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1

Bringing earth system modeling framework (ESMF) components into the common component architecture (cca)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Typical earth system models involve coupled model components in high performance computing (HPC) environments. Two kinds of potential component-based framework have emerged recently. The Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) defines a common component interface in the context of earth system models. Common Component Architecture (CCA) is developed to support model components in HPC environments. The purpose of this work is

S. Zhou; A. Dasilva; B. Womack; G. Higgins

2003-01-01

2

Coupling climate models with the Earth System Modeling Framework and the Common Component Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Typical Earth system models involve coupled model components in high-performance computing (HPC) environments. In the last few years, several frameworks have been developed for HPC applications. Two of them are component-based frameworks: the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) defining a component interface for Earth system models and the Common Component Architecture (CCA) defining a generic component model. The purpose

Shujia Zhou

2006-01-01

3

A Hands-On Guide to the Common Component Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Assembling and running a CCA application, driver components, creating a component from an existing library, creating a new component from scratch, using TAU to monitor performance of components, understanding arrays and component state, understanding objects and message passing, remote access for CCA environment, building CCA tools and TAU, setting up your environment, tutorial

4

Toward a Common Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes work in progress to develop a standard for interoperability among high-performance scientific components. This research stems from the growing recognition that the scientific community needs to better manage the complexity of multidisciplinary simulations and better address scalable performance issues on parallel and distributed architectures. The driving force for this is the need for fast connections among components that perform

Robert C. Armstrong; Dennis Gannon; Al Geist; Katarzyna Keahey; Scott R. Kohn; Lois C. McInnes; Steve R. Parker; Brent A. Smolinski

1999-01-01

5

Toward a common component architecture for high-performance scientific computing  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes work in progress to develop a standard for interoperability among high-performance scientific components. This research stems from growing recognition that the scientific community must better manage the complexity of multidisciplinary simulations and better address scalable performance issues on parallel and distributed architectures. Driving forces are the need for fast connections among components that perform numerically intensive work and parallel collective interactions among components that use multiple processes or threads. This paper focuses on the areas we believe are most crucial for such interactions, namely an interface definition language that supports scientific abstractions for specifying component interfaces and a ports connection model for specifying component interactions.

Armstrong, R; Gannon, D; Geist, A; Katarzyna, K; Kohn, S; McInnes, L; Parker, S; Smolinski, B

1999-06-09

6

Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture  

E-print Network

Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture by Philippe Kruchten Rational Fellow Rational Software Canada References to architecture are everywhere: in every article, in every ad. And we take definition of software architecture. Are we all understanding the same thing? We gladly accept that software

van der Hoek, André

7

Parallel, Multigrid Finite Element Simulator for Fractured/Faulted and Other Complex Reservoirs based on Common Component Architecture (CCA)  

SciTech Connect

Black-oil, compositional and thermal simulators have been developed to address different physical processes in reservoir simulation. A number of different types of discretization methods have also been proposed to address issues related to representing the complex reservoir geometry. These methods are more significant for fractured reservoirs where the geometry can be particularly challenging. In this project, a general modular framework for reservoir simulation was developed, wherein the physical models were efficiently decoupled from the discretization methods. This made it possible to couple any discretization method with different physical models. Oil characterization methods are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and it is possible to construct geologically constrained models of faulted/fractured reservoirs. Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) simulation provides the option of performing multiphase calculations on spatially explicit, geologically feasible fracture sets. Multiphase DFN simulations of and sensitivity studies on a wide variety of fracture networks created using fracture creation/simulation programs was undertaken in the first part of this project. This involved creating interfaces to seamlessly convert the fracture characterization information into simulator input, grid the complex geometry, perform the simulations, and analyze and visualize results. Benchmarking and comparison with conventional simulators was also a component of this work. After demonstration of the fact that multiphase simulations can be carried out on complex fracture networks, quantitative effects of the heterogeneity of fracture properties were evaluated. Reservoirs are populated with fractures of several different scales and properties. A multiscale fracture modeling study was undertaken and the effects of heterogeneity and storage on water displacement dynamics in fractured basements were investigated. In gravity-dominated systems, more oil could be recovered at a given pore volume of injection at lower rates. However, if oil production can be continued at high water cuts, the discounted cumulative production usually favors higher production rates. The workflow developed during the project was also used to perform multiphase simulations in heterogeneous, fracture-matrix systems. Compositional and thermal-compositional simulators were developed for fractured reservoirs using the generalized framework. The thermal-compositional simulator was based on a novel 'equation-alignment' approach that helped choose the correct variables to solve depending on the number of phases present and the prescribed component partitioning. The simulators were used in steamflooding and in insitu combustion applications. The framework was constructed to be inherently parallel. The partitioning routines employed in the framework allowed generalized partitioning on highly complex fractured reservoirs and in instances when wells (incorporated in these models as line sources) were divided between two or more processors.

Milind Deo; Chung-Kan Huang; Huabing Wang

2008-08-31

8

The SOHO Archive Components, Architecture, Processing & Technology  

E-print Network

1 The SOHO Archive Components, Architecture, Processing & Technology George Dimitoglou SOHO ESA/NASA Project Science Team EER/L3 Space Sciences Division #12;2 SOHO Archive Components n-tier architecture

9

LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture  

E-print Network

1 LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture of Robot Controllers R. Passama, D. Andreu, C component approaches and robot control architectures. This methodology defines a process that guides architecture, useful for analysis and integration, and a dedicated component-based language, focusing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

10

Development of Embedded Software with Component Integration Based on ABCD Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The state-of-art approaches to embedded real-time software development are very costly. The high development cost can be reduced significantly by using model-based integration of reusable components. To the ABCD (Architecture, Basic, Common and Domain) architecture, we propose an architecture that supports integration of software components and their behaviors, and reconfiguration of component behavior at executable-code-level. In the architecture, components are

Haeng-Kon Kim; Roger Y. Lee; Hae-Sool Yang

2005-01-01

11

A Component Architecture for High-Performance Computing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This preprint, written by researchers at Oak Ridge and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, discusses some important design decisions involved in developing a high-performance computer architecture for scientific applications. The authors introduce the Common Component Architecture and its orientation toward the general computing needs of the scientific community, as opposed to other approaches that are suitable only for specific tasks. The proposed methodology illuminates many aspects of future generations of large scale computing efforts.

Bernholdt, D.E.

12

Compoweb: a component-oriented web architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, client-site Web mashups are studied from component-oriented perspective, and CompoWeb, a component- oriented Web architecture, is proposed. In CompoWeb, a Web application is decomposed into Web components called gadgets. A gadget is an abstraction of functional or logical Web component. It is isolated from other gadgets for security and reliability. Contract-based channels are the only way to

Rui Guo; Bin B. Zhu; Min Feng; Aimin Pan; Bosheng Zhou

2008-01-01

13

Distributed Rate-Distortion With Common Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a scheme for rate-distortion with dis- tributed encoding in which the sources to be compressed contain a common component. We show that this scheme is optimal in some situations and that it strictly improves upon existing schemes, which do not make full use of common components. This establishes that independent quantization followed by in- dependent binning is not

Aaron B. Wagner; Benjamin G. Kelly; Ycel Altug

2011-01-01

14

A component architecture for high-performance scientific computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The

Felipe Bertrand; Kenneth Chiu; Tamara L. Dahlgren; Kostadin Damevski; Wael R. Elwasif; Thomas G. W. Epperly; Madhusudhan Govindaraju; Daniel S. Katz; James Arthur Kohl; Manojkumar Krishnan; Gary K. Kumfert; Jay Walter Larson; Sophia Lefantzi; Michael J. Lewis; Allen D. Malony; Lois C. McInnes; Jarek Nieplocha; Boyana Norris; Steven G. Parker; Jaideep Ray; Sameer Shende; Theresa L. Windus; Shujia Zhou

2006-01-01

15

Component architecture of the Tecolote framework  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Tecolote Framework is used in conjunction with other libraries by several physical simulations. This paper briefly describes the design and use of Tecolote`s component architecture. A component is a C++ class that meets several requirements imposed by the framework to increase its reusability, configurability, and ease of replacement. The authors discuss both the motives for imposing these requirements upon components and the means by which a generic C++ class may be integrated into Tecolote by satisfying these requirements. They also describe the means by which these components may be combined into a physics application.

Zander, M.; Hall, J.; Painter, J.; O`Rourke, S.

1998-11-01

16

Component architecture in drug discovery informatics.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the characteristics of a new model of computing that has been spurred on by the Internet, known as Netcentric computing. Developments in this model led to distributed component architectures, which, although not new ideas, are now realizable with modern tools such as Enterprise Java. The application of this approach to scientific computing, particularly in pharmaceutical discovery research, is discussed and highlighted by a particular case involving the management of biological assay data. PMID:12058611

Smith, Peter M

2002-05-01

17

A component-based architecture for self-healing systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This seminar paper considers some of the problems in creating a architecture for a self-healing system. The presen- tation is by no means exhaustive. An example of an architecture of a self-healing component is presented and then starting from that architecture, problems of integrating these components are analysed. Completely different problems might arise if different approach was taken. I. INTRODUCTION

Juho Vuori

18

Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components  

SciTech Connect

There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and maintenance support. Each product is briefly described in Appendix A. Selection of the most appropriate software package for a particular application will depend on the chosen component, system, or structure. Ongoing research will determine the most appropriate choices for a successful demonstration of PHM systems in aging NPPs.

N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

2011-08-01

19

CAPRI: A Common Architecture for Distributed Probabilistic Internet Fault Diagnosis  

E-print Network

This thesis presents a new approach to root cause localization and fault diagnosis in the Internet based on a Common Architecture for Probabilistic Reasoning in the Internet (CAPRI) in which distributed, heterogeneous ...

Lee, George J.

2007-06-04

20

CAPRI : a common architecture for distributed probabilistic Internet fault diagnosis  

E-print Network

This thesis presents a new approach to root cause localization and fault diagnosis in the Internet based on a Common Architecture for Probabilistic Reasoning in the Internet (CAPRI) in which distributed, heterogeneous ...

Lee, George J. (George Janbing), 1979-

2007-01-01

21

SIFT - A Component-Based Integration Architecture for Enterprise Analytics  

SciTech Connect

Architectures and technologies for enterprise application integration are relatively mature, resulting in a range of standards-based and proprietary middleware technologies. In the domain of complex analytical applications, integration architectures are not so well understood. Analytical applications such as those used in scientific discovery, emergency response, financial and intelligence analysis exert unique demands on their underlying architecture. These demands make existing integration middleware inappropriate for use in enterprise analytics environments. In this paper we describe SIFT (Scalable Information Fusion and Triage), a platform designed for integrating the various components that comprise enterprise analytics applications. SIFT exploits a common pattern for composing analytical components, and extends an existing messaging platform with dynamic configuration mechanisms and scaling capabilities. We demonstrate the use of SIFT to create a decision support platform for quality control based on large volumes of incoming delivery data. The strengths of the SIFT solution are discussed, and we conclude by describing where further work is required to create a complete solution applicable to a wide range of analytical application domains.

Thurman, David A.; Almquist, Justin P.; Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Chatterton, Jack

2007-02-01

22

ARCHITECTURE AND MAIN HARDWARE COMPONENTS OF THE FEL CONTROL SYSTEM  

E-print Network

ARCHITECTURE AND MAIN HARDWARE COMPONENTS OF THE FEL CONTROL SYSTEM E.N. Dementiev, V.R. Kozak, E.V. Tararyshkin, A.G. Tribendis, E.N. Shubin, Abstract This article considers the architecture of the control architecture depended on several factors specific to both the facility itself and the control equipment used

Kozak, Victor R.

23

Study on the standard architecture for geoinformation common services  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The construction of platform for geoinformation common services was completed or on going in in most provinces and cities in these years in China, and the platforms plays an important role in the economic and social activities. Geoinfromation and geoinfromation based services are the key issues in the platform. The standards on geoinormation common services play as bridges among the users, systems and designers of the platform. The standard architecture for geoinformation common services is the guideline for designing and using the standard system in which the standards integrated to each other to promote the development, sharing and services of geoinformation resources. To establish the standard architecture for geoinformation common services is one of the tasks of "Study on important standards for geonformation common services and management of public facilities in city". The scope of the standard architecture is defined, such as data or information model, interoperability interface or service, information management. Some Research work on the status of international standards of geoinormation common services in organization and countries, like ISO/TC 211, OGC and other countries or unions like USA, EU, Japan have done. Some principles are set up to evaluate the standard, such as availability, suitability and extensible ability. Then the development requirement and practical situation are analyzed, and a framework of the standard architecture for geoinformation common services are proposed. Finally, a summary and prospects of the geoinformation standards are made.

Zha, Z.; Zhang, L.; Wang, C.; Jiang, J.; Huang, W.

2014-04-01

24

A component based architecture for distributed, pervasive gaming applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe a component based architecture for developing distributed, pervasive games that integrate tangible and graphical user interface components. We first discuss some of the interface components we have developed and then present a coordination infrastructure called Pegasus that allows flexibly coupling and reconfiguring components during runtime. On top of Pegasus we have created a language for

Carsten Magerkurth; Timo Engelke; Daniel H. Grollman

2006-01-01

25

New architectures support for ALMA common software: lessons learned  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ALMA Common Software (ACS) is a distributed control framework based on CORBA that provides communication between distributed pieces of software. Because of its size and complexity it provides its own compilation system, a mix of several technologies. The current ACS compilation process depends on specific tools, compilers, code generation, and a strict dependency model induced by the large number of software components. This document presents a summary of several porting and compatibility attempts at using ACS on platforms other than the officially supported one. A porting of ACS to the Microsoft Windows Platform and to the ARM processor architecture were attempted, with different grades of success. Also, support for LINUX-PREEMPT (a set of real-time patches for the Linux kernel) using a new design for real-time services was implemented. These efforts were integrated with the ACS building and compilation system, while others were included in its design. Lessons learned in this process are presented, and a general approach is extracted from them.

Menay, Camilo E.; Zamora, Gabriel A.; Tobar, Rodrigo J.; Avarias, Jorge A.; Dahl-skog, Kevin R.; von Brand, Horst H.; Chiozzi, Gianluca

2010-07-01

26

Genetic improvement of plant architecture in the common bean.  

PubMed

Knowledge of genetic control of plant architecture in the common bean can help breeders define the most adequate breeding strategy to optimize gains. We examined genetic control of plant architecture in the common bean by means of partial diallel crosses. Fourteen bean lines were crossed under a partial diallel scheme, in which group 1 was composed of 8 erect plant lines and group 2 of 6 carioca-type grain lines. The F1 plants from the crosses and the 14 parents were evaluated during spring (March sowing) for the characteristics plant architecture score, hypocotyl diameter, mean plant height, and grain yield. The additive effects were found to predominate in the genetic control of plant architecture score and hypocotyl diameter. Thus, selection of more erect plants can be done in early generations. Heritability estimate in a wide sense was greater for hypocotyl diameter (0.81) than for plant architecture score (0.60), showing that the latter is a more complex characteristic than the former. Hypocotyl diameter has the potential to be used in the selection of more erect plants, either by considering selection between and within families, or by combined or phenotypic recurrent selection. The reason for this is that the diameter measurements are taken from individual plants inside the plots. PMID:23408452

Silva, V M P; Menezes Jnior, J A N; Carneiro, P C S; Carneiro, J E S; Cruz, C D

2013-01-01

27

Estimation of Common Long-Memory Components in Cointegrated Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of cointegration in large systems requires a reduction of their dimensionality. To achieve this, we propose to obtain the I(1) common factors in every subsystem and then analyze cointegration among them. In this article, a new way of estimating common long-memory components of a cointegrated system is proposed. The identification of these I(1) common factors is achieved by

Jesus Gonzalo; Clive W J Granger

1995-01-01

28

Common and Cluster-Specific Simultaneous Component Analysis  

PubMed Central

In many fields of research, so-called multiblock data are collected, i.e., data containing multivariate observations that are nested within higher-level research units (e.g., inhabitants of different countries). Each higher-level unit (e.g., country) then corresponds to a data block. For such data, it may be interesting to investigate the extent to which the correlation structure of the variables differs between the data blocks. More specifically, when capturing the correlation structure by means of component analysis, one may want to explore which components are common across all data blocks and which components differ across the data blocks. This paper presents a common and cluster-specific simultaneous component method which clusters the data blocks according to their correlation structure and allows for common and cluster-specific components. Model estimation and model selection procedures are described and simulation results validate their performance. Also, the method is applied to data from cross-cultural values research to illustrate its empirical value. PMID:23667463

De Roover, Kim; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Mesquita, Batja; Ceulemans, Eva

2013-01-01

29

Architecture, Middleware and Common Applications Information Services and Technology  

E-print Network

Management Services Ian Crew Patricia Juarez-Gordiano Marlita Kahn Sally Le (student) Elena Zhang (student Desk Functions Kellsie Adams Craig Carlson Jon Broshious Systems Integration & Architecture George

Sanders, Seth

30

A Proven Ground System Architecture for Promoting Collaboration and Common Solutions at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's "GMSEC" ground system architecture was presented at GSAW2003 as a concept being studied. GMSEC would utilize a publish/subscribe middleware framework and standardized interfaces to allow custom and COTS ground system components to plug-and-play. This capability, in turn, would reduce integration costs, allow for technology infusion over time, and encourage the development and sharing of common components across missions and organizations. At GSAW2004, GMSEC was presented at a breakout session as a system working well in the NASA lab and being applied as an integral piece of reengineering efforts for several GSFC missions. Today, GMSEC is supporting five satellites at GSFC and has been selected by several future missions. Over 30 plug-and-play components are now available to missions using the GMSEC approach. Other organizations, including Marshall Space Flight Center, Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physic Lab, and the Institute for Scientific Research are each developing GMSEC-compatible components. Based on the success of GMSEC and efforts at other NASA Centers, the message bus approach is now being evaluated as a NASA Agency-wide approach for many future missions involving multiple NASA Centers as we move towards the goals of NASA s new Exploration Initiative. The presentation will explain the basic technical concepts of using a publish/subscribe framework for mission operations support (and its applicability to flight systems as well). Lessons learned on NASA's GMSEC program will allow the audience to better understand the significant benefits of this architecture approach over the traditional "one-off" solution approach. The point of the presentation is to show the long-term benefits of using a ground system architecture which incorporates many of the successful GMSEC concepts - message bus, mix of COTS and custom software, standard interfaces, plug-and-play, etc. The implications for the development process will also be discussed.

Smith, Danford

2005-01-01

31

A Study on the Component Based Architecture for Workflow Rule Engine and Tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The component based development and architecture technology have the potential to be more powerful than traditional. In this\\u000a paper, we propose 4 views for architecture development, which are use case view, logical view, component view and implementation\\u000a view. We present component based architecture through ABCD pattern in a component viewpoint. In addition, we apply 4 viewpoints\\u000a for workflow rule and

Ho-jun Shin; Kwang-ki Kim; Bo-yeon Shim

2005-01-01

32

Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document captures the system architecture for a Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) capability needed for electronics maintenance and repair of the Constellation Program (CxP). CLEAR is intended to improve flight system supportability and reduce the mass of spares required to maintain the electronics of human rated spacecraft on long duration missions. By necessity it allows the crew to make repairs that would otherwise be performed by Earth based repair depots. Because of practical knowledge and skill limitations of small spaceflight crews they must be augmented by Earth based support crews and automated repair equipment. This system architecture covers the complete system from ground-user to flight hardware and flight crew and defines an Earth segment and a Space segment. The Earth Segment involves database management, operational planning, and remote equipment programming and validation processes. The Space Segment involves the automated diagnostic, test and repair equipment required for a complete repair process. This document defines three major subsystems including, tele-operations that links the flight hardware to ground support, highly reconfigurable diagnostics and test instruments, and a CLEAR Repair Apparatus that automates the physical repair process.

Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

2011-01-01

33

A Plug and Play GNC Architecture Using FPGA Components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of Plug and Play, or PnP, is to allow hardware and software components to work together automatically, without requiring manual setup procedures. As a result, new or replacement hardware can be plugged into a system and automatically configured with the appropriate resource assignments. However, in many cases it may not be practical or even feasible to physically replace hardware components. One method for handling these types of situations is through the incorporation of reconfigurable hardware such as Field Programmable Gate Arrays, or FPGAs. This paper describes a phased approach to developing a Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) architecture that expands on the traditional concepts of PnP, in order to accommodate hardware reconfiguration without requiring detailed knowledge of the hardware. This is achieved by establishing a functional based interface that defines how the hardware will operate, and allow the hardware to reconfigure itself. The resulting system combines the flexibility of manipulating software components with the speed and efficiency of hardware.

KrishnaKumar, K.; Kaneshige, J.; Waterman, R.; Pires, C.; Ippoloito, C.

2005-01-01

34

Aesthetic preferences for architecture do not rely on commonly shared semantic distinctions  

E-print Network

Aesthetic preferences for architecture do not rely on commonly shared semantic distinctions that aesthetic preferences for architecture do not rely on culturally shared semantic distinctions. 2 Alexander H. Denker, G. Gabrielle Starr, Edward A. Vessel New York University What drives our aesthetic

Vessel, Edward A.

35

Common global architecture applied to automobile electrical distribution systems  

E-print Network

Electrical and electronic components have a prominent role in today's vehicles. Particularly during the last two decades, functionality has been added at an exponential rate, resulting in increased complexity, especially ...

Azpeitia Camacho, Marcia E. (Marcia Edna)

2010-01-01

36

Architectural Design of Component-Based Agents: A Behavior-Based Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper relates an experience in using a component model to design and construct agents. After discussing various rationales and architectural styles for decomposing an agent architecture, we describe a model of component for agents, named MALEVA. In this model, compo- nents encapsulate various units of agent behaviors (e.g., follow gradient, flee, reproduce). It provides an explicit notion of control

Jean-pierre Briot; Thomas Meurisse; Frdric Peschanski

2006-01-01

37

SeQoMo Architecture: Interactions of Security, QoS and Mobility Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes the architectural framework of the SeQoMo (Secure, QoS-enabled Mobilitysupport) architecture. After a review of the SeQoMo requirement, components and functionalities,protocol interactions of mobility, QoS and security components are described. Two use cases arepresented to explain the typical behaviors of the overall system.

X. Fu; T. Chen; A. Festag; G. Schfer; H. Karl

38

The space avionics architecture standard tailored to the Common Lunar Lander conceptual design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The major avionics requirements for a Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) and the Artemis Common Lunar Lander (CLL) are summarized. The SGOAA was applied to the Artemis program which included the tailoring of the operations control subsystem, the space data subsystem, the hardware processor requirements, and the processor internal architecture. It is concluded that tailoring the generic data system to the initial functional requirements for CLL system design facilitated the design that met the Artemis requirements.

Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

39

From Business Process to Component Architecture: Engineering Business to IT Alignment  

E-print Network

From Business Process to Component Architecture: Engineering Business to IT Alignment Karim Dahman--Maintaining the alignment between the Business and IT is of high strategic relevance in today's enterprise roadmap to ensure a clear conceptual alignment between the Business Processes and the Software Architectures. As our

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

40

A Successful Component Architecture for Interoperable and Evolvable Ground Data Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has adopted an open architecture approach for satellite control centers and is now realizing benefits beyond those originally envisioned. The Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) architecture utilizes standardized interfaces and a middleware software bus to allow functional components to be easily integrated. This paper presents the GMSEC architectural goals and concepts, the capabilities enabled and the benefits realized by adopting this framework approach. NASA experiences with applying the GMSEC architecture on multiple missions are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of lessons learned, future directions for GMSEC and the possible applications beyond NASA GSFC.

Smith, Danford S.; Bristow, John O.; Wilmot, Jonathan

2006-01-01

41

Sensitivity analysis by approximation formulas - Illustrative examples. [reliability analysis of six-component architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper examines the reliability of three architectures for six components. For each architecture, the probabilities of the failure states are given by algebraic formulas involving the component fault rate, the system recovery rate, and the operating time. The dominant failure modes are identified, and the change in reliability is considered with respect to changes in fault rate, recovery rate, and operating time. The major conclusions concern the influence of system architecture on failure modes and parameter requirements. Without this knowledge, a system designer may pick an inappropriate structure.

White, A. L.

1983-01-01

42

Common relationships among proximate composition components in fishes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Relationships between the various body proximate components and dry matter content were examined for five species of fishes, representing anadromous, marine and freshwater species: chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta, Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix and striped bass Morone saxatilis. The dry matter content or per cent dry mass of these fishes can be used to reliably predict the per cent composition of the other components. Therefore, with validation it is possible to estimate fat, protein and ash content of fishes from per cent dry mass information, reducing the need for costly and time-consuming laboratory proximate analysis. This approach coupled with new methods of non-lethal estimation of per cent dry mass, such as from bioelectrical impedance analysis, can provide non-destructive measurements of proximate composition of fishes. ?? 2008 The Authors.

Hartman, K.J.; Margraf, F.J.

2008-01-01

43

An Approach to Designing Adaptive Enterprise Component-based Architectures for Business Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to fully realize the potential of component-based software engineering, the multiple aspects and domains that should be considered are discussed. We focus on two of the domains, namely, the methodology and architecture domains of component -based development and integration (CBDI). For the method domain, we examine some extensions to that are needed to current methods such as: Subsystem

Ali Arsanjani

44

A Proven Ground System Architecture for Promoting Collaboration and Common Solutions at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Requirement: Improve how NASA develops and maintains ground data systems for dozens of missions, with a couple new missions always in the development phase. Decided in 2001 on enhanced message-bus architecture. Users offered choices for major components. They plug and play because key interfaces are all the same. Can support COTS, heritage, and new software. Even the middleware can be switched. Project name: GMSEC. Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center.

Smith, Danford

2005-01-01

45

Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Overview and Architectural Tenets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: 1) Command and control and mission management for the Suomi National Polar Partnership (S-NPP) mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite and the Polar Free Flyer mission in 2017 2) Data acquisition via a Polar Receptor Network (PRN) for S-NPP, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the Department of Defense (DoD) 3) Data routing over a global fiber Wide Area Network (WAN) for S-NPP, JPSS-1, Polar Free Flyer, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN, which includes several Earth Observing System [EOS] missions), MetOp for the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) 4) Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS architecture will receive a technology refresh in 2015 to satisfy several key objectives: 1) 'Operationalizing' Suomi NPP, which had originally been intended as a risk reduction mission 2) Leveraging lessons learned to date in multi-mission support 3) Taking advantage of newer, more reliable and efficient technologies 4) Satisfying new requirements and constraints due to the continually evolving budgetary environment To meet these needs, we are upgrading the CGS in the following ways: 1) Performing a system-wide technology refresh for enhanced performance and security 2) Establishing a new front end architecture and augmenting the PRN for mission data transport 3) Standardizing data protocols to accommodate an even wider variety of missions 4) Enhancing flexibility and modularity in IDPS for new and evolving algorithms 5) Achieving comprehensive situational awareness 6) Deploying a full backup capability for Continuity of Operations (COOP) 7) Providing an enclave in compliance with the latest security standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 800-53 This paper will provide an overview of the CGS as it is deployed and operating today, along with a summary of the architectural tenets that will facilitate even easier incorporation of new missions and applications in 2015.

Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

2013-12-01

46

Micro guidance and control synthesis: New components, architectures, and capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New GN&C (guidance, navigation and control) system capabilities are shown to arise from component innovations that involve the synergistic use of microminiature sensors and actuators, microelectronics, and fiber optics. Micro-GN&C system and component concepts are defined that include micro-actuated adaptive optics, micromachined inertial sensors, fiber-optic data nets and light-power transmission, and VLSI microcomputers. The thesis is advanced that these micro-miniaturization products are capable of having a revolutionary impact on space missions and systems, and that GN&C is the pathfinder micro-technology application that can bring that about.

Mettler, Edward; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

1993-01-01

47

Checking Architectural and Implementation Constraints for Domain-Specific Component  

E-print Network

that in order to promote the reuse of components within various domain contexts an homogeneous design approach domains. Index Terms--CBSE, Model-Driven Engineering, Domain- Specific Models, Conformance Checking I-specific concerns using a dedicated design process. Although the use of HULOTTE eases the implementation of domain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

Can Core Components in Mathematics Courses Replace Comprehensive Common Course Finals? AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to balance common academic outcomes, as measured by common course finals, with faculty's individual teaching styles, Johnson County Community College (Kansas) mathematics faculty developed "core components" for 10 of the mathematics courses offered in Spring 1995. The core components were designed by faculty teaching each course, and

Duckwall, Julia M.; Wilson, Steven J.

49

Manned/Unmanned Common Architecture Program (MCAP) net centric flight tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Properly architected avionics systems can reduce the costs of periodic functional improvements, maintenance, and obsolescence. With this in mind, the U.S. Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) initiated the Manned/Unmanned Common Architecture Program (MCAP) in 2003 to develop an affordable, high-performance embedded mission processing architecture for potential application to multiple aviation platforms. MCAP analyzed Army helicopter and unmanned air vehicle (UAV) missions, identified supporting subsystems, surveyed advanced hardware and software technologies, and defined computational infrastructure technical requirements. The project selected a set of modular open systems standards and market-driven commercial-off-theshelf (COTS) electronics and software, and, developed experimental mission processors, network architectures, and software infrastructures supporting the integration of new capabilities, interoperability, and life cycle cost reductions. MCAP integrated the new mission processing architecture into an AH-64D Apache Longbow and participated in Future Combat Systems (FCS) network-centric operations field experiments in 2006 and 2007 at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico and at the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) in 2008. The MCAP Apache also participated in PM C4ISR On-the-Move (OTM) Capstone Experiments 2007 (E07) and 2008 (E08) at Ft. Dix, NJ and conducted Mesa, Arizona local area flight tests in December 2005, February 2006, and June 2008.

Johnson, Dale

2009-04-01

50

A Systems Approach to Developing an Affordable Space Ground Transportation Architecture using a Commonality Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a structured approach for achieving a compatible Ground System (GS) and Flight System (FS) architecture that is affordable, productive and sustainable. This paper is an extension of the paper titled "Approach to an Affordable and Productive Space Transportation System" by McCleskey et al. This paper integrates systems engineering concepts and operationally efficient propulsion system concepts into a structured framework for achieving GS and FS compatibility in the mid-term and long-term time frames. It also presents a functional and quantitative relationship for assessing system compatibility called the Architecture Complexity Index (ACI). This paper: (1) focuses on systems engineering fundamentals as it applies to improving GS and FS compatibility; (2) establishes mid-term and long-term spaceport goals; (3) presents an overview of transitioning a spaceport to an airport model; (4) establishes a framework for defining a ground system architecture; (5) presents the ACI concept; (6) demonstrates the approach by presenting a comparison of different GS architectures; and (7) presents a discussion on the benefits of using this approach with a focus on commonality.

Garcia, Jerry L.; McCleskey, Carey M.; Bollo, Timothy R.; Rhodes, Russel E.; Robinson, John W.

2012-01-01

51

Power optimization of digital baseband WCDMA receiver components on algorithmic and architectural level  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High data rates combined with high mobility represent a challenge for the design of cellular devices. Advanced algorithms are required which result in higher complexity, more chip area and increased power consumption. However, this contrasts to the limited power supply of mobile devices. This presentation discusses the application of an HSDPA receiver which has been optimized regarding power consumption with the focus on the algorithmic and architectural level. On algorithmic level the Rake combiner, Prefilter-Rake equalizer and MMSE equalizer are compared regarding their BER performance. Both equalizer approaches provide a significant increase of performance for high data rates compared to the Rake combiner which is commonly used for lower data rates. For both equalizer approaches several adaptive algorithms are available which differ in complexity and convergence properties. To identify the algorithm which achieves the required performance with the lowest power consumption the algorithms have been investigated using SystemC models regarding their performance and arithmetic complexity. Additionally, for the Prefilter Rake equalizer the power estimations of a modified Griffith (LMS) and a Levinson (RLS) algorithm have been compared with the tool ORINOCO supplied by ChipVision. The accuracy of this tool has been verified with a scalable architecture of the UMTS channel estimation described both in SystemC and VHDL targeting a 130 nm CMOS standard cell library. An architecture combining all three approaches combined with an adaptive control unit is presented. The control unit monitors the current condition of the propagation channel and adjusts parameters for the receiver like filter size and oversampling ratio to minimize the power consumption while maintaining the required performance. The optimization strategies result in a reduction of the number of arithmetic operations up to 70% for single components which leads to an estimated power reduction of up to 40% while the BER performance is not affected. This work utilizes SystemC and ORINOCO for the first estimation of power consumption in an early step of the design flow. Thereby algorithms can be compared in different operating modes including the effects of control units. Here an algorithm having higher peak complexity and power consumption but providing more flexibility showed less consumption for normal operating modes compared to the algorithm which is optimized for peak performance.

Schmann, M.; Bcker, M.; Hessel, S.; Langmann, U.

2008-05-01

52

Evidence for a shared nuclear pore complex architecture that is conserved from the last common eukaryotic ancestor  

E-print Network

, karyopherin; LCEA, last common eukaryotic ancestor; NE, nuclear envelope; NPC, nuclear pore complex; Nup conserved throughout the eukaryota, and was already established in the last common eukaryotic ancestor1 Evidence for a shared nuclear pore complex architecture that is conserved from the last common

Chait, Brian T.

53

Intelligent mechatronic components: control system engineering using an open distributed architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the results of case study on application of open distributed software architecture IEC61499 to the organization of intelligence, embedded to smart mechatronic components. The presented approach targets the issues related to integration and reconfiguration of automation systems, where the software integration plays an important role. Based on the testbed studies, a classification of \\

V. Vyatkin

2003-01-01

54

A compact single-pass architecture for hysteresis thresholding and component labeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hysteresis thresholding offers enhanced edge\\/object detection in the presence of noise. However, due to its recursive nature, it requires a lot of memory and execution time. Thus, it is restricted and sometimes totally avoided in streaming processors with limited memory. We propose an efficient architecture coupling hysteresis thresholding with component labeling and feature extraction in a single pass over the

Mayssaa Al Najjar; Swetha Karlapudi; Magdy A. Bayoumi

2010-01-01

55

Generation of Component Based Architecture from Business Processes: Model Driven Engineering for SOA  

E-print Network

of the company. To avoid technology-driven business, the managed business processes must be designed at the level of the service interactions pertaining to a domain being modeled (i.e., in the design space), it is possibleGeneration of Component Based Architecture from Business Processes: Model Driven Engineering

Boyer, Edmond

56

Component Architecture and Modeling for Microkernel-Based Embedded System Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microkernel-based approach provides operating system support for developing embedded systems with high performance and safety through memory protection. This allows us to introduce architectural mechanisms that enable good separation of concerns, while still satisfy the performance, security and reliability needs of embedded systems. Organizing embedded software as interacting components with well-defined interfaces is compatible with modeling methods. The challenge issue

Yan Liu; Ted Wong

2008-01-01

57

Comparison of pelvic muscle architecture between humans and commonly used laboratory species  

PubMed Central

Introduction and hypothesis Pelvic floor muscles (PFM) are deleteriously affected by vaginal birth, which contributes to the development of pelvic floor disorders. To mechanistically link these events, experiments using animal models are required, as access to human PFM tissue is challenging. In choosing an animal model, a comparative study of PFM design is necessary, since gross anatomy alone is insufficient to guide the selection. Methods Human PFM architecture was measured using micromechanical dissection and then compared with mouse (n=10), rat (n=10), and rabbit (n=10) using the Architectural Difference Index (ADI) (parameterizing a combined measure of sarcomere length-to-optimal-sarcomere ratio, fiber-to-muscle-length ratio, and fraction of total PFM mass and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) contributed by each muscle). Coccygeus (C), iliocaudalis (IC), and pubocaudalis (PC) were harvested and subjected to architectural measurements. Parameters within species were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc Tukey's tests. The scaling relationships of PFM across species were quantified using least-squares regression of log-10-transformed variables. Results Based on the ADI, rat was found to be the most similar to humans (ADI = 2.5), followed by mouse (ADI = 3.3). When animals' body mass was regressed against muscle mass, muscle length, fiber length, and PCSA scaling coefficients showed a negative allometric relationship or smaller increase than predicted by geometric scaling. Conclusion In terms of muscle design among commonly used laboratory animals, rat best approximates the human PFM, followed by mouse. Negative allometric scaling of PFM architectural parameters is likely due to the multifaceted function of these muscles. PMID:24915840

Alperin, Marianna; Tuttle, Lori J.; Conner, Blair R.; Dixon, Danielle M.; Mathewson, Margie A.; Ward, Samuel R.

2014-01-01

58

Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed MemoryComputer Architectures  

SciTech Connect

A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflop scale computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the Community Climate System Model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice components. Each component is semi-independent and has been developed at a different institution. We study how this multi-component, multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory architectures. For the first time, we clearly identify five effective execution modes and develop the MPH library to support application development utilizing these modes. MPH performs component-name registration, resource allocation and initial component handshaking in a flexible way.

He, Yun; Ding, Chris

2005-03-24

59

Investigation of a Novel Common Subexpression Elimination Method for Low Power and Area Efficient DCT Architecture  

PubMed Central

A wide interest has been observed to find a low power and area efficient hardware design of discrete cosine transform (DCT) algorithm. This research work proposed a novel Common Subexpression Elimination (CSE) based pipelined architecture for DCT, aimed at reproducing the cost metrics of power and area while maintaining high speed and accuracy in DCT applications. The proposed design combines the techniques of Canonical Signed Digit (CSD) representation and CSE to implement the multiplier-less method for fixed constant multiplication of DCT coefficients. Furthermore, symmetry in the DCT coefficient matrix is used with CSE to further decrease the number of arithmetic operations. This architecture needs a single-port memory to feed the inputs instead of multiport memory, which leads to reduction of the hardware cost and area. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed scheme uses minimum logic utilizing mere 340 slices and 22 adders. Moreover, this design meets the real time constraints of different video/image coders and peak-signal-to-noise-ratio (PSNR) requirements. Furthermore, the proposed technique has significant advantages over recent well-known methods along with accuracy in terms of power reduction, silicon area usage, and maximum operating frequency by 41%, 15%, and 15%, respectively. PMID:25133249

Siddiqui, M. F.; Reza, A. W.; Kanesan, J.; Ramiah, H.

2014-01-01

60

XML Based Integration of Web, Mobile and Desktop Components in a Service Oriented Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Component autonomy and easy composition are two of the main purposes of Service oriented Architectures. Recently, some multilayer\\u000a frameworks supporting service abstraction and tier-integration facilities have been developed. They are especially useful\\u000a for developing ubiquitous software systems where the presentation layers for different visualization devices are decoupled\\u000a from the business logic layer, but services provided by this one can be

Antonio Lillo Sanz; Mara N. Moreno Garca; Vivian F. Lpez Batista

2008-01-01

61

Frequency multiplexed flux locked loop architecture providing an array of DC SQUIDS having both shared and unshared components  

DOEpatents

Architecture for frequency multiplexing multiple flux locked loops in a system comprising an array of DC SQUID sensors. The architecture involves dividing the traditional flux locked loop into multiple unshared components and a single shared component which, in operation, form a complete flux locked loop relative to each DC SQUID sensor. Each unshared flux locked loop component operates on a different flux modulation frequency. The architecture of the present invention allows a reduction from 2N to N+1 in the number of connections between the cryogenic DC SQUID sensors and their associated room temperature flux locked loops. Furthermore, the 1.times.N architecture of the present invention can be paralleled to form an M.times.N array architecture without increasing the required number of flux modulation frequencies.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-01-01

62

Workflow-enabled distributed component-based information architecture for digital medical imaging enterprises.  

PubMed

Few information systems today offer a flexible means to define and manage the automated part of radiology processes, which provide clinical imaging services for the entire healthcare organization. Even fewer of them provide a coherent architecture that can easily cope with heterogeneity and inevitable local adaptation of applications and can integrate clinical and administrative information to aid better clinical, operational, and business decisions. We describe an innovative enterprise architecture of image information management systems to fill the needs. Such a system is based on the interplay of production workflow management, distributed object computing, Java and Web techniques, and in-depth domain knowledge in radiology operations. Our design adapts the approach of "4+1" architectural view. In this new architecture, PACS and RIS become one while the user interaction can be automated by customized workflow process. Clinical service applications are implemented as active components. They can be reasonably substituted by applications of local adaptations and can be multiplied for fault tolerance and load balancing. Furthermore, the workflow-enabled digital radiology system would provide powerful query and statistical functions for managing resources and improving productivity. This paper will potentially lead to a new direction of image information management. We illustrate the innovative design with examples taken from an implemented system. PMID:14518730

Wong, Stephen T C; Tjandra, Donny; Wang, Huili; Shen, Weimin

2003-09-01

63

Common Components of Home-Based Family Therapy Models: The HBFT Partnership in Kansas  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we provide an analysis of components shared by varying home-based family therapy (HBFT) practices and evidence-based\\u000a models. Applying a consistent statewide standard for HBFT presents challenges for the training of therapists from varying\\u000a disciplines, with different levels of experience, and from diverse agencies. We propose focusing on common components across\\u000a existing evidence-based models and discuss the trainings

C. R. Macchi; Nancy OConner

2010-01-01

64

Individual and Common Components of the Social Environment at Work and Psychological Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interpretations of correlational research on the social origins of psychological well-being are limited by the possibility of reciprocal influences between persons and their social situations and by respondent bias. These issues are addressed in a study of the relation between the social environment at work and mental health. Two components of a social environment were measured: a common social environment,

Rena L. Repetti

1987-01-01

65

Statistical intercomparison of global climate models: A common principal component approach with application to GCM data  

SciTech Connect

Variables describing atmospheric circulation and other climate parameters derived from various GCMs and obtained from observations can be represented on a spatio-temporal grid (lattice) structure. The primary objective of this paper is to explore existing as well as some new statistical methods to analyze such data structures for the purpose of model diagnostics and intercomparison from a statistical perspective. Among the several statistical methods considered here, a new method based on common principal components appears most promising for the purpose of intercomparison of spatio-temporal data structures arising in the task of model/model and model/data intercomparison. A complete strategy for such an intercomparison is outlined. The strategy includes two steps. First, the commonality of spatial structures in two (or more) fields is captured in the common principal vectors. Second, the corresponding principal components obtained as time series are then compared on the basis of similarities in their temporal evolution.

Sengupta, S.K.; Boyle, J.S.

1993-05-01

66

Origin of the Genetic Components of the Vomeronasal System in the Common Ancestor of all Extant Vertebrates  

E-print Network

Origin of the Genetic Components of the Vomeronasal System in the Common Ancestor of all Extant components of the present-day VNS existed in the common ancestor of all extant vertebrates. Additionally, all these morphological characters are found only in tetrapods, the VNS was thought to have evolved in the common ancestor of

Zhang, Jianzhi

67

Identifying common components across biological network graphs using a bipartite data model  

PubMed Central

The GeneWeaver bipartite data model provides an efficient means to evaluate shared molecular components from sets derived across diverse species, disease states and biological processes. In order to adapt this model for examining related molecular components and biological networks, such as pathway or gene network data, we have developed a means to leverage the bipartite data structure to extract and analyze shared edges. Using the Pathway Commons database we demonstrate the ability to rapidly identify shared connected components among a diverse set of pathways. In addition, we illustrate how results from maximal bipartite discovery can be decomposed into hierarchical relationships, allowing shared pathway components to be mapped through various parent-child relationships to help visualization and discovery of emergent kernel driven relationships. Interrogating common relationships among biological networks and conventional GeneWeaver gene lists will increase functional specificity and reliability of the shared biological components. This approach enables self-organization of biological processes through shared biological networks. PMID:25374613

2014-01-01

68

Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X{sub 35}-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

Inui, Ken [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan) [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Sagane, Yoshimasa [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Miyata, Keita [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan) [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Suzuki, Tomonori [Department of Bacteriology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)] [Department of Bacteriology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Shikamori, Yasuyuki [Agilent Technologies International Japan, Ltd. Takaura-cho 9-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan)] [Agilent Technologies International Japan, Ltd. Takaura-cho 9-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan); Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-watana@bioindustry.nodai.ac.jp [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)

2012-03-16

69

Myogenic Satellite Cell Proliferative and Differentiative Responses to Components of Common Oral Ergogenic Supplements  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the ability of common ergogenic supplement components to alter satellite cell proliferative activity in vitro. Compounds studied were cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, L-glutathione, ?-hydroxybutyric acid, calcium-?-hydroxy-?-methylbutyrate monohydrate, DL-thioctic acid (?-lipoic acid), and ornithine ?-ketoglutarate. Satellite cells were exposed to different levels of ergogenic test compound for a specified amount of time and analyzed by counting mononucleated and

MELINDA E. FERNYHOUGH; DERI L. HELTERLINE; JAN L. VIERCK; MICHAEL V. DODSON; LUKE R. BUCCI; JEFF Feliciano

2004-01-01

70

Fitness and genetic architecture of parent and hybrid willows in common gardens.  

PubMed

Models of hybrid zone dynamics incorporate different patterns of hybrid fitness relative to parental species fitness. An important but understudied source of variation underlying these fitness differences is the environment. We investigated the performance of two willow species and their F1, F2, and backcross hybrids using a common-garden experiment with six replicated gardens that differed in soil moisture. Aboveground biomass, catkin production, seed production per catkin, and seed germination rate were significantly different among genetic classes. For aboveground biomass and catkin production, hybrids generally had intermediate or inferior performance compared to parent species. Salix eriocephala had the highest performance for all performance measures, but in two gardens F, plants had superior or equal performance for aboveground biomass and female catkin production. Salix eriocephala and backcrosses to S. eriocephala had the highest numbers of filled seeds per catkin and the highest estimates of total fitness in all gardens. Measures of filled seeds per catkin and germination rate tend to support the model of endogenous hybrid unfitness, and these two measures had major effects on estimates of total seed production per catkin. We also estimated how the two willow species differ genetically in these fitness measures using line cross analysis. We found a complex genetic architecture underlying the fitness differences between species that involved additive, dominance, and epistatic genetic effects for all fitness measures. The environment was important in the expression of these genetic differences, because the type of epistasis differed among the gardens for above-ground biomass and for female catkin production. These findings suggest that fine-scale environmental variation can have a significant impact on hybrid fitness in hybrid zones where parents and hybrids are widely interspersed. PMID:16892972

Fritz, Robert S; Hochwender, Cris G; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Czesak, Mary Ellen

2006-06-01

71

An approximate method for optimizing HPC component applications in the presence of multiple component implementations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Common Component Architecture allows com- putational scientists to adopt a component-based architecture for scientific simulation codes. Components, which in the scientific context, usually embody a numerical solution facility or a physical or numerical model, are composed at runtime into a simulation code by loading in an implementation of a component and linking it to others. However, a component may

N. Trebon; J. Ray; S. Shende; R. C. Armstrong; A. Malony

72

Novel precipitatemicrostructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fabrication of Cu components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates exhibits a novel example of precipitatedislocation architecture. Such architectures are seen by optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, to consist generally of equiaxed precipitatedislocation cell-like arrays (13?m) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular

D. A. Ramirez; L. E. Murr; E. Martinez; D. H. Hernandez; J. L. Martinez; B. I. Machado; F. Medina; P. Frigola; R. B. Wicker

2011-01-01

73

Abstract Interfaces for Data Analysis - Component Architecture for Data Analysis Tools  

SciTech Connect

The fast turnover of software technologies, in particular in the domain of interactivity (covering user interface and visualization), makes it difficult for a small group of people to produce complete and polished software-tools before the underlying technologies make them obsolete. At the HepVis '99 workshop, a working group has been formed to improve the production of software tools for data analysis in HENP. Beside promoting a distributed development organization, one goal of the group is to systematically design a set of abstract interfaces based on using modern OO analysis and OO design techniques. An initial domain analysis has come up with several categories (components) found in typical data analysis tools: Histograms, Ntuples, Functions, Vectors, Fitter, Plotter, Analyzer and Controller. Special emphasis was put on reducing the couplings between the categories to a minimum, thus optimizing re-use and maintainability of any component individually. The interfaces have been defined in Java and C++ and implementations exist in the form of libraries and tools using C++ (Anaphe/Lizard, OpenScientist) and Java (Java Analysis Studio). A special implementation aims at accessing the Java libraries (through their Abstract Interfaces) from C++. This paper gives an overview of the architecture and design of the various components for data analysis as discussed in AIDA.

Barrand, Guy

2002-08-20

74

Common variation contributes to the genetic architecture of social communication traits  

PubMed Central

Background Social communication difficulties represent an autistic trait that is highly heritable and persistent during the course of development. However, little is known about the underlying genetic architecture of this phenotype. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study on parent-reported social communication problems using items of the childrens communication checklist (age 10 to 11 years) studying single and/or joint marker effects. Analyses were conducted in a large UK population-based birth cohort (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and their Children, ALSPAC, N = 5,584) and followed-up within a sample of children with comparable measures from Western Australia (RAINE, N = 1364). Results Two of our seven independent top signals (P-discovery <1.0E-05) were replicated (0.009 common polymorphisms to variation in social communication phenotypes. PMID:24047820

2013-01-01

75

Miniaturized Analytical Platforms From Nanoparticle Components: Studies in the Construction, Characterization, and High-Throughput Usage of These Novel Architectures  

SciTech Connect

The scientific community has recently experienced an overall effort to reduce the physical size of many experimental components to the nanometer size range. This size is unique as the characteristics of this regime involve aspects of pure physics, biology, and chemistry. One extensively studied example of a nanometer sized experimental component, which acts as a junction between these three principle scientific theologies, is deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA). These biopolymers not only contain the biological genetic guide to code for the production of life-sustaining materials, but are also being probed by physicists as a means to create electrical circuits and furthermore as controllable architectural and sensor motifs in the chemical disciplines. Possibly the most common nano-sized component between these sciences are nanoparticles composed of a variety of materials. The cross discipline employment of nanoparticles is evident from the vast amount of literature that has been produced from each of the individual communities within the last decade. Along these cross-discipline lines, this dissertation examines the use of several different types of nanoparticles with a wide array of surface chemistries to understand their adsorption properties and to construct unique miniaturized analytical and immunoassay platforms. This introduction will act as a literature review to provide key information regarding the synthesis and surface chemistries of several types of nanoparticles. This material will set the stage for a discussion of assembling ordered arrays of nanoparticles into functional platforms, architectures, and sensors. The introduction will also include a short explanation of the atomic force microscope that is used throughout the thesis to characterize the nanoparticle-based structures. Following the Introduction, four research chapters are presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 examines the self-assembly of polymeric nanoparticles exhibiting a variety of surface chemistries and attempts to deconvolute general adsorption rules for their assembly on various substrates. Chapter 2 extends the usage of self-assembly of polymeric nanoparticles through a layer-by-layer deposition concept and photolithography methodologies to create analytical platforms with a vertical height controlled within the nanometer regime. This platform is then furthered in Chapter 3 by employing this integrated concept as a bio-recognition platform, with the extension of the method to a high-throughput screening system explored. Chapter 4 exploits two different types of nanoparticles, silica and gold, as multiplexed, self-assembled immunoassay sensors. This final research chapter is followed by a general summation and future prospectus section that concludes the dissertation.

Andrew David Pris

2003-08-05

76

Servicing HEP experiments with a complete set of ready integreated and configured common software components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The LCG Applications Area at CERN provides basic software components for the LHC experiments such as ROOT, POOL, COOL which are developed in house and also a set of "external" software packages (70) which are needed in addition such as Python, Boost, Qt, CLHEP, etc. These packages target many different areas of HEP computing such as data persistency, math, simulation, grid computing, databases, graphics, etc. Other packages provide tools for documentation, debugging, scripting languages and compilers. All these packages are provided in a consistent manner on different compilers, architectures and operating systems. The Software Process and Infrastructure project (SPI) [1] is responsible for the continous testing, coordination, release and deployment of these software packages. The main driving force for the actions carried out by SPI are the needs of the LHC experiments, but also other HEP experiments could profit from the set of consistent libraries provided and receive a stable and well tested foundation to build their experiment software frameworks. This presentation will first provide a brief description of the tools and services provided for the coordination, testing, release, deployment and presentation of LCG/AA software packages and then focus on a second set of tools provided for outside LHC experiments to deploy a stable set of HEP related software packages both as binary distribution or from source.

Roiser, Stefan; Gaspar, Ana; Perrin, Yves; Kruzelecki, Karol

2010-04-01

77

Mayo clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES): architecture, component evaluation and applications  

PubMed Central

We aim to build and evaluate an open-source natural language processing system for information extraction from electronic medical record clinical free-text. We describe and evaluate our system, the clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES), released open-source at http://www.ohnlp.org. The cTAKES builds on existing open-source technologiesthe Unstructured Information Management Architecture framework and OpenNLP natural language processing toolkit. Its components, specifically trained for the clinical domain, create rich linguistic and semantic annotations. Performance of individual components: sentence boundary detector accuracy=0.949; tokenizer accuracy=0.949; part-of-speech tagger accuracy=0.936; shallow parser F-score=0.924; named entity recognizer and system-level evaluation F-score=0.715 for exact and 0.824 for overlapping spans, and accuracy for concept mapping, negation, and status attributes for exact and overlapping spans of 0.957, 0.943, 0.859, and 0.580, 0.939, and 0.839, respectively. Overall performance is discussed against five applications. The cTAKES annotations are the foundation for methods and modules for higher-level semantic processing of clinical free-text. PMID:20819853

Masanz, James J; Ogren, Philip V; Zheng, Jiaping; Sohn, Sunghwan; Kipper-Schuler, Karin C; Chute, Christopher G

2010-01-01

78

Optimal Architecture for an Asteroid Mining Mission: System Components and Project Execution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) offer potential profits both in the near-term (mining platinum group metals, or PGMs) and long-term (harvesting water, volatiles and ore to provide the economic backbone for lunar, Martian and other space exploration). The abundance of raw materials in NEAs include: water and other volatiles for life-support and power, nickel, iron and other metals for construction and manufacturing; carbonaceous compounds for ceramics and building materials; and PGMs for fuel cells and numerous applications on Earth. An efficient, flexible and cost-effective mission utilizing adaptable and resilient robotic compo-nents is essential to successfully establish NEA mining as a comer-cial enterprise. This paper presents an optimized architecture, detailing necessary engineering components, task integration between them, and methods to address the more likely problems encountered. Candidate NEAs are suggested that could offer optimal PGM resources and that have already been evaluated by rendezvous mapping. Mission delta-V and propellant selection are based upon launch from and return to LEO. On-site equipment includes AI-guided robotics, with human telecontrol from Earth to minimize risk and cost. A command-control-communication (CCC) unit orbits the NEA, and coordinates four small lander-miners (LMs), each of which acquire and process regolith. Two LMs are specialized for water and volatiles, two for PGM and Ni-Fe ore. A solar-powered unit hydrolyzes water from the NEA into H2 and O2 for use as propellant, and a solar-thermal propulsion unit returns additional water, PGMs and Ni-Fe ore to LEO. The pro-posed architecture emphasizes flexibility, redundancy of critical units, and fail-safes to maximize probability of mission success. Potential problems addressed include: failure of components, varying surface conditions and mineralogic content, fluctuating solar exposure (due to asteroid rotation) and its impact on solar power units, extreme temperature changes, drilling in milli-gravity conditions, handling regolith dust, and managing liquid H2. Mission-enhancing technologies are included that could increase profitability and further accelerate asteroid mining enterprises.

Erickson, Ken R.

2007-01-01

79

A Common Network Architecture Efficiently Implements a Variety of Sparsity-Based Inference Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sparse coding hypothesis has generated significant interest in the computational and theoretical neuroscience communities, but there remain open questions about the exact quantitative form of the sparsity penalty and the implementation of such a coding rule in neurally plausible architectures. The main contribution of this work is to show that a wide variety of sparsity-based probabilistic inference problems proposed

Adam S. Charles; Pierre Garrigues; Christopher J. Rozell

2012-01-01

80

Common object request broker architecture (CORBA)-based security services for the virtual radiology environment.  

PubMed

The US Army Great Plains Regional Medical Command (GPRMC) has a requirement to conform to Department of Defense (DoD) and Army security policies for the Virtual Radiology Environment (VRE) Project. Within the DoD, security policy is defined as the set of laws, rules, and practices that regulate how an organization manages, protects, and distributes sensitive information. Security policy in the DoD is described by the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (TCSEC), Army Regulation (AR) 380-19, Defense Information Infrastructure Common Operating Environment (DII COE), Military Health Services System Automated Information Systems Security Policy Manual, and National Computer Security Center-TG-005, "Trusted Network Interpretation." These documents were used to develop a security policy that defines information protection requirements that are made with respect to those laws, rules, and practices that are required to protect the information stored and processed in the VRE Project. The goal of the security policy is to provide for a C2-level of information protection while also satisfying the functional needs of the GPRMC's user community. This report summarizes the security policy for the VRE and defines the CORBA security services that satisfy the policy. In the VRE, the information to be protected is embedded into three major information components: (1) Patient information consists of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-formatted fields. The patient information resides in the digital imaging network picture archiving and communication system (DIN-PACS) networks in the database archive systems and includes (a) patient demographics; (b) patient images from x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US); and (c) prior patient images and related patient history. (2) Meta-Manager information to be protected consists of several data objects. This information is distributed to the Meta-Manager nodes and includes (a) radiologist schedules; (b) modality worklists; (c) routed case information; (d) DIN-PACS and Composite Health Care system (CHCS) messages, and Meta-Manager administrative and security information; and (e) patient case information. (3) Access control and communications security is required in the VRE to control who uses the VRE and Meta-Manager facilities and to secure the messages between VRE components. The CORBA Security Service Specification version 1.5 is designed to allow up to TCSEC's B2-level security for distributed objects. The CORBA Security Service Specification defines the functionality of several security features: identification and authentication, authorization and access control, security auditing, communication security, nonrepudiation, and security administration. This report describes the enhanced security features for the VRE and their implementation using commercial CORBA Security Service software products. PMID:10847365

Martinez, R; Cole, C; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K

2000-05-01

81

Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders  

PubMed Central

Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disordersattention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10?5). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genescommon to five of six disordersincluded ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 2030% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders. PMID:25414627

Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W.; van der Voet, Monique

2014-01-01

82

This is the JavaBeans API specification. It describes the core specification for the JavaBeans component architecture.  

E-print Network

- ments to java-beans@java.sun.com. To stay in touch with the JavaBeans project, visit our web site atThis is the JavaBeans API specification. It describes the core specification for the JavaBeans component architecture. This version (1.01) of the specification describes the JavaBeans APIs

Demurjian, Steven A.

83

Common components of patch-clamp internal recording solutions can significantly affect protein kinase A activity.  

PubMed

Common components of whole-cell internal recording solutions were tested both in vitro and in patch-clamp experiments for their effects on the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Potassium fluoride (KF), 440 mM trimethylamine chloride and exclusion of bovine serum albumin (BSA) decreased the activity of the enzyme, while ethylene glycol-bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the potassium salts of aspartate, gluconate, methylsulfate and monobasic phosphate increased its activity. Addition of KF to the internal solution produced a hyperpolarizing shift in the V1/2 of Ih channel activation, consistent with the KF-induced reduction of protein kinase A activity. Therefore, consideration of the composition of internal solutions is warranted when studying channel physiology by patch-clamp techniques. PMID:10320738

Vargas, G; Yeh, T Y; Blumenthal, D K; Lucero, M T

1999-05-15

84

Active components of common traditional Chinese medicine decoctions have antioxidant functions.  

PubMed

Many traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) decoctions are proven to have multiple functions in animal production. These decoctions are seldom recognized by the international scientific community because the mechanisms of action are not clearly elucidated. According to TCM theory, Cortex Phellodendri (COP), Rhizoma Atractylodes (RA), Agastache Rugosa (AR), and Gypsum Fibrosum (GF) can be used to formulate a medicinal compound that prevents or cures animal disease caused by heat stress. The aim of this research was to study the regulatory functions of the active components of TCM and to elucidate the effects of different TCM decoctions on antioxidant activity and lipid peroxide content, using in vitro and in vivo models of heat stress. For in vitro experiments, intestinal crypt-like epithelial cell line-6 (IEC-6) cells were employed to evaluate the effects of the active components of COP, RA, AR, and GF. For in vivo experiments, forty-eight 2-mo-old Chinese experimental mini-pigs (7.20 0.02 kg) were randomly assigned to 4 groups: a normal-temperature group (NTG); a high-temperature group (HTG); HTG treated with COP, RA, AR, and GF (1:1:1:1, TCM1); and HTG treated with COP, RA, AR, and GF (1:1:1:0.5, TCM2). Results showed that the active components of the COP, RA, AR, and GF increased (P < 0.05) the proliferation and viability of heat-stressed IEC-6 cells and that the most effective treatment doses of COP alkaloid, RA Aetherolea, Herba Agastachis Aetherolea, and GF water extract were 200, 100, 100, and 200 g/mL, respectively. All 4 active components increased (P < 0.05) superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activities, and glutathione content, and decreased (P < 0.05) malondialdehyde content with respect to the heat-stressed group to concentrations similar to those seen in NTG. In vivo experiments demonstrated that TCM1 and TCM2 improved (P < 0.05) the poor growth performance seen in HTG pigs. The superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activities, and malondialdehyde content in porcine jejunum treated with TCM1 and TCM2 were not different (P > 0.05) from those seen in the NTG and were better (P < 0.05) than results seen in the HTG. Overall, it appeared that TCM2 was more effective than TCM1 in ameliorating the effects of heat stress in pigs. In conclusion, this study revealed that the active components of common TCM decoctions have antioxidant functions. PMID:21571894

Guo, K J; Xu, S F; Yin, P; Wang, W; Song, X Z; Liu, F H; Xu, J Q; Zoccarato, I

2011-10-01

85

Architecture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aspects of decline that affect architecture--enrollment, resources, facility condition, funding, the educator's role, and the architect's role--were discussed by workshop participants. Specific solutions included building conversion, master plans, an energy bond referendum, and a regional school concept. (Author/MLF)

Conroy, Jeffrey

1977-01-01

86

Whole-genome sequencing to understand the genetic architecture of common gene expression and biomarker phenotypes.  

PubMed

Initial results from sequencing studies suggest that there are relatively few low-frequency (<5%) variants associated with large effects on common phenotypes. We performed low-pass whole-genome sequencing in 680 individuals from the InCHIANTI study to test two primary hypotheses: (i) that sequencing would detect single low-frequency-large effect variants that explained similar amounts of phenotypic variance as single common variants, and (ii) that some common variant associations could be explained by low-frequency variants. We tested two sets of disease-related common phenotypes for which we had statistical power to detect large numbers of common variant-common phenotype associations-11 132 cis-gene expression traits in 450 individuals and 93 circulating biomarkers in all 680 individuals. From a total of 11 657 229 high-quality variants of which 6 129 221 and 5 528 008 were common and low frequency (<5%), respectively, low frequency-large effect associations comprised 7% of detectable cis-gene expression traits [89 of 1314 cis-eQTLs at P < 1 10(-06) (false discovery rate ?5%)] and one of eight biomarker associations at P < 8 10(-10). Very few (30 of 1232; 2%) common variant associations were fully explained by low-frequency variants. Our data show that whole-genome sequencing can identify low-frequency variants undetected by genotyping based approaches when sample sizes are sufficiently large to detect substantial numbers of common variant associations, and that common variant associations are rarely explained by single low-frequency variants of large effect. PMID:25378555

Wood, Andrew R; Tuke, Marcus A; Nalls, Mike; Hernandez, Dena; Gibbs, J Raphael; Lin, Haoxiang; Xu, Christopher S; Li, Qibin; Shen, Juan; Jun, Goo; Almeida, Marcio; Tanaka, Toshiko; Perry, John R B; Gaulton, Kyle; Rivas, Manny; Pearson, Richard; Curran, Joanne E; Johnson, Matthew P; Gring, Harald H H; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Blangero, John; Mccarthy, Mark I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N; Singleton, Andrew; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M

2015-03-01

87

Whole-genome sequencing to understand the genetic architecture of common gene expression and biomarker phenotypes  

PubMed Central

Initial results from sequencing studies suggest that there are relatively few low-frequency (<5%) variants associated with large effects on common phenotypes. We performed low-pass whole-genome sequencing in 680 individuals from the InCHIANTI study to test two primary hypotheses: (i) that sequencing would detect single low-frequencylarge effect variants that explained similar amounts of phenotypic variance as single common variants, and (ii) that some common variant associations could be explained by low-frequency variants. We tested two sets of disease-related common phenotypes for which we had statistical power to detect large numbers of common variantcommon phenotype associations11 132 cis-gene expression traits in 450 individuals and 93 circulating biomarkers in all 680 individuals. From a total of 11 657 229 high-quality variants of which 6 129 221 and 5 528 008 were common and low frequency (<5%), respectively, low frequencylarge effect associations comprised 7% of detectable cis-gene expression traits [89 of 1314 cis-eQTLs at P < 1 10?06 (false discovery rate ?5%)] and one of eight biomarker associations at P < 8 10?10. Very few (30 of 1232; 2%) common variant associations were fully explained by low-frequency variants. Our data show that whole-genome sequencing can identify low-frequency variants undetected by genotyping based approaches when sample sizes are sufficiently large to detect substantial numbers of common variant associations, and that common variant associations are rarely explained by single low-frequency variants of large effect. PMID:25378555

Wood, Andrew R.; Tuke, Marcus A.; Nalls, Mike; Hernandez, Dena; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Lin, Haoxiang; Xu, Christopher S.; Li, Qibin; Shen, Juan; Jun, Goo; Almeida, Marcio; Tanaka, Toshiko; Perry, John R. B.; Gaulton, Kyle; Rivas, Manny; Pearson, Richard; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Gring, Harald H. H.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Blangero, John; Mccarthy, Mark I.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N.; Singleton, Andrew; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M

2015-01-01

88

A Flexible Component based Access Control Architecture for OPeNDAP Services  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Network data access services such as OPeNDAP enable widespread access to data across user communities. However, without ready means to restrict access to data for such services, data providers and data owners are constrained from making their data more widely available. Even with such capability, the range of different security technologies available can make interoperability between services and user client tools a challenge. OPeNDAP is a key data access service in the infrastructure under development to support the CMIP5 (Couple Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5). The work is being carried out as part of an international collaboration including the US Earth System Grid and Curator projects and the EU funded IS-ENES and Metafor projects. This infrastructure will bring together Petabytes of climate model data and associated metadata from over twenty modelling centres around the world in a federation with a core archive mirrored at three data centres. A security system is needed to meet the requirements of organisations responsible for model data including the ability to restrict data access to registered users, keep them up to date with changes to data and services, audit access and protect finite computing resources. Individual organisations have existing tools and services such as OPeNDAP with which users in the climate research community are already familiar. The security system should overlay access control in a way which maintains the usability and ease of access to these services. The BADC (British Atmospheric Data Centre) has been working in collaboration with the Earth System Grid development team and partner organisations to develop the security architecture. OpenID and MyProxy were selected at an early stage in the ESG project to provide single sign-on capability across the federation of participating organisations. Building on the existing OPeNDAP specification an architecture based on pluggable server side components has been developed at the BADC. These components filter requests to the service they protect and apply the required authentication and authorisation schemes. Filters have been developed for OpenID and SSL client based authentication. The latter enabling access with MyProxy issued credentials. By preserving a clear separation between the security and application functionality, multiple authentication technologies may be supported without the need for modification to the underlying OPeNDAP application. The software has been developed in the Python programming language securing the Python based OPeNDAP implementation, PyDAP. This utilises the Python WSGI (Web Server Gateway Interface) specification to create distinct security filter components. Work is also currently underway to develop a parallel Java based filter implementation to secure the THREDDS Data Server. Whilst the ability to apply this flexible approach to the server side security layer is important, the development of compatible client software is vital to the take up of these services across a wide user base. To date PyDAP and wget based clients have been tested and work is planned to integrate the required security interface into the netCDF API. This forms part of ongoing collaboration with the OPeNDAP user and development community to ensure interoperability.

Kershaw, Philip; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Cinquini, Luca; Lawrence, Bryan; Pascoe, Stephen; Siebenlist, Frank

2010-05-01

89

Comparing the Magnitude of Two Fractions with Common Components: Which Representations Are Used by 10- and 12-Year-Olds?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested whether 10- and 12-year-olds who can correctly compare the magnitudes of fractions with common components access the magnitudes of the whole fractions rather than only compare the magnitudes of their components. Time for comparing two fractions was predicted by the numerical distance between the whole fractions, suggesting an

Meert, Gaelle; Gregoire, Jacques; Noel, Marie-Pascale

2010-01-01

90

NFRs-Aware Architectural Evolution of Component-Based Chouki Tibermacine  

E-print Network

emphasizes the interest of formally documenting the links binding non- functional requirements the developer of possible effects of an architectural change on non-functional requirements. 1. INTRODUCTION that the architecture of an application is determined by the non-functional require- This material is based upon work

Boyer, Edmond

91

The St. Thomas Common Sense Symposium: Designing Architectures for Human-Level Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: To build a machine that has `common sense' was once a principal goal in the fieldof Artificial Intelligence. But most researchers in recent years have retreated fromthat ambitious aim. Instead, each developed some special technique that coulddeal with some class of problem well, but does poorly at almost everything else.

Marvin Minsky; Push Singh; Aaron Sloman

2004-01-01

92

Quantitative Trait Loci for Root Architecture Traits Correlated with Phosphorus Acquisition in Common Bean  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low soil P availability is a primary constraint to common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Latin America and Africa. Substantial genotypic variation in bean adaptation to low phosphorus (LP) availability has been linked with root traits that enhance the efficiency of soil foraging. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for P accumulation and

Stephen E. Beebe; Marcela Rojas-Pierce; Xiaolong Yan; Matthew W. Blair; Fabio Pedraza; Fernando Muoz; Joe Tohme; Jonathan P. Lynch

2006-01-01

93

Learning common sense knowledge from user interaction and principal component analysis  

E-print Network

In this thesis, I present a system for reasoning with common sense knowledge in multiple natural languages, as part of the Open Mind Common Sense project. The knowledge that Open Mind collects from volunteer contributors ...

Speer, Robert (Robert H.)

2007-01-01

94

Symbolics Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

What is an architecture. In computer systems, an architecture is a specification of an interface. To be dignified by the name architecture, an interface should be designed for a long lifespan and should connect system components maintained by different organizations. Often an architecture is part of a product definition and defines characteristics on which purchasers of that product rely, but

David A. Moon

1987-01-01

95

Synthesizing Communication Middleware from Explicit Connectors in Component Based Distributed Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In component based software engineering, an application is build by composing trusted and reusable units of execution, the\\u000a components. A composition is formed by connecting the components related interfaces. The point of connection, namely the\\u000a connector, is an abstract representation of their interaction. Most component models implementations rely on extensive middleware,\\u000a which handles component interaction and hides matters of heterogeneity

Dietmar Schreiner; Karl M. Gschka

2007-01-01

96

Moving Towards a Common Ground and Flight Data Systems Architecture for NASA's Exploration Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has embarked on an ambitious effort to return man to the moon and then on to Mars. The Exploration Vision requires development of major new space and ground assets and poses challenges well beyond those faced by many of NASA's recent programs. New crewed vehicles must be developed. Compatible supply vehicles, surface mobility modules and robotic exploration capabilities will supplement the manned exploration vehicle. New launch systems will be developed as well as a new ground communications and control infrastructure. The development must take place in a cost-constrained environment and must advance along an aggressive schedule. Common solutions and system interoperability and will be critical to the successful development of the Exploration data systems for this wide variety of flight and ground elements. To this end, NASA has assembled a team of engineers from across the agency to identify the key challenges for Exploration data systems and to establish the most beneficial strategic approach to be followed. Key challenges and the planned NASA approach for flight and ground systems will be discussed in the paper. The described approaches will capitalize on new technologies, and will result in cross-program interoperability between spacecraft and ground systems, from multiple suppliers and agencies.

Rader. Steve; Kearney, Mike; McVittie, Thom; Smith, Dan

2006-01-01

97

Helplets: A Common Sense-Based Collaborative Help Collection and Retrieval Architecture for Web-Enabled Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All computer software systems, whether online or offline, require a help system. Help texts are traditionally written by software development companies and answer targeted questions in the form of how-tos and troubleshooting procedures. However, when the popularity of an application grows, users of the application themselves start adding to the corpus of help for the system in the form of online tutorials. There is, however, one problem with such tutorials. They have no direct link with the software for which they are written. Users have to search the Internet for different tutorials that are usually hosted on dispersed locations, and there is no ideal way of finding the relevant information without ending up with lots of noise in the search results. In this chapter, we describe a model for a help system which enhances this concept using collaborative tagging for categorization of "helplets." For the knowledge retrieval part of the system, we utilize a previously developed technique based on common sense and user personalization. We use a freely available common sense reasoning toolkit for knowledge retrieval. Our architecture can be implemented in Web-based systems as well as in stand-alone desktop applications.

Nauman, Mohammad; Khan, Shahbaz; Khan, Sanaullah

98

An Open Distributed Architecture for Reuse and Integration of Heterogeneous NLP Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shift from Computational Linguistics to Language Engineering is indicative of new trends in NLP. This paper reviews two NLP engineering problems: reuse and integration, while relating these concerns to the larger context of applied NLP. It presents a software architecture which is geared to support the development of a va- riety of large-scale NLP applications: In- formation Retrieval, Corpus

Rmi Zajac; Mark Casper; Nigel Sharples

1997-01-01

99

Variance Component Calculations: Common Methods and Misapplications in the Semiconductor Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calculating variance components is of utmost importance in the semiconductor industry. Often, estimates of product and process variation are needed for both qualification and improvement. Once estimates are obtained, process and product improvement efforts can proceed. In this paper, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method is used to show how variance components are calculated correctly from a fully nested, random

Charles R. Jensen

2002-01-01

100

Behavioral (Feeding) Responses of the Crayfish, Procambarus clarkii , to Natural Dietary Items and Common Components of Formulated Crustacean Feeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have examined the behavioral (feeding) response of Procambarus clarkii to natural dietary items (zooplankton, live fishes, dead fishes, and fish eggs) and common components of formulated feeds used in the aquaculture industry (soybean meal, fish meal, corn meal, alfalfa meal, and vitamin C). The feeding response by P. clarkii was determined using an ordinally ranked, whole-animal bioassay that included

Jennifer L. Kreider; Stephen A. Watts

1998-01-01

101

High-resolution microwave diagnostics of architectural components by particle swarm optimization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a very simple monostatic setup for coherent multifrequency microwave measurements, and an optimization procedure to reconstruct high-resolution permittivity profiles of layered objects from complex reflection coefficients. This system is capable of precisely locating internal inhomogeneities in dielectric bodies, and can be applied to on-site diagnosis of architectural components. While limiting the imaging possibilities to 1D permittivity profiles, the monostatic geometry has an important advantage over multistatic tomographic systems, since these are normally confined to laboratories, and on-site applications are difficult to devise. The sensor is a transmitting-receiving microwave antenna, and the complex reflection coefficients are measured at a number of discrete frequencies over the system passband by using a general-purpose vector network analyzer. A dedicated instrument could also be designed, thus realizing an unexpensive, easy-to-handle system. The profile reconstruction algorithm is based on the optimization of an objective functional that includes a data-fit term and a regularization term. The first consists in the norm of the complex vector difference between the measured data and the data computed by a forward solver from the current estimate of the profile function. The regularization term enforces a piecewise smooth model for the solution, based on two 1D interacting Markov random fields: the intensity field, which models the continuous permittivity values, and the binary line field, which accounts for the possible presence of discontinuities in the profile. The data-fit and the regularization terms are balanced through a tunable regularization coefficient. By virtue of this prior model, the final result is robust against noise, and overcomes the usual limitations in spatial resolution induced by the wavelengths of the probing radiations. Indeed, the accuracy in the location of the discontinuities is only limited by the system noise and the discretization grid used by the forward solver. The algorithm we chose to optimize the objective is based on the particle swarm paradigm. Each feasible solution is coded as a location in a multidimensional space, explored by a number of "particles" each moving with a certain velocity, which is partly random and partly induced by the experience of both the particle itself and the "swarm" of all the other particles. In our case, the search is complicated by the mixed continuous-binary nature of our unknowns, but the swarm intelligence approach maintains the advantage of its intrinsic parallelism. The experimental results we obtained from both simulated and real measurements show that, for typical permittivity values and radiation wavelengths, the spatial resolution is highly improved by the line process. From real measurements in the range 1.7-2.6 GHz, we accurately reconstructed the permittivity values of our test phantom and located the discontinuities within the limits imposed by our discretization grid (with 1.5 mm cell thickness). At present, the applicability of our reconstruction method is still limited by the forward solver, which is based on a cascaded transmission-line model that assumes normal and plane-wave incidence. We are developing a new solver based on a closed-form Green's function in multilayered media, which should enable us to model appropriately both the microwave sensor and the illumination geometry, thus improving the accuracy of the computed reflection coefficients in the objective functional.

Genovesi, Simone; Salerno, Emanuele; Monorchio, Agostino; Manara, Giuliano

2010-05-01

102

Comparing the magnitude of two fractions with common components: which representations are used by 10- and 12-year-olds?  

PubMed

This study tested whether 10- and 12-year-olds who can correctly compare the magnitudes of fractions with common components access the magnitudes of the whole fractions rather than only compare the magnitudes of their components. Time for comparing two fractions was predicted by the numerical distance between the whole fractions, suggesting an access to their magnitude. In addition, we tested whether the relative magnitude of the denominator interferes with the processing of the fraction magnitude and, thus, needs to be inhibited. Response times were slower for fractions with common numerators than for fractions with common denominators, indicating an interference of the magnitude of the denominators with the selection of the larger fraction. A negative priming effect was shown for the comparison of natural numbers primed by fractions with common numerators, suggesting an inhibition of the selection of the larger denominator during the comparison of fractions. In conclusion, children who can correctly compare fractions with common components can access the magnitude of the whole fractions but remain sensitive to the interference of the relative magnitude of the denominators. This study highlights the fact that beyond the interference of natural number knowledge at the conceptual level (called the "whole number bias" by Ni & Zhou, 2005), children need to manage the interference of the magnitude of the denominators (Stroop-like effect). PMID:20627317

Meert, Galle; Grgoire, Jacques; Nol, Marie-Pascale

2010-11-01

103

A Component-Based Architecture for Automation of Protocol-Directed Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The automation of protocol-based care requires reasoning about a patient's situation over time and about how the standard protocol plan can be adapted to address the patient's current clinical situation. The EON architecture brings together (1) a skeletal-planning reasoning method, ESPR, that can determine appropriate clinical interventions by instantiating an abstract protocol specification, (2) a temporal-reasoning system, RSUM, that can

Mark A. Musen; Samson W. Tu; Amar K. Das; Yuval Shahar

1995-01-01

104

Commonality analysis and selection of parents for with-in boll yield components in Upland cotton  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Relationships between lint yield and within-boll yield components are important for genetic improvement of lint yield in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars. F2 plants derived from crosses between germplasm lines and high yielding cultivars were analyzed to determine the contributions of withi...

105

Variance component estimation techniques compared for two mating designs with forest genetic architecture through computer simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer simulation was used to compare minimum variance quadratic estimation (MIVQUE), minimum norm quadratic unbiased estimation (MINQUE), restricted maximum likelihood (REML), maximum likelihood (ML), and Henderson's Method 3 (HM3) on the basis of variance among estimates, mean square error (MSE), bias and probability of nearness for estimation of both individual variance components and three ratios of variance components. The investigation

D. A. Huber; T. L. White; G. R. Hodge

1994-01-01

106

Evaluating Performance of Components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parallel Component Performance Benchmarks is a computer program developed to aid the evaluation of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) - a software architecture, based on a component model, that was conceived to foster high-performance computing, including parallel computing. More specifically, this program compares the performances (principally by measuring computing times) of componentized versus conventional versions of the Parallel Pyramid 2D Adaptive Mesh Refinement library - a software library that is used to generate computational meshes for solving physical problems and that is typical of software libraries in use at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Katz, Daniel; Tisdale, Edwin; Norton, Charles

2004-01-01

107

The molecular architecture of myelin: identification of the external surface membrane components.  

PubMed

Basic information concerning the molecular organization of the myelin membrane is an intrinsic requirement for understanding the neurochemical events leading to myelination, as well as the potential mechanism of demyelination that might exist at the molecular level for a variety of neurological diseases. The application of chemical, enzymatic, fluorescent, and immunological membrane probes has contributed significantly to this end, although the diverse structural complexity of the myelin sheath has permitted only a rudimentary understanding of its molecular organization. Nevertheless, compelling evidence is accumulating which suggests that components of myelin are asymmetrically distributed in the membrane. Such membrane asymmetry should not only provide important clues to the mechanisms of membrane assembly in the process of myelination, but should also serve as a paradigm for potential functional asymmetry of the individual components at the molecular level. One particularly useful membrane probe is galactose oxidase which has the capacity for identifying surface galactose residues in both glycoproteins and glycolipids on the external surface of the myelin sheath. The identification of these surface components on the myelin sheath is of primary importance since such components might be more readily susceptible to immunological damage or act as a viral receptor which ultimately might lead to demyelination. PMID:696473

Poduslo, J F

1978-01-01

108

The post-ejection evolution of the orbital components during a common envelope phase  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of planetary nebulae containing binary cores (BPNe) have become numerous enough to provide constraints on models of common envelope (CE) evolution. The observed orbital period distribution in BPNe is sharply peaked at approximately 0.3 days, similar to the orbital period distribution found in post-CE binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Theoretical orbital period distributions for BPNe calculated using population synthesis techniques peak at longer periods or are too broad, regardless of the choices for various uncertain input parameters. In this talk, I describe a possible resolution of this discrepancy that involves considering further dynamical evolution of the orbit after the envelope has been ejected. If there is sufficient material within the orbit, the frictional interaction between the secondary and this material will continue to drive spiral-in until the inter-orbit material becomes too small to support itself against collapse onto the core of the giant. Attempts to model this post-ejection phase and determine final orbital separations will be discussed. If available, preliminary results, in which such post-ejection orbital evolution is included into population synthesis calculations, will be presented.

Politano, Michael; Provance, Justin

2014-09-01

109

Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets  

DOEpatents

This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

Alman, David E. (Corvallis, OR); Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR); Davis, Daniel L. (Albany, OR)

2011-03-08

110

VLSI architecture of leading eigenvector generation for on-chip principal component analysis spike sorting system  

Microsoft Academic Search

On-chip spike detection and principal component analysis (PCA) sorting hardware in an integrated multi-channel neural recording system is highly desired to ease the bandwidth bottleneck from high-density microelectrode array implanted in the cortex. In this paper, we propose the first leading eigenvector generator, the key hardware module of PCA, to enable the whole framework. Based on the iterative eigenvector distilling

Tung-Chien Chen; Wentai Liu; Liang-Gee Chen

2008-01-01

111

Limits of Principal Components Analysis for Producing a Common Trait Space: Implications for Inferring Selection, Contingency, and Chance in Evolution  

PubMed Central

Background Comparing patterns of divergence among separate lineages or groups has posed an especially difficult challenge for biologists. Recently a new, conceptually simple methodology called the ordered-axis plot approach was introduced for the purpose of comparing patterns of diversity in a common morphospace. This technique involves a combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and linear regression. Given the common use of these statistics the potential for the widespread use of the ordered axis approach is high. However, there are a number of drawbacks to this approach, most notably that lineages with the greatest amount of variance will largely bias interpretations from analyses involving a common morphospace. Therefore, without meeting a set of a priori requirements regarding data structure the ordered-axis plot approach will likely produce misleading results. Methodology/Principal Findings Morphological data sets from cichlid fishes endemic to Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi, and Victoria were used to statistically demonstrate how separate groups can have differing contributions to a common morphospace produced by a PCA. Through a matrix superimposition of eigenvectors (scale-free trajectories of variation identified by PCA) we show that some groups contribute more to the trajectories of variation identified in a common morphospace. Furthermore, through a set of randomization tests we show that a common morphospace model partitions variation differently than group-specific models. Finally, we demonstrate how these limitations may influence an ordered-axis plot approach by performing a comparison on data sets with known alterations in covariance structure. Using these results we provide a set of criteria that must be met before a common morphospace can be reliably used. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that a common morphospace produced by PCA would not be useful for producing biologically meaningful results unless a restrictive set of criteria are met. We therefore suggest biologists be aware of the limitations of the ordered-axis plot approach before employing it on their own data, and possibly consider other, less restrictive methods for addressing the same question. PMID:19956767

Parsons, Kevin J.; Cooper, W. James; Albertson, R. Craig

2009-01-01

112

[Rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine with MRM by LC-MS/MS].  

PubMed

This paper reports the establishment of a method for rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine (paracetamol, aminophenazone, pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, methylephedrine hydrochloride, caffeine, amantadine hydrochloride, phenazone, guaifenesin, chlorphenamine maleate, dextromethorphen hydrobromide, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, promethazine hydrochloride, propyphenazone, benorilate and diclofenac sodium) with MRM by LC-MS/MS. The samples were extracted by methanol and were separated from a Altantis T3 column within 15 min with a gradient of acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (containing 0.25% glacial acetic acid), a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source (ESI) was used in positive ion mode, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was performed for qualitative analysis of these compounds. The minimum detectable quantity were 0.33-2.5 microg x kg(-1) of the 15 compounds. The method is simple, accurate and with good reproducibility for rapid identification many components in the same chromatographic condition, and provides a reference for qualitative analysis illegally added chemicals in anti common cold medicine. PMID:23600148

Jiang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Xi-Ru; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Song, Geng-Shen

2013-01-01

113

Symbolics architecture  

SciTech Connect

What is an architecture. In computer systems, an architecture is a specification of an interface. To be dignified by the name architecture, an interface should be designed for a long lifespan and should connect system components maintained by different organizations. Often an architecture is part of a product definition and defines characteristics on which purchasers of that product rely, but this is not true of everything that is called an architecture. An architecture is more formal than an internal interface between closely-related system components, and has farther-reaching effects on system characteristics and performance. A computer system typically contains many levels and types of architecture. This article discusses three architectures defined in Symbolics computers: (1) System architecture - defines how the system appears to end users and application programmers, including the characteristics of languages, user interface, and operating system. (2) Instruction architecture - defines the instruction set of the machine, the types of data that can be manipulated by those instructions, and the environment in which the instructions operate, for example subroutine calling discipline, virtual memory management, interrupts and exception traps, etc. This is an interface between the compilers and the hardware. (3) Processor architecture - defines the overall structure of the implementation of the instruction architecture. This is an interface between the firmware and the hardware, and is also an interface between the parts of the processor hardware.

Moon, D.A.

1987-01-01

114

The Breakpoint Region of the Most Common Isochromosome, i(17q), in Human Neoplasia Is Characterized by a Complex Genomic Architecture with Large, Palindromic, Low-Copy Repeats  

PubMed Central

Although a great deal of information has accumulated regarding the mechanisms underlying constitutional DNA rearrangements associated with inherited disorders, virtually nothing is known about the molecular processes involved in acquired neoplasia-associated chromosomal rearrangements. Isochromosome 17q, or i(17q), is one of the most common structural abnormalities observed in human neoplasms. We previously identified a breakpoint cluster region for i(17q) formation in 17p11.2 and hypothesized that genome architectural features could be responsible for this clustering. To address this hypothesis, we precisely mapped the i(17q) breakpoints in 11 patients with different hematologic malignancies and determined the genomic structure of the involved region. Our results reveal a complex genomic architecture in the i(17q) breakpoint cluster region, characterized by large (?3849-kb), palindromic, low-copy repeats, strongly suggesting that somatic rearrangements are not random events but rather reflect susceptibilities due to the genomic structure. PMID:14666446

Barbouti, Aikaterini; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Nusbaum, Chad; Cuomo, Christina; Cook, April; Hglund, Mattias; Johansson, Bertil; Hagemeijer, Anne; Park, Sung-Sup; Mitelman, Felix; Lupski, James R.; Fioretos, Thoas

2004-01-01

115

Hardware Architecture Study for NASA's Space Software Defined Radios  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study defines a hardware architecture approach for software defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radio frequency (RF) front-ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that comprise a typical communication radio. This paper describes the architecture details, module definitions, and the typical functions on each module as well as the module interfaces. Trade-offs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify the internal physical implementation within each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

Reinhart, Richard C.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Andro, Monty; Smith, Carl; Liebetreu, John

2008-01-01

116

Experimental study of impact-cratering damage on brittle cylindrical column model as a fundamental component of space architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cylindrical column of brittle material processed from soil and rock is a fundamental component of architectures on the surface of solid bodies in the solar system. One of the most hazardous events for the structure is damaging by hypervelocity impacts by meteoroids and debris. In such a background, cylindrical columns made of plaster of Paris and glass-bead-sintered ceramic were impacted by spherical projectiles of nylon, glass, and steel at velocity of about 1-4.5 km/s. Measured crater radii, depth, and excavated mass expressed by a function of the cylinder radius are similar irrespective of the target material, if those parameters are normalized by appropriate parameters of the crater produced on the flat-surface target. The empirical scaling relations of the normalized crater radii and depth are provided. Using them, crater dimensions and excavated mass of crater on cylindrical surface of any radius can be predicted from the existing knowledge of those for flat surface. Recommendation for the minimum diameter of a cylinder so as to resist against a given impact is provided.

Fujiwara, Akira; Onose, Naomi; Setoh, Masato; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Hiraoka, Kensuke; Hasegawa, Sunao; Okudaira, Kyoko

2014-10-01

117

An Intelligent Architecture Based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays Designed to Detect Moving Objects by Using Principal Component Analysis  

PubMed Central

This paper presents a complete implementation of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithm in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices applied to high rate background segmentation of images. The classical sequential execution of different parts of the PCA algorithm has been parallelized. This parallelization has led to the specific development and implementation in hardware of the different stages of PCA, such as computation of the correlation matrix, matrix diagonalization using the Jacobi method and subspace projections of images. On the application side, the paper presents a motion detection algorithm, also entirely implemented on the FPGA, and based on the developed PCA core. This consists of dynamically thresholding the differences between the input image and the one obtained by expressing the input image using the PCA linear subspace previously obtained as a background model. The proposal achieves a high ratio of processed images (up to 120 frames per second) and high quality segmentation results, with a completely embedded and reliable hardware architecture based on commercial CMOS sensors and FPGA devices. PMID:22163406

Bravo, Ignacio; Mazo, Manuel; Lzaro, Jos L.; Gardel, Alfredo; Jimnez, Pedro; Pizarro, Daniel

2010-01-01

118

Common and unique neural networks for proactive and reactive response inhibition revealed by independent component analysis of functional MRI data.  

PubMed

Response inhibition involves proactive and reactive modes. Proactive inhibition is goal-directed, triggered by warning cues, and serves to restrain actions. Reactive inhibition is stimulus-driven, triggered by salient stop-signals, and used to stop actions completely. Functional MRI studies have identified brain regions that activate during proactive and reactive inhibition. It remains unclear how these brain regions operate in functional networks, and whether proactive and reactive inhibition depend on common networks, unique networks, or a combination. To address this we analyzed a large fMRI dataset (N=65) of a stop-signal task designed to measure proactive and reactive inhibition, using independent component analysis (ICA). We found 1) three frontal networks that were associated with both proactive and reactive inhibition, 2) one network in the superior parietal lobe, which also included dorsal premotor cortex and left putamen, that was specifically associated with proactive inhibition, and 3) two right-lateralized frontal and fronto-parietal networks, including the right inferior frontal gyrus and temporoparietal junction as well as a bilateral fronto-temporal network that were uniquely associated with reactive inhibition. Overlap between networks was observed in dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal cortices. Taken together, we offer a new perspective on the neural underpinnings of inhibitory control, by showing that proactive inhibition and reactive inhibition are supported by a group of common and unique networks that appear to integrate and interact in frontoparietal areas. PMID:25224995

van Belle, Janna; Vink, Matthijs; Durston, Sarah; Zandbelt, Bram B

2014-12-01

119

Plastic and Heritable Components of Phenotypic Variation in Nucella lapillus: An Assessment Using Reciprocal Transplant and Common Garden Experiments  

PubMed Central

Assessment of plastic and heritable components of phenotypic variation is crucial for understanding the evolution of adaptive character traits in heterogeneous environments. We assessed the above in relation to adaptive shell morphology of the rocky intertidal snail Nucella lapillus by reciprocal transplantation of snails between two shores differing in wave action and rearing snails of the same provenance in a common garden. Results were compared with those reported for similar experiments conducted elsewhere. Microsatellite variation indicated limited gene flow between the populations. Intrinsic growth rate was greater in exposed-site than sheltered-site snails, but the reverse was true of absolute growth rate, suggesting heritable compensation for reduced foraging opportunity at the exposed site. Shell morphology of reciprocal transplants partially converged through plasticity toward that of native snails. Shell morphology of F2s in the common garden partially retained characteristics of the P-generation, suggesting genetic control. A maternal effect was revealed by greater resemblance of F1s than F2s to the P-generation. The observed synergistic effects of plastic, maternal and genetic control of shell-shape may be expected to maximise fitness when environmental characteristics become unpredictable through dispersal. PMID:22299035

Pascoal, Sonia; Carvalho, Gary; Creer, Simon; Rock, Jenny; Kawaii, Kei; Mendo, Sonia; Hughes, Roger

2012-01-01

120

A Pan-Cancer Modular Regulatory Network Analysis to Identify Common and Cancer-Specific Network Components  

PubMed Central

Many human diseases including cancer are the result of perturbations to transcriptional regulatory networks that control context-specific expression of genes. A comparative approach across multiple cancer types is a powerful approach to illuminate the common and specific network features of this family of diseases. Recent efforts from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) have generated large collections of functional genomic data sets for multiple types of cancers. An emerging challenge is to devise computational approaches that systematically compare these genomic data sets across different cancer types that identify common and cancer-specific network components. We present a module- and network-based characterization of transcriptional patterns in six different cancers being studied in TCGA: breast, colon, rectal, kidney, ovarian, and endometrial. Our approach uses a recently developed regulatory network reconstruction algorithm, modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), within a stability selection framework to predict regulators for individual genes and gene modules. Our module-based analysis identifies a common theme of immune system processes in each cancer study, with modules statistically enriched for immune response processes as well as targets of key immune response regulators from the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) families. Comparison of the inferred regulatory networks from each cancer type identified a core regulatory network that included genes involved in chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, and immune response. Regulatory network hubs included genes with known roles in specific cancer types as well as genes with potentially novel roles in different cancer types. Overall, our integrated module and network analysis recapitulated known themes in cancer biology and additionally revealed novel regulatory hubs that suggest a complex interplay of immune response, cell cycle, and chromatin remodeling across multiple cancers. PMID:25374456

Knaack, Sara A; Siahpirani, Alireza Fotuhi; Roy, Sushmita

2014-01-01

121

Components of the Plasminogen Activation System Promote Engraftment of Porous Polyethylene Biomaterial via Common and Distinct Effects  

PubMed Central

Rapid fibrovascularization is a prerequisite for successful biomaterial engraftment. In addition to their well-known roles in fibrinolysis, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or their inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have recently been implicated as individual mediators in non-fibrinolytic processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Since these events are critical for fibrovascularization of biomaterial, we hypothesized that the components of the plasminogen activation system contribute to biomaterial engraftment. Employing in vivo and ex vivo microscopy techniques, vessel and collagen network formation within porous polyethylene (PPE) implants engrafted into dorsal skinfold chambers were found to be significantly impaired in uPA-, tPA-, or PAI-1-deficient mice. Consequently, the force required for mechanical disintegration of the implants out of the host tissue was significantly lower in the mutant mice than in wild-type controls. Conversely, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, non-catalytic uPA, or PAI-1, but not with non-catalytic tPA, accelerated implant vascularization in wild-type mice. Thus, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 contribute to the fibrovascularization of PPE implants through common and distinct effects. As clinical perspective, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, or PAI-1 might provide a novel strategy for accelerating the vascularization of this biomaterial. PMID:25658820

Reichel, Christoph A.; Hessenauer, Maximilian E. T.; Pflieger, Kerstin; Rehberg, Markus; Kanse, Sandip M.; Zahler, Stefan; Krombach, Fritz; Berghaus, Alexander; Strieth, Sebastian

2015-01-01

122

GITEWS, an extensible and open integration platform for manifold sensor systems and processing components based on Sensor Web Enablement and the principles of Service Oriented Architectures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) is a multifaceted system consisting of various sensor types like seismometers, sea level sensors or GPS stations, and processing components, all with their own system behavior and proprietary data structure. To operate a warning chain, beginning from measurements scaling up to warning products, all components have to interact in a correct way, both syntactically and semantically. Designing the system great emphasis was laid on conformity to the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) specification by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The technical infrastructure, the so called Tsunami Service Bus (TSB) follows the blueprint of Service Oriented Architectures (SOA). The TSB is an integration concept (SWE) where functionality (observe, task, notify, alert, and process) is grouped around business processes (Monitoring, Decision Support, Sensor Management) and packaged as interoperable services (SAS, SOS, SPS, WNS). The benefits of using a flexible architecture together with SWE lead to an open integration platform: accessing and controlling heterogeneous sensors in a uniform way (Functional Integration) assigns functionality to distinct services (Separation of Concerns) allows resilient relationship between systems (Loose Coupling) integrates services so that they can be accessed from everywhere (Location Transparency) enables infrastructures which integrate heterogeneous applications (Encapsulation) allows combination of services (Orchestration) and data exchange within business processes Warning systems will evolve over time: New sensor types might be added, old sensors will be replaced and processing components will be improved. From a collection of few basic services it shall be possible to compose more complex functionality essential for specific warning systems. Given these requirements a flexible infrastructure is a prerequisite for sustainable systems and their architecture must be tailored for evolution. The use of well-known techniques and widely used open source software implementing industrial standards reduces the impact of service modifications allowing the evolution of a system as a whole. GITEWS implemented a solution to feed sensor raw data from any (remote) system into the infrastructure. Specific dispatchers enable plugging in sensor-type specific processing without changing the architecture. Client components don't need to be adjusted if new sensor-types or individuals are added to the system, because they access them via standardized services. One of the outstanding features of service-oriented architectures is the possibility to compose new services from existing ones. The so called orchestration, allows the definition of new warning processes which can be adapted easily to new requirements. This approach has following advantages: With implementing SWE it is possible to establish the "detection" and integration of sensors via the internet. Thus a system of systems combining early warning functionality at different levels of detail is feasible. Any institution could add both its own components as well as components from third parties if they are developed in conformance to SOA principles. In a federation an institution keeps the ownership of its data and decides which data are provided by a service and when. A system can be deployed at minor costs as a core for own development at any institution and thus enabling autonomous early warning- or monitoring systems. The presentation covers both design and various instantiations (live demonstration) of the GITEWS architecture. Experiences concerning the design and complexity of SWE will be addressed in detail. A substantial amount of attention is laid on the techniques and methods of extending the architecture, adapting proprietary components to SWE services and encoding, and their orchestration in high level workflows and processes. Furthermore the potential of the architecture concerning adaptive behavior, collaboration across boundaries and semantic interoperab

Haener, Rainer; Waechter, Joachim; Fleischer, Jens; Herrnkind, Stefan; Schwarting, Herrmann

2010-05-01

123

Tutorial on single- and two-component two-phase flow and heat transfer: Commonality and difference  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is assessed to what extent the results of two-phase two-component flow and heat transfer research can be usefully applied to support research on the flow and heat transfer in two-phase single-component systems. The latter single-component two-phase systems, envisaged for spacecraft thermal control applications, are Mechanically Pumped and Vapor Pressure Driven Loops, Capillary Pumped Loops, and Loop Heat Pipes. In

A. A. M. Delil

2002-01-01

124

Uncovering the genetic architecture of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum resistance through QTL mapping and epistatic interaction analysis in common bean  

PubMed Central

Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in common bean. Despite the genetics of anthracnose resistance has been studied for a long time, few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) studies have been conducted on this species. The present work examines the genetic basis of quantitative resistance to races 23 and 1545 of C. lindemuthianum in different organs (stem, leaf and petiole). A population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from the cross PMB0225 PHA1037 was evaluated for anthracnose resistance under natural and artificial photoperiod growth conditions. Using multi-environment QTL mapping approach, 10 and 16 main effect QTLs were identified for resistance to anthracnose races 23 and 1545, respectively. The homologous genomic regions corresponding to 17 of the 26 main effect QTLs detected were positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL) proteins. Among them, it is worth noting that the main effect QTLs detected on linkage group 05 for resistance to race 1545 in stem, petiole and leaf were located within a 1.2 Mb region. The NL gene Phvul.005G117900 is located in this region, which can be considered an important candidate gene for the non-organ-specific QTL identified here. Furthermore, a total of 39 epistatic QTL (E-QTLs) (21 for resistance to race 23 and 18 for resistance to race 1545) involved in 20 epistatic interactions (eleven and nine interactions for resistance to races 23 and 1545, respectively) were identified. None of the main and epistatic QTLs detected displayed significant environment interaction effects. The present research provides essential information not only for the better understanding of the plant-pathogen interaction but also for the application of genomic assisted breeding for anthracnose resistance improvement in common bean through application of marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25852706

Gonzlez, Ana M.; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J.; Rodio, A. Paula; De Ron, Antonio M.; Capel, Carmen; Garca-Alczar, Manuel; Lozano, Rafael; Santalla, Marta

2015-01-01

125

architecture architecture urban & regional  

E-print Network

landscape architecture architecture urban & regional planning environment + design college of fine in architectural design, history, building construction, structures, and environmental technology from our for high school students interested in pursuing a career in architecture. Becoming an Architect To become

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

126

Catalytic Site Components Common to Both Splicing Steps of a Group II Intron Author(s): Guillaume Chanfreau and Alain Jacquier  

E-print Network

Catalytic Site Components Common to Both Splicing Steps of a Group II Intron Author(s): GuillaumeManualand Handbook forEscherichia coli and Related Bacteria, J. H. Miller,Eds. (Cold Spring HarborLaboratoryPress, Cold Spring Har- bor, NY, 1992), pp. 2.3-2.43. 13. N. Saitou and M. Nei, Mol. Biol. Evol.4, 406 (1987

Chanfreau, Guillaume

127

CSc 165 Computer Game Architecture and Implementation Spring 2014 -Gordon Assignment #1: Building A Game Using Game Engine Components  

E-print Network

: Building A Game Using Game Engine Components Due: Tuesday, February 25th (2 weeks) The objective of this assignment is to learn how to use game engine components to build a simple 3D game. You are to rely on existing game engine components to supply much of the underlying functionality while implementing some

Gordon, Scott

128

Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) Hardware Architecture Standard: Release 1.0 Hardware Section  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report defines a hardware architecture approach for software-defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general-purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays, and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radiofrequency front ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that compose a typical communication radio. This report describes the architecture details, the module definitions, the typical functions on each module, and the module interfaces. Tradeoffs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify a physical implementation internally on each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John; Hill, Gary; Mortensen, Dale J.; Andro, Monty; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Farrington, Allen

2008-01-01

129

Self-organization by selection: Generation of a metallosupramolecular grid architecture by selection of components in a dynamic library of ligands  

PubMed Central

Self-organization by selection is implemented in the generation of a tetranuclear [2 2] grid-type metallosupramolecular architecture from its components. It occurs through a two-level self-assembly involving two dynamic processes: reversible covalent bound connection and reversible metal ion coordination. Thus, mixing the aminophenol 3, the dialdehyde 4, and zinc acetate generates the grid complex 1a(Zn) via the assembly of the ligand 2a by imine formation and of the grid by zinc(II) binding. When the same process is conducted in a solution containing a mixture of different aminophenol and carbonyl components, the generation of the grid 1a(Zn) drives the selection of the correct components in a virtual dynamic library of ligands, displaying an amplification factor of >100 and a selectivity of >99%. Component exchange as well as reversible protonic modulation of the assembly/disassembly process display the dynamic character of the system and its ability to respond/adapt to changes in environmental conditions. The processes described demonstrate the implementation of a two-level self-organization by selection operating on the dynamic diversity generated by a set of reversibly connected components and driven by the formation of a specific product in a self-design fashion. PMID:14517351

Nitschke, Jonathan R.; Lehn, Jean-Marie

2003-01-01

130

Identifications and limited spectroscopy for Luyten common proper motion stars with probable white dwarf components. I - Pair brighter than 17th magnitude  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Identifications are provided for 103 bright Luyten common proper motion (CPM) stellar systems with m(pg) less than 17.0 mag containing likely white dwarf (WD) components. New spectral types are presented for 55 components, and spectral types for 51 more are available in the literature. With the CPM systems previously published by Giclas et al. (1978), the Luyten stars provide a uniform sample of nearly 200 pairs or multiples brighter than 17h magnitude. Selection effects biasing the combined samples are discussed; in particular, evidence is presented that fewer than 1 percent of wide WD binaries have been detected.

Oswalt, Terry D.; Hintzen, Paul M.; Luyten, Willem J.

1988-01-01

131

Security Aspects of an Enterprise-Wide Network Architecture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of two projects that concern local area networks and the common point between networks as they relate to network security. Discusses security architectures based on firewall components, packet filters, application gateways, security-management components, an intranet solution, user registration by Web form, and requests for

Loew, Robert; Stengel, Ingo; Bleimann, Udo; McDonald, Aidan

1999-01-01

132

Chip-package co-design of common emitter LNA in system-on-package with on-chip versus off-chip passive component analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present common emitter LNAs (low noise amplifiers) in system-on-package for 5GHz WLAN application. Innovation of this module is that it is chip-package co-designed and co-simulated with performance trade-offs for on-chip versus off-chip passive component integration. It thus provides an optimal total solution for embedded RF electronics in system-level integration. Analytical equations for key performance parameters, noise

Xinzhong Duo; Li-Rong Zheng; Hannu Tenhunen

2003-01-01

133

The complement component C5 of the common carp ( Cyprinus carpio ): cDNA cloning of two distinct isotypes that differ in a functional site  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complement component C5 plays important roles in inflammatory responses and complement-mediated cytolysis. In bony fish, although C5 has been identified at the DNA or the protein level in trout, carp and gilthead seabream, only partial C5 sequences are available. The present study was designed to obtain the complete primary structure of C5 from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and

Yoko Kato; Miki Nakao; Junichi Mutsuro; Ioannis K. Zarkadis; Tomoki Yano

2003-01-01

134

SPX1 is an important component in the phosphorus signalling network of common bean regulating root growth and phosphorus homeostasis  

PubMed Central

Proteins containing the SPX domain are believed to play vital roles in the phosphorus (P) signalling network in plants. However, the functions of SPX proteins in legumes remain largely unknown. In this study, three SPX members, PvSPX1PvSPX3 were cloned from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). It was found that the transcripts of all three PvSPX members were significantly enhanced in both bean leaves and roots by phosphate (Pi) starvation. Among them, the expression of nuclear localized PvSPX1 showed more sensitive and rapid responses to Pi starvation. Consistently, only overexpression of PvSPX1 resulted in increased root P concentration and modified morphology of transgenic bean hairy roots, such as inhibited root growth and an enlarged root hair zone. It was further demonstrated that PvSPX1 transcripts were up-regulated by overexpressing PvPHR1, and overexpressing PvSPX1 led to increased transcripts of 10 Pi starvation-responsive genes in transgenic bean hairy roots. Taken together, it is suggested that PvSPX1 is a positive regulator in the P signalling network of common bean, and is downstream of PvPHR1. PMID:24790114

Yao, Zhu-Fang; Liang, Cui-Yue; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Xiao, Bi-Xian; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

2014-01-01

135

Distinguishing the common components of oil- and water-based metalworking fluids for assessment of cancer incidence risk in autoworkers  

PubMed Central

Background Metalworking fluids (MWF) straight, soluble, and synthetic have overlapping components. We derived constituent-based metrics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), water-based MWF, biocides, and nitrosamines to account for this overlap and examined their relations with cancer incidence. Methods An autoworkers cohort of 30,000 was followed for cancer incidence. Hazard ratios were estimated for each cancer and cumulative exposure (lagged) to each new metric; soluble MWF contributed variably to several metrics with weight k=01. Results For most cancer sites, the constituent-based metrics resulted in stronger exposure-disease associations than the MWF classes alone. Laryngeal and bladder cancer were most strongly associated with PAH (k=0). Protective effects for stomach and lung cancer were observed with biocide, a component that may be a surrogate for endotoxin. Conclusions Our findings provide support and clarification of possible etiologies for previous positive associations and provide support for distinguishing exposure from oil- and water-based MWF in epidemiologic studies. PMID:21328414

Friesen, Melissa C; Costello, Sadie; Thurston, Sally W; Eisen, Ellen A

2012-01-01

136

Architecture 2030  

E-print Network

Architecture 2030 AIA Houston + 2030 series The data in this presentation is from Architecture 2030, all the information can be found on their website: www.architecture2030.org The 2030 Challenge The 2030 Challenge Architecture2030.org... Architecture2030.org Architecture2030.org The Problem Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org Energy Architecture2030.org Energy Architecture2030.org...

Reihl, K.; Tullos, A.

2012-01-01

137

A Reference Architecture for Space Information Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe a reference architecture for space information management systems that elegantly overcomes the rigid design of common information systems in many domains. The reference architecture consists of a set of flexible, reusable, independent models and software components that function in unison, but remain separately managed entities. The main guiding principle of the reference architecture is to separate the various models of information (e.g., data, metadata, etc.) from implemented system code, allowing each to evolve independently. System modularity, systems interoperability, and dynamic evolution of information system components are the primary benefits of the design of the architecture. The architecture requires the use of information models that are substantially more advanced than those used by the vast majority of information systems. These models are more expressive and can be more easily modularized, distributed and maintained than simpler models e.g., configuration files and data dictionaries. Our current work focuses on formalizing the architecture within a CCSDS Green Book and evaluating the architecture within the context of the C3I initiative.

Mattmann, Chris A.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Hughes, J. Steven; Ramirez, Paul M.; Berrios, Daniel C.

2006-01-01

138

Architecture College of Architecture  

E-print Network

Architecture College of Architecture S.R. Crown Hall 3360 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60616 312 of History and Theory: Sean Keller Director of Master of Science in Architecture: Vedran Mimica Director of Master of Landscape Architecture Program: Marshall Brown Director of Studios: Frank Flury Director

Heller, Barbara

139

Particulate matter components and subclinical atherosclerosis: common approaches to estimating exposure in a Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Concentrations of outdoor fine particulate matter (PM2.5) have been associated with cardiovascular disease. PM2.5 chemical composition may be responsible for effects of exposure to PM2.5. Methods Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) collected in 20002002 on 6,256 US adults without clinical cardiovascular disease in six U.S. metropolitan areas, we investigated cross-sectional associations of estimated long-term exposure to total PM2.5 mass and PM2.5 components (elemental carbon [EC], organic carbon [OC], silicon and sulfur) with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcium [CAC] and right common carotid intima-media thickness [CIMT]). Community monitors deployed for this study from 2007 to 2008 were used to estimate exposures at baseline addresses using three commonly-used approaches: (1) nearest monitor (the primary approach), (2) inverse-distance monitor weighting and (3) city-wide average. Results Using the exposure estimate based on nearest monitor, in single-pollutant models, increased OC (effect estimate [95% CI] per IQR: 35.1 ?m [26.8, 43.3]), EC (9.6 ?m [3.6,15.7]), sulfur (22.7 ?m [15.0,30.4]) and total PM2.5 (14.7 ?m [9.0,20.5]) but not silicon (5.2 ?m [?9.8,20.1]), were associated with increased CIMT; in two-pollutant models, only the association with OC was robust to control for the other pollutants. Findings were generally consistent across the three exposure estimation approaches. None of the PM measures were positively associated with either the presence or extent of CAC. In sensitivity analyses, effect estimates for OC and silicon were particularly sensitive to control for metropolitan area. Conclusion Employing commonly-used exposure estimation approaches, all of the PM2.5 components considered, except silicon, were associated with increased CIMT, with the evidence being strongest for OC; no component was associated with increased CAC. PM2.5 chemical components, or other features of the sources that produced them, may be important in determining the effect of PM exposure on atherosclerosis. These cross-sectional findings await confirmation in future work employing longitudinal outcome measures and using more sophisticated approaches to estimating exposure. PMID:23641873

2013-01-01

140

Computational Modeling of Brain Processes for Agent Architectures: Issues and Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Cognitive architectures are integrative frameworks that include a series of components that interoperate to generate a variety\\u000a of behaviors in autonomous agents. Commonly, such components attempt to synthesize the operations and architecture of brain\\u000a functions, such as perception and emotions. To carry out this, they embody computational models whose development is based\\u000a on theories explaining cognitive and affective functions as

Luis-Felipe Rodrguez; Flix Ramos; Gregorio Garca

141

Phosphorus runoff from a phosphorus deficient soil under common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) genotypes with contrasting root architecture  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Selection of plant materials on the basis of root characteristics is key to improving nutrient and water use efficiency in low-input farming systems. Crop genotypes with superior root architecture can make more efficient use of available soil resources and, through improved growth, may also lower er...

142

Reference Avionics Architecture for Lunar Surface Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Developing and delivering infrastructure capable of supporting long-term manned operations to the lunar surface has been a primary objective of the Constellation Program in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Several concepts have been developed related to development and deployment lunar exploration vehicles and assets that provide critical functionality such as transportation, habitation, and communication, to name a few. Together, these systems perform complex safety-critical functions, largely dependent on avionics for control and behavior of system functions. These functions are implemented using interchangeable, modular avionics designed for lunar transit and lunar surface deployment. Systems are optimized towards reuse and commonality of form and interface and can be configured via software or component integration for special purpose applications. There are two core concepts in the reference avionics architecture described in this report. The first concept uses distributed, smart systems to manage complexity, simplify integration, and facilitate commonality. The second core concept is to employ extensive commonality between elements and subsystems. These two concepts are used in the context of developing reference designs for many lunar surface exploration vehicles and elements. These concepts are repeated constantly as architectural patterns in a conceptual architectural framework. This report describes the use of these architectural patterns in a reference avionics architecture for Lunar surface systems elements.

Somervill, Kevin M.; Lapin, Jonathan C.; Schmidt, Oron L.

2010-01-01

143

The Ubiquitous Nature of Epistasis in Determining Susceptibility to Common Human Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is increasing awareness that epistasis or gene-gene interaction plays a role in susceptibility to common human diseases. In this paper, we formulate a working hypothesis that epistasis is a ubiquitous component of the genetic architecture of common human diseases and that complex interactions are more important than the independent main effects of any one susceptibility gene. This working hypothesis

Jason H. Moore

2003-01-01

144

A Reference Architecture for Situated Multiagent Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A reference architecture integrates a set of architectural pat- terns that have proven their value for a family of applications. Such fam- ily of applications is characterized by specific functionality and quality requirements. A reference architecture provides a blueprint for develop- ing software architectures for applications that share that common base. As such, a reference architecture provides a means for

Danny Weyns; Tom Holvoet

2006-01-01

145

STRATEGIESEMPLOYERSAREAS ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

STRATEGIESEMPLOYERSAREAS ARCHITECTURE RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE Description: Designing new homes or renovat- ing existing ones for either single or multiple families. Architecture firms Real estate Housing COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE Private Industry Public/Government Description: Designing office buildings

Escher, Christine

146

Mapping genomic loci for cotton plant architecture, yield components, and fiber properties in an interspecific (Gossypium hirsutum L. G. barbadense L.) RIL population.  

PubMed

A quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was conducted to better understand the genetic control of plant architecture (PA), yield components (YC), and fiber properties (FP) in the two cultivated tetraploid species of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. and G. barbadense L.). One hundred and fifty-nine genomic regions were identified on a saturated genetic map of more than 2,500 SSR and SNP markers, constructed with an interspecific recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from the genetic standards of the respective cotton species (G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 G. barbadense acc. 3-79). Using the single nonparametric and MQM QTL model mapping procedures, we detected 428 putative loci in the 159 genomic regions that confer 24 cotton traits in three diverse production environments [College Station F&B Road (FB), TX; Brazos Bottom (BB), TX; and Shafter (SH), CA]. These putative QTL loci included 25 loci for PA, 60 for YC, and 343 for FP, of which 3, 12, and 60, respectively, were strongly associated with the traits (LOD score ? 3.0). Approximately 17.7 % of the PA putative QTL, 32.9 % of the YC QTL, and 48.3 % of the FP QTL had trait associations under multiple environments. The At subgenome (chromosomes 1-13) contributed 72.7 % of loci for PA, 46.2 % for YC, and 50.4 % for FP while the Dt subgenome (chromosomes 14-26) contributed 27.3 % of loci for PA, 53.8 % for YC, and 49.6 % for FP. The data obtained from this study augment prior evidence of QTL clusters or gene islands for specific traits or biological functions existing in several non-homoeologous cotton chromosomes. DNA markers identified in the 159 genomic regions will facilitate further dissection of genetic factors underlying these important traits and marker-assisted selection in cotton. PMID:25314923

Yu, John Z; Ulloa, Mauricio; Hoffman, Steven M; Kohel, Russell J; Pepper, Alan E; Fang, David D; Percy, Richard G; Burke, John J

2014-12-01

147

The Software Architecture of Global Climate Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has become common to compare and contrast the output of multiple global climate models (GCMs), such as in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). However, intercomparisons of the software architecture of GCMs are almost nonexistent. In this qualitative study of seven GCMs from Canada, the United States, and Europe, we attempt to fill this gap in research. We describe the various representations of the climate system as computer programs, and account for architectural differences between models. Most GCMs now practice component-based software engineering, where Earth system components (such as the atmosphere or land surface) are present as highly encapsulated sub-models. This architecture facilitates a mix-and-match approach to climate modelling that allows for convenient sharing of model components between institutions, but it also leads to difficulty when choosing where to draw the lines between systems that are not encapsulated in the real world, such as sea ice. We also examine different styles of couplers in GCMs, which manage interaction and data flow between components. Finally, we pay particular attention to the varying levels of complexity in GCMs, both between and within models. Many GCMs have some components that are significantly more complex than others, a phenomenon which can be explained by the respective institution's research goals as well as the origin of the model components. In conclusion, although some features of software architecture have been adopted by every GCM we examined, other features show a wide range of different design choices and strategies. These architectural differences may provide new insights into variability and spread between models.

Alexander, K. A.; Easterbrook, S. M.

2011-12-01

148

Formalizing architectural connection  

Microsoft Academic Search

As software systems become more complex the overall system structure or software architecture becomes a central design problem. An important step towards an engineering discipline of sofware is a formal basis for describing and analyzing these designs. In this paper we present a theory for one aspect of architectural description: the interactions between components. The key idea is

Robert B. Allen; David Garlan

1994-01-01

149

An SNP-guided microRNA map of fifteen common human disorders identifies a consensus disease phenocode aiming at principal components of the nuclear import pathway.  

PubMed

Recent large-scale genome-wide association (GWA) studies of SNP variations captured many thousands individual genetic profiles of H. sapiens and facilitated identification of significant genetic traits which are highly likely to influence the pathogenesis of several major human diseases. Here we apply the integrative genomics principles to interrogate relationships between structural features and gene expression patterns of disease-linked SNPs, microRNAs and mRNAs of protein-coding genes in association to phenotypes of 15 major human disorders, namely bipolar disease (BD); rheumatoid arthritis (RA); coronary artery disease (CAD); Crohn's disease (CD); type 1 diabetes (T1D); type 2 diabetes (T2D); hypertension (HT); ankylosing spondylitis (AS); Graves' disease (autoimmune thyroid disease; AITD); multiple sclerosis (MS); breast cancer (BC); prostate cancer (PC); systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); vitiligo-associated multiple autoimmune disease (VIT); and ulcerative colitis (UC). We selected for sequence homology profiling a set of approximately 250 SNPs which were unequivocally associated with common human disorders based on multiple independent studies of 220,124 individual samples comprising 85,077 disease cases and 129,506 controls. Our analysis reveals a systematic primary sequence homology/complementarity-driven pattern of associations between disease-linked SNPs, microRNAs and protein-coding mRNAs defined here as a human disease phenocode. We utilize this approach to draw SNP-guided microRNA maps of major human diseases and define a consensus disease phenocode for fifteen major human disorders. A consensus disease phenocode comprises 72 SNPs and 18 microRNAs with an apparent propensity to target mRNA sequences derived from a single protein-coding gene, KPNA1. Each of microRNAs in this elite set appears linked to at least three common human diseases and has potential protein-coding mRNA targets among the principal components of the nuclear import pathway. We confirmed the validity of our findings by analyzing independent sets of most significant disease-linked SNPs and demonstrating statistically significant KPNA1-gene expression phenotypes associated with human genotypes of CD, BD, T2D and RA populations. Our analysis supports the idea that variations in DNA sequences associated with multiple human diseases may affect phenotypes in trans via non-protein-coding RNA intermediaries interfering with functions of microRNAs and defines the nuclear import pathway as a potential major target in 15 common human disorders. PMID:18719369

Glinsky, Gennadi V

2008-08-15

150

Introduction The idea of architecture  

E-print Network

Introduction The idea of architecture What cognitve behaviors have in common Behavior as movement through problem spaces Tying the content to the architecture Memory, perception, action and cognition Detecting a lack of knowledge Learning The SOAR architecture in review Introduction to SOAR based on

Bremen, Universität

151

Towards a Domain Specific Software Architecture for Scientific Data Distribution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A reference architecture is a "design that satisfies a clearly distinguished subset of the functional capabilities identified in the reference requirements within the boundaries of certain design and implementation constraints, also identified in reference requirements." [Tracz, 1995] Recognizing the value of a reference architecture, NASA's ESDSWG's Standards Process Group (SPG) is introducing a multi-disciplinary science data systems (SDS) reference architecture in order to provide an implementation neutral, template solution for an architecture to support scientific data systems in general [Burnett, et al, 2011]. This reference architecture describes common features and patterns in scientific data systems, and can thus provide guidelines in building and improving such systems. But, guidelines alone may not be sufficient to actually build a system. A domain specific software architecture (DSSA) is "an assemblage of software components, specialized for a particular type of task (domain), generalized for effective use across that domain, composed in a standardized structure (topology) effective for building successful applications." [Tracz, 1995]. It can be thought of as relatively specific reference architecture. The "DSSA Process" is a software life cycle developed at Carnegie Melon's Software Engineering Institute that is based on the development and use of domain-specific software architectures, components, and tools. The process has four distinct activities: 1) develop a domain specific base/model, 2) populate and maintain the library, 3) build applications, 4) operate and maintain applications [Armitage, 1993]. The DSSA process may provide the missing link between guidelines and actual system construction. In this presentation we focus specifically on the realm of scientific data access and distribution. Assuming the role of domain experts in building data access systems, we report the results of creating a DSSA for scientific data distribution. We describe the resulting domain model and our efforts towards building a heterogenous, multi-"vendor" architecture framework for data distribution based on that model. We draw on experiences and lessons learned supporting data access and distribution for multiple projects having common functionality but also unique details.

Wilson, A.; Lindholm, D. M.

2011-12-01

152

Extracellular Matrix Remodeling: The Common Denominator in Connective Tissue DiseasesPossibilities for Evaluation and Current Understanding of the Matrix as More Than a Passive Architecture, but a Key Player in Tissue Failure  

PubMed Central

Abstract Increased attention is paid to the structural components of tissues. These components are mostly collagens and various proteoglycans. Emerging evidence suggests that altered components and noncoded modifications of the matrix may be both initiators and drivers of disease, exemplified by excessive tissue remodeling leading to tissue stiffness, as well as by changes in the signaling potential of both intact matrix and fragments thereof. Although tissue structure until recently was viewed as a simple architecture anchoring cells and proteins, this complex grid may contain essential information enabling the maintenance of the structure and normal functioning of tissue. The aims of this review are to (1) discuss the structural components of the matrix and the relevance of their mutations to the pathology of diseases such as fibrosis and cancer, (2) introduce the possibility that post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as protease cleavage, citrullination, cross-linking, nitrosylation, glycosylation, and isomerization, generated during pathology, may be unique, disease-specific biochemical markers, (3) list and review the range of simple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that have been developed for assessing the extracellular matrix (ECM) and detecting abnormal ECM remodeling, and (4) discuss whether some PTMs are the cause or consequence of disease. New evidence clearly suggests that the ECM at some point in the pathogenesis becomes a driver of disease. These pathological modified ECM proteins may allow insights into complicated pathologies in which the end stage is excessive tissue remodeling, and provide unique and more pathology-specific biochemical markers. PMID:23046407

Nielsen, Mette J.; Sand, Jannie M.; Henriksen, Kim; Genovese, Federica; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Smith, Victoria; Adamkewicz, Joanne I.; Christiansen, Claus; Leeming, Diana J.

2013-01-01

153

Performance Measurement and Modeling of Component Applications in a High Performance Computing Environment: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. We present a case study of performance measurement and modeling of a CCA (common component architecture) component-based application in a high performance computing environment. Component-based HPC applications allow the possibility of creating component-level performance models and synthesizing them into application performance models. However, they impose the restriction that performance measurement\\/monitoring needs to be done in a

Jaideep Ray; Nick Trebon; Robert C. Armstrong; Sameer Shende; Allen D. Malony

2004-01-01

154

The NASA Integrated Information Technology Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document defines an Information Technology Architecture for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), where Information Technology (IT) refers to the hardware, software, standards, protocols and processes that enable the creation, manipulation, storage, organization and sharing of information. An architecture provides an itemization and definition of these IT structures, a view of the relationship of the structures to each other and, most importantly, an accessible view of the whole. It is a fundamental assumption of this document that a useful, interoperable and affordable IT environment is key to the execution of the core NASA scientific and project competencies and business practices. This Architecture represents the highest level system design and guideline for NASA IT related activities and has been created on the authority of the NASA Chief Information Officer (CIO) and will be maintained under the auspices of that office. It addresses all aspects of general purpose, research, administrative and scientific computing and networking throughout the NASA Agency and is applicable to all NASA administrative offices, projects, field centers and remote sites. Through the establishment of five Objectives and six Principles this Architecture provides a blueprint for all NASA IT service providers: civil service, contractor and outsourcer. The most significant of the Objectives and Principles are the commitment to customer-driven IT implementations and the commitment to a simpler, cost-efficient, standards-based, modular IT infrastructure. In order to ensure that the Architecture is presented and defined in the context of the mission, project and business goals of NASA, this Architecture consists of four layers in which each subsequent layer builds on the previous layer. They are: 1) the Business Architecture: the operational functions of the business, or Enterprise, 2) the Systems Architecture: the specific Enterprise activities within the context of IT systems, 3) the Technical Architecture: a common, vendor-independent framework for design, integration and implementation of IT systems and 4) the Product Architecture: vendor=specific IT solutions. The Systems Architecture is effectively a description of the end-user "requirements". Generalized end-user requirements are discussed and subsequently organized into specific mission and project functions. The Technical Architecture depicts the framework, and relationship, of the specific IT components that enable the end-user functionality as described in the Systems Architecture. The primary components as described in the Technical Architecture are: 1) Applications: Basic Client Component, Object Creation Applications, Collaborative Applications, Object Analysis Applications, 2) Services: Messaging, Information Broker, Collaboration, Distributed Processing, and 3) Infrastructure: Network, Security, Directory, Certificate Management, Enterprise Management and File System. This Architecture also provides specific Implementation Recommendations, the most significant of which is the recognition of IT as core to NASA activities and defines a plan, which is aligned with the NASA strategic planning processes, for keeping the Architecture alive and useful.

Baldridge, Tim

1997-01-01

155

STRATEGIESEMPLOYERSAREAS ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

STRATEGIESEMPLOYERSAREAS ARCHITECTURE RESIDENTIALARCHITECTURE Description: Designing new homes or renovat- ing existing ones for either single or multiple families. Architecture firms Real estate-UnitResidential TractHomes Senior/AssitedLiving Remodeling/Renovations COMMERCIAL/INSTITUTIONAL ARCHITECTURE Private

Rock, Chris

156

Foundations for the study of software architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to build the foundation for software architecture. We first develop an intuition for software architecture by appealing to several well-established architectural disciplines. On the basis of this intuition, we present a model of software architecture that consists of three components: elements, form, and rationale. Elements are either processing, data, or connecting elements. Form is

Dewayne E. Perry; Alexander L. Wolf

1992-01-01

157

Standardization and program effect analysis (Study 2.4). Volume 2: Equipment commonality analysis. [cost savings of using flight-proven components in designing spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility and cost savings of using flight-proven components in designing spacecraft were investigated. The components analyzed were (1) large space telescope, (2) stratospheric aerosol and gas equipment, (3) mapping mission, (4) solar maximum mission, and (5) Tiros-N. It is concluded that flight-proven hardware can be used with not-too-extensive modification, and significant savings can be realized. The cost savings for each component are presented.

Shiokari, T.

1975-01-01

158

Molecular Profiling of Isolated Histological Components of Wilms Tumor Implicates a Common Role for the Wnt Signaling Pathway in Kidney and Tumor Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wilms tumor (WT), a tumor composed of three histological components blastema (BL), epithelia and stroma is considered an appropriate model system to study the biological relationship between differentiation and tumorigenesis. To investigate molecular associations between nephrogenesis and WT, the gene expression pattern of individual cellular components was analyzed, using a customized platform containing 4,608 genes. WT gene expression

Mariana Maschietto; Beatriz de Camargo; Helena Brentani; Paul Grundy; Simone T. Sredni; Csar Torres; Louise D. Mota; Isabela W. Cunha; Diogo F. C. Patro; Ceclia M. L. Costa; Fernando A. Soares; Ricardo R. Brentani; Dirce M. Carraro

2008-01-01

159

Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

Naiman, Cynthia G.

2004-01-01

160

Genome-wide association study of agronomic traits in common bean  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a global Andean diversity panel (ADP) of 237 genotypes of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris was conducted to gain insight into the genetic architecture of several agronomic traits controlling phenology, biomass, yield components and seed yield. The panel wa...

161

Microcomponent sheet architecture  

DOEpatents

The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Drost, M. Kevin (Richland, WA); McDonald, Carolyn E. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01

162

Microcomponent sheet architecture  

DOEpatents

The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 14 figs.

Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K..; McDonald, C.E.

1997-03-18

163

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

93 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian.Arch. The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment. The school in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

164

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

165

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

88 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School ofArchitecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in architecture and urban design. Intimate student-faculty interaction, academic freedom, and unre- stricted

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

166

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

97 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

167

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

86 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute liberal education for undergraduates in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

168

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

91 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

169

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

90 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School ofArchitecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in architecture and urban design. Intimate student-faculty interaction, academic freedom, and unre- stricted

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

170

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

91 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute liberal education for undergraduates in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

171

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

89 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The NationalArchitecturalAccreditingBoard,whichisthesoleagencyauthorizedto accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes 2 types of degree: the Bachelor

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

172

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE 51 Architecture  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE 51 College of Architecture www.coa.uncc.edu Dean: Kenneth Lambla Associate. Kazebee Mission. The mission of the College of Architecture (CoA) is to further the discourse between the theory and practice of architecture by the education and training of students, the work and research

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

173

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

1 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

174

Riding the Storm out: Developmental Education Reform as a Key Component of Common Core Implementation. The College Board Advocacy & Policy Center Affinity Network Background Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Common Core State Standards provide a unique opening for K-12 and higher education institutions to work together to ensure that high school students are better prepared for postsecondary education. The college and career readiness assessments will provide educators the opportunities to intervene with students while still in high school to

Vandal, Bruce

2012-01-01

175

Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)  

SciTech Connect

This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

Sussman, Alan [University of Maryland

2014-10-21

176

Breeding value and variance component estimation from data containing inbred individuals: application to gynogenetic families in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under gynogenetic reproduction, offspring receive genes only from their dams and completely homozygous offspring are produced within one generation. When gynogenetic reproduction is applied to fully inbred individuals, homozygous clone lines are produced. A mixed model method was developed for breeding value and variance component estimation in gynogenetic families, which requires the inverse of the numerator relationship matrix. A general

P. Bijma; Arendonk van J. A. M; H. Bovenhuis

1997-01-01

177

Architectural caring. Architectural qualities from a residential property perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

A common definition of architectural qualities in general and the values of the qualities in particular can differ significantly in the understanding of different operators in the building construction sector. One platform to define and investigate architectural qualities is to use a property management perspective and focus on the tenants and their individual well-being in the accommodation. In this study,

Ulf Nordwall; Thomas Olofsson

2011-01-01

178

An exploration of architectural innovation in professional service firms  

E-print Network

Architectural innovation is achieved using architectural knowledge to reconfigure an established system to link together components in a new way that provides a competitive advantage. Components in professional service ...

Espinosa Vasconcelos, Fernando (Francisco Fernando)

2007-01-01

179

Genetic, Common Environment, and Individual Specific Components of Variance for Bone Mineral Density in 10- to 26Yearold Females: A Twin Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lean mass and areal bone mineral density at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total forearm were measured in 215 volunteer female twin pairs (122 monozygotic, 93 dizygotic), aged 10-26 years, using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The study was conducted in Melbourne from 1990 to1994. Under the classic twin model, there was evidence for a genetic component of variation in

John L. Hopper; Robyn M. Green; Carol A. Nowson; Doris Young; A. Jane Sherwin; Bahtiyar Kaymakci; Richard G. Larkins; John D. Wark

180

Validity of the mental health component scale of the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (MCS12) as measure of common mental disorders in the general population  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the screening utility of the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey's (SF-12) mental health component scale (MCS-12) for diagnosable depression and anxiety disorders in a general population sample, and thus, the validity of this scale as a measure of mental health in epidemiological research. Data were from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (N=10,504). Diagnoses were

Sarah C. Gill; Peter Butterworth; Bryan Rodgers; Andrew Mackinnon

2007-01-01

181

Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

1993-01-01

182

Architecture & Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the

Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

2010-01-01

183

Witherspoon Architecture  

E-print Network

Garden 122 Labyrinth Books Theatre 114 Architecture 1879 Marx Woolworth Prospect House Prospect Gardens Carnegie Jadwin Gym Architecture Lab Caldwell Fieldhouse DeNunzio Pool Elementary Particle Labs Fitz, F2 Art Museum G4 Auditoriums: Betts, Architecture School, H3 Dodds, Robertson Hall, I4 Helm, 50 Mc

184

Witherspoon Architecture  

E-print Network

Burr Garden Theatre 114 Architecture 1879 Marx Woolworth Prospect House Prospect Gardens Lockhart Shea Rowing Center Class of 1887 Boathouse Lake Carnegie Jadwin Gym Architecture Lab Caldwell Association (Maclean House, F2) Art Museum (G4) Auditoriums: Betts (Architecture School, H3) Dodds (Robertson

185

Power system commonality study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A limited top level study was completed to determine the commonality of power system/subsystem concepts within potential lunar and Mars surface power system architectures. A list of power system concepts with high commonality was developed which can be used to synthesize power system architectures which minimize development cost. Examples of potential high commonality power system architectures are given in this report along with a mass comparison. Other criteria such as life cycle cost (which includes transportation cost), reliability, safety, risk, and operability should be used in future, more detailed studies to select optimum power system architectures. Nineteen potential power system concepts were identified and evaluated for planetary surface applications including photovoltaic arrays with energy storage, isotope, and nuclear power systems. A top level environmental factors study was completed to assess environmental impacts on the identified power system concepts for both lunar and Mars applications. Potential power system design solutions for commonality between Mars and lunar applications were identified. Isotope, photovoltaic array (PVA), regenerative fuel cell (RFC), stainless steel liquid-metal cooled reactors (less than 1033 K maximum) with dynamic converters, and in-core thermionic reactor systems were found suitable for both lunar and Mars environments. The use of SP-100 thermoelectric (TE) and SP-100 dynamic power systems in a vacuum enclosure may also be possible for Mars applications although several issues need to be investigated further (potential single point failure of enclosure, mass penalty of enclosure and active pumping system, additional installation time and complexity). There are also technical issues involved with development of thermionic reactors (life, serviceability, and adaptability to other power conversion units). Additional studies are required to determine the optimum reactor concept for Mars applications. Various screening criteria (availability, environmental compatibility, mass competitiveness of energy storage, safety, and practicality for the application) were used to define concept applicability for each lunar and Mars application. A screening study resulted in 13 power systems for lunar applications and 15 for Mars applications. A commonality analysis showed several power systems with potentially high commonality (across both lunar and Mars applications). These high commonality systems include d PVA/RFC, dynamic isotope (1033 K Stirling, 1133 K Brayton, and 1300 K Brayton PCU's), SP-100 TE and dynamic derivatives (Mars systems required vacuum enclosure), in-core thermionic reactor, and liquid metal cooled reactor/Stirling cycle (1033 K). The generic commonality results were used to synthesize 3 high commonality power system architectures: (1) predominantly PV (limited nuclear and isotope), (2) predominantly in-core thermionic reactor/DIPS, and (3) predominantly SP-100 reactor/DIPS. The in-core thermionic reactor/DIPS power system architecture had the lowest total mass. Specific outputs from this study included lists of power system requirements, power system candidates, a power system application matrix, power system characteristics (mass), power system commonality ratings, example high commonality power system architectures, architecture masses, and issues/design solutions for lunar/Mars commonality.

Littman, Franklin D.

1992-07-01

186

Diagnosing SCA Components Using Wombat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Service Component Architecture (SCA) is a new technology aiming to simplify application development in a service-oriented\\u000a architecture. Developing a SCA application basically consists of two major parts: The implementation or discovery of individual\\u000a components, and the assembly of sets of components. Since each assembly itself might act as a component within a larger application,\\u000a SCA obviously enables the construction

Axel Martens; Simon Moser

2006-01-01

187

Infrared thermography at EDF: common technique for high-voltage lines but new in monitoring and diagnosis of PWR plant components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infrared thermography is a remarkable aid in maintenance, and has been used for a number of years in testing high-voltage lines and transformer substations. Electricite de France (EDF) has developed a special infrared thermography system for this type of application. Until recently, use of IRT in both fossil and nuclear power plants was only sporadic and depended on the interest shown in the technique by individual maintenance managers. In power stations, it was primarily used for tests on switchyards, electrical control cabinets and insulation. The General Engineering Department of the EDF Generation and Transmission Division was responsible for assessing new equipment and studying special development requirements as they arose. Routine infrared thermography tests were performed by two teams from the Division, one handling northern France and the other southern France. Today, infrared thermography has become a fully-fledged monitoring and diagnosis tool in its own right, and related activities are being reorganized accordingly. Its recent success can be attributed to a number of factors: more high-powered IRT techniques, valuable feedback from American utility companies, and technical and economic assessments conducted by EDF over the last two years on equipment such as electrical and mechanical components, valves and insulation. EDF's reorganization of infrared thermography activities will begin with an overview of the resources now existing within the company. This inventory will be carried out by the General Engineering Department. At the same time, a report will be drawn up bearing on IRT testing over the last decade in conventional and nuclear power plants in France and the United States. Lastly, EDF will draw up a list of components to be monitored in this way, essentially on the basis of RCM studies. These measures will provide power plants with a catalogue of infrared thermography applications for specific component/failure combinations.

Provost, Daniel

1996-03-01

188

Project Integration Architecture: Application Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications is enabled.

Jones, William Henry

2005-01-01

189

Architectural Graphics Course Syllabus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document is a syllabus for an architectural graphics course taught by Dorothy Payton of Portland Community College. The course provides "an introduction to the design process and the common drawing types for residential design." This syllabus provides a list of desired student learning outcomes, including class activities to be completed throughout the course. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

Payton, Dorothy

190

Evolution of Bow-Tie Architectures in Biology  

PubMed Central

Bow-tie or hourglass structure is a common architectural feature found in many biological systems. A bow-tie in a multi-layered structure occurs when intermediate layers have much fewer components than the input and output layers. Examples include metabolism where a handful of building blocks mediate between multiple input nutrients and multiple output biomass components, and signaling networks where information from numerous receptor types passes through a small set of signaling pathways to regulate multiple output genes. Little is known, however, about how bow-tie architectures evolve. Here, we address the evolution of bow-tie architectures using simulations of multi-layered systems evolving to fulfill a given input-output goal. We find that bow-ties spontaneously evolve when the information in the evolutionary goal can be compressed. Mathematically speaking, bow-ties evolve when the rank of the input-output matrix describing the evolutionary goal is deficient. The maximal compression possible (the rank of the goal) determines the size of the narrowest part of the networkthat is the bow-tie. A further requirement is that a process is active to reduce the number of links in the network, such as product-rule mutations, otherwise a non-bow-tie solution is found in the evolutionary simulations. This offers a mechanism to understand a common architectural principle of biological systems, and a way to quantitate the effective rank of the goals under which they evolved. PMID:25798588

Friedlander, Tamar; Mayo, Avraham E.; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

2015-01-01

191

Full scale prototype laboratory for architecture students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Innovation in prefabrication with new technologies in product development of building components together with the important role materialization is playing in the education of architectural engineers and building technology designers are the main motifs for full scale material prototyping in the Master track of Architectural Engineer and the Master track Building Technology at the Technical University Delft faculty of Architecture.

A. C. J. M. Eekhout; P. M. J. Van Swieten

2011-01-01

192

A formal basis for architectural connection  

Microsoft Academic Search

As software systems become more complex, the overall system structureor software architecturebecomes a central design problem. An important step toward an engineering discipline of software is a formal basis for describing and analyzing these designs. In the article we present a formal approach to one aspect of architectural design: the interactions among components. The key idea is to define architectural

Robert Allen; David Garlan

1997-01-01

193

Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case

Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

2013-01-01

194

Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 2: Army fault tolerant architecture design and analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Described here is the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) hardware architecture and components and the operating system. The architectural and operational theory of the AFTA Fault Tolerant Data Bus is discussed. The test and maintenance strategy developed for use in fielded AFTA installations is presented. An approach to be used in reducing the probability of AFTA failure due to common mode faults is described. Analytical models for AFTA performance, reliability, availability, life cycle cost, weight, power, and volume are developed. An approach is presented for using VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) to describe and design AFTA's developmental hardware. A plan is described for verifying and validating key AFTA concepts during the Dem/Val phase. Analytical models and partial mission requirements are used to generate AFTA configurations for the TF/TA/NOE and Ground Vehicle missions.

Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

1992-01-01

195

Breeding Value and Variance Component Estimation from Data Containing Inbred Individuals: Application to Gynogenetic Families in Common Carp (Cyprinus Carpio L.)  

PubMed Central

Under gynogenetic reproduction, offspring receive genes only from their dams and completely homozygous offspring are produced within one generation. When gynogenetic reproduction is applied to fully inbred individuals, homozygous clone lines are produced. A mixed model method was developed for breeding value and variance component estimation in gynogenetic families, which requires the inverse of the numerator relationship matrix. A general method for creating the inverse for a population with unusual relationships between animals is presented, which reduces to simple rules as is illustrated for gynogenetic populations. The presence of clones in gynogenetic populations causes singularity of the numerator relationship matrix. However, clones can be regarded as repeated observations of the same genotype, which can be accommodated by modifying the incidence matrix, and by considering only unique genotypes in the estimation procedure. Optimum gynogenetic sib family sizes for estimating heritabilities and estimates of their accuracy were derived and compared to those for conventional full-sib designs. This was done by means of a deterministic derivation and by stochastic simulation using Gibbs sampling. Optimum family sizes were smallest for gynogenetic families. Only for low heritabilities, there was a small advantage in accuracy under the gynogenetic design. PMID:9093872

Bijma, P.; Van-Arendonk, JAM.; Bovenhuis, H.

1997-01-01

196

NASA Integrated Network Monitor and Control Software Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Communications and Navigation office (SCaN) has commissioned a series of trade studies to define a new architecture intended to integrate the three existing networks that it operates, the Deep Space Network (DSN), Space Network (SN), and Near Earth Network (NEN), into one integrated network that offers users a set of common, standardized, services and interfaces. The integrated monitor and control architecture utilizes common software and common operator interfaces that can be deployed at all three network elements. This software uses state-of-the-art concepts such as a pool of re-programmable equipment that acts like a configurable software radio, distributed hierarchical control, and centralized management of the whole SCaN integrated network. For this trade space study a model-based approach using SysML was adopted to describe and analyze several possible options for the integrated network monitor and control architecture. This model was used to refine the design and to drive the costing of the four different software options. This trade study modeled the three existing self standing network elements at point of departure, and then described how to integrate them using variations of new and existing monitor and control system components for the different proposed deployments under consideration. This paper will describe the trade space explored, the selected system architecture, the modeling and trade study methods, and some observations on useful approaches to implementing such model based trade space representation and analysis.

Shames, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Kowal, Steve; Levesque, Michael; Sindiy, Oleg; Donahue, Kenneth; Barnes, Patrick

2012-01-01

197

Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of Monarda punctata essential oil and its main components against common bacterial pathogens in respiratory tract  

PubMed Central

The aim of the current research work was to study the chemical composition of the essential oil of Monarda punctata along with evaluating the essential oil and its major components for their antibacterial effects against some frequently encountered respiratory infection causing pathogens. Gas chromatographic mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of 13 chemical constituents with thymol (75.2%), p-cymene (6.7%), limonene (5.4), and carvacrol (3.5%) as the major constituents. The oil composition was dominated by the oxygenated monoterpenes. Antibacterial activity of the essential oil and its major constituents (thymol, p-cymene, limonene) was evaluated against Streptococcus pyogenes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. The study revealed that the essential oil and its constituents exhibited a broad spectrum and variable degree of antibacterial activity against different strains. Among the tested strains, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the most susceptible bacterial strain showing lowest MIC and MBC values. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most resistant bacterial strain to the essential oil treatment showing relatively higher MIC and MBC values. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the essential oil induced potent and dose-dependent membrane damage in S. pyogenes and MRSA bacterial strains. The reactive oxygen species generated by the Monarda punctata essential oil were identified using 2, 7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA).This study indicated that the Monarda punctata essential oil to a great extent and thymol to a lower extent triggered a substantial increase in the ROS levels in S. pyogenes bacterial cultures which ultimately cause membrane damage as revealed by SEM results. PMID:25550774

Li, Hong; Yang, Tian; Li, Fei-Yan; Yao, Yan; Sun, Zhong-Min

2014-01-01

198

Splicing remodels messenger ribonucleoprotein architecture via eIF4A3-dependent and -independent recruitment of exon junction complex components.  

PubMed

Pre-mRNA splicing not only removes introns and joins exons to generate spliced mRNA but also results in remodeling of the spliced messenger ribonucleoprotein, influencing various downstream events. This remodeling includes the loading of an exon-exon junction complex (EJC). It is unclear how the spliceosome recruits the EJC onto the mRNA and whether EJC formation or EJC components are required for pre-mRNA splicing. Here we immunodepleted the EJC core component eIF4A3 from HeLa cell nuclear extract and found that eIF4A3 is dispensable for pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. However, eIF4A3 is required for the splicing-dependent loading of the Y14/Magoh heterodimer onto mRNA, and this activity of human eIF4A3 is also present in the Drosophila ortholog. Surprisingly, the loading of six other EJC components was not affected by eIF4A3 depletion, suggesting that their binding to mRNA involves different or redundant pathways. Finally, we found that the assembly of the EJC onto mRNA occurs at the late stages of the splicing reaction and requires the second-step splicing and mRNA-release factor HRH1/hPrp22. The EJC-dependent and -independent recruitment of RNA-binding proteins onto mRNA suggests a role for the EJC in messenger ribonucleoprotein remodeling involving interactions with other proteins already bound to the pre-mRNA, which has implications for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and other mRNA transactions. PMID:17606899

Zhang, Zuo; Krainer, Adrian R

2007-07-10

199

Common Cold  

MedlinePLUS

... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

200

Estrogen-receptor independent effects of two ubiquitous environmental estrogens on Melosira varians Agardh, a common component of the aquatic primary production community.  

PubMed

Estrogenic compounds have been discovered in many surface water samples in many anthropogenically altered surface waters. Wastewater effluent has been identified as a major pathway of contamination and found to revert much of the metabolic products of these biologically active compounds back to their original form. This presentation explains methodology for determining exposure effects through a newly developed bioassay, examining the physiological response of a diatom to these compounds. Diatoms represent an important aspect of the primary production community. They are a desirable food source over other members of the primary production community through storage of photosynthetically produced sugars in the form of lipids rather than starch. Therefore, many members of higher trophic levels selectively feed on diatoms when present with other members of the primary production community. This study examines the effects of 17beta-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol on the physiological development of the diatom species Melosira varians. Clearly, unicellular protists such as diatoms are not susceptible to these contaminants in a manner directly analogous to that expressed in vertebrates. However, estradiol and nonylphenol are lipophilic making them particularly effective in entering the diatom cell membrane. Melosira varians was selected because it commonly occurs in most freshwater environments and has been the subject of other toxicological studies. An adequate literature base also exists for evaluating results of this experiment. The species grows rapidly and is easy to maintain in culture. Comparing cell density, chl-a, and lipid content in control and exposed cultures allowed interpretation of how the species responded to varying compound concentrations. Results of this study revealed differences in responses to each compound. 17beta-estradiol appears to have no detrimental effect on M. varians, while 4-nonylphenol results in cell mortality with sufficient dosage. Similar results with 17beta-estradiol are reported for other autotrophic organism, but the 4-nonylphenol response is not as uniform in other photosynthetic groups. The use of a phytoplankton species as a test organism complements other investigations involving vertebrate models at or near the apex of the trophic hierarchy by considering effects at the base of the food web. PMID:17826850

Julius, Matthew L; Stepanek, Joshua; Tedrow, O'Neill; Gamble, Carolyn; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

2007-11-15

201

Lunar architecture and urbanism  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human civilization and architecture have defined each other for over 5000 years on Earth. Even in the novel environment of space, persistent issues of human urbanism will eclipse, within a historically short time, the technical challenges of space settlement that dominate our current view. By adding modern topics in space engineering, planetology, life support, human factors, material invention, and conservation to their already renaissance array of expertise, urban designers can responsibly apply ancient, proven standards to the exciting new opportunities afforded by space. Inescapable facts about the Moon set real boundaries within which tenable lunar urbanism and its component architecture must eventually develop.

Sherwood, Brent

1992-01-01

202

Architectural-landsystem analysis of a modern glacial landscape, Slheimajkull, southern Iceland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacial terrains are commonly recorded using a landsystem approach, which allows detailed documentation of the geomorphological evolution of the landscape. However, landsystem analysis of Quaternary subsurface stratigraphies in which landforms are not apparent or preserved is problematic, making delineation of the sedimentary architecture of a glaciated basin infill difficult. The purpose of this study is to delineate the sedimentary architecture of the Slheimajkull (southern Iceland) glacial landsystem and to provide an architectural framework for allostratigraphy and modern analogue purposes. An integrated architectural-landsystem approach is applied here, which utilizes the principles from both architectural element analysis and landsystem analysis. A bounding surface hierarchy (fourth- to seventh-order surfaces) provides a framework within which the architecture is organized. Fieldwork was conducted at Slheimajkull glacier in 2012 and 2013; and 22 different surface features (bounded by the fourth-order surfaces) were mapped, which were grouped into four different landsystem tracts (glaciofluvial, ice-contact, jkulhlaup, and colluvial slope; bounded by the sixth-order surfaces). Landsystem tracts were deconstructed into smaller architectural units (components; bounded by the fifth-order surfaces), which allowed the delineation of eight allostratigraphic units that record the evolution of the glacial landsystem from ~ 7000 YBP to A.D. 2013. The results of this study can provide insight to interpretation and delineation of the sedimentary architecture of other modern glacial landsystems and subsurface Quaternary deposits in North America and other formerly glaciated areas.

Slomka, Jessica M.; Eyles, Carolyn H.

2015-02-01

203

Global ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC: Model architecture and performance as component of the MPI-Earth system model in different CMIP5 experimental realizations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ocean biogeochemistry is a novel standard component of fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiments which project future climate change caused by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Of particular interest here is the evolution of the oceanic sink of carbon and the oceanic contribution to the climate-carbon cycle feedback loop. The Hamburg ocean carbon cycle model (HAMOCC), a component of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth system model (MPI-ESM), is employed to address these challenges. In this paper we describe the version of HAMOCC used in the CMIP5 experiments (HAMOCC 5.2) and its implementation in the MPI-ESM to provide a documentation and basis for future CMIP5-related studies. Modeled present day distributions of biogeochemical variables calculated in two different horizontal resolutions compare fairly well with observations. Statistical metrics indicate that the model performs better at the ocean surface and worse in the ocean interior. There is a tendency for improvements in the higher resolution model configuration in representing deeper ocean variables; however, there is little to no improvement at the ocean surface. An experiment with interactive carbon cycle driven by emissions of CO2 produces a 25% higher variability in the oceanic carbon uptake over the historical period than the same model forced by prescribed atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, a climate warming of 3.5 K projected at atmospheric CO2 concentration of four times the preindustrial value, reduced the atmosphere-ocean CO2 flux by 1 GtC yr-1. Overall, the model shows consistent results in different configurations, being suitable for the type of simulations required within the CMIP5 experimental design.

Ilyina, Tatiana; Six, Katharina D.; Segschneider, Joachim; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Li, Hongmei; NEz-Riboni, Ismael

2013-06-01

204

Component-Oriented Verification of Noninterference Alessandro Aldini Marco Bernardo  

E-print Network

architectural description language equipped with equivalence checking techniques. Key words: component engineering often relies on libraries of trusted components that are combined to build dependable and secure-based software systems, noninterference analysis, architectural description languages, process algebra

Aldini, Alessandro

205

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Communication, Technology and Society; Construc- tion Science

Stuart, Steven J.

206

Relating architectural views with architectural concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Architectural views are at the foundation of software architecture and are used to describe the system from different perspectives. However, some architectural concerns crosscut the decomposition of the architecture in views. The drawbacks of crosscutting with respect to architectural views is similar to the drawbacks with respect to code, i.e. hampering reuse, maintenance and evolution of the architecture. This paper

Nelis Bouck; Tom Holvoet

2006-01-01

207

Project Integration Architecture: Architectural Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. By being a single, self-revealing architecture, the ability to develop single tools, for example a single graphical user interface, to span all applications is enabled. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications becomes possible, Object-encapsulation further allows information to become in a sense self-aware, knowing things such as its own dimensionality and providing functionality appropriate to its kind.

Jones, William Henry

2001-01-01

208

Terra Harvest software architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under the Terra Harvest Program, the DIA has the objective of developing a universal Controller for the Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) community. The mission is to define, implement, and thoroughly document an open architecture that universally supports UGS missions, integrating disparate systems, peripherals, etc. The Controller's inherent interoperability with numerous systems enables the integration of both legacy and future UGS System (UGSS) components, while the design's open architecture supports rapid third-party development to ensure operational readiness. The successful accomplishment of these objectives by the program's Phase 3b contractors is demonstrated via integration of the companies' respective plug-'n'-play contributions that include controllers, various peripherals, such as sensors, cameras, etc., and their associated software drivers. In order to independently validate the Terra Harvest architecture, L-3 Nova Engineering, along with its partner, the University of Dayton Research Institute, is developing the Terra Harvest Open Source Environment (THOSE), a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) running on an embedded Linux Operating System. The Use Cases on which the software is developed support the full range of UGS operational scenarios such as remote sensor triggering, image capture, and data exfiltration. The Team is additionally developing an ARM microprocessor-based evaluation platform that is both energy-efficient and operationally flexible. The paper describes the overall THOSE architecture, as well as the design decisions for some of the key software components. Development process for THOSE is discussed as well.

Humeniuk, Dave; Klawon, Kevin

2012-06-01

209

Performative architecture  

E-print Network

The following thesis explores two central hypotheses. On the one hand it introduces the idea of performative architecture (performance in design), and has done so with the desire to contribute directly to the expansion of ...

Araya, Sergio (Sergio Alejandro)

2011-01-01

210

The Superthreaded Processor Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The common single-threaded execution model limits processors to exploiting only the relatively small amount of instruction-level parallelism available in application programs. The superthreaded pro- cessor, on the other hand, is a concurrent multithreaded architecture (CMA) that can exploit the multiple granularities of parallelism available in general-purpose application programs. Unlike other CMAs that rely primarily on hardware for run-time dependence detection

Jenn-yuan Tsai; Jian Huang; Christoffer Amlo; David J. Lilja; Pen-chung Yew

1999-01-01

211

Language interoperability for high-performance parallel scientific components  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing complexity and interdisciplinary nature of scientific applications, code reuse is becoming increasingly important in scientific computing. One method for facilitating code reuse is the use of components technologies, which have been used widely in industry. However, components have only recently worked their way into scientific computing. Language interoperability is an important underlying technology for these component architectures. In this paper, we present an approach to language interoperability for a high-performance parallel, component architecture being developed by the Common Component Architecture (CCA) group. Our approach is based on Interface Definition Language (IDL) techniques. We have developed a Scientific Interface Definition Language (SIDL), as well as bindings to C and Fortran. We have also developed a SIDL compiler and run-time library support for reference counting, reflection, object management, and exception handling (Babel). Results from using Babel to call a standard numerical solver library (written in C) from C and Fortran show that the cost of using Babel is minimal, where as the savings in development time and the benefits of object-oriented development support for C and Fortran far outweigh the costs.

Elliot, N; Kohn, S; Smolinski, B

1999-05-18

212

ASAC Executive Assistant Architecture Description Summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this technical document, we describe the system architecture developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, discuss our choice for an architecture methodology, the Domain Specific Software Architecture (DSSA), and the DSSA approach to developing a system architecture, and describe the development process and the results of the ASAC EA system architecture. The document has six appendices.

Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.

1997-01-01

213

Microcomponent chemical process sheet architecture  

DOEpatents

The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one chemical process unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Drost, M. Kevin (Richland, WA); Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA); Birmingham, Joseph G. (Richland, WA); McDonald, Carolyn Evans (Richland, WA); Kurath, Dean E. (Benton County, WA); Friedrich, Michele (Prosser, WA)

1998-01-01

214

Microcomponent chemical process sheet architecture  

DOEpatents

The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one chemical process unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 26 figs.

Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K.; Call, C.J.; Birmingham, J.G.; McDonald, C.E.; Kurath, D.E.; Friedrich, M.

1998-09-22

215

Component-Based Software for High-Performance Scientific Computing  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in both computational hardware and multidisciplinary science have given rise to an unprecedented level of complexity in scientific simulation software. This paper describes an ongoing grass roots effort aimed at addressing complexity in high-performance computing through the use of Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE). Highlights of the benefits and accomplishments of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum and SciDAC ISIC are given, followed by an illustrative example of how the CCA has been applied to drive scientific discovery in quantum chemistry. Thrusts for future research are also described briefly.

Alexeev, Yuri; Allan, Benjamin A.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Bernholdt, David E.; Dahlgren, Tamara L.; Gannon, Dennis B.; Janssen, Curtis; Kenny, Joseph P.; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kohl, James A.; Kumfert, Gary K.; McInnes, Lois C.; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steven G.; Rasmussen, Craig; Windus, Theresa L.

2005-06-26

216

Automating component reuse and adaptation  

E-print Network

, SPARTACAS adapts the behavior of partial matches by imposing interactions with other components at the architecture level. A subproblem is synthesized that specifies the missing functionality required to complete the problem; the subproblem is used to query...

Alexander, Perry; Morel, B.

2004-09-01

217

Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA s current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

Reinhart, Richard C.

2006-01-01

218

An overview of the ALMA Common Software (ACS) .  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ALMA Common Software (ACS) is an application framework designed to provide a common and homogeneous software architecture and infrastructure, spanning the end to end needs of an Astronomical observatory, from the Telescope Control system to high-level data flow management. ACS offers, at the lower level, several basic services needed for object-oriented distributed computing like transparent remote object invocation, object deployment and location, distributed error, alarm handling, logging and events. On top of this it provides an application architecture based on the Component/Container paradigm that fosters sharing and reusing of software components. Although developed for the ALMA project, ACS is now used by several other projects worldwide, among which the Italian Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). Besides, there is an active community that shares ideas, concepts and actual software components. Major drivers for this diffusion were the choice of adopting the LGPL public license and the adoption of CORBA, a free but reliable and widely used middleware software. In this paper we present an overview of the main features of ACS, emphasizing in particular the role of INAF-OAT in this project.

Di Marcantonio, P.; Cirami, R.; Caproni, A.; Chiozzi, G.; Jeram, B.; Sommer, H.; Harrington, S.; Zagar, K.; Plesko, M.; Sekoranja, M.

219

Composing architectural styles from architectural primitives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Architectural styles are named collections of constraints on configurations of architectural elements, and are believed to bring economies of scale in applying software architecture techniques to software development. Existing research on architectural styles provides little guidance for the systematic design and construction of architectural style elements. This paper proposes a framework, Alfa, for systematically and constructively composing \\

Nikunj R. Mehta; Nenad Medvidovic

2003-01-01

220

College of Architecture College of Architecture  

E-print Network

College of Architecture College of Architecture S.R. Crown Hall 3360 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60616 of Master of Science in Architecture: Vedram Mimica Director of Master of Landscape Architecture Program Manager of Academic Affairs: Sarah Pariseau Mission The College of Architecture's graduate degree programs

Heller, Barbara

221

ARCHITECTURE www.pdx.edu/architecture  

E-print Network

ARCHITECTURE www.pdx.edu/architecture For additional information about the Architecture Department: Department of Architecture School of Fine and Performing Arts, Portland State University P.O. Box 751 Portland, OR 97207-0751 Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Arts in Architecture Bachelor of Science

222

42 College of Architecture COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

42 College of Architecture COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Dean: Professor Lambla; Chair: Associate of Architecture (CoA) is to further the discourse between the theory and practice of architecture by the education, the profession, and the community. Architecture in the narrow sense includes important public monuments and

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

223

Parametric architecture : performative/responsive assembly components  

E-print Network

Current parametric design generates many possible solutions during modeling and design process, but in the final stage, only allows users to choose one solution to develop. This thesis demonstrates a design strategy for ...

Yu, Huei Sheng

2009-01-01

224

Architectural Digest  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Architectural Digest is one of the world's premier periodicals dedicated to architecture and interior design. Their website is a trove of materials for those dabbling in such matters. On this site, visitors can look through one of six sections: Interiors + Inspiration, Celebrity Style, Architecture + Design, Shopping + Sources, News, Culture + Travel, and In the Magazine. These areas are rich in content and commentary from diverse caravansaries. First-timers might enjoy a jaunt on over to the Daily AD to get their daily dose of what's happening in the field. A random visit to the site might bring up a photo gallery of 25 inspiring staircases from around the world, a renovation of a chateau in the Loire Valley, or a look into the homes of some of Southern California's movers and shakers. Additionally, users can sign up to receive updates about their special editions and website only features.

225

An Investigation into Cost Modelling for Design of Distributed Automotive Electrical Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerging automotive electrical architecture is a distributed real-time control system whose functions are integrated by a combination of shared memory, hardwired connections and in-vehicle control networks such as CAN, LIN and FlexRay. The uptake of AUTOSAR for the integration of application software, with common embedded device driver components, offers the opportunity for the partitioning and business model of automotive

C. P. Quigley; R. McMurran; R. P. Jones

226

Introduction Subsumption Architecture  

E-print Network

Introduction Subsumption Architecture Metabolic Architecture Comparison Conclusions A metabolic subsumption architecture for cooperative control of the e-puck Verena Fischer and Simon Hickinbotham Verena Verena Fischer and Simon Hickinbotham A metabolic subsumption architecture 1 #12;Introduction Subsumption

Leeds, University of

227

The Combination of Renewable Energy Effective Use and Architecture Design  

E-print Network

in Buildings Solar energy can be directly converted into light and heat. It is the most commonly using energy of buildings. 2.1.1 solar water heater Fig.1 Combination with roof Solar water heater is primarily to the use of solar thermal energy... in Germany only. (5)? Free-style, breaks the traditional concept of water heater. This method improves the tech-level of water heater. Also, the water heater becomes the free component of architecture. 2.1.2 solar house The solar thermal energy...

Zhou, Y.

2006-01-01

228

Architectural Illusion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a lesson plan developed around the work of architectural muralist Richard Haas. Discusses the significance of mural painting and gives key concepts for the lesson. Lists class activities for the elementary and secondary grades. Provides a photograph of the Haas mural on the Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel, 1986. (GG)

Doornek, Richard R.

1990-01-01

229

Pipeline Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pipelined computer architecture has re ceived considerable attention since the 1960s when the need for faster and more cost-effective systems became critical. The merit of pipelining is that it can help to match the speeds of various subsystems without duplicating the cost of the entire system involved. As technology evolves, faster and cheaper LSI circuits become available, and the future

C. V. Ramamoorthy; Hon F. Li

1977-01-01

230

DIELECTROPHORETIC ARCHITECTURES  

E-print Network

experienced by a dielectric object in a nonuni- form electric field. This effect exists because the dipole is dielectrophoresis, or the net force experienced by a neutral dielectric object in a nonuniform electric field5 DIELECTROPHORETIC ARCHITECTURES Alexander D. Wissner-Gross Electric programmability has been

Wissner-Gross, Alexander

231

Service-Oriented Architecture for Space Exploration Robotic Rover Systems  

E-print Network

Currently, industrial sectors are transforming their business processes into e-services and component-based architectures to build flexible, robust, and scalable systems, and reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. Robotics is yet another promising and fast-growing industry that deals with the creation of machines that operate in an autonomous fashion and serve for various applications including space exploration, weaponry, laboratory research, and manufacturing. It is in space exploration that the most common type of robots is the planetary rover which moves across the surface of a planet and conducts a thorough geological study of the celestial surface. This type of rover system is still ad-hoc in that it incorporates its software into its core hardware making the whole system cohesive, tightly-coupled, more susceptible to shortcomings, less flexible, hard to be scaled and maintained, and impossible to be adapted to other purposes. This paper proposes a service-oriented architecture fo...

Bassil, Youssef

2012-01-01

232

Common cold  

MedlinePLUS

... are the most common reason that children miss school and parents miss work. Parents often get colds ... other children. A cold can spread quickly through schools or daycares. Colds can occur at any time ...

233

Application development using the ALMA common software  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ALMA Common Software (ACS) provides the software infrastructure used by ALMA and by several other telescope projects, thanks also to the choice of adopting the LGPL public license. ACS is a set of application frameworks providing the basic services needed for object oriented distributed computing. Among these are transparent remote object invocation, object deployment and location based on a container/component model, distributed error, alarm handling, logging and events. ACS is based on CORBA and built on top of free CORBA implementations. Free software is extensively used wherever possible. The general architecture of ACS was presented at SPIE 2002. ACS has been under development for 6 years and it is midway through its development life. Many applications have been written using ACS; the ALMA test facility, APEX and other telescopes are running systems based on ACS. This is therefore a good time to look back and see what have been until now the strong and the weak points of ACS in terms of architecture and implementation. In this perspective, it is very important to analyze the applications based on ACS, the feedback received by the users and the impact that this feedback has had on the development of ACS itself, by favoring the development of some features with respect to others. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of this analysis and discuss what we would like to do in order to extend and improve ACS in the coming years, in particular to make application development easier and more efficient.

Chiozzi, G.; Caproni, A.; Jeram, B.; Sommer, H.; Wang, V.; Plesko, M.; Sekoranja, M.; Zagar, K.; Fugate, D. W.; Harrington, S.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Cirami, R.

2006-06-01

234

architecture 2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option  

E-print Network

master of architecture (M.Arch.) #12;2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option Taubman College's 2-year master of architecture option is for applicants who hold a bachelor of science degree in architecture or its equivalent. This 60 credit

Papalambros, Panos

235

A Layered Brain Architecture for Synthetic Creatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new layered brain architecture for simulated autonomous and semi-autonomous creatures that inhabit graphical worlds. The main feature of the brain is its division into distinct systems, which communicate through common access to an internal mental blackboard. The brain was designed to encourage experimentation with various systems and architectures. It has so far proven flexible enough to

Damian A. Isla; Robert C. Burke; Marc Downie; Bruce Blumberg

2001-01-01

236

Hybrid Power Management-Based Vehicle Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hybrid Power Management (HPM) is the integration of diverse, state-of-the-art power devices in an optimal configuration for space and terrestrial applications (s ee figure). The appropriate application and control of the various power devices significantly improves overall system performance and efficiency. The basic vehicle architecture consists of a primary power source, and possibly other power sources, that provides all power to a common energy storage system that is used to power the drive motors and vehicle accessory systems. This architecture also provides power as an emergency power system. Each component is independent, permitting it to be optimized for its intended purpose. The key element of HPM is the energy storage system. All generated power is sent to the energy storage system, and all loads derive their power from that system. This can significantly reduce the power requirement of the primary power source, while increasing the vehicle reliability. Ultracapacitors are ideal for an HPM-based energy storage system due to their exceptionally long cycle life, high reliability, high efficiency, high power density, and excellent low-temperature performance. Multiple power sources and multiple loads are easily incorporated into an HPM-based vehicle. A gas turbine is a good primary power source because of its high efficiency, high power density, long life, high reliability, and ability to operate on a wide range of fuels. An HPM controller maintains optimal control over each vehicle component. This flexible operating system can be applied to all vehicles to considerably improve vehicle efficiency, reliability, safety, security, and performance. The HPM-based vehicle architecture has many advantages over conventional vehicle architectures. Ultracapacitors have a much longer cycle life than batteries, which greatly improves system reliability, reduces life-of-system costs, and reduces environmental impact as ultracapacitors will probably never need to be replaced and disposed of. The environmentally safe ultracapacitor components reduce disposal concerns, and their recyclable nature reduces the environmental impact. High ultracapacitor power density provides high power during surges, and the ability to absorb high power during recharging. Ultracapacitors are extremely efficient in capturing recharging energy, are rugged, reliable, maintenance-free, have excellent lowtemperature characteristic, provide consistent performance over time, and promote safety as they can be left indefinitely in a safe, discharged state whereas batteries cannot.

Eichenberg, Dennis J.

2011-01-01

237

Architectural Design Recovery using Data Mining Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a technique for recovering the high level design of legacy software systems according to user defined architectural plans. Architectural plans are rep- resented using a description language and specify system components and their interfaces. Such descriptions are viewed as queries that are applied on a large data base which stores information extracted from the source code of

Kamran Sartipi; Kostas Kontogiannis; Farhad Mavaddat

2000-01-01

238

A new RFID middleware architecture design  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, RFID technology has developed very rapidly, which combines printing, information, computer, electronic technology in one, and developed from single anti-counterfeiting capabilities to logistics management, aviation baggage management, supermarket commodity management, automated production line components management directions. This paper proposes a middleware based on COM+ and designs its system architecture, uses layered architecture approach to make the system

Su Jing; Chen Guoqiang

2010-01-01

239

A component-based problem list subsystem for the HOLON testbed. Health Object Library Online.  

PubMed

One of the deliverables of the HOLON (Health Object Library Online) project is the specification of a reference architecture for clinical information systems that facilitates the development of a variety of discrete, reusable software components. One of the challenges facing the HOLON consortium is determining what kinds of components can be made available in a library for developers of clinical information systems. To further explore the use of component architectures in the development of reusable clinical subsystems, we have incorporated ongoing work in the development of enterprise terminology services into a Problem List subsystem for the HOLON testbed. We have successfully implemented a set of components using CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture) and Java distributed object technologies that provide a functional problem list application and UMLS-based "Problem Picker." Through this development, we have overcome a variety of obstacles characteristic of rapidly emerging technologies, and have identified architectural issues necessary to scale these components for use and reuse within an enterprise clinical information system. PMID:9929252

Law, V; Goldberg, H S; Jones, P; Safran, C

1998-01-01

240

Evolution of System Architectures: Where Do We Need to Fail Next?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Innovation requires testing and failing. Thomas Edison was right when he said "I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work". For innovation and improvement of standards to happen, service Architectures have to be tested and tested. Within the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), testing of service architectures has occurred for the last 15 years. This talk will present an evolution of these service architectures and a possible future path. OGC is a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and for the advancement and development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC Interoperability Program is a series of hands-on, fast paced, engineering initiatives to accelerate the development and acceptance of OGC standards. Each initiative is organized in threads that provide focus under a particular theme. The first testbed, OGC Web Services phase 1, completed in 2003 had four threads: Common Architecture, Web Mapping, Sensor Web and Web Imagery Enablement. The Common Architecture was a cross-thread theme, to ensure that the Web Mapping and Sensor Web experiments built on a base common architecture. The architecture was based on the three main SOA components: Broker, Requestor and Provider. It proposed a general service model defining service interactions and dependencies; categorization of service types; registries to allow discovery and access of services; data models and encodings; and common services (WMS, WFS, WCS). For the latter, there was a clear distinction on the different services: Data Services (e.g. WMS), Application services (e.g. Coordinate transformation) and server-side client applications (e.g. image exploitation). The latest testbed, OGC Web Service phase 9, completed in 2012 had 5 threads: Aviation, Cross-Community Interoperability (CCI), Security and Services Interoperability (SSI), OWS Innovations and Compliance & Interoperability Testing & Evaluation (CITE). Compared to the first testbed, OWS-9 did not have a separate common architecture thread. Instead the emphasis was on brokering information models, securing them and making data available efficiently on mobile devices. The outcome is an architecture based on usability and non-intrusiveness while leveraging mediation of information models from different communities. This talk will use lessons learned from the evolution from OGC Testbed phase 1 to phase 9 to better understand how global and complex infrastructures evolve to support many communities including the Earth System Science Community.

Bermudez, Luis; Alameh, Nadine; Percivall, George

2013-04-01

241

Component-specific modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accomplishments are described for the second year effort of a 3-year program to develop methodology for component specific modeling of aircraft engine hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models; (2) geometry model generators; (3) remeshing; (4) specialty 3-D inelastic stuctural analysis; (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies; (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis; (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

Mcknight, R. L.

1985-01-01

242

Common Cold  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site provides comprehensive information, selected by medical doctors, about the common cold. "The goal is to provide a framework for critical thinking which will allow informed decisions about medical care for the common cold." The section entitled Understanding Colds gives a detailed overview of how the cold virus invades the human body and how cold symptoms are caused. Information about preventing colds, and some of the complications that can occur are also included. The Special Features section includes one of the most interesting parts of the site -- Myths of the Common Cold. This site should be interesting to almost anyone, but perhaps more so for those of us who have recently had a cold.

243

Fabric Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published by the Industrial Fabrics Association International, Fabric Architecture magazine is published bimonthly and is distributed to over 13000 architects working in the field. For those who've never thought about the possibilities and opportunities afforded by this area that straddles the lines between fabrics, design, and architecture, it's quite a find. On this page, users can look through materials that address topics like tents, lightweight structures, graphics, awnings, and truck covers. After perusing these areas, visitors should delve into the current issue. The archives here date back to 2006, and the topics covered within these pages include fabrics in the workplace, flexible design materials, and creating a "green" car park with various fabrics. For those who are interested, there's also information about how to subscribe to the print edition of the magazine.

244

Architecture selection for neural networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers worldwide converge into the fact that the exhaustive search over the space of network architectures is computationally infeasible even for networks of modest size. The use of heuristic strategies that dramatically reduce the search complexity is a common technique. These heuristic approaches employ directed search algorithms, such as selection of the number of nodes via sequential network construction (SNC),

Pythagoras Karampiperis; Nikos Manouselis; Theodore B. Trafalis

2002-01-01

245

College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

57 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The collaboration of Architecture (Landscape Ar- chitecture, Construction Science and Management, City and Regional Planning, and Architecture) with Arts (Visual Arts and Performing Arts) and the Humanities (Communication

Stuart, Steven J.

246

56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE Arts + Architecture  

E-print Network

56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE College of Arts + Architecture coaa.uncc.edu Dean: Mr. Kenneth Lambla Associate Dean: Dr. Lee Gray MISSION AND OBJECTIVES The College of Arts + Architecture consists leadership. The arts and architecture have a long history of collaboration; they require analysis

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

247

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

62 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers one-of-a- kind opportunities for interdisciplinary exploration, but the enduring questions. The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities is organized into three schools

Bolding, M. Chad

248

College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

56 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities 56 COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The collaboration of Architecture (Landscape Ar- chitecture, Construction Science and Management, City and Regional Planning, and Architecture) with Arts (Visual Arts and Performing Arts) and the Humanities (Communication

Stuart, Steven J.

249

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

25 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Construction Science and Management; Digital Pro- duction Arts

Stuart, Steven J.

250

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

63 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers one-of-a- kind opportunities for interdisciplinary exploration, but the enduring questions. The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities is organized into three schools

Stuart, Steven J.

251

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Construction Science and Management; Digital Pro- duction Arts

Stuart, Steven J.

252

College of Architecture 41 COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

College of Architecture 41 COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Dean: Professor Lambla; Chair: Betsy West, Farris, Cole; Emeritus Professors: Hight, MacLean. Mission. The mission of the College of Architecture (CoA) is to further the discourse between the theory and practice of architecture by the education

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

253

Architecture TAKING ARCHITECTURE TO NEW HEIGHTS  

E-print Network

School of Architecture #12;TAKING ARCHITECTURE TO NEW HEIGHTS This is a time of tremendous momentum at the School of Architecture. Looking ahead, we have the unique opportunity to build on our strengths immediate and long term, and enable us to stake our ground as one of the country's premier architecture

McConnell, Terry

254

College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

25 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts, and Humani- ties offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Construction Science and Management; Digital Production Arts; English

Stuart, Steven J.

255

College of Architecture College of Architecture  

E-print Network

College of Architecture College of Architecture S.R. Crown Hall 3360 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60616 Academic Affairs: TBD Director, Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture Program: Mahjoub Elnimeiri Director of Thesis: Dirk Denison, FAIA Director of Master of Landscape Architecture Program: Peter L. Osler Director

Heller, Barbara

256

56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE Arts + Architecture  

E-print Network

56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE College of Arts + Architecture www.coaa.uncc.edu Dean: Kenneth Lambla Associate Dean: Lee Gray Mission and Objectives. The College of Arts + Architecture consists leadership. The arts and architecture have a long history of collaboration; they require analysis

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

257

Design and realization of macroscopic grid architectures mimicking carbon molecules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper shows, through a new geometrical approach, how to build some special deltahedra, which might represent nano-architectures of molecular structures, in nature commonly known as fullerenes, as well as new intriguing macro-architectures for designing innovative structures. We have realized models of these nano and macro architectures including a roof-like structure for a tennis court and educational games.

Gastaldi, Davide; Pugno, Nicola M.

2009-10-01

258

Challenges for Complete Creature Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years there has been a move within the artificial intelligence and robotics communities towards building complete autonomous creatures that operate in the physical world. Certain approaches have proven quite successful, and have caused a re-analysis within the field of artificial intelligence of what components are necessary in the intellectual architecture of such creatures. However nothing built thus far

Rodney A. Brooks

1990-01-01

259

Distributed visualization framework architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An architecture for distributed and collaborative visualization is presented. The design goals of the system are to create a lightweight, easy to use and extensible framework for reasearch in scientific visualization. The system provides both single user and collaborative distributed environment. System architecture employs a client-server model. Visualization projects can be synchronously accessed and modified from different client machines. We present a set of visualization use cases that illustrate the flexibility of our system. The framework provides a rich set of reusable components for creating new applications. These components make heavy use of leading design patterns. All components are based on the functionality of a small set of interfaces. This allows new components to be integrated seamlessly with little to no effort. All user input and higher-level control functionality interface with proxy objects supporting a concrete implementation of these interfaces. These light-weight objects can be easily streamed across the web and even integrated with smart clients running on a user's cell phone. The back-end is supported by concrete implementations wherever needed (for instance for rendering). A middle-tier manages any communication and synchronization with the proxy objects. In addition to the data components, we have developed several first-class GUI components for visualization. These include a layer compositor editor, a programmable shader editor, a material editor and various drawable editors. These GUI components interact strictly with the interfaces. Access to the various entities in the system is provided by an AssetManager. The asset manager keeps track of all of the registered proxies and responds to queries on the overall system. This allows all user components to be populated automatically. Hence if a new component is added that supports the IMaterial interface, any instances of this can be used in the various GUI components that work with this interface. One of the main features is an interactive shader designer. This allows rapid prototyping of new visualization renderings that are shader-based and greatly accelerates the development and debug cycle.

Mishchenko, Oleg; Raman, Sundaresan; Crawfis, Roger

2010-01-01

260

Optical linear algebra processors - Architectures and algorithms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attention is given to the component design and optical configuration features of a generic optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) architecture, as well as the large number of OLAP architectures, number representations, algorithms and applications encountered in current literature. Number-representation issues associated with bipolar and complex-valued data representations, high-accuracy (including floating point) performance, and the base or radix to be employed, are discussed, together with case studies on a space-integrating frequency-multiplexed architecture and a hybrid space-integrating and time-integrating multichannel architecture.

Casasent, David

1986-01-01

261

Common Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents K-12 and college common areas considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,

American School & University, 2003

2003-01-01

262

Common Chuckwalla  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The Common Chuckwalla is primarily found across the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the United States and Mexico, at elevations ranging from sea level to 1,370 m. This large (125180 mm) lizard is dorsoventrally flattened and has wrinkles on its belly and neck. Chuckwallas are strongly associa...

263

An agent architecture for supporting individualized services in Internet applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the agent architecture of an Internet application development tool called Distributed Interactive Web-site Builder (DIWB). Together with the component object model and a layering framework, the agent architecture can be used to build Internet applications that support individualized services. The DIWB can construct pages dynamically at runtime and can be easily customized for individual users. The architecture

Weiguang Shao; Wei-Tek Tsai; Sanjai Rayadurgam; Robert Lai

1998-01-01

264

Most genetic risk for autism resides with common variation  

PubMed Central

A key component of genetic architecture is the allelic spectrum influencing trait variability. For autism spectrum disorder (henceforth autism) the nature of its allelic spectrum is uncertain. Individual risk genes have been identified from rare variation, especially de novo mutations18. From this evidence one might conclude that rare variation dominates its allelic spectrum, yet recent studies show that common variation, individually of small effect, has substantial impact en masse9,10. At issue is how much of an impact relative to rare variation. Using a unique epidemiological sample from Sweden, novel methods that distinguish total narrow-sense heritability from that due to common variation, and by synthesizing results from other studies, we reach several conclusions about autisms genetic architecture: its narrow-sense heritability is ?54% and most traces to common variation; rare de novo mutations contribute substantially to individuals liability; still their contribution to variance in liability, 2.6%, is modest compared to heritable variation. PMID:25038753

Gaugler, Trent; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J.; Bodea, Corneliu A.; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Lee, Ann B.; Mahajan, Milind; Manaa, Dina; Pawitan, Yudi; Reichert, Jennifer; Ripke, Stephan; Sandin, Sven; Sklar, Pamela; Svantesson, Oscar; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hultman, Christina M.; Devlin, Bernie

2014-01-01

265

The Component-Based Application for GAMESS  

SciTech Connect

GAMESS, a quantum chetnistry program for electronic structure calculations, has been freely shared by high-performance application scientists for over twenty years. It provides a rich set of functionalities and can be run on a variety of parallel platforms through a distributed data interface. While a chemistry computation is sophisticated and hard to develop, the resource sharing among different chemistry packages will accelerate the development of new computations and encourage the cooperation of scientists from universities and laboratories. Common Component Architecture (CCA) offers an enviromnent that allows scientific packages to dynamically interact with each other through components, which enable dynamic coupling of GAMESS with other chetnistry packages, such as MPQC and NWChem. Conceptually, a cotnputation can be constructed with "plug-and-play" components from scientific packages and require more than componentizing functions/subroutines of interest, especially for large-scale scientific packages with a long development history. In this research, we present our efforts to construct cotnponents for GAMESS that conform to the CCA specification. The goal is to enable the fine-grained interoperability between three quantum chemistry programs, GAMESS, MPQC and NWChem, via components. We focus on one of the three packages, GAMESS; delineate the structure of GAMESS computations, followed by our approaches to its component development. Then we use GAMESS as the driver to interoperate integral components from the other tw"o packages, arid show the solutions for interoperability problems along with preliminary results. To justify the versatility of the design, the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) components have been coupled with GAMESS and its components, so that the performance of GAMESS and its components may be analyzed for a wide range of systetn parameters.

Fang Peng

2008-05-01

266

Common modeling system for digital simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Joint Modeling and Simulation System is a tri-service investigation into a common modeling framework for the development digital models. The basis for the success of this framework is an X-window-based, open systems architecture, object-based/oriented methodology, standard interface approach to digital model construction, configuration, execution, and post processing. For years Department of Defense (DOD) agencies have produced various weapon systems/technologies and typically digital representations of the systems/technologies. These digital representations (models) have also been developed for other reasons such as studies and analysis, Cost Effectiveness Analysis (COEA) tradeoffs, etc. Unfortunately, there have been no Modeling and Simulation (M&S) standards, guidelines, or efforts towards commonality in DOD M&S. The typical scenario is an organization hires a contractor to build hardware and in doing so an digital model may be constructed. Until recently, this model was not even obtained by the organization. Even if it was procured, it was on a unique platform, in a unique language, with unique interfaces, and, with the result being UNIQUE maintenance required. Additionally, the constructors of the model expended more effort in writing the 'infrastructure' of the model/simulation (e.g. user interface, database/database management system, data journalizing/archiving, graphical presentations, environment characteristics, other components in the simulation, etc.) than in producing the model of the desired system. Other side effects include: duplication of efforts; varying assumptions; lack of credibility/validation; and decentralization in policy and execution. J-MASS provides the infrastructure, standards, toolset, and architecture to permit M&S developers and analysts to concentrate on the their area of interest.

Painter, Rick

1994-01-01

267

Regulation of inflorescence architecture by cytokinins  

PubMed Central

In flowering plants, the arrangement of flowers on a stem becomes an inflorescence, and a huge variety of inflorescence architecture occurs in nature. Inflorescence architecture also affects crop yield. In simple inflorescences, flowers form on a main stem; by contrast, in compound inflorescences, flowers form on branched stems and the branching pattern defines the architecture of the inflorescence. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the regulation of inflorescence architecture by cytokinin plant hormones. Results in rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis thaliana show that although these two species have distinct inflorescence architectures, cytokinins have a common effect on inflorescence branching. Based on these studies, we discuss how cytokinins regulate distinct types of inflorescence architecture through their effect on meristem activities. PMID:25505480

Han, Yingying; Yang, Haibian; Jiao, Yuling

2014-01-01

268

Electrical Grounding Architecture for Unmanned Spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and all NASA Centers and is intended to provide a common framework for consistent practices across NASA programs. This handbook was developed to describe electrical grounding design architecture options for unmanned spacecraft. This handbook is written for spacecraft system engineers, power engineers, and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) engineers. Spacecraft grounding architecture is a system-level decision which must be established at the earliest point in spacecraft design. All other grounding design must be coordinated with and be consistent with the system-level architecture. This handbook assumes that there is no one single 'correct' design for spacecraft grounding architecture. There have been many successful satellite and spacecraft programs from NASA, using a variety of grounding architectures with different levels of complexity. However, some design principles learned over the years apply to all types of spacecraft development. This handbook summarizes those principles to help guide spacecraft grounding architecture design for NASA and others.

1998-01-01

269

Complex Event Recognition Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

2009-01-01

270

Savannah River Site computing architecture migration guide  

SciTech Connect

The SRS Computing Architecture is a vision statement for site computing which enumerates the strategies which will guide SRS computing efforts for the 1990s. Each strategy is supported by a number of feature statements which clarify the strategy by providing additional detail. Since it is a strategic planning document, the Architecture has sitewide applicability and endorsement but does not attempt to specify implementation details. It does, however, specify that a document will be developed to guide the migration from the current site environment to that envisioned by the new architecture. The goal of this document, the SRS Computing Architecture Migration Guide, is to identify specific strategic and tactical tasks which would have to be completed to fully implement the architectural vision for site computing as well as a recommended sequence and timeframe for addressing these tasks. It takes into account the expected availability of technology, the existing installed base, and interdependencies among architectural components and objectives.

Not Available

1991-07-30

271

michigan architecture 20082009  

E-print Network

2008­2009 michigan architecture Programs + Courses #12;#12;2008­2009 ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMS + COURSE This bulletin provides an overview of policies, procedures, degree options, and courses for the U-M architecture of Architecture + Urban Planning 2150 Art + Architecture Building 2000 Bonisteel Boulevard Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Kamat, Vineet R.

272

Component-specific modeling. [jet engine hot section components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accomplishments are described for a 3 year program to develop methodology for component-specific modeling of aircraft hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models, (2) geometry model generators, (3) remeshing, (4) specialty three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis, (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies, (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis, (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

1992-01-01

273

Automated Synthesis of Architecture of Avionic Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Architecture Synthesis Tool (AST) is software that automatically synthesizes software and hardware architectures of avionic systems. The AST is expected to be most helpful during initial formulation of an avionic-system design, when system requirements change frequently and manual modification of architecture is time-consuming and susceptible to error. The AST comprises two parts: (1) an architecture generator, which utilizes a genetic algorithm to create a multitude of architectures; and (2) a functionality evaluator, which analyzes the architectures for viability, rejecting most of the non-viable ones. The functionality evaluator generates and uses a viability tree a hierarchy representing functions and components that perform the functions such that the system as a whole performs system-level functions representing the requirements for the system as specified by a user. Architectures that survive the functionality evaluator are further evaluated by the selection process of the genetic algorithm. Architectures found to be most promising to satisfy the user s requirements and to perform optimally are selected as parents to the next generation of architectures. The foregoing process is iterated as many times as the user desires. The final output is one or a few viable architectures that satisfy the user s requirements.

Chau, Savio; Xu, Joseph; Dang, Van; Lu, James F.

2006-01-01

274

Digital Resource Commons  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ohio Digital Resource Commons (DRC) is a place to learn about the historic, instructional, cultural, and creative works of those in the Ohio University system, as well as the liberal arts colleges of Ohio. Although not all of the Ohio schools save material with the DRC, many of them elect to do so. Higher education institutions, as well as K-12 institutions are allowed to save their work via the central network, as long as the work has archival merit. Visitors will want to click on "Communities and Collections" on the left hand menu to browse the vast resources available. Some of the communities included are "Art and Architecture", "Multi-Subject Video", and "OhioLINK Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Center". Within each community are some notable collections including, "Archaeological Atlas of Ohio", "Encyclopedia of Physics Demonstrations", and the "Kent State Shootings Oral Histories". In order to see a list of the archives available to search, visitors should click on "Advanced Search", under the blank search box near the top of the page. The scrollable box next to the archives category includes such choices as "Oberlin Digital Commons", "Scholarly Commons at Miami University", and "Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives".

275

Common world model for unmanned systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Robotic Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) seeks to provide adaptive robot capabilities which move beyond traditional metric algorithms to include cognitive capabilities. Key to this effort is the Common World Model, which moves beyond the state-of-the-art by representing the world using metric, semantic, and symbolic information. It joins these layers of information to define objects in the world. These objects may be reasoned upon jointly using traditional geometric, symbolic cognitive algorithms and new computational nodes formed by the combination of these disciplines. The Common World Model must understand how these objects relate to each other. Our world model includes the concept of Self-Information about the robot. By encoding current capability, component status, task execution state, and histories we track information which enables the robot to reason and adapt its performance using Meta-Cognition and Machine Learning principles. The world model includes models of how aspects of the environment behave, which enable prediction of future world states. To manage complexity, we adopted a phased implementation approach to the world model. We discuss the design of "Phase 1" of this world model, and interfaces by tracing perception data through the system from the source to the meta-cognitive layers provided by ACT-R and SS-RICS. We close with lessons learned from implementation and how the design relates to Open Architecture.

Dean, Robert Michael S.

2013-05-01

276

Electronics Prognostics Reference Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronics prognostics can be defined as the prediction of the Remaining Useful Life (RUL) of electronic components before a failure occurs. This field, while immature, is increasingly important to Raytheonpsilas customers. Raytheon must develop a common and synergistic strategy to address new prognostic requirements. For this reason, Raytheon established a Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) (formerly known as Health Management

N. Almonte; D. Cook; J. Devereaux; M. Henry; T. Higgins; G. Roth

2008-01-01

277

Architecture Engineering Construction (AEC)  

E-print Network

Architecture Engineering Construction (AEC) Presented to FM Staff February 25, 2009 Updated March 1, 2010 #12;University of Maryland Baltimore Director Architecture, Engineering and Construction Vacant Administration & Finance Kathleen M. Byington #12;Division of Facilities Management Architecture, Engineering

Weber, David J.

278

Component based distributed systems - CORBA and EJB in context.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy, like other sciences, is highly collaborative, so it is no surprise that astronomical computing environments have become increasingly distributed in nature. Therefore the interest in benefiting from new developments in distributed computing technologies is clear, but to reap these potential benefits one must overcome the problems posed by the heterogeneous mix of different architectures and operating systems that occur. This mix has made information flow between systems at best difficult and organizations have not been able to fully harness one of their most valuable assets, namely information. This paper introduces the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and Enterprise Java Beans (EJBs), and puts forward a rationale as to why they have the potential to provide the required integration platform. These component based distributed technologies, allow disparate, heterogeneous legacy data systems to be integrated with current systems and they also support the incremental growth of current systems to meet evolving requirements.

Lunney, T. F.; McCaughey, A. J.

2000-05-01

279

Software architecture critics in the Argo design environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software architectures are high-level design representations of software systems that focus on composition o f software components and how those components interact. Software architectures abstract the details o f implementation and allow the designer to focus on essential design decisions. Regardless of notation, designers are faced with the task of making good design decisions that demand a broad range of

Jason E. Robbins; David F. Redmiles

1998-01-01

280

Packaging architecture: a critique of architectural commodification  

E-print Network

and architecture was initiated in the United States between 1870 and 1900, while the development of modern architecture in terms of written work, artistic production, and informed patronage began primarily in Continental Europe in the 1920's. In the case...

Pushpathadam, Thomas

1996-01-01

281

Analogy, Cognitive Architecture and Universal Construction: A Tale of Two Systematicities  

PubMed Central

Cognitive science recognizes two kinds of systematicity: (1) as the property where certain cognitive capacities imply certain other related cognitive capacities (Fodor and Pylyshyn); and (2) as the principle that analogical mappings based on collections of connected relations are preferred over relations in isolation (Gentner). Whether these kinds of systematicity are two aspects of a deeper property of cognition is hitherto unknown. Here, it is shown that both derive from the formal, category-theoretic notion of universal construction. In conceptual/psychological terms, a universal construction is a form of optimization of cognitive resources: optimizing the re-utilization of common component processes for common task components. Systematic cognitive capacity and the capacity for analogy are hallmarks of human cognition, which suggests that universal constructions (in the category-theoretic sense) are a crucial component of human cognitive architecture. PMID:24586555

Phillips, Steven

2014-01-01

282

5-Hydroxytryptamine2A receptor stimulation induces activator protein-1 and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding with cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein and Jun D as common components in cerebellar neurons.  

PubMed

Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that stimulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptors in rat cerebellar granule cells produces an increase in the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor messenger RNA and binding sites, and that this up-regulation requires de novo RNA and protein synthesis. Here we showed that up-regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor binding sites induced by stimulation with the 5-hydroxytryptamine2A/2C receptor agonist, (+/-)-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI), is associated with an increase in the 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor transcription rate. To examine the possible role of transcriptional activation in DOI-induced 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor up-regulation, we studied the effects of DOI on transcription factor binding to activator protein-1 and cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE) DNA consensus sequences. We found that DOI induces a time-dependent increase in activator protein-1 and CRE transcription factor binding activity, which is blocked by 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor antagonists. Similar to 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor up-regulation, DOI-induced activator protein-1 binding is suppressed by inhibitors of calmodulin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases. The increased activator protein-1 binding is effectively competed by excessive activator protein-1 and CRE sequences as well as endogenous activator protein-1-like sequences present in the rat 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor gene. Supershift assays revealed that cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and Jun D are common components of both activator protein-1 and CRE binding complexes. DOI also increased the level of phospho-CREB in a time-dependent manner. The binding of phospho-CREB transcription factor to the activator protein-1 site suggests that CREB may modulate the transcription of genes that contain activator protein-1 but lack CRE site in their promoters, through interaction with the activator protein-1 site. The rat 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor up-regulation may involve such a mechanism. PMID:10363825

Chalecka-Franaszek, E; Chen, H; Chuang, D M

1999-01-01

283

Application Protocol Reference Architecture Application Protocol Reference Architecture  

E-print Network

Application Protocol Reference Architecture 165 Chapter 7 Application Protocol Reference Architecture This chapter proposes an alternative reference architecture for application protocols. The proposed reference architecture consists of the set of possible architectures for application protocols

van Sinderen, Marten

284

Master of Architecture Bylaws School of Architecture and Construction Management  

E-print Network

Master of Architecture Bylaws School of Architecture and Construction Management Washington State University Administrative Home: School of Architecture and Construction Management I. Objectives Degrees offered: Master of Architecture: Professional Accredited Degree. Discipline: Architecture is a general

Collins, Gary S.

285

Parameterized Programming and Software Architecture  

E-print Network

This paper discusses an approach to software architecture based on concepts from parameterized programming, particularly its language of "module expressions." A module expression describes the architecture of a system as an interconnection of component modules, and executing the expression actually builds the system. Language features include: modules parameterized by theories, which declare interfaces; a number of module composition operations; views for binding modules to interfaces; and both vertical and horizontal composition. Modules may involve information hiding, theories may declare semantic restrictions with axioms, and views assert behavioral satisfaction of axioms by a module. Some "laws of software composition" are given, showing how various module composition operations are related. We also show how a variety of architectural styles can be supported, and how this approach can be extended to support evolution and traceability. All this is intended to ease the development of large systems, and in particular, to make reuse more effective in practice.

Joseph A. Goguen

1996-01-01

286

The Incorrect Measurement of Components  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Component analysis provides an attractive alternative to factor analysis, since component scores are easily determined while factor scores can only be estimated. The correct method of determining component scores is presented as well as several illustrations of how commonly used incorrect methods distort the meaning of the component solution. (RC)

Halperin, Silas

1976-01-01

287

Style Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a novel method for interactive editing of motion data based on motion decomposition. Our method employs Independent Component Analysis (ICA) to separate motion data into visually meaningful components called style components. The user then interactively identies suitable style components and manipulates them based on a proposed set of operations. In particular, the user can transfer style components from

Ari Shapiro Yong; Petros Faloutsos

288

Architecture as Design Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the use of analogies in architectural design, the importance of Gestalt theory and aesthetic cannons in understanding and being sensitive to architecture. Emphasizes the variation between public and professional appreciation of architecture. Notes that an understanding of architectural process enables students to improve the aesthetic

Kauppinen, Heta

1989-01-01

289

Architecture and Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes "Architecture and Children," a traveling exhibition which visually involves children in architectural principles and historic styles. States that it teaches children about architecture, and through architecture it instills the basis for aesthetic judgment. Argues that "children learn best by concrete examples of ideas, not just from

Taylor, Anne; Campbell, Leslie

1988-01-01

290

Engineering and Architecture (FEA)  

E-print Network

Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (FEA) #12;362 Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (FEA) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (FEA) Officers of the Faculty Peter F, and architectural engineering. The years from 1951 to 1954 were a transitional period of continuous development

291

THREE-DIMENSIONAL METALLIC ARCHITECTURES FOR PHOTONIC AND ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS  

E-print Network

THREE-DIMENSIONAL METALLIC ARCHITECTURES FOR PHOTONIC AND ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS BY KEVIN interesting for photonic and energy storage applications. Sacrificial templates are commonly used metamaterial, and energy storage applications. 3D metallic architectures are useful for solar

Braun, Paul

292

An Architecture for Agile Assembly  

Microsoft Academic Search

This short paper outlines new hardware and softwaretechnologies and methods being developed forautomated assembly of precision high-value productssuch as magnetic storage devices, palmtop and wearablecomputers and other high-density equipment.Our Agile Assembly Architecture (AAA) supportsthe creation of miniature assembly factories (minifactories)built from small modular robotic components.The goals are to substantially reduce designand deployment times and product changeovertimes,...

Arthur Quaid; Ralph L. Hollis

1995-01-01

293

Dictionary of architectural and building technology  

SciTech Connect

This book has been revised and expanded to include over 6000 entries pertaining to both architectural design and engineering. Compiled from subject indexes of some 200 textbooks in the field, the Dictionary aims to provide coverage of all but the most commonly understood terms within the field of architectural science proper-that is, structures, building materials, acoustics, thermal environment, lighting, and building services. In addition, definitions are provided for frequently encountered terms from neighboring field, including civil and mechanical engineering, physics, chemistry, architectural history, and fine art. Computer abbreviations for FORTRAN programs are provided, and appendixes and references supplement the main work.

Cowan, H.J.; Smith, P.R.

1986-01-01

294

Reconfigurable Hybrid Architecture for Web Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper describes a Reconfigurable Hybrid Architecture for the developing, distribution and execution of web applications\\u000a with high computational requirements. The Architecture is a layered model based on a hybrid device (standard microprocessor\\u000a and FPGA), for which has been designed and implemented a component as a web browser plug-in. Web applications are divided\\u000a into two parts: an standard part and

David Rodrguez Lozano; Juan Manuel Snchez-prez; Juan Antonio Gmez Pulido

2003-01-01

295

CONRAD Software Architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Convergent Radio Astronomy Demonstrator (CONRAD) is a collaboration between the computing teams of two SKA pathfinder instruments, MeerKAT (South Africa) and ASKAP (Australia). Our goal is to produce the required common software to operate, process and store the data from the two instruments. Both instruments are synthesis arrays composed of a large number of antennas (40 - 100) operating at centimeter wavelengths with wide-field capabilities. Key challenges are the processing of high volume of data in real-time as well as the remote mode of operations. Here we present the software architecture for CONRAD. Our design approach is to maximize the use of open solutions and third-party software widely deployed in commercial applications, such as SNMP and LDAP, and to utilize modern web-based technologies for the user interfaces, such as AJAX.

Guzman, J. C.; Bennett, T.

2008-08-01

296

Computer Architecture Tutorial  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students in computer science or engineering will find this tutorial on computer architecture very useful and enlightening. Contributed by Professor Prabhu at Iowa State University, the material covers beginning and intermediate topics. Beginning with an overview of basic theorems, like Amdahl's Law, Prabhu explains the most important considerations for processor performance. He then goes into more details of a computer's operation, with a particular emphasis on memory hierarchy. This constitutes the first half of the material; the entire second part is devoted to the principles and implications of pipelined execution. Besides the text and figures, the tutorial also has a few interactive components, including a calculator that demonstrates the resulting speedup of an enhancement.

Prabhu, Gurpur M.

1969-12-31

297

Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS): Technical Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG s SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA's current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

Reinhart, Richard C.

2006-01-01

298

Concept and architecture of the RHIC LLRF upgrade platform  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the RHIC LLRF upgrade has been the development of a stand alone, generic, high performance, modular LLRF control platform, which can be configured to replace existing systems and serve as a common platform for all new RF systems. The platform is also designed to integrate seamlessly into a distributed network based controls infrastructure, be easy to deploy, and to be useful in a variety of digital signal processing and data acquisition roles. Reuse of hardware, software and firmware has been emphasized to minimize development effort and maximize commonality of system components. System interconnection, synchronization and scaling are facilitated by a deterministic, high speed serial timing and data link, while standard intra and inter chassis communications utilize high speed, non-deterministic protocol based serial links. System hardware configuration is modular and flexible, based on a combination of a main carrier board which can host up to six custom or commercial daughter modules as required to implement desired functionality. This paper will provide an overview of the platform concept, architecture, features and benefits. The RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform has been developed with the goal of providing a flexible, modular and scalable architecture which will support our current applications and satisfy new ones for the foreseeable future. The platform has been recently commissioned at both RHIC and the RHIC EBIS injector. To date the platform has demonstrated its versatility and utility, meeting the design goals as originally defined.

Smith, K.S.; Hayes, T.; Severino, F.

2011-03-28

299

Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities at NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world's largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

2014-01-01

300

Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities At NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world?s largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center?s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

2012-01-01

301

QTL analysis of yield traits in an advanced backcross population derived from a cultivated Andeanנwild common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cross  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced backcross QTL analysis was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for agronomic performance in a population\\u000a of BC2F3:5 introgression lines created from the cross of a Colombian large red-seeded commercial cultivar, ICA Cerinza, and a wild common\\u000a bean accession, G24404. A total of 157 lines were evaluated for phenological traits, plant architecture, seed weight, yield\\u000a and yield components

M. W. Blair; G. Iriarte; S. Beebe

2006-01-01

302

Partitioning heritability of regulatory and cell-type-specific variants across 11 common diseases.  

PubMed

Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg(2)) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg(2) from imputed SNPs (5.1 enrichment; p = 3.7 10(-17)) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg(2) from genotyped SNPs (1.6 enrichment, p = 1.0 10(-4)). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg(2) despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjlmsson, Bjarni J; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Khler, Anna K; Hultman, Christina M; Purcell, Shaun M; McCarroll, Steven A; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F; Neale, Benjamin M; Wray, Naomi R; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L

2014-11-01

303

Part of the Architectural History and Criticism Commons, Art and Design Commons, Cultural History Commons, and the Modern Art and Architecture Commons Recommended Citation  

E-print Network

This dissertation would not have been possible without the assistance of so many people, to whom I am forever indebted. First of all, I must thank David Brownlee, my advisor, the late Detlef Mertins, Andr Dombrowski, and Bob Ousterhout and other members of the faculty in the Graduate Group of the History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania for all their assistance with this project over the past seven years. Their constant guidance, advice, and monetary support in the form of supplementary summer travel grants to finish my research have been invaluable. I also wish to thank Judith Rohrer, Judith Miller, Joanne Brzinski, and all those at Emory University who first encouraged me to pursue this

Peter Clericuzio; Peter Joseph; Clericuzio Acknowledgements

304

Connectionism and Cognitive Architecture Connectionism and Cognitive Architecture  

E-print Network

Connectionism and Cognitive Architecture Connectionism and Cognitive Architecture: 1A Critical architecture and the sorts of models that have traditionally been assumed in cognitive science. We claim that the major distinction is that, while both Connectionist and Classical architectures postulate

Pylyshyn, Zenon

305

Modeling of common radio resource management scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we first present a systematic view on common radio resource management (CRRM) problems. Then we classify different CRRM levels and propose a categorization framework for CRRM algorithms based on their relationship to load sharing strategies. The proposed model framework based on this systematic view enables a cost-benefit analysis of different CRRM algorithms and architectures. Different centralized or

Andreas Pillekeit; Fariborz Derakhshan; Bruno Mller-clostermann

2007-01-01

306

Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

Malony, Allen D.

2007-05-08

307

Robotic collaborative technology alliance: an open architecture approach to integrated research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) seeks to provide adaptive robot capabilities which move beyond traditional metric algorithms to include cognitive capabilities [1]. Research occurs in 5 main Task Areas: Intelligence, Perception, Dexterous Manipulation and Unique Mobility (DMUM), Human Robot Interaction (HRI), and Integrated Research (IR). This last task of Integrated Research is especially critical and challenging. Individual research components can only be fully assessed when integrated onto a robot where they interact with other aspects of the system to create cross-Task capabilities which move beyond the State of the Art. Adding to the complexity, the RCTA is comprised of 12+ independent organizations across the United States. Each has its own constraints due to development environments, ITAR, "lab" vs "real-time" implementations, and legacy software investments from previous and ongoing programs. We have developed three main components to manage the Integration Task. The first is RFrame, a data-centric transport agnostic middleware which unifies the disparate environments, protocols, and data collection mechanisms. Second is the modular Intelligence Architecture built around the Common World Model (CWM). The CWM instantiates a Common Data Model and provides access services. Third is RIVET, an ITAR free Hardware-In-The-Loop simulator based on 3D game technology. RIVET provides each researcher a common test-bed for development prior to integration, and a regression test mechanism. Once components are integrated and verified, they are released back to the consortium to provide the RIVET baseline for further research. This approach allows Integration of new and legacy systems built upon different architectures, by application of Open Architecture principles.

Dean, Robert Michael S.; DiBerardino, Charles A.

2014-06-01

308

Integrated Architectural Concepts  

E-print Network

attention to energetical concerns and questions on sustainability and the optimisation of resources, leading to the development of an intelligent and economised, architectural solution amid the border area between architecture and technology, is of great...

Schossig, E.

2008-01-01

309

Experiencing architecture, experiencing nature  

E-print Network

The idea for this thesis came from the recognition of the richness in an architectural experience and the desire to understand more about the meaning of this experience in the larger context of architecture and culture. ...

Torres, MaryAlice

1992-01-01

310

Architecture master's programme  

E-print Network

Landscape Architecture ­ master's programme at SLU, Alnarp, Sweden* Starts in September 2011. Last a possibility to in-depth studies in varied areas in the field of Landscape Architecture, for example in open

311

1 Interior Architecture and Design INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE AND  

E-print Network

1 Interior Architecture and Design INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN GW's interior architecture. UNDERGRADUATE Bachelor's program · Bachelor of Fine Arts with a major in interior architecture and design (http://bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/interior- architecture-design/bfa) GRADUATE Master's program · Master of Fine Arts in the field of interior architecture

Vertes, Akos

312

ARCHITECTURE AT McGILL Bachelor of Science in Architecture  

E-print Network

ARCHITECTURE AT McGILL Bachelor of Science in Architecture What is architecture? Architecture. Is this the program for me? Architecture students come to McGill with a wide variety of backgrounds and life? You will need a professional degree in architecture in order to practice as an architect. At Mc

Barthelat, Francois

313

Master of Science in Architecture -  

E-print Network

a Master of Science in Architecture - Architectural Design Milano Bovisa Campus www.polinternational.polimi.it #12;Subjects Main Subjects: Architectural Design Studio, History of Contemporary Architecture, Aesthetics, Culture of Urban Design, Urban Restoration, Materials for Building, Mathematics and Mechanics

314

Automated component creation for legacy C++ and fortran codes.  

SciTech Connect

A significant amount of work has been spent creating component models and programming environments, but little support exists for automation in the process of creating components from existing codes. To entice users to adopt the component-based paradigm over traditional programming models, integration of legacy codes must be as simple and fast as possible, We present a system for automating the IDL generation stage of component development based on source code analysis of legacy C, C-t-4 and Fortran codes using the Program Database Toolkit. Together with IDL compilation tools such as Babel, we provide an alternative to hand-written IDL code for legacy applications and libraries. In addition to generating IDL, we propose an XML-based method for specifying meta-data related to type mapping and wrapper generation that can be shared between our tools and IDL compilers. The component model of choice for this work is the Common Component Architecture (CCA) using the Scientific Interface Definition Language (SIDL), though the concepts presented can be applied to other models.

Sottile, M. J. (Matthew J.); Rasmussen, C. E. (Craig E.)

2001-01-01

315

ZOID: I\\/O-forwarding infrastructure for petascale architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ZeptoOS project is developing an open-source alterna- tive to the proprietary software stacks available on contem- porary massively parallel architectures. The aim is to enable computer science research on these architectures, enhance community collaboration, and foster innovation. In this pa- per, we introduce a component of ZeptoOS called ZOID an I\\/O-forwarding infrastructure for architectures such as IBM Blue Gene

Kamil Iskra; John W. Romein; Kazutomo Yoshii; Peter H. Beckman

2008-01-01

316

On developmental mental architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a computational theory of developmental mental architectures for artificial and natural systems, motivated by neuroscience. The work is an attempt to approximately model biological mental architectures using mathematical tools. Six types of architecture are presented, beginning with the observation-driven Markov decision process as Type-1. From Type-1 to Type-6, the architecture progressively becomes more complete toward the necessary

Juyang Weng

2007-01-01

317

Java based open architecture controller  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) the authors have been developing an open architecture machine tool controller. This work has been patterned after the General Motors (GM) led Open Modular Architecture Controller (OMAC) work, where they have been involved since its inception. The OMAC work has centered on creating sets of implementation neutral application programming interfaces (APIs) for machine control software components. In the work at LLNL, they were among the early adopters of the Java programming language. As an application programming language, it is particularly well suited for component software development. The language contains many features, which along with a well-defined implementation API (such as the OMAC APIs) allows third party binary files to be integrated into a working system. Because of its interpreted nature, Java allows rapid integration testing of components. However, for real-time systems development, the Java programming language presents many drawbacks. For instance, lack of well defined scheduling semantics and threading behavior can present many unwanted challenges. Also, the interpreted nature of the standard Java Virtual Machine (JVM) presents an immediate performance hit. Various real-time Java vendors are currently addressing some of these drawbacks. The various pluses and minuses of using the Java programming language and environment, with regard to a component-based controller, will be outlined.

Weinert, G F

2000-01-13

318

Proceedings 10th International Workshop on the Foundations of Coordination Languages and Software Architectures  

E-print Network

Computation nowadays is becoming inherently concurrent, either because of characteristics of the hardware (with multicore processors becoming omnipresent) or due to the ubiquitous presence of distributed systems (incarnated in the Internet). Computational systems are therefore typically distributed, concurrent, mobile, and often involve composition of heterogeneous components. To specify and reason about such systems and go beyond the functional correctness proofs, e.g., by supporting reusability and improving maintainability, approaches such as coordination languages and software architecture are recognised as fundamental. The goal of the this workshop is to put together researchers and practitioners of the aforementioned fields, to share and identify common problems, and to devise general solutions in the context of coordination languages and software architectures.

Mousavi, Mohammad Reza

2011-01-01

319

An Evaluation of the High Level Architecture (HLA) as a Framework for NASA Modeling and Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The High Level Architecture (HLA) is a current US Department of Defense and an industry (IEEE-1516) standard architecture for modeling and simulations. It provides a framework and set of functional rules and common interfaces for integrating separate and disparate simulators into a larger simulation. The goal of the HLA is to reduce software costs by facilitating the reuse of simulation components and by providing a runtime infrastructure to manage the simulations. In order to evaluate the applicability of the HLA as a technology for NASA space mission simulations, a Simulations Group at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) conducted a study of the HLA and developed a simple prototype HLA-compliant space mission simulator. This paper summarizes the prototyping effort and discusses the potential usefulness of the HLA in the design and planning of future NASA space missions with a focus on risk mitigation and cost reduction.

Reid, Michael R.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

320

Architectural Control Points  

Microsoft Academic Search

System designers and technology strategists have long recognized the concept of an architectural control point as a way to identify parts of a system that have particular strategic importance. Despite the vast body of work on system architecture in the engineering design literature, however, few authors have attempted to define architectural control points or study them systematically. Moreover, some industry

C. Jason WOODARD

2008-01-01

321

High performance parallel architectures  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Anderson, R.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1989-09-01

322

UMTS network architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper proposes a Functional Architecture and a corresponding Network Architecture for the Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS). Procedures like call handling, location management, and handover are considered. The architecture covers the domestic, business, and public environments. Integration with existing and forthcoming networks for fixed communications is anticipated and the Intelligent Network (IN) philosophy is applied.

Katoen, J. P.; Saiedi, A.; Baccaro, I.

1994-05-01

323

bachelor of architecture  

E-print Network

bachelor of science in architecture (B.S.) #12;Student working in studio The B.S. degree prepares studies in a professional degree program in architecture or a related field, including landscape architecture, engineering, art, construction, urban planning, urban design, or historic preservation. Others

Kamat, Vineet R.

324

IIT Architecture Undergraduate  

E-print Network

IIT Architecture Chicago Undergraduate Programs #12;#12;NOWNESS is our approach. There are no more boundaries, no eternal forms. We should not attempt to define architecture in an all-encompassing way but instead make possible an architecture of freedom. Now is the time for opportunities of innovation. Now

Heller, Barbara

325

Architecture AddressingModes  

E-print Network

MIPS R2000 Architecture and Assembly (Part 1) 1. CPU Registers 2. Byte Order 3. AddressingModes 4­endian byte order 3 2 1 0 0 1 2 3 Or Byte number #12; AddressingModes . MIPS is a load/store architecture . RICS -- Load/Store architecture -- All instructions have equal length of 4 bytes -- Every register can

Nguyen, Dat H.

326

NASA Enterprise Architecture and Its Use in Transition of Research Results to Operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Enterprise architecture describes the design of the components of an enterprise, their relationships and how they support the objectives of that enterprise. NASA Stennis Space Center leads several projects involving enterprise architecture tools used to gather information on research assets within NASA's Earth Science Division. In the near future, enterprise architecture tools will link and display the relevant requirements, parameters, observatories, models, decision systems, and benefit/impact information relationships and map to the Federal Enterprise Architecture Reference Models. Components configured within the enterprise architecture serving the NASA Applied Sciences Program include the Earth Science Components Knowledge Base, the Systems Components database, and the Earth Science Architecture Tool. The Earth Science Components Knowledge Base systematically catalogues NASA missions, sensors, models, data products, model products, and network partners appropriate for consideration in NASA Earth Science applications projects. The Systems Components database is a centralized information warehouse of NASA's Earth Science research assets and a critical first link in the implementation of enterprise architecture. The Earth Science Architecture Tool is used to analyze potential NASA candidate systems that may be beneficial to decision-making capabilities of other Federal agencies. Use of the current configuration of NASA enterprise architecture (the Earth Science Components Knowledge Base, the Systems Components database, and the Earth Science Architecture Tool) has far exceeded its original intent and has tremendous potential for the transition of research results to operational entities.

Frisbie, T. E.; Hall, C. M.

2006-12-01

327

Open Architecture SDR for Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes an open-architecture SDR (software defined radio) infrastructure that is suitable for space-based operations (Space-SDR). SDR technologies will endow space and planetary exploration systems with dramatically increased capability, reduced power consumption, and significantly less mass than conventional systems, at costs reduced by vigorous competition, hardware commonality, dense integration, reduced obsolescence, interoperability, and software re-use. Significant progress has been recorded on developments like the Joint Tactical Radio System (JSTRS) Software Communication Architecture (SCA), which is oriented toward reconfigurable radios for defense forces operating in multiple theaters of engagement. The JTRS-SCA presents a consistent software interface for waveform development, and facilitates interoperability, waveform portability, software re-use, and technology evolution.

Smith, Carl; Long, Chris; Liebetreu, John; Reinhart, Richard C.

2005-01-01

328

Advanced high-performance computer system architectures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Convergence of computer systems and communication technologies are moving to switched high-performance modular system architectures on the basis of high-speed switched interconnections. Multi-core processors become more perspective way to high-performance system, and traditional parallel bus system architectures (VME/VXI, cPCI/PXI) are moving to new higher speed serial switched interconnections. Fundamentals in system architecture development are compact modular component strategy, low-power processor, new serial high-speed interface chips on the board, and high-speed switched fabric for SAN architectures. Overview of advanced modular concepts and new international standards for development high-performance embedded and compact modular systems for real-time applications are described.

Vinogradov, V. I.

2007-02-01

329

Architectural Prescriptions for Dependable Systems Manuel Brandozzi, Dewayne E. Perry  

E-print Network

on various levels. We categorize architectural solutions to non-functional requirements according for non- functional requirements just adds new components to the system; the second kind modifies only), provides a framework to enforce non-functional (dependability) requirements at the architectural level. 1

Perry, Dewayne E.

330

Towards a RealTime MultiAgent System Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last few years, the application of the agent\\/multi- agent system paradigm seems appropriate for solving com- plex problems which require intelligence and bounded res- ponse times. This paper presents SIMBA: an architecture based on ARTIS agents as its main component for the deve- lopment of real-time multiagent systems. The ARTIS agent architecture guarantees an agent response that satises

Jose Soler; Vicente Julian; Miguel Rebollo; Carlos Carrascosa; Vicente Botti

331

First International Workshop on Variability in Software Architecture (VARSA 2011)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variability is the ability of a software artifact to be changed for a specific context. Mechanisms to accommodate variability include software product lines, configuration wizards and tools in commercial software, configuration interfaces of software components, or the dynamic runtime composition of web services. Variability is primarily reflected in and facilitated through the software architecture. Also, the software architecture is the

Matthias Galster; Danny Weyns; Tomi Mannisto

2011-01-01

332

Reconfigurable Transceiver and Software-Defined Radio Architecture and Technology Evaluated for NASA Space Communications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the development and suitability of a software-based open-architecture for space-based reconfigurable transceivers (RTs) and software-defined radios (SDRs). The main objectives of this project are to enable advanced operations and reduce mission costs. SDRs are becoming more common because of the capabilities of reconfigurable digital signal processing technologies such as field programmable gate arrays and digital signal processors, which place radio functions in firmware and software that were traditionally performed with analog hardware components. Features of interest of this communications architecture include nonproprietary open standards and application programming interfaces to enable software reuse and portability, independent hardware and software development, and hardware and software functional separation. The goals for RT and SDR technologies for NASA space missions include prelaunch and on-orbit frequency and waveform reconfigurability and programmability, high data rate capability, and overall communications and processing flexibility. These operational advances over current state-of-art transceivers will be provided to reduce the power, mass, and cost of RTs and SDRs for space communications. The open architecture for NASA communications will support existing (legacy) communications needs and capabilities while providing a path to more capable, advanced waveform development and mission concepts (e.g., ad hoc constellations with self-healing networks and high-rate science data return). A study was completed to assess the state of the art in RT architectures, implementations, and technologies. In-house researchers conducted literature searches and analysis, interviewed Government and industry contacts, and solicited information and white papers from industry on space-qualifiable RTs and SDRs and their associated technologies for space-based NASA applications. The white papers were evaluated, compiled, and used to assess RT and SDR system architectures and core technology elements to determine an appropriate investment strategy to advance these technologies to meet future mission needs. The use of these radios in the space environment represents a challenge because of the space radiation suitability of the components, which drastically reduces the processing capability. The radios available for space are considered to be RTs (as opposed to SDRs), which are digitally programmable radios with selectable changes from an architecture combining analog and digital components. The limited flexibility of this design contrasts against the desire to have a power-efficient solution and open architecture.

Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

2004-01-01

333

A cochlear heterodyning architecture for an RF fovea  

E-print Network

We describe a novel wireless receiver architecture that is a broadband generalization of narrowband heterodyning systems commonly used in radio. It can be constructed with cochlea-like traveling-wave structures. We show ...

Mandal, Soumyajit

334

Sexual reproduction reshapes the genetic architecture of digital organisms  

E-print Network

Sexual reproduction reshapes the genetic architecture of digital organisms Dusan Misevic1 in sexual than in asexual organisms. Our results show that sexual reproduction profoundly influences & Gerhart 1998). While sexual reproduction with obligatory recombination is also common (Bell 1982

335

High Performance Connected Components Labeling on FPGA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a comparison of the two most advanced algorithms for connected components labeling, highlighting how they perform on a soft core SoC architecture based on FPGA. In particular we test our block based connected components labeling algorithm, optimized with decision tables and decision trees. The embedded system is composed of the CMOS image sensor, FPGA, DDR SDRAM, USB

Costantino Grana; Daniele Borghesani; Paolo Santinelli; Rita Cucchiara

2010-01-01

336

Overview of Digital Library Components and Developments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Digital libraries are being built upon a firm foundation of prior work as the high-end information systems of the future. A component architecture approach is becoming popular, with well established support for key components like the repository, especially through the Open Archives Initiative. We consider digital objects, metadata, harvesting, indexing, searching, browsing, rights management, linking, and powerful interfaces. Flexible interaction

Edward A. Fox

337

Parallel supercomputing with commodity components  

SciTech Connect

We have implemented a parallel computer architecture based entirely upon commodity personal computer components. Using 16 Intel Pentium Pro microprocessors and switched fast ethernet as a communication fabric, we have obtained sustained performance on scientific applications in excess of one Gigaflop. During one production astrophysics treecode simulation, we performed 1.2 x 10{sup 15} floating point operations (1.2 Petaflops) over a three week period, with one phase of that simulation running continuously for two weeks without interruption. We report on a variety of disk, memory and network benchmarks. We also present results from the NAS parallel benchmark suite, which indicate that this architecture is competitive with current commercial architectures. In addition, we describe some software written to support efficient message passing, as well as a Linux device driver interface to the Pentium hardware performance monitoring registers.

Warren, M.S.; Goda, M.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Becker, D.J. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

1997-09-01

338

Low cost control system with hierarchy architecture for sequencer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A low cost control system with hierarchy architecture for sequencer is designed in this paper. A touch screen computer is used as master computer to realize Human Machine Interface (HMI). A programmable logic controller (PLC) works as slave computer to receive sequence file and instructions from the master computer. It controls the component arranging, component inspecting, and component taping processes.

Ping Yang; De Xu

2010-01-01

339

Abstractions for Software Architecture and Tools to Support Them  

Microsoft Academic Search

Architectures for software use rich abstractions and idioms to describe system components, the nature of interactions among the components, and the patterns that guide the composition of components into systems. These abstractions are higher-level than the elements usually supported by programming languages and tools. They capture packaging and interaction is- sues as well as computational functionality. Well-established (if informal) patterns

Mary Shaw; Robert Deline; Daniel V. Klein; Theodore L. Ross; David M. Young; Gregory Zelesnik

1995-01-01

340

Extensible Hardware Architecture for Mobile Robots  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center has developed a new mobile robot hardware architecture designed for extensibility and reconfigurability. Currently implemented on the k9 rover. and won to be integrated onto the K10 series of human-robot collaboration research robots, this architecture allows for rapid changes in instrumentation configuration and provides a high degree of modularity through a synergistic mix of off-the-shelf and custom designed components, allowing eased transplantation into a wide vane6 of mobile robot platforms. A component level overview of this architecture is presented along with a description of the changes required for implementation on K10 , followed by plans for future work.

Park, Eric; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Susan Y.

2005-01-01

341

Requirements for a common GUI architecture for ultrasound applications  

E-print Network

Different kinds of ultrasound equipment exist in the market today. But none of these offer features like interoperability and portability that is of very high importance (in certain situations like on the battlefield). It is to provide...

Muthukrishnan, Sreenivas

2001-01-01

342

Architectural Support for Efficient Communication in Future Microprocessors  

E-print Network

Traditionally, the microprocessor design has focused on the computational aspects of the problem at hand. However, as the number of components on a single chip continues to increase, the design of communication architecture has become a crucial...

Jin, Yu Ho

2010-01-16

343

AUTONOMY ARCHITECTURES FOR A CONSTELLATION OF SPACECRAFT Anthony Barrett  

E-print Network

AUTONOMY ARCHITECTURES FOR A CONSTELLATION OF SPACECRAFT Anthony Barrett Jet Propulsion Laboratory a hundred spacecraft (such as for interferometer or magnetospheric constellation missions). 1. INTRODUCTION software components of autonomous spacecraft and constellations, the next section describes a master

Schaffer, Steven

344

Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits in Plants  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Genetic architecture refers to the numbers and genome locations of genes affecting a trait, the magnitude of their effects, and the relative contributions of additive, dominant, and epistatic gene effects. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping techniques are commonly used to investigate genetic ar...

345

Web Service Architecture Framework for Embedded Devices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of Service Oriented Architectures, namely web services, has become a widely adopted method for transfer of data between systems across the Internet as well as the Enterprise. Adopting a similar approach to embedded devices is also starting to emerge as personal devices and sensor networks are becoming more common in the industry. This

Yanzick, Paul David

2009-01-01

346

An architecture for combining ways to think  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why have AI researchers not been able to give computers human-like 'common sense', the ability to think about ordinary things the way people can? In our view, the source of the difficulty is that they too often seek after types of cognitive architectures, kinds of representations, and methods of inference that are based on some single, simple process, theory, or

Push Singh; Marvin Minsky

2003-01-01

347

Integrated computer control system architectural overview  

SciTech Connect

This overview introduces the NIF Integrated Control System (ICCS) architecture. The design is abstract to allow the construction of many similar applications from a common framework. This summary lays the essential foundation for understanding the model-based engineering approach used to execute the design.

Van Arsdall, P.

1997-06-18

348

Hardware architectures for public key cryptography  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of hardware implementations for the two commonly used types of Public Key Cryptography, i.e. RSA and Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC), both based on modular arithmetic. We first discuss the mathematical back- ground and the algorithms to implement these cryptosystems. Next an overview is given of the dierent hardware architectures which have been proposed in the

Lejla Batina; Siddika Berna rs; Bart Preneel; Joos Vandewalle

2003-01-01

349

Distributed component technologies and their software engineering implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this state of the art report, we review advances in distributed component technologies, such as the Enterprise Java Beans specification and the CORBA Component Model. We assess the state of industrial practice in the use of distributed components. We show several architectural styles for whose implementation distributed components have been used successfully. We review the use of iterative and

Wolfgang Emmerich

2002-01-01

350

Overview of the CORBA Component Model. Chapter 38, Section 6  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) object model is increasingly gaining acceptance as the industry standard, cross-platform, cross-language distributed object computing model. The recent addition of the CORBA Component Model (CCM) integrates a successful component programming model from EJB, while maintaining the interoperability and language-neutrality of CORBA. The CCM programming model is thus suitable for leveraging proven technologies and existing services to develop the next-generation of highly scalable distributed applications. However, the CCM specification is large and complex. Therefore, ORB providers have only started implementing the specification recently. As with first-generation CORBA implementations several years ago, it is still hard to evaluate the quality and performance of CCM implementations. Moreover, the interoperability of components and containers from different providers is not well understood yet. By the end of next year, we expect that CCM providers will implement the complete specification, as well as support value-added enhancements to their implementations, just as operating system and ORB providers have done historically. In particular, containers provided by the CCM component model implementation provide quality of service (QoS) capabilities for CCM components, and can be extended to provide more services to components to relieve components from implementing these functionalities in an ad-hoc way (Wang, 2000b). These container QoS extensions provide services that can monitor and control certain aspects of components behaviors that cross-cut different programming layers or require close interaction among components, containers, and operating systems. As CORBA and the CCM evolve, we expect some of these enhancements will be incorporated into the CCM specification.

Claus, Russell W. (Technical Monitor); Wang, Nanbor; Schmidt, Douglas C.; ORyan, Carlos

2001-01-01

351

Architecture of interiority (architecture of traces)  

E-print Network

In a growing globalized world where ideas of connections, transparency and exposure are becoming commonplace, the need will arise to devise an architecture that addresses issues of identity and belonging by creating places ...

Michel, Nicole Yael, 1977-

2002-01-01

352

PIN: a binary instrumentation tool for computer architecture research and education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer architecture embraces a tremendous number of ever-changing inter-connected concepts and information, yet computer architecture education is very often static, seemingly motionless. Computer architecture is commonly taught using simple piecewise methods of explaining how the hardware performs a given task, rather than characterizing the interaction of software and hardware. Visualization tools allow students to interactively explore basic concepts in computer

Vijay Janapa Reddi; Alex Settle; Daniel A. Connors; Robert S. Cohn

2004-01-01

353

Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This

Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

2012-01-01

354

Distributed Architectures for Event-Based Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Event-driven distributed systems have two important characteristics, which differentiate them from other system types: the\\u000a existence of several software or hardware components that run simultaneously on different inter-networked nodes, and the use\\u000a of events as the main vehicle to organize component intercommunication. Clearly, both attributes influence event-driven distributed\\u000a architectures, which are discussed in this chapter. We start with presenting the

Valentin Cristea; Florin Pop; Ciprian Dobre; Alexandru Costan

355

The Mermaid Architecture-workbench for Multicomputers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cache hierarchyBusFigure 3: The template architecture models.defines a bus component. It is a simple forwarding mechanism, carrying out arbitrationupon multiple accesses. The parameters used to configure this component include buswidth,bus cycle-time and arbitration details. Changing the bus to a more complex structure,such as a multistage network, can be done without too much remodelling effort. Inthat case, only a new Pearl

1996-01-01

356

Ultra long-life avionics architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For survival and achieving reliability in ultra long-life missions, fault tolerant design techniques need to handle the predominant failure mode, which is the wear-out of components. Conventional design methodologies will need excessive redundancy to achieve the required reliability. The objective of this paper is to present a new approach to design a more efficient fault-tolerant avionics system architecture that requires significantly fewer redundant components.

Chau, S. N.; Sengupta, A.; Tran, T.; Bakhshi, A.; Kia, T.

2002-01-01

357

Designing modular architectures in the framework AKIRA  

Microsoft Academic Search

AKIRA is an open source framework designed for parallel, asynchronous and distributed computation, on the basis of some general architectural principles which are inspired by modular organization in biological systems. We introduce the motivation behind its design, the components of the framework and some examples of use: 1) a case study in a simple number domain, in which its capabilities

Giovanni Pezzulo; Gianguglielmo Calvi

2007-01-01

358

Concrete Architecture of LEAP Database Management System  

E-print Network

or teach databases" originally written as an undergraduate project by Richard Leyton. LEAP is written in CConcrete Architecture of LEAP Database Management System Analyzed by BASEM SHIHADA bshihada CONCRETE ARCITECTURE 3.1 Reverse Engineering Toolkit 3.2 LEAP Sub-systems Graph 3.3 LEAP Components

Shihada, Basem

359

Intelligent system design and architectural patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article introduces design and architectural patterns useful in intelligent systems engineering. Patterns are represented using class, collaboration, and sequence diagrams from the unified modeling language (UML) specialized relative to various components and subsystems of an intelligent system (IS). An IS pattern is seen an entity that is vaguely defined relative to structural and functional features of an intelligent system.

James F. Peters; Sheela Ramanna

2003-01-01

360

Compatibility and inheritance in software architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of formal methods to the development of software depends on the availability of adequate models and formalisms for each of the stages of the de- velopment process. In this work, we focus on the level of design called Software Architecture. At this level, the system is described as a collection of interrelated components, and it is here where

Carlos Canal; Ernesto Pimentel; Jos M. Troya

2001-01-01

361

The Delta4 extra performance architecture (XPA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design of an extra performance architecture for Delta-4, which explicitly supports the requirements of real-time systems with respect to throughput and response, is presented. The Delta-4 approach to fault tolerance is based on the replication of software components on distinct host computers using a range of different replication strategies. The problems of replicate divergence are discussed, and a solution

P. A. Barret; A. M. Hilborne; P. G. Bond; D. T. Seaton; P. Verissimo; L. Rodrigues; N. A. Speirs

1990-01-01

362

Development of the control system for the 40m OAN radiotelescope with the Alma Common Software  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Observatorio Astronmico Nacional (OAN) is building a 40m radiotelescope in its facilities in Yebes (Spain) which will be delivered in summer 2006. The radiotelescope is an instrument composed of antenna, receivers, backends, and auxiliary equipment connected through a Local Area Network (LAN). The control system has to deal with a distributed environment which needs to be remotely controlled and monitored from external heterogeneous users (astronomers and engineers) and requires multiple processes simultaneously working and being synchronized. We have chosen the Alma Common Software (ACS) framework for the development of the control system. ACS provides an implementation of the component/container paradigm via Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and also provides general purpose utility libraries, hiding the complexity of CORBA to the developer. ACS is supported by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the National Radioastronomy Observatory (NRAO) for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) with a lifetime similar to our radiotelescope. This is an important guarantee for the OAN with a very reduced software team. We present an overview of the planned software architecture of the radiotelescope and the current status of the development of the components.

de Vicente, P.; Bolao, R.; Barbas, L.

2006-07-01

363

Texture-Based Metrics Visualization on Software Architecture Diagrams Heorhiy Byelas Alexandru Telea  

E-print Network

Texture-Based Metrics Visualization on Software Architecture Diagrams Heorhiy Byelas Alexandru, such as classes or components in UML diagrams, together with metrics computed on diagram element members on architecture diagrams extracted from real-world software systems. 1 Introduction Architecture diagrams

Telea, Alexandru C.

364

A Scalable Application Architecture for Composing News Portals on the Internet  

E-print Network

A Scalable Application Architecture for Composing News Portals on the Internet Serpil Tok and Zeki architecture for building news portals on the Internet. The main component of this architecture is XML Web a desktop program. Articles are kept in different databases for each author. Various news portals can

Bayram, Zeki

365

Architecture-Based Conformance Testing Elena Leroux, Flavio Oquendo, and Qin Xiong  

E-print Network

Architecture-Based Conformance Testing Elena Leroux, Flavio Oquendo, and Qin Xiong IRISA--In the last two decades, software architecture has played a central role in the development of software abstractions of the system's components and their interactions. In our work, the software architecture

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Smart City: An Event Driven Architecture for Monitoring Public Spaces with Heterogeneous Sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present the Smart City Architecture developed in the context of the ARTEMIS JU SP3 SOFIA project. It is an Event Driven Architecture that allows the management and cooperation of heterogeneous sensors for monitoring public spaces. The main components of the architecture are implemented in a testbed on a subway scenario with the objective to demonstrate that

Luca Filipponi; Andrea Vitaletti; Giada Landi; Vincenzo Memeo; Giorgio Laura; Paolo Pucci

2010-01-01

367

No Common Opinion on the Common Core  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the three authors of this article, the 2014 "EdNext" poll yields four especially important new findings: (1) Opinion with respect to the Common Core has yet to coalesce. The idea of a common set of standards across the country has wide appeal, and the Common Core itself still commands the support of a majority of the public.

Henderson, Michael B.; Peterson, Paul E.; West, Martin R.

2015-01-01

368

Gravity response mechanisms of lateral organs and the control of plant architecture in Arabidopsis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most research on gravity responses in plants has focused on primary roots and shoots, which typically grow in a vertical orientation. However, the patterns of lateral organ formation and their growth orientation, which typically are not vertical, govern plant architecture. For example, in Arabidopsis, when lateral roots emerge from the primary root, they grow at a nearly horizontal orientation. As they elongate, the roots slowly curve until they eventually reach a vertical orientation. The regulation of this lateral root orientation is an important component affecting the overall root system architecture. We have found that this change in orientation is not simply due to the onset of gravitropic competence, as non-vertical lateral roots are capable of both positive and negative gravitropism. Thus, the horizontal growth of the new lateral roots is determined by what is called the gravitropic set-point angle (GSA). In Arabidopsis shoots, rosette leaves and inflorescence branches also display GSA-dependent developmental changes in their orientation. The developmental control of the GSA of lateral organs in Arabidopsis provides us with a useful system for investigating the components involved in regulating directionality of tropistic responses. We have identified several Arabidopsis mutants that have either altered lateral root orientations, altered orientation of lateral organs in the shoot, or both, but maintain normal primary organ orientation. The mgsa ({m}odified {g}ravitropic {s}et-point {a}ngle) mutants with both altered lateral root and shoot orientation show that there are common components in the regulation of growth orientation in the different organs. Rosette leaves and lateral roots also have in common a regulation of positioning by red light. Further molecular and physiological analyses of the GSA mutants will provide insight into the basis of GSA regulation and, thus, a better understanding of how gravity controls plant architecture. [This work was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through grant no. NCC 2-1200.

Mullen, J.; Hangarter, R.

369

Common Polymorphisms in Angiogenesis  

PubMed Central

A wide variety of diseases have a significant genetic component, including major causes of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Many of these diseases are also angiogenesis dependent. In humans, common polymorphisms, although more subtle in effect than rare mutations that cause Mendelian disease, are expected to have greater overall effects on human disease. Thus, common polymorphisms in angiogenesis-regulating genes may affect the response to an angiogenic stimulus and thereby affect susceptibility to or progression of such diseases. Candidate gene studies have identified several associations between angiogenesis gene polymorphisms and disease. Similarly, emerging pharmacogenomic evidence indicates that several angiogenesis-regulating polymorphisms may predict response to therapy. In contrast, genome-wide association studies have identified only a few risk alleles in obvious angiogenesis genes. As in other traits, regulatory polymorphisms appear to dominate the landscape of angiogenic responsiveness. Rodent assays, including the mouse corneal micropocket assay, tumor models, and a macular degeneration model have allowed the identification and comparison of loci that directly affect the trait. Complementarity between human and animal approaches will allow increased understanding of the genetic basis for angiogenesis-dependent disease. PMID:23125197

Rogers, Michael S.; DAmato, Robert J.

2012-01-01

370

Architecture Rationalization: A Methodology for Architecture Verifiability, Traceability and Completeness  

E-print Network

Architecture Rationalization: A Methodology for Architecture Verifiability, Traceability-mail: {atang, jhan}@it.swin.edu.au Abstract Architecture modeling is practiced extensively in the software of architecture designs. Deficiencies in any of these three areas in an architecture model can be costly and risky

Han, Jun

371

GPGPU Processing in CUDA Architecture  

E-print Network

The future of computation is the Graphical Processing Unit, i.e. the GPU. The promise that the graphics cards have shown in the field of image processing and accelerated rendering of 3D scenes, and the computational capability that these GPUs possess, they are developing into great parallel computing units. It is quite simple to program a graphics processor to perform general parallel tasks. But after understanding the various architectural aspects of the graphics processor, it can be used to perform other taxing tasks as well. In this paper, we will show how CUDA can fully utilize the tremendous power of these GPUs. CUDA is NVIDIA's parallel computing architecture. It enables dramatic increases in computing performance, by harnessing the power of the GPU. This paper talks about CUDA and its architecture. It takes us through a comparison of CUDA C/C++ with other parallel programming languages like OpenCL and DirectCompute. The paper also lists out the common myths about CUDA and how the future seems to be pro...

Ghorpade, Jayshree; Kulkarni, Madhura; Bawaskar, Amit

2012-01-01

372

Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

2014-01-01

373

An Architecture of Embedded Decompressor with Reconfigurability for Test Compression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Test compression/decompression scheme for reducing the test application time and memory requirement of an LSI tester has been proposed. In the scheme, the employed coding algorithms are tailored to a given test data, so that the tailored coding algorithm can highly compress the test data. However, these methods have some drawbacks, e. g., the coding algorithm is ineffective in extra test data except for the given test data. In this paper, we introduce an embedded decompressor that is reconfigurable according to coding algorithms and given test data. Its reconfigurability can overcome the drawbacks of conventional decompressors with keeping high compression ratio. Moreover, we propose an architecture of reconfigurable decompressors for four variable-length codings. In the proposed architecture, the common functions for four codings are implemented as fixed (or non-reconfigurable) components so as to reduce the configuration data, which is stored on an ATE and sent to a CUT. Experimental results show that (1) the configuration data size becomes reasonably small by reducing the configuration part of the decompressor, (2) the reconfigurable decompressor is effective for SoC testing in respect of the test data size, and (3) it can achieve an optimal compression of test data by Huffman coding.

Ichihara, Hideyuki; Saiki, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Tomoo

374

Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture.  

PubMed

The Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping of plant architecture is a critical step for understanding the genetic determinism of plant architecture. Previous studies adopted simple measurements, such as plant-height, stem-diameter and branching-intensity for QTL mapping of plant architecture. Many of these quantitative traits were generally correlated to each other, which give rise to statistical problem in the detection of QTL. We aim to test the applicability of kernel methods to phenotyping inflorescence architecture and its QTL mapping. We first test Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) over an artificial dataset of simulated inflorescences with different types of flower distribution, which is coded as a sequence of flower-number per node along a shoot. The ability of discriminating the different inflorescence types by SVM and KPCA is illustrated. We then apply the KPCA representation to the real dataset of rose inflorescence shoots (n=1460) obtained from a 98 F1 hybrid mapping population. We find kernel principal components with high heritability (>0.7), and the QTL analysis identifies a new QTL, which was not detected by a trait-by-trait analysis of simple architectural measurements. The main tools developed in this paper could be use to tackle the general problem of QTL mapping of complex (sequences, 3D structure, graphs) phenotypic traits. PMID:24211258

Kawamura, Koji; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Foucher, Fabrice; Thouroude, Tatiana; Loustau, Sbastien

2014-02-01

375

GNC Architecture Design for ARES Simulation. Revision 3.0. Revision 3.0  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this document is to describe the GNC architecture and associated interfaces for all ARES simulations. Establishing a common architecture facilitates development across the ARES simulations and provides an efficient mechanism for creating an end-to-end simulation capability. In general, the GNC architecture is the frame work in which all GNC development takes place, including sensor and effector models. All GNC software applications have a standard location within the architecture making integration easier and, thus more efficient.

Gay, Robert

2006-01-01

376

Brain components  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

377

Blood Components  

MedlinePLUS

... of volume) suspended in plasma (~55% of volume). Red cells Red cells, or erythrocytes , carry oxygen from the lungs ... frozen plasma. Transfusable Blood Components Summary Whole Blood Red Blood Cells Platelets Plasma Cryoprecipitated AHF COLOR OF ...

378

Interactive agent generated architecture  

E-print Network

The thesis explores architectural form generation through two behavior based artificial intelligence approaches: the communication of agents in an unpredictable simulation system, and the codification of information within ...

Krause, Jeffrey Charles Stanley

1996-01-01

379

Architectural disruption in aerospace  

E-print Network

Distinctive technology and customer / supplier relationships are currently the primary sources of competitive advantage in the Aerospace industry. Modular Open System Architecture (MOSA) requirements represent a significant ...

Ashworth, Geoffrey (Geoffrey John)

2009-01-01

380

Understanding EPIC Architectures and Implementations  

Microsoft Academic Search

HP and Intel have recently introduced a new s tyle of instruction set architecture called EPIC (Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing), and a specific architecture called the IPF (Itanium Processor Family). This paper seeks to illustrate the differences between EPIC architectures and former styles of instruction set architectures such as superscalar and VLIW. Several aspects of EPIC architectures have already appeared

Mark Smotherman

381

ArchiTecTUre UNDERGRADUATE  

E-print Network

UTS: DeSign ArchiTecTUre & BUilDing UNDERGRADUATE COURSES GUIDE 2014 dab.uts.edu.au ThINk.ChANGE.DO #12;2 WElCOmETOUTS: DESIGN, ARChITECTURE & bUIlDING CONTENTS Why Design, Architecture & building 14 bachelor of Design in Visual Communication 16 ARChITECTURE 18 bachelor of Design in Architecture

University of Technology, Sydney

382

SEAL: Common Core Libraries and Services for LHC Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CERN LHC experiments have begun the LHC Computing Grid project in 2001. One of the project's aims is to develop common software infrastructure based on a development vision shared by the participating experiments. The SEAL project will provide common foundation libraries, services and utilities identified by the project's architecture blueprint report. This requires a broad range of functionality that

J. Generowicz; P. Mato; L. Moneta; S. Roiser; M. Marino; L A Tuura

2003-01-01

383

Transformation of painting into architecture : museum for the works of F. Lembersky  

E-print Network

Art and architecture share a common goal and similar formal principles. Their common goal is to express and abstract spiritual content through harmonious, pure and beautiful material form. The shared principles of form ...

Lembersky, Yelena

1994-01-01

384

Common Control System Vulnerability  

SciTech Connect

The Control Systems Security Program and other programs within the Idaho National Laboratory have discovered a vulnerability common to control systems in all sectors that allows an attacker to penetrate most control systems, spoof the operator, and gain full control of targeted system elements. This vulnerability has been identified on several systems that have been evaluated at INL, and in each case a 100% success rate of completing the attack paths that lead to full system compromise was observed. Since these systems are employed in multiple critical infrastructure sectors, this vulnerability is deemed common to control systems in all sectors. Modern control systems architectures can be considered analogous to today's information networks, and as such are usually approached by attackers using a common attack methodology to penetrate deeper and deeper into the network. This approach often is composed of several phases, including gaining access to the control network, reconnaissance, profiling of vulnerabilities, launching attacks, escalating privilege, maintaining access, and obscuring or removing information that indicates that an intruder was on the system. With irrefutable proof that an external attack can lead to a compromise of a computing resource on the organization's business local area network (LAN), access to the control network is usually considered the first phase in the attack plan. Once the attacker gains access to the control network through direct connections and/or the business LAN, the second phase of reconnaissance begins with traffic analysis within the control domain. Thus, the communications between the workstations and the field device controllers can be monitored and evaluated, allowing an attacker to capture, analyze, and evaluate the commands sent among the control equipment. Through manipulation of the communication protocols of control systems (a process generally referred to as ''reverse engineering''), an attacker can then map out the control system processes and functions. With the detailed knowledge of how the control data functions, as well as what computers and devices communicate using this data, the attacker can use a well known Man-in-the-Middle attack to perform malicious operations virtually undetected. The control systems assessment teams have used this method to gather enough information about the system to craft an attack that intercepts and changes the information flow between the end devices (controllers) and the human machine interface (HMI and/or workstation). Using this attack, the cyber assessment team has been able to demonstrate complete manipulation of devices in control systems while simultaneously modifying the data flowing back to the operator's console to give false information of the state of the system (known as ''spoofing''). This is a very effective technique for a control system attack because it allows the attacker to manipulate the system and the operator's situational awareness of the perceived system status. The three main elements of this attack technique are: (1) network reconnaissance and data gathering, (2) reverse engineering, and (3) the Man-in-the-Middle attack. The details of this attack technique and the mitigation techniques are discussed.

Trent Nelson

2005-12-01

385

TRANSIMS software architecture for IOC-1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the TRANSIMS software architecture and high-level design for the first Interim Operational Capability (IOC-1). Our primary goal in establishing the TRANSIMS software architecture is to lay down a framework for IOC-1. We aim to make sure that the various components of TRANSIMS are effectively integrated, both for IOC-1 and beyond, so that TRANSIMS remains flexible, expandable, portable, and maintainable throughout its lifetime. In addition to outlining the high-level design of the TRANSIMS software, we also set forth the software development environment and software engineering practices used for TRANSIMS.

Berkbigler, K.P.; Bush, B.W.; Davis, J.F.

1997-04-03

386

Model-Drive Architecture for Agent-Based Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Model Driven Architecture (MDA) approach uses a platform-independent model to define system functionality, or requirements, using some specification language. The requirements are then translated to a platform-specific model for implementation. An agent architecture based on the human cognitive model of planning, the Cognitive Agent Architecture (Cougaar) is selected for the implementation platform. The resulting Cougaar MDA prescribes certain kinds of models to be used, how those models may be prepared and the relationships of the different kinds of models. Using the existing Cougaar architecture, the level of application composition is elevated from individual components to domain level model specifications in order to generate software artifacts. The software artifacts generation is based on a metamodel. Each component maps to a UML structured component which is then converted into multiple artifacts: Cougaar/Java code, documentation, and test cases.

Gradanin, Denis; Singh, H. Lally; Bohner, Shawn A.; Hinchey, Michael G.

2004-01-01

387

Components in the Pipeline  

SciTech Connect

Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan (Jenny); Yin, Jian

2011-02-24

388

Common Platform Enumeration: Dictionary  

E-print Network

Common Platform Enumeration: Dictionary Specification Version 2.3 Paul Cichonski David Waltermire Karen Scarfone NIST Interagency Report 7697 #12;Common Platform Enumeration: Dictionary Specification and Director NIST Interagency Report 7697 #12;COMMON PLATFORM ENUMERATION (CPE): DICTIONARY SPECIFICATION

389

Migraine and Common Morbidities  

MedlinePLUS

... headaches . Home > Migraine and Common Morbidities Print Email Migraine and Common Morbidities ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine and Common Morbidities For many patients, migraine is ...

390

COMPONENT User's Guide Consensus trees  

E-print Network

COMPONENT User's Guide Chapter 4 Consensus trees Consensus trees are a convenient way to summarise the agreement between two or more trees. This chapter describes the consensus methods available in COMPONENT subtree (Kubicka et al, 1992; also called the common pruned tree [Finden and Gordon, 1985]). This method

Page, Roderic

391

College of Design ARC Architecture  

E-print Network

College of Design ARC Architecture KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped,landscape,andarchitecturalspaceswithattentiontotheirapplicationtothearchitecturalexperience.Studio:4hoursperweek. Prereq: Admission to the School of Architecture. ARC 102 DRAWING II: OBSERVATIONAL OF ARCHITECTURE. (3

MacAdam, Keith

392

Color in architecture  

E-print Network

Good design can be spoiled by poor color. Weak design can be helped by good color. Color is therefore of prime importance as an integral element of architectural design. Color is vitally related to man in many fields. The study of architecture...

Vrooman, Richard

1952-01-01

393

Study Abroad in Architecture  

E-print Network

Study Abroad in Architecture Studying abroad is increasingly important for architecture majors when you enter the job market. Why should I go abroad? Studying abroad is an opportunity to not only studies and career. Some of the potential benefits of going abroad include: Gain an international

Heller, Barbara

394

Emerging supercomputer architectures  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the current and near future trends for commercially available high-performance computers with architectures that differ from the mainstream ''supercomputer'' systems in use for the last few years. These emerging supercomputer architectures are just beginning to have an impact on the field of high performance computing. 7 refs., 1 tab.

Messina, P.C.

1987-01-01

395

The Technology of Architecture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses how career and technical education is helping students draw up plans for success in architectural technology. According to the College of DuPage (COD) in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, one of the two-year schools offering training in architectural technology, graduates have a number of opportunities available to them. They may work

Reese, Susan

2006-01-01

396

Teaching Software Architecture Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teaching software architecture design in an academic course so that it would equip the students with industrially useful capabilities is challenging. The real software architecture design problems are less clear than what the students are used to learning; the existing mass of assets of an industrial environment is hard to bring into a classroom; and so forth. We have designed

Tomi Mnnist; Juha Savolainen; Varvana Myllrniemi

2008-01-01

397

Aesthetics of sustainable architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this book is to reveal, explore and further the debate on the aesthetic potentials of sustainable architecture and its practice. This book opens a new area of scholarship and discourse in the design and production of sustainable architecture, one that is based in aesthetics. The chapters in this book have been compiled from architects and scholars working

S. Lee

2011-01-01

398

Architecture Summer Orientation  

E-print Network

-personal.umich.edu/~nscholtz/orientation-v1.html #12;Art, Architecture & Engineering Library Rebecca Price / rpw@umich.edu / 647-5274 / http://www.lib.umich.edu/aael #12;Art, Architecture & Engineering Library Rebecca Price / rpw@umich.edu / 647-5274 / http? 2010: TAIWAN, JAPAN, ICELAND, FRANCE, SPAIN, ITALY, BEIJING 2011: ICELAND, FRANCE, SPAIN, NETHERLAND

Kamat, Vineet R.

399

Information Architecture Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Information Architecture Library is a selection of resources (articles, books, blogs, and other genres) related to the field of information architecture. The library is browseable by subject, resource type, author, and language. The website also features a list of selected introductory resources for those new to the field and a list of the ten most recently added resources.

400

The logical core architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular nanotechnology (MNT) promises new functions for engineered systems, such as fairly general purpose fabrication and disassembly. Systems designed afresh to take advantage of these new functions should offer original architectures. One compelling example is the `logical core architecture', which uses subsystems providing general purpose manufacturing to enable a long-lived, very flexible system. This paper provides motivation for the logical

Tom McKendree

1998-01-01

401

Irish Architecture Foundation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Irish Architecture Foundation's website is very inviting with its stylish grey and green-schemed color scheme. The Foundation has multiple goals: encouraging people to value architecture and "champion[ing] the power of architecture and urban design," just to name a few. Visitors will find this website filled with opportunities to learn about, discuss, and debate the role of architecture, at lectures, workshops and events. The "Education" link under the Activity heading at the top of the page contains lesson plans for teachers, lecture series' for adults, programs for children, and details on their Summer School. The "Exhibition" link, also under the Activity heading, has a number of announcements for design competitions, such as one for a public civic space for Dublin. There are also calls for papers, which include one on the politics of architectural destruction and the nature of sculpture is in the 21st century.

402

Tool Support for Model Based Architectural Design for Automotive Control Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In conjunction with Ford Motor Company, we built a tool to support multilevel architectural design. The tool, called Synergy, allows Ford to visually design architectures of vehicle control components. The components are imported from existing Simulink models; then the tool automatically generates a detailed view showing all required connections and ports. The resulting model is exported to Simulink for further

Kevin Steppe; David Garlan; Greg Bylenok; Bradley Schmerl; Kanat Abirov; Nataliya Shevchenko

403

Utilizing Linux Kernel Components in K42 modified October 2001  

E-print Network

and Linux file-systems. An examination of the run-time environment within the Linux-kernel is the starting, the chosen strategy calls upon K42 to provide to the desired Linux-kernel components a run-time environment as a target hardware architecture for Linux (in the same way as real hard- ware architectures such as Alpha, i

Appavoo, Jonathan

404

Molecular basis of angiosperm tree architecture.  

PubMed

I. II. III. IV. V. References SUMMARY: The architecture of trees greatly impacts the productivity of orchards and forestry plantations. Amassing greater knowledge on the molecular genetics that underlie tree form can benefit these industries, as well as contribute to basic knowledge of plant developmental biology. This review describes the fundamental components of branch architecture, a prominent aspect of tree structure, as well as genetic and hormonal influences inferred from studies in model plant systems and from trees with non-standard architectures. The bulk of the molecular and genetic data described here is from studies of fruit trees and poplar, as these species have been the primary subjects of investigation in this field of science. PMID:25483362

Hollender, Courtney A; Dardick, Chris

2014-12-01

405

Challenges of Algebraic Multigrid across Multicore Architectures  

SciTech Connect

Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a popular solver for large-scale scientific computing and an essential component of many simulation codes. AMG has shown to be extremely efficient on distributed-memory architectures. However, when executed on modern multicore architectures, we face new challenges that can significantly deteriorate AMG's performance. We examine its performance and scalability on three disparate multicore architectures: a cluster with four AMD Opteron Quad-core processors per node (Hera), a Cray XT5 with two AMD Opteron Hex-core processors per node (Jaguar), and an IBM BlueGene/P system with a single Quad-core processor (Intrepid). We discuss our experiences on these platforms and present results using both an MPI-only and a hybrid MPI/OpenMP model. We also discuss a set of techniques that helped to overcome the associated problems, including thread and process pinning and correct memory associations.

Baker, A H; Gamblin, T; Schulz, M; Yang, U M

2010-04-12

406

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 4 School of Architecture  

E-print Network

%); a final exam (30%) during the university's exam period. #12;2 Lecture Schedule: Brave New World (Jan 10 Winter 2013 This fourth course in our Architectural History sequence explores new forms that emerged new approaches to the subject, carefully chosen to nurture skills in critical reading and to encourage

Barthelat, Francois

407

Documenting the ICT Architecture of TSI R. J. Wieringa1  

E-print Network

and Services of TSI 9 4 Business Processes 11 5 Application Architecture 15 6 Network and Implementation with a common pur- pose to deliver a product or service to a market. The common purpose is stated in a shared. Business processes are operational processes that respond to external and temporal events to deliver

Fokkinga, Maarten M.

408

Nuclear power plant common aging terminology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report defines and encourages the use of a set of common terms and definitions that characterize aging and aging management of nuclear power plant systems, structures, and components. Common aging terminology encompasses the areas of degradation causes, degradation\\/aging, life, failure, and maintenance. The terminology should prove useful in plant license renewal, life-cycle management, maintenance, and equipment qualification. The principal

W. S. Grant; E. J. Miller; G. E. Sliter

1992-01-01

409

The Dimensions of Common Factors in Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Common factors is a concept that offers an explanation as to what makes counseling effective. Evidence from outcome studies has implications for training and practice. The particular purpose of this paper is to review the components of a popular model of common factors, the evidence supporting them, and subsequent implications for counselor

Leibert, Todd W.

2011-01-01

410

A Facility and Architecture for Autonomy Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Autonomy is a key enabling factor in the advancement of the remote robotic exploration. There is currently a large gap between autonomy software at the research level and software that is ready for insertion into near-term space missions. The Mission Simulation Facility (MST) will bridge this gap by providing a simulation framework and suite of simulation tools to support research in autonomy for remote exploration. This system will allow developers of autonomy software to test their models in a high-fidelity simulation and evaluate their system's performance against a set of integrated, standardized simulations. The Mission Simulation ToolKit (MST) uses a distributed architecture with a communication layer that is built on top of the standardized High Level Architecture (HLA). This architecture enables the use of existing high fidelity models, allows mixing simulation components from various computing platforms and enforces the use of a standardized high-level interface among components. The components needed to achieve a realistic simulation can be grouped into four categories: environment generation (terrain, environmental features), robotic platform behavior (robot dynamics), instrument models (camera/spectrometer/etc.), and data analysis. The MST will provide basic components in these areas but allows users to plug-in easily any refined model by means of a communication protocol. Finally, a description file defines the robot and environment parameters for easy configuration and ensures that all the simulation models share the same information.

Pisanich, Greg; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

411

Fractal Geometry of Architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately, scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also Gothic cathedrals and Indian temples offer self-similarity. This study mainly focuses upon the question whether this concept of self-similarity makes architecture with fractal properties more diverse and interesting than Euclidean Modern architecture. The first part gives an introduction and explains Fractal properties in various natural and architectural objects, presenting the underlying structure by computer programmed renderings. In this connection, differences between the fractal, architectural concept and true, mathematical Fractals are worked out to become aware of limits. This is the basis for dealing with the problem whether fractal-like architecture, particularly facades, can be measured so that different designs can be compared with each other under the aspect of fractal properties. Finally the usability of the Box-Counting Method, an easy-to-use measurement method of Fractal Dimension is analyzed with regard to architecture.

Lorenz, Wolfgang E.

412

Failure-free Coordinator Synthesis for Correct Components Assembly  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the main challenges in components assembly is re- lated to the ability to predict possible coordination policies of the components interaction behavior by only assuming a limited knowledge of the single components computational behavior. Our answer to this problem is a software architec- ture based approach in which the software architecture im- posed on the coordinating part of

Paola Inverardi; Massimo Tivoli

2003-01-01

413

Commonality analysis as a knowledge acquisition problem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Commonality analysis is a systematic attempt to reduce costs in a large scale engineering project by discontinuing development of certain components during the design phase. Each discontinued component is replaced by another component that has sufficient functionality to be considered an appropriate substitute. The replacement strategy is driven by economic considerations. The System Commonality Analysis Tool (SCAT) is based on an oversimplified model of the problem and incorporates no knowledge acquisition component. In fact, the process of arriving at a compromise between functionality and economy is quite complex, with many opportunities for the application of expert knowledge. Such knowledge is of two types: general knowledge expressible as heuristics or mathematical laws potentially applicable to any set of components, and specific knowledge about the way in which elements of a given set of components interrelate. Examples of both types of knowledge are presented, and a framework is proposed for integrating the knowledge into a more general and useable tool.

Yeager, Dorian P.

1987-01-01

414

New Jersey School of Architecture The Master of Architecture  

E-print Network

New Jersey School of Architecture The Master of Architecture New Jersey Institute of Technology #12 Design in Architecture), and a past president of ACSA (Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture of the symbolic power of buildings and the extraordinarily complex issues involved in the process of planning

Bieber, Michael

415

UNLV School of Architecture BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

UNLV School of Architecture BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ARCHITECTURE 4505 south maryland parkway, las vegas, nevada 89145-4018 telephone: 702 895 3031 fax: 702 895 1119 http://architecture.unlv.edu #12;UNLV School of Architecture "Anarchitecturaleducationhelpsusthink about place, how place is made, and how

Hemmers, Oliver

416

Partially Decentralized Control Architectures for Satellite Formations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a partially decentralized control architecture, more than one but less than all nodes have supervisory capability. This paper describes an approach to choosing the number of supervisors in such au architecture, based on a reliability vs. cost trade. It also considers the implications of these results for the design of navigation systems for satellite formations that could be controlled with a partially decentralized architecture. Using an assumed cost model, analytic and simulation-based results indicate that it may be cheaper to achieve a given overall system reliability with a partially decentralized architecture containing only a few supervisors, than with either fully decentralized or purely centralized architectures. Nominally, the subset of supervisors may act as centralized estimation and control nodes for corresponding subsets of the remaining subordinate nodes, and act as decentralized estimation and control peers with respect to each other. However, in the context of partially decentralized satellite formation control, the absolute positions and velocities of each spacecraft are unique, so that correlations which make estimates using only local information suboptimal only occur through common biases and process noise. Covariance and monte-carlo analysis of a simplified system show that this lack of correlation may allow simplification of the local estimators while preserving the global optimality of the maneuvers commanded by the supervisors.

Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, Frank H.

2002-01-01

417

Helicopter-based wildfire monitoring system software architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work introduces a flexible and reusable architecture designed to facilitate the development of remote sensing applications. Based on it, we are developing a helicopter system, called Red-Eye, devoted to the detection, control and analysis of wild land forest fires in the Mediterranean area. The design of the proposed system is composed of five main components. Each component will work

Enric Pastor; Marc Sole; Juan Lopez; Pablo Royo; Cristina Barrado

2010-01-01

418

Development of a Conceptual Structure for Architectural Solar Energy Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Solar subsystems and components were identified and conceptual structure was developed for architectural solar energy heating and cooling systems. Recent literature related to solar energy systems was reviewed and analyzed. Solar heating and cooling system, subsystem, and component data were compared for agreement and completeness. Significant

Ringel, Robert F.

419

Common Career Technical Core: Common Standards, Common Vision for CTE  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides an overview of the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium's (NASDCTEc) Common Career Technical Core (CCTC), a state-led initiative that was created to ensure that career and technical education (CTE) programs are consistent and high quality across the United States. Forty-two states,

Green, Kimberly

2012-01-01

420

Architectural plasticity in a Mediterranean winter annual  

PubMed Central

Size variability in plants may be underlain by overlooked components of architectural plasticity. In annual plants, organ sizes are expected to depend on the availability and reliability of resources and developmental time. Given sufficient resources and developmental time, plants are expected to develop a greater number of large branches, which would maximize fitness in the long run. However, under restrictive growth conditions and environmental reliability, developing large branches might be risky and smaller branches are expected to foster higher final fitness. Growth and architecture of Trifolium purpureum (Papilionaceae) plants from both Mediterranean (MED) and semi-arid (SAR) origins were studied, when plants were subjected to variable water availability, photoperiod cues and germination timing. Although no clear architectural plasticity could be found in response to water availability, plants subjected to photoperiod cuing typical to late spring developed fewer basal branches. Furthermore, plants that germinated late were significantly smaller, with fewer basal branches, compared with plants which grew for the same time, starting at the beginning of the growing season. The results demonstrate an intricate interplay between size and architectural plasticities, whereby size modifications are readily induced by environmental factors related to prevalent resource availability but architectural plasticity is only elicited following the perception of reliable anticipatory cues. PMID:22499177

Shemesh, Hagai; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Acua, Tania; Novoplansky, Ariel

2012-01-01

421

Hybrid architecture for building secure sensor networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sensor networks have various communication and security architectural concerns. Three approaches are defined to address these concerns for sensor networks. The first area is the utilization of new computing architectures that leverage embedded virtualization software on the sensor. Deploying a small, embedded virtualization operating system on the sensor nodes that is designed to communicate to low-cost cloud computing infrastructure in the network is the foundation to delivering low-cost, secure sensor networks. The second area focuses on securing the sensor. Sensor security components include developing an identification scheme, and leveraging authentication algorithms and protocols that address security assurance within the physical, communication network, and application layers. This function will primarily be accomplished through encrypting the communication channel and integrating sensor network firewall and intrusion detection/prevention components to the sensor network architecture. Hence, sensor networks will be able to maintain high levels of security. The third area addresses the real-time and high priority nature of the data that sensor networks collect. This function requires that a quality-of-service (QoS) definition and algorithm be developed for delivering the right data at the right time. A hybrid architecture is proposed that combines software and hardware features to handle network traffic with diverse QoS requirements.

Owens, Ken R., Jr.; Watkins, Steve E.

2012-04-01

422

HYDRA : High-speed simulation architecture for precision spacecraft formation simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

e Hierarchical Distributed Reconfigurable Architecture- is a scalable simulation architecture that provides flexibility and ease-of-use which take advantage of modern computation and communication hardware. It also provides the ability to implement distributed - or workstation - based simulations and high-fidelity real-time simulation from a common core. Originally designed to serve as a research platform for examining fundamental challenges in formation flying simulation for future space missions, it is also finding use in other missions and applications, all of which can take advantage of the underlying Object-Oriented structure to easily produce distributed simulations. Hydra automates the process of connecting disparate simulation components (Hydra Clients) through a client server architecture that uses high-level descriptions of data associated with each client to find and forge desirable connections (Hydra Services) at run time. Services communicate through the use of Connectors, which abstract messaging to provide single-interface access to any desired communication protocol, such as from shared-memory message passing to TCP/IP to ACE and COBRA. Hydra shares many features with the HLA, although providing more flexibility in connectivity services and behavior overriding.

Martin, Bryan J.; Sohl, Garett.

2003-01-01

423

Feedback loops and temporal misalignment in component-based hydrologic modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In component-based modeling, a complex system is represented as a series of loosely integrated components with defined interfaces and data exchanges that allow the components to be coupled together through shared boundary conditions. Although the component-based paradigm is commonly used in software engineering, it has only recently been applied for modeling hydrologic and earth systems. As a result, research is needed to test and verify the applicability of the approach for modeling hydrologic systems. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate two aspects of using component-based software architecture for hydrologic modeling: (1) simulation of feedback loops between components that share a boundary condition and (2) data transfers between temporally misaligned model components. We investigated these topics using a simple case study where diffusion of mass is modeled across a water-sediment interface. We simulated the multimedia system using two model components, one for the water and one for the sediment, coupled using the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) standard. The results were compared with a more conventional numerical approach for solving the system where the domain is represented by a single multidimensional array. Results showed that the component-based approach was able to produce the same results obtained with the more conventional numerical approach. When the two components were temporally misaligned, we explored the use of different interpolation schemes to minimize mass balance error within the coupled system. The outcome of this work provides evidence that component-based modeling can be used to simulate complicated feedback loops between systems and guidance as to how different interpolation schemes minimize mass balance error introduced when components are temporally misaligned.

Elag, Mostafa M.; Goodall, Jonathan L.; Castronova, Anthony M.

2011-12-01

424

Preliminary Panda Architecture Peter Reiher  

E-print Network

Preliminary Panda Architecture Peter Reiher August 12, 1998 1. Introduction The Panda system architecture they are developing sets certain limits on what is possible in Panda. This document describes a preliminary architecture for the Panda system. This preliminary architecture is meant purely to serve

California at Los Angeles, University of

425

GEOMETRY CONCEPTS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between geometry and architectural design are described and dis- cussed along some examples. Geometry is the fundamental science of forms and their order. Geo- metric figures, forms and transformations build the material of architectural design. In the history of architecture geometric rules based on the ideas of proportions and symmetries formed fixed tools for architectural design. Proportions were

Cornelie LEOPOLD

426

architecture study (M.Arch)  

E-print Network

architecture graduate study (M.Arch) #12;3G option deadlinesmaster of architecture (M.Arch) 2G option Taubman College's Master of Architecture 3G option is designed for applicants who have received an undergraduate degree in a discipline other than architecture. This 105 credit hour degree draws upon the diverse

Papalambros, Panos

427

Architecture and Environmental Building Design  

E-print Network

1 56% 2% 7% 2% 5% 28% Architecture and Environmental Building Design 33% response rate Full Seeking Employment as of the date they completed the survey- 27% 69% 19% 12% Landscape Architecture 46" Architecture, Master of Architecture (M.Arch) Fulltime Employment Amanda Levete Architects, Design, Part II

Plotkin, Joshua B.

428

The Information Architecture of Behavior Change Websites  

PubMed Central

The extraordinary growth in Internet use offers researchers important new opportunities to identify and test new ways to deliver effective behavior change programs. The information architecture (IA)the structure of website informationis an important but often overlooked factor to consider when adapting behavioral strategies developed in office-based settings for Web delivery. Using examples and relevant perspectives from multiple disciplines, we describe a continuum of website IA designs ranging from a matrix design to the tunnel design. The free-form matrix IA design allows users free rein to use multiple hyperlinks to explore available content according to their idiosyncratic interests. The more directive tunnel IA design (commonly used in e-learning courses) guides users step-by-step through a series of Web pages that are arranged in a particular order to improve the chances of achieving a goal that is measurable and consistent. Other IA designs are also discussed, including hierarchical IA and hybrid IA designs. In the hierarchical IA design, program content is arranged in a top-down manner, which helps the user find content of interest. The more complex hybrid IA design incorporates some combination of components that use matrix, tunnel, and/or hierarchical IA designs. Each of these IA designs is discussed in terms of usability, participant engagement, and program tailoring, as well as how they might best be matched with different behavior change goals (using Web-based smoking cessation interventions as examples). Our presentation underscores the role of considering and clearly reporting the use of IA designs when creating effective Web-based interventions. We also encourage the adoption of a multidisciplinary perspective as we move towards a more mature view of Internet intervention research. PMID:15914459

McKay, H Garth; Seeley, John R

2005-01-01

429

Assimilating hybridized architecture  

E-print Network

The thesis searches for means of operation to deal with hybridized architecture. As a conceptual framework, sociology theory appears to be an insightful precedent, for it analyzes and classifies how multiple constituents ...

Wu, Jane C., 1977-

2005-01-01

430

Robot Electronics Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electronics architecture has been developed to enable the rapid construction and testing of prototypes of robotic systems. This architecture is designed to be a research vehicle of great stability, reliability, and versatility. A system according to this architecture can easily be reconfigured (including expanded or contracted) to satisfy a variety of needs with respect to input, output, processing of data, sensing, actuation, and power. The architecture affords a variety of expandable input/output options that enable ready integration of instruments, actuators, sensors, and other devices as independent modular units. The separation of different electrical functions onto independent circuit boards facilitates the development of corresponding simple and modular software interfaces. As a result, both hardware and software can be made to expand or contract in modular fashion while expending a minimum of time and effort.

Garrett, Michael; Magnone, Lee; Aghazarian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Kennedy, Brett

2008-01-01

431

Distance in architecture  

E-print Network

The document which follows represents an exploration of distance and its connection to architecture. This exploration is threefold. On one level it regards distance as an ontological question, researching for precedent ...

Criparacos, George C

1987-01-01

432

Architectural Support for  

E-print Network

Architectural Support for Cooperative Multiuser Interfaces Richard Bentley,Tom Rodden,Pete Sawyer sharingawareness of other users'activities. Tom Roddenat the address shown at the end of the article. For more

Sommerville, Ian

433

Sustainability in architecture  

E-print Network

Current standard practice in architecture does not take into account the external societal costs that a building creates. To understand the total consequences of a building, one must consider all of the ecological and human ...

Cordero, Elizabeth, 1959-

2001-01-01

434

International Architecture Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Drawing on the contributions from persons across much of Europe, the International Architecture Database website has served as a valuable clearinghouse for thousands of architectural projects (both built and unrealized) since 1996. Currently, the database contains information on more than 13,000 projects, most from the 20th and 21st centuries. Visitors can begin by browsing the database by name, location, or keyword. Looking at a single record, visitors will be presented with a host of information, such as building type, primary architect, location, years of construction, and in certain cases with external links, photographs, and plans. Looking through the lists of keywords can actually be quite useful, as each keyword is linked to examples that are demonstrative of the idea suggested by the keyword, such as early Gothic or elementary school. Overall, this is a fine resource for those persons who wish to learn a bit more about architecture or for those looking for information on different architectural projects.

435

OBBL Architecture Blocks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive applet gives students the opportunity to compose architectural structures using geometric and irregular elements. Learners must consider the effects of gravity and the methods of joining parts. Links to Help and Ideas sections are included.

2011-01-01

436

Architectural Winners Named.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides blueprints and color photographs and describes outstanding features of six winners of the camp architecture competition sponsored by "Camping Magazine." Winners are in the categories of support facilities, housing, program facilities, and recreation facilities. (JHZ)

Camping Magazine, 1987

1987-01-01

437

Updates to the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes an update of the Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) open architecture for NASA space based radios. The STRS architecture has been defined as a framework for the design, development, operation and upgrade of space based software defined radios, where processing resources are constrained. The architecture has been updated based upon reviews by NASA missions, radio providers, and component vendors. The STRS Standard prescribes the architectural relationship between the software elements used in software execution and defines the Application Programmer Interface (API) between the operating environment and the waveform application. Modeling tools have been adopted to present the architecture. The paper will present a description of the updated API, configuration files, and constraints. Minimum compliance is discussed for early implementations. The paper then closes with a summary of the changes made and discussion of the relevant alignment with the Object Management Group (OMG) SWRadio specification, and enhancements to the specialized signal processing abstraction.

Kacpura, Thomas J.; Handler, Louis M.; Briones, Janette; Hall, Charles S.

2008-01-01

438

Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis  

PubMed Central

Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy. PMID:25063994

OBrien, Terence J.; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G.; Balding, David J.

2014-01-01

439

Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis.  

PubMed

Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy. PMID:25063994

Speed, Doug; O'Brien, Terence J; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G; Balding, David J; Johnson, Michael R

2014-10-01

440

Renaissance and Baroque Architecture: Architectural History 102  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site hosts a collection of over 500 images that were prepared by the Digital Image Center at the University of Virginia Library for use in Professor C. W. Westfall's course on Renaissance and Baroque Architecture. The images are grouped topically, as they were covered in the class. Section titles include Florence in the 15th Century, The Sixteenth Century--Bramante and Roman Architecture, French Explorations of the New Classicism, The Holy Roman Emperor Rediscovers the Empire, and England Accepts Classicism, among others. Each section contains a number of thumbnails each of which leads to a full-sized JPEG image. It should be noted that the images are not individually labelled, but instead each section offers a description list at the bottom of the page. In some sections, but not in all, these are also hyperlinked. Teachers, scholars, students, and the general public are free to use these images for educational purposes.

441

Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

2011-10-01

442

Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture  

SciTech Connect

A Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture is described that allows a simulation to be automatically distributed over a heterogeneous network of computers and executed with very little human direction. A prototype Framework is presented that implements the elements of the Architecture and demonstrates the feasibility of the concepts. It provides a basis for a future, improved Framework that will support legacy models. Because the Framework is implemented in Java, it may be installed on almost any modern computer system.

Booker, C.P.

1999-05-14

443

CORDIC processor architectures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As CORDIC algorithms receive more and more attention in elementary function evaluation and signal processing applications, the problem of their VLSI realization has attracted considerable interest. In this work we review the CORDIC fundamentals covering algorithm, architecture, and implementation issues. Various aspects of the CORDIC algorithm are investigated such as efficient scale factor compensation, redundant and non-redundant addition schemes, and convergence domain. Several CORDIC processor architectures and implementation examples are discussed.

Boehme, Johann F.; Timmermann, D.; Hahn, H.; Hosticka, Bedrich J.

1991-12-01

444

Securing Agent Based Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agent based architectures provide significant flexibility and extensibility to software systems that attempt to model complex\\u000a real world interactions between human users and functional agents. Such systems allow agents to be seamlessly published into\\u000a the system providing services to human agent consumers. Securing agent based architectures in permissions based environments\\u000a while still maintaining extensibility involves establishing a pathway of trust

Michael Maxim; Ashish Venugopal

2002-01-01

445

An embedded JTAG, system test architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

IEEE 1149.1, The Standard Test Access Port and Boundary-Scan Architecture (JTAG) was written to provide standardized test access to surface mounted integrated circuits (ICs) whose high density packaging restricted physical test access. Although the four-wire (optionally five-wire) test port defined within the standard is commonly applied to test printed circuit boards (PCBs) in a factory, there is not yet a

J. Andrews

1994-01-01

446

Optimal Broadcasting in Mesh-Connected Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we disprove the common assumption that the time for broadcasting in a meshis at best proportional to the square root of the number of processors, at least in the presenceof worm-hole routing. We present an optimal algorithm for broadcasting in mesh-connecteddistributed-memory architectures with worm-hole routing. By organizing the processing nodesin a logical spanning tree, the algorithm executes

Michael Barnett; David G. Payne; Robert Van De Geijn

1991-01-01

447

Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

Dorband, John E.

2006-01-01

448

LU factorization algorithms on distributed-memory multiprocessor architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the authors consider the effect that the data-storage scheme and pivoting scheme have on the efficiency of LU factorization on a distributed-memory multiprocessor. The authors' presentation focuses on the hypercube architecture, but most of the results are applicable to distributed-memory architectures in general. The authors restrict their attention to two commonly used storage schemes (storage by rows

George A. Geist; Charles H. Romine

1988-01-01

449

A design pattern for active rule-based system architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

A design pattern provides a general solution for common and recurring problems. This paper describes a design pattern for an architecture design of active rule-based systems. The rule-based approach uses event-condition-action rules to specify and manage event-driven activities. The pattern described in this paper can form the basis to design system architecture using active rules and serve as a reference

Ying Jin

2005-01-01

450

Generalized architecture for DOA estimation for wideband/narrowband sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The high-resolution direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation algorithms are studied to develop architecture for real time applications. Methods for DOA estimation for wideband sources proposed by Buckley and Griffiths and MUSIC algorithm for narrowband sources proposed by Schmidt have been selected for hardware implementation. These algorithms have been simplified and generalized into one common programmable algorithm. It is then parallelized and is executed in a pipelined fashion. A parallel architecture has been designed for this generalized algorithm.

Tabar, R.; Jamali, Mohsin M.; Kwatra, S. C.; Djouadi, A. H.

1993-10-01

451

Expandable computed-tomography architecture for nondestructive inspection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Radon transform and its inverse, commonly used for computed tomography (CT), are computationally burdensome for single processor computers. Since projection-based computations are easily executed in parallel, multiprocessor architectures have been proposed for high-speed operation. In this paper, we describe an architecture for a high-speed (30 MHz raster-scan image data rate), high accuracy (12-bits per pixel) computed-tomography system for use

Iskender Agi; Paul J. Hurst

1993-01-01

452

Application and management of commonality within NASA systems  

E-print Network

Commonality can be defined as the sharing of assets such as components, designs, processes, technologies, interfaces, and/or infrastructure across systems. Through commonality, NASA has the opportunity to develop, produce, ...

Rhodes, Richard Alexander

2010-01-01

453

The architectural relevance of cybernetics  

SciTech Connect

This title is taken from an article by Gordon Pask in Architectural Design September 1969. It raises a number of questions which this article attempts to answer. How did Gordon come to be writing for an architectural publication? What was his contribution to architecture? How does he now come to be on the faculty of a school of architecture? And what indeed is the architectural relevance of cybernetics? 12 refs.

Frazer, J.H. [Univ. of Ulster, Belfast (United Kingdom)

1993-12-31

454

Evaluating recovery aware components for grid reliability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Failure in grids is costly and inevitable. Existing fault tolerance (FT) mechanisms are typically defensive and reactive, thus unnecessarily costly. In this paper we propose a hybrid FT approach, recovery aware component (RAC), combining reactive and proactive FT, with failure recovery or aversion of user-defined granularity, by component-orientation and architecture-level reasoning about FT, to increase reliability and availability without needless

Iman I. Yusuf; Heinz W. Schmidt; Ian D. Peake

2009-01-01

455

Crown architecture in relation to productivity of Populus clones in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.A.  

E-print Network

Crown architecture in relation to productivity of Populus clones in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.A. R, to crown architecture and canopy density. There- fore, it is important to adequately describe and quantifiy different components of crown architecture to better understand and optimize productivity in tree planta

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

456

IDD Archival Hardware Architecture and Workflow  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the functionality of every component in the DHS/IDD archival and storage hardware system shown in Fig. 1. The document describes steps by step process of image data being received at LLNL then being processed and made available to authorized personnel and collaborators. Throughout this document references will be made to one of two figures, Fig. 1 describing the elements of the architecture and the Fig. 2 describing the workflow and how the project utilizes the available hardware.

Mendonsa, D; Nekoogar, F; Martz, H

2008-10-09

457

Soft Constraints for Dependable Service Oriented Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose the use of Soft Constraints as a natural way to model Service Oriented Architecture. In the framework, constraints\\u000a are used to model components and connectors and constraint aggregation is used to represent their interactions. Moreover,\\u000a a specific constraint projection operator is used to highlight the service interface. The quality of a service is measured\\u000a and considered when performing

Stefano Bistarelli; Francesco Santini

2008-01-01

458

A Component-based Reconfigurable RFID Middleware  

Microsoft Academic Search

RFID middleware, a bridge between RFID hardware and enterprise application systems, enables enterprise to reap the full benefits of RFID technology. Current RFID middleware is inflexible and monolithic and fails to address the emerging needs for adaptation to changing requirements. In this paper, we put forward a component-based, service-oriented RFID middleware architecture that provides developers with the possibility of constructing

Jie Wu; Dong Wang; Huanye Sheng

2007-01-01

459

Development of a satellite structural architecture for operationally responsive space  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Research Laboratory\\/Space Vehicles Directorate (AFRL\\/RV) is developing a satellite structural architecture in support of the Department of Defense's Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) initiative. Such a structural architecture must enable rapid Assembly, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the satellite, accommodate multiple configurations (to include structural configurations, components, and payloads), and incorporate structurally integrated thermal management and electronics, while

Brandon J. Arritt; Steven J. Buckley; Jeffrey M. Ganley; Jeffry S. Welsh; Benjamin K. Henderson; M. Eric Lyall; Andrew D. Williams; Jeffrey C. Preble; John DiPalma; Greg Mehle; R. Roopnarine

2008-01-01

460

Reusable strategies for software agents via the subsumption architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The subsumption architecture is a layered mediator invented by Rodney Brooks for behaviour-based control of robots. The layers are minimally dependent and use minimal communication. We develop an object-oriented software design for the subsumption architecture, and demonstrate that each layer can be used as a slot for a set of plug-and-play components that implement different micro-strategies for achieving a particular

Greg Butler; Andrea Gantchev; Peter Grogono

1999-01-01

461

Architectural Issues in Software Reuse: It's Not Just the Functionality, It's the Packaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective reuse depends not only on finding and reusing components, but also on the ways those components are combined. The informal folklore of software engineering provides a number of diverse styles for organizing software systems. These styles, or architectures, show how to com- pose systems from components; different styles expect different kinds of component packaging and different kinds of interactions

Mary Shaw

1995-01-01

462

Canonical Commonality Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Commonality analysis is a method of partitioning variance that has advantages over more traditional "OVA" methods. Commonality analysis indicates the amount of explanatory power that is "unique" to a given predictor variable and the amount of explanatory power that is "common" to or shared with at least one predictor variable. This paper outlines

Leister, K. Dawn

463

A Common Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of a common schooling to provide a common education and to create a common culture is argued. The limited separate education supported by E. Callan will not be effective in maintaining the distinctive cultural integrity it hopes to defend. (SLD)

Barrow, Robin

1995-01-01

464

The New Common School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Horace Mann's goal of creating a common school that brings our society's children together in mutual respect and common learning need not be frustrated by residential segregation and geographical separation of the haves and have-nots. Massachusetts' new common school vision boasts a Metro Program for minority students, 80 magnet schools, and

Glenn, Charles L.

1987-01-01

465

Protein Dynamics: Implications for Nuclear Architecture and Gene Expression  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Studies of nuclear architecture reveal that the dynamic properties of proteins in the nucleus are critical for their function. The high mobility of proteins ensures their availability throughout the nucleus; their dynamic interplay generates an ever-changing, but overall stable, architectural framework, within which nuclear processes take place. As a consequence, overall nuclear morphology is determined by the functional interactions of nuclear components. The observed dynamic properties of nuclear proteins are consistent with a central role for stochastic mechanisms in gene expression and nuclear architecture.

Tom Mistelli (National Cancer Institute; )

2001-02-02

466

C.Sc. 131: Systems ArchitectureC.Sc. 131: Systems ArchitectureC.Sc. 131: Systems Architecture ---200620062006 Systems Architecture  

E-print Network

1 C.Sc. 131: Systems ArchitectureC.Sc. 131: Systems ArchitectureC.Sc. 131: Systems Architecture --- 200620062006 C.Sc. 131: Systems Architecture Dr Keith Cheverst kc@comp.lancs.ac.uk C42, infolab C.Sc. 131: Systems ArchitectureC.Sc. 131: Systems ArchitectureC.Sc. 131: Systems Architecture --- 200620062006 CSc101

Cheverst, Keith

467

How Common Is the Common Core?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the introduction of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) in 2010, stakeholders in adopting states have engaged in a variety of activities to understand CCSSM standards and transition from previous state standards. These efforts include research, professional development, assessment and modification of curriculum resources,

Thomas, Amande; Edson, Alden J.

2014-01-01

468

Putting non-functional requirements into software architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an approach for incorporating non-functional information of software systems into software architectures. To do so, components present two distinguished slots: their non-functional specification, where non-functional requirements on components are placed, and their non-functional behaviour with respect to these requirements. Also, connector protocols may describe which non-functional aspects are relevant to component connections. We propose a notation to

Xavier Franch; Pere Botella

1998-01-01

469

A Reusable Component Architecture for Agent Construction Bryan C. Horling  

E-print Network

to painlessly transport source code from one project to E ort sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Air Force Research Laboratory Air Force Materiel Command, USAF, under agreement representing the o cial policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of the Defense Advanced Research

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

470

An Architectural Framework and a Middleware for Cooperating Smart Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a future networked physical world, a myriad of smart sensors and actuators assess and control aspects of their en- vironments and autonomously act in response to it. Exam- ples range in telematics, tra-c management, team robotics or home automation to name a few. To a large extent, such systems operate proactively and independently of direct hu- man control driven

U. Ulm; Paulo Ver issimo

471

An architectural framework and a middleware for cooperating smart components  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a future networked physical world, a myriad of smart sensors and actuators assess and control aspects of their environments and autonomously act in response to it. Examples range in telematics, traffic management, team robotics or home automation to name a few. To a large extent, such systems operate proactively and independently of direct human control driven by the perception

Antnio Casimiro; Jrg Kaiser; Paulo Verssimo

2004-01-01

472

LASER RANGE DATA, PHOTOGRAPHS AND ARCHITECTURAL COMPONENTS. C. Chevrier a,  

E-print Network

deal with 3D modelling from point clouds issued from laser scanning and also from photographs model for archaeologists based on laser scanning of relics of the past. 3D models of existing buildings. INTRODUCTION 3D modelling based on a point cloud issued from laser scanning has led to many scientific

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

473

Storage system architectures and their characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Not all users storage requirements call for 20 MBS data transfer rates, multi-tier file or data migration schemes, or even automated retrieval of data. The number of available storage solutions reflects the broad range of user requirements. It is foolish to think that any one solution can address the complete range of requirements. For users with simple off-line storage requirements, the cost and complexity of high end solutions would provide no advantage over a more simple solution. The correct answer is to match the requirements of a particular storage need to the various attributes of the available solutions. The goal of this paper is to introduce basic concepts of archiving and storage management in combination with the most common architectures and to provide some insight into how these concepts and architectures address various storage problems. The intent is to provide potential consumers of storage technology with a framework within which to begin the hunt for a solution which meets their particular needs. This paper is not intended to be an exhaustive study or to address all possible solutions or new technologies, but is intended to be a more practical treatment of todays storage system alternatives. Since most commercial storage systems today are built on Open Systems concepts, the majority of these solutions are hosted on the UNIX operating system. For this reason, some of the architectural issues discussed focus around specific UNIX architectural concepts. However, most of the architectures are operating system independent and the conclusions are applicable to such architectures on any operating system.

Sarandrea, Bryan M.

1993-01-01

474

An architecture for integrating distributed and cooperating knowledge-based Air Force decision aids  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MITRE has been developing a Knowledge-Based Battle Management Testbed for evaluating the viability of integrating independently-developed knowledge-based decision aids in the Air Force tactical domain. The primary goal for the testbed architecture is to permit a new system to be added to a testbed with little change to the system's software. Each system that connects to the testbed network declares that it can provide a number of services to other systems. When a system wants to use another system's service, it does not address the server system by name, but instead transmits a request to the testbed network asking for a particular service to be performed. A key component of the testbed architecture is a common database which uses a relational database management system (RDBMS). The RDBMS provides a database update notification service to requesting systems. Normally, each system is expected to monitor data relations of interest to it. Alternatively, a system may broadcast an announcement message to inform other systems that an event of potential interest has occurred. Current research is aimed at dealing with issues resulting from integration efforts, such as dealing with potential mismatches of each system's assumptions about the common database, decentralizing network control, and coordinating multiple agents.

Nugent, Richard O.; Tucker, Richard W.

1988-01-01

475

Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

NONE

1997-04-01

476

A Flexible, High Performance Service-Oriented Architecture for Detecting Cyber Attacks  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of intrusion detection and cyber defense technologies must be highly flexible so that deployed solutions can be quickly modified to detect new attack scenarios. They must also be able to provide the performance necessary to monitor traffic from high speed networks, and scale to enterprise wide deployments. In this paper we describe our experiences in creating a production application for cyber situational awareness. The application exploits the capabilities of several independently developed components and integrates them using SIFT (Scalable Information Fusion and Triage), a service-oriented architecture (SOA) designed for creating domain-independent, enterprise scale analytical applications. SIFT exploits a common design pattern for composing analytical components, and extends an existing messaging platform with scaling capabilities. We describe the design of the application, and provide a performance analysis that demonstrates the capabilities of the SIFT platform. The paper concludes by discussing the lessons we have learned from this project, and outlines the architecture of the MeDICI, the next generation of our enterprise analytics platforms.

Wynne, Adam S.; Gorton, Ian; Almquist, Justin P.; Chatterton, Jack; Thurman, David A.

2008-02-01

477

Speculatively Multithreaded Architectures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the increasing number of transistors to build larger dynamic-issue superscalar processors for the purposes of exposing more parallelism has run into problems of diminishing returns, great design complexity, and high power dissipation. While chip multiprocessors (CMPs) alleviate these problems by employing multiple smaller, power-efficient cores to utilize the available transistors, CMPs require parallel programming which is significantly harder than sequential programming. Speculatively multithreaded architectures address both the programmability issues of CMPs and the power-complexity-performance problems of superscalar processors. Speculatively multithreaded architectures partition a sequential program into contiguous program fragments called tasks which are executed in parallel on multiple cores. The architectures execute the tasks in parallel by speculating that the tasks are independent, though the tasks are not guaranteed to be independent. The architecture provides hardware support to detect dependencies and roll back misspeculations. This chapter addresses the key questions of how programs are partitioned into tasks while maximizing inter-task parallelism and how inter-task control-flow and data dependencies (register and memory dependencies) are maintained especially in the distributed multicore organization employed by the speculatively multithreaded architectures.

Sohi, Gurindar S.; Vijaykumar, T. N.

478

Information architecture of a telecare system.  

PubMed

An information architecture is a high-level, conceptual design for a system which describes the fundamental requirements and principles of a system, and details its essential elements and characteristics. I conducted a comprehensive review of published literature on telecare, including government reports and case study papers. This enabled a complete picture to be constructed of telecare system components. The components can be divided into four separate categories: human components, ICT components, telecare operational units and supportive elements. The system requirements cover functional, non-functional and informational requirements. Telecare holds great potential for all sectors of society. Its true value may only be realised when the nature of information within the telecare system is fully understood. The thorough analysis, manipulation and usage of system data are the key to the future success of telecare services. PMID:19471025

Collinge, William H; Liu, Kecheng

2009-01-01

479

Hadl: HUMS Architectural Description Language  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Specification of architectures is an important prerequisite for evaluation of architectures. With the increase m the growth of health usage and monitoring systems (HUMS) in commercial and military domains, the need far the design and evaluation of HUMS architectures has also been on the increase. In this paper, we describe HADL, HUMS Architectural Description Language, that we have designed for this purpose. In particular, we describe the features of the language, illustrate them with examples, and show how we use it in designing domain-specific HUMS architectures. A companion paper contains details on our design methodology of HUMS architectures.

Mukkamala, R.; Adavi, V.; Agarwal, N.; Gullapalli, S.; Kumar, P.; Sundaram, P.

2004-01-01

480

Agent Architectures for Compliance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

481

American Architectural Foundation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Those who have scoured the web for architecture sites may have come across the homepage of the American Architectural Foundation (AAF), but those who haven't will find this site to be quite a find. Founded in 1943, the AAF "seeks to educate individuals and community leaders about the power of architecture to improve lives and transform the places where we live, learn, work, and play." Visitors to the site can take advantage of a number of online resources, including their online publications. These publications include findings from their design study charrettes and their invest