruit juices by producing guaiacol taint. In this study, Alicyclobacillus contamination of commercial fruit juices in West Africa was investigated using culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Firstly, a total of 225 fruit juice products from Ghana (n = 39) and Nigeria (n = 186) were enriched with yeast-starch-glucose (YSG) broth (pH 3.7) following heat shock at 80 °C for 10 min. Alicyclobacillus was detected in 11.6% (26) of samples. Isolates were identified to the genus taxonomic level by genus-specific PCR which targeted the squalene-hopene-cyclase (shc) gene followed by analysis of the almost-complete 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences that identified 16 Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, 7 Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and 3 Alicyclobacillus genomic species 1 (Alicyclobacillus sp. 1). Whole-genome fingerprinting using PCR-RAPD primers Ba-10, F-61 and F-64 grouped the 16 A. acidoterrestris isolates into two genetic clusters. Furthermore, high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analyses revealed the activity of vanillic-acid decarboxylase (vdc) in all A. acidoterrestris isolates due to guaiacol production from vanillic-acid. Lastly, species-specific PCR-DGGE targeting the 16S rRNA gene clearly discriminated between the guaiacol-producing A. acidoterrestris and the non-spoilage A. acidocaldarius group. Information provided by this study is fundamental to the development of effective strategies for the improvement of quality and shelf-life of processed tropical fruit juices in W. Africa. PMID:26919814

  10. The DOE subsurface microbial culture collection at Florida State University. Interim technical report, 15 August 1993--15 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Balkwill, D.L.

    1994-03-15

    This research is a renewal of a project to support research in the Deep Microbiology Subprogram of the Subsurface Science Program, by maintaining a culture collection of microorganisms isolated from subsurface environments (SMCC). Approximately 2,400 new subsurface microbial isolates were incorporated into the SMCC during the period August 15, 1993 to March 15, 1994. Colony morphological characteristics were determined for each of the 2,400 newly incorporated strains. Cell morphological characteristics were determined for 1,100 of the new isolates, and 21 selected physiological traits were determined for 2,200 of the new isolates.

  11. EVALUATION OF COMMERCIAL, MICROBIAL-BASED PRODUCTS TO TREAT PARAFFIN DEPOSITION IN TANK BOTTOMS AND OIL PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction:

    Paraffins are naturally-occurring components of crude oils, but often form solids within oil reservoirs and on oil production equipment when oil is harvested from hot subsurface temperatures to the cooler surface environments. Microbial t...

  12. Compound-specific Isotope Analysis of Cyanobacterial Pure cultures and Microbial Mats: Effects of Photorespiration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Summons, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial mats are considered modern homologs of Precambrian stromatolites. The carbon isotopic compositions of organic matter and biomarker lipids provide clues to the depositional environments of ancient mat ecosystems. As the source of primary carbon fixation for over two billion years, an understanding of cyanobacterial lipid biosynthesis, associated isotopic discriminations, and the influence of physiological factors on growth and isotope expression is essential to help us compare modern microbial ecosystems to their ancient counterparts. Here, we report on the effects of photorespiration (PR) on the isotopic composition of cyanobacteria and biomarker lipids, and on potential PR effects associated with the composition of various microbial mats. The high light, high O2 and limiting CO2 conditions often present at the surface of microbial mats are known to support PR in cyanobacteria. The oxygenase function of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase can result in photoexcretion of glycolate and subsequent degration by heterotrophic bacteria. We have found evidence which supports an isotopic depletion (increased apparent E) scaled to O2 level associated with growth of Phormidium luridum at low CO2 concentrations (less than 0.04%). Similar to previous studies, isotopic differences between biomass and lipid biomarkers, and between lipid classes were positively correlated with overall fractionation, and should provide a means of estimating the influence of PR on overall isotopic composition of microbial mats. Several examples of microbial mats growing in the hydrothermal waters of Yellowstone National Park and the hypersaline marine evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja Sur Mexico will be compared with a view to PR as a possible explanation of the relatively heavy C-isotope composition of hypersaline mats.

  13. Microbial characterization of anode-respiring bacteria within biofilms developed from cultures previously enriched in dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pierra, Mélanie; Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Trably, Eric; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Bernet, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    This work evaluated the use of a culture enriched in DMRB as a strategy to enrich ARB on anodes. DMRB were enriched with Fe(III) as final electron acceptor and then transferred to a potentiostatically-controlled system with an anode as sole final electron acceptor. Three successive iron-enrichment cultures were carried out. The first step of enrichment revealed a successful selection of the high current-producing ARB Geoalkalibacter subterraneus. After few successive enrichment steps, the microbial community analysis in electroactive biofilms showed a significant divergence with an impact on the biofilm electroactivity. Enrichment of ARB in electroactive biofilms through the pre-selection of DMRB should therefore be carefully considered. PMID:26182995

  14. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Edger, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hayes, John M.; DesMarais, David J.; Cady, Sherry; Hope, Janet M.; Summons, Roger E.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic microbial communities associated with the siliceous vent walls and outflow channel of Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, have been examined for lipid biomarkers and carbon isotopic signatures. These data were compared with that obtained from representatives of three Aquificales genera. Thermocrinis ruber. "Thermocrinis sp. HI", Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, Aquifex pyrophilus and Aquifex aeolicus all contained phospholipids composed not only of the usual ester-linked fatty acids, but also ether-linked alkyls. The fatty acids of all cultured organisms were dominated by a very distinct pattern of n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21 compounds. The alkyl glycerol ethers were present primarily as CIS() monoethers with the expection of the Aquifex spp. in which dialkyl glycerol ethers with a boarder carbon-number distribution were also present. These Aquificales biomarker lipids were the major constituents in the lipid extracts of the Octopus Spring microbial samples. Two natural samples, a microbial biofilm growing in association with deposition of amorphous silica on the vent walls at 92 C, and the well-known 'pink-streamers community' (PSC), siliceous filaments of a microbial consortia growing in the upper outflow channel at 87 C were analyzed. Both the biofilm and PSC samples contained mono and dialkyl glycerol ethers with a prevalence of C-18 and C-20 alkyls. Phospholipid fatty acids were comprised of both the characteristic Aquificales n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21, and in addition, a series of iso-branched fatty acids from i-C-15:0 to i-C-21:0, With i-C-17:0 dominant in the PSC and i-C-19:0 in the biofilm, suggesting the presence of two major bacterial groups. Bacteriohopanepolyols were absent and the minute quantities of archaeol detected showed that Archaea were only minor constituents. Carbon isotopic compositions of the PSC yielded information about community structure and likely physiology. Biomass was C-13-depleted (10.9%) relative to available

  15. Community proteomics provides functional insight into polyhydroxyalkanoate production by a mixed microbial culture cultivated on fermented dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrea J; Guho, Nicholas M; Paszczynski, Andrzej J; Coats, Erik R

    2016-09-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bio-based, biodegradable polyesters that can be produced from organic-rich waste streams using mixed microbial cultures (MMCs). To maximize PHA production, MMCs are enriched for bacteria with a high polymer storage capacity through the application of aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), which consequently induces a feast-famine metabolic response. Though the feast-famine response is generally understood empirically at a macro-level, the molecular level is less refined. The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial community composition and proteome profile of an enriched MMC cultivated on fermented dairy manure. The enriched MMC exhibited a feast-famine response and was capable of producing up to 40 % (wt. basis) PHA in a fed-batch reactor. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a microbial community dominated by Meganema, a known PHA-producing genus not often observed in high abundance in enrichment SBRs. The application of the proteomic methods two-dimensional electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS revealed PHA synthesis, energy generation, and protein synthesis prominently occurring during the feast phase, corroborating bulk solution variable observations and theoretical expectations. During the famine phase, nutrient transport, acyl-CoA metabolism, additional energy generation, and housekeeping functions were more pronounced, informing previously under-determined MMC functionality under famine conditions. During fed-batch PHA production, acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase and PHA granule-bound phasin proteins were in increased abundance relative to the SBR, supporting the higher PHA content observed. Collectively, the results provide unique microbial community structural and functional insight into feast-famine PHA production from waste feedstocks using MMCs. PMID:27147532

  16. Automated analysis of food-borne pathogens using a novel microbial cell culture, sensing and classification system.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kun; Li, Yinglei; Ford, William; Land, Walker; Schaffer, J David; Congdon, Robert; Zhang, Jing; Sadik, Omowunmi

    2016-02-21

    We hereby report the design and implementation of an Autonomous Microbial Cell Culture and Classification (AMC(3)) system for rapid detection of food pathogens. Traditional food testing methods require multistep procedures and long incubation period, and are thus prone to human error. AMC(3) introduces a "one click approach" to the detection and classification of pathogenic bacteria. Once the cultured materials are prepared, all operations are automatic. AMC(3) is an integrated sensor array platform in a microbial fuel cell system composed of a multi-potentiostat, an automated data collection system (Python program, Yocto Maxi-coupler electromechanical relay module) and a powerful classification program. The classification scheme consists of Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), Support Vector Machines (SVM) and General Regression Neural Network (GRNN) oracle-based system. Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) is performed on standard samples or unknown samples. Then, using preset feature extractions and quality control, accepted data are analyzed by the intelligent classification system. In a typical use, thirty-two extracted features were analyzed to correctly classify the following pathogens: Escherichia coli ATCC#25922, Escherichia coli ATCC#11775, and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC#12228. 85.4% accuracy range was recorded for unknown samples, and within a shorter time period than the industry standard of 24 hours. PMID:26818563

  17. Utilizing a Robotic Sprayer for High Lateral and Mass Resolution MALDI FT-ICR MSI of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderton, Christopher R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Tolić, Nikola; Creissen, Alain; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-03-01

    The ability to visualize biochemical interactions between microbial communities using MALDI MSI has provided tremendous insights into a variety of biological fields. Matrix application using a sieve proved to be incredibly useful, but it has many limitations that include uneven matrix coverage and limitation in the types of matrices that could be employed in studies. Recently, there has been a concerted effort to improve matrix application for studying agar plated microbial cultures, many of which utilized automated matrix sprayers. Here, we describe the usefulness of using a robotic sprayer for matrix application. The robotic sprayer has two-dimensional control over where matrix is applied, and a heated capillary that allows for rapid drying of the applied matrix. This method provided a significant increase in MALDI sensitivity over the sieve method, as demonstrated by FT-ICR MS analysis, facilitating the ability to gain higher lateral resolution MS images of Bacillus subtilis than previously reported. This method also allowed for the use of different matrices to be applied to the culture surfaces.

  18. Culture of dialysis fluids on nutrient-rich media for short periods at elevated temperatures underestimate microbial contamination.

    PubMed

    Pass, T; Wright, R; Sharp, B; Harding, G B

    1996-01-01

    Recommended culture methods for monitoring bacterial contamination of H2O, dialysate and bicarbonate concentrate in dialysis centers in the USA involves culturing these fluids for 48 h at 37 degrees C. A variety of media and commercial culture methods are accepted for monitoring these fluids. Over a 3-month a comparison was made between an acceptable culture method, tryptic soy agar (TSA) employing the pour plate (PP) technique at 37 degrees C for 48 h, and PP cultures on standard methods agar (SMA) and R2A agar, incubated at ambient temperature (23 degrees C) for 48, 72, 168 h. Increases in the colony counts over time occurred for all three fluids. However, counts wee greater on SMA and R2A than on TSA. The increases over the standard 48-hour TSA cultures ranged as high as 10(4) times for 23 degrees C cultures at 7 days of incubation. Endotoxin levels even in the most contaminated samples were found to be below the acceptable 5 EU/ml recommended for reprocessor water. Bacterial colonies that appeared at 48, 72 and 168 h were isolated and identified. Pseudomonas, Moraxella, Acinetobacter and CDC group VI C-2 were among some of the common bacteria isolated. This study indicates that the media utilized, the time and temperature of incubation may result in a significant underestimation of the bacterial population of water and dialysis fluids, thus potentially placing the patient at a higher risk. PMID:8785029

  19. Microbial Ecophysiology of Whey Biomethanation: Comparison of Carbon Transformation Parameters, Species Composition, and Starter Culture Performance in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chartrain, M.; Bhatnagar, L.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in lactose concentration and feed rate altered bacterial growth and population levels in a whey-processing chemostat. The bacterial population and methane production levels increased in relation to increased lactose concentrations comparable to those in raw whey (6%) and converted over 96% of the substrate to methane, carbon dioxide, and cells. Sequential increases in the chemostat dilution rate demonstrated excellent biomethanation performance at retention times as low as 25 h. Retention times shorter than 25 h caused prevalent bacterial populations and methane production to decrease, and intermediary carbon metabolites accumulated in the following order: acetate, butyrate, propionate, lactate, ethanol, and lactose. Bacterial species dominated in the chemostat as a function of their enhanced substrate uptake and growth kinetic properties. The substrate uptake kinetic properties displayed by the mixed chemostat population were equivalent to those of individual species measured in pure culture, whereas the growth kinetic properties of species in mixed culture were better than those measured in pure culture. A designed starter culture consisting of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanobacterium formicicum displayed biomethanation performance, which was similar to that of a diverse adapted mixed-culture inoculum, in a continuous contact digestor system to which 10 g of dry whey per liter was added. Preserved starter cultures were developed and used as inocula for the start-up of a continuous anaerobic digestion process that was effective for biomethanation of raw whey at a retention time of 100 h. Images PMID:16347341

  20. THE AIRBORNE CULTURABLE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF SEVEN FEEDYARDS IN THE HIGH PLAINS OF TEXAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) produce a large amount of manure that can impact the environment if not managed properly. Environmental issues at CAFO include odor, pathogens, endotoxins (ET), and dust. The role of ET and pathogens with dust emissions was investigated. Airborne microbi...

  1. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weaning and transport stress can have a negative impact on the piglet's immune system and intestinal microbiota. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of a yeast product on innate immunity and microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract following stress of weaning and trans...

  2. Conversion of methane-derived carbon and microbial community in enrichment cultures in response to O2 availability.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Meng; He, Ruo; Chen, Min; Su, Yao; Ma, Ruo-Chan

    2016-04-01

    Methanotrophs not only play an important role in mitigating CH4 emissions from the environment, but also provide a large quantity of CH4-derived carbon to their habitats. In this study, the distribution of CH4-derived carbon and microbial community was investigated in a consortium enriched at three O2 tensions, i.e., the initial O2 concentrations of 2.5 % (LO-2), 5 % (LO-1), and 21 % (v/v) (HO). The results showed that compared with the O2-limiting environments (2.5 and 5 %), more CH4-derived carbon was converted into CO2 and biomass under the O2 sufficient condition (21 %). Besides biomass and CO2, a high conversion efficiency of CH4-derived carbon to dissolved organic carbon was detected in the cultures, especially in LO-2. Quantitative PCR and Miseq sequencing both showed that the abundance of methanotroph increased with the increasing O2 concentrations. Type II methanotroph Methylocystis dominated in the enrichment cultures, accounting for 54.8, 48.1, and 36.9 % of the total bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing reads in HO, LO-1, and LO-2, respectively. Methylotrophs, mainly including Methylophilus, Methylovorus, Hyphomicrobium, and Methylobacillus, were also abundant in the cultures. Compared with the O2 sufficient condition (21 %), higher microbial biodiversity (i.e., higher Simpson and lower Shannon indexes) was detected in LO-2 enriched at the initial O2 concentration of 2.5 %. These findings indicated that compared with the O2 sufficient condition, more CH4-derived carbon was exuded into the environments and promoted the growth of non-methanotrophic microbes in O2-limiting environments. PMID:26728286

  3. Cultural management of microbial community structure to enhance growth of apple in replant soils.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Mark; Granatstein, David M; Elfving, Don C; Mullinix, Kent; Gu, Yu-Huan

    2002-12-01

    ABSTRACT Apple replant disease typically is managed through pre-plant application of broad-spectrum soil fumigants including methyl bromide. The impending loss or restricted use of soil fumigants and the needs of an expanding organic tree fruit industry necessitate the development of alternative control measures. The microbial community resident in a wheat field soil was shown to suppress components of the microbial complex that incites apple replant disease. Pseudomonas putida was the primary fluorescent pseudomonad recovered from suppressive soil, whereas Pseudomonas fluorescens bv. III was dominant in a conducive soil; the latter developed within 3 years of orchard establishment at the same site. In greenhouse studies, cultivation of wheat in replant orchard soils prior to planting apple suppressed disease development. Disease suppression was induced in a wheat cultivar-specific manner. Wheat cultivars that enhanced apple seedling growth altered the dominant fluorescent pseudo-monad from Pseudomonas fluorescens bv. III to Pseudomonas putida. The microbial community resident in replant orchard soils after growing wheat also was suppressive to an introduced isolate of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 5, which causes root rot of apple. Incorporation of high glucosinolate containing rapeseed ('Dwarf Essex') meal also enhanced growth of apple in replant soils through suppression of Rhizoc-tonia spp., Cylindrocarpon spp., and Pratylenchus penetrans. Integration of these methods will require knowledge of the impact of the biofumigant component on the wheat-induced disease-suppressive microbial community. Implementation of these control strategies for management of apple replant disease awaits confirmation from ongoing field validation trials. PMID:18943894

  4. Microbial Community Response of an Organohalide Respiring Enrichment Culture to Permanganate Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Nora B.; Atashgahi, Siavash; Saccenti, Edoardo; Grotenhuis, Tim; Smidt, Hauke; Rijnaarts, Huub H. M.

    2015-01-01

    While in situ chemical oxidation is often used to remediate tetrachloroethene (PCE) contaminated locations, very little is known about its influence on microbial composition and organohalide respiration (OHR) activity. Here, we investigate the impact of oxidation with permanganate on OHR rates, the abundance of organohalide respiring bacteria (OHRB) and reductive dehalogenase (rdh) genes using quantitative PCR, and microbial community composition through sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. A PCE degrading enrichment was repeatedly treated with low (25 μmol), medium (50 μmol), or high (100 μmol) permanganate doses, or no oxidant treatment (biotic control). Low and medium treatments led to higher OHR rates and enrichment of several OHRB and rdh genes, as compared to the biotic control. Improved degradation rates can be attributed to enrichment of (1) OHRB able to also utilize Mn oxides as a terminal electron acceptor and (2) non-dechlorinating community members of the Clostridiales and Deltaproteobacteria possibly supporting OHRB by providing essential co-factors. In contrast, high permanganate treatment disrupted dechlorination beyond cis-dichloroethene and caused at least a 2–4 orders of magnitude reduction in the abundance of all measured OHRB and rdh genes, as compared to the biotic control. High permanganate treatments resulted in a notably divergent microbial community, with increased abundances of organisms affiliated with Campylobacterales and Oceanospirillales capable of dissimilatory Mn reduction, and decreased abundance of presumed supporters of OHRB. Although OTUs classified within the OHR-supportive order Clostridiales and OHRB increased in abundance over the course of 213 days following the final 100 μmol permanganate treatment, only limited regeneration of PCE dechlorination was observed in one of three microcosms, suggesting strong chemical oxidation treatments can irreversibly disrupt OHR. Overall, this detailed investigation into dose

  5. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  6. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  7. Effects of added chelated trace minerals, organic selenium, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract in horses. Part I: Blood nutrient concentration and digestibility.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M E; Edwards, M S; Sweeney, C R; Jerina, M L

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that feed additives such as chelated minerals, organic Se, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract would improve nutrient digestibility when included in an equine diet. Horses (Quarter Horse geldings 4.5 to 16 yr of age; mean BW 522 kg ± 46 kg) were acclimated to 100% pelleted diets formulated with (ADD) and without (CTRL) commercially available sources of the aforementioned additives followed by a 14-d collection period of feces and urine. Chelated sources of Cu, Zn, Mn and Co were utilized versus sulfated forms, at a 100% replacement rate. No significant differences among apparent the digestibility of DM, ADF, or NDF (P= 0.665, P = 0.866, P = 0.747, respectively) were detected between dietary treatments. Likewise, no differences in apparent digestibility of Cu (P = 0.724), Zn (P = 0.256), Mn (P = 0.888), Co (P = 0.71), or Se (P = 0.588) were observed. No differences were observed in serum Cu, Mn, or Co concentrations between ADD and CTRL at acclimation or collection time points (P > 0.05). While no difference in serum Zn concentrations were observed between ADD and CTRL groups at acclimation (P > 0.05), they were statistically higher at the collection time period for horses consuming CTRL (P < 0.0001). Whole blood Se concentration was greater in the CTRL group versus the ADD group both at acclimation (P = 0.041) and collection (P = 0.005) time periods. In reference to time, serum Cu concentrations increased (P = 0.012) for animals consuming CTRL, but not ADD (P > 0.05). Serum Zn concentrations of horses consuming both ADD (P = 0.021) and CTRL (P < 0.0001) increased over time from acclimation to collection time points. No time differences (P > 0.05) were observed in serum Mn concentrations. Serum Co concentrations increased over time in horses consuming both ADD (P = 0.001) and CTRL (P = 0.021). From acclimation to collection, whole blood Se concentration increased for horses

  8. A novel approach to recycle bacterial culture waste for fermentation reuse via a microbial fuel cell-membrane bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhu, Yuan; Zhuang, Liangpeng; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Goodell, Barry; Sonoki, Tomonori; He, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Biochemical production processes require water and nutrient resources for culture media preparation, but aqueous waste is generated after the target products are extracted. In this study, culture waste (including cells) produced from a lab-scale fermenter was fed into a microbial fuel cell-membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) system. Electrical energy was generated via the interaction between the microbial consortia and the solid electrode in the MFC. The treated wastewater was reclaimed in this process which was reused as a solvent and a nutrient source in subsequent fermentation. Polarization testing showed that the MFC produced a maximum current density of 37.53 A m(-3) with a maximum power density of 5.49 W m(-3). The MFC was able to generate 0.04 kWh of energy per cubic meter of culture waste treated. The lab-scale fermenters containing pure cultures of an engineered Pseudomonas spp. were used to generate 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDC), a high value platform chemical. When the MFC-MBR-treated wastewater was used for the fermenter culture medium, a specific bacterial growth rate of 1.00 ± 0.05 h(-1) was obtained with a PDC production rate of 708.11 ± 64.70 mg PDC L(-1) h(-1). Comparable values for controls using pure water were 0.95 ± 0.06 h(-1) and 621.01 ± 22.09 mg PDC L(-1) h(-1) (P > 0.05), respectively. The results provide insight on a new approach for more sustainable bio-material production while at the same time generating energy, and suggest that the treated wastewater can be used as a solvent and a nutrient source for the fermentation production of high value platform chemicals. PMID:26013992

  9. Heat treatment of colostrum on commercial dairy farms decreases colostrum microbial counts while maintaining colostrum immunoglobulin G concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted on six commercial dairy farms in Minnesota and Wisconsin to describe the effect of heat-treatment of colostrum, at 60o58 C for 60 minutes, on colostrum bacteria counts and immunoglobulin G concentrations. First milking colostrum was collected each day, pooled, divided into t...

  10. Detection of Biosignatures in Natural and Microbial Cultured Jarosites Using Laser- Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: Implications for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, J.; Hinman, N. W.; Yan, B.; Stoner, D. L.; Scott, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    The jarosite group minerals have received increasing attention since the discovery by the Mars Exploration Rover-Opportunity of jarosite on the Martian surface. The general chemical formula for jarosite is XFe3(SO4)2(OH)6 where the X represents both monovalent and divalent cations that can occupy the axial positions in the crystal structure. Commonly found ions include K+, Na+, H3O+, NH4+, and Pb2+ with reports of other large ions occupying this position in the literature. Modeling efforts have been performed to confirm that jarosite has the ability to incorporate a variety of "foreign" cations. The minerals unique ability to incorporate various large ions in its structure and its association with biological activity in terrestrial environments has lead to investigations regarding its use as an indicator of aqueous and/or biological activity. The use of laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LD-FTMS) has revealed the presence of organic matter including the amino acid, glycine, in several jarosite samples from various worldwide locations. Iron precipitates derived from acidophilic microbial cultures were also analyzed. Using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), signals indicative of microbes or microbial exudates were weak and ambiguous. In contrast, LD-FTMS clearly detected bioorganic constituents in some desorption spots. However, the signals were sporadic and required the laser scanning/imaging capability of our laboratory built system to locate the microbial signatures in the heterogeneous samples. The ability to observe these bioorganic signatures in jarosite samples using the instrumental technique employed in this study furthers the goals of planetary geologists to determine whether signs of life (e.g., presence of biomolecules or biomolecule precursors) can be detected in the rock record of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples.

  11. Methods for facilitating microbial growth on pulp mill waste streams and characterization of the biodegradation potential of cultured microbes.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Stephanie L; Ayoub, Ali S; Pawlak, Joel; Grunden, Amy M

    2013-01-01

    The kraft process is applied to wood chips for separation of lignin from the polysaccharides within lignocellulose for pulp that will produce a high quality paper. Black liquor is a pulping waste generated by the kraft process that has potential for downstream bioconversion. However, the recalcitrant nature of the lignocellulose resources, its chemical derivatives that constitute the majority of available organic carbon within black liquor, and its basic pH present challenges to microbial biodegradation of this waste material. Methods for the collection and modification of black liquor for microbial growth are aimed at utilization of this pulp waste to convert the lignin, organic acids, and polysaccharide degradation byproducts into valuable chemicals. The lignocellulose extraction techniques presented provide a reproducible method for preparation of lignocellulose growth substrates for understanding metabolic capacities of cultured microorganisms. Use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry enables the identification and quantification of the fermentation products resulting from the growth of microorganisms on pulping waste. These methods when used together can facilitate the determination of the metabolic activity of microorganisms with potential to produce fermentation products that would provide greater value to the pulping system and reduce effluent waste, thereby increasing potential paper milling profits and offering additional uses for black liquor. PMID:24378616

  12. Methods for Facilitating Microbial Growth on Pulp Mill Waste Streams and Characterization of the Biodegradation Potential of Cultured Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Stephanie L.; Ayoub, Ali S.; Pawlak, Joel; Grunden, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    The kraft process is applied to wood chips for separation of lignin from the polysaccharides within lignocellulose for pulp that will produce a high quality paper. Black liquor is a pulping waste generated by the kraft process that has potential for downstream bioconversion. However, the recalcitrant nature of the lignocellulose resources, its chemical derivatives that constitute the majority of available organic carbon within black liquor, and its basic pH present challenges to microbial biodegradation of this waste material. Methods for the collection and modification of black liquor for microbial growth are aimed at utilization of this pulp waste to convert the lignin, organic acids, and polysaccharide degradation byproducts into valuable chemicals. The lignocellulose extraction techniques presented provide a reproducible method for preparation of lignocellulose growth substrates for understanding metabolic capacities of cultured microorganisms. Use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry enables the identification and quantification of the fermentation products resulting from the growth of microorganisms on pulping waste. These methods when used together can facilitate the determination of the metabolic activity of microorganisms with potential to produce fermentation products that would provide greater value to the pulping system and reduce effluent waste, thereby increasing potential paper milling profits and offering additional uses for black liquor. PMID:24378616

  13. μ-Synthesis of dissimilation process of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol in microbial continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Yuan, Jinlong; Wang, Xinying; Feng, Enmin; Xiu, Zhilong

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, robust control problem using μ-synthesis in microbial continuous culture is studied. The dissimilation process of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol cannot avoid the disturbances caused by uncertain factors. Based on the biodynamical model, a control system with the initial glycerol concentration as input control is proposed to simplify the controller design. μ-synthesis method is applied to find a feedback controller to assure both of robust stability and robust performance of the closed-loop system simultaneously. To solve the corresponding structured singular value optimization problem, a converged result is obtained through D-K iteration method. The μ-synthesis system is also compared with the corresponding H(∞) system. The simulation results indicate that the μ-controller might be more feasible for the continuous bioprocess controlling. PMID:24078112

  14. High-Throughput Sequencing and Metagenomics: Moving Forward in the Culture-Independent Analysis of Food Microbial Ecology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Following recent trends in environmental microbiology, food microbiology has benefited from the advances in molecular biology and adopted novel strategies to detect, identify, and monitor microbes in food. An in-depth study of the microbial diversity in food can now be achieved by using high-throughput sequencing (HTS) approaches after direct nucleic acid extraction from the sample to be studied. In this review, the workflow of applying culture-independent HTS to food matrices is described. The current scenario and future perspectives of HTS uses to study food microbiota are presented, and the decision-making process leading to the best choice of working conditions to fulfill the specific needs of food research is described. PMID:23475615

  15. Numerical modeling analysis of hydrodynamic and microbial controls on DNAPL pool dissolution and detoxification: Dehalorespirers in co-culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesseldyke, Eric S.; Becker, Jennifer G.; Seagren, Eric A.; Mayer, Alex S.; Zhang, Changyong

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants like tetrachloroethene (PCE) can be "bioenhanced" via biodegradation, which increases the concentration gradient at the DNAPL-water interface. Model simulations were used to evaluate the impact of ecological interactions between different dehalorespiring strains and hydrodynamics on the bioenhancement effect and the extent of PCE dechlorination. Simulations were performed using a two-dimensional coupled flow-transport model, with a DNAPL pool source and two microbial species, Dehalococcoides mccartyi 195 and Desulfuromonas michiganensis, which compete for electron acceptors (e.g., PCE), but not for their electron donors. Under biostimulation, low vx conditions, D. michiganensis alone significantly enhanced dissolution by rapidly utilizing aqueous-phase PCE. In co-culture under these conditions, D. mccartyi 195 increased this bioenhancement modestly and greatly increased the extent of PCE transformation. Although D. michiganensis was the dominant population under low velocity conditions, D. mccartyi 195 dominated under high velocity conditions due to bioclogging effects.

  16. Evaluating standard operating procedures to mitigate off-flavor from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar cultured in a semi-commercial scale recirculating aquaculture system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish cultured within water recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) can acquire “earthy” or “musty” off-flavors due to bioaccumulation of the compounds geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), respectively, which are produced by certain bacterial species present in RAS biosolids and microbial biofilms. ...

  17. Incidence of Phytophthora and Pythium Infection and the Relation to Cultural Conditions in Commercial Blueberry Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty-five commercial blueberry fields were sampled in northwest Oregon in 2001 and assessed for the presence of Phytophthora and Pythium root rot fungi. Phytophthora was detected in 24% and Pythium was detected in 85% of the fields sampled. The only species of Phytophthora identified in the study...

  18. Factors affecting application of milk allantoin as an estimator of microbial protein flow to the duodenum under commercial conditions.

    PubMed

    Schager, W M; Harrison, J H; Gaskins, C T; Davidson, D

    2003-05-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effect of diet change, milk sampling technique, and bovine somatotropin (bST) on allantoin output in milk and the use of allantoin as a practical, noninvasive method for estimating microbial protein flow in dairy cattle. In experiment 1, four lactating Holstein cows were used in a 2 x 2 Latin square design with two treatments (ratio of forage to concentrate) and two periods. In experiment 2, six Holstein cows were used in a completely randomized design, and milk was collected by 1) a strip sample collected immediately before milking, 2) a strip sample collected 3 min from start of milking, and 3) a composite sample taken with an autosampler. In experiment three, 10 cows were used in a randomized block design to determine the effect of bST on milk allantoin. Milk samples were taken daily for 21 d, 7 d before, and 14 d after bST administration. In experiment 1, allantoin output (mmol/d) was significantly greater for cows fed the higher ratio of concentrate to forage, and there was a significant change in the amount of allantoin in milk 12 h (first subsequent milking) after a diet change. There was no difference in milk yield or dry matter intake between treatments. In experiment 2, no difference was detected in milk allantoin concentration among the three sampling methods. In experiment 3, milk yield, allantoin concentration, and total allantoin output was significantly increased after bST administration even though dry matter intake (DMI) remained unchanged. During the first 14 d following bST administration, estimates of microbial protein production derived from milk allantoin may be inaccurate due to increased milk production without an increase in DMI. PMID:12778582

  19. A simple and cost effective liquid culture system for the micropropagation of two commercially important apple rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mohina; Ram, Raja; Bhattacharya, Amita

    2014-07-01

    The two commercially important apple rootstocks i.e., MM106 and B9 were micropropagated using a liquid culture system. Three different strengths of 0.8% agar solidified PGR free basal MS medium were first tested to optimize the culture media for both the rootstocks. Full strength medium (MS0) supported maximum in vitro growth, multiplication, rooting and survival under field conditions as opposed to quarter and half strength media. When three different volumes of liquid MS0 were tested, highest in vitro growth, multiplication, rooting and also survival under field conditions were achieved in 20 mL liquid MS0. The cost of one litre of liquid medium was also reduced by 8 times to Rs. 6.29 as compared to solid medium. The cost of 20 mL medium was further reduced to Rs. 0.125. PMID:25059043

  20. Chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on the metabolic activity and composition of enriched nitrifying microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Merlin, Christophe; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Ubay-Cokgor, Emine; Orhon, Derin

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) on activated sludge sustaining an enriched nitrifying biomass. For this purpose, a laboratory scale fill and draw reactor was operated with 100 mg COD/L of peptone mixture and 50 mg N/L of ammonia at a sludge age of 15 days. Additionally, the biomass was exposed to a daily SMX dose of 50 mg/L once the reactor reached steady-state conditions. The reactor performance and microbial composition were monitored for 37 days with conventional parameters and molecular techniques based on the gene for ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) and the prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA gene cloning analyses suggested a microbial community change concurrent with the addition of SMX. Specifically, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (qPCR/RT-qPCR) revealed a significant reduction in the levels and activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, the acclimation period ended with high amoA mRNA levels and improved nitrification efficiency. Partial degradation of SMX by heterotrophic bacteria was also observed. PMID:27235775

  1. Egypt's Red Sea coast: phylogenetic analysis of cultured microbial consortia in industrialized sites

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ghada A.; Abd-Elgawad, Amr; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    The Red Sea possesses a unique geography, and its shores are rich in mangrove, macro-algal and coral reef ecosystems. Various sources of pollution affect Red Sea biota, including microbial life. We assessed the effects of industrialization on microbes along the Egyptian Red Sea coast at eight coastal sites and two lakes. The bacterial communities of sediment samples were analyzed using bacterial 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of V6-V4 hypervariable regions. The taxonomic assignment of 131,402 significant reads to major bacterial taxa revealed five main bacterial phyla dominating the sampled sites: Proteobacteria (68%), Firmicutes (13%), Fusobacteria (12%), Bacteriodetes (6%), and Spirochetes (0.03%). Further analysis revealed distinct bacterial consortia that primarily included (1) marine Vibrio spp.—suggesting a “marine Vibrio phenomenon”; (2) potential human pathogens; and (3) oil-degrading bacteria. We discuss two divergent microbial consortia that were sampled from Solar Lake West near Taba/Eilat and Saline Lake in Ras Muhammad; these consortia contained the highest abundance of human pathogens and no pathogens, respectively. Our results draw attention to the effects of industrialization on the Red Sea and suggest the need for further analysis to overcome the hazardous effects observed at the impacted sites. PMID:25157243

  2. Addition of high concentration of inorganic selenium in orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) hay diet does not interfere with microbial fermentation in mixed ruminal microorganisms in continuous cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current literature lacks information on ruminal microbial metabolism in response to high selenium (Se) concentration in the diet. We investigated changes in ruminal fermentation when high concentration of Se was administered in mixed ruminal cultures in fermentors. Two mature beef cows, 'tted wi...

  3. Comparison of two commercially available rapid detection methods and a conventional culture method to detect naturally occurring salmonellae on broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many different screening devices and sampling methods have been used to detect the presence of naturally occurring Salmonella on commercially processed broiler carcasses. The objective of this study was to compare two commercial screening systems (BAX® and Roka®) to a standard cultural procedure use...

  4. Batch fermentative hydrogen production by enriched mixed culture: Combination strategy and their microbial composition.

    PubMed

    Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Sen, Biswarup; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2014-02-01

    The effect of individual and combined mixed culture on dark fermentative hydrogen production performance was investigated. Mixed cultures from cow dung (C1), sewage sludge (C2), and pig slurry (C3) were enriched under strict anaerobic conditions at 37°C with glucose as the sole carbon source. Biochemical hydrogen production test in peptone-yeast-glucose (PYG) and basal medium was performed for individual mixed cultures (C1, C2 and C3) and their combinations (C1-C2, C2-C3, C1-C3 and C1-C2-C3) at a glucose concentration of 10 g/L, 37°C and initial pH 7. Maximum hydrogen yields (HY) of 2.0 and 1.86 [Formula: see text] by C2, and 1.98 and 1.95 mol(H2)/mol(glucose) by C2-C3 were obtained in PYG and basal medium, respectively. Butyrate and acetate were the major soluble metabolites produced by all the cultures, and the ratio of butyrate to acetate was ∼2 fold higher in basal medium than PYG medium, indicating strong influence of media formulation on glucose catabolism. The major hydrogen-producing bacterial strains, observed in all mixed cultures, belonged to Clostridium butyricum, C. saccharobutylicum, C. tertium and C. perfringens. The hydrogen production performance of the combined mixed culture (C2-C3) was further evaluated on beverage wastewater (10 g/L) at pH 7 and 37°C. The results showed an HY of 1.92 mol(H2)/mol(glucose-equivalent). Experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen fermentation by mixed culture combination could be a novel strategy to improve the HY from industrial wastewater. PMID:24095211

  5. Data correction pre-processing for electronically stored blood culture results: Implications on microbial spectrum and empiric antibiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The outcome of patients with bacteraemia is influenced by the initial selection of adequate antimicrobial therapy. The objective of our study was to clarify the influence of different crude data correction methods on a) microbial spectrum and ranking of pathogens, and b) cumulative antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of blood culture isolates obtained from patients from intensive care units (ICUs) using a computer based tool, MONI. Methods Analysis of 13 ICUs over a period of 7 years yielded 1427 microorganisms from positive results. Three different data correction methods were applied. Raw data method (RDM): Data without further correction, including all positive blood culture results. Duplicate-free method (DFM): Correction of raw data for consecutive patient's results yielding same microorganism with similar antibiogram within a two-week period. Contaminant-free method (CFM): Bacteraemia caused by possible contaminants was only assumed as true bloodstream infection, if an organism of the same species was isolated from > 2 sets of blood cultures within 5 days. Results Our study demonstrates that different approaches towards raw data correction – none (RDM), duplicate-free (DFM), and a contaminant-free method (CFM) – show different results in analysis of positive blood cultures. Regarding the spectrum of microorganisms, RDM and DFM yielded almost similar results in ranking of microorganisms, whereas using the CFM resulted in a clinically and epidemiologically more plausible spectrum. Conclusion For possible skin contaminants, the proportion of microorganisms in terms of number of episodes is most influenced by the CFM, followed by the DFM. However, with exception of fusidic acid for gram-positive organisms, none of the evaluated correction methods would have changed advice for empiric therapy on the selected ICUs. PMID:19500418

  6. Prediction of competitive microbial growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model developed with the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model successfully predicted the growth of bacteria in mixed culture using the mesophiles Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella at a constant temperature in our previous studies. In this study, we further studied the prediction of the growth of those bacteria in mixed culture at dynamic temperatures with various initial populations with the competition model. First, we studied the growth kinetics of the species in a monoculture at various constant temperatures ranging from 16℃ to 32℃. With the analyzed data in the monoculture, we then examined the prediction of bacterial growth in mixed culture with two and three species. The growth of the bacteria in the mixed culture at dynamic temperatures was successfully predicted with the model. The residuals between the observed and predicted populations at the data points were <0.5 log at most points, being 83.3% and 84.2% for the two-species mixture and the three-species mixture, respectively. The present study showed that the model could be applied to the competitive growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns. PMID:25252643

  7. Culture-Dependent and Culture-Independent Characterization of Microbial Assemblages Associated with High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Orphan, V. J.; Taylor, L. T.; Hafenbradl, D.; Delong, E. F.

    2000-01-01

    Recent investigations of oil reservoirs in a variety of locales have indicated that these habitats may harbor active thermophilic prokaryotic assemblages. In this study, we used both molecular and culture-based methods to characterize prokaryotic consortia associated with high-temperature, sulfur-rich oil reservoirs in California. Enrichment cultures designed for anaerobic thermophiles, both autotrophic and heterotrophic, were successful at temperatures ranging from 60 to 90°C. Heterotrophic enrichments from all sites yielded sheathed rods (Thermotogales), pleomorphic rods resembling Thermoanaerobacter, and Thermococcus-like isolates. The predominant autotrophic microorganisms recovered from inorganic enrichments using H2, acetate, and CO2 as energy and carbon sources were methanogens, including isolates closely related to Methanobacterium, Methanococcus, and Methanoculleus species. Two 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) libraries were generated from total community DNA collected from production wellheads, using either archaeal or universal oligonucleotide primer sets. Sequence analysis of the universal library indicated that a large percentage of clones were highly similar to known bacterial and archaeal isolates recovered from similar habitats. Represented genera in rDNA clone libraries included Thermoanaerobacter, Thermococcus, Desulfothiovibrio, Aminobacterium, Acidaminococcus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Desulfomicrobium. The archaeal library was dominated by methanogen-like rDNAs, with a lower percentage of clones belonging to the Thermococcales. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that sulfur-utilizing and methane-producing thermophilic microorganisms have a widespread distribution in oil reservoirs and the potential to actively participate in the biogeochemical transformation of carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur in situ. PMID:10653739

  8. Reduction of bromate to bromide coupled to acetate oxidation by anaerobic mixed microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, C G; van Haperen, A M; van der Togt, B

    2005-01-01

    Bromate, a weakly mutagenic oxidizing agent, exists in surface waters. The biodegradation of bromate was investigated by assessing the ability of mixed cultures of micro-organisms for utilization of bromate as electron acceptor and acetate as electron donor. Reduction of bromate was only observed at relatively low concentrations (<3.0 mM) in the absence of molecular oxygen. Under these conditions bromate was reduced stoichiometrically to bromide. Unadapted sludge from an activated sludge treatment plant and a digester reduced bromate without lag period at a constant rate. Using an enrichment culture adapted to bromate, it was demonstrated that bromate was a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Approximately 50% of the acetate was utilized for growth with bromate by the enrichment culture. A doubling of 20 h was estimated from a logarithmic growth curve. Other electron acceptors, like perchlorate, chlorate and nitrate, were not reduced or at negligible rates by bromate-utilizing microorganisms. PMID:15607164

  9. How Commercial and "Violent" Video Games Can Promote Culturally Sensitive Science Learning: Some Questions and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwah, Helen

    2012-01-01

    In their paper, Munoz and El-Hani propose to bring video games into science classrooms to promote culturally sensitive ethics and citizenship education. Instead of bringing "educational" games, Munoz and El-Hani take a more creative route and include games such as Fallout 3[R] precisely because they are popular and they reproduce ideological and…

  10. Improved Amplification of Microbial DNA from Blood Cultures by Removal of the PCR Inhibitor Sodium Polyanetholesulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Fredricks, David N.; Relman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular methods are increasingly used to identify microbes in clinical samples. A common technical problem with PCR is failed amplification due to the presence of PCR inhibitors. Initial attempts at amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene from inoculated blood culture media failed for this reason. The inhibitor persisted, despite numerous attempts to purify the DNA, and was identified as sodium polyanetholesulfonate (SPS), a common additive to blood culture media. Like DNA, SPS is a high-molecular-weight polyanion that is soluble in water but insoluble in alcohol. Accordingly, SPS tends to copurify with DNA. An extraction method was designed for purification of DNA from blood culture media and removal of SPS. Blood culture media containing human blood and spiked with Escherichia coli was subjected to an organic extraction procedure with benzyl alcohol, and removal of SPS was documented spectrophotometrically. Successful amplification of the extracted E. coli 16S rRNA gene was achieved by adding 5 μl of undiluted processed sample DNA to a 50-μl PCR mixture. When using other purification methods, the inhibitory effect of SPS could be overcome only by dilution of these samples. By our extraction technique, even uninoculated blood culture media were found to contain bacterial DNA when they were subjected to broad-range 16S rRNA gene consensus PCR. We conclude that the blood culture additive SPS is a potent inhibitor of PCR, is resistant to removal by traditional DNA purification methods, but can be removed by a benzyl alcohol extraction protocol that results in improved PCR performance. PMID:9738025

  11. Efficacy of a commercial probiotic relative to oxytetracycline as Gram-negative bacterial control agents in a rotifer (Brachionus plicatilis) batch culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to evaluate two gram-negative bacterial control strategies in batch cultures of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis. In the first trial, rotifers at an initial density of 47/mL were cultured for 5 d and dosed with a 10-mg/L solution of either oxytetracycline or a commercial p...

  12. Flux balance analysis of mixed microbial cultures: application to the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from complex mixtures of volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pardelha, Filipa; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Reis, Maria A M; Dias, João M L; Oliveira, Rui

    2012-12-31

    Fermented agro-industrial wastes are potential low cost substrates for polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production by mixed microbial cultures (MMC). The use of complex substrates has however profound implications in the PHA metabolism. In this paper we investigate PHA accumulation using a lumped metabolic model that describes PHA storage from arbitrary mixtures of volatile fatty acids (VFA). Experiments were conducted using synthetic and complex VFA mixtures obtained from the fermentation of sugar cane molasses. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) and flux balance analysis (FBA) were performed at different stages of culture enrichment in order to investigate the effect of VFA composition and time of enrichment in PHA storage efficiency. Substrate uptake and PHA storage fluxes increased over enrichment time by 70% and 73%, respectively. MFA calculations show that higher PHA storage fluxes are associated to an increase in the uptake of VFA with even number of carbon atoms and a more effective synthesis of hydroxyvalerate (HV) precursors from VFA with odd number of carbons. Furthermore, FBA shows that the key metabolic objective of a MMC subjected to the feast and famine regimen is the minimization of the tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes. The PHA flux and biopolymer composition (hydroxybutyrate (HB): HV) could be accurately predicted in several independent experiments. PMID:23036926

  13. Enrichment culture and microscopy conceal diverse thermophilic Synechococcus populations in a single hot spring microbial mat habitat.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, M J; Ruff-Roberts, A L; Kopczynski, E D; Bateson, M M; Ward, D M

    1996-01-01

    Recent molecular studies have shown a great disparity between naturally occurring and cultivated microorganisms. We investigated the basis for disparity by studying thermophilic unicellular cyanobacteria whose morphologic simplicity suggested that a single cosmopolitan species exists in hot spring microbial mats worldwide. We found that partial 16S rRNA sequences for all thermophilic Synechococcus culture collection strains from diverse habitats are identical. Through oligonucleotide probe analysis and cultivation, we provide evidence that this species is strongly selected for in laboratory culture to the exclusion of many more-predominant cyanobacterial species coexisting in the Octopus Spring mat in Yellowstone National Park. The phylogenetic diversity among Octopus Spring cyanobacteria is of similar magnitude to that exhibited by all cyanobacteria so far investigated. We obtained axenic isolates of two predominant cyanobacterial species by diluting inocula prior to enrichment. One isolate has a 16S rRNA sequence we have not yet detected by cloning. The other has a 16S rRNA sequence identical to a new cloned sequence we report herein. This is the first cultivated species whose 16S rRNA sequence has been detected in this mat system by cloning. We infer that biodiversity within this community is linked to guild structure. PMID:11536748

  14. Effect of different heterotrophic plate count methods on the estimation of the composition of the culturable microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Gössl, Eva-Maria; Antonielli, Livio; Sessitsch, Angela; Kostić, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) are routinely determined within the scope of water quality assessment. However, variable HPC methods with different cultivation parameters (i.e., temperature and media type) are applied, which could lead to significant effects in the outcome of the analysis. Therefore the effect of different HPC methods, according to DIN EN ISO 6222 and EPA, on the culturable microbial community composition was investigated by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and statistical evaluation was performed. The culturable community composition revealed significant effects assigned to temperature (p < 0.01), while for media type no statistical significance was observed. However, the abundance of certain detected bacteria was affected. Lower temperature (22 °C) showed the abundance of naturally occurring Pseudomonadaceae and Aeromonadaceae, whereas at high temperature (37 °C) numerous Enterobacteriaceae, Citrobacter spp. and Bacilli were identified. The highest biodiversity was detected at lower temperature, especially on R2A medium. These results indicate that different temperatures (low and high) should be included into HPC measurement and selection of media should, ideally, be adjusted to the monitored water source. Accordingly, it can be inferred that the HPC method is more suitable for continuous monitoring of the same water source than for single assessments of a water sample. PMID:25861554

  15. Microbial Populations in Naked Neck Chicken Ceca Raised on Pasture Flock Fed with Commercial Yeast Cell Wall Prebiotics via an Illumina MiSeq Platform.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Hong; Lee, Sang In; Ricke, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrate dietary supplements that selectively stimulate the growth of one or more beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of the host. These bacteria can inhibit colonization of pathogenic bacteria by producing antimicrobial substances such as short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and competing for niches with pathogens within the gut. Pasture flock chickens are generally raised outdoors with fresh grass, sunlight and air, which represents different environmental growth conditions compared to conventionally raised chickens. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in microbial populations from naked neck chicken ceca fed with commercial prebiotics derived from brewer's yeast cell wall via an Illumina MiSeq platform. A total of 147 day-of-hatch naked neck chickens were distributed into 3 groups consisted of 1) C: control (no prebiotic), 2) T1: Biolex® MB40 with 0.2%, and 3) T2: Leiber® ExCel with 0.2%, consistently supplemented prebiotics during the experimental period. At 8 weeks, a total of 15 birds from each group were randomly selected and ceca removed for DNA extraction. The Illumina Miseq platform based on V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was applied for microbiome analysis. Both treatments exhibited limited impact on the microbial populations at the phylum level, with no significant differences in the OTU number of Bacteroidetes among groups and an increase of Proteobacteria OTUs for the T1 (Biolex® MB40) group. In addition there was a significant increase of genus Faecalibacterium OTU, phylum Firmicutes. According to the development of next generation sequencing (NGS), microbiome analysis based on 16S rRNA gene proved to be informative on the prebiotic impact on poultry gut microbiota in pasture-raised naked neck birds. PMID:26992104

  16. Microbial Populations in Naked Neck Chicken Ceca Raised on Pasture Flock Fed with Commercial Yeast Cell Wall Prebiotics via an Illumina MiSeq Platform

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si Hong; Lee, Sang In; Ricke, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrate dietary supplements that selectively stimulate the growth of one or more beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of the host. These bacteria can inhibit colonization of pathogenic bacteria by producing antimicrobial substances such as short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and competing for niches with pathogens within the gut. Pasture flock chickens are generally raised outdoors with fresh grass, sunlight and air, which represents different environmental growth conditions compared to conventionally raised chickens. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in microbial populations from naked neck chicken ceca fed with commercial prebiotics derived from brewer’s yeast cell wall via an Illumina MiSeq platform. A total of 147 day-of-hatch naked neck chickens were distributed into 3 groups consisted of 1) C: control (no prebiotic), 2) T1: Biolex® MB40 with 0.2%, and 3) T2: Leiber® ExCel with 0.2%, consistently supplemented prebiotics during the experimental period. At 8 weeks, a total of 15 birds from each group were randomly selected and ceca removed for DNA extraction. The Illumina Miseq platform based on V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was applied for microbiome analysis. Both treatments exhibited limited impact on the microbial populations at the phylum level, with no significant differences in the OTU number of Bacteroidetes among groups and an increase of Proteobacteria OTUs for the T1 (Biolex® MB40) group. In addition there was a significant increase of genus Faecalibacterium OTU, phylum Firmicutes. According to the development of next generation sequencing (NGS), microbiome analysis based on 16S rRNA gene proved to be informative on the prebiotic impact on poultry gut microbiota in pasture-raised naked neck birds. PMID:26992104

  17. Enrichment Culture of Hydrogen Fermentation Microorganisms and Analysis of Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoyu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Ohnishi, Akihiro; Sakamoto, Masaru; Fujimoto, Naoshi; Suzuki, Masaharu

    The present study was aimed at enrichment of hydrogen fermentative microflora that can utilize garbage as fermentation substrate. It was shown that stable hydrogen fermentation was performed using enriched microbes from sewage sludge compost. During the enrichment culture, the microflora were analyzed by the FISH method and the PCR-DGGE method. As a result, predominant microbes of hydrogen production were determined to be from the genus Clostridium belonging to a Gram positive Low G+C group. Furthermore, it was supposed that genus Bacillus contributed to the stability of hydrogen productivity from garbage by genus Clostridium. In the batch culture, under pH control at 6.0, it was ascertained that enriched microflora obtained from sewage sludge compost had sufficient hydrogen productivity using garbage, and yielded 2.03mol-H2/mol-hexose. It is supposed that the microflora of sewage sludge compost is effective as inoculum of the hydrogen fermentation system when using garbage as substrate.

  18. Comparison of Two Culture Methods for Use in Assessing Microbial Contamination of Duodenoscopes.

    PubMed

    Gazdik, Michaela A; Coombs, Jana; Burke, John P; Lopansri, Bert K

    2016-02-01

    Recent outbreaks of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections associated with duodenoscopes used for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography have highlighted the challenge of cleaning and high-level disinfection of these instruments. The Food and Drug Administration has suggested that duodenoscope surveillance by microbiological culturing, along with strict adherence to reprocessing protocols, may help reduce the risk of duodenoscope-associated infection transmission. We developed and validated an effective, user-friendly duodenoscope sampling and culture protocol and compared its performance to the interim Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended guidelines. Our protocol resulted in a 65% recovery rate for Gram-negative organisms, demonstrating a 2-fold increased recovery rate compared to the CDC method. The implementation of this protocol may increase the feasibility of duodenoscope surveillance for microbiology laboratories and endoscopy departments. PMID:26582839

  19. Microbial deterioration of cultural heritage and works of art--tilting at windmills?

    PubMed

    Sterflinger, Katja; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2013-11-01

    Microorganisms (bacteria, archaea and fungi), in addition to lichens and insect pests, cause problems in the conservation of cultural heritage because of their biodeteriorative potential. This holds true for all types of historic artefacts, and even for art made of modern materials, in public buildings, museums and private art collections. The variety of biodeterioration phenomena observed on materials of cultural heritage is determined by several factors, such as the chemical composition and nature of the material itself, the climate and exposure of the object, in addition to the manner and frequency of surface cleaning and housekeeping in museums. This study offers a review of a variety of well-known biodeterioration phenomena observed on different materials, such as stone and building materials, objects exhibited in museums and libraries, as well as human remains and burial-related materials. The decontamination of infected artefacts, exhibition rooms and depots incurs high expenditure for museums. Nevertheless, the question has to be raised: whether the process of biodeterioration of cultural heritage can or should be stopped under all circumstances, or whether we have to accept it as a natural and an implicit consecution of its creation. This study also highlights critically the pros and cons of biocide treatments and gives some prominent examples of successful and unsuccessful conservation treatments. Furthermore, an outlook on the future research needs and developments in this highly interesting field is given. PMID:24100684

  20. Persistence of pentolite (PETN and TNT) in soil microcosms and microbial enrichment cultures.

    PubMed

    Arbeli, Ziv; Garcia-Bonilla, Erika; Pardo, Cindy; Hidalgo, Kelly; Velásquez, Trigal; Peña, Luis; C, Eliana Ramos; Avila-Arias, Helena; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolás; Brandão, Pedro F B; Roldan, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Pentolite is a mixture (1:1) of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and little is known about its fate in the environment. This study was aimed to determine the dissipation of pentolite in soils under laboratory conditions. Microcosm experiments conducted with two soils demonstrated that dissipation rate of PETN was significantly slower than that of TNT. Interestingly, the dissipation of PETN was enhanced by the presence of TNT, while PETN did not enhanced the dissipation of TNT. Pentolite dissipation rate was significantly faster under biostimulation treatment (addition of carbon source) in soil from the artificial wetland, while no such stimulation was observed in soil from detonation field. In addition, the dissipation rate of TNT and PETN in soil from artificial wetland under biostimulation was significantly faster than the equivalent abiotic control, although it seems that non-biological processes might also be important for the dissipation of TNT and PETN. Transformation of PETN was also slower during establishment of enrichment culture using pentolite as the sole nitrogen source. In addition, transformation of these explosives was gradually reduced and practically stopped after the forth cultures transfer (80 days). DGGE analysis of bacterial communities from these cultures indicates that all consortia were dominated by bacteria from the order Burkholderiales and Rhodanobacter. In conclusion, our results suggest that PETN might be more persistent than TNT. PMID:26832872

  1. Microbial reduction and precipitation of vanadium (V) in groundwater by immobilized mixed anaerobic culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baogang; Hao, Liting; Tian, Caixing; Yuan, Songhu; Feng, Chuanping; Ni, Jinren; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2015-09-01

    Vanadium is an important contaminant impacted by natural and industrial activities. Vanadium (V) reduction efficiency as high as 87.0% was achieved by employing immobilized mixed anaerobic sludge as inoculated seed within 12h operation, while V(IV) was the main reduction product which precipitated instantly. Increasing initial V(V) concentration resulted in the decrease of V(V) removal efficiency, while this index increased first and then decreased with the increase of initial COD concentration, pH and conductivity. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis indicated the decreased microbial diversity. V(V) reduction was realized through dissimilatory reduction process by significantly enhanced Lactococcus and Enterobacter with oxidation of lactic and acetic acids from fermentative microorganisms such as the enriched Paludibacter and the newly appeared Acetobacterium, Oscillibacter. This study is helpful to detect new functional species for V(V) reduction and constitutes a step ahead in developing in situ bioremediations of vanadium contamination. PMID:26067477

  2. A commercial rapid optical immunoassay detects Streptococcus agalactiae from aquatic cultures and clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joyce J; Pasnik, David J; Klesius, Phillip H

    2010-08-26

    The BioStar STREP B Optical ImmunoAssay (STREP B OIA) (BioStar OIA Strep B Assay Kit; BioStar Incorporation, Louisville, CO, USA), commonly used for diagnosis of human maternal group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization, was evaluated for its diagnostic and analytical sensitivity and specificity to aquatic animal GBS isolates, cross-reactivity, and diagnosis and recovery of GBS directly from clinically- infected fish swabs. STREP B OIA identified 25 known fish and dolphin GBS isolates. Thirteen non-GBS negative control isolates from fish and other animals were negative, giving 100% analytical specificity and no cross-reactivity. Three groups of 6 Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) (mean weight of 40.60+/-1.70 g) each were inoculated intraperitoneally with either 10(6) colony-forming units (cfu) GBS/fish, 10(6) cfu Streptococcus iniae/fish or 100 microL of tryptic soy broth (TSB) and observed for mortality for 7 days. The nare and brain of all fish were swabbed and subjected to the STREP B OIA for detection of GBS antigen immediately after swabbing (0 h) or 24, 48 and 72 h post-swabbing and compared to conventional culture on trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep blood. The STREP B OIA method demonstrated a diagnostic sensitivity of 75.0% and a diagnostic specificity of 69.2% compared to direct TSA. The percent agreement between OIA and culture was 100%. GBS antigen could be retrieved by OIA following 72-h storage of swabs. These results demonstrate the utility of the STREP B OIA to identify GBS from culture and directly from swabs of clinically- infected fish. PMID:20430538

  3. Dechlorination of commercial PCBs and other multiple halogenated compounds by a sediment-free culture containing Dehalococcoides and Dehalobacter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanquan; He, Jianzhong

    2013-09-17

    At the contaminated sites, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) frequently coexist with other halogenated compounds, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), chloroethanes, and chloroethenes. The presence of multiple halogenated compounds usually poses toxicity to dehalogenating microbes, because few cultures are capable of detoxifying a broad spectrum of halogenated compounds. In this study, a sediment-free culture, designed as AD14, is able to sequentially remove halogens from PCBs and other cocontaminants. Culture AD14 dechlorinated the commercial PCB mixture-Aroclor 1260-mainly by removing flanked para- and doubly flanked meta-chlorines. It also dehalogenated octa-brominated diphenyl ether mixture predominantly to tetra-BDEs, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) to 4-CP, and tetrachloroethene (PCE)/1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) completely to ethene. When applied to a mixture of the above-mentioned compounds, culture AD14 stepwise removed halogens from 2,4,6-TCP, 1,2-DCA, PCE, PBDEs, and PCBs. Illumina sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that only two known dechlorinating genera, Dehalococcoides and Dehalobacter, were present in culture AD14. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the 16S rRNA gene copies of Dehalococcoides and Dehalobacter increased from 1.14 × 10(5) to 7.04 × 10(6) copies mL(-1) and from 1.15 × 10(5) to 8.20 × 10(6) copies mL(-1) after removing 41.13 μM of total chlorine from PCBs. The above results suggest that both Dehalobacter and Dehalococcoides could be responsible for PCB dechlorination. Although two Dehalococoides mccartyi strains with identical 16S rRNA genes were isolated from the PCBs-dechlorinating mixed culture using trichloroethene (TCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) as alternatives to PCBs, the two isolates are incapable of dechlorinating PCBs. In all, culture AD14 is promising for bioremediation applications at sites cocontaminated with PCBs and other halogenated compounds. PMID:23964900

  4. Differences in protein binding and cytokine release from monocytes on commercially sourced tissue culture polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Battiston, Kyle G; McBane, Joanne E; Labow, Rosalind S; Paul Santerre, J

    2012-01-01

    Tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) is a ubiquitous substrate used by many researchers in the biomedical and biological sciences. Different parameters involved in the production of TCPS, including the treatment time and the use of reactive gases and chemical agents, can have a significant influence on the ultimate surface properties achieved. The assumption that they will all yield a consistent and controlled product has not proven to be true. To provide a better insight into the bioactivity differences in TCPS supplied by different manufacturers, TCPS from three different companies (Sarstedt, Wisent Corp., and Becton Dickinson (BD)) were analyzed for their surface properties, protein adsorption characteristics, and interactions with human monocytes. Marked differences were observed in terms of surface wettability and surface chemistry. Furthermore, Wisent TCPS adsorbed more than twice the amount of serum proteins compared with BD and Sarstedt TCPS. Sarstedt showed significantly more cell retention (more DNA) compared with both BD and Wisent TCPS brands over a 7 day culture period. Cytokine release from monocytes adherent on the three different TCPS also differed significantly, suggesting that the differences in the surface properties were sufficient to differentially mediate monocyte activation. These results have important implications for TCPS research use, in terms of appreciating the interpretation of the data when TCPS is used as a control substrate as well as when it is used where a pre-conditioned state would influence the outcome of the study. PMID:21963405

  5. Biodiversity within hot spring microbial mat communities: molecular monitoring of enrichment cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, D. M.; Santegoeds, C. M.; Nold, S. C.; Ramsing, N. B.; Ferris, M. J.; Bateson, M. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have begun to examine the basis for incongruence between hot spring microbial mat populations detected by cultivation or by 16S rRNA methods. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to monitor enrichments and isolates plated therefrom. At near extincting inoculum dilutions we observed Chloroflexus-like and cyanobacterial populations whose 16S rRNA sequences have been detected in the 'New Pit' Spring Chloroflexus mat and the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat. Cyanobacterial populations enriched from 44 to 54 degrees C and 56 to 63 degrees C samples at near habitat temperatures were similar to those previously detected in mat samples of comparable temperatures. However, a lower temperature enrichment from the higher temperature sample selected for the populations found in the lower temperature sample. Three Thermus populations detected by both DGGE and isolation exemplify even more how enrichment may bias our view of community structure. The most abundant population was adapted to the habitat temperature (50 degrees C), while populations adapted to 65 degrees C and 70 degrees C were 10(2)- and 10(4)-fold less abundant, respectively. However, enrichment at 70 degrees C favored the least abundant strain. Inoculum dilution and incubation at the habitat temperature favored the more numerically relevant populations. We enriched many other aerobic chemoorganotrophic populations at various inoculum dilutions and substrate concentrations, most of whose 16S rRNA sequences have not been detected in mats. A common feature of numerically relevant cyanobacterial, Chloroflexus-like and aerobic chemorganotrophic populations, is that they grow poorly and resist cultivation on solidified medium, suggesting plating bias, and that the medium composition and incubation conditions may not reflect the natural microenvironments these populations inhabit.

  6. Application of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods for the identification of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens in microbial consortia present in kefir grains.

    PubMed

    Hamet, Maria Fernanda; Londero, Alejandra; Medrano, Micaela; Vercammen, Elisabeth; Van Hoorde, Koenraad; Garrote, Graciela L; Huys, Geert; Vandamme, Peter; Abraham, Analía G

    2013-12-01

    The biological and technological characteristics of kefiran as well as its importance in grain integrity led us to analyze the microbial kefir grain consortium with focus on Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The presence of L. kefiranofaciens in the nine kefir grains studied was demonstrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. By culture dependent methods applying a methodology focused on the search of this species, 22 isolates with typical morphology were obtained and identified applying a combination of SDS-PAGE of whole cell proteins, (GTG)5-PCR and sequence analysis of the housekeeping gene encoding the α-subunit of bacterial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS). This polyphasic approach allowed the reliable identification of 11 L. kefiranofaciens, 5 Lactobacillus paracasei, 4 Lactobacillus kefiri and 2 Lactobacillus parakefiri isolates. Isolated L. kefiranofaciens strains produced polysaccharide in strain-dependent concentrations and EPS produced by them also differed in the degree of polymerization. The isolation and accurate identification of L. kefiranofaciens is relevant taking into account the important role of this microorganism in the grain ecosystem as well as its potential application as starter in food fermentations. PMID:24010614

  7. Changing the academic culture: Valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement

    PubMed Central

    Sanberg, Paul R.; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T.; Kaler, Eric W.; Marchase, Richard B.; Sands, Timothy D.; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-01-01

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future. PMID:24778248

  8. Changing the academic culture: valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, Paul R; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T; Kaler, Eric W; Marchase, Richard B; Sands, Timothy D; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-05-01

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future. PMID:24778248

  9. Impact of dilution on microbial community structure and functional potential: comparison of numerical simulations and batch culture experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, R. B.; Garland, J. L.; Bolster, C. H.; Mills, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    A series of microcosm experiments was performed using serial dilutions of a sewage microbial community to inoculate a set of batch cultures in sterile sewage. After inoculation, the dilution-defined communities were allowed to regrow for several days and a number of community attributes were measured in the regrown assemblages. Based upon a set of numerical simulations, community structure was expected to differ along the dilution gradient; the greatest differences in structure were anticipated between the undiluted-low-dilution communities and the communities regrown from the very dilute (more than 10(-4)) inocula. Furthermore, some differences were expected among the lower-dilution treatments (e.g., between undiluted and 10(-1)) depending upon the evenness of the original community. In general, each of the procedures used to examine the experimental community structures separated the communities into at least two, often three, distinct groups. The groupings were consistent with the simulated dilution of a mixture of organisms with a very uneven distribution. Significant differences in community structure were detected with genetic (amplified fragment length polymorphism and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism), physiological (community level physiological profiling), and culture-based (colony morphology on R2A agar) measurements. Along with differences in community structure, differences in community size (acridine orange direct counting), composition (ratio of sewage medium counts to R2A counts, monitoring of each colony morphology across the treatments), and metabolic redundancy (i.e., generalist versus specialist) were also observed, suggesting that the differences in structure and diversity of communities maintained in the same environment can be manifested as differences in community organization and function.

  10. A Culture-Independent Approach to Unravel Uncultured Bacteria and Functional Genes in a Complex Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Chen, Yin; Zhou, Qian; Huang, Shi; Ning, Kang; Xu, Jian; Kalin, Robert M.; Rolfe, Stephen; Huang, Wei E.

    2012-01-01

    Most microorganisms in nature are uncultured with unknown functionality. Sequence-based metagenomics alone answers ‘who/what are there?’ but not ‘what are they doing and who is doing it and how?’. Function-based metagenomics reveals gene function but is usually limited by the specificity and sensitivity of screening strategies, especially the identification of clones whose functional gene expression has no distinguishable activity or phenotypes. A ‘biosensor-based genetic transducer’ (BGT) technique, which employs a whole-cell biosensor to quantitatively detect expression of inserted genes encoding designated functions, is able to screen for functionality of unknown genes from uncultured microorganisms. In this study, BGT was integrated with Stable isotope probing (SIP)-enabled Metagenomics to form a culture-independent SMB toolbox. The utility of this approach was demonstrated in the discovery of a novel functional gene cluster in naphthalene contaminated groundwater. Specifically, metagenomic sequencing of the 13C-DNA fraction obtained by SIP indicated that an uncultured Acidovorax sp. was the dominant key naphthalene degrader in-situ, although three culturable Pseudomonas sp. degraders were also present in the same groundwater. BGT verified the functionality of a new nag2 operon which co-existed with two other nag and two nah operons for naphthalene biodegradation in the same microbial community. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that the nag2 operon was the key functional operon in naphthalene degradation in-situ, and shared homology with both nag operons in Ralstonia sp. U2 and Polaromonas naphthalenivorans CJ2. The SMB toolbox will be useful in providing deep insights into uncultured microorganisms and unravelling their ecological roles in natural environments. PMID:23082176

  11. Molecular and culture-based assessment of the microbial diversity of diabetic chronic foot wounds and contralateral skin sites.

    PubMed

    Oates, Angela; Bowling, Frank L; Boulton, Andrew J M; McBain, Andrew J

    2012-07-01

    Wound debridement samples and contralateral (healthy) skin swabs acquired from 26 patients attending a specialist foot clinic were analyzed by differential isolation and eubacterium-specific PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in conjunction with DNA sequencing. Thirteen of 26 wounds harbored pathogens according to culture analyses, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common (13/13). Candida (1/13), pseudomonas (1/13), and streptococcus (7/13) were less prevalent. Contralateral skin was associated with comparatively low densities of bacteria, and overt pathogens were not detected. According to DGGE analyses, all wounds contained significantly greater eubacterial diversity than contralateral skin (P < 0.05), although no significant difference in total eubacterial diversity was detected between wounds from which known pathogens had been isolated and those that were putatively uninfected. DGGE amplicons with homology to Staphylococcus sp. (8/13) and S. aureus (2/13) were detected in putatively infected wound samples, while Staphylococcus sp. amplicons were detected in 11/13 noninfected wounds; S. aureus was not detected in these samples. While a majority of skin-derived DGGE consortial fingerprints could be differentiated from wound profiles through principal component analysis (PCA), a large minority could not. Furthermore, wounds from which pathogens had been isolated could not be distinguished from putatively uninfected wounds on this basis. In conclusion, while chronic wounds generally harbored greater eubacterial diversity than healthy skin, the isolation of known pathogens was not associated with qualitatively distinct consortial profiles or otherwise altered diversity. The data generated support the utility of both culture and DGGE for the microbial characterization of chronic wounds. PMID:22553231

  12. Polyhydroxyalkanoate granules quantification in mixed microbial cultures using image analysis: Sudan Black B versus Nile Blue A staining.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Daniela P; Amaral, A Luís; Leal, Cristiano; Oehmen, Adrian; Reis, Maria A M; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2015-03-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) can be produced and intracellularly accumulated as inclusions by mixed microbial cultures (MMC) for bioplastic production and in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems. Classical methods for PHA quantification use a digestion step prior to chromatography analysis, rendering them labor intensive and time-consuming. The present work investigates the use of two quantitative image analysis (QIA) procedures specifically developed for PHA inclusions identification and quantification. MMC obtained from an EBPR system were visualized by bright-field and fluorescence microscopy for PHA inclusions detection, upon Sudan Black B (SBB) and Nile Blue A (NBA) staining, respectively. The captured color images were processed by QIA techniques and the image analysis data were further treated using multivariate statistical analysis. Partial least squares (PLS) regression coefficients of 0.90 and 0.86 were obtained between QIA parameters and PHA concentrations using SBB and NBA, respectively. It was found that both staining procedures might be seen as alternative methodologies to classical PHA determination. PMID:25732579

  13. Methods for Observing Microbial Biofilms Directly on Leaf Surfaces and Recovering Them for Isolation of Culturable Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. E.; Monier, J.; Jacques, M.

    1997-01-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to observe microbial biofilms directly on leaf surfaces. Biofilms were observed on leaves of all species sampled (spinach, lettuce, Chinese cabbage, celery, leeks, basil, parsley, and broad-leaved endive), although the epifluorescent images were clearest when pale green tissue or cuticle pieces were used. With these techniques, biofilms were observed that were about 20 (mu)m in depth and up to 1 mm in length and that contained copious exopolymeric matrices, diverse morphotypes of microorganisms, and debris. The epifluorescence techniques described here can be used to rapidly determine the abundance and localization of biofilms on leaves. An additional technique was developed to recover individual biofilms or portions of single biofilms from leaves and to disintegrate them for isolation of the culturable microorganisms they contained. Nineteen biofilms from broad-leaved endive, spinach, parsley, and olive leaves were thus isolated and characterized to illustrate the applications of this technique. PMID:16535579

  14. Numerical Modeling Analysis of Hydrodynamic and Microbial Controls on DNAPL Pool Dissolution and Detoxification: Dehalorespirers in Co-culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wesseldyke, Eric S.; Becker, Jennifer G.; Seagren, Eric A.; Mayer, Alex S.; Zhang, Changyong

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants like tetrachloroethene (PCE) can be “bioenhanced” via biodegradation, which increases the concentration gradient at the DNAPL–water interface. Model simulations were used to evaluate the impact of ecological interactions between different dehalorespiring strains and hydrodynamics on the bioenhancement effect and the extent of PCE dechlorination. Simulations were performed using a two-dimensional coupled flow-transport model, with a DNAPL pool source and two microbial species, Dehalococcoides mccartyi 195 and Desulfuromonas michiganensis, which compete for electron acceptors (e.g., PCE), but not for their electron donors. Under biostimulation, low vx conditions, D. michiganensis alone significantly enhanced dissolution by rapidly utilizing aqueous-phase PCE. In co-culture under these conditions, D. mccartyi 195 increased this bioenhancement modestly and greatly increased the extent of PCE transformation. Although D. michiganensis was the dominant population under low velocity conditions, D. mccartyi 195 dominated under high velocity conditions due to bioclogging effects.

  15. Segregated flux balance analysis constrained by population structure/function data: the case of PHA production by mixed microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Pardelha, F; Albuquerque, M G E; Carvalho, G; Reis, M A M; Dias, J M L; Oliveira, R

    2013-08-01

    In this study we developed a segregated flux balance analysis (FBA) method to calculate metabolic flux distributions of the individual populations present in a mixed microbial culture (MMC). Population specific flux data constraints were derived from the raw data typically obtained by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microautoradiography (MAR)-FISH techniques. This method was applied to study the metabolic heterogeneity of a MMC that produces polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) from fermented sugar cane molasses. Three populations were identified by FISH, namely Paracoccus sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. The segregated FBA method predicts a flux distribution for each of the identified populations. The method is shown to predict with high accuracy the average PHA storage flux and the respective monomeric composition for 16 independent experiments. Moreover, flux predictions by segregated FBA were slightly better than those obtained by nonsegregated FBA, and also highly concordant with metabolic flux analysis (MFA) estimated fluxes. The segregated FBA method can be of high value to assess metabolic heterogeneity in MMC systems and to derive more efficient eco-engineering strategies. For the case of PHA-producing MMC considered in this work, it becomes apparent that the PHA average monomeric composition might be controlled not only by the volatile fatty acids (VFA) feeding profile but also by the population composition present in the MMC. PMID:23475571

  16. Bioelectricity production from microbial fuel cell using mixed bacterial culture isolated from distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Samsudeen, N; Radhakrishnan, T K; Matheswaran, Manickam

    2015-11-01

    The effect of various system parameters such as wastewater Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) concentration, pH, conductivity, membrane size and thickness on efficient energy production using mixed isolated culture from the distillery wastewater in the MFC was studied. The power density increased with increase in the anolyte pH from 6 to 8. The peak power density and COD removal efficiency was observed as 63.8±0.65 mW/m(2) and 63.5±1.5% at pH 8, respectively. The MFC performance increased with increasing COD concentration (800-3200 mg/l), conductivity (1.1-9.7 mS/cm) and membrane area (8-24 cm(2)). The MFC operating with wastewater COD concentration of 3200 mg/l and its conductivity of 9.7 mS/cm produced the highest power density of 202±6 mW/m(2) with a corresponding current density of 412±12 mA/m(2). The results showed that the efficient electricity generation and simultaneous treatment of distillery wastewater can be attained in the MFC. PMID:26212679

  17. The potential of autochthonous microbial culture encapsulation in a confined environment for phenol biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Azaizeh, Hassan; Kurzbaum, Eyal; Said, Ons; Jaradat, Husain; Menashe, Ofir

    2015-10-01

    Olive mill wastewater (OMWW) is claimed to be one of the most polluting effluents produced by agro-food industries, providing high contaminants load that encase cytotoxic agents such as phenolic and polyphenolic compounds. Therefore, a significant and continuous stress episode is induced once the mixed liquor of the wastewater treatment plants (WWTP's) is being exposed to OMWW. The use of bio-augmentation treatment procedures can be useful to eliminate or reduce such stress episodes. In this study, we have estimated the use of autochthonous biomass implementation within small bioreactor platform (SBP) particles as a bio-augmentation method to challenge against WWTPs stress episodes. Our results showed that SBP particles significantly reduced the presence of various phenolics: tannic, gallic and caffeic acid in a synthetic medium and in crude OMWW matrix. Moreover, the SBP particles succeeded to biodegrade a very high concentration of phenol blend (3000 mg L(-1)). Our findings indicated that the presence of the SBP microfiltration membrane has reduced the phenol biodegradation rate by 50 % compared to the same suspended culture. Despite the observed reduction in biodegradation rate, encapsulation in a confined environment can offer significant values such as overcoming the grazing forcers and dilution, thus achieving a long-term sufficient biomass. The potential for reducing stress episodes caused by cytotoxic agents through bio-augmentation treatment procedure using the SBP technology is discussed. PMID:26250809

  18. Inflight Microbial Monitoring - An Alternative Method to Culture Based Detection Currently Used on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Roman, Monsi; Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms including potential human pathogens have been detected on the International Space Station (ISS). The potential to introduce new microorganisms occurs with every exchange of crew or addition of equipment or supplies. Current microbial monitoring methods require enrichment of microorganisms and a 48-hour incubation time resulting in an increase in microbial load, detecting a limited number of unidentified microorganisms. An expedient, low-cost, in-flight method of microbial detection, identification, and enumeration is warranted.

  19. Culture-independent method for identification of microbial enzyme-encoding genes by activity-based single-cell sequencing using a water-in-oil microdroplet platform

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Nishi, Shinro; Yoshida, Takao; Hatada, Yuji; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Ayaka; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Sekiguchi, Tetsushi; Shoji, Shuichi; Funatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Environmental microbes are a great source of industrially valuable enzymes with potent and unique catalytic activities. Unfortunately, the majority of microbes remain unculturable and thus are not accessible by culture-based methods. Recently, culture-independent metagenomic approaches have been successfully applied, opening access to untapped genetic resources. Here we present a methodological approach for the identification of genes that encode metabolically active enzymes in environmental microbes in a culture-independent manner. Our method is based on activity-based single-cell sequencing, which focuses on microbial cells showing specific enzymatic activities. First, at the single-cell level, environmental microbes were encapsulated in water-in-oil microdroplets with a fluorogenic substrate for the target enzyme to screen for microdroplets that contain microbially active cells. Second, the microbial cells were recovered and subjected to whole genome amplification. Finally, the amplified genomes were sequenced to identify the genes encoding target enzymes. Employing this method, we successfully identified 14 novel β-glucosidase genes from uncultured bacterial cells in marine samples. Our method contributes to the screening and identification of genes encoding industrially valuable enzymes. PMID:26915788

  20. Culture-independent method for identification of microbial enzyme-encoding genes by activity-based single-cell sequencing using a water-in-oil microdroplet platform.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Nishi, Shinro; Yoshida, Takao; Hatada, Yuji; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Ayaka; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Sekiguchi, Tetsushi; Shoji, Shuichi; Funatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Environmental microbes are a great source of industrially valuable enzymes with potent and unique catalytic activities. Unfortunately, the majority of microbes remain unculturable and thus are not accessible by culture-based methods. Recently, culture-independent metagenomic approaches have been successfully applied, opening access to untapped genetic resources. Here we present a methodological approach for the identification of genes that encode metabolically active enzymes in environmental microbes in a culture-independent manner. Our method is based on activity-based single-cell sequencing, which focuses on microbial cells showing specific enzymatic activities. First, at the single-cell level, environmental microbes were encapsulated in water-in-oil microdroplets with a fluorogenic substrate for the target enzyme to screen for microdroplets that contain microbially active cells. Second, the microbial cells were recovered and subjected to whole genome amplification. Finally, the amplified genomes were sequenced to identify the genes encoding target enzymes. Employing this method, we successfully identified 14 novel β-glucosidase genes from uncultured bacterial cells in marine samples. Our method contributes to the screening and identification of genes encoding industrially valuable enzymes. PMID:26915788

  1. Study of microbial diversity in raw milk and fresh curd used for Fontina cheese production by culture-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Giannino, Maria Laura; Marzotto, Marta; Dellaglio, Franco; Feligini, Maria

    2009-04-15

    The bacterial populations of raw milk employed for the production of Fontina cheese in alpine farms located in different valleys and altitudes (from 700 to 2246 m above sea level) were investigated by culture independent techniques. Total microbial DNA was isolated from milk and curd samples and used as template in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to study the hypervariable V3 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and analyzed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Representative bands of DGGE patterns were sequenced for identification purposes. The use of universal primer for PCR-DGGE allowed the description of the bacterial community, not only for the presence of lactic acid bacteria, but also for other adventitious species. DGGE profiles obtained from milk and fresh curd samples were generally different and typical for each farm, although some recurrent bands were observed. Cluster analysis of DGGE profiles did not show high similarity among samples and it was probably dependent on the different geographical areas of pastures. Some Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) recurred in many samples (Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc lactis) indicating that alpine milk is a preferential niche for their colonization. The microbiota included not only mesophilic and thermoresistant LAB but also adventitious bacteria (Macrococcus caseolyticus, Rothia spp.) and psychrotrophic bacteria (Chryseobacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp.), that were found in almost all samples, but disappeared after the warming up at 47-48 degrees C of coagulated milk. Pantoea spp. was primarily found in curds and only with a low incidence in milk samples, indicating the environmental origin. Finally the sequencing data confirmed the presence of E. faecium, E. faecalis and S. thermophilus as major species present in the curd. These species were found also in raw milk, proving its importance as source of the typical fermenting

  2. Type Culture Collections and Their Databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial culture collections, also known as Biological Resource Centers, are primary suppliers of microbial cultures (germplasm) for medical, agricultural and biotechnological research and development. Many countries have one or more culture collections, which may specialize in certain microbial g...

  3. Integrated ‘omics analysis for studying the microbial community response to a pH perturbation of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor culture

    SciTech Connect

    Boaro, Amy A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Konopka, Allan; Callister, Stephen J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated ‘omics have been used on pure cultures and co-cultures, yet they have not been applied to complex microbial communities to examine questions of perturbation response. In this study, we used integrated ‘omics to measure the perturbation response of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor community fed with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). We predicted that a pH decrease by addition of a pulse of acid would reduce microbial community diversity and temporarily reduce reactor function such as cellulose degradation. However, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing results revealed increased alpha diversity in the microbial community after the perturbation, and a persistence of the dominant community members over the duration of the experiment. Proteomics results showed a decrease in activity of proteins associated with Fibrobacter succinogenes two days after the perturbation followed by increased protein abundances six days after the perturbation. The decrease in cellulolytic activity suggested by the proteomics was confirmed by the accumulation of Avicel in the reactor. Metabolomics showed a pattern similar to that of the proteome, with amino acid production decreasing two days after the perturbation and increasing after six days. This study demonstrated that community ‘omics data provides valuable information about the interactions and function of anaerobic cellulolytic community members after a perturbation.

  4. Persistence of the tissue culture origin vaccine for infectious laryngotracheitis virus in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Parra, Silvana H Santander; Nuñez, Luis F; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2015-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a respiratory disease of great importance that causes serious economic losses in the poultry industry. Its control is based on biosecurity procedures and vaccination programs that use live attenuated vaccines such as tissue culture origin (TCO), chicken embryo origin (CEO), and vectored vaccines. However, problems have been reported, such as the reversion of virulence, virus latency, and field virus outbreaks. Several molecular techniques have been developed to differentiate between the field and vaccine strains. This study was conducted to determine the presence of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in Brazil from 2012 to 2014. PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) was used to detect and differentiate ILTV strains; DNA sequencing and predictive RFLP analysis were also used for this purpose. Molecular analysis detected the presence of ILTV in 15 samples that were characterized as strains of TCO vaccine origin. This study showed that the ILTV TCO vaccine strain has been circulating in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil since its introduction during the 2002 outbreak. PMID:26500264

  5. Assessment of Culturable Tea Rhizobacteria Isolated from Tea Estates of Assam, India for Growth Promotion in Commercial Tea Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Jintu; Handique, Pratap J.; Thakur, Debajit

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, 217 rhizobacterial isolates were obtained from six different tea estates of Assam, India and subjected to preliminary in vitro plant growth promotion (PGP) screening for indole acetic acid (IAA) production, phosphate solubilization, siderophore production and ammonia production. Fifty isolates showed all the PGP traits and five isolates did not exhibit any PGP traits. These 50 potential isolates were further analyzed for quantitative estimation of the PGP traits along with the aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, protease and cellulose production. After several rounds of screening, four rhizobacteria were selected based on their maximum ability to produce in vitro PGP traits and their partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that they belong to Enterobacter lignolyticus strain TG1, Burkholderia sp. stain TT6, Bacillus pseudomycoides strain SN29 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain KH45. To evaluate the efficacy of these four rhizobacteria as plant growth promoters, three different commercially important tea clones TV1, TV19, and TV20 plants were inoculated with these rhizobacteria in greenhouse condition and compared to the uninoculated control plants. Though, all the rhizobacterial treatments showed an increase in plant growth compared to control but the multivariate PCA analysis confirmed more growth promotion by TG1 and SN29 strains than the other treatments in all three clones. To validate this result, the fold change analysis was performed and it revealed that the tea clone TV19 plants inoculated with the E. lignolyticus strain TG1 showed maximum root biomass production with an increase in 4.3-fold, shoot biomass with increase in 3.1-fold, root length by 2.2-fold and shoot length by 1.6-fold. Moreover, two way ANOVA analysis also revealed that rhizobacterial treatment in different tea clones showed the significant increase (P < 0.05) in growth promotion compared to the control. Thus, this study indicates that the

  6. Microbial diversity and dynamics throughout manufacturing and ripening of surface ripened semi-hard Danish Danbo cheeses investigated by culture-independent techniques.

    PubMed

    Ryssel, Mia; Johansen, Pernille; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Sørensen, Søren; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-12-23

    Microbial successions on the surface and in the interior of surface ripened semi-hard Danish Danbo cheeses were investigated by culture-dependent and -independent techniques. Culture-independent detection of microorganisms was obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing, using amplicons of 16S and 26S rRNA genes for prokaryotes and eukaryotes, respectively. With minor exceptions, the results from the culture-independent analyses correlated to the culture-dependent plating results. Even though the predominant microorganisms detected with the two culture-independent techniques correlated, a higher number of genera were detected by pyrosequencing compared to DGGE. Additionally, minor parts of the microbiota, i.e. comprising <10.0% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), were detected by pyrosequencing, resulting in more detailed information on the microbial succession. As expected, microbial profiles of the surface and the interior of the cheeses diverged. During cheese production pyrosequencing determined Lactococcus as the dominating genus on cheese surfaces, representing on average 94.7%±2.1% of the OTUs. At day 6 Lactococcus spp. declined to 10.0% of the OTUs, whereas Staphylococcus spp. went from 0.0% during cheese production to 75.5% of the OTUs at smearing. During ripening, i.e. from 4 to 18 weeks, Corynebacterium was the dominant genus on the cheese surface (55.1%±9.8% of the OTUs), with Staphylococcus (17.9%±11.2% of the OTUs) and Brevibacterium (10.4%±8.3% of the OTUs) being the second and third most abundant genera. Other detected bacterial genera included Clostridiisalibacter (5.0%±4.0% of the OTUs), as well as Pseudoclavibacter, Alkalibacterium and Marinilactibacillus, which represented <2% of the OTUs. At smearing, yeast counts were low with Debaryomyces being the dominant genus accounting for 46.5% of the OTUs. During ripening the yeast counts increased significantly with Debaryomyces being the predominant genus

  7. What they eat is how they fractionate: controls on sulfur isotope fractionations during microbial sulfate reduction in culture and nature (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, T.; Sim, M.; Donovan, K.; Grabenstatter, J. D.; Ono, S.

    2010-12-01

    Some of the largest sulfur isotope effects are produced by microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction. This biological signature is used to reconstruct the oxygenation of Earth’s surface, the coupled cycling of carbon and sulfur through geologic time and to constrain the evolution of sulfur-based metabolisms. However, mechanistic links between the isotopic signatures of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates and microbial physiologies and growth conditions are poorly understood. To address this, we investigate the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by marine sulfate reducing bacteria as a function of the type and the availability of the electron donors. DMSS-1, a bacterium that is unable to completely oxidize acetate to CO2, produces isotope effects between 5-46 ‰ during active growth on various electron donors in batch and continuous cultures. Overall, the largest isotope effects are produced at very slow dilution and growth rates, but appear to correlate best with the rate at which cells release free energy. Maximum sulfur isotope effects in continuous cultures are produced during very slow growth, when the physiology of the organism is visibly altered. Because the same genetic and enzymatic machinery can yield fractionations from ~ 5 to 46 ‰, we conclude that the upper range of sulfur isotope effects during microbial sulfate reduction depends primarily on the coupling between the intracellular processes coupling the oxidation of carbon to the reduction of sulfur. Future work will attempt to identify these processes and the underlying enzymatic machinery by identifying the changes in the expression of genes during microbial growth under conditions that yield low and high sulfur isotope effects.

  8. In-Flight Microbial Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Ruby, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that potential human pathogens have been detected on the International Space Station (ISS). New microorganisms are introduced with every exchange of crew and cargo. Microorganisms introduced to the ISS are readily transferred between crew and subsystems (i.e., ECLSS, environmental control and life support systems). Current microbial characterization methods require a culture-based enrichment of microorganisms and at least a 48-hour incubation time. This increases the microbial load while detecting only a limited number of microorganisms. The culture-based method detects approximately 1-10% of the total organisms present and provides no identification. To identify and enumerate ISS samples requires that the microbes be returned to Earth for complete analysis. Therefore, a more expedient, low-cost, inflight method of microbial detection, identification, and enumeration is needed. The RAZOR EX, a ruggedized, commercial off the shelf, real-time PCR field instrument was tested for its ability to detect microorganisms at low concentrations within one hour. Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected at low levels using real-time DNA amplification. Total heterotrophic counts could also be detected using a 16S gene marker that can identify up to 98% of all bacteria. To reflect viable cells found in the samples, RNA was also detectable using a modified, single-step reverse transcription reaction.

  9. Changes in Microbial Communities, Including both Uncultured and Culturable Bacteria, with Mid-Ocean Ballast-Water Exchange during a Voyage from Japan to Australia

    PubMed Central

    Tomaru, Akiko; Kawachi, Masanobu; Demura, Mikihide; Fukuyo, Yasuwo

    2014-01-01

    We assessed changes in the microbial communities in ballast water during a trans-Pacific voyage from Japan to Australia that included a mid-ocean ballast-water exchange. Uncultured (i.e., total) and culturable bacteria were counted and were characterized by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). There was a clear decrease over time in numbers of uncultured microorganisms, except for heterotrophic nanoflagellates, whereas the abundance of culturable bacteria initially decreased after the ballast-water exchange but then increased. The increase, however, was only up to 5.34% of the total number of uncultured bacteria. Cluster analysis showed that the DGGE profiles of uncultured bacteria clearly changed after the exchange. In contrast, there was no clear change in the DGGE profiles of culturable bacteria after the exchange. Multidimensional scaling analysis showed changes in microbial communities over the course of the voyage. Although indicator microbes as defined by the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments were occasionally detected, no coliform bacteria were detected after the exchange. PMID:24817212

  10. Family fun or cultural free-for-all? A critique of the 2015 National Football League Super Bowl commercials

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Corey H.; Kernan, William D; Reeves, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to enumerate and describe violent and risky behaviors as well as other general health behaviors exhibited in the advertisements during the National Football League (NFL) Super Bowl 2015. Methods: Commercials during the NFL Super Bowl 2015 were assessed for violent and risky behaviors. Additional health behaviors were indicated such as the advertisement of unhealthy food, promotion of physical activity, and sexual content. Results: A total of 110 commercials were documented, accounting for 64 minutes of broadcast time. Commercials promoting automobiles, television shows, food, and movies were the most prevalent, representing just over half (53.7%) of all of the advertisements featured. Depictions of unsafe driving were found in 10.9% (n = 12) of the commercials. All 12 commercials contained some sort of risky or wild driving behavior, and speeding was observed in 11 of the 12 commercials. A total of 32 (29.1%) of the commercials were coded as including violent content.Physical activity behavior was present in 3 (2.7%) of the commercials. Conversely, substance use was observed in 3 (2.7%) of the commercials, none of which included health promotion messaging. Of the 110 commercials aired during the 2015 Super Bowl, 12.7% (n = 14) included sexual content. Conclusion: Parents should consider the possibility that their children may observe acts of violence or conflicting safety messages during commercial breaks. PMID:27123435

  11. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process

    PubMed Central

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types. PMID:27485896

  12. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types.

  13. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process.

    PubMed

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types. PMID:27485896

  14. Production of polyol oils from soybean oil by bioprocess: results of microbial screening and identification of positive cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently we reported methods for microbial screening and production of polyol oils from soybean oil through bioprocessing (Hou and Lin, 2013). Soy-polyol oils (oxygenated acylglycerols) are important starting materials for the manufacture of polymers such as polyurethane. Currently, they are produce...

  15. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CULTURABLE SOIL MICROBIAL POPULATIONS AND GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATION PROCESSES IN A CLAY LOAM SOIL ACROSS ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The size and quality of soil organic matter (SOM) pool can vary between ecosystems and can affect many soil properties. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between gross N transformation rates and microbial populations and to investigate the role that SOM...

  16. Influence of a Commercial Fertilizer and Tropic Sunn (Crotalaria juncea) as a Cover Crop on Soil Microbial Communities Under Organic Sweet Pepper Produciton in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic production in Puerto Rico is at an early stage and research is needed to validate the sustainability of different management practices. This research initiated evaluation of selected soil properties including the microbial communities and enzyme activities in order to evaluate the effects o...

  17. Differential induction of nitric oxide, degranulation, and oxidative burst activities in response to microbial agonist stimulation in monocytes and heterophils from young commercial turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns and trigger inflammatory immune responses to control the infection. Here, we examined functional innate immune responses to Salmonella enteritidis (SE, live or formalin-killed) and various TLR ag...

  18. From genetic improvement to commercial-scale mass culture of a Chilean strain of the green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis with enhanced productivity of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Patricia I.; Inostroza, Ingrid; Pizarro, Mario; Pérez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a red ketocarotenoid, widely used as a natural red colourant in marine fish aquaculture and poultry and, recently, as an antioxidant supplement for humans and animals. The green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the richest natural sources of this pigment. However, its slow growth rate and complex life cycle make mass culture difficult for commercial purposes. The aims of this research were (i) to standardize and apply a genetic improvement programme to a Chilean strain of H. pluvialis in order to improve its carotenogenic capacity and (ii) to evaluate the performance of a selected mutant strain in commercial-sized (125 000 L) open ponds in the north of Chile. Haematococcus pluvialis strain 114 was mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate. The level of mutagen dose (exposure time and concentration) was one that induced at least 90 % mortality. Surviving colonies were screened for resistance to the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor diphenylamine (25 µM). Resistant mutants were grown in a 30-mL volume for 30 days, after which the total carotenoid content was determined by spectrophotometry. Tens of mutants with improved carotenogenic capacity compared with the wild-type strain were isolated by the application of these standardized protocols. Some mutants exhibited curious morphological features such as spontaneous release of astaxanthin and loss of flagella. One of the mutants was grown outdoors in commercial-sized open ponds of 125 000 L in the north of Chile. Grown under similar conditions, the mutant strain accumulated 30 % more astaxanthin than the wild-type strain on a per dry weight basis and 72 % more on a per culture volume basis. We show that random mutagenesis/selection is an effective strategy for genetically improving strains of H. pluvialis and that improved carotenogenic capacity is maintained when the volume of the cultures is scaled up to a commercial size. PMID:23789055

  19. Evaluation of microbial stability, bioactive compounds, physicochemical properties, and consumer acceptance of pomegranate juice processed in a commercial scale pulsed electric field system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigated the feasibility for pasteurizing raw pomegranate juice in a commercial scale pulsed electric field (PEF) system. The juice was processed in a commercial scale PEF processing system at 35 and 38 kV/cm for 281 µs at 55 degree C with a flow rate of 100 L/h. Effect of PEF process...

  20. Production of Gouda cheese and Camembert with probiotic cultures: the suitability of some commercial probiotic cultures to be implemented in cheese.

    PubMed

    Van de Casteele, S; Ruyssen, T; Vanheuverzwijn, T; Van Assche, P

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of 10 probiotic cultures (L. acidophilus, Bifidobacterium sp., L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei) was examined during the production and ripening of Gouda cheese and Camembert. The overall objective of this research project was to obtain a product (cheese) containing at least 10(7) probiotic cfu/g. In general 10(6) cfu of a probiotic culture must be implemented per ml cheese milk, together with the cheesestarter, to reach this objective. L. paracasei sp. have the ability to grow more than 2 log units during cheese ripening. A lower inoculation value can be considered for these cultures. PMID:24757803

  1. Surface-to-surface biofilm transfer: a quick and reliable startup strategy for mixed culture microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Andreas; Bischof, Franz; Wichern, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The startup of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is known to be prone to failure or result in erratic performance impeding the research. The aim of this study was to advise a quick launch strategy for laboratory-scale MFCs that ensures steady operation performance in a short period of time. Different startup strategies were investigated and compared with membraneless single chamber MFCs. A direct surface-to-surface biofilm transfer (BFT) in an operating MFC proved to be the most efficient method. It provided steady power densities of 163 ± 13 mWm(-2) 4 days after inoculation compared to 58 ± 15 mWm(-2) after 30 days following a conventional inoculation approach. The in situ BFT eliminates the need for microbial acclimation during startup and reduces performance fluctuations caused by shifts in microbial biodiversity. Anaerobic pretreatment of the substrate and addition of suspended enzymes from an operating MFC into the new MFC proved to have a beneficial effect on startup and subsequent operation. Polarization methods were applied to characterize the startup phase and the steady state operation in terms of power densities, internal resistance and power overshoot during biofilm maturation. Applying this method a well-working MFC can be multiplied into an array of identically performing MFCs. PMID:27120629

  2. Microbial diversity in methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures isolated from a water-flooded oil reservoir (Dagang oil field, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Núria; Cai, Minmin; Straaten, Nontje; Yao, Jun; Richnow, Hans H.; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Microbial transformation of oil to methane is one of the main degradation processes taking place in oil reservoirs, and it has important consequences as it negatively affects the quality and economic value of the oil. Nevertheless, methane could constitute a recovery method of carbon from exhausted reservoirs. Previous studies combining geochemical and isotopic analysis with molecular methods showed evidence for in situ methanogenic oil degradation in the Dagang oil field, China (Jiménez et al., 2012). However, the main key microbial players and the underlying mechanisms are still relatively unknown. In order to better characterize these processes and identify the main microorganisms involved, laboratory biodegradation experiments under methanogenic conditions were performed. Microcosms were inoculated with production and injection waters from the reservoir, and oil or 13C-labelled single hydrocarbons (e.g. n-hexadecane or 2-methylnaphthalene) were added as sole substrates. Indigenous microbiota were able to extensively degrade oil within months, depleting most of the n-alkanes in 200 days, and producing methane at a rate of 76 ± 6 µmol day-1 g-1 oil added. They could also produce heavy methane from 13C-labeled 2-methylnaphthalene, suggesting that further methanogenesis may occur from the aromatic and polyaromatic fractions of Dagang reservoir fluids. Microbial communities from oil and 2-methyl-naphthalene enrichment cultures were slightly different. Although, in both cases Deltaproteobacteria, mainly belonging to Syntrophobacterales (e.g. Syntrophobacter, Smithella or Syntrophus) and Clostridia, mostly Clostridiales, were among the most represented taxa, Gammaproteobacteria could be only identified in oil-degrading cultures. The proportion of Chloroflexi, exclusively belonging to Anaerolineales (e.g. Leptolinea, Bellilinea) was considerably higher in 2-methyl-naphthalene degrading cultures. Archaeal communities consisted almost exclusively of representatives of

  3. Nitrogen availability of grape juice limits killer yeast growth and fermentation activity during mixed-culture fermentation with sensitive commercial yeast strains.

    PubMed Central

    Medina, K; Carrau, F M; Gioia, O; Bracesco, N

    1997-01-01

    The competition between selected or commercial killer strains of type K2 and sensitive commercial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied under various conditions in sterile grape juice fermentations. The focus of this study was the effect of yeast inoculation levels and the role of assimilable nitrogen nutrition on killer activity. A study of the consumption of free amino nitrogen (FAN) by pure and mixed cultures of killer and sensitive cells showed no differences between the profiles of nitrogen assimilation in all cases, and FAN was practically depleted in the first 2 days of fermentation. The effect of the addition of assimilable nitrogen and the size of inoculum was examined in mixed killer and sensitive strain competitions. Stuck and sluggish wine fermentations were observed to depend on nitrogen availability when the ratio of killer to sensitive cells was low (1:10 to 1:100). A relationship between the initial assimilable nitrogen content of must and the proportion of killer cells during fermentation was shown. An indirect relationship was found between inoculum size and the percentage of killer cells: a smaller inoculum resulted in a higher proportion of killer cells in grape juice fermentations. In all cases, wines obtained with pure-culture fermentations were preferred to mixed-culture fermentations by sensory analysis. The reasons why killer cells do not finish fermentation under competitive conditions with sensitive cells are discussed. PMID:9212430

  4. Carbon dioxide reduction by mixed and pure cultures in microbial electrosynthesis using an assembly of graphite felt and stainless steel as a cathode.

    PubMed

    Bajracharya, Suman; ter Heijne, Annemiek; Dominguez Benetton, Xochitl; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Buisman, Cees J N; Strik, David P B T B; Pant, Deepak

    2015-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction to multi-carbon compounds at the cathode using chemolithoautotrophs is an emerging application of microbial electrosynthesis (MES). In this study, CO2 reduction in MES was investigated at hydrogen evolving potentials, separately by a mixed culture and Clostridium ljungdahlii, using a graphite felt and stainless steel assembly as cathode. The mixed culture reactor produced acetate at the maximum rate of 1.3 mM d(-1), along with methane and hydrogen at -1.1 V/Ag/AgCl. Over 160 days of run-time in four fed-batches, 26% of bicarbonate was converted to acetate between day 28 and 41, whereas in the late batches, methane production prevailed. Out of 45 days of run-time in the C. ljungdahlii reactor, 2.4 mM d(-1) acetate production was achieved at -0.9 V/Ag/AgCl in Batch 1. Simultaneous product degradation occurred when the mixed culture was not selectively enriched. Hydrogen evolution is potentially the rapid way of transferring electrons to the biocatalysts for higher bioproduction rates. PMID:26066971

  5. Response of a three-stage process for PHA production by mixed microbial cultures to feedstock shift: impact on polymer composition.

    PubMed

    Duque, Anouk F; Oliveira, Catarina S S; Carmo, Inês T D; Gouveia, Ana R; Pardelha, Filipa; Ramos, Ana M; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-06-25

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) can be produced by mixed microbial cultures (MMC) using a three-stage process. An attractive feature of MMC for PHA production is the ability to use waste/surplus feedstocks. In this study, the effect of a feedstock shift, mimicking a seasonal feedstock scenario and/or as a strategy for controlling polymer composition, on a MMC PHA production process was assessed using cheese whey (CW) and sugar cane molasses (SCM) as model feedstocks. The acidogenic stage responded immediately to the feedstock shift by changing the fermented products profile, with acetate and butyrate being the main acids produced from CW, while for SCM propionate and valerate were the dominant products. The fermentation process was then quite stable during long term operation. The PHA culture selection stage also responded quickly to the fermented feestocks shift, generating a polymer whose composition was linearly dependent on the concentration of HV and HB precursors produced in the acidogenic stage. The selected culture reached a maximum PHA content of 56% and 65% with fermented SCM and CW, respectively. Mixing fermented CW and SCM, in equal volume proportions, demonstrated the possibility of using different fermented feedstocks for tailoring polymer composition. PMID:24211366

  6. Selection of an actinobacteria mixed culture for chlordane remediation. Pesticide effects on microbial morphology and bioemulsifier production.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, María S; Colin, Verónica L; Amoroso, María J; Benimeli, Claudia S

    2016-02-01

    Chlordane bioremediation using actinobacteria mixed culture is an attractive clean-up technique. Their ability to produce bioemulsifiers could increase the bioavailability of this pesticide. In order to select a defined actinobacteria mixed culture for chlordane remediation, compatibility assays were performed among six Streptomyces strains. The strains did not show growth inhibition, and they were assayed for chlordane removal, either as pure or as mixed cultures. In pure cultures, all of the strains showed specific dechlorination activity (1.42-24.20 EU mg(-1)) and chlordane removal abilities (91.3-95.5%). The specific dechlorination activity was mainly improved with cultures of three or four microorganisms. The mixed culture consisting of Streptomyces sp. A2-A5-A13 was selected. Their ability to produce bioemulsifiers in the presence of glucose or chlordane was tested, but no significant differences were observed (p > 0.05). However, the stability of the emulsions formed was linked to the carbon source used. Only in chlordane presence the emulsions retained 100% of their initial height. Finally, the selected consortium showed a high degree of sporulation in the pesticide presence. This is the first study on the effects that chlordane exerts on microbe morphology and emulsifier production for a defined mixed culture of Streptomyces with ability to remediate the pesticide. PMID:26554742

  7. Metagenomic analysis of an anaerobic alkane-degrading microbial culture: potential hydrocarbon-activating pathways and inferred roles of community members.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boonfei; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia

    2013-10-01

    A microbial community (short-chain alkane-degrading culture, SCADC) enriched from an oil sands tailings pond was shown to degrade C6-C10 alkanes under methanogenic conditions. Total genomic DNA from SCADC was subjected to 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina paired-end sequencing, and 16S rRNA amplicon pyrotag sequencing; the latter revealed 320 operational taxonomic units at 5% distance. Metagenomic sequences were subjected to in-house quality control and co-assembly, yielding 984 086 contigs, and annotation using MG-Rast and IMG. Substantial nucleotide and protein recruitment to Methanosaeta concilii, Syntrophus aciditrophicus, and Desulfobulbus propionicus reference genomes suggested the presence of closely related strains in SCADC; other genomes were not well mapped, reflecting the paucity of suitable reference sequences for such communities. Nonetheless, we detected numerous homologues of putative hydrocarbon succinate synthase genes (e.g., assA, bssA, and nmsA) implicated in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation, suggesting the ability of the SCADC microbial community to initiate methanogenic alkane degradation by addition to fumarate. Annotation of a large contig revealed analogues of the ass operon 1 in the alkane-degrading sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01. Despite being enriched under methanogenic-fermentative conditions, additional metabolic functions inferred by COG profiling indicated multiple CO(2) fixation pathways, organic acid utilization, hydrogenase activity, and sulphate reduction. PMID:24237341

  8. Comparison of Different Strategies for Selection/Adaptation of Mixed Microbial Cultures Able to Ferment Crude Glycerol Derived from Second-Generation Biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    Varrone, C.; Heggeset, T. M. B.; Le, S. B.; Haugen, T.; Markussen, S.; Skiadas, I. V.; Gavala, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was the selection and adaptation of mixed microbial cultures (MMCs), able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel and produce building-blocks and green chemicals. Various adaptation strategies have been investigated for the enrichment of suitable and stable MMC, trying to overcome inhibition problems and enhance substrate degradation efficiency, as well as generation of soluble fermentation products. Repeated transfers in small batches and fed-batch conditions have been applied, comparing the use of different inoculum, growth media, and Kinetic Control. The adaptation of activated sludge inoculum was performed successfully and continued unhindered for several months. The best results showed a substrate degradation efficiency of almost 100% (about 10 g/L glycerol in 21 h) and different dominant metabolic products were obtained, depending on the selection strategy (mainly 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, or butyrate). On the other hand, anaerobic sludge exhibited inactivation after a few transfers. To circumvent this problem, fed-batch mode was used as an alternative adaptation strategy, which led to effective substrate degradation and high 1,3-propanediol and butyrate production. Changes in microbial composition were monitored by means of Next Generation Sequencing, revealing a dominance of glycerol consuming species, such as Clostridium, Klebsiella, and Escherichia. PMID:26509171

  9. The effect of storage conditions on microbial community composition and biomethane potential in a biogas starter culture.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Live Heldal; Vivekanand, Vivekanand; Pope, Phillip B; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Horn, Svein J

    2015-07-01

    A new biogas process is initiated by adding a microbial community, typically in the form of a sample collected from a functional biogas plant. This inoculum has considerable impact on the initial performance of a biogas reactor, affecting parameters such as stability, biogas production yields and the overall efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, we have analyzed changes in the microbial composition and performance of an inoculum during storage using barcoded pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and determination of the biomethane potential, respectively. The inoculum was stored at room temperature, 4 and -20 °C for up to 11 months and cellulose was used as a standard substrate to test the biomethane potential. Storage up to 1 month resulted in similar final methane yields, but the rate of methane production was reduced by storage at -20 °C. Longer storage times resulted in reduced methane yields and slower production kinetics for all storage conditions, with room temperature and frozen samples consistently giving the best and worst performance, respectively. Both storage time and temperature affected the microbial community composition and methanogenic activity. In particular, fluctuations in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes were observed. Interestingly, a shift from hydrogenotrophic methanogens to methanogens with the capacity to perform acetoclastic methanogensis was observed upon prolonged storage. In conclusion, this study suggests that biogas inocula may be stored up to 1 month with low loss of methanogenic activity, and identifies bacterial and archaeal species that are affected by the storage. PMID:25947246

  10. Fate of β-hexachlorocyclohexane in the mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) three-stage polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production process from cheese whey.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Francesco; Riccardi, Carmela; Campanari, Sabrina; Pomata, Donatella; Majone, Mauro

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to study the fate and effect of β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) during several steps of PHA production and purification, by using an artificially contaminated cheese whey (CW) as the feedstock. Most of β-HCH (around 90%) was adsorbed on CW solids and it was removed after the acidogenic fermentation step, when residual CW solids are separated along with anaerobic biomass from the liquid-phase. Purification steps also contributed strongly to the removal of residual β-HCH; overall, the PHA production process removed about 99.9% of initial β-HCH content. Moreover, it has been shown that β-HCH has neither detrimental effect on acidogenic fermentation nor on PHA accumulation, that were performed by using unacclimated mixed microbial cultures. PMID:26048084