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Sample records for common cellular events

  1. The Mosaic Theory Revisited: Common Molecular Mechanisms Coordinating Diverse Organ and Cellular Events in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Over 60 years ago, Dr. Irvine Page proposed the Mosaic Theory of hypertension, which states that many factors, including genetics, environment, adaptive, neural, mechanical and hormonal perturbations interdigitate to raise blood pressure. In the past two decades, it has become clear that common molecular and cellular events in various organs underlie many features of the Mosaic Theory. Two of these are the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. These factors increase neuronal firing in specific brain centers, increase sympathetic outflow, alter vascular tone and morphology and promote sodium retention in the kidney. Moreover, factors such as genetics and environment contribute to oxidant generation and inflammation. Other common cellular signals, including calcium signaling and endoplasmic reticulum stress are similarly perturbed in different cells in hypertension and contribute to components of Dr. Page’s theory. Thus, Dr. Page’s Mosaic Theory formed a framework for future studies of molecular and cellular signals in the context of hypertension, and has greatly aided our understanding of this complex disease. PMID:23321405

  2. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jumaat Mohd. Yussof; Omar, Effat; Pai, Dinker R.; Sood, Suneet

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs). MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds. PMID:23162220

  3. Cellular Neurothekeoma: A Rare Tumor with a Common Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Boukovalas, Stefanos; Rogers, Hayley; Boroumand, Nahal

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Neurothekeomas are rare benign tumors commonly found on the head, neck, and upper extremities of women and younger individuals. They are thought to be of nerve sheath origin and usually present as painless, slow growing masses. We present a case of cellular neurothekeoma on the nasal ala of an 8-year-old girl with no previous history of trauma or piercings. Differential diagnosis, treatment options, and special considerations regarding potentially atypical characteristics are discussed.

  4. Cellular Neurothekeoma: A Rare Tumor with a Common Clinical Presentation.

    PubMed

    Boukovalas, Stefanos; Rogers, Hayley; Boroumand, Nahal; Cole, Eric Lowry

    2016-08-01

    Neurothekeomas are rare benign tumors commonly found on the head, neck, and upper extremities of women and younger individuals. They are thought to be of nerve sheath origin and usually present as painless, slow growing masses. We present a case of cellular neurothekeoma on the nasal ala of an 8-year-old girl with no previous history of trauma or piercings. Differential diagnosis, treatment options, and special considerations regarding potentially atypical characteristics are discussed. PMID:27622087

  5. Cellular Dynamic Simulator: An Event Driven Molecular Simulation Environment for Cellular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Cellular Dynamic Simulator (CDS) for simulating diffusion and chemical reactions within crowded molecular environments. CDS is based on a novel event driven algorithm specifically designed for precise calculation of the timing of collisions, reactions and other events for each individual molecule in the environment. Generic mesh based compartments allow the creation / importation of very simple or detailed cellular structures that exist in a 3D environment. Multiple levels of compartments and static obstacles can be used to create a dense environment to mimic cellular boundaries and the intracellular space. The CDS algorithm takes into account volume exclusion and molecular crowding that may impact signaling cascades in small sub-cellular compartments such as dendritic spines. With the CDS, we can simulate simple enzyme reactions; aggregation, channel transport, as well as highly complicated chemical reaction networks of both freely diffusing and membrane bound multi-protein complexes. Components of the CDS are generally defined such that the simulator can be applied to a wide range of environments in terms of scale and level of detail. Through an initialization GUI, a simple simulation environment can be created and populated within minutes yet is powerful enough to design complex 3D cellular architecture. The initialization tool allows visual confirmation of the environment construction prior to execution by the simulator. This paper describes the CDS algorithm, design implementation, and provides an overview of the types of features available and the utility of those features are highlighted in demonstrations. PMID:20361275

  6. Using Fluctuation Analysis to Establish Causal Relations between Cellular Events without Experimental Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Welf, Erik S.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2014-01-01

    Experimental perturbations are commonly used to establish causal relationships between the molecular components of a pathway and their cellular functions; however, this approach suffers inherent limitations. Especially in pathways with a significant level of nonlinearity and redundancy among components, such perturbations induce compensatory responses that obscure the actual function of the targeted component in the unperturbed pathway. A complementary approach uses constitutive fluctuations in component activities to identify the hierarchy of information flow through pathways. Here, we review the motivation for using perturbation-free approaches and highlight recent advances made in using perturbation-free fluctuation analysis as a means to establish causality among cellular events. PMID:25468328

  7. Early events in annelid regeneration: a cellular perspective.

    PubMed

    Bely, Alexandra E

    2014-10-01

    The ability to regenerate extensive portions of the body is widespread among the phylum Annelida and this group includes some of the most highly regenerative animals known. Knowledge of the cellular and molecular basis of regeneration in this group is thus important for understanding how regenerative processes have evolved both within the group and across animal phyla. Here, the cellular basis of annelid regeneration is reviewed, with a focus on the earliest steps of regeneration, namely wound-healing and formation of the blastema. Information from a wide range of annelids is compiled in order to identify common and variable elements. There is a large body of valuable older literature on the cellular basis of regeneration in annelids and an effort is made to review this literature in addition to more recent studies. Annelids typically seal the wound through muscular contraction and undergo some autolysis of tissue at the site of the wound. Bodily injury elicits extensive cell migration toward the wound, involving several different types of cells. Some migrating cells form a tissue-clot and phagocytize damaged tissues, whereas others are inferred to contribute to regenerated tissue, specifically mesodermal tissue. In one annelid subgroup, the clitellates, a group of mesodermal cells, sometimes referred to as neoblasts, is inferred to migrate over considerable distances, with cells moving to the wound from several segments away. Epidermis and gut epithelia severed upon amputation typically heal by fusing with like tissue, although not always. After amputation, cellular contacts with the extracellular matrix are disrupted and major changes in cell morphology and adhesion occur within tissues near the wound. Interactions of tissues at the wound appear key for initiating a blastema, with a particularly important role suggested for the ventral nerve cord, although species are variable in this regard; longer-distance effects mediated by the brain are also reported. The

  8. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Dale M. Rasmuson

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the treatment of common-cause failure in probabilistic risk assessment of operational events. The approach is based upon the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, and examples are illustrated using the alpha-factor parameterization, the approach adopted by the NRC in their Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared common-cause failure potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g., failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper. These methods are being applied by the NRC in assessing the risk significance of operational events for the Significance Determination Process (SDP) and the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program.

  9. Chronology of mitochondrial and cellular events during skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Stéphanie; Charles, Anne-Laure; Meyer, Alain; Lejay, Anne; Scholey, James W; Chakfé, Nabil; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common circulatory disorder of the lower limb arteries that reduces functional capacity and quality of life of patients. Despite relatively effective available treatments, PAD is a serious public health issue associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) cycles during PAD are responsible for insufficient oxygen supply, mitochondriopathy, free radical production, and inflammation and lead to events that contribute to myocyte death and remote organ failure. However, the chronology of mitochondrial and cellular events during the ischemic period and at the moment of reperfusion in skeletal muscle fibers has been poorly reviewed. Thus, after a review of the basal myocyte state and normal mitochondrial biology, we discuss the physiopathology of ischemia and reperfusion at the mitochondrial and cellular levels. First we describe the chronology of the deleterious biochemical and mitochondrial mechanisms activated by I/R. Then we discuss skeletal muscle I/R injury in the muscle environment, mitochondrial dynamics, and inflammation. A better understanding of the chronology of the events underlying I/R will allow us to identify key factors in the development of this pathology and point to suitable new therapies. Emerging data on mitochondrial dynamics should help identify new molecular and therapeutic targets and develop protective strategies against PAD. PMID:27076618

  10. LINKING MOLECULAR EVENT TO CELLULAR RESPONSES AT LOW DOSE EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defining low dose radiation cancer risks is limited by our ability to measure and directly correlate relevant cellular and molecular responses occurring at low dose and dose rate with tumor formation. This deficiency has led to conservative risk assessments based on low dose ext...

  11. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  12. Myocardial Remodeling: Cellular and Extracellular Events and Targets

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer A.; Spinale, Francis G.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this review is on translational studies utilizing large-animal models and clinical studies that provide fundamental insight into cellular and extracellular pathways contributing to post–myocardial infarction (MI) left ventricle (LV) remodeling. Specifically, both large-animal and clinical studies have examined the potential role of endogenous and exogenous stem cells to alter the course of LV remodeling. Interestingly, there have been alterations in LV remodeling with stem cell treatment despite a lack of long-term cell engraftment. The translation of the full potential of stem cell treatments to clinical studies has yet to be realized. The modulation of proteolytic pathways that contribute to the post-MI remodeling process has also been examined. On the basis of recent large-animal studies, there appears to be a relationship between stem cell treatment post-MI and the modification of proteolytic pathways, generating the hypothesis that stem cells leave an echo effect that moderates LV remodeling. PMID:21314431

  13. Integrated Circuit-Based Biofabrication with Common Biomaterials for Probing Cellular Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Sung, Chun-Yen; Yang, Chung-Yao; Yeh, J Andrew; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in bioengineering have enabled the development of biomedical tools with modifiable surface features (small-scale architecture) to mimic extracellular matrices and aid in the development of well-controlled platforms that allow for the application of mechanical stimulation for studying cellular biomechanics. An overview of recent developments in common biomaterials that can be manufactured using integrated circuit-based biofabrication is presented. Integrated circuit-based biofabrication possesses advantages including mass and diverse production capacities for fabricating in vitro biomedical devices. This review highlights the use of common biomaterials that have been most frequently used to study cellular biomechanics. In addition, the influence of various small-scale characteristics on common biomaterial surfaces for a range of different cell types is discussed. PMID:26708959

  14. Identification of the "minimal triangle" and other common event-to-event transitions in conflict and containment incidents.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Len; James, Karen; Quirk, Alan; Wright, Steve; Williams, Hilary; Stewart, Duncan

    2013-07-01

    Although individual conflict and containment events among acute psychiatric inpatients have been studied in some detail, the relationship of these events to each other has not. In particular, little is known about the temporal order of events for individual patients. This study aimed to identify the most common pathways from event to event. A sample of 522 patients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in 31 hospital locations in London and the surrounding areas during 2009-2010. Data on the order of conflict and containment events were collected for the first two weeks of admission from patients' case notes. Event-to-event transitions were tabulated and depicted diagrammatically. Event types were tested for their most common temporal placing in sequences of events. Most conflict and containment occurs within and between events of the minimal triangle (verbal aggression, de-escalation, and PRN medication), and the majority of these event sequences conclude in no further events; a minority transition to other, more severe, events. Verbal abuse and medication refusal were more likely to start sequences of disturbed behaviour. Training in the prevention and management of violence needs to acknowledge that a gradual escalation of patient behaviour does not always occur. Verbal aggression is a critical initiator of conflict events, and requires more detailed and sustained research on optimal management and prevention strategies. Similar research is required into medication refusal by inpatients. PMID:23875553

  15. Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, Aldine R.; Johnston, Hereroa T.; Nedoncelle, Karine; Warner, Jacob F.; Ferreira, Solène; Röttinger, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the extant sister group to bilateria, are well known for their impressive regenerative capacity. The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a well-established system for the study of development and evolution that is receiving increased attention for its regenerative capacity. Nematostella is able to regrow missing body parts within five to six days after its bisection, yet studies describing the morphological, cellular, and molecular events underlying this process are sparse and very heterogeneous in their experimental approaches. In this study, we lay down the basic framework to study oral regeneration in Nematostella vectensis. Using various imaging and staining techniques we characterize in detail the morphological, cellular, and global molecular events that define specific landmarks of this process. Furthermore, we describe in vivo assays to evaluate wound healing success and the initiation of pharynx reformation. Using our described landmarks for regeneration and in vivo assays, we analyze the effects of perturbing either transcription or cellular proliferation on the regenerative process. Interestingly, neither one of these experimental perturbations has major effects on wound closure, although they slightly delay or partially block it. We further show that while the inhibition of transcription blocks regeneration in a very early step, inhibiting cellular proliferation only affects later events such as pharynx reformation and tentacle elongation. PMID:26633371

  16. Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Aldine R; Johnston, Hereroa T; Nedoncelle, Karine; Warner, Jacob F; Ferreira, Solène; Röttinger, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the extant sister group to bilateria, are well known for their impressive regenerative capacity. The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a well-established system for the study of development and evolution that is receiving increased attention for its regenerative capacity. Nematostella is able to regrow missing body parts within five to six days after its bisection, yet studies describing the morphological, cellular, and molecular events underlying this process are sparse and very heterogeneous in their experimental approaches. In this study, we lay down the basic framework to study oral regeneration in Nematostella vectensis. Using various imaging and staining techniques we characterize in detail the morphological, cellular, and global molecular events that define specific landmarks of this process. Furthermore, we describe in vivo assays to evaluate wound healing success and the initiation of pharynx reformation. Using our described landmarks for regeneration and in vivo assays, we analyze the effects of perturbing either transcription or cellular proliferation on the regenerative process. Interestingly, neither one of these experimental perturbations has major effects on wound closure, although they slightly delay or partially block it. We further show that while the inhibition of transcription blocks regeneration in a very early step, inhibiting cellular proliferation only affects later events such as pharynx reformation and tentacle elongation. PMID:26633371

  17. Application of a new cellular model for bedload transporting extreme events at steep slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Scheidl, C.

    2015-10-01

    A cellular model for bedload transport at steep channel gradients and alluvial fans has been developed to simulate lateral distribution of erosion and deposition on alluvial fans of mountain streams. The cellular model, named FluviSed, applies a quasi-steady-state routing of a flood hydrograph over a rectangular grid. Bedload transport is calculated and the morphological changes are updated after each time step. FluviSed is designed to complement existing one-dimensional bedload transport simulation tools by using their outcome as an input for the simulation of inundated areas. The model has been evaluated against TomSed, a one-dimensional bedload transport model. Further, a back-calculation of a laboratory bedload experiment and a real flood event from 2005 at Schnannerbach in Austria are provided to test the model's suitability for reproducing morphological changes caused by flood events at high channel gradients.

  18. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced up to 33% by all mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer. PMID:20921274

  19. Grading dermatologic adverse events of cancer treatments: the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice P; Setser, Ann; Anadkat, Milan J; Cotliar, Jonathan; Olsen, Elise A; Garden, Benjamin C; Lacouture, Mario E

    2012-11-01

    Dermatologic adverse events to cancer therapies have become more prevalent and may to lead to dose modifications or discontinuation of life-saving or prolonging treatments. This has resulted in a new collaboration between oncologists and dermatologists, which requires accurate cataloging and grading of side effects. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 is a descriptive terminology and grading system that can be used for uniform reporting of adverse events. A proper understanding of this standardized classification system is essential for dermatologists to properly communicate with all physicians caring for patients with cancer. PMID:22502948

  20. TSQ, a Common Fluorescent Sensor for Cellular Zinc, Images Zinc Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Tomasiewicz, Henry; Nowakowski, Andrew; Petering, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Zn2+ is a necessary cofactor for thousands of mammalian proteins. Research has suggested that transient fluxes of cellular Zn2+ are also involved in processes such as apoptosis. Observations of Zn2+ trafficking have been collected using Zn2+ responsive fluorescent dyes. A commonly used Zn2+ fluorophore is TSQ. The chemical species responsible for TSQ's observed fluorescence in resting or activated cells have not been characterized. Parallel fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry of LLC-PK1 cells incubated with TSQ demonstrated punctate staining that concentrated around the nucleus and was characterized by an emission maximum near 470 nm. Addition of cell permeable Zn-pyrithione resulted in greatly increased, diffuse fluorescence that shifted the emission peak to 490 nm, indicative of the formation of Zn(TSQ)2. TPEN, a cell permeant Zn2+ chelator, largely quenched TSQ fluorescence returning the residual fluorescence to the 470 nm emission maximum. Gel filtration chromatography of cell supernatant from LLC-PK1 cells treated with TSQ revealed that TSQ fluorescence (470 nm emission) eluted with the proteome fractions. Similarly, addition of TSQ to proteome prior to chromatography resulted in 470 nm fluorescence emission that was not observed in smaller molecular weight fractions. It is hypothesized that Zn-TSQ fluorescence, blue-shifted from the 490 nm emission maximum of Zn(TSQ)2, results from ternary complex, TSQ-Zn-protein formation. As an example, Zn-carbonic anhydrase formed a ternary adduct with TSQ characterized by a fluorescence emission maximum of 470 nm and a dissociation constant of 1.55 × 10-7 M. Quantification of TSQ-Zn-proteome fluorescence indicated that approximately 8% of cellular Zn2+ was imaged by TSQ. These results were generalized to other cell types and model Zn-proteins. PMID:21774459

  1. Cellular and Deafness Mechanisms Underlying Connexin Mutation-Induced Hearing Loss – A Common Hereditary Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, Jeffrey C.; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family, which encodes gap junctional proteins, is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of non-syndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. However, there is no apparent, demonstrable relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel) functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Cx30 (GJB6), Cx29 (GJC3), Cx31 (GJB3), and Cx43 (GJA1) mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation-induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes remain unclear. Also, little is known about specific mutation-induced pathological changes in vivo and little information is available for humans. Such further studies are urgently required. PMID:26074771

  2. Monitoring Cellular Events in Living Mast Cells Stimulated with an Extremely Small Amount of Fluid on a Microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaka, Tatsuya; Abe, Hirohisa; Kanai, Masaki; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Yamaoka, Tetsuji; Shoji, Shuichi; Murakami, Akira

    2006-07-01

    We successfully developed a measurement system for real-time analysis of cellular function using a newly designed microchip. This microchip was equipped with a micro cell incubation chamber (240 nl) and was stimulated by a very small amount of stimuli (as small as 24 nl). Using the microchip system, cultivation of mast cells was successfully carried out. Monitoring of the cellular events after stimulation with an extremely small amount of fluid on a microchip was performed. This system could be applicable for various types of cellular analysis including real-time monitoring of cellular response by stimulation.

  3. Photosynthetic sensitivity of phytoplankton to commonly used pharmaceuticals and its dependence on cellular phosphorus status.

    PubMed

    Grzesiuk, Malgorzata; Wacker, Alexander; Spijkerman, Elly

    2016-05-01

    Recently pharmaceuticals have become significant environmental pollutants in aquatic ecosystems, that could affect primary producers such as microalgae. Here we analyzed the effect of pharmaceuticals on the photosynthesis of microalgae commonly found in freshwater-two species of Chlorophyceae and a member of the Eustigmatophyceae, via PAM fluorometry. As pharmaceuticals, three medicines often consumed in households were chosen: (i) fluoxetine, an antidepressant, (ii) propranolol, a β-blocker and (iii) ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory and analgesic medicine. The EC50 for the quantum yield of photosystem II in phytoplankton acclimated to inorganic phosphorus (Pi)-replete and Pi-limited conditions was estimated. Acute toxicity experiments over a 5 h exposure revealed that Nannochloropsis limnetica was the least sensitive to pharmaceuticals in its photosynthetic yield out of all species tested. Although the estimation of sub-lethal effects can be vital in contrast to that of LC50s, the EC50 values in all species and for all medicines were orders of magnitude higher than concentrations found in polluted surface water. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was the most sensitive to fluoxetine (EC50 of 1.6 mg L(-1)), and propranolol (EC50 of 3 mg L(-1)). Acutodesmus obliquus was most sensitive to ibuprofen (EC50 of 288 mg L(-1)). Additionally, the sensitivity to the pharmaceuticals changed under a Pi-limitation; the green algae became less sensitive to fluoxetine and propranolol. In contrast, Pi-limited algal species were more sensitive to ibuprofen. Our results suggest that the sensitivity of algae to pharmaceuticals is (i) highly compound- and species-specific and (ii) dependent on the cellular P status. PMID:26894612

  4. Induction of Autophagy in Porcine Kidney Cells by Quantum Dots: A Common Cellular Response to Nanomaterials?

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Stephan T.; Zolnik, Banu S.; McLeland, Christopher B.; Clogston, Jeffery; Zheng, Jiwen; McNeil, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are being investigated as novel in vivo imaging agents. The leaching of toxic metals from these QDs in biological systems is of great concern. This study compared the cytotoxic mechanisms of two QD species made of different core materials (cadmium selenide [CdSe] vs. indium gallium phosphide [InGaP]) but similar core sizes (5.1 vs. 3.7 nm) and surface compositions (both ZnS capped, lipid-coated and pegylated). The CdSe QD was found to be 10-fold more toxic to porcine renal proximal tubule cells (LLC-PK1) than the InGaP QD on a molar basis, as determined by MTT assay (48 h IC50 10nM for CdSe vs. 100nM for InGaP). Neither of the QD species induced appreciable oxidative stress, as determined by lipid peroxide and reduced glutathione content, suggesting that toxicity was not metal associated. In agreement, treatment of cells with CdSe QDs was not associated with changes in metallothionein-IA (MT-IA) gene expression or Cd-associated caspase 3 enzyme activation. By contrast, incubation of the LLC-PK1 cells with the InGaP QD resulted in a dramatic increase in MT-IA expression by 21- and 43-fold, at 8 and 24 h, respectively. The most remarkable finding was evidence of extensive autophagy in QD-treated cells, as determined by Lysotracker Red dye uptake, TEM, and LC3 immunobloting. Autophagy induction has also been described for other nanomaterials and may represent a common cellular response. These data suggest that QD cytotoxicity is dependent upon properties of the particle as a whole, and not exclusively the metal core materials. PMID:18632727

  5. On the possible common nature of double extensive air showers and aligned events

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, V. I.

    2012-07-15

    Double extensive air showers and aligned events at energies in the region E Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10{sup 16} eV were discovered more than a quarter of a century ago. However, there is still no satisfactory explanation of their nature. In the present study, it is assumed that these two types of events have common nature, stemming from the break of a string that arises in the interaction of ultrahigh-energy particles.

  6. A database of common-cause events for risk and reliability applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.N.; Rao, S.B. )

    1992-06-01

    This report documents a common cause event database and updates an earlier version of a database that was published as EPRI report NP-3967 in June 1985. The purposes of this report are to provide more information on the original set of common cause events, to expand on both the number of events and the coverage of different component types, and to provide guidance in how to use the database to support applied risk and reliability evaluations such as the ongoing individual plant examination (IPE). Included in this report are descriptions and analyses of events that were found to be of potential importance in a common cause analysis, statistical information from which to estimate common cause failure probabilities, and examples of how the information can be used to support a plant-specific probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) or reliability evaluation, according to the PRA Procedures for Common Cause Analysis documented in NUREG/CR-4780. That procedures guide, which was developed under joint sponsorship of EPRI and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was supported by EPRI research project RP2169-4.

  7. A database of common-cause events for risk and reliability applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.N.; Rao, S.B.

    1992-06-01

    This report documents a common cause event database and updates an earlier version of a database that was published as EPRI report NP-3967 in June 1985. The purposes of this report are to provide more information on the original set of common cause events, to expand on both the number of events and the coverage of different component types, and to provide guidance in how to use the database to support applied risk and reliability evaluations such as the ongoing individual plant examination (IPE). Included in this report are descriptions and analyses of events that were found to be of potential importance in a common cause analysis, statistical information from which to estimate common cause failure probabilities, and examples of how the information can be used to support a plant-specific probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) or reliability evaluation, according to the PRA Procedures for Common Cause Analysis documented in NUREG/CR-4780. That procedures guide, which was developed under joint sponsorship of EPRI and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was supported by EPRI research project RP2169-4.

  8. Common-Cause Failure Treatment in Event Assessment: Basis for a Proposed New Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Song-Hua Shen; Gary DeMoss; Kevin Coyne; Don Marksberry

    2010-06-01

    Event assessment is an application of probabilistic risk assessment in which observed equipment failures and outages are mapped into the risk model to obtain a numerical estimate of the event’s risk significance. In this paper, we focus on retrospective assessments to estimate the risk significance of degraded conditions such as equipment failure accompanied by a deficiency in a process such as maintenance practices. In modeling such events, the basic events in the risk model that are associated with observed failures and other off-normal situations are typically configured to be failed, while those associated with observed successes and unchallenged components are assumed capable of failing, typically with their baseline probabilities. This is referred to as the failure memory approach to event assessment. The conditioning of common-cause failure probabilities for the common cause component group associated with the observed component failure is particularly important, as it is insufficient to simply leave these probabilities at their baseline values, and doing so may result in a significant underestimate of risk significance for the event. Past work in this area has focused on the mathematics of the adjustment. In this paper, we review the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, which underlies most current risk modelling, discuss the limitations of this model with respect to event assessment, and introduce a proposed new framework for common-cause failure, which uses a Bayesian network to model underlying causes of failure, and which has the potential to overcome the limitations of the Basic Parameter Model with respect to event assessment.

  9. Sustaining Public Education Events through Partnerships: Joining Forces for a Common Goal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, L. R.; Clift, S.; Moore, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Well-designed public STEM events benefit both the subject matter experts and the broader community. But planning and conducting these events costs participants' time and energy. For 15 years, the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin has hosted an Austin Earth Science Week Career Day, in which STEM professionals showcase their knowledge, skills, and experiences for middle-school students. By establishing partnerships and assuming a leadership role, the Bureau has leveraged resources to host a sustainable series of educational events. Key to success was finding a common goal that all participants were interested in fulfilling. Engaging and educating students about careers in geoscience became that unifying goal. Governmental agency staffers, industry professionals, graduate students, and school administrators were all interested in this effort. The career theme also attracted a wide variety of professionals, many of whom have participated in the event every year. The biggest challenge is meeting the demand from schools for this type of educational experience. In early years, the event was hosted by a few Bureau scientists in their offices. As word spread about the event, new partners and a larger facility were required to accommodate the growing number of participants. Currently, new media and distance learning platforms are being explored for broadening the event to meet demand. After 15 years, the Austin Earth Science Week Career Day has now become a tradition. We hope it serves as a model to others interested in establishing a STEM event in their own community.

  10. Overexpression of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 is an early event in the progression of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Irene; Kleeff, Jörg; Abiatari, Ivane; Shi, Xined; Giese, Nathalia; Bergmann, Frank; Roth, Wilfried; Friess, Helmut; Schirmacher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine the role of two antiapoptotic proteins of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1) and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2), in human pancreatic carcinogenesis. Methods mRNA levels were measured in pancreatic tissues and pancreatic cancer cell lines by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Protein expression was assessed in pancreatic cancer cell lines by immunoblotting and in pancreatic tissues by immunohistochemistry, and correlated with pathological and survival data. Results cIAP1 expression was constantly high in non‐neoplastic pancreatic tissues, in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, as well as in a subset of primary and metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), and a preferential cytoplasmatic localisation was observed in the tumour tissues. cIAP1 expression was rare in a cohort of cystic tumours. cIAP2 mRNA levels were significantly higher (2.4 fold) in PDAC than in normal tissues. cIAP2 protein was overexpressed in PDAC, and was detectable in low‐ and high‐grade PanIN lesions. Moreover, cIAP2 was often expressed in pancreatic cystic tumours. cIAP1 and cIAP2 mRNA and protein were detected in all the examined cell lines. Survival analysis revealed a shorter survival in patients with cIAP1/cIAP2‐positive tumours. Conclusions cIAP1 might contribute to the regulation of the apoptotic process in the normal and in the neoplastic pancreas, depending on its subcellular localisation. Overexpression of cIAP2 is a common and early event in the progression of pancreatic cancer, and could therefore potentially influence the important pathophysiological aspects of PDAC, such as anoikis or chemoresistance. PMID:16775116

  11. Molecular and Cellular Events Mediating Glomerular Podocyte Dysfunction and Depletion in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Anil Kumar, P.; Welsh, Gavin I.; Saleem, Moin A.; Menon, Ram K.

    2014-01-01

    The essential function of the kidney is to ensure formation of a relatively protein-free ultra-filtrate, urine. The rate of filtration and composition of the primary renal filtrate is determined by the transport of fluid and solutes across the glomerular filtration barrier consisting of endothelial cells, the glomerular basement membrane, and podocyte foot processes. In diabetes mellitus (DM), components of the kidney that enable renal filtration get structurally altered and functionally compromised resulting in proteinuria that often progresses to end-stage renal disease. Histological alterations in DM include early hypertrophy of glomerular and tubular components, subsequent thickening of basement membrane in glomeruli and tubules, progressive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the glomerular mesangium and loss of podocytes, together constituting a clinical condition referred to as diabetic nephropathy (DN). The glomerulus has become the focus of research investigating the mechanism of proteinuria. In particular, the progressive dysfunction and/or loss of podocytes that is contemporaneous with proteinuria in DN have attracted intense scientific attention. The absolute number of podocytes predicts glomerular function and podocyte injury is a hallmark of various glomerular diseases. This review discusses the importance of podocytes in normal renal filtration and details the molecular and cellular events that lead to podocyte dysfunction and decreased podocyte count in DN. PMID:25309512

  12. Common envelope events with low-mass giants: understanding the energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-08-01

    Common envelope events are important interactions between two binary stars that lead to the formation of close binary systems. We present here a systematic three-dimensional study in which we model common envelope events with low-mass giant donors. The results allow us to revise the energy formalism that is usually used to determine common envelope event outcomes. We show that the energy budget for this type of system should include the recombination energy, and that it also must take into account that a significant fraction of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejecta. We provide three ways in which our results can be used by binary population synthesis studies: a relation that links the observed post-common envelope binary with the initial binary parameters, a fitting formula for the $\\alpha_{\\rm ce}\\lambda$ parameter of the standard energy formalism, and a revised energy formalism that takes into account both the recombination energy and the energy that is taken away by the ejecta.

  13. Common envelope events with low-mass giants: understanding the energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-08-01

    Common envelope events are important interactions between two binary stars that lead to the formation of close binary systems. We present here a systematic three-dimensional study in which we model common envelope events with low-mass giant donors. The results allow us to revise the energy formalism that is usually used to determine common envelope event outcomes. We show that the energy budget for this type of system should include the recombination energy, and that it also must take into account that a significant fraction of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejecta. We provide three ways in which our results can be used by binary population synthesis studies: a relation that links the observed post-common envelope binary with the initial binary parameters, a fitting formula for the αceλ parameter of the standard energy formalism, and a revised energy formalism that takes into account both the recombination energy and the energy that is taken away by the ejecta.

  14. Common envelope events with low-mass giants: understanding the energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-05-01

    Common envelope events are important interactions between two binary stars that lead to the formation of close binary systems. We present here a systematic three-dimensional study in which we model common envelope events with low-mass giant donors. The results allow us to revise the energy formalism that is usually used to determine common envelope event outcomes. We show that the energy budget for this type of system should include the recombination energy, and that it also must take into account that a significant fraction of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejecta. We provide three ways in which our results can be used by binary population synthesis studies: a relation that links the observed post-common envelope binary with the initial binary parameters, a fitting formula for the αceλ parameter of the standard energy formalism, and a revised energy formalism that takes into account both the recombination energy and the energy that is taken away by the ejecta.

  15. The effect of bisphosphonate treatment on the biochemical and cellular events during bone remodelling in response to microinjury stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, L E; Curtin, C M; McCoy, R J; O'Brien, F J; Taylor, D; Lee, T C; Duffy, G P

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most prevalent bone diseases worldwide and is characterised by high levels of bone turnover, a marked loss in bone mass and accumulation of microdamage, which leads to an increased fracture incidence that places a huge burden on global health care systems. Bisphosphonates have been used to treat osteoporosis and have shown great success in conserving bone mass and reducing fracture incidence. In spite of the existing knowledge of the in vivo responses of bone to bisphosphonates, the cellular responses to these drugs have yet to be fully elucidated. In vitro model systems that allow the decoupling of complex highly integrated events, such as bone remodelling, provide a tool whereby these biological processes may be studied in a more simplified context. This study firstly utilised an in vitro model system of bone remodelling and comprising all three major cell types of the bone (osteocytes, osteoclasts and osteoblasts), which was representative of the bone's capacity to sense microdamage and subsequently initiate a basic multicellular unit response. Secondly, this system was used to study the effect of two commonly utilised aminobisphosphonate treatments for osteoporosis, alendronate and zoledronate. We demonstrated that microinjury to osteocyte networks being treated with bisphosphonates modulates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and osteoprotegerin activity, and subsequently osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, bisphosphonates increased the osteogenic potential following microinjury. Thus, we have shown for the first time that bisphosphonates act at all three stages of bone remodelling, from microinjury to osteoclastogenesis and ultimately osteogenesis. PMID:26614482

  16. Common Genetic Variation In Cellular Transport Genes and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chornokur, Ganna; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Qu, Xiaotao; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Jim, Heather S. L.; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Mellissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Narod, Steven A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Defective cellular transport processes can lead to aberrant accumulation of trace elements, iron, small molecules and hormones in the cell, which in turn may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species, promoting DNA damage and aberrant expression of key regulatory cancer genes. As DNA damage and uncontrolled proliferation are hallmarks of cancer, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we hypothesized that inherited variation in the cellular transport genes contributes to EOC risk. Methods In total, DNA samples were obtained from 14,525 case subjects with invasive EOC and from 23,447 controls from 43 sites in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Two hundred seventy nine SNPs, representing 131 genes, were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium iSelect BeadChip as part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNP analyses were conducted using unconditional logistic regression under a log-additive model, and the FDR q<0.2 was applied to adjust for multiple comparisons. Results The most significant evidence of an association for all invasive cancers combined and for the serous subtype was observed for SNP rs17216603 in the iron transporter gene HEPH (invasive: OR = 0.85, P = 0.00026; serous: OR = 0.81, P = 0.00020); this SNP was also associated with the borderline/low malignant potential (LMP) tumors (P = 0.021). Other genes significantly associated with EOC histological subtypes (p<0.05) included the UGT1A (endometrioid), SLC25A45 (mucinous), SLC39A11 (low malignant potential), and SERPINA7 (clear cell carcinoma). In addition, 1785 SNPs in six genes (HEPH, MGST1, SERPINA, SLC25A45, SLC39A11 and UGT1A) were imputed from the 1000 Genomes Project and examined for association with INV EOC in white-European subjects. The most significant imputed SNP was rs117729793 in SLC39A11 (per allele, OR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.5-4.35, p = 5.66x10-4). Conclusion These results, generated on a large cohort of women, revealed associations

  17. Recurrence time statistics of landslide events simulated by a cellular automaton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, Ester; Di Maio, Rosa; Avella, Adolfo

    2014-05-01

    The recurrence time statistics of a cellular automaton modelling landslide events is analyzed by performing a numerical analysis in the parameter space and estimating Fano factor behaviors. The model is an extended version of the OFC model, which is a paradigm for SOC in non-conserved systems, but it works differently from the original OFC model as a finite value of the driving rate is applied. By driving the system to instability with different rates, the model exhibits a smooth transition from a correlated to an uncorrelated regime as the effect of a change in predominant mechanisms to propagate instability. If the rate at which instability is approached is small, chain processes dominate the landslide dynamics, and power laws govern probability distributions. However, the power-law regime typical of SOC-like systems is found in a range of return intervals that becomes shorter and shorter by increasing the values of the driving rates. Indeed, if the rates at which instability is approached are large, domino processes are no longer active in propagating instability, and large events simply occur because a large number of cells simultaneously reach instability. Such a gradual loss of the effectiveness of the chain propagation mechanism causes the system gradually enter to an uncorrelated regime where recurrence time distributions are characterized by Weibull behaviors. Simulation results are qualitatively compared with those from a recent analysis performed by Witt et al.(Earth Surf. Process. Landforms, 35, 1138, 2010) for the first complete databases of landslide occurrences over a period as large as fifty years. From the comparison with the extensive landslide data set, the numerical analysis suggests that statistics of such landslide data seem to be described by a crossover region between a correlated regime and an uncorrelated regime, where recurrence time distributions are characterized by power-law and Weibull behaviors for short and long return times

  18. Cellular and extracellular dehydration, and angiotensin as stimuli to drinking in the common iguana Iguana iguana.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, J T; Kaufman, S

    1977-02-01

    1. After water deprivation, the iguana promptly drank slightly more than enough water to restore the body fluids to isotonicity even under conditions of hypervolaemia. 2. In response to systemic injections of hypertonic solutions of NaCl and sucrose, the iguana drank and retained enough water to dilute the injected load to isotonicity irrespective of whether water was offered immediately or after 3 hr, and irrespective of whether the solute was administered I.V. or I.P. 3. Hypertonic solutions to glucose, urea, sorbitol and KCl caused little drinking. 4. The long latencies to drinking after hypertonic loads, which were not dependent on the nature of the solute, the route of administration or the dosage, were shown not to be a result of slow distribution of the solute throughout the body fluids. 5. Clearance of injected solutes via renal and extra-renal (nasal salt gland) routes was negligible during the 6 hr experimental period. 6. Measurements of plasma [Na], haematocrit, osmotic pressure and inulin space showed that the iguana drank, in response to cellular dehydration, enough water to restore the intracellular fluid volume to normal. 7. We conclude that, in response to substances which dehydrate cells, the iguana regulates its body osmolality precisely and efficiently provided it is able to do so by drinking. In this respect the responses of the iguana are similar to those of the nephrectomized rat since, in the short term, both rely exclusively on drinking to restore cellular water to normal. 8. The iguana also drinks in response to extracellular dehydration produced by hyperoncotic peritoneal dialysis, and in response to I.P. angiotensin II. PMID:850202

  19. Simulation of debris flow events in Sicily by cellular automata model SCIDDICA_SS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancelliere, A.; Lupiano, V.; Peres, D. J.; Stancanelli, L.; Avolio, M.; Foti, E.; Di Gregorio, S.

    2013-12-01

    Debris flow models are widely used for hazard mapping or for evaluating the effectiveness of risk mitigation measures. Several models analyze the dynamics of debris flow runout solving Partial Differential Equations. In use of such models, difficulties arise in estimating kinematic geotechnical soil parameters for real phenomena. In order to overcome such difficulties, alternative semi-empirical approaches can be employed, such as macroscopic Cellular Automata (CA). In particular, for CA simulation purposes, the runout of debris flows emerges from local interactions in a dynamical system, subdivided into elementary parts, whose state evolves within a spatial and temporal discretum. The attributes of each cell (substates) describe physical characteristics. For computational reasons, the natural phenomenon is splitted into a number of elementary processes, whose proper composition makes up the CA transition function. By simultaneously applying this function to all the cells, the evolution of the phenomenon can be simulated in terms of modifications of the substates. In this study, we present an application of the macroscopic CA semi-empirical model SCIDDICA_SS3 to the Peloritani Mountains area in Sicily island, Italy. The model was applied using detailed data from the 1 October 2009 debris flow event, which was triggered by a rainfall event of about 250 mm falling in 9 hours, that caused the death of 37 persons. This region is characterized by river valleys with large hillslope angles (30°-60°), catchment basins of small extensions (0.5-12 km2) and soil composed by metamorphic material, which is easy to be eroded. CA usage implies a calibration phase, that identifies an optimal set of parameters capable of adequately play back the considered case, and a validation phase, that tests the model on a sufficient (and different) number of cases similar in terms of physical and geomorphological properties. The performance of the model can be measured in terms of a fitness

  20. Approaches to Manipulating the Dimensionality and Physicochemical Properties of Common Cellular Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Saumendra; Kim, Na Young; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    A major hurdle in studying biological systems and administering effective tissue engineered therapies is the lack of suitable cell culture models that replicate the dynamic nature of cell-microenvironment interactions. Advances in the field of surface chemistry and polymer science have allowed researchers to develop novel methodologies to manipulate materials to be extrinsically tunable. Usage of such materials in modeling tissues in vitro has offered valuable insights into numerous cellular processes including motility, invasion, and alterations in cell morphology. Here, we discuss novel techniques devised to more closely mimic cell-tissue interactions and to study cell response to distinct physico-chemical changes in biomaterials, with an emphasis on the manipulation of collagen scaffolds. The benefits and pitfalls associated with using collagen are discussed in the context of strategies proposed to control the engineered microenvironment. Tunable systems such as these offer the ability to alter individual features of the microenvironment in vitro, with the promise that the molecular basis of mechanotransduction in vivo may be laid out in future. PMID:22272094

  1. mFOAM-1.02: A compact version of the cellular event generator FOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadach, S.; Sawicki, P.

    2007-09-01

    The general-purpose self-adapting Monte Carlo (MC) event generator/simulator mFOAM (standing for mini-FOAM) is a new compact version of the FOAM program, with a slightly limited functionality with respect to its parent version. On the other hand, mFOAM is easier to use for the average user. This new version is fully integrated with the ROOT package, the C++ utility library used widely in the particle physics community. The internal structure of the code is simplified and the very valuable feature of the persistency of the objects of the mFOAM class is improved. With the persistency at hand, it is possible to record very easily the complete state of a MC simulator object based on mFOAM and ROOT into a disk-file at any stage of its use: just after object allocation, after full initialization (exploration of the distribution), or at any time during the generation of the long series of MC events. Later on the MC simulator object can be easily restored from the disk-file in the "ready to go" state. Objects of the TFoam class can be used as a stand-alone solution to many everyday problems in the area of the Monte Carlo simulation, or as building blocks in large-scale MC projects, taking full advantage of the object-oriented technology and persistency. Program summaryManuscript title: mFOAM-1.02: A compact version of the cellular event generator FOAM Authors: S. Jadach, P. Sawicki Program title: mFOAM (mini FOAM), version 1.02 Catalogue identifier: ADYX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 036 711 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 21 403 104 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: ANSI C++ Computer: Most Unix workstations, supercomputers and PC Operating

  2. Big Events and Risks to Global Substance Using Populations: Unique Threats and Common Challenges.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, we review a set of "Big Events" from around the world that have adversely impacted substance using populations by first identifying common thematic areas between them, and then describing the unique challenges faced by the diverse and vulnerable populations impacted. The Big Events reviewed are multifaceted and complex in nature, and include the recent global financial crisis, economic and trade sanctions, political transition and its impact on ethnic minorities, colonialism and indigenous communities, and ecological disasters. All have led to immense trauma, displacement, and disruption to critical healthcare services/treatment for people who use drugs, populations who are left underserved in the midst of these crises. It is our hope that through this comparative assessment, global policymakers will proactively identify Big Events and prioritize the development of interventions and policy that meet the unique and immediate needs of substance using population in order to mitigate the significant negative short- and long-term impacts on global public health. PMID:25723311

  3. The cytotoxicity of polycationic iron oxide nanoparticles: Common endpoint assays and alternative approaches for improved understanding of cellular response mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP's) have an increasing number of biomedical applications. As such in vitro characterisation is essential to ensure the bio-safety of these particles. Little is known on the cellular interaction or effect on membrane integrity upon exposure to these MNPs. Here we synthesised Fe3O4 and surface coated with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to achieve particles of varying surface positive charges and used them as model MNP's to evaluate the relative utility and limitations of cellular assays commonly applied for nanotoxicity assessment. An alternative approach, atomic force microscopy (AFM), was explored for the analysis of membrane structure and cell morphology upon interacting with the MNPs. The particles were tested in vitro on human SH-SY5Y, MCF-7 and U937 cell lines for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lipid peroxidation (LPO), LDH leakage and their overall cytotoxic effect. These results were compared with AFM topography imaging carried out on fixed cell lines. Results Successful particle synthesis and coating were characterised using FTIR, PCS, TEM and ICP. The particle size from TEM was 30 nm (−16.9 mV) which increased to 40 nm (+55.6 mV) upon coating with PEI and subsequently 50 nm (+31.2 mV) with PEG coating. Both particles showed excellent stability not only at neutral pH but also in acidic environment of pH 4.6 in the presence of sodium citrate. The higher surface charge MNP-PEI resulted in increased cytotoxic effect and ROS production on all cell lines compared with the MNP-PEI-PEG. In general the effect on the cell membrane integrity was observed only in SH-SY5Y and MCF-7 cells by MNP-PEI determined by LDH leakage and LPO production. AFM topography images showed consistently that both the highly charged MNP-PEI and the less charged MNP-PEI-PEG caused cell morphology changes possibly due to membrane disruption and cytoskeleton remodelling. Conclusions Our findings

  4. Expression of transferrin receptors on mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes: relation to cellular activation and related metabolic events.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, R M; Galbraith, G M

    1981-01-01

    Mitogen-activated normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes bind transferrin to specific membrane receptors. In this study, lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin for 0-66 hr were examined to determine the relation of this phenomenon to cellular activation and related metabolic events. Transferrin receptors were first detected at 20-24 hr. This event was consistently preceded by RNA and protein turnover which commenced during the first 6 hr of culture, whereas initiation of DNA synthesis was detected concurrently with the appearance of receptors or slightly later (24-30 hr). Exposure of cells to inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis early during culture (at 0 or 24 hr) prevented the expression of transferrin receptors, but also caused generalized metabolic failure, and abrogated cellular activation. In contrast, later addition of these agents at 48 hr did not interfere significantly with the process of activation, but did suppress the terminal increase in receptor-bearing cells observed during the final 18 hr in control cultures lacking inhibitor. After deliberate thermal stripping of receptors from activated cells, the reappearance of membrance binding sites which normally occurred within 30 min, was also blocked by cycloheximide, puromycin and actinomycin D. However, similar inhibition of DNA which was induced by hydroxyurea had much less effect upon both the initial appearance of receptors and their reappearance after ligand-induced depletion. These results demonstrate that the appearance of transferrin receptors upon human lymphocytes is dependent upon cellular activation and requires synthesis of protein and RNA. PMID:6172372

  5. Older Adults' Coping with Negative Life Events: Common Processes of Managing Health, Interpersonal, and Financial/Work Stressors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Rudolf H.; Brennan, Penny L.; Schutte, Kathleen K.; Moos, Bernice S.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined how older adults cope with negative life events in health, interpersonal, and financial/work domains and whether common stress and coping processes hold across these three domains. On three occasions, older adults identified the most severe negative event they faced in the last year and described how they appraised and coped…

  6. TSQ (6-methoxy-8-p-toluenesulfonamido-quinoline), a common fluorescent sensor for cellular zinc, images zinc proteins.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W; Tomasiewicz, Henry; Nowakowski, Andrew; Petering, David H

    2011-08-15

    Zn(2+) is a necessary cofactor for thousands of mammalian proteins. Research has suggested that transient fluxes of cellular Zn(2+) are also involved in processes such as apoptosis. Observations of Zn(2+) trafficking have been collected using Zn(2+) responsive fluorescent dyes. A commonly used Zn(2+) fluorophore is 6-methoxy-8-p-toluenesulfonamido-quinoline (TSQ). The chemical species responsible for TSQ's observed fluorescence in resting or activated cells have not been characterized. Parallel fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry of LLC-PK(1) cells incubated with TSQ demonstrated punctate staining that concentrated around the nucleus and was characterized by an emission maximum near 470 nm. Addition of cell permeable Zn-pyrithione resulted in greatly increased, diffuse fluorescence that shifted the emission peak to 490 nm, indicative of the formation of Zn(TSQ)(2). TPEN (N,N,N'N'-tetrakis(-)[2-pyridylmethyl]-ethylenediamine), a cell permeant Zn(2+) chelator, largely quenched TSQ fluorescence returning the residual fluorescence to the 470 nm emission maximum. Gel filtration chromatography of cell supernatant from LLC-PK(1) cells treated with TSQ revealed that TSQ fluorescence (470 nm emission) eluted with the proteome fractions. Similarly, addition of TSQ to proteome prior to chromatography resulted in 470 nm fluorescence emission that was not observed in smaller molecular weight fractions. It is hypothesized that Zn-TSQ fluorescence, blue-shifted from the 490 nm emission maximum of Zn(TSQ)(2), results from ternary complex, TSQ-Zn-protein formation. As an example, Zn-carbonic anhydrase formed a ternary adduct with TSQ characterized by a fluorescence emission maximum of 470 nm and a dissociation constant of 1.55 × 10(-7) M. Quantification of TSQ-Zn-proteome fluorescence indicated that approximately 8% of cellular Zn(2+) was imaged by TSQ. These results were generalized to other cell types and model Zn-proteins. PMID:21774459

  7. In situ sensing and modeling of molecular events at the cellular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruiguo

    We developed the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nanorobot in combination with other nanomechanical sensors for the investigation of cell signaling pathways. The AFM nanorobotics hinge on the superior spatial resolution of AFM in imaging and extends it into the measurement of biological processes and manipulation of biological matters. A multiple input single output control system was designed and implemented to solve the issues of nanomanipulation of biological materials, feedback, response frequency and nonlinearity. The AFM nanorobotic system therefore provide the human-directed position, velocity and force control with high frequency feedback, and more importantly it can feed the operator with the real-time imaging of manipulation result from the fast-imaging based local scanning. The use of the system has taken the study of cellular process at the molecular scale into a new level. The cellular response to the physiological conditions can be significantly manifested in cellular mechanics. Dynamic mechanical property has been regarded as biomarkers, sometimes even regulators of the signaling and physiological processes, thus the name mechanobiology. We sought to characterize the relationship between the structural dynamics and the molecular dynamics and the role of them in the regulation of cell behavior. We used the AFM nanorobotics to investigate the mechanical properties in real-time of cells that are stimulated by different chemical species. These reagents could result in similar ion channel responses but distinctive mechanical behaviors. We applied these measurement results to establish a model that describes the cellular stimulation and the mechanical property change, a "two-hit" model that comprises the loss of cell adhesion and the initiation of cell apoptosis. The first hit was verified by functional experiments: depletion of Calcium and nanosurgery to disrupt the cellular adhesion. The second hit was tested by a labeling of apoptotic markers that

  8. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  9. What Caused the UK's Largest Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis) Mass Stranding Event?

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Paul D.; Deaville, Robert; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Barnett, James; Brownlow, Andrew; Brownell Jr., Robert L.; Clare, Frances C.; Davison, Nick; Law, Robin J.; Loveridge, Jan; Macgregor, Shaheed K.; Morris, Steven; Murphy, Sinéad; Penrose, Rod; Perkins, Matthew W.; Pinn, Eunice; Seibel, Henrike; Siebert, Ursula; Sierra, Eva; Simpson, Victor; Tasker, Mark L.; Tregenza, Nick; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On 9 June 2008, the UK's largest mass stranding event (MSE) of short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) occurred in Falmouth Bay, Cornwall. At least 26 dolphins died, and a similar number was refloated/herded back to sea. On necropsy, all dolphins were in good nutritive status with empty stomachs and no evidence of known infectious disease or acute physical injury. Auditory tissues were grossly normal (26/26) but had microscopic haemorrhages (5/5) and mild otitis media (1/5) in the freshest cases. Five lactating adult dolphins, one immature male, and one immature female tested were free of harmful algal toxins and had low chemical pollutant levels. Pathological evidence of mud/seawater inhalation (11/26), local tide cycle, and the relative lack of renal myoglobinuria (26/26) suggested MSE onset on a rising tide between 06∶30 and 08∶21 hrs (9 June). Potential causes excluded or considered highly unlikely included infectious disease, gas/fat embolism, boat strike, by-catch, predator attack, foraging unusually close to shore, chemical or algal toxin exposure, abnormal weather/climatic conditions, and high-intensity acoustic inputs from seismic airgun arrays or natural sources (e.g., earthquakes). International naval exercises did occur in close proximity to the MSE with the most intense part of the exercises (including mid-frequency sonars) occurring four days before the MSE and resuming with helicopter exercises on the morning of the MSE. The MSE may therefore have been a “two-stage process” where a group of normally pelagic dolphins entered Falmouth Bay and, after 3–4 days in/around the Bay, a second acoustic/disturbance event occurred causing them to strand en masse. This spatial and temporal association with the MSE, previous associations between naval activities and cetacean MSEs, and an absence of other identifiable factors known to cause cetacean MSEs, indicates naval activity to be the most probable cause of the Falmouth Bay MSE. PMID

  10. What caused the UK's largest common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) mass stranding event?

    PubMed

    Jepson, Paul D; Deaville, Robert; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Barnett, James; Brownlow, Andrew; Brownell, Robert L; Clare, Frances C; Davison, Nick; Law, Robin J; Loveridge, Jan; Macgregor, Shaheed K; Morris, Steven; Murphy, Sinéad; Penrose, Rod; Perkins, Matthew W; Pinn, Eunice; Seibel, Henrike; Siebert, Ursula; Sierra, Eva; Simpson, Victor; Tasker, Mark L; Tregenza, Nick; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On 9 June 2008, the UK's largest mass stranding event (MSE) of short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) occurred in Falmouth Bay, Cornwall. At least 26 dolphins died, and a similar number was refloated/herded back to sea. On necropsy, all dolphins were in good nutritive status with empty stomachs and no evidence of known infectious disease or acute physical injury. Auditory tissues were grossly normal (26/26) but had microscopic haemorrhages (5/5) and mild otitis media (1/5) in the freshest cases. Five lactating adult dolphins, one immature male, and one immature female tested were free of harmful algal toxins and had low chemical pollutant levels. Pathological evidence of mud/seawater inhalation (11/26), local tide cycle, and the relative lack of renal myoglobinuria (26/26) suggested MSE onset on a rising tide between 06:30 and 08∶21 hrs (9 June). Potential causes excluded or considered highly unlikely included infectious disease, gas/fat embolism, boat strike, by-catch, predator attack, foraging unusually close to shore, chemical or algal toxin exposure, abnormal weather/climatic conditions, and high-intensity acoustic inputs from seismic airgun arrays or natural sources (e.g., earthquakes). International naval exercises did occur in close proximity to the MSE with the most intense part of the exercises (including mid-frequency sonars) occurring four days before the MSE and resuming with helicopter exercises on the morning of the MSE. The MSE may therefore have been a "two-stage process" where a group of normally pelagic dolphins entered Falmouth Bay and, after 3-4 days in/around the Bay, a second acoustic/disturbance event occurred causing them to strand en masse. This spatial and temporal association with the MSE, previous associations between naval activities and cetacean MSEs, and an absence of other identifiable factors known to cause cetacean MSEs, indicates naval activity to be the most probable cause of the Falmouth Bay MSE. PMID:23646103

  11. Common carotid intima-media thickness relates to cardiovascular events in adults aged <45 years.

    PubMed

    Eikendal, Anouk L M; Groenewegen, Karlijn A; Anderson, Todd J; Britton, Annie R; Engström, Gunnar; Evans, Greg W; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hedblad, Bo; Holewijn, Suzanne; Ikeda, Ai; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Kitamura, Akihiko; Lonn, Eva M; Lorenz, Matthias W; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Okazaki, Shuhei; O'Leary, Daniel H; Polak, Joseph F; Price, Jacqueline F; Robertson, Christine; Rembold, Christopher M; Rosvall, Maria; Rundek, Tatjana; Salonen, Jukka T; Sitzer, Matthias; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Hoefer, Imo E; Peters, Sanne A E; Bots, Michiel L; den Ruijter, Hester M

    2015-04-01

    Although atherosclerosis starts in early life, evidence on risk factors and atherosclerosis in individuals aged <45 years is scarce. Therefore, we studied the relationship between risk factors, common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and first-time cardiovascular events in adults aged <45 years. Our study population consisted of 3067 adults aged <45 years free from symptomatic cardiovascular disease at baseline, derived from 6 cohorts that are part of the USE-IMT initiative, an individual participant data meta-analysis of general-population-based cohort studies evaluating CIMT measurements. Information on risk factors, CIMT measurements, and follow-up of the combined end point (first-time myocardial infarction or stroke) was obtained. We assessed the relationship between risk factors and CIMT and the relationship between CIMT and first-time myocardial infarction or stroke using a multivariable linear mixed-effects model and a Cox proportional-hazards model, respectively. During a follow-up of 16.3 years, 55 first-time myocardial infarctions or strokes occurred. Median CIMT was 0.63 mm. Of the risk factors under study, age, sex, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol related to CIMT. Furthermore, CIMT related to first-time myocardial infarction or stroke with a hazard ratio of 1.40 per SD increase in CIMT, independent of risk factors (95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.76). CIMT may be a valuable marker for cardiovascular risk in adults aged <45 years who are not yet eligible for standard cardiovascular risk screening. This is especially relevant in those with an increased, unfavorable risk factor burden. PMID:25624341

  12. Association between use of warfarin with common sulfonylureas and serious hypoglycemic events: retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Romley, John A; Gong, Cynthia; Jena, Anupam B; Goldman, Dana P; Williams, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is warfarin use associated with an increased risk of serious hypoglycemic events among older people treated with the sulfonylureas glipizide and glimepiride? Methods This was a retrospective cohort analysis of pharmacy and medical claims from a 20% random sample of Medicare fee for service beneficiaries aged 65 years or older. It included 465 918 beneficiaries with diabetes who filled a prescription for glipizide or glimepiride between 2006 and 2011 (4 355 418 person quarters); 71 895 (15.4%) patients also filled a prescription for warfarin (416 479 person quarters with warfarin use). The main outcome measure was emergency department visit or hospital admission with a primary diagnosis of hypoglycemia in person quarters with concurrent fills of warfarin and glipizide/glimepiride compared with the rates in quarters with glipizide/glimepiride fills only, Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for individual characteristics. Secondary outcomes included fall related fracture and altered consciousness/mental status. Summary answer and limitations In quarters with glipizide/glimepiride use, hospital admissions or emergency department visits for hypoglycemia were more common in person quarters with concurrent warfarin use compared with quarters without warfarin use (294/416 479 v 1903/3 938 939; adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.42). The risk of hypoglycemia associated with concurrent use was higher among people using warfarin for the first time, as well as in those aged 65-74 years. Concurrent use of warfarin and glipizide/glimepiride was also associated with hospital admission or emergency department visit for fall related fractures (3919/416 479 v 20 759/3 938 939; adjusted odds ratio 1.47, 1.41 to 1.54) and altered consciousness/mental status (2490/416 479 v 14 414/3 938 939; adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 1.16 to 1.29). Unmeasured factors could be correlated with both warfarin use and

  13. 77 FR 5857 - Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and Research, Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ...: On November 2, 2011 (76 FR 67764), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published for public comment Draft NUREG, ``Common- Cause Failure Analysis in Event and Condition Assessment: Guidance and...-2011-0254. Discussion On November 2, 2011 (76 FR 67764), the NRC published for public comment...

  14. 76 FR 67456 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ..., 2008: 73 FR 70731-70814. AHRQ coordinates the development of a set of common definitions and reporting... March 7, 2011: 76 FR 12358-12359. With this release, AHRQ had made available Common Formats for two... public sector patient safety reporting systems. This inventory provides an evidence base that...

  15. 75 FR 16140 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ..., 2008: 73 FR 70731-70814. As authorized by the Secretary of HHS, AHRQ coordinates the development of a... Register on September 2, 2009: 74 FR 45457-45458. Definition of Common Formats The term ``Common Formats... private and public sector patient safety reporting systems. This inventory provides an evidence base...

  16. The role of well-defined nanotopography of titanium implants on osseointegration: cellular and molecular events in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karazisis, Dimitrios; Ballo, Ahmed M; Petronis, Sarunas; Agheli, Hossein; Emanuelsson, Lena; Thomsen, Peter; Omar, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms governing the cellular interactions with well-defined nanotopography are not well described in vivo. This is partly due to the difficulty in isolating a particular effect of nanotopography from other surface properties. This study employed colloidal lithography for nanofabrication on titanium implants in combination with an in vivo sampling procedure and different analytical techniques. The aim was to elucidate the effect of well-defined nanotopography on the molecular, cellular, and structural events of osseointegration. Materials and methods Titanium implants were nanopatterned (Nano) with semispherical protrusions using colloidal lithography. Implants, with and without nanotopography, were implanted in rat tibia and retrieved after 3, 6, and 28 days. Retrieved implants were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, histology, immunohistochemistry, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Results Surface characterization showed that the nanotopography was well defined in terms of shape (semispherical), size (79±6 nm), and distribution (31±2 particles/µm2). EDS showed similar levels of titanium, oxygen, and carbon for test and control implants, confirming similar chemistry. The molecular analysis of the retrieved implants revealed that the expression levels of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and the osteoclastic marker, CatK, were reduced in cells adherent to the Nano implants. This was consistent with the observation of less CD163-positive macrophages in the tissue surrounding the Nano implant. Furthermore, periostin immunostaining was frequently detected around the Nano implant, indicating higher osteogenic activity. This was supported by the EDS analysis of the retrieved implants showing higher content of calcium and phosphate on the Nano implants. Conclusion The results show that Nano implants elicit less periimplant macrophage infiltration and downregulate the early expression of inflammatory (TNF-α) and

  17. 77 FR 22322 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... November 21, 2008: 73 FR 70731-70814. The collection of patient safety work product allows the aggregation.... This inventory provides an evidence base that informs construction of the Common Formats. The...

  18. 77 FR 42736 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Federal Register on November 21, 2008: 73 FR 70731-70814. This collection allows the aggregation of... base that informs construction of the Common Formats. The inventory includes many systems from...

  19. 76 FR 12358 - Common Formats for Patient Safety Data Collection and Event Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ..., 2008: 73 FR 70731-70814. As authorized by the Secretary of HHS, AHRQ coordinates the development of a..., 2009: 74 FR 45457-45458. This release was later replaced by Version 1.1, as announced in the Federal Register on March 31, 2010: 75 FR 16140-16142. Version 1.1 includes updated event descriptions, forms,...

  20. Common stressful life events and difficulties are associated with mental health symptoms and substance use in young adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stressful life events are associated with mood disorders in adults in clinical settings. Less described in the literature is the association between common life stressors and a wide range of psychopathology in young adolescents. This study uses a large non-clinical sample of young adolescents to describe the associations among worry or stress about common life events/difficulties, mental health and substance use. Methods Data on lifetime stress or worry about common life events/difficulties (i.e., romantic breakups, family disruption, interpersonal difficulties, and personal stress (health, weight, school work)), symptoms of depression, conduct disorder symptoms, and substance use were collected from 1025 grade 7 students (mean age 12.9 years; 45% male). The association between each source of stress and each mental health and substance use indicator was modeled in separate logistic regression analyses. Results The proportion of adolescents reporting worry or stress ranged from 7% for new family to 53% for schoolwork. Romantic breakup stress was statistically significantly associated with all the mental health and substance use indicators except illicit drug use. Family disruption was statistically significantly associated with depression symptoms, marijuana use, and cigarette use. Interpersonal difficulties stress was statistically significantly associated with depression symptoms. All sources of personal stress were statistically significantly related to depression symptoms. In addition, health-related stress was inversely related to binge drinking. Conclusion Young adolescents may benefit from learning positive coping skills to manage worry or stress about common stressors and in particular, worry or stress related to romantic breakups. Appropriate management of mental health symptoms and substance use related to common stressful life events and difficulties may help reduce emerging psychopathology. PMID:22900789

  1. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  2. Emerging proteomic technologies for elucidating context-dependent cellular signaling events: A big challenge of tiny proportions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Sarah J; Raedschelders, Koen; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant cell signaling events either drive or compensate for nearly all pathologies. A thorough description and quantification of maladaptive signaling flux in disease is a critical step in drug development, and complex proteomic approaches can provide valuable mechanistic insights. Traditional proteomics-based signaling analyses rely heavily on in vitro cellular monoculture. The characterization of these simplified systems generates a rich understanding of the basic components and complex interactions of many signaling networks, but they cannot capture the full complexity of the microenvironments in which pathologies are ultimately made manifest. Unfortunately, techniques that can directly interrogate signaling in situ often yield mass-limited starting materials that are incompatible with traditional proteomics workflows. This review provides an overview of established and emerging techniques that are applicable to context-dependent proteomics. Analytical approaches are illustrated through recent proteomics-based studies in which selective sample acquisition strategies preserve context-dependent information, and where the challenge of minimal starting material is met by optimized sensitivity and coverage. This review is organized into three major technological themes: (i) LC methods in line with MS; (ii) antibody-based approaches; (iii) MS imaging with a discussion of data integration and systems modeling. Finally, we conclude with future perspectives and implications of context-dependent proteomics. PMID:25545106

  3. Emerging proteomic technologies for elucidating context-dependent cellular signaling events: A big challenge of tiny proportions

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Sarah J; Raedschelders, Koen; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cell signaling events either drive or compensate for nearly all pathologies. A thorough description and quantification of maladaptive signaling flux in disease is a critical step in drug development, and complex proteomic approaches can provide valuable mechanistic insights. Traditional proteomics-based signaling analyses rely heavily on in vitro cellular monoculture. The characterization of these simplified systems generates a rich understanding of the basic components and complex interactions of many signaling networks, but they cannot capture the full complexity of the microenvironments in which pathologies are ultimately made manifest. Unfortunately, techniques that can directly interrogate signaling in situ often yield mass-limited starting materials that are incompatible with traditional proteomics workflows. This review provides an overview of established and emerging techniques that are applicable to context-dependent proteomics. Analytical approaches are illustrated through recent proteomics-based studies in which selective sample acquisition strategies preserve context-dependent information, and where the challenge of minimal starting material is met by optimized sensitivity and coverage. This review is organized into three major technological themes: (1) LC methods inline with mass spectrometry; (2) Antibody-based approaches; (3) MS Imaging with a discussion of data integration and systems modeling. Finally, we conclude with future perspectives and implications of context-dependent proteomics. PMID:25545106

  4. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  5. The Common Core State Standards Initiative: An Event History Analysis of State Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVenia, Mark; Cohen-Vogel, Lora; Lang, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Today, with states' near-universal adoption of the Common Core State Standards, the political system has achieved that which was not possible less than 2 decades ago. Just why this is so remains unanswered. Some observers have attributed states' embrace of the standards to the substantial financial incentives that the federal government…

  6. On the Nature of EXor Accretion Events: An Infrequent Manifestation of a Common Phenomenology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Antoniucci, S.; Giannini, T.; Li Causi, G.; Ventura, P.; Arkharov, A. A.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Larionov, V. M.; Di Paola, A.; Nisini, B.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of a comparison between classical and newly identified EXor based on literature data and aimed at recognizing possible differences or similarities between the categories. Optical and near-IR two-color diagrams, modalities of fluctuations, and derived values of the mass accretion rates are indicative of strong similarities between the two samples. We demonstrate how the difference between the outburst and the quiescence spectral energy distribution of all EXor can be well fitted with a single blackbody, as if an additional thermal component appears during the outbursting phase. Temperatures of this additional component span between 1000 and 4500 K, while the radii of the emitting regions (assumed to be a uniform disk) span between 0.01 and 0.1 AU, sizes typical of the inner portions of the circumstellar disk. Spots persisting up to 50% of the outburst duration, not exceeding 10% of the stellar surface, and with temperatures compatible with the EXor mass accretion rates, are able to account for both the appearance of the additional thermal component and the dust sublimation in the inner structures of the disk. We also compare the EXor events with the most significant color and magnitude fluctuations of active T Tauri stars finding that (1) burst accretion phenomena should also be important for this latter class and (2) EXor events could be more frequent than those accidentally discovered. A remarkable case is that of the source V2493 Cyg, a T Tauri star recently identified as a strong outbursting object: New optical and near-IR photometric and spectroscopic data are presented in an attempt to clarify its EXor or FUor nature. Based on observations collected at AZT-24 telescope (Campo Imperatore, Italy), AZT-8 (Crimea, Ukraine), and LX-200 (St. Petersburg, Russia).

  7. Technical note: Common characteristics of directional spreading-steepness joint distribution in freak wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shouhua; Li, Yizhen; Yue, Xinyang

    2016-06-01

    Seven freak wave incidents previously documented in the real ocean in combination with model hindcast simulations are used to study the variations associated with freak-wave-related parameters, such as wave steepness, directional spreading, and frequency bandwidth. Unlike the strong correlations between the freak wave parameters and freak waves' occurrence which were obtained in experimental and physical research, the correlations are not clear in the freak waves occurring in the real ocean. Wave directional spreading-steepness joint distribution is introduced and common visual features were found in the joint distribution when freak waves occur among seven "freakish" sea states. The visual features show that freak wave incidents occur when the steepness is large and directional spreading is small. Besides large steepness and small directional spreading, a long-duration, relatively rough sea state is also necessary for the freak wave generation. The joint distribution is more informative than any single statistical wave parameter. The continuous sea states of local large steepness and small directional spreading are supposed to generate freak waves, and two-dimensional distribution visualization is found to be a useful tool for freak waves' forecast. The common visual features of joint distributions supply an important cue for the theoretical and experimental research.

  8. Dose-response modeling of early molecular and cellular key events in the CAR-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Geter, David R; Bhat, Virunya S; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Sura, Radhakrishna; Hester, Susan D

    2014-04-01

    Low-dose extrapolation and dose-related transitions are paramount in the ongoing debate regarding the quantification of cancer risks for nongenotoxic carcinogens. Phenobarbital (PB) is a prototypical nongenotoxic carcinogen that activates the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) resulting in rodent liver tumors. In this study, male and female CD-1 mice administered dietary PB at 0, 0.15, 1.5, 15, 75, or 150 mg/kg-day for 2 or 7 days to characterize multiple apical and molecular endpoints below, at (∼75 mg/kg-day), and above the carcinogenic dose level of PB and examine these responses using benchmark dose modeling. Linear toxicokinetics were observed for all doses. Increased liver weight, hepatocellular hypertrophy, and mitotic figures were seen at 75 and 150 mg/kg-day. CAR activation, based on Cyp2b qPCR and pentoxyresorufin dealkylase activity, occurred at doses ≥ 1.5 mg/kg-day. The no-observable transcriptional effect level for global gene expression was 15 mg/kg-day. At 2 days, several xenobiotic metabolism and cell protective pathways were activated at lower doses and to a greater degree in females. However, hepatocellular proliferation, quantified by bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry, was the most sensitive indicator of PB exposure with female mice more sensitive than males, contrary to sex-specific differences in sensitivity to hepatocarcinogenesis. Taken together, the identification of low-dose cellular and molecular transitions in the subtumorigenic dose range aids the understanding of early key events in CAR-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24449422

  9. Stereospecific Inhibitory Effects of CCG-1423 on the Cellular Events Mediated by Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Bunta; Minami, Saki; Ishida, Hideaki; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Morita, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Ken’ichiro

    2015-01-01

    CCG-1423 suppresses several pathological processes including cancer cell migration, tissue fibrosis, and the development of atherosclerotic lesions. These suppressions are caused by inhibition of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A), which is a critical factor for epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). CCG-1423 can therefore be a potent inhibitor for EMT. CCG-1423 and related compounds, CCG-100602 and CCG-203971 possess similar biological activities. Although these compounds are comprised of two stereoisomers, the differences in their biological activities remain to be assessed. To address this issue, we stereoselectively synthesized optically pure isomers of these compounds and validated their biological activities. The S-isomer of CCG-1423 rather than the R-isomer exhibited modestly but significantly higher inhibitory effects on the cellular events triggered by MRTF-A activation including serum response factor-mediated gene expression and cell migration of fibroblasts and B16F10 melanoma cells. Accordingly, the S-isomer of CCG-1423 more potently blocked the serum-induced nuclear import of MRTF-A than the R-isomer. No such difference was observed in cells treated with each of two stereoisomers of CCG-100602 or CCG-203971. We previously reported that the N-terminal basic domain (NB), which functions as a nuclear localization signal of MRTF-A, is a binding site for CCG-1423. Consistent with the biological activities of two stereoisomers of CCG-1423, docking simulation demonstrated that the S-isomer of CCG-1423 was more likely to bind to NB than the R-isomer. This is a first report demonstrating the stereospecific biological activities of CCG-1423. PMID:26295164

  10. A beacon of hope in stroke therapy-Blockade of pathologically activated cellular events in excitotoxic neuronal death as potential neuroprotective strategies.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Ashfaqul; Hossain, M Iqbal; Ameen, S Sadia; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas; Ng, Dominic C H; Chueh, Anderly C; Roulston, Carli; Cheng, Heung-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Excitotoxicity, a pathological process caused by over-stimulation of ionotropic glutamate receptors, is a major cause of neuronal loss in acute and chronic neurological conditions such as ischaemic stroke, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. Effective neuroprotective drugs to reduce excitotoxic neuronal loss in patients suffering from these neurological conditions are urgently needed. One avenue to achieve this goal is to clearly define the intracellular events mediating the neurotoxic signals originating from the over-stimulated glutamate receptors in neurons. In this review, we first focus on the key cellular events directing neuronal death but not involved in normal physiological processes in the neurotoxic signalling pathways. These events, referred to as pathologically activated events, are potential targets for the development of neuroprotectant therapeutics. Inhibitors blocking some of the known pathologically activated cellular events have been proven to be effective in reducing stroke-induced brain damage in animal models. Notable examples are inhibitors suppressing the ion channel activity of neurotoxic glutamate receptors and those disrupting interactions of specific cellular proteins occurring only in neurons undergoing excitotoxic cell death. Among them, Tat-NR2B9c and memantine are clinically effective in reducing brain damage caused by some acute and chronic neurological conditions. Our second focus is evaluation of the suitability of the other inhibitors for use as neuroprotective therapeutics. We also discuss the experimental approaches suitable for bridging our knowledge gap in our current understanding of the excitotoxic signalling mechanism in neurons and discovery of new pathologically activated cellular events as potential targets for neuroprotection. PMID:26899498

  11. Deletion at Fragile Sites is a Common and Early Event in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Lisa A.; Kostadinov, Rumen; Barrett, Michael T.; Peiffer, Daniel A.; Pokholok, Dimitry; Odze, Robert; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Maley, Carlo C.; Reid, Brian J.; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus is a premalignant intermediate to esophageal adenocarcinoma, which develops in the context of chronic inflammation and exposure to bile and acid. We asked whether there might be common genomic alterations that could be identified as potential clinical biomarker(s) for Barrett’s esophagus by whole genome profiling. We detected copy number alterations and/or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at fifty-six fragile sites in 20 patients with premalignant Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Chromosomal fragile sites are particularly sensitive to DNA breaks and have been shown to be frequent sites of rearrangement or loss in many human cancers. 78% of all genomic alterations detected by array-CGH were associated with fragile sites. Copy number losses in early BE were observed at particularly high frequency at FRA3B (81%), FRA9A/C (71.4%), FRA5E (52.4%) and FRA 4D (52.4%), and at lower frequencies in other fragile sites, including FRA1K (42.9%), FRAXC (42.9%), FRA 12B (33.3%) and FRA16D (33.3%). Due to the consistency of the region of copy number loss, we were able to verify these results by quantitative PCR which detected loss of FRA3B and FRA16D, in 83% and 40% of early molecular stage BE patients respectively. LOH in these cases was confirmed via pyrosequencing at FRA3B and FRA16D (75% and 70% respectively). Deletion and genomic instability at FRA3B and other fragile sites could thus be a biomarker of genetic damage in BE patients and a potential biomarker of cancer risk. PMID:20647332

  12. Deletion at fragile sites is a common and early event in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lisa A; Kostadinov, Rumen; Barrett, Michael T; Peiffer, Daniel A; Pokholok, Dimitry; Odze, Robert; Sanchez, Carissa A; Maley, Carlo C; Reid, Brian J; Gunderson, Kevin L; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2010-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant intermediate to esophageal adenocarcinoma, which develops in the context of chronic inflammation and exposure to bile and acid. We asked whether there might be common genomic alterations that could be identified as potential clinical biomarker(s) for BE by whole genome profiling. We detected copy number alterations and/or loss of heterozygosity at 56 fragile sites in 20 patients with premalignant BE. Chromosomal fragile sites are particularly sensitive to DNA breaks and are frequent sites of rearrangement or loss in many human cancers. Seventy-eight percent of all genomic alterations detected by array-CGH were associated with fragile sites. Copy number losses in early BE were observed at particularly high frequency at FRA3B (81%), FRA9A/C (71.4%), FRA5E (52.4%), and FRA 4D (52.4%), and at lower frequencies in other fragile sites, including FRA1K (42.9%), FRAXC (42.9%), FRA 12B (33.3%), and FRA16D (33.3%). Due to the consistency of the region of copy number loss, we were able to verify these results by quantitative PCR, which detected the loss of FRA3B and FRA16D, in 83% and 40% of early molecular stage BE patients, respectively. Loss of heterozygosity in these cases was confirmed through pyrosequencing at FRA3B and FRA16D (75% and 70%, respectively). Deletion and genomic instability at FRA3B and other fragile sites could thus be a biomarker of genetic damage in BE patients and a potential biomarker of cancer risk. PMID:20647332

  13. Influence of common genetic variation on blood lipid levels, cardiovascular risk, and coronary events in two British prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sonia; Casas, Juan P.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Cooper, Jackie; Drenos, Fotios; Zabaneh, Delilah; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Palmen, Jutta; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Ebrahim, Shah; Smith, George Davey; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Day, Ian N.M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to quantify the collective effect of common lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on blood lipid levels, cardiovascular risk, use of lipid-lowering medication, and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods and results Analysis was performed in two prospective cohorts: Whitehall II (WHII; N = 5059) and the British Women’s Heart and Health Study (BWHHS; N = 3414). For each participant, scores were calculated based on the cumulative effect of multiple genetic variants influencing total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). Compared with the bottom quintile, individuals in the top quintile of the LDL-C genetic score distribution had higher LDL-C {mean difference of 0.85 [95% confidence interval, (CI) = 0.76–0.94] and 0.63 [95% CI = 0.50–0.76] mmol/l in WHII and BWHHS, respectively}. They also tended to have greater odds of having ‘high-risk’ status (Framingham 10-year cardiovascular disease risk >20%) [WHII: odds ratio (OR) = 1.36 (0.93–1.98), BWHHS: OR = 1.49 (1.14–1.94)]; receiving lipid-lowering treatment [WHII: OR = 2.38 (1.57–3.59), BWHHS: OR = 2.24 (1.52–3.29)]; and CHD events [WHII: OR = 1.43 (1.02–2.00), BWHHS: OR = 1.31 (0.99–1.72)]. Similar associations were observed for the TC score in both studies. The TG score was associated with high-risk status and medication use in both studies. Neither HDL nor TG scores were associated with the risk of coronary events. The genetic scores did not improve discrimination over the Framingham risk score. Conclusion At the population level, common SNPs associated with LDL-C and TC contribute to blood lipid variation, cardiovascular risk, use of lipid-lowering medications and coronary events. However, their effects are too small to discriminate future lipid-lowering medication requirements or coronary events. PMID:22977227

  14. Cellular dynamical mechanisms for encoding the time and place of events along spatiotemporal trajectories in episodic memory

    PubMed Central

    Hasselmo, Michael E.; Giocomo, Lisa M.; Yoshida, Motoharu

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of episodic memory requires linking behavioural data and lesion effects to data on the dynamics of cellular membrane potentials and population interactions within these brain regions. Linking behavior to specific membrane channels and neurochemicals has implications for therapeutic applications. Lesions of the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and subcortical nuclei impair episodic memory function in humans and animals, and unit recording data from these regions in behaving animals indicate episodic memory processes. Intracellular recording in these regions demonstrates specific cellular properties including resonance, membrane potential oscillations and bistable persistent spiking that could underlie the encoding and retrieval of episodic trajectories. A model presented here shows how intrinsic dynamical properties of neurons could mediate the encoding of episodic memories as complex spatiotemporal trajectories. The dynamics of neurons allow encoding and retrieval of unique episodic trajectories in multiple continuous dimensions including temporal intervals, personal location, the spatial coordinates and sensory features of perceived objects and generated actions, and associations between these elements. The model also addresses how cellular dynamics could underlie unit firing data suggesting mechanisms for coding continuous dimensions of space, time, sensation and action. PMID:20018213

  15. Adverse Events Lead to Drug Discontinuation More Commonly among Patients Who Receive Nafcillin than among Those Who Receive Oxacillin.

    PubMed

    Viehman, J Alexander; Oleksiuk, Louise-Marie; Sheridan, Kathleen R; Byers, Karin E; He, Peimei; Falcione, Bonnie A; Shields, Ryan K

    2016-05-01

    Nafcillin and oxacillin are used interchangeably in clinical practice, yet few studies have evaluated the safety of these two agents. Our objective was to compare the differential tolerabilities of nafcillin and oxacillin among hospitalized patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients who received 12 g/day of nafcillin or oxacillin for at least 24 h. Two hundred twenty-four patients were included. Baseline characteristics and comorbidities were similar among patients receiving nafcillin (n = 160) and those receiving oxacillin (n = 64). Hypokalemia, defined as a potassium level of ≤3.3 mmol/liter or ≤2.9 mmol/liter or as a ≥0.5-mmol/liter decrease from the baseline level, occurred more frequently among patients who received nafcillin (51%, 20%, and 56%, respectively) than among those who received oxacillin (17%, 3%, and 34%, respectively; P < 0.0001, P = 0.0008, and P = 0.005, respectively). By multivariate logistic regression analysis, receipt of nafcillin was an independent predictor of severe hypokalemia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46 to 31.2; P = 0.02). Rates of hepatotoxicity did not differ between groups; however, acute kidney injury occurred more commonly with nafcillin than with oxacillin (18% versus 6%; P = 0.03). Overall, 18% of patients who received nafcillin discontinued therapy prematurely due to adverse events, compared to 2% of patients who received oxacillin (P = 0.0004). Nafcillin treatment is associated with higher rates of adverse events and treatment discontinuation than oxacillin among hospitalized adult patients. These findings have important implications for patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings, particularly patients who require long-term therapy and cannot be monitored routinely. Future randomized controlled studies evaluating the efficacy, costs, and tolerability of nafcillin versus oxacillin are warranted. PMID:26976858

  16. Members of the NODE (Nanog and Oct4-associated deacetylase) complex and SOX-2 promote the initiation of a natural cellular reprogramming event in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Ahier, Arnaud; Fischer, Nadine; Jarriault, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated cells can be forced to change identity, either to directly adopt another differentiated identity or to revert to a pluripotent state. Direct reprogramming events can also occur naturally. We recently characterized such an event in Caenorhabditis elegans, in which a rectal cell switches to a neuronal cell. Here we have used this single-cell paradigm to investigate the molecular requirements of direct cell-type conversion, with a focus on the early steps. Our genetic analyses revealed the requirement of sem-4/Sall, egl-27/Mta, and ceh-6/Oct, members of the NODE complex recently identified in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and of the OCT4 partner sox-2, for the initiation of this natural direct reprogramming event. These four factors have been shown to individually impact on ES cell pluripotency; however, whether they act together to control cellular potential during development remained an open question. We further found that, in addition to acting at the same time, these factors physically associate, suggesting that they could act together as a NODE-like complex during this in vivo process. Finally, we have elucidated the functional domains in EGL-27/MTA that mediate its reprogramming activity in this system and have found that modulation of the posterior HOX protein EGL-5 is a downstream event to allow the initiation of Y identity change. Our data reveal unique in vivo functions in a natural direct reprogramming event for these genes that impact on ES cells pluripotency and suggest that conserved nuclear events could be shared between different cell plasticity phenomena across phyla. PMID:22493276

  17. Members of the NODE (Nanog and Oct4-associated deacetylase) complex and SOX-2 promote the initiation of a natural cellular reprogramming event in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Ahier, Arnaud; Fischer, Nadine; Jarriault, Sophie

    2012-04-24

    Differentiated cells can be forced to change identity, either to directly adopt another differentiated identity or to revert to a pluripotent state. Direct reprogramming events can also occur naturally. We recently characterized such an event in Caenorhabditis elegans, in which a rectal cell switches to a neuronal cell. Here we have used this single-cell paradigm to investigate the molecular requirements of direct cell-type conversion, with a focus on the early steps. Our genetic analyses revealed the requirement of sem-4/Sall, egl-27/Mta, and ceh-6/Oct, members of the NODE complex recently identified in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and of the OCT4 partner sox-2, for the initiation of this natural direct reprogramming event. These four factors have been shown to individually impact on ES cell pluripotency; however, whether they act together to control cellular potential during development remained an open question. We further found that, in addition to acting at the same time, these factors physically associate, suggesting that they could act together as a NODE-like complex during this in vivo process. Finally, we have elucidated the functional domains in EGL-27/MTA that mediate its reprogramming activity in this system and have found that modulation of the posterior HOX protein EGL-5 is a downstream event to allow the initiation of Y identity change. Our data reveal unique in vivo functions in a natural direct reprogramming event for these genes that impact on ES cells pluripotency and suggest that conserved nuclear events could be shared between different cell plasticity phenomena across phyla. PMID:22493276

  18. Opossum carboxylesterases: sequences, phylogeny and evidence for CES gene duplication events predating the marsupial-eutherian common ancestor

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    residues previously reported for human CES1 involved in catalysis, ligand binding, tertiary structure and organelle localization. Phylogenetic studies indicated the gene duplication events which generated ancestral mammalian CES genes predated the common ancestor for marsupial and eutherian mammals, and appear to coincide with the early diversification of tetrapods. PMID:18289373

  19. Loss of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors From Bile Duct Epithelia Is a Common Event in Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    SHIBAO, KAZUNORI; HIRATA, KEIJI; ROBERT, MARIE E.; NATHANSON, MICHAEL H.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims: Cholestasis is one of the principal manifestations of liver disease and often results from disorders involving bile duct epithelia rather than hepatocytes. A range of disorders affects biliary epithelia, and no unifying pathophysiologic event in these cells has been identified as the cause of cholestasis. Here we examined the role of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R)/Ca2+ release channel in Ca2+ signaling and ductular secretion in animal models of cholestasis and in patients with cholestatic disorders. Methods: The expression and distribution of the InsP3R and related proteins were examined in rat cholangiocytes before and after bile duct ligation or treatment with endotoxin. Ca2+ signaling was examined in isolated bile ducts from these animals, whereas ductular bicarbonate secretion was examined in isolated perfused livers. Confocal immunofluorescence was used to examine cholangiocyte InsP3R expression in human liver biopsy specimens. Results: Expression of the InsP3R was selectively lost from biliary epithelia after bile duct ligation or endotoxin treatment. As a result, Ca2+ signaling and Ca2+-mediated bicarbonate secretion were lost as well, although other components of the Ca2+ signaling pathway and adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated bicarbonate secretion both were preserved. Examination of human liver biopsy specimens showed that InsP3Rs also were lost from bile duct epithelia in a range of human cholestatic disorders, although InsP3R expression was intact in noncholestatic liver disease. Conclusions: InsP3-mediated Ca2+ signaling in bile duct epithelia appears to be important for normal bile secretion in the liver, and loss of InsP3Rs may be a final common pathway for cholestasis. PMID:14517800

  20. Clonal Analysis in Recurrent Astrocytic, Oligoastrocytic and Oligodendroglial Tumors Implicates IDH1- Mutation as Common Tumor Initiating Event

    PubMed Central

    von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Kiwit, Jürgen; Stockhammer, Florian; Horaczek, Jörn A.; Veelken, Julian; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jeuken, Judith; von Deimling, Andreas; Mueller, Wolf

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the dynamics of inter- and intratumoral molecular alterations during tumor progression in recurrent gliomas. Methodology/Principal Findings To address intertumoral heterogeneity we investigated non- microdissected tumor tissue of 106 gliomas representing 51 recurrent tumors. To address intratumoral heterogeneity a set of 16 gliomas representing 7 tumor pairs with at least one recurrence, and 4 single mixed gliomas were investigated by microdissection of distinct oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumor components. All tumors and tumor components were analyzed for allelic loss of 1p/19q (LOH 1p/19q), for TP53- mutations and for R132 mutations in the IDH1 gene. The investigation of non- microdissected tumor tissue revealed clonality in 75% (38/51). Aberrant molecular alterations upon recurrence were detected in 25% (13/51). 64% (9/14) of these were novel and associated with tumor progression. Loss of previously detected alterations was observed in 36% (5/14). One tumor pair (1/14; 7%) was significant for both. Intratumoral clonality was detected in 57% (4/7) of the microdissected tumor pairs and in 75% (3/4) of single microdissected tumors. 43% (3/7) of tumor pairs and one single tumor (25%) revealed intratumoral heterogeneity. While intratumoral heterogeneity affected both the TP53- mutational status and the LOH1p/19q status, all tumors with intratumoral heterogeneity shared the R132 IDH1- mutation as a common feature in both their microdissected components. Conclusions/Significance The majority of recurrent gliomas are of monoclonal origin. However, the detection of divertive tumor cell clones in morphological distinct tumor components sharing IDH1- mutations as early event may provide insight into the tumorigenesis of true mixed gliomas. PMID:22844452

  1. Cellular basis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bali, Jitin; Halima, Saoussen Ben; Felmy, Boas; Goodger, Zoe; Zurbriggen, Sebastian; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2010-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associated and hence, membrane trafficking and cellular compartmentalization play important roles. In this review, we summarize the key cellular events that lead to the progression of AD. PMID:21369424

  2. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  3. The effects of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) on the cellular events associated with Alzheimer's disease in a stably expressed HFE neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line.

    PubMed

    Mairuae, Nootchanat; Connor, James R; Lee, Sang Y; Cheepsunthorn, Poonlarp; Tongjaroenbuangam, Walaiporn

    2015-08-31

    It has been reported that persons carrying the H63D variant in their hemochromatosis (HFE) gene are at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the possibility that okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) and quercetin could mitigate this risk factor by examining its effect on AD-associated cellular events in HFE stably expressing SH-SY5Y cells. Treatment of H63D HFE cells either with okra or quercetin significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and protein oxidation compared to untreated cells. The levels of tau phosphorylation at serine-199, serine-202, and serine-396 sites were also significantly decreased when cells were treated with okra. Exposure of the H63D and wild type (WT) cells to iron increased tau phosphorylation, but this response was decreased significantly when cells were treated with okra. The mechanism responsible for these changes appears to be related to decreased glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β activity, an upstream signaling kinase of tau phosphorylation. We also established that okra treatment dramatically decreases intracellular iron levels in H63D cells compared to untreated cells. Our results provide important in vitro data on the effects of okra on various AD-associated cellular processes in H63D variant HFE cells. These results suggest okra may be beneficial in people expressing the H63D variant to reduce the risk of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases related to oxidative stress. Further in vivo studies would help confirm this. PMID:26170247

  4. Development of an event-specific hydrolysis probe quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Treml, Diana; Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-12-10

    A genetically modified (GM) common bean event, namely Embrapa 5.1, resistant to the bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV), was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Brazilian regulation for genetically modified organism (GMO) labeling requires that any food containing more than 1% GMO be labeled. The event-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method has been the primary trend for GMO identification and quantitation because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence. This work reports the development of an event-specific assay, named FGM, for Embrapa 5.1 detection and quantitation by use of SYBR Green or hydrolysis probe. The FGM assay specificity was tested for Embrapa 2.3 event (a noncommercial GM common bean also resistant to BGMV), 46 non-GM common bean varieties, and other crop species including maize, GM maize, soybean, and GM soybean. The FGM assay showed high specificity to detect the Embrapa 5.1 event. Standard curves for the FGM assay presented a mean efficiency of 95% and a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 genome copies in the presence of background DNA. The primers and probe developed are suitable for the detection and quantitation of Embrapa 5.1. PMID:25437743

  5. Common and Segregated Neural Substrates for Automatic Conceptual and Affective Priming as Revealed by Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hongyan; Hu, Zhiguo; Peng, Danling; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Kuncheng

    2010-01-01

    The brain activity associated with automatic semantic priming has been extensively studied. Thus far there has been no prior study that directly contrasts the neural mechanisms of semantic and affective priming. The present study employed event-related fMRI to examine the common and distinct neural bases underlying conceptual and affective priming…

  6. Evidence for a Common Acceleration Mechanism for Enrichments of 3He and Heavy Ions in Impulsive SEP Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Glenn M.; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Innes, Davina E.

    2016-06-01

    We have surveyed the period 1997–2015 for a rare type of 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) event, with enormously enhanced values of the S/O ratio, that differs from the majority of 3He-rich events, which show enhancements of heavy ions increasing smoothly with mass. Sixteen events were found, most of them small but with solar source characteristics similar to other 3He-rich SEP events. A single event on 2014 May 16 had higher intensities than the others, and curved Si and S spectra that crossed the O spectrum above ∼200 keV nucleon‑1. Such crossings of heavy-ion spectra have never previously been reported. The dual enhancement of Si and S suggests that element Q/M ratio is critical to the enhancement since this pair of elements uniquely has very similar Q/M ratios over a wide range of temperatures. Besides 3He, Si, and S, in this same event the C, N, and Fe spectra also showed curved shape and enhanced abundances compared to O. The spectral similarities suggest that all have been produced from the same mechanism that enhances 3He. The enhancements are large only in the high-energy portion of the spectrum, and so affect only a small fraction of the ions. The observations suggest that the accelerated plasma was initially cool (∼0.4 MK) and was then heated to a few million kelvin to generate the preferred Q/M ratio in the range C–Fe. The temperature profile may be the distinct feature of these events that produces the unusual abundance signature.

  7. Common Neural Systems Associated with the Recognition of Famous Faces and Names: An Event-Related fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielson, Kristy A.; Seidenberg, Michael; Woodard, John L.; Durgerian, Sally; Zhang, Qi; Gross, William L.; Gander, Amelia; Guidotti, Leslie M.; Antuono, Piero; Rao, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Person recognition can be accomplished through several modalities (face, name, voice). Lesion, neurophysiology and neuroimaging studies have been conducted in an attempt to determine the similarities and differences in the neural networks associated with person identity via different modality inputs. The current study used event-related…

  8. Histological characterization and quantification of cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healthy and demyelinated CNS tissue.

    PubMed

    Praet, Jelle; Santermans, Eva; Reekmans, Kristien; de Vocht, Nathalie; Le Blon, Debbie; Hoornaert, Chloé; Daans, Jasmijn; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi; Hens, Niel; Van der Linden, Annemie; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical animal studies involving intracerebral (stem) cell grafting are gaining popularity in many laboratories due to the reported beneficial effects of cell grafting on various diseases or traumata of the central nervous system (CNS). In this chapter, we describe a histological workflow to characterize and quantify cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healthy and demyelinated CNS tissue. First, we provide standardized protocols to isolate and culture eGFP(+) neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cells from embryonic mouse tissue. Second, we describe flow cytometric procedures to determine cell viability, eGFP transgene expression, and the expression of different stem cell lineage markers. Third, we explain how to induce reproducible demyelination in the CNS of mice by means of cuprizone administration, a validated mouse model for human multiple sclerosis. Fourth, the technical procedures for cell grafting in the CNS are explained in detail. Finally, an optimized and validated workflow for the quantitative histological analysis of cell graft survival and endogenous astroglial and microglial responses is provided. PMID:25173390

  9. The principal PINK1 and Parkin cellular events triggered in response to dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential occur in primary neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koyano, Fumika; Okatsu, Kei; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Fujioka, Yusuke; Kimura, Mayumi; Sobue, Gen; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    PINK1 and PARKIN are causal genes for hereditary Parkinsonism. Recent studies have shown that PINK1 and Parkin play a pivotal role in the quality control of mitochondria, and dysfunction of either protein likely results in the accumulation of low-quality mitochondria that triggers early-onset familial Parkinsonism. As neurons are destined to degenerate in PINK1/Parkin-associated Parkinsonism, it is imperative to investigate the function of PINK1 and Parkin in neurons. However, most studies investigating PINK1/Parkin have used non-neuronal cell lines. Here we show that the principal PINK1 and Parkin cellular events that have been documented in non-neuronal lines in response to mitochondrial damage also occur in primary neurons. We found that dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential triggers phosphorylation of both PINK1 and Parkin and that, in response, Parkin translocates to depolarized mitochondria. Furthermore, Parkin's E3 activity is re-established concomitant with ubiquitin–ester formation at Cys431 of Parkin. As a result, mitochondrial substrates in neurons become ubiquitylated. These results underscore the relevance of the PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitochondrial quality control pathway in primary neurons and shed further light on the underlying mechanisms of the PINK1 and Parkin pathogenic mutations that predispose Parkinsonism in vivo. PMID:23751051

  10. A common mineralocorticoid receptor polymorphism (I180V) interacts with life events in relation to perfectionism in eating disorders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Slof-Op't Landt, Margarita C T; DeRijk, Roel H; van Son, Gabrielle E; Suchiman, H Eka D; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Van Furth, Eric F

    2014-11-01

    The stress response is regulated by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). When the balance between GR and MR signalling is disturbed, one's capacity to cope with a stressful event is diminished. In this pilot study, we tested the hypothesis that an interaction between common variants in the MR (rs5522) or GR gene (rs41423247) and stressful life events influences perfectionism levels in a group of patients with an eating disorder (ED; n = 113). Patients carrying the minor G allele of rs5522 had a higher perfectionism score if more stressful life events were experienced [β = 0.95, t(109) = 3.75, p < 0.01]. This effect was not found for patients carrying the AA genotype. These results suggest that rs5522 G allele carriers might be vulnerable to stressful life events. When patients with an ED are carriers and experience multiple life events, this might fuel their insecurity, which in turn may engender higher levels of perfectionism. Further studies are necessary to replicate and expand our findings. PMID:25220664

  11. Analysis of the Sam50 translocase of Excavate organisms supports evolution of divergent organelles from a common endosymbiotic event

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Christopher J.; Lawler, Karen; Kerr, Ian D.

    2013-01-01

    As free-living organisms the ancestors of mitochondria and plastids encoded complete genomes, proteomes and metabolomes. As these symbionts became organelles all these aspects were reduced – genomes have degenerated with the host nucleus now encoding the most of the remaining endosymbiont proteome, while the metabolic processes of the symbiont have been streamlined to the functions of the emerging organelle. By contrast, the topology of the endosymbiont membrane has been preserved, necessitating the development of complex pathways for membrane insertion and translocation. In this study, we examine the characteristics of the endosymbiont-derived β-barrel insertase Sam501 in the excavate super-group. A candidate is further characterized in Trichomonas vaginalis, an unusual eukaryote possessing degenerate hydrogen-producing mitochondria called hydrogenosomes. This information supports a mitochondriate eukaryotic common ancestor with a similarly evolved β-barrel insertase, which has continued to be conserved in degenerate mitochondria. PMID:24147756

  12. Proton-dependent coniferin transport, a common major transport event in differentiating xylem tissue of woody plants.

    PubMed

    Tsuyama, Taku; Kawai, Ryo; Shitan, Nobukazu; Matoh, Toru; Sugiyama, Junji; Yoshinaga, Arata; Takabe, Keiji; Fujita, Minoru; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2013-06-01

    Lignin biosynthesis is an essential physiological activity of vascular plants if they are to survive under various environmental stresses on land. The biosynthesis of lignin proceeds in the cell wall by polymerization of precursors; the initial step of lignin polymerization is the transportation of lignin monomers from the cytosol to the cell wall, which is critical for lignin formation. There has been much debate on the transported form of the lignin precursor, either as free monolignols or their glucosides. In this study, we performed biochemical analyses to characterize the membrane transport mechanism of lignin precursors using angiosperms, hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii × Populus grandidentata) and poplar (Populus sieboldii), as well gymnosperms, Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and pine (Pinus densiflora). Membrane vesicles prepared from differentiating xylem tissues showed clear ATP-dependent transport activity of coniferin, whereas less than 4% of the coniferin transport activity was seen for coniferyl alcohol. Bafilomycin A1 and proton gradient erasers markedly inhibited coniferin transport in hybrid poplar membrane vesicles; in contrast, vanadate had no effect. Cis-inhibition experiments suggested that this transport activity was specific for coniferin. Membrane fractionation of hybrid poplar microsomes demonstrated that transport activity was localized to the tonoplast- and endomembrane-rich fraction. Differentiating xylem of Japanese cypress exhibited almost identical transport properties, suggesting the involvement of a common endomembrane-associated proton/coniferin antiport mechanism in the lignifying tissues of woody plants, both angiosperms and gymnosperms. PMID:23585651

  13. Weight Loss and Decrease of Body Mass Index during Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Are Common Events with Limited Clinical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Christina T.; Wischumerski, Isabel; Rust, Christian; Fiegl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Weight loss in cancer patients has been attributed with significant morbidity and mortality. During allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), oral nutrition is often hampered and hence total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is necessary. We therefore investigated the course of weight during stem cell transplantation and the clinical consequences of weight change. Methods 180 consecutive patients who received allogeneic SCT between January 2010 and December 2011 at our center were analyzed for weight loss, laboratory and clinical parameters. Results During SCT, a median decrease of 6.6% of body mass index (BMI) was observed for the whole population (from 25.3 at admission to 23.6 at discharge), and a 1.6fold increase of malnutrition despite use of TPN (28.3% to 45.0%). 55.6% of patients experienced a significant weight loss of ≥5% with a median decrease of 9.2% in BMI. Serum levels of albumin, total protein and cholesterol rapidly decreased during conditioning therapy. After a median of 2.4 years, the median BMI was still only 23.4 (not different from discharge). However, we did not observe a meaningful difference in side effects and survival between patients that did or did not lose weight. Conclusion Weight loss is commonly observed during allogeneic SCT despite TPN, but the clinical consequences thereof seem limited: we observed no significant impact on patients with a decrease ≥ 5% in BMI on transplant outcome, side effects or survival. PMID:26683031

  14. Disruption of STAT5b-Regulated Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome by Diverse Factors Is a Common Event.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Waxman, David J; Corton, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is a growth hormone (GH)-activated transcription factor and a master regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Disruption of the GH hypothalamo-pituitary-liver axis controlling STAT5b activation can lead to metabolic dysregulation, steatosis, and liver cancer. Computational approaches were developed to identify factors that disrupt STAT5b function in a mouse liver gene expression compendium. A biomarker comprised of 144 STAT5b-dependent genes was derived using comparisons between wild-type male and wild-type female mice and between STAT5b-null and wild-type mice. Correlations between the STAT5b biomarker gene set and a test set comprised of expression datasets (biosets) with known effects on STAT5b function were evaluated using a rank-based test (the Running Fisher algorithm). Using a similarity p-value ≤ 10(-4), the test achieved a balanced accuracy of 99% and 97% for detection of STAT5b activation or STAT5b suppression, respectively. The STAT5b biomarker gene set was then used to identify factors that activate (masculinize) or suppress (feminize) STAT5b function in an annotated mouse liver and primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium of ~1,850 datasets. Disruption of GH-regulated STAT5b is a common phenomenon in liver in vivo, with 5% and 29% of the male datasets, and 11% and 13% of the female datasets, associated with masculinization or feminization, respectively. As expected, liver STAT5b activation/masculinization occurred at puberty and suppression/feminization occurred during aging and in mutant mice with defects in GH signaling. A total of 70 genes were identified that have effects on STAT5b activation in genetic models in which the gene was inactivated or overexpressed. Other factors that affected liver STAT5b function were shown to include fasting, caloric restriction and infections. Together, these findings identify diverse factors that perturb the hypothalamo

  15. Disruption of STAT5b-Regulated Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome by Diverse Factors Is a Common Event

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Waxman, David J.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is a growth hormone (GH)-activated transcription factor and a master regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Disruption of the GH hypothalamo-pituitary-liver axis controlling STAT5b activation can lead to metabolic dysregulation, steatosis, and liver cancer. Computational approaches were developed to identify factors that disrupt STAT5b function in a mouse liver gene expression compendium. A biomarker comprised of 144 STAT5b-dependent genes was derived using comparisons between wild-type male and wild-type female mice and between STAT5b-null and wild-type mice. Correlations between the STAT5b biomarker gene set and a test set comprised of expression datasets (biosets) with known effects on STAT5b function were evaluated using a rank-based test (the Running Fisher algorithm). Using a similarity p-value ≤ 10−4, the test achieved a balanced accuracy of 99% and 97% for detection of STAT5b activation or STAT5b suppression, respectively. The STAT5b biomarker gene set was then used to identify factors that activate (masculinize) or suppress (feminize) STAT5b function in an annotated mouse liver and primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium of ~1,850 datasets. Disruption of GH-regulated STAT5b is a common phenomenon in liver in vivo, with 5% and 29% of the male datasets, and 11% and 13% of the female datasets, associated with masculinization or feminization, respectively. As expected, liver STAT5b activation/masculinization occurred at puberty and suppression/feminization occurred during aging and in mutant mice with defects in GH signaling. A total of 70 genes were identified that have effects on STAT5b activation in genetic models in which the gene was inactivated or overexpressed. Other factors that affected liver STAT5b function were shown to include fasting, caloric restriction and infections. Together, these findings identify diverse factors that perturb the hypothalamo

  16. Algorithm for Screening Phasor Measurement Unit Data for Power System Events and Categories and Common Characteristics for Events Seen in Phasor Measurement Unit Relative Phase-Angle Differences and Frequency Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.; Santoso, S.; Muljadi, E.

    2013-08-01

    A network of multiple phasor measurement units (PMU) was created, set up, and maintained at the University of Texas at Austin to obtain actual power system measurements for power system analysis. Power system analysis in this report covers a variety of time ranges, such as short- term analysis for power system disturbances and their effects on power system behavior and long- term power system behavior using modal analysis. The first objective of this report is to screen the PMU data for events. The second objective of the report is to identify and describe common characteristics extracted from power system events as measured by PMUs. The numerical characteristics for each category and how these characteristics are used to create selection rules for the algorithm are also described. Trends in PMU data related to different levels and fluctuations in wind power output are also examined.

  17. Cellular basis of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Jitin; Halima, Saoussen Ben; Felmy, Boas; Goodger, Zoe; Zurbriggen, Sebastian; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associated and hence, membrane trafficking and cellular compartmentalization play important roles. In this review, we summarize the key cellular events that lead to the progression of AD. PMID:21369424

  18. Pain Flare Is a Common Adverse Event in Steroid-Naïve Patients After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Andrew; Zeng, Liang; Zhang, Liying; Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Loblaw, Andrew; Chow, Edward; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of pain flare after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in steroid-naïve patients and identify predictive factors. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients were treated with spine SBRT between February 2010 and April 2012. All patients had their pain assessed at baseline, during, and for 10 days after SBRT using the Brief Pain Inventory. All pain medications were recorded daily and narcotics converted to an oral morphine equivalent dose. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in worst pain score as compared with baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, a 25% increase in analgesic intake as compared with baseline with no decrease in worst pain score, or if corticosteroids were initiated at any point during or after SBRT because of pain. Results: The median age and Karnofsky performance status were 57.5 years (range, 27-80 years) and 80 (range, 50-100), respectively. Eighteen patients were treated with 20-24 Gy in a single fraction, whereas 23 patients were treated with 24-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions. Pain flare was observed in 68.3% of patients (28 of 41), most commonly on day 1 after SBRT (29%, 8 of 28). Multivariate analysis identified a higher Karnofsky performance status (P=.02) and cervical (P=.049) or lumbar (P=.02) locations as significant predictors of pain flare. In those rescued with dexamethasone, a significant decrease in pain scores over time was subsequently observed (P<.0001). Conclusions: Pain flare is a common adverse event after spine SBRT and occurs most commonly the day after treatment completion. Patients should be appropriately consented for this adverse event.

  19. Comprehensive analysis of RET common and rare variants in a series of Spanish Hirschsprung patients confirms a synergistic effect of both kinds of events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background RET is the major gene associated to Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) with differential contributions of its rare and common, coding and noncoding mutations to the multifactorial nature of this pathology. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive study of our HSCR series evaluating the involvement of both RET rare variants (RVs) and common variants (CVs) in the context of the disease. Methods RET mutational screening was performed by dHPLC and direct sequencing for the identification of RVs. In addition Taqman technology was applied for the genotyping of 3 RET CVs previously associated to HSCR, including a variant lying in an enhancer domain within RET intron 1 (rs2435357). Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS v.17.0 to analyze the distribution of the variants. Results Our results confirm the strongest association to HSCR for the "enhancer" variant, and demonstrate a significantly higher impact of it in male versus female patients. Integration of the RET RVs and CVs analysis showed that in 91.66% of cases with both kinds of mutational events, the enhancer allele is in trans with the allele bearing the RET RV. Conclusions A gender effect exists on both the transmission and distribution of rare coding and common HSCR causing mutations. In addition, these RET CVs and RVs seem to act in a synergistic way leading to HSCR phenotype. PMID:21995290

  20. Common Phenolic Metabolites of Flavonoids, but Not Their Unmetabolized Precursors, Reduce the Secretion of Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecules by Human Endothelial Cells123

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Emily F; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, K Saki; O’Hagan, David; O’Connell, Maria A; Kay, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    Background: Flavonoids have been implicated in the prevention of cardiovascular disease; however, their mechanisms of action have yet to be elucidated, possibly because most previous in vitro studies have used supraphysiological concentrations of unmetabolized flavonoids, overlooking their more bioavailable phenolic metabolites. Objective: We aimed to explore the effects of phenolic metabolites and their precursor flavonoids at physiologically achievable concentrations, in isolation and combination, on soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1). Method: Fourteen phenolic acid metabolites and 6 flavonoids were screened at 1 μM for their relative effects on sVCAM-1 secretion by human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The active metabolites were further studied for their response at different concentrations (0.01 μM–100 μM), structure-activity relationships, and effect on vascular cellular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 mRNA expression. In addition, the additive activity of the metabolites and flavonoids was investigated by screening 25 unique mixtures at cumulative equimolar concentrations of 1 μM. Results: Of the 20 compounds screened at 1 μM, inhibition of sVCAM-1 secretion was elicited by 4 phenolic metabolites, of which protocatechuic acid (PCA) was the most active (−17.2%, P = 0.05). Investigations into their responses at different concentrations showed that PCA significantly reduced sVCAM-1 15.2–36.5% between 1 and 100 μM, protocatechuic acid-3-sulfate and isovanillic acid reduced sVCAM-1 levels 12.2–54.7% between 10 and 100 μM, and protocatechuic acid-4-sulfate and isovanillic acid-3-glucuronide reduced sVCAM-1 secretion 27.6% and 42.8%, respectively, only at 100 μM. PCA demonstrated the strongest protein response and was therefore explored for its effect on VCAM-1 mRNA, where 78.4% inhibition was observed only after treatment with 100 μM PCA. Mixtures of the metabolites showed no

  1. Stakeholder perspectives on implementing the National Cancer Institute's patient-reported outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE).

    PubMed

    Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Hanisch, Laura J; Reeve, Bryce B; Trotti, Andy M; Schrag, Deborah; Sit, Laura; Mendoza, Tito R; Minasian, Lori; O'Mara, Ann; Denicoff, Andrea M; Rowland, Julia H; Montello, Michael; Geoghegan, Cindy; Abernethy, Amy P; Clauser, Steven B; Castro, Kathleen; Mitchell, Sandra A; Burke, Laurie; Trentacosti, Ann Marie; Basch, Ethan M

    2011-03-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing a patient-reported version of its Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, called the "PRO-CTCAE." The PRO-CTCAE consists of a library of patient-reported items which can be administered in clinical trials to directly capture the patient experience of adverse events during cancer treatment, as well as a software platform for administering these items via computer or telephone. In order to better understand the impressions of stakeholders involved in cancer clinical research about the potential value of the PRO-CTCAE approach to capturing adverse event information in clinical research, as well as their perspectives about barriers and strategies for implementing the PRO-CTCAE in NCI-sponsored cancer trials, a survey was conducted. A survey including structured and open-ended questions was developed to elicit perceptions about the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) for adverse event reporting, and to explore logistical considerations for implementing the PRO-CTCAE in cancer trials. The survey was distributed electronically and by paper to a convenience sample of leadership and committee members in the NCI's cooperative group network, including principal investigators, clinical investigators, research nurses, data managers, patient advocates, and representatives of the NCI and Food and Drug Administration. Between October, 2008 through February, 2009, 727 surveys were collected. Most respondents (93%) agreed that patient reporting of adverse symptoms would be useful for improving understanding of the patient experience with treatment in cancer trials, and 88%, 80%, and 76%, respectively, endorsed that administration of PRO-CTCAE items in clinical trials would improve the completeness, accuracy, and efficiency of symptom data collection. More than three fourths believed that patient reports would be useful for informing treatment dose modifications and towards FDA regulatory evaluation of drugs. Eighty

  2. Development of the National Cancer Institute’s Patient-Reported Outcomes Version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE)

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Bryce B.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Clauser, Steven B.; Minasian, Lori M.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Hay, Jennifer; Atkinson, Thomas M.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Bruner, Deborah W.; Cleeland, Charles S.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Chilukuri, Ram; Baumgartner, Paul; Denicoff, Andrea; St. Germain, Diane; O’Mara, Ann M.; Chen, Alice; Kelaghan, Joseph; Bennett, Antonia V.; Sit, Laura; Rogak, Lauren; Barz, Allison; Paul, Diane B.; Schrag, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    The standard approach for documenting symptomatic adverse events (AEs) in cancer clinical trials involves investigator reporting using the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Because this approach underdetects symptomatic AEs, the NCI issued two contracts to create a patient-reported outcome (PRO) measurement system as a companion to the CTCAE, called the PRO-CTCAE. This Commentary describes development of the PRO-CTCAE by a group of multidisciplinary investigators and patient representatives and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative studies of its measurement properties. A systematic evaluation of all 790 AEs listed in the CTCAE identified 78 appropriate for patient self-reporting. For each of these, a PRO-CTCAE plain language term in English and one to three items characterizing the frequency, severity, and/or activity interference of the AE were created, rendering a library of 124 PRO-CTCAE items. These items were refined in a cognitive interviewing study among patients on active cancer treatment with diverse educational, racial, and geographic backgrounds. Favorable measurement properties of the items, including construct validity, reliability, responsiveness, and between-mode equivalence, were determined prospectively in a demographically diverse population of patients receiving treatments for many different tumor types. A software platform was built to administer PRO-CTCAE items to clinical trial participants via the internet or telephone interactive voice response and was refined through usability testing. Work is ongoing to translate the PRO-CTCAE into multiple languages and to determine the optimal approach for integrating the PRO-CTCAE into clinical trial workflow and AE analyses. It is envisioned that the PRO-CTCAE will enhance the precision and patient-centeredness of adverse event reporting in cancer clinical research. PMID:25265940

  3. Development of the National Cancer Institute's patient-reported outcomes version of the common terminology criteria for adverse events (PRO-CTCAE).

    PubMed

    Basch, Ethan; Reeve, Bryce B; Mitchell, Sandra A; Clauser, Steven B; Minasian, Lori M; Dueck, Amylou C; Mendoza, Tito R; Hay, Jennifer; Atkinson, Thomas M; Abernethy, Amy P; Bruner, Deborah W; Cleeland, Charles S; Sloan, Jeff A; Chilukuri, Ram; Baumgartner, Paul; Denicoff, Andrea; St Germain, Diane; O'Mara, Ann M; Chen, Alice; Kelaghan, Joseph; Bennett, Antonia V; Sit, Laura; Rogak, Lauren; Barz, Allison; Paul, Diane B; Schrag, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    The standard approach for documenting symptomatic adverse events (AEs) in cancer clinical trials involves investigator reporting using the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Because this approach underdetects symptomatic AEs, the NCI issued two contracts to create a patient-reported outcome (PRO) measurement system as a companion to the CTCAE, called the PRO-CTCAE. This Commentary describes development of the PRO-CTCAE by a group of multidisciplinary investigators and patient representatives and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative studies of its measurement properties. A systematic evaluation of all 790 AEs listed in the CTCAE identified 78 appropriate for patient self-reporting. For each of these, a PRO-CTCAE plain language term in English and one to three items characterizing the frequency, severity, and/or activity interference of the AE were created, rendering a library of 124 PRO-CTCAE items. These items were refined in a cognitive interviewing study among patients on active cancer treatment with diverse educational, racial, and geographic backgrounds. Favorable measurement properties of the items, including construct validity, reliability, responsiveness, and between-mode equivalence, were determined prospectively in a demographically diverse population of patients receiving treatments for many different tumor types. A software platform was built to administer PRO-CTCAE items to clinical trial participants via the internet or telephone interactive voice response and was refined through usability testing. Work is ongoing to translate the PRO-CTCAE into multiple languages and to determine the optimal approach for integrating the PRO-CTCAE into clinical trial workflow and AE analyses. It is envisioned that the PRO-CTCAE will enhance the precision and patient-centeredness of adverse event reporting in cancer clinical research. PMID:25265940

  4. Collective specification of cellular development.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Tsvi

    2003-09-01

    Studies of chimeras and in vivo development demonstrate that cell lineages are often quite variable, apparently in response to chance perturbations. This points to an apparent contradiction: although individual cells are the units of genetic information and differentiation, not all cellular events need be precise for the development of functional organisms. The social organization of ants can serve as a metaphor that helps understand the mechanisms that underlie such development. Ants suggest that continued cellular interactions and environmental conditions could specify the proportion and general location of specialized units. Leaf venation is used as a concrete example of this general principle. A signal produced continuously by all cells specifies a requirement for vein differentiation. The cells that respond by differentiation then transport the signal away from the leaf; this removal acting as a feedback indicating that the requirement is being met. Because transport increases during vein differentiation, early initiation occurs in excess and vein 'competition' for the signal assures an acceptable outcome. Such specification would be robust since it does not depend on events in any single cell, and chance events, rather than being corrected or reversed, may be built upon in reaching an expected, collective phenotype. The absence of detailed information preceding development distinguishes this hypothesis from the common alternatives of a program or blueprint. Collective specification would have important implications for developmental plasticity and evolution. PMID:12938179

  5. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Cancer Clinical Trials: Measuring Symptomatic Adverse Events With the National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes Version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE).

    PubMed

    Kluetz, Paul G; Chingos, Diana T; Basch, Ethan M; Mitchell, Sandra A

    2016-01-01

    Systematic capture of the patient perspective can inform the development of new cancer therapies. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are commonly included in cancer clinical trials; however, there is heterogeneity in the constructs, measures, and analytic approaches that have been used making these endpoints challenging to interpret. There is renewed effort to identify rigorous methods to obtain high-quality and informative PRO data from cancer clinical trials. In this setting, PROs are used to address specific research objectives, and an important objective that spans the product development life cycle is the assessment of safety and tolerability. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Hematology and Oncology Products (OHOP) has identified symptomatic adverse events (AEs) as a central PRO concept, and a systematic assessment of patient-reported symptomatic AEs can provide data to complement clinician reporting. The National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE) is being evaluated by multiple stakeholders, including the FDA, and is considered a promising tool to provide a standard yet flexible method to assess symptomatic AEs from the patient perspective. In this article, we briefly review the FDA OHOP's perspective on PROs in cancer trials submitted to the FDA and focus on the assessment of symptomatic AEs using PRO-CTCAE. We conclude by discussing further work that must be done to broaden the use of PRO-CTCAE as a method to provide patient-centered data that can complement existing safety and tolerability assessments across cancer clinical trials. PMID:27249687

  6. Decreasing electron flux through the cytochrome and/or alternative respiratory pathways triggers common and distinct cellular responses dependent on growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Kristina; Yin, Guangkun; Duncan, Owen; Law, Simon R; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Kaur, Parwinder; Meyer, Etienne; Wang, Yan; Small, Catherine Colas des Francs; Giraud, Estelle; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2015-01-01

    Diverse signaling pathways are activated by perturbation of mitochondrial function under different growth conditions.Mitochondria have emerged as an important organelle for sensing and coping with stress in addition to being the sites of important metabolic pathways. Here, responses to moderate light and drought stress were examined in different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant plants lacking a functional alternative oxidase (alternative oxidase1a [aox1a]), those with reduced cytochrome electron transport chain capacity (T3/T7 bacteriophage-type RNA polymerase, mitochondrial, and plastidial [rpoTmp]), and double mutants impaired in both pathways (aox1a:rpoTmp). Under conditions considered optimal for growth, transcriptomes of aox1a and rpoTmp were distinct. Under adverse growth conditions, however, transcriptome changes in aox1a and rpoTmp displayed a highly significant overlap and were indicative of a common mitochondrial stress response and down-regulation of photosynthesis. This suggests that the role of mitochondria to support photosynthesis is provided through either the alternative pathway or the cytochrome pathway, and when either pathway is inhibited, such as under environmental stress, a common, dramatic, and succinct mitochondrial signal is activated to alter energy metabolism in both organelles. aox1a:rpoTmp double mutants grown under optimal conditions showed dramatic reductions in biomass production compared with aox1a and rpoTmp and a transcriptome that was distinct from aox1a or rpoTmp. Transcript data indicating activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in aox1a:rpoTmp were supported by a proteomic analysis of over 200 proteins. Under optimal conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp plants seemed to switch on many of the typical mitochondrial stress regulators. Under adverse conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp turned off these responses and displayed a biotic stress response. Taken together, these results highlight the diverse signaling pathways activated by the

  7. Demographic clusters identified within the northern Gulf of Mexico common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncates) unusual mortality event: January 2010-June 2013.

    PubMed

    Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Garrison, Lance; Litz, Jenny; Fougeres, Erin; Mase, Blair; Rappucci, Gina; Stratton, Elizabeth; Carmichael, Ruth; Odell, Daniel; Shannon, Delphine; Shippee, Steve; Smith, Suzanne; Staggs, Lydia; Tumlin, Mandy; Whitehead, Heidi; Rowles, Teri

    2015-01-01

    A multi-year unusual mortality event (UME) involving primarily common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncates) was declared in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) with an initial start date of February 2010 and remains ongoing as of August 2014. To examine potential changing characteristics of the UME over time, we compared the number and demographics of dolphin strandings from January 2010 through June 2013 across the entire GoM as well as against baseline (1990-2009) GoM stranding patterns. Years 2010 and 2011 had the highest annual number of stranded dolphins since Louisiana's record began, and 2011 was one of the years with the highest strandings for both Mississippi and Alabama. Statewide, annual numbers of stranded dolphins were not elevated for GoM coasts of Florida or Texas during the UME period. Demographic, spatial, and temporal clusters identified within this UME included increased strandings in northern coastal Louisiana and Mississippi (March-May 2010); Barataria Bay, Louisiana (August 2010-December 2011); Mississippi and Alabama (2011, including a high prevalence and number of stranded perinates); and multiple GoM states during early 2013. While the causes of the GoM UME have not been determined, the location and magnitude of dolphin strandings during and the year following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including the Barataria Bay cluster from August 2010 to December 2011, overlap in time and space with locations that received heavy and prolonged oiling. There are, however, multiple known causes of previous GoM dolphin UMEs, including brevetoxicosis and dolphin morbillivirus. Additionally, increased dolphin strandings occurred in northern Louisiana and Mississippi before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Identification of spatial, temporal, and demographic clusters within the UME suggest that this mortality event may involve different contributing factors varying by location, time, and bottlenose dolphin populations that will be better discerned

  8. Using the Skindex-16 and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess rash symptoms: results of a pooled-analysis (N0993)

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Kelli N.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Wittich, Michelle A. Neben; Miller, Robert C.; Jatoi, Aminah; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Historically, skin toxicity has been assessed in prospective clinical trials using the clinician-reported National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The patient-reported Skindex-16 measures symptoms and perceptions of toxicity. This study was designed to compare information provided by these two measures. Methods Data were compiled from three placebo-controlled North Central Cancer Treatment Group studies (N06C4, N03CB, N05C4) having rash prevention as the primary objective. All used the Skindex-16 and CTCAE at baseline, weekly during treatment and during a minimum 2-week follow-up period. Statistical procedures, including Pearson correlations, were utilized to determine relationships between adverse event (AE) grades and Skindex-16 scores. Results Four hundred and twelve individual patients provided data (median age, 61; 134 male). Patients’ Skindex-16 score results show a 0.9 overall mean (range 0–6 with 6 being worse symptoms), a 0.4 baseline mean (range, 0–4.3) and a 1.3 end-of-treatment mean (range, 0–5.9). Ninety-three, 142 and 177 patients experienced a grade 0, 1 and 2+ CTCAE skin toxicity, respectively. Baseline Skindex-16 scores had relatively low correlation with CTCAE grades. The correlation of rash grade with Skindex-16 scores ranged from r=0.49 with the function subscale to r=0.62 with the symptom subscale. The highest correlations of the maximum grade of any dermatological AE with the Skindex-16 were r=0.48 for the total score and r=0.55 for the symptom subscale. Conclusions The data reported support the decision to include both measures in a clinical trial to assess the patient experience, as each measure may specifically target varying symptoms and intensities. PMID:21922203

  9. Demographic Clusters Identified within the Northern Gulf of Mexico Common Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncates) Unusual Mortality Event: January 2010 - June 2013

    PubMed Central

    Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Garrison, Lance; Litz, Jenny; Fougeres, Erin; Mase, Blair; Rappucci, Gina; Stratton, Elizabeth; Carmichael, Ruth; Odell, Daniel; Shannon, Delphine; Shippee, Steve; Smith, Suzanne; Staggs, Lydia; Tumlin, Mandy; Whitehead, Heidi; Rowles, Teri

    2015-01-01

    A multi-year unusual mortality event (UME) involving primarily common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncates) was declared in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) with an initial start date of February 2010 and remains ongoing as of August 2014. To examine potential changing characteristics of the UME over time, we compared the number and demographics of dolphin strandings from January 2010 through June 2013 across the entire GoM as well as against baseline (1990-2009) GoM stranding patterns. Years 2010 and 2011 had the highest annual number of stranded dolphins since Louisiana’s record began, and 2011 was one of the years with the highest strandings for both Mississippi and Alabama. Statewide, annual numbers of stranded dolphins were not elevated for GoM coasts of Florida or Texas during the UME period. Demographic, spatial, and temporal clusters identified within this UME included increased strandings in northern coastal Louisiana and Mississippi (March-May 2010); Barataria Bay, Louisiana (August 2010-December 2011); Mississippi and Alabama (2011, including a high prevalence and number of stranded perinates); and multiple GoM states during early 2013. While the causes of the GoM UME have not been determined, the location and magnitude of dolphin strandings during and the year following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including the Barataria Bay cluster from August 2010 to December 2011, overlap in time and space with locations that received heavy and prolonged oiling. There are, however, multiple known causes of previous GoM dolphin UMEs, including brevetoxicosis and dolphin morbillivirus. Additionally, increased dolphin strandings occurred in northern Louisiana and Mississippi before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Identification of spatial, temporal, and demographic clusters within the UME suggest that this mortality event may involve different contributing factors varying by location, time, and bottlenose dolphin populations that will be better

  10. Cognitive interviewing of the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE)

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Jennifer L.; Atkinson, Thomas M.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Willis, Gordon; Minasian, Lori M.; Clauser, Steven B.; Denicoff, Andrea; O’Mara, Ann; Chen, Alice; Bennett, Antonia V.; Paul, Diane B.; Gagne, Joshua; Rogak, Lauren; Sit, Laura; Viswanath, Vish; Schrag, Deborah; Basch, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The National Cancer Institute’s Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE) is a library of question items that enables patient reporting of adverse events (AEs) in clinical trials. This study contributes content validity evidence of the PRO-CTCAE by incorporating cancer patient input of the relevance and comprehensiveness of the item library. Methods Cognitive interviews were conducted among patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy at multiple sites to evaluate comprehension, memory retrieval, judgment, and response mapping related to AE terms (e.g., nausea); attribute terms (regarding frequency, severity, or interference); response options; and recall period. Three interview rounds were conducted with ≥20 patients completing each item per round. Items were modified and retested if ≥3 patients exhibited cognitive difficulties or if experienced by ≤25% patients. Results 127 patients participated (35% ≤high school; 28% non-white; 59% female). Most AE terms (63/80) generated no cognitive difficulties. The remaining 17 were modified without further difficulties by Round 3. Terms were comprehended regardless of education level. Attribute terms and response options required no modifications. Patient adherence to recall period (7-days) was improved when the reference period was incorporated. Conclusions This study provides evidence confirming comprehension of the U.S. English language versions of items in the PRO-CTCAE library for measuring symptomatic AEs from the patient perspective within the context of cancer treatment. Several minor changes were made to the items to improve item clarity, comprehension, and ease of response judgment. This study helps establish the content validity of PRO-CTCAE items for patient reporting of AEs during cancer treatment. PMID:23868457

  11. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Gretchen; Ajioka, James W; Kelly, Krystyna A; Mui, Ernest; Roberts, Fiona; Kasza, Kristen; Mayr, Thomas; Kirisits, Michael J; Wollmann, Robert; Ferguson, David JP; Roberts, Craig W; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Trendler, Toria; Kennan, Richard P; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Reardon, Catherine; Hickey, William F; Chen, Lieping; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Background Worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii with largely unknown consequences. Methods To better understand long-term effects and pathogenesis of this common, persistent brain infection, mice were infected at a time in human years equivalent to early to mid adulthood and studied 5–12 months later. Appearance, behavior, neurologic function and brain MRIs were studied. Additional analyses of pathogenesis included: correlation of brain weight and neurologic findings; histopathology focusing on brain regions; full genome microarrays; immunohistochemistry characterizing inflammatory cells; determination of presence of tachyzoites and bradyzoites; electron microscopy; and study of markers of inflammation in serum. Histopathology in genetically resistant mice and cytokine and NRAMP knockout mice, effects of inoculation of isolated parasites, and treatment with sulfadiazine or αPD1 ligand were studied. Results Twelve months after infection, a time equivalent to middle to early elderly ages, mice had behavioral and neurological deficits, and brain MRIs showed mild to moderate ventricular dilatation. Lower brain weight correlated with greater magnitude of neurologic abnormalities and inflammation. Full genome microarrays of brains reflected inflammation causing neuronal damage (Gfap), effects on host cell protein processing (ubiquitin ligase), synapse remodeling (Complement 1q), and also increased expression of PD-1L (a ligand that allows persistent LCMV brain infection) and CD 36 (a fatty acid translocase and oxidized LDL receptor that mediates innate immune response to beta amyloid which is associated with pro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease). Immunostaining detected no inflammation around intra-neuronal cysts, practically no free tachyzoites, and only rare bradyzoites. Nonetheless, there were perivascular, leptomeningeal inflammatory cells, particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of Sylvius and hippocampus

  12. Analysis of the common deletions in the mitochondrial DNA is a sensitive biomarker detecting direct and non-targeted cellular effects of low dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Sándor, Nikolett; Kis, Eniko; Kadhim, Munira; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2011-11-01

    One of the key issues of current radiation research is the biological effect of low doses. Unfortunately, low dose science is hampered by the unavailability of easily performable, reliable and sensitive quantitative biomarkers suitable detecting low frequency alterations in irradiated cells. We applied a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) based protocol detecting common deletions (CD) in the mitochondrial genome to assess direct and non-targeted effects of radiation in human fibroblasts. In directly irradiated (IR) cells CD increased with dose and was higher in radiosensitive cells. Investigating conditioned medium-mediated bystander effects we demonstrated that low and high (0.1 and 2Gy) doses induced similar levels of bystander responses and found individual differences in human fibroblasts. The bystander response was not related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The importance of signal sending donor and signal receiving target cells was investigated by placing conditioned medium from a bystander response positive cell line (F11-hTERT) to bystander negative cells (S1-hTERT) and vice versa. The data indicated that signal sending cells are more important in the medium-mediated bystander effect than recipients. Finally, we followed long term effects in immortalized radiation sensitive (S1-hTERT) and normal (F11-hTERT) fibroblasts up to 63 days after IR. In F11-hTERT cells CD level was increased until 35 days after IR then reduced back to control level by day 49. In S1-hTERT cells the increased CD level was also normalized by day 42, however a second wave of increased CD incidence appeared by day 49 which was maintained up to day 63 after IR. This second CD wave might be the indication of radiation-induced instability in the mitochondrial genome of S1-hTERT cells. The data demonstrated that measuring CD in mtDNA by qRT-PCR is a reliable and sensitive biomarker to estimate radiation-induced direct and non-targeted effects. PMID:21843534

  13. Akt activation is a common event in pediatric malignant gliomas and a potential adverse prognostic marker: a report from the children’s oncology group

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Ronald L.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Burger, Peter C.; Brat, Daniel J.; Rosenblum, Marc K.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Holmes, Emiko J.; Zhou, Tianni; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Jakacki, Regina I.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Akt is a common finding in adult malignant gliomas, resulting in most cases from mutations or deletions involving PTEN, which allows constitutive Akt phosphorylation. In contrast, we have previously reported that pediatric malignant gliomas, which are morphologically similar to lesions arising in adults, have a substantially lower incidence of genomic alterations of PTEN. The objective of this study was to determine whether Akt activation was also an uncommon finding in childhood malignant gliomas and whether this feature was associated with survival. To address this issue, we examined the frequency of Akt activation, determined by overexpression of the activated phosphorylated form of Akt (Se473) on immunohistochemical analysis, in a series of 53 childhood malignant gliomas obtained from newly diagnosed patients treated on the Children’s Oncology Group ACNS0126 and 0423 studies. The relationship between Akt activation and p53 over-expression, MIB1 labeling, and tumor histology was evaluated. The association between Akt activation and survival was also assessed. Overexpression of activated Akt was observed in 42 of 53 tumors, far in excess of the frequency of PTEN mutations we have previously observed. There was no association between Akt activation and either histology, p53 overexpression, or MIB1 proliferation indices. Although tumors that lacked Akt overexpression had a trend toward more favorable event-free survival and overall survival (p = 0.06), this association reflected that non-overexpressing tumors were significantly more likely to have undergone extensive tumor removal, which was independently associated with outcome. Activation of Akt is a common finding in pediatric malignant gliomas, although it remains uncertain whether this is an independent adverse prognostic factor. In view of the frequency of Akt activation, the evaluation of molecularly targeted therapies that inhibit this pathway warrants consideration for these tumors

  14. The role of dose rate in radiation cancer risk: evaluating the effect of dose rate at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels using key events in critical pathways following exposure to low LET radiation

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Preston, R. Julian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: This review evaluates the role of dose rate on cell and molecular responses. It focuses on the influence of dose rate on key events in critical pathways in the development of cancer. This approach is similar to that used by the U.S. EPA and others to evaluate risk from chemicals. It provides a mechanistic method to account for the influence of the dose rate from low-LET radiation, especially in the low-dose region on cancer risk assessment. Molecular, cellular, and tissues changes are observed in many key events and change as a function of dose rate. The magnitude and direction of change can be used to help establish an appropriate dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). Conclusions: Extensive data on key events suggest that exposure to low dose-rates are less effective in producing changes than high dose rates. Most of these data at the molecular and cellular level support a large (2–30) DREF. In addition, some evidence suggests that doses delivered at a low dose rate decrease damage to levels below that observed in the controls. However, there are some data human and mechanistic data that support a dose-rate effectiveness factor of 1. In summary, a review of the available molecular, cellular and tissue data indicates that not only is dose rate an important variable in understanding radiation risk but it also supports the selection of a DREF greater than one as currently recommended by ICRP (2007) and BEIR VII (NRC/NAS 2006). PMID:27266588

  15. Variety Is Not the Spice of Life for People with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Frequency Ratings of Central, Variable and Inappropriate Aspects of Common Real-Life Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loth, Eva; Happe, Francesca; Gomez, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    This study used a novel rating task to investigate whether high-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulties distinguishing essential from variable aspects of familiar events. Participants read stories about everyday events and judged how often central, variable, and inappropriate event-components normally occur in…

  16. Population structure within lineages of Wheat streak mosaic virus derived from a common founding event exhibits stochastic variation inconsistent with the deterministic quasi-species model

    SciTech Connect

    French, Roy; Stenger, Drake C. . E-mail: dstenger@unlnotes.unl.edu

    2005-12-20

    Structure of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) populations derived from a common founding event and subjected to serial passage at high multiplicity of infection (MOI) was evaluated. The founding population was generated by limiting dilution inoculation. Lineages of known pedigree were sampled at passage 9 (two populations) and at passage 15, with (three populations) or without mixing (four populations) of lineages at passage 10. Polymorphism within each population was assessed by sequencing 17-21 clones containing a 1371 nt region (WSMV-Sidney 81 nts 8001-9371) encompassing the entire coat protein cistron and flanking regions. Mutation frequency averaged {approx}5.0 x 10{sup -4}/nt across all populations and ranged from 2.4 to 11.6 x 10{sup -4}/nt within populations, but did not consistently increase or decrease with the number of passages removed from the founding population. Shared substitutions (19 nonsynonymous, 10 synonymous, and 3 noncoding) occurred at 32 sites among 44 haplotypes. Only four substitutions became fixed (frequency = 100%) within a population and nearly one third (10/32) never achieved a frequency of 10% or greater in any sampled population. Shared substitutions were randomly distributed with respect to genome position, with transitions outnumbering transversions 5.4:1 and a clear bias for A to G and U to C substitutions. Haplotype composition of each population was unique with complexity of each population varying unpredictably, in that the number and frequency of haplotypes within a lineage were not correlated with number of passages removed from the founding population or whether the population was derived from a single or mixed lineage. The simplest explanation is that plant virus lineages, even those propagated at high MOI, are subject to frequent, narrow genetic bottlenecks during systemic movement that result in low effective population size and stochastic changes in population structure upon serial passage.

  17. Common and segregated neural substrates for automatic conceptual and affective priming as revealed by event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Hu, Zhiguo; Peng, Danling; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Kuncheng

    2010-02-01

    The brain activity associated with automatic semantic priming has been extensively studied. Thus far there has been no prior study that directly contrasts the neural mechanisms of semantic and affective priming. The present study employed event-related fMRI to examine the common and distinct neural bases underlying conceptual and affective priming with a lexical decision task. A special type of emotional word, a dual-meaning word containing both conceptual meaning and affective meaning, was adopted as target. Short stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) (50 ms) was used to emphasize automatic processing. Fifteen participants were scanned in the present study. We found that the left middle/superior temporal gyrus was the brain region involved in both automatic conceptual and affective priming effects, suggesting general lexical-semantic processing that share in the two types of priming. The left inferior frontal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus were found to be the conceptual-specific areas in automatic priming effect, consistent with the role of these areas in more extensive within-category semantic processes. The results also revealed that the left fusiform gyrus and left insula were the affective-specific regions in automatic priming effect, demonstrating the involvement of the left fusiform gyrus in automatic affective priming effect, and clarifying the role of the insula in emotional processing rather than conceptual processing. Despite comparable behavioral effects of automatic conceptual priming and affective priming, the present study revealed a neural dissociation of the two types of priming, as well as the shared neural bases. PMID:20018360

  18. Genomic losses at 5q13.2 and 8p23.1 in dysplastic hepatocytes are common events in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, ZHANG; CHEN, GUANG-YONG; LONG, JIANG; LI, HAI; HUANG, JIAN

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal loci with genomic imbalances are frequently identified in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Greater than two-thirds of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCCs originate from liver cirrhosis following a duration of up to two decades. However, it is unclear whether these genomic imbalances occur and accumulate in dysplastic hepatocytes of the cirrhotic liver during the progression from regenerated nodules to preneoplastic lesions, including dysplastic nodules (DN). In the present study, high-grade DNs (HGDNs) of HBV-related liver cirrhosis were screened to identify loci with genomic imbalances, and the frequency of the identified loci in a group of HCCs was analyzed in order to determine whether there may be a genetic link between liver cirrhosis and HCC. Genomic DNA was extracted from six HGDNs of two cases of HBV-related liver cirrhosis and subjected to array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis with a NimbleGen 720K microarray. Loci with the most frequently observed genomic imbalances in DNs were further analyzed in 83 cases of HCC by differential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR. The array CGH analysis revealed that the majority of genomic imbalances in the HGDNs were genomic losses of small segments, with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 5q13.2 and 8p23.1 identified most frequently. Of the 83 HCC cases, 30 (36.1%) cases were identified with LOH at 5q13.2, where known tumor-associated genes are located, including general transcription factor IIH subunit 2 (GTF2H2), baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 1 (BIRC1) and occludin (OCLN). LOH frequency at 8p23.1 in HCC was 61.29% (D8S1130) and 68.4% (D8S503) respectively, similar to the results obtained in previous studies. In conclusion, the results of the present study provided evidence that genomic losses at 5q13.2 and 8p23.1 identified in dysplastic hepatocytes of the cirrhotic liver are common events in HCC. HCC-associated chromosomal abnormalities may occur and accumulate

  19. Cosmogenic Noble Gases and Their Production Rates in Eucrites, Diogenites, and Howardites: Common Asteroid Break-up Events 38 Ma, 21 Ma, and 6 MA Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, O.; Michel, Th.

    1993-07-01

    It is likely that the eucrites and their associates, the howardites and diogenites, sample the surface and shallow interior of a single parent body, possibly 4 Vesta (cf. [1] and [2]). A break-up event that reaches deep enough may, thus, eject asteroidal fragments representing meteorites from all three classes. In this work we present a comprehensive investigation of the exposure age clusters for howardites, eucrites, and diogenites (HEDs). Cosmic-ray exposure ages critically depend on the production rates for cosmic-ray produced nuclei. For eucrites shielding independent production rates for ^21Ne and ^38Ar have been determined previously [3,4]. We now present production rates of ^3He, ^21Ne, ^33Ar, ^78Kr, ^83Kr, and ^126Xe for eucrites, howardites, and diogenites as a function of shielding, where appropriate, and of target element abundances as derived on the basis of ^81Kr-Kr ages. E.g., for ^21Ne we obtain: P(sub)21 (EUC) = 8.43 P^1(sub)21 [16.1 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 10.3]^-1, P(sub)21 (HOW) = 6.16 P^1(sub)21 [18.1 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 14.1]^-1, P(sub)21 (DIO) = 4.81 P^1(sub)21 [25.7 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 23.7]^-1, where P^1(sub)21 = 1.63 [Mg] + 0.6 [Al] + 0.32 [Si] + 0.22 [S] + 0.07 [Ca] + 0.021 [Fe + Ni] as given by [3]. (Elemental abundance [x] in weight %, P(sub)21 in 10^10 cm^3 STP/g, Ma). Average cosmic-ray exposure ages were derived from as many nuclei as possible for 14 HEDs analyzed by us (see also [5,6]) and for those compiled by [7]. Two major exposure age clusters at 21 and 38 Ma are represented in all three meteorite classes (Fig. 1). In the cluster at 21 +- 4 Ma are 12 out of 39 eucrites, 6 out of 14 howardites, and 7out of 12 diogenites. In the cluster at 38 +- 8 Ma are 6 eucrites, 5 howardites, and 4 diogenites. A third common break-up event at 5 +- 1 Ma is indicated by the remaining diogenite, three eucrites, and one howardite. Schultz [8] found major clusters for eucrites at 13, 21, 26, and 40 Ma for howardites around 10 and 24 Ma, and for

  20. In Vivo Implanted Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Trigger a Cascade of Cellular Events Leading to the Formation of an Ectopic Bone Regenerative Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tasso, Roberta; Ulivi, Valentina; Reverberi, Daniele; Lo Sicco, Claudia; Descalzi, Fiorella

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that mouse bone marrow stromal cells, also known as bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), seeded onto a scaffold and implanted in vivo, led to an ectopic bone deposition by host cells. This MSCs capacity was critically dependent on their commitment level, being present only in MSCs cultured in presence of fibroblast growth factor-2. Taking advantage of a chimeric mouse model, in this study we show that seeded MSCs trigger a cascade of events resulting in the mobilization of macrophages, the induction of their functional switch from a proinflammatory to a proresolving phenotype, and the subsequent formation of a bone regenerative niche through the recruitment, within the first 2 weeks of implantation, of endothelial progenitors and of cells with an osteogenic potential (CD146+CD105+), both of them derived from the BM. Moreover, we demonstrated that, in an inflammatory environment, MSCs secrete a large amount of prostaglandin E2 playing a key role in the macrophage phenotype switch. PMID:23924051

  1. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    PubMed

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  2. Adaptive and maladaptive mechanisms of cellular priming.

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, D R; Cleveland, J C; Moore, E E; Partrick, D A; Banerjee, A; Harken, A H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The mechanisms of cellular priming resulting in both adaptive and maladaptive responses to subsequent injury and strategies for manipulating this priming to constructive therapeutic advantage are explored. BACKGROUND DATA: A cell is prepared or educated by an initial insult (priming stimulus). Investigations in both laboratory animals and humans indicate that cells, organs, and perhaps even whole patients respond differently to a proximal second insult ("second hit") by virtue of this prior environmental history. The opportunity to achieve the primed state appears to be conserved across almost all cell types. The initial stimulus transmits a message to the cellular machinery that influences the cell's response to a subsequent challenge. This response may result in an exaggerated inflammatory response in the case of the neutrophil (an often maladaptive process) or an improved tolerance to injury by the myocyte (adaptive response). Our global hypothesis is that cellular priming is a conserved, receptor-dependent process that invokes common intracellular targets across multiple cell types. We further postulate that these targets create a language based on the transient phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of intracellular enzymes that is therapeutically accessible. CONCLUSIONS: Priming is a conserved, receptor-dependent process transduced by means of intracellular targets across multiple cell types. The potential therapeutic strategies outlined involve the receptor-mediated manipulation of cellular events. These events are transmitted through an intracellular language that instructs the cell regarding its behavior in response to subsequent stimulation. Understanding these intracellular events represents a realistic goal of priming and preconditioning biology and will likely lead to clinical control of the primed state. PMID:9389392

  3. Flooding of the Great River during the Common Era: A Paleohydrological Record of High Magnitude Flood Events from the Central Mississippi River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. W.; Munoz, S. E.; Gruley, K. E.; Massie, A.

    2014-12-01

    Streamflow characteristics are known to be sensitive to changes in climate, but few continuous records of flooding exist to evaluate the response of hydrological systems to centennial- and millennia-scale climate changes. Here, we present sedimentary records from two oxbow lakes (Horseshoe Lake and Grassy Lake, Illinois, USA) in the central Mississippi River valley (CMRV) that display abrupt shifts in sediment composition and particle-size consistent with deposition by floodwaters immediately following inundation of the floodplain. The sedimentary record at Horseshoe Lake begins ca. AD 100 and displays five major flood events, with four of these occurring after ca. AD 1100. Situated 200 km downstream, the record from Grassy Lake begins later, ca. AD 800, and also shows four major flood events after ca. AD 1100. An analysis of synchronicity using Bayesian age modelling software shows high likelihoods that the four overlapping flood events occurred at the same time, confirming that these events resulted from flooding of the Mississippi River. The most recent event we record at AD 1840 ± 50 corresponds to the AD 1844 flood, the largest flood by discharge (37 m3/s) measured by the gauging station at St. Louis, Missouri, indicating that our sedimentary records document high magnitude flood events. Together, our two sedimentary records show a major shift in the frequency of high magnitude flooding in the central Mississippi River at ca. AD 1100. From AD 100 - AD 1100, only one relatively subtle flood event is recorded, but from AD 1100 - AD 1900, four high magnitude floods deposited distinctive sediment at both sites. The period of infrequent flooding corresponds to a time of agricultural intensification and population growth in the CMRV, while the entire region was abandoned when flood frequency increased. The pronounced shift in flood frequency we observe in our records at ca. AD 1100 begins during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; AD 950 - AD 1250), a period of

  4. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  5. System Safety Common Cause Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-03-10

    The COMCAN fault tree analysis codes are designed to analyze complex systems such as nuclear plants for common causes of failure. A common cause event, or common mode failure, is a secondary cause that could contribute to the failure of more than one component and violates the assumption of independence. Analysis of such events is an integral part of system reliability and safety analysis. A significant common cause event is a secondary cause common tomore » all basic events in one or more minimal cut sets. Minimal cut sets containing events from components sharing a common location or a common link are called common cause candidates. Components share a common location if no barrier insulates any one of them from the secondary cause. A common link is a dependency among components which cannot be removed by a physical barrier (e.g.,a common energy source or common maintenance instructions).« less

  6. Multi-event capture–recapture modeling of host–pathogen dynamics among European rabbit populations exposed to myxoma and Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses: common and heterogeneous patterns

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Host–pathogen epidemiological processes are often unclear due both to their complexity and over-simplistic approaches used to quantify them. We applied a multi-event capture–recapture procedure on two years of data from three rabbit populations to test hypotheses about the effects on survival of, and the dynamics of host immunity to, both myxoma virus and Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (MV and RHDV). Although the populations shared the same climatic and management conditions, MV and RHDV dynamics varied greatly among them; MV and RHDV seroprevalences were positively related to density in one population, but RHDV seroprevalence was negatively related to density in another. In addition, (i) juvenile survival was most often negatively related to seropositivity, (ii) RHDV seropositives never had considerably higher survival, and (iii) seroconversion to seropositivity was more likely than the reverse. We suggest seropositivity affects survival depending on trade-offs among antibody protection, immunosuppression and virus lethality. Negative effects of seropositivity might be greater on juveniles due to their immature immune system. Also, while RHDV directly affects survival through the hemorrhagic syndrome, MV lack of direct lethal effects means that interactions influencing survival are likely to be more complex. Multi-event modeling allowed us to quantify patterns of host–pathogen dynamics otherwise difficult to discern. Such an approach offers a promising tool to shed light on causative mechanisms. PMID:24708296

  7. Multi-event capture-recapture modeling of host-pathogen dynamics among European rabbit populations exposed to myxoma and Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses: common and heterogeneous patterns.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Simone; Pacios, Isa; Moreno, Sacramento; Bertó-Moran, Alejandro; Rouco, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Host-pathogen epidemiological processes are often unclear due both to their complexity and over-simplistic approaches used to quantify them. We applied a multi-event capture-recapture procedure on two years of data from three rabbit populations to test hypotheses about the effects on survival of, and the dynamics of host immunity to, both myxoma virus and Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (MV and RHDV). Although the populations shared the same climatic and management conditions, MV and RHDV dynamics varied greatly among them; MV and RHDV seroprevalences were positively related to density in one population, but RHDV seroprevalence was negatively related to density in another. In addition, (i) juvenile survival was most often negatively related to seropositivity, (ii) RHDV seropositives never had considerably higher survival, and (iii) seroconversion to seropositivity was more likely than the reverse. We suggest seropositivity affects survival depending on trade-offs among antibody protection, immunosuppression and virus lethality. Negative effects of seropositivity might be greater on juveniles due to their immature immune system. Also, while RHDV directly affects survival through the hemorrhagic syndrome, MV lack of direct lethal effects means that interactions influencing survival are likely to be more complex. Multi-event modeling allowed us to quantify patterns of host-pathogen dynamics otherwise difficult to discern. Such an approach offers a promising tool to shed light on causative mechanisms. PMID:24708296

  8. Cellular resilience.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  9. The Common Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.

    Current curricula in institutions of higher education are criticized in this speech for their lack of a common core of education. Several possibilities for developing such a common core include education centered around our common heritage and the challenges of the present. It is suggested that all students must be introduced to the events,…

  10. Real-time analysis of the detailed sequence of cellular events in mAb-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity of B-cell lines and of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B-cells.

    PubMed

    Lindorfer, Margaret A; Cook, Erika M; Tupitza, Jillian C; Zent, Clive S; Burack, Richard; de Jong, Rob N; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I; Taylor, Ronald P

    2016-02-01

    Complement-dependent cytotoxicity is an important mechanism of action of certain mAbs used in cancer immunotherapy, including ofatumumab and rituximab. However, the detailed sequence of cellular changes that occur in nucleated cells attacked by mAb and complement has not been delineated. Recently developed CD20 mAbs, engineered to form hexamers on binding to cells, react with B-cells in serum, chelate C1q, and then activate complement and promote cell killing considerably more effectively than their wild-type precursors. We used these engineered mAbs as a model to investigate the sequence of events that occur when mAbs bind to B-cell lines and to primary cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and then activate complement. Based on four-color confocal microscopy real-time movies and high resolution digital imaging, we find that after CD20 mAb binding and C1q uptake, C3b deposits on cells, followed by Ca(2+) influx, revealed by bright green signals generated on cells labeled with FLUO-4, a Ca(2+) indicator. The bright FLUO-4/Ca(2+) signal fades, replaced by punctate green signals in mitochondria, indicating Ca(2+) localization. This step leads to mitochondrial poisoning followed by cell death. The entire sequence is completed in <2 min for hexamerization-enhanced CD20 mAb-mediated killing. To our knowledge this is the first time the entire process has been characterized in detail in real time. By identifying multiple discrete steps in the cytotoxic pathway for nucleated cells our findings may inform future development and more effective application of complement-fixing mAbs to cancer treatment. PMID:26690706

  11. Common Space, Common Time, Common Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Melody J.

    2005-01-01

    The most valued means of support and learning cited by new teachers at Poland Regional High School in rural Maine are the collegial interactions that common workspace, common planning time, and common tasks make possible. The school has used these everyday structures to enable new and veteran teachers to converse about curricular and pedagogical…

  12. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  13. 47 CFR 22.911 - Cellular geographic service area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular geographic service area. 22.911 Section 22.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.911 Cellular geographic service area. The Cellular Geographic Service Area (CGSA) of...

  14. 47 CFR 22.911 - Cellular geographic service area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cellular geographic service area. 22.911 Section 22.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.911 Cellular geographic service area. The Cellular Geographic Service Area (CGSA) of...

  15. 47 CFR 22.911 - Cellular geographic service area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cellular geographic service area. 22.911 Section 22.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.911 Cellular geographic service area. The Cellular Geographic Service Area (CGSA) of...

  16. Common Schools for Common Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Eamonn

    1995-01-01

    A vision of common education for citizens of a liberal democracy warrants faith in common schools as an instrument of social good. Some kinds of separate schooling are not inconsistent with common schooling and are even desirable. Equal respect, as defined by J. Rawls, is a basis for common education. (SLD)

  17. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds. You can get a cold by touching your ...

  18. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  19. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  20. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  1. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  2. 47 CFR 22.939 - Site availability requirements for applications competing with cellular renewal applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22... application competing against a cellular renewal application must contain, when initially filed,...

  3. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  4. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  5. Student Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  6. Common Cause Failures and Ultra Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    A common cause failure occurs when several failures have the same origin. Common cause failures are either common event failures, where the cause is a single external event, or common mode failures, where two systems fail in the same way for the same reason. Common mode failures can occur at different times because of a design defect or a repeated external event. Common event failures reduce the reliability of on-line redundant systems but not of systems using off-line spare parts. Common mode failures reduce the dependability of systems using off-line spare parts and on-line redundancy.

  7. Two HAP2-GCS1 homologs responsible for gamete interactions in the cellular slime mold with multiple mating types: Implication for common mechanisms of sexual reproduction shared by plants and protozoa and for male-female differentiation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Marina; Yamada, Lixy; Fujisaki, Yukie; Bloomfield, Gareth; Yoshida, Kentaro; Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Sawada, Hitoshi; Mori, Toshiyuki; Urushihara, Hideko

    2016-07-01

    Fertilization is a central event in sexual reproduction, and understanding its molecular mechanisms has both basic and applicative biological importance. Recent studies have uncovered the molecules that mediate this process in a variety of organisms, making it intriguing to consider conservation and evolution of the mechanisms of sexual reproduction across phyla. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum undergoes sexual maturation and forms gametes under dark and humid conditions. It exhibits three mating types, type-I, -II, and -III, for the heterothallic mating system. Based on proteome analyses of the gamete membranes, we detected expression of two homologs of the plant fertilization protein HAP2-GCS1. When their coding genes were disrupted in type-I and type-II strains, sexual potency was completely lost, whereas disruption in the type-III strain did not affect mating behavior, suggesting that the latter acts as female in complex organisms. Our results demonstrate the highly conserved function of HAP2-GCS1 in gamete interactions and suggest the presence of additional allo-recognition mechanisms in D. discoideum gametes. PMID:27189178

  8. Aging, Cellular Senescence, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith

    2014-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyper-plastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  9. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  10. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the most common reason that children miss school and parents miss work. Parents often get colds ... other children. A cold can spread quickly through schools or daycares. Colds can occur at any time ...

  11. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  12. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  13. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  14. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  15. 47 CFR 22.917 - Emission limitations for cellular equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emission limitations for cellular equipment. 22.917 Section 22.917 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.917 Emission limitations for cellular equipment. The rules in this section...

  16. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular service requirements and limitations. 22.901 Section 22.901 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.901 Cellular service requirements and limitations. The licensee of each...

  17. Making the Common Good Common

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

  18. Modelling cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  19. Probing intra-cellular drug release event using activatable (OFF/ON) CdS:Mn/ZnS quantum dots (Qdots): spectroscopic studies to investigate interaction of Qdots with quencher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharkur, Jeremy; Teblum, Andrew; Basumallick, Srijita; Shah, Rikhav; Cantarero, Karishma; Maity, Niharika; Rifai, Sara; Doshi, Mona; Gesquiere, Andre J.; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, activatable Quantum Dots (AQdots) are gaining popularity in a number of chemical and biological sensing applications. A basic design of AQdot probes involves a suitable quencher which is capable of altering optical properties of the Qdots. In our previous studies we have shown that CdS:Mn/ZnS fluorescence can be effectively quenched using small molecule quenchers (such as dopamine, chemotherapeutic drug) as well as iron oxide nanoparticle via electron/energy transfer process. We have also shown that the quenched Qdot fluorescence can be restored when the Qdots are separated from the quencher. Using Qdot based activatable probes, we detected intracellular drug release event. Qdot fluorescence was restored upon interaction with the intracellular glutathione (GSH). In this paper, we report a GSH induced quenching of water-soluble N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) surface-conjugated Cds:Mn/ZnS Qdots. Quenching of NAC-Qdots was due to aggregation of Qdots in solution. This aggregation induced fluorescence quenching phenomenon resembles with the self-quenching phenomenon of traditional organic fluorescence dyes at high concentrations. UV-VIS and fluorescence emission spectroscopy data support the interaction and binding of GSH with the NAC-Qdots. Increase in particle size due to GSH induced aggregation of NAC-Qdots was confirmed by the Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data.

  20. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  1. Activating Event Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or typically play a role in. We used short stimulus onset asynchrony priming to demonstrate that (1) event nouns prime people (sale-shopper) and objects (trip-luggage) commonly found at those events; (2) location nouns prime people/animals (hospital-doctor) and objects (barn-hay) commonly found at those locations; and (3) instrument nouns prime things on which those instruments are commonly used (key-door), but not the types of people who tend to use them (hose-gardener). The priming effects are not due to normative word association. On our account, facilitation results from event knowledge relating primes and targets. This has much in common with computational models like LSA or BEAGLE in which one word primes another if they frequently occur in similar contexts. LSA predicts priming for all six experiments, whereas BEAGLE correctly predicted that priming should not occur for the instrument-people relation but should occur for the other five. We conclude that event-based relations are encoded in semantic memory and computed as part of word meaning, and have a strong influence on language comprehension. PMID:19298961

  2. Hyperglycemia Induces Cellular Hypoxia through Production of Mitochondrial ROS Followed by Suppression of Aquaporin-1

    PubMed Central

    Sada, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Kukidome, Daisuke; Yoshinaga, Tomoaki; Kajihara, Nobuhiro; Sonoda, Kazuhiro; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously proposed that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation is a key event in the development of diabetic complications. Interestingly, some common aspects exist between hyperglycemia and hypoxia-induced phenomena. Thus, hyperglycemia may induce cellular hypoxia, and this phenomenon may also be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In endothelial cells (ECs), cellular hypoxia increased after incubation with high glucose (HG). A similar phenomenon was observed in glomeruli of diabetic mice. HG-induced cellular hypoxia was suppressed by mitochondria blockades or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpression, which is a specific SOD for mtROS. Overexpression of MnSOD also increased the expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1), a water and oxygen channel. AQP1 overexpression in ECs suppressed hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia, endothelin-1 and fibronectin overproduction, and apoptosis. Therefore, hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia and mtROS generation may promote hyperglycemic damage in a coordinated manner. PMID:27383386

  3. Hippocampal ensemble dynamics timestamp events in long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Alon; Geva, Nitzan; Sheintuch, Liron; Ziv, Yaniv

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to remember temporal relationships between different events is essential to episodic memory, but little is currently known about its underlying mechanisms. We performed time-lapse imaging of thousands of neurons over weeks in the hippocampal CA1 of mice as they repeatedly visited two distinct environments. Longitudinal analysis exposed ongoing environment-independent evolution of episodic representations, despite stable place field locations and constant remapping between the two environments. These dynamics time-stamped experienced events via neuronal ensembles that had cellular composition and activity patterns unique to specific points in time. Temporally close episodes shared a common timestamp regardless of the spatial context in which they occurred. Temporally remote episodes had distinct timestamps, even if they occurred within the same spatial context. Our results suggest that days-scale hippocampal ensemble dynamics could support the formation of a mental timeline in which experienced events could be mnemonically associated or dissociated based on their temporal distance. PMID:26682652

  4. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  5. CELLULAR MAGNESIUM HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Andrea M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cellular cation after potassium, is essential to regulate numerous cellular functions and enzymes, including ion channels, metabolic cycles, and signaling pathways, as attested by more than 1000 entries in the literature. Despite significant recent progress, however, our understanding of how cells regulate Mg2+ homeostasis and transport still remains incomplete. For example, the occurrence of major fluxes of Mg2+ in either direction across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells following metabolic or hormonal stimuli has been extensively documented. Yet, the mechanisms ultimately responsible for magnesium extrusion across the cell membrane have not been cloned. Even less is known about the regulation in cellular organelles. The present review is aimed at providing the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms enacted by eukaryotic cells to regulate cellular Mg2+ homeostasis and how these mechanisms are altered under specific pathological conditions. PMID:21640700

  6. Recent Advances in Cellular Glycomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2013-01-01

    A large variety of glycans is intricately located on the cell surface, and the overall profile (the glycome, given the entire repertoire of glycoconjugate-associated sugars in cells and tissues) is believed to be crucial for the diverse roles of glycans, which are mediated by specific interactions that control cell-cell adhesion, immune response, microbial pathogenesis and other cellular events. The glycomic profile also reflects cellular alterations, such as development, differentiation and cancerous change. A glycoconjugate-based approach would therefore be expected to streamline discovery of novel cellular biomarkers. Development of such an approach has proven challenging, due to the technical difficulties associated with the analysis of various types of cellular glycomes; however, recent progress in the development of analytical methodologies and strategies has begun to clarify the cellular glycomics of various classes of glycoconjugates. This review focuses on recent advances in the technical aspects of cellular glycomic analyses of major classes of glycoconjugates, including N- and O-linked glycans, derived from glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycosphingolipids. Articles that unveil the glycomics of various biologically important cells, including embryonic and somatic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and cancer cells, are discussed. PMID:24970165

  7. Event Perception

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives. PMID:23082236

  8. Unveiling the principle of microRNA-mediated redundancy in cellular pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Simon; Handrick, René; Aschrafi, Armaz; Otte, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the multifaceted nature of microRNA (miRNA) function in mammalian cells is still a challenge. Commonly accepted principles of cooperativity and multiplicity of miRNA function imply that individual mRNAs can be targeted by several miRNAs whereas a single miRNA may concomitantly regulate a subset of different genes. However, there is a paucity of information whether multiple miRNAs regulate critical cellular events and thereby acting redundantly. To gain insight into this notion, we conducted an unbiased high-content miRNA screen by individually introducing 1139 miRNA mimics into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We discovered that 66% of all miRNAs significantly impacted on proliferation, protein expression, apoptosis and necrosis. In summary, we provide evidence for a substantial degree of redundancy among miRNAs to maintain cellular homeostasis. PMID:25826657

  9. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found. PMID:25291810

  10. Natural Agents: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Photoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Afaq, Farrukh

    2010-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body that produces a flexible and self-repairing barrier and protects the body from most common potentially harmful physical, environmental, and biological insults. Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the major environmental insults to the skin and causes multi-tiered cellular and molecular events eventually leading to skin cancer. The past decade has seen a surge in the incidence of skin cancer due to changes in life style patterns that have led to a significant increase in the amount of UV radiation that people receive. Reducing excessive exposure to UV radiation is desirable; nevertheless this approach is not easy to implement. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel strategies to reduce the adverse biological effects of UV radiation on the skin. A wide variety of natural agents have been reported to possess substantial skin photoprotective effects. Numerous preclinical and clinical studies have elucidated that natural agents act by several cellular and molecular mechanisms to delay or prevent skin cancer. In this review article, we have summarized and discussed some of the selected natural agents for skin photoprotection. PMID:21147060

  11. Cellular reprogramming and hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Wen; Nie, Yun-Zhong; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2013-12-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and is also the leading cause of death worldwide. Studies have shown that cellular reprogramming contributes to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance and the recurrence of cancers. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest findings in the area of cellular reprogramming in HCC. The aberrant expression of transcription factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, c-MYC, NANOG, and LIN28 have been also observed, and the expression of these transcription factors is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in HCC. Studies indicate that cellular reprogramming may play a critical role in the occurrence and recurrence of HCC. Recent reports have shown that DNA methylation, miRNAs, tumor microenvironment, and signaling pathways can induce the expression of stemness transcription factors, which leads to cellular reprogramming in HCC. Furthermore, studies indicate that therapies based on cellular reprogramming could revolutionize HCC treatment. Finally, a novel therapeutic concept is discussed: reprogramming control therapy. A potential reprogramming control therapy method could be developed based on the reprogramming demonstrated in HCC studies and applied at two opposing levels: differentiation and reprogramming. Our increasing understanding and control of cellular programming should facilitate the exploitation of this novel therapeutic concept and its application in clinical HCC treatment, which may represent a promising strategy in the future that is not restricted to liver cancer. PMID:24379607

  12. The common ancestry of life

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is common belief that all cellular life forms on earth have a common origin. This view is supported by the universality of the genetic code and the universal conservation of multiple genes, particularly those that encode key components of the translation system. A remarkable recent study claims to provide a formal, homology independent test of the Universal Common Ancestry hypothesis by comparing the ability of a common-ancestry model and a multiple-ancestry model to predict sequences of universally conserved proteins. Results We devised a computational experiment on a concatenated alignment of universally conserved proteins which shows that the purported demonstration of the universal common ancestry is a trivial consequence of significant sequence similarity between the analyzed proteins. The nature and origin of this similarity are irrelevant for the prediction of "common ancestry" of by the model-comparison approach. Thus, homology (common origin) of the compared proteins remains an inference from sequence similarity rather than an independent property demonstrated by the likelihood analysis. Conclusion A formal demonstration of the Universal Common Ancestry hypothesis has not been achieved and is unlikely to be feasible in principle. Nevertheless, the evidence in support of this hypothesis provided by comparative genomics is overwhelming. Reviewers this article was reviewed by William Martin, Ivan Iossifov (nominated by Andrey Rzhetsky) and Arcady Mushegian. For the complete reviews, see the Reviewers' Report section. PMID:21087490

  13. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  14. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  15. Auxin and Cellular Elongation.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Estevez, José M

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  16. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  17. Teaching cellular engineering.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Daniel A; Waugh, Richard E

    2006-02-01

    Cellular engineering is one of the fastest growing subdisciplines in the field of Biomedical Engineering. It involves the application of engineering analysis to understand and control cellular behavior, with the ultimate objective of developing novel therapeutic or diagnostic approaches for the clinic or harnessing cellular function for commercial applications. Well-educated students in this area need strong foundational knowledge in engineering science, chemistry, and cell and molecular biology. In undergraduate curricula, the challenge is to include essential engineering skills plus appropriate levels of training in chemistry and biology while satisfying accreditation-mandated breadth in engineering training. At the graduate level, educators must accommodate students with diverse backgrounds and provide them with both a state-of-the-art understanding of the life sciences and the most advanced engineering skills. Engineering curricular content should include mechanics and materials, physical chemistry, transport phenomena, and control theory. Training from faculty with appointments and research programs in the life sciences is generally recommended, and additional life science content should also be integrated within the engineering curriculum. A capstone course in cellular engineering that includes opportunities for students to have hands-on experiences with state-of-the-art laboratory techniques is highly recommended. PMID:16450196

  18. [Cellular pathology of neurodegenerative disorders].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Common cellular and molecular mechanisms including protein aggregation and inclusion body formation are involved in many neurodegenerative diseases. α-Synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as in glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Tau is a principal component of neurofibrillary and glial tangles in tauopathies. Recently, TDP-43 was identified as a component of ubiquitinated inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. PD is traditionally considered a movement disorder with hallmark lesions in the brainstem pigmented nuclei. However, pathological changes occur in widespread regions of the central and peripheral nervous systems in this disease. Furthermore, primary glial involvement ("gliodegeneration") can be observed in PD and MSA as well as in tauopathy. The present article reviews abnormal protein accumulation and inclusion body formation inside and outside the central nervous system. PMID:23965852

  19. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  20. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, H. Corby; Broz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g., amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH), enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported. PMID:25709603

  1. Pelvic Retroperitoneal Cellular Leiomyoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tantitamit, Tanitra; Hamontri, Suttha; Rangsiratanakul, Likit; Suksamarnwong, Maysita

    2015-10-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign gynecological tumors and usually arise in the uterus. The retroperitoneal cellular leiomyoma, one of the unusual manifestations, is a rare tumor. Diagnosis and treatment are challenges. We report a case of 65-year-old women presented with an asymptomatic mass beneath the right posterior vaginal mucosa. CT imaging revealed heterogeneous mass 6 cm in the pelvic cavity abutted lower segment of uterus, cervix, and vagina. The provisional diagnosis was subserosal cervical leiomyoma. She underwent exploratory laparotomy. Intra-operative, a normal size uterus was found separately from retroperitoneal pelvic mass at the level of internal os. Histological report confirmed cellular leiomyoma later Total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy and completely excision of tumor were achieved with good outcome. Our patient represents the rare case of retroperitoneal cellular leiomyoma, which is hardly identified from internal examination and preoperative imaging. Surgical removal is essential for pathological diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26817226

  2. COMMON ENVELOPE: ENTHALPY CONSIDERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N.; Chaichenets, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this Letter, we discuss a modification to the criterion for the common envelope (CE) event to result in envelope dispersion. We emphasize that the current energy criterion for the CE phase is not sufficient for an instability of the CE, nor for an ejection. However, in some cases, stellar envelopes undergo stationary mass outflows, which are likely to occur during the slow spiral-in stage of the CE event. We propose the condition for such outflows, in a manner similar to the currently standard {alpha}{sub CE}{lambda}-prescription but with an addition of P/{rho} term in the energy balance equation, accounting therefore for the enthalpy of the envelope rather than merely the gas internal energy. This produces a significant correction, which might help to dispense with an unphysically high value of energy efficiency parameter during the CE phase, currently required in the binary population synthesis studies to make the production of low-mass X-ray binaries with a black hole companion to match the observations.

  3. Cellular growth in biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.D.; Whitaker, S.

    1999-09-20

    In this paper the authors develop a macroscopic evolutionary equation for the growth of the cellular phase starting from a microscopic description of mass transport and a simple structured model for product formation. The methods of continuum mechanics and volume averaging are used to develop the macroscopic representation by carefully considering the fluxes of chemical species that pertain to cell growth. The concept of structured models is extended to include the transport of reacting chemical species at the microscopic scale. The resulting macroscopic growth model is similar in form to previously published models for the transport of a single substrate and electron donor and for the production of cellular mass and exopolymer. The method of volume averaging indicated under what conditions the developed growth model is valid and provides an explicit connection between the relevant microscopic model parameters and their corresponding macroscopic counterparts.

  4. Transcriptomic responses to darkness stress point to common coral bleaching mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desalvo, M. K.; Estrada, A.; Sunagawa, S.; Medina, Mónica

    2012-03-01

    Coral bleaching occurs in response to numerous abiotic stressors, the ecologically most relevant of which is hyperthermic stress due to increasing seawater temperatures. Bleaching events can span large geographic areas and are currently a salient threat to coral reefs worldwide. Much effort has been focused on understanding the molecular and cellular events underlying bleaching, and these studies have mainly utilized heat and light stress regimes. In an effort to determine whether different stressors share common bleaching mechanisms, we used complementary DNA (cDNA) microarrays for the corals Acropora palmata and Montastraea faveolata (containing >10,000 features) to measure differential gene expression during darkness stress. Our results reveal a striking transcriptomic response to darkness in A. palmata involving chaperone and antioxidant up-regulation, growth arrest, and metabolic modifications. As these responses were previously measured during thermal stress, our results suggest that different stressors may share common bleaching mechanisms. Furthermore, our results point to hypoxia and endoplasmic reticulum stress as critical cellular events involved in molecular bleaching mechanisms. On the other hand, we identified a meager transcriptomic response to darkness in M. faveolata where gene expression differences between host colonies and sampling locations were greater than differences between control and stressed fragments. This and previous coral microarray studies reveal the immense range of transcriptomic responses that are possible when studying two coral species that differ greatly in their ecophysiology, thus pointing to the importance of comparative approaches in forecasting how corals will respond to future environmental change.

  5. Ectopic endometrium in human foetuses is a common event and sustains the theory of müllerianosis in the pathogenesis of endometriosis, a disease that predisposes to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Signorile, Pietro G; Baldi, Feliciano; Bussani, Rossana; D'Armiento, Mariarosaria; De Falco, Maria; Baldi, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Background Endometriosis is a gynecological disease defined by the histological presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Women with endometriosis have an increased risk of different types of malignancies, especially ovarian cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Though there are several theories, researchers remain unsure as to the definitive cause of endometriosis. Our objective was to test the validity of the theory of müllerianosis for endometriosis, that is the misplacing of primitive endometrial tissue along the migratory pathway of foetal organogenesis Methods We have collected at autopsy 36 human female foetuses at different gestational age. We have performed a morphological and immunohistochemical study (expression of oestrogen receptor and CA125) on the pelvic organs of the 36 foetuses included en-block and totally analyzed. Results In 4 out of 36 foetuses we found presence of misplaced endometrium in five different ectopic sites: in the recto-vaginal septum, in the proximity of the Douglas pouch, in the mesenchimal tissue close to the posterior wall of the uterus, in the rectal tube at the level of muscularis propria, and in the wall of the uterus. All these sites are common location of endometriosis in women. Conclusion We propose that a cause of endometriosis is the dislocation of primitive endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity during organogenesis. PMID:19358700

  6. Radiolabeled cellular blood elements

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.; Ezikowitz, M.D.; Hardeman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers delivered by guest lectures and participants at the Advanced Study Institute's colloquium on Radiolabeled Cellular Blood Elements at Maratea, Italy on August 29, to September 9, 1982. The book includes chapters on basic cell physiology and critical reviews of data and experience in the preparation and use of radiolabeled cells, as well as reports on very recent developments, from a faculty that included experts on cell physiology in health and disease and on the technology of in vivo labeling.

  7. Cellular dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Mervyn

    2008-12-01

    Cellular dysfunction is a commonplace sequelum of sepsis and other systemic inflammatory conditions. Impaired energy production (related to mitochondrial inhibition, damage, and reduced protein turnover) appears to be a core mechanism underlying the development of organ dysfunction. The reduction in energy availability appears to trigger a metabolic shutdown that impairs normal functioning of the cell. This may well represent an adaptive mechanism analogous to hibernation that prevents a massive degree of cell death and thus enables eventual recovery in survivors. PMID:18954700

  8. Predictability in cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Chira, Camelia; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Modelled as finite homogeneous Markov chains, probabilistic cellular automata with local transition probabilities in (0, 1) always posses a stationary distribution. This result alone is not very helpful when it comes to predicting the final configuration; one needs also a formula connecting the probabilities in the stationary distribution to some intrinsic feature of the lattice configuration. Previous results on the asynchronous cellular automata have showed that such feature really exists. It is the number of zero-one borders within the automaton's binary configuration. An exponential formula in the number of zero-one borders has been proved for the 1-D, 2-D and 3-D asynchronous automata with neighborhood three, five and seven, respectively. We perform computer experiments on a synchronous cellular automaton to check whether the empirical distribution obeys also that theoretical formula. The numerical results indicate a perfect fit for neighbourhood three and five, which opens the way for a rigorous proof of the formula in this new, synchronous case. PMID:25271778

  9. Probabilistic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-09-01

    Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case-connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders-the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  10. Quantum cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porod, Wolfgang; Lent, Craig S.; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1994-06-01

    The Notre Dame group has developed a new paradigm for ultra-dense and ultra-fast information processing in nanoelectronic systems. These Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA's) are the first concrete proposal for a technology based on arrays of coupled quantum dots. The basic building block of these cellular arrays is the Notre Dame Logic Cell, as it has been called in the literature. The phenomenon of Coulomb exclusion, which is a synergistic interplay of quantum confinement and Coulomb interaction, leads to a bistable behavior of each cell which makes possible their use in large-scale cellular arrays. The physical interaction between neighboring cells has been exploited to implement logic functions. New functionality may be achieved in this fashion, and the Notre Dame group invented a versatile majority logic gate. In a series of papers, the feasibility of QCA wires, wire crossing, inverters, and Boolean logic gates was demonstrated. A major finding is that all logic functions may be integrated in a hierarchial fashion which allows the design of complicated QCA structures. The most complicated system which was simulated to date is a one-bit full adder consisting of some 200 cells. In addition to exploring these new concepts, efforts are under way to physically realize such structures both in semiconductor and metal systems. Extensive modeling work of semiconductor quantum dot structures has helped identify optimum design parameters for QCA experimental implementations.

  11. Cellular ubiquitin pool dynamics and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Kwon-Yul

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a versatile signaling molecule that plays important roles in a variety of cellular processes. Cellular Ub pools, which are composed of free Ub and Ub conjugates, are in dynamic equilibrium inside cells. In particular, increasing evidence suggests that Ub homeostasis, or the maintenance of free Ub above certain threshold levels, is important for cellular function and survival under normal or stress conditions. Accurate determination of various Ub species, including levels of free Ub and specific Ub chain linkages, have become possible in biological specimens as a result of the introduction of the proteomic approach using mass spectrometry. This technology has facilitated research on dynamic properties of cellular Ub pools and has provided tools for in-depth investigation of Ub homeostasis. In this review, we have also discussed the consequences of the disruption of Ub pool dynamics and homeostasis via deletion of polyubiquitin genes or mutations of deubiquitinating enzymes. The common consequence was a reduced availability of free Ub and a significant impact on the function and viability of cells. These observations further indicate that the levels of free Ub are important determinants for cellular protection. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(9): 475-482] PMID:24924398

  12. Cellular mechanisms of somatic stem cell aging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yunjoon; Brack, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity rely on rare populations of somatic stem cells endowed with the potential to self-renew and differentiate. During aging, many tissues show a decline in regenerative potential coupled with a loss of stem cell function. Cells including somatic stem cells have evolved a series of checks and balances to sense and repair cellular damage to maximize tissue function. However, during aging the mechanisms that protect normal cell function begin to fail. In this review, we will discuss how common cellular mechanisms that maintain tissue fidelity and organismal lifespan impact somatic stem cell function. We will highlight context-dependent changes and commonalities that define aging, by focusing on three age-sensitive stem cell compartments: blood, neural, and muscle. Understanding the interaction between extrinsic regulators and intrinsic effectors that operate within different stem cell compartments is likely to have important implications for identifying strategies to improve health span and treat age-related degenerative diseases. PMID:24439814

  13. Cellular Mechanisms of Somatic Stem Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yunjoon

    2014-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity rely on rare populations of somatic stem cells endowed with the potential to self-renew and differentiate. During aging, many tissues show a decline in regenerative potential coupled with a loss of stem cell function. Cells including somatic stem cells have evolved a series of checks and balances to sense and repair cellular damage to maximize tissue function. However, during aging the mechanisms that protect normal cell function begin to fail. In this review, we will discuss how common cellular mechanisms that maintain tissue fidelity and organismal lifespan impact somatic stem cell function. We will highlight context-dependent changes and commonalities that define aging, by focusing on three age-sensitive stem cell compartments: blood, neural, and muscle. Understanding the interaction between extrinsic regulators and intrinsic effectors that operate within different stem cell compartments is likely to have important implications for identifying strategies to improve health span and treat age-related degenerative diseases. PMID:24439814

  14. A scientific role for Space Station Freedom: Research at the cellular level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Terry C.; Brady, John N.

    1993-01-01

    The scientific importance of Space Station Freedom is discussed in light of the valuable information that can be gained in cellular and developmental biology with regard to the microgravity environment on the cellular cytoskeleton, cellular responses to extracellular signal molecules, morphology, events associated with cell division, and cellular physiology. Examples of studies in basic cell biology, as well as their potential importance to concerns for future enabling strategies, are presented.

  15. No Common Opinion on the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael B.; Peterson, Paul E.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    According to the three authors of this article, the 2014 "EdNext" poll yields four especially important new findings: (1) Opinion with respect to the Common Core has yet to coalesce. The idea of a common set of standards across the country has wide appeal, and the Common Core itself still commands the support of a majority of the public.…

  16. Control of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco; Rechtman, Raúl; El Yacoubi, Samira

    2012-12-01

    We study the problem of master-slave synchronization and control of totalistic cellular automata. The synchronization mechanism is that of setting a fraction of sites of the slave system equal to those of the master one (pinching synchronization). The synchronization observable is the distance between the two configurations. We present three control strategies that exploit local information (the number of nonzero first-order Boolean derivatives) in order to choose the sites to be synchronized. When no local information is used, we speak of simple pinching synchronization. We find the critical properties of control and discuss the best control strategy compared with simple synchronization.

  17. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  18. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  19. Cellular Mechanisms Controlling Caspase Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Amanda B.; Freel, Christopher D.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Caspases are the primary drivers of apoptotic cell death, cleaving cellular proteins that are critical for dismantling the dying cell. Initially translated as inactive zymogenic precursors, caspases are activated in response to a variety of cell death stimuli. In addition to factors required for their direct activation (e.g., dimerizing adaptor proteins in the case of initiator caspases that lie at the apex of apoptotic signaling cascades), caspases are regulated by a variety of cellular factors in a myriad of physiological and pathological settings. For example, caspases may be modified posttranslationally (e.g., by phosphorylation or ubiquitylation) or through interaction of modulatory factors with either the zymogenic or active form of a caspase, altering its activation and/or activity. These regulatory events may inhibit or enhance enzymatic activity or may affect activity toward particular cellular substrates. Finally, there is emerging literature to suggest that caspases can participate in a variety of cellular processes unrelated to apoptotic cell death. In these settings, it is particularly important that caspases are maintained under stringent control to avoid inadvertent cell death. It is likely that continued examination of these processes will reveal new mechanisms of caspase regulation with implications well beyond control of apoptotic cell death. PMID:23732469

  20. Monte Carlo Event Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytman, Steven

    2011-10-01

    Every neutrino experiment requires a Monte Carlo event generator for various purposes. Historically, each series of experiments developed their own code which tuned to their needs. Modern experiments would benefit from a universal code (e.g. PYTHIA) which would allow more direct comparison between experiments. GENIE attempts to be that code. This paper compares most commonly used codes and provides some details of GENIE.

  1. 47 CFR 22.969 - Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding. 22.969 Section 22.969 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.969 Cellular RSA...

  2. 47 CFR 22.969 - Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding. 22.969 Section 22.969 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.969 Cellular RSA...

  3. 47 CFR 22.969 - Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding. 22.969 Section 22.969 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.969 Cellular RSA...

  4. 47 CFR 22.969 - Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding. 22.969 Section 22.969 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.969 Cellular RSA...

  5. 47 CFR 22.969 - Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding. 22.969 Section 22.969 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.969 Cellular RSA...

  6. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  7. Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Jonathan

    2006-04-01

    The assessment of risks posed by natural hazards such as floods, droughts, earthquakes, tsunamis or cyclones, is often based on short-term historical records that may not reflect the full range or magnitude of events possible. As human populations grow, especially in hazard-prone areas, methods for accurately assessing natural hazard risks are becoming increasingly important. In Extreme Events Jonathan Nott describes the many methods used to reconstruct such hazards from natural long-term records. He demonstrates how long-term (multi-century to millennial) records are essential in gaining a realistic understanding of the variability of natural hazards, and how short-term historical records can often misrepresent the likely risks associated with natural hazards. This book will form a useful resource for students taking courses covering natural hazards and risk assessment. It will also be valuable for urban planners, policy makers and non-specialists as a guide to understanding and reconstructing long-term records of natural hazards. Explains mechanisms that cause extreme events and discusses their prehistoric records Describes how to reconstruct long-term records of natural hazards in order to make accurate risk assessments Demonstrates that natural hazards can follow cycles over time and do not occur randomly

  8. Integrated cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  9. Engineering Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-03-10

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation. PMID:26967285

  10. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  11. Inducing cellular senescence using defined genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Opitz, Oliver G

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G1 cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. Cellular senescence can be induced through several different mechanisms. Primary mammalian cells display a finite life span, suggesting a mechanism that counts cell divisions. Those cells initially proliferate but eventually enter a state of permanent growth arrest, called replicative senescence. Erosion of telomeric DNA has emerged as a key factor in replicative senescence, which is antagonized during cell immortalization. Nevertheless, besides telomere shortening, there are other mechanisms inducing a growth arrest similar to the replicative senescencent phenotype. Oncogenic or mitogenic signals as well as DNA damage can induce such a phenotype of cellular senescence. All forms of cellular senescence share common signaling pathways and morphological features. Thereby, p53 seems to be essential for the senescence response. Many of these senescence inducing mechanisms can be experimentally recapitulated by the introduction of defined genetic elements. Replicative senescence due to telomere shortening can, for example, be induced by a dominant negative version of telomerase, premature senescence by the overexpression of oncogenic ras, or p16. PMID:17634581

  12. Common approaches for adolescents.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    A South-South program organized by JOICFP provided an excellent opportunity for the exchange of experiences in the field of adolescent reproductive health (RH) between Mexico and the Philippines. Alfonso Lopez Juarez, executive director, Mexican Foundation for Family Planning (MEXFAM), shared MEXFAM's experiences with field personnel and GO-NGO representatives related to JOICFP's RH-oriented project in the Philippines while in the country from November 16 to 21. The program was also effective for identifying common issues and effective approaches to adolescent health issues and communicating with youth on RH and sexual health. The exchange was supported by the Hoken Kaikan Foundation and organized by JOICFP in collaboration with UNFPA-Manila and the Commission on Population (POPCOM). Lopez shared some of the lessons of MEXFAM's decade-long Gente Joven IEC program on adolescent health with GO and NGO representatives at a forum held on November 18. The event was opened by Dr. Carmencita Reodica, secretary, Department of Health (DOH). He then moved to the project sites of Balayan and Malvar municipalities of Batangas Province, where he spoke with field staff and demonstrated MEXFAM's approach in classroom situations with young people. Lopez also observed various adolescent activities such as group work with peer facilitators. "I am pleased that we can share some applicable experiences and learn from each other's projects," commented Lopez. PMID:12348336

  13. Cells anticipate periodic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  14. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches . Home > Migraine and Common Morbidities Print Email Migraine and Common Morbidities ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine and Common Morbidities For many patients, migraine is ...

  15. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  16. Event extraction with complex event classification using rich features.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Makoto; Saetre, Rune; Kim, Jin-Dong; Tsujii, Jun'ichi

    2010-02-01

    Biomedical Natural Language Processing (BioNLP) attempts to capture biomedical phenomena from texts by extracting relations between biomedical entities (i.e. proteins and genes). Traditionally, only binary relations have been extracted from large numbers of published papers. Recently, more complex relations (biomolecular events) have also been extracted. Such events may include several entities or other relations. To evaluate the performance of the text mining systems, several shared task challenges have been arranged for the BioNLP community. With a common and consistent task setting, the BioNLP'09 shared task evaluated complex biomolecular events such as binding and regulation.Finding these events automatically is important in order to improve biomedical event extraction systems. In the present paper, we propose an automatic event extraction system, which contains a model for complex events, by solving a classification problem with rich features. The main contributions of the present paper are: (1) the proposal of an effective bio-event detection method using machine learning, (2) provision of a high-performance event extraction system, and (3) the execution of a quantitative error analysis. The proposed complex (binding and regulation) event detector outperforms the best system from the BioNLP'09 shared task challenge. PMID:20183879

  17. Cellular and molecular introduction to brain development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiangning; Nardelli, Jeannette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the study of brain development over the last decades, especially recent findings regarding the evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex, and large-scale analyses of the proteome/transcriptome in the human brain, have offered novel insights into the molecular mechanisms guiding neural maturation, and the pathophysiology of multiple forms of neurological disorders. As a preamble to reviews of this issue, we provide an overview of the cellular, molecular and genetic bases of brain development with an emphasis on the major mechanisms associated with landmarks of normal neural development in the embryonic stage and early postnatal life, including neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation, cortical neuronal migration, evolution and folding of the cerebral cortex, synaptogenesis and neural circuit development, gliogenesis and myelination. We will only briefly depict developmental disorders that result from perturbations of these cellular or molecular mechanisms, and the most common perinatal brain injuries that could disturb normal brain development. PMID:26184894

  18. Electrosurgery with cellular precision.

    PubMed

    Palanker, Daniel V; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Philip

    2008-02-01

    Electrosurgery, one of the most-often used surgical tools, is a robust but somewhat crude technology that has changed surprisingly little since its invention almost a century ago. Continuous radiofrequency is still used for tissue cutting, with thermal damage extending to hundreds of micrometers. In contrast, lasers developed 70 years later, have been constantly perfected, and the laser-tissue interactions explored in great detail, which has allowed tissue ablation with cellular precision in many laser applications. We discuss mechanisms of tissue damage by electric field, and demonstrate that electrosurgery with properly optimized waveforms and microelectrodes can rival many advanced lasers. Pulsed electric waveforms with burst durations ranging from 10 to 100 micros applied via insulated planar electrodes with 12 microm wide exposed edges produced plasma-mediated dissection of tissues with the collateral damage zone ranging from 2 to 10 microm. Length of the electrodes can vary from micrometers to centimeters and all types of soft tissues-from membranes to cartilage and skin could be dissected in liquid medium and in a dry field. This technology may allow for major improvements in outcomes of the current surgical procedures and development of much more refined surgical techniques. PMID:18270030

  19. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  20. Cellular energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, M.

    1991-06-01

    Studies have been carried out on adenylate kinase which is an important enzyme in determining the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. An efficient method has been developed to clone mutant adenylate kinase genes in E. coli. Site-specific mutagenesis of the wild type gene also has been used to obtain forms of adenylate kinase with altered amino acids. The wild type and mutant forms of adenylate kinase have been overexpressed and large quantities were readily isolated. The kinetic and fluorescence properties of the different forms of adenylate kinase were characterized. This has led to a new model for the location of the AMP and ATP bindings sites on the enzyme and a proposal for the mechanism of substrate inhibition. Crystals of the wild type enzyme were obtained that diffract to at least 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Experiments were also initiated to determine the function of adenylate kinase in vivo. In one set of experiments, E. coli strains with mutations in adenylate kinase showed large changes in cellular nucleotides after reaching the stationary phase in a low phosphate medium. This was caused by selective proteolytic degradation of the mutant adenylate kinase caused by phosphate starvation.

  1. Molecular and Cellular Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular and Cellular Biophysics provides advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a foundation in the basic concepts of biophysics. Students who have taken physical chemistry and calculus courses will find this book an accessible and valuable aid in learning how these concepts can be used in biological research. The text provides a rigorous treatment of the fundamental theories in biophysics and illustrates their application with examples. Conformational transitions of proteins are studied first using thermodynamics, and subsequently with kinetics. Allosteric theory is developed as the synthesis of conformational transitions and association reactions. Basic ideas of thermodynamics and kinetics are applied to topics such as protein folding, enzyme catalysis and ion channel permeation. These concepts are then used as the building blocks in a treatment of membrane excitability. Through these examples, students will gain an understanding of the general importance and broad applicability of biophysical principles to biological problems. Offers a unique synthesis of concepts across a wide range of biophysical topics Provides a rigorous theoretical treatment, alongside applications in biological systems Author has been teaching biophysics for nearly 25 years

  2. Common Career Technical Core: Common Standards, Common Vision for CTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium's (NASDCTEc) Common Career Technical Core (CCTC), a state-led initiative that was created to ensure that career and technical education (CTE) programs are consistent and high quality across the United States. Forty-two states,…

  3. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  4. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  5. Different Kinds of Causality in Event Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Tamplin, Andrea K.; Armendarez, Joseph; Thompson, Alexis N.

    2014-01-01

    Narrative memory is better for information that is more causally connected and occurs at event boundaries, such as a causal break. However, it is unclear whether there are common or distinct influences of causality. For the event boundaries that arise as a result of causal breaks, the events that follow may subsequently become more causally…

  6. Events diary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  7. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  8. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... of common interventional techniques is below. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures Angiography An X-ray exam of the ... into the vertebra. Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair Ridge Drive • Suite ...

  9. How Common Is the Common Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Amande; Edson, Alden J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) in 2010, stakeholders in adopting states have engaged in a variety of activities to understand CCSSM standards and transition from previous state standards. These efforts include research, professional development, assessment and modification of curriculum resources,…

  10. Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  11. Knowledge representation for commonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, Dorian P.

    1990-01-01

    Domain-specific knowledge necessary for commonality analysis falls into two general classes: commonality constraints and costing information. Notations for encoding such knowledge should be powerful and flexible and should appeal to the domain expert. The notations employed by the Commonality Analysis Problem Solver (CAPS) analysis tool are described. Examples are given to illustrate the main concepts.

  12. The New Common School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Horace Mann's goal of creating a common school that brings our society's children together in mutual respect and common learning need not be frustrated by residential segregation and geographical separation of the haves and have-nots. Massachusetts' new common school vision boasts a Metro Program for minority students, 80 magnet schools, and…

  13. QUANTITATIVE IN VITRO MEASUREMENT OF CELLULAR PROCESSES CRITICAL TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEURAL CONNECTIVITY USING HCA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    New methods are needed to screen thousands of environmental chemicals for toxicity, including developmental neurotoxicity. In vitro, cell-based assays that model key cellular events have been proposed for high throughput screening of chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity. Whi...

  14. Hippocampal ensemble dynamics timestamp events in long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Alon; Geva, Nitzan; Sheintuch, Liron; Ziv, Yaniv

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to remember temporal relationships between different events is essential to episodic memory, but little is currently known about its underlying mechanisms. We performed time-lapse imaging of thousands of neurons over weeks in the hippocampal CA1 of mice as they repeatedly visited two distinct environments. Longitudinal analysis exposed ongoing environment-independent evolution of episodic representations, despite stable place field locations and constant remapping between the two environments. These dynamics time-stamped experienced events via neuronal ensembles that had cellular composition and activity patterns unique to specific points in time. Temporally close episodes shared a common timestamp regardless of the spatial context in which they occurred. Temporally remote episodes had distinct timestamps, even if they occurred within the same spatial context. Our results suggest that days-scale hippocampal ensemble dynamics could support the formation of a mental timeline in which experienced events could be mnemonically associated or dissociated based on their temporal distance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12247.001 PMID:26682652

  15. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors sh...

  16. Cellular therapy for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Roddie, P H; Turner, M L

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the recent progress made in the field of cellular therapeutics in haematological malignancy. The review also examined the role that the National Transfusion Services might play in the manufacture of new cellular therapeutic agents, given both their expertise in the safe provision of blood products and their possession of accredited cell manipulation facilities. Cellular therapy is entering an era in which novel cellular products will find increasing clinical use, particularly in the areas of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and immunotherapy. The production of novel cell-based therapies, both in Europe and North America, is now under strict regulatory control and therefore collaboration with the National Transfusion Services in the manufacture of these agents may well be beneficial if the production standards demanded by the regulatory authorities are to be fulfilled. PMID:12437515

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research. PMID:27557541

  18. Common ecology quantifies human insurgency.

    PubMed

    Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Gourley, Sean; Dixon, Alexander R; Spagat, Michael; Johnson, Neil F

    2009-12-17

    Many collective human activities, including violence, have been shown to exhibit universal patterns. The size distributions of casualties both in whole wars from 1816 to 1980 and terrorist attacks have separately been shown to follow approximate power-law distributions. However, the possibility of universal patterns ranging across wars in the size distribution or timing of within-conflict events has barely been explored. Here we show that the sizes and timing of violent events within different insurgent conflicts exhibit remarkable similarities. We propose a unified model of human insurgency that reproduces these commonalities, and explains conflict-specific variations quantitatively in terms of underlying rules of engagement. Our model treats each insurgent population as an ecology of dynamically evolving, self-organized groups following common decision-making processes. Our model is consistent with several recent hypotheses about modern insurgency, is robust to many generalizations, and establishes a quantitative connection between human insurgency, global terrorism and ecology. Its similarity to financial market models provides a surprising link between violent and non-violent forms of human behaviour. PMID:20016600

  19. Connecting Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration: Preservice Teachers' Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mary H.; Schwartz, Renee S.

    2009-01-01

    The biological processes of photosynthesis and plant cellular respiration include multiple biochemical steps, occur simultaneously within plant cells, and share common molecular components. Yet, learners often compartmentalize functions and specialization of cell organelles relevant to these two processes, without considering the interconnections…

  20. 47 CFR 32.5003 - Cellular mobile revenue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cellular mobile revenue. 32.5003 Section 32.5003 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Revenue Accounts § 32.5003...

  1. 47 CFR 32.5003 - Cellular mobile revenue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cellular mobile revenue. 32.5003 Section 32.5003 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Revenue Accounts § 32.5003...

  2. 47 CFR 32.5003 - Cellular mobile revenue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular mobile revenue. 32.5003 Section 32.5003 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Revenue Accounts § 32.5003...

  3. 47 CFR 32.5003 - Cellular mobile revenue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cellular mobile revenue. 32.5003 Section 32.5003 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Revenue Accounts § 32.5003...

  4. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  5. Hypoxia Defined as a Common Culprit/Initiation Factor in Mitochondrial-Mediated Proinflammatory Processes

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, George B.; Kream, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals and invertebrates, the activities of neuro- and immuno-competent cells, e.g., glia, which are present in nervous tissues, are deemed of critical importance to normative neuronal function. The responsiveness of invertebrate and vertebrate immuno-competent glia to a common set of signal molecules, such as nitric oxide and endogenous morphine, is functionally linked to physiologically driven innate immunological and neuronal activities. Importantly, the presence of a common, evolutionarily conserved, set of signal molecules in comparative animal groups strongly suggests an expansive intermediate metabolic profile dependent on high output mitochondrial ATP production and utilization. Normative bidirectional neural-immune communication across invertebrate and vertebrate species requires common anatomical and biochemical substrates and pathways involved in energy production and mitochondrial integrity. Within this closed-loop system, abnormal perturbation of the respective tissue functions will have profound ramifications in functionally altering associated nervous and vascular systems and it is highly likely that the initial trigger to the induction of a physiologically debilitating pro-inflammatory state is a micro-environmental hypoxic event. This is surmised by the need for an unwavering constant oxygen supply. In this case, temporal perturbations of normative oxygen tension may be tolerated for short, but not extended, periods and ischemic/hypoxic perturbations in oxygen delivery represent significant physiological challenges to overall cellular and multiple organ system viability. Hence, hypoxic triggering of multiple pro-inflammatory events, if not corrected, will promote pathophysiological amplification leading to a deleterious cascade of bio-senescent cellular and molecular signaling pathways, which converge to markedly impair mitochondrial energy utilization and ATP production. PMID:25997954

  6. Event group importance measures for top event frequency analyses

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-31

    Three traditional importance measures, risk reduction, partial derivative, nd variance reduction, have been extended to permit analyses of the relative importance of groups of underlying failure rates to the frequencies of resulting top events. The partial derivative importance measure was extended by assessing the contribution of a group of events to the gradient of the top event frequency. Given the moments of the distributions that characterize the uncertainties in the underlying failure rates, the expectation values of the top event frequency, its variance, and all of the new group importance measures can be quantified exactly for two familiar cases: (1) when all underlying failure rates are presumed independent, and (2) when pairs of failure rates based on common data are treated as being equal (totally correlated). In these cases, the new importance measures, which can also be applied to assess the importance of individual events, obviate the need for Monte Carlo sampling. The event group importance measures are illustrated using a small example problem and demonstrated by applications made as part of a major reactor facility risk assessment. These illustrations and applications indicate both the utility and the versatility of the event group importance measures.

  7. Open cellular structure in marine stratocumulus sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Comstock, K. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Cornish, C.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Fairall, C.

    2008-06-25

    Geostationary and sunsynchronous satellite data and in-situ observations from ship cruises are used to investigate the formation of open cellular structure in marine stratocumulus clouds over the Southeast Pacific (SEP). Open cellular convection either forms spontaneously as pockets of open cells (POCs) within overcast stratocumulus, or is advected into the region from midlatitude regions. POC formation occurs most frequently during the latter part of the night demonstrating that this transition is not caused by solar absorption-driven decoupling. The transition preferentially occurs in clouds with low 11-3.7 microns nighttime brightness temperature difference (BTD) which is found to be well correlated with both in-situ measured accumulation mode aerosol concentration and cloud droplet concentration estimates derived from MODIS. Besides indicating that night time BTD is an excellent proxy for stratocumulus cloud droplet concentration Nd, this also suggests that low aerosol concentrations favor POC formation. Indeed, extremely low accumulation mode aerosol concentrations are found during the passage of open cell events over the ship. Free-tropospheric moisture is not found to be an important factor in POC formation. Significant subseasonal variability occurs in the fractional coverage of open cellular convection over the broader SEP. This coverage is well correlated with a MODIS-derived drizzle proxy (MDP) proportional to the ratio of liquid water path (LWP) to Nd for predominantly overcast regions. Both LWP and Nd variability influences the MDP. Periods of low MDP have significant positive large scale Nd anomalies and are preceded byoffshore winds at 850 hPa, which suggests a potential continental influence upon open cell formation over the SEP. Together, the results suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and drizzle in marine stratocumulus and a role for drizzle in modulating the large scale albedo of these cloud systems.

  8. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOEpatents

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  9. Sound attenuation characteristics of cellular metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Satya Surya Srinivas

    The objectives of this work were to develop lightweight barrier and compact absorbing material systems for controlling low frequency noise (say below 2 kHz). The solutions explored fell into the broad category of segmented cellular materials in which local resonances are built-in attributes. The body of the work was divided into four parts. First, a cellular metamaterial concept for lightweight barrier materials was proposed, then, secondly, the concept was experimentally verified by testing application-scale designs in a diffuse sound field setup. In the remaining two parts of the work, the idea of shifting sound energy emporally and spatially was explored as a means of improving the performance of metamaterial-based barrier solutions and of compact sound absorbers, respectively. The high sound transmission loss (STL) metamaterials described to-date commonly require the introduction of relatively heavy resonating or constraining components which runs counter to the desire to create lightweight barrier solutions. It was proposed here that a cellular panel comprising a periodic arrangement of unit cells consisting of plates held in a grid-like frame, which itself is unsupported, can possess a high STL within a specified frequency range without an undue mass penalty. It was numerically demonstrated that such a cellular panel can yield enhanced STL if the unit cell mass is apportioned appropriately between the unit cell plate and the surrounding grid-like frame. The concept of planar cellular metamaterials was verified through diffuse field experiments on application-scale specimens by using intensity methods. Two cellular panel designs were tested and their behavior was compared with that of a reference limp panel. It was found that the predicted benefit of the cellular panels could be realized by increasing the mass contrast in the designs, and that the benefit was reduced with increasing diffuseness of the sound field. It was also found that the loss in performance

  10. Cellular commitment in the developing cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Marzban, Hassan; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Alizadeh, Javad; Ghavami, Saeid; Zachariah, Robby M.; Rastegar, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is located in the posterior cranial fossa and is critical for motor coordination and non-motor functions including cognitive and emotional processes. The anatomical structure of cerebellum is distinct with a three-layered cortex. During development, neurogenesis and fate decisions of cerebellar primordium cells are orchestrated through tightly controlled molecular events involving multiple genetic pathways. In this review, we will highlight the anatomical structure of human and mouse cerebellum, the cellular composition of developing cerebellum, and the underlying gene expression programs involved in cell fate commitments in the cerebellum. A critical evaluation of the cell death literature suggests that apoptosis occurs in ~5% of cerebellar cells, most shortly after mitosis. Apoptosis and cellular autophagy likely play significant roles in cerebellar development, we provide a comprehensive discussion of their role in cerebellar development and organization. We also address the possible function of unfolded protein response in regulation of cerebellar neurogenesis. We discuss recent advancements in understanding the epigenetic signature of cerebellar compartments and possible connections between DNA methylation, microRNAs and cerebellar neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss genetic diseases associated with cerebellar dysfunction and their role in the aging cerebellum. PMID:25628535