Sample records for common component architecture

  1. How the common component architecture advances computational science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Kumfert; D. E. Bernholdt; T. G. W. Epperly; J. A. Kohl; L. C. McInnes; S. Parker; J. Ray

    2006-01-01

    Computational chemists are using Common Component Architecture (CCA) technology to increase the parallel scalability of their application ten-fold. Combustion researchers are publishing science faster because the CCA manages software complexity for them. Both the solver and meshing communities in SciDAC are converging on community interface standards as a direct response to the novel level of interoperability that CCA presents. Yet,

  2. Bringing earth system modeling framework (ESMF) components into the common component architecture (cca)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Zhou; A. Dasilva; B. Womack; G. Higgins

    2003-01-01

    Typical earth system models involve coupled model components in high performance computing (HPC) environments. Two kinds of potential component-based framework have emerged recently. The Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) defines a common component interface in the context of earth system models. Common Component Architecture (CCA) is developed to support model components in HPC environments. The purpose of this work is

  3. How the common component architecture advances computational science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumfert, G.; Bernholdt, D. E.; Epperly, T. G. W.; Kohl, J. A.; McInnes, L. C.; Parker, S.; Ray, J.

    2006-09-01

    Computational chemists are using Common Component Architecture (CCA) technology to increase the parallel scalability of their application ten-fold. Combustion researchers are publishing science faster because the CCA manages software complexity for them. Both the solver and meshing communities in SciDAC are converging on community interface standards as a direct response to the novel level of interoperability that CCA presents. Yet, there is much more to do before component technology becomes mainstream computational science. This paper highlights the impact that the CCA has made on scientific applications, conveys some lessons learned from five years of the SciDAC program, and previews where applications could go with the additional capabilities that the CCA has planned for SciDAC 2.

  4. How the Common Component Architecture Advances Compuational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kumfert, G; Bernholdt, D; Epperly, T; Kohl, J; McInnes, L C; Parker, S; Ray, J

    2006-06-19

    Computational chemists are using Common Component Architecture (CCA) technology to increase the parallel scalability of their application ten-fold. Combustion researchers are publishing science faster because the CCA manages software complexity for them. Both the solver and meshing communities in SciDAC are converging on community interface standards as a direct response to the novel level of interoperability that CCA presents. Yet, there is much more to do before component technology becomes mainstream computational science. This paper highlights the impact that the CCA has made on scientific applications, conveys some lessons learned from five years of the SciDAC program, and previews where applications could go with the additional capabilities that the CCA has planned for SciDAC 2.

  5. Coupling climate models with the Earth System Modeling Framework and the Common Component Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shujia Zhou

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Typical Earth system models involve coupled model components in high-performance computing (HPC) environments. In the last few years, several frameworks have been developed for HPC applications. Two of them are component-based frameworks: the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) defining a component interface for Earth system models and the Common Component Architecture (CCA) defining a generic component model. The purpose

  6. A Hands-On Guide to the Common Component Architecture

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Assembling and running a CCA application, driver components, creating a component from an existing library, creating a new component from scratch, using TAU to monitor performance of components, understanding arrays and component state, understanding objects and message passing, remote access for CCA environment, building CCA tools and TAU, setting up your environment, tutorial

  7. Toward a Common Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert C. Armstrong; Dennis Gannon; Al Geist; Katarzyna Keahey; Scott R. Kohn; Lois C. McInnes; Steve R. Parker; Brent A. Smolinski

    1999-01-01

    Describes work in progress to develop a standard for interoperability among high-performance scientific components. This research stems from the growing recognition that the scientific community needs to better manage the complexity of multidisciplinary simulations and better address scalable performance issues on parallel and distributed architectures. The driving force for this is the need for fast connections among components that perform

  8. Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture

    E-print Network

    van der Hoek, André

    Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture by Philippe Kruchten Rational Fellow Rational Software Canada References to architecture are everywhere: in every article, in every ad. And we take definition of software architecture. Are we all understanding the same thing? We gladly accept that software

  9. Software Architecture Issues in Scientific Component Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boyana Norris

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a Commercial component-based software engineering practices, such as the CORBA component model, Enterprise JavaBeans, and COM,\\u000a are well-established in the business computing community. These practices present an approach for managing the increasing\\u000a complexity of scientific software development, which has motivated the Common Component Architecture (CCA), a component specification\\u000a targeted at high-performance scientific application development. The CCA is an approach to component

  10. Building a Common Enterprise Technical Architecture for an Universal Bank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianguang Sun; Yan Chen

    2010-01-01

    Researches on enterprise architecture mainly focus on business process organizing, software development, enterprise application integration and etc., but not much emphasis is focused on the enterprise technical architecture and its components. The paper proposed a domain based integrated enterprise technical architecture for a universal bank, helping to build common patterns to manage bank's technical IT applications and infrastructure in a

  11. Parallel, Multigrid Finite Element Simulator for Fractured/Faulted and Other Complex Reservoirs based on Common Component Architecture (CCA)

    SciTech Connect

    Milind Deo; Chung-Kan Huang; Huabing Wang

    2008-08-31

    Black-oil, compositional and thermal simulators have been developed to address different physical processes in reservoir simulation. A number of different types of discretization methods have also been proposed to address issues related to representing the complex reservoir geometry. These methods are more significant for fractured reservoirs where the geometry can be particularly challenging. In this project, a general modular framework for reservoir simulation was developed, wherein the physical models were efficiently decoupled from the discretization methods. This made it possible to couple any discretization method with different physical models. Oil characterization methods are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and it is possible to construct geologically constrained models of faulted/fractured reservoirs. Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) simulation provides the option of performing multiphase calculations on spatially explicit, geologically feasible fracture sets. Multiphase DFN simulations of and sensitivity studies on a wide variety of fracture networks created using fracture creation/simulation programs was undertaken in the first part of this project. This involved creating interfaces to seamlessly convert the fracture characterization information into simulator input, grid the complex geometry, perform the simulations, and analyze and visualize results. Benchmarking and comparison with conventional simulators was also a component of this work. After demonstration of the fact that multiphase simulations can be carried out on complex fracture networks, quantitative effects of the heterogeneity of fracture properties were evaluated. Reservoirs are populated with fractures of several different scales and properties. A multiscale fracture modeling study was undertaken and the effects of heterogeneity and storage on water displacement dynamics in fractured basements were investigated. In gravity-dominated systems, more oil could be recovered at a given pore volume of injection at lower rates. However, if oil production can be continued at high water cuts, the discounted cumulative production usually favors higher production rates. The workflow developed during the project was also used to perform multiphase simulations in heterogeneous, fracture-matrix systems. Compositional and thermal-compositional simulators were developed for fractured reservoirs using the generalized framework. The thermal-compositional simulator was based on a novel 'equation-alignment' approach that helped choose the correct variables to solve depending on the number of phases present and the prescribed component partitioning. The simulators were used in steamflooding and in insitu combustion applications. The framework was constructed to be inherently parallel. The partitioning routines employed in the framework allowed generalized partitioning on highly complex fractured reservoirs and in instances when wells (incorporated in these models as line sources) were divided between two or more processors.

  12. LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture of Robot Controllers R. Passama, D. Andreu, C component approaches and robot control architectures. This methodology defines a process that guides architecture, useful for analysis and integration, and a dedicated component-based language, focusing

  13. A component architecture for LAM\\/MPI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey M. Squyres; Andrew Lumsdaine

    2003-01-01

    To better manage the ever increasing complexity of LAM\\/MPI, we have created a lightweight component architecture for it that is specif- ically designed for high-performance message passing. This paper de- scribes the basic design of the component architecture, as well as some of the particular component instances that constitute the latest release of LAM\\/MPI. Performance comparisons against the previous, mono-

  14. Perceptual-components architecture for digital video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    A perceptual-components architecture for digital video partitions the image stream into signal components in a manner analogous to that used in the human visual system. These components consist of achromatic and opponent color channels, divided into static and motion channels, further divided into bands of particular spatial frequency and orientation. Bits are allocated to an individual band in accord with visual sensitivity to that band and in accord with the properties of visual masking. This architecture is argued to have desirable features such as efficiency, error tolerance, scalability, device independence, and extensibility.

  15. Component Commonality with Service Level Requirements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yigal Gerchak; Michael J. Magazine; A. Bruce Gamble

    1988-01-01

    This paper extends recent results of Baker et al. (Baker, K. R., M. J. Magazine, H. L. W. Nuttle. 1986. The effect of commonality on safety stocks in a simple inventory model. Management Sci. 32 982--988.) in understanding the impact of component commonality on stocking levels under service level constraints. A model is formulated for an arbitrary number of products

  16. Component vs. application-level MVC architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yonglei Tao

    2002-01-01

    We describe our approach to teaching the MVC (Model-View-Controller) architecture for GUI applications. Swing adopts MVC at component level. We use it as a case study to illustrate features of MVC and also help students learn to use the tool for programming projects. To encourage them to see beyond a specific tool, we assign students a project to build a

  17. THE COMPONENT ARCHITECTURE OF OPEN MPI

    E-print Network

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    THE COMPONENT ARCHITECTURE OF OPEN MPI: ENABLING THIRD-PARTY COLLECTIVE ALGORITHMS Jeffrey M jsquyres@open-mpi.org lums@open-mpi.org Abstract As large-scale clusters become more distributed and heterogeneous, significant research interest has emerged in optimizing MPI collective operations because

  18. Automation component architecture for the efficient development of industrial automation systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinhard Hametner; Alois Zoitl; Mario Semo

    2010-01-01

    The increasing complexity of automation applications needs a new framework architecture to develop automation control systems. This paper shows a workflow for engineering and maintenance applications in the automation control system domain. A new component architecture is specified which supports component-oriented design, reusability, and encapsulation of functional parts. The common component includes an automation sub-component, diagnosis sub-component, an optional condition

  19. Towards a Common Reference Architecture for Aspect-Oriented Modeling

    E-print Network

    Towards a Common Reference Architecture for Aspect-Oriented Modeling A. Schauerhuber* W. Schwinger E. Kapsammer W. Retschitzegger M. Wimmer Women's Postgraduate College for Internet Technologies and more comprehensive view on aspect-orientation by discussing a common reference architecture for aspect

  20. A component-based architecture for self-healing systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juho Vuori

    This seminar paper considers some of the problems in creating a architecture for a self-healing system. The presen- tation is by no means exhaustive. An example of an architecture of a self-healing component is presented and then starting from that architecture, problems of integrating these components are analysed. Completely different problems might arise if different approach was taken. I. INTRODUCTION

  1. Towards Architecture-Level Middleware-Enabled Exception Handling of Component-based Systems

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    solutions for common problems in software development and operation, such as component lifecycle managementTowards Architecture-Level Middleware-Enabled Exception Handling of Component-based Systems Gang of a component-based system. The classical code-level exception handling approach is usually applied

  2. Reliability prediction for component-based software architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralf H. Reussner; Heinz W. Schmidt; Iman H. Poernomo

    2003-01-01

    One of the motivations for specifying software architectures explicitly is the use of high level structural design information for improved control and prediction of software system quality attributes. In this paper, we present an approach for determining the reliability of component-based software architectures.Our method is based on rich architecture definition language (RADL) oriented towards modem industrial middleware platforms, such as

  3. Component Deployment Evolution Driven by Architecture Patterns and Resource

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Component Deployment Evolution Driven by Architecture Patterns and Resource Requirements Didier.Hoareau,Chouki.Tibermacine}@univ-ubs.fr Abstract. Software architectures are often designed with respect to some architecture patterns, like the pipeline and peer-to-peer. These pat- terns are the guarantee of some quality attributes, like

  4. ARCHITECTURE AND MAIN HARDWARE COMPONENTS OF THE FEL CONTROL SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Kozak, Victor R.

    ARCHITECTURE AND MAIN HARDWARE COMPONENTS OF THE FEL CONTROL SYSTEM E.N. Dementiev, V.R. Kozak, E.V. Tararyshkin, A.G. Tribendis, E.N. Shubin, Abstract This article considers the architecture of the control architecture depended on several factors specific to both the facility itself and the control equipment used

  5. Reasoning about Software Architectures with Contractually Specified Components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralf H. Reussner; Iman H. Poernomo; Heinz W. Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    \\u000a One of the motivations for specifying software architectures explicitly is the better prediction of system quality attributes.\\u000a In this chapter we present an approach for determining the reliability of component-based software architectures.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Our method is based on RADL (Rich Architecture Definition Language), an extension of DARWIN [16]. RADL places special emphasis\\u000a on component interoperation and, in particular, on accounting for

  6. Component-based Specification of Software Architecture Constraints

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    phase of the software lifecycle. They propose to de- velopers to explicit, in a structured way, design through a transformation mechanism. When defining component-based software architecture de- scriptionsComponent-based Specification of Software Architecture Constraints Chouki Tibermacine LIRMM, CNRS

  7. Architectural Analysis Approaches: A Component-Based System Development Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Novia Admodisastro; Gerald Kotonya

    2008-01-01

    Component-based system development (CBD) relies on the integration of existing software components to compose systems. These\\u000a are often black-box components whose functionality and configuration may not match the “ideal” system context. Systematic\\u000a architectural analysis can ensure that risks resulting from architectural adaptations and trade-offs do not adversely affect\\u000a critical system qualities (e.g. cost, dependability and system resource constraints). The analysis

  8. Automotive electrical systems: architecture and components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. A. Khan

    1999-01-01

    Automotive electrical power systems that address the demands of increased electrical power, improved fuel economy and reduced emissions are discussed. Considerations related to high-efficiency automotive electrical power systems such as the selection of the types of electrical machines and power converters, selection of system voltages, battery voltage equalization, load management, energy management, regenerative braking, centralized and distributed power system architectures,

  9. Processing and Scheduling Components in an Innovative Network Processor Architecture

    E-print Network

    Vlachos, Kyriakos G.

    Processing and Scheduling Components in an Innovative Network Processor Architecture K. Vlachos1 processing in high speed network interfaces and at the tight coupling of low and high level protocols. The proposed design uses programmable hard-wired components with line rate throughput and is capable

  10. GEARS: An Enterprise Architecture Based On Common Ground Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Earth observation satellites collect a broad variety of data used in applications that range from weather forecasting to climate monitoring. Within NOAA the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS) supports these applications by operating satellites in both geosynchronous and polar orbits. Traditionally NESDIS has acquired and operated its satellites as stand-alone systems with their own command and control, mission management, processing, and distribution systems. As the volume, velocity, veracity, and variety of sensor data and products produced by these systems continues to increase, NESDIS is migrating to a new concept of operation in which it will operate and sustain the ground infrastructure as an integrated Enterprise. Based on a series of common ground services, the Ground Enterprise Architecture System (GEARS) approach promises greater agility, flexibility, and efficiency at reduced cost. This talk describes the new architecture and associated development activities, and presents the results of initial efforts to improve product processing and distribution.

  11. Meta-Level Architectures for Component-Based Mobile Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnel I. Periquet; Eric C. Lin

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach to mobile-aware application development that integrates mobile-awareness into existing distributed component designs. Our proposed mobile components encapsulate a context of distributed components that collaborate to fulfill a set of published application functions. The approach is based on a set of meta-level architectures for mobility. First, we present a reflective layered-adaptation model derived from a proposed set

  12. A reference architecture for the component factory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor R. Basili; Gianluigi Caldiera; Giovanni Cantone

    1992-01-01

    Software reuse can be achieved through an organization that focuses on utilization of life cycle products from previous developments. The component factory is both an example of the more general concepts of experience and domain factory and an organizational unit worth being considered independently. The critical features of such an organization are flexibility and continuous improvement. In order to achieve

  13. Workshop WS1: UWB technology: components, systems and architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhi Ning Chen; M. Y. W. Chia; R. J. Fontana; A. H. Tewfik; R. A. Scholtz; N. K. Askar; H. Arslan; I. Oppermann; Won Namgoong; T. Kaiser

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The new allocation of extremely wide frequency ranges has greatly promoted the commercial applications of Ultra Wideband (UWB) technology in communications, radar, and localization. In an UWB system, the transmission of digital data at very high rates and with very low power over a very wide frequency band will raise many issues in component, system, and architecture levels. This

  14. Missile signal processing common computer architecture for rapid technology upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinkin, Daniel V.; Rutledge, Edward; Monticciolo, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Interceptor missiles process IR images to locate an intended target and guide the interceptor towards it. Signal processing requirements have increased as the sensor bandwidth increases and interceptors operate against more sophisticated targets. A typical interceptor signal processing chain is comprised of two parts. Front-end video processing operates on all pixels of the image and performs such operations as non-uniformity correction (NUC), image stabilization, frame integration and detection. Back-end target processing, which tracks and classifies targets detected in the image, performs such algorithms as Kalman tracking, spectral feature extraction and target discrimination. In the past, video processing was implemented using ASIC components or FPGAs because computation requirements exceeded the throughput of general-purpose processors. Target processing was performed using hybrid architectures that included ASICs, DSPs and general-purpose processors. The resulting systems tended to be function-specific, and required custom software development. They were developed using non-integrated toolsets and test equipment was developed along with the processor platform. The lifespan of a system utilizing the signal processing platform often spans decades, while the specialized nature of processor hardware and software makes it difficult and costly to upgrade. As a result, the signal processing systems often run on outdated technology, algorithms are difficult to update, and system effectiveness is impaired by the inability to rapidly respond to new threats. A new design approach is made possible three developments; Moore's Law - driven improvement in computational throughput; a newly introduced vector computing capability in general purpose processors; and a modern set of open interface software standards. Today's multiprocessor commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) platforms have sufficient throughput to support interceptor signal processing requirements. This application may be programmed under existing real-time operating systems using parallel processing software libraries, resulting in highly portable code that can be rapidly migrated to new platforms as processor technology evolves. Use of standardized development tools and 3rd party software upgrades are enabled as well as rapid upgrade of processing components as improved algorithms are developed. The resulting weapon system will have a superior processing capability over a custom approach at the time of deployment as a result of a shorter development cycles and use of newer technology. The signal processing computer may be upgraded over the lifecycle of the weapon system, and can migrate between weapon system variants enabled by modification simplicity. This paper presents a reference design using the new approach that utilizes an Altivec PowerPC parallel COTS platform. It uses a VxWorks-based real-time operating system (RTOS), and application code developed using an efficient parallel vector library (PVL). A quantification of computing requirements and demonstration of interceptor algorithm operating on this real-time platform are provided.

  15. Self-healing components in robust software architecture for concurrent and distributed systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael E. Shin

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to designing self-healing components for robust, concurrent and distributed software architecture. A self-healing component is able to detect object anomalies inside of the component, reconfigure inter-component and intra-components before and after repairing the sick object, repair it, and then test the healed object. For this, each self-healing component is structured to the layered architecture with

  16. The Common Structural Architecture of Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium Type Three Secretion

    E-print Network

    Baker, David

    The Common Structural Architecture of Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium Type Three architectures of the T3SS needle have been previously proposed. First, an atomic model of the Salmonella solved for Salmonella typhimurium PrgI needles and establish that Shigella flexneri and Salmonella

  17. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This document captures the system architecture for a Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) capability needed for electronics maintenance and repair of the Constellation Program (CxP). CLEAR is intended to improve flight system supportability and reduce the mass of spares required to maintain the electronics of human rated spacecraft on long duration missions. By necessity it allows the crew to make repairs that would otherwise be performed by Earth based repair depots. Because of practical knowledge and skill limitations of small spaceflight crews they must be augmented by Earth based support crews and automated repair equipment. This system architecture covers the complete system from ground-user to flight hardware and flight crew and defines an Earth segment and a Space segment. The Earth Segment involves database management, operational planning, and remote equipment programming and validation processes. The Space Segment involves the automated diagnostic, test and repair equipment required for a complete repair process. This document defines three major subsystems including, tele-operations that links the flight hardware to ground support, highly reconfigurable diagnostics and test instruments, and a CLEAR Repair Apparatus that automates the physical repair process.

  18. A Plug and Play GNC Architecture Using FPGA Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    KrishnaKumar, K.; Kaneshige, J.; Waterman, R.; Pires, C.; Ippoloito, C.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of Plug and Play, or PnP, is to allow hardware and software components to work together automatically, without requiring manual setup procedures. As a result, new or replacement hardware can be plugged into a system and automatically configured with the appropriate resource assignments. However, in many cases it may not be practical or even feasible to physically replace hardware components. One method for handling these types of situations is through the incorporation of reconfigurable hardware such as Field Programmable Gate Arrays, or FPGAs. This paper describes a phased approach to developing a Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) architecture that expands on the traditional concepts of PnP, in order to accommodate hardware reconfiguration without requiring detailed knowledge of the hardware. This is achieved by establishing a functional based interface that defines how the hardware will operate, and allow the hardware to reconfigure itself. The resulting system combines the flexibility of manipulating software components with the speed and efficiency of hardware.

  19. Component-based modeling of enterprise architectures for collaborative manufacturing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heekwon Chae; Younghwan Choi; Kwangsoo Kim

    2007-01-01

    Agility and collaboration are key factors in collaborative manufacturing. An enterprise architecture (EA) framework for collaborative\\u000a manufacturing has to support agility and have the ability to increase opportunities for collaboration. In this paper, an architecture-unit-based\\u000a enterprise architecture (AUEA) framework is introduced for collaborative manufacturing. It supports the agility and collaboration\\u000a ability of the EA using architecture units (AUs) and semantics

  20. Common global architecture applied to automobile electrical distribution systems

    E-print Network

    Azpeitia Camacho, Marcia E. (Marcia Edna)

    2010-01-01

    Electrical and electronic components have a prominent role in today's vehicles. Particularly during the last two decades, functionality has been added at an exponential rate, resulting in increased complexity, especially ...

  1. Modeling and Integrating Aspects into Component Architectures Lydia Michotte Robert B. France Franck Fleurey

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Franck Fleurey Prism CNRS Lab Versailles University France Departement of Computer Science Colorado State architectural model used to illustrate the approach in this paper consists of a component primary view produced by AOM consists of a base component architecture model called the primary view which reflects

  2. Manned\\/Unmanned Common Architecture Program (MCAP) net centric flight tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dale Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Properly architected avionics systems can reduce the costs of periodic functional improvements, maintenance, and obsolescence. With this in mind, the U.S. Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) initiated the Manned\\/Unmanned Common Architecture Program (MCAP) in 2003 to develop an affordable, high-performance embedded mission processing architecture for potential application to multiple aviation platforms. MCAP analyzed Army helicopter and unmanned air vehicle

  3. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Architecture Overview and Technical Performance Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. D.; Johnson, B. R.; Miller, S. W.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions. Originally designed to support S-NPP and JPSS, the CGS has demonstrated its scalability and flexibility to incorporate all of these other important missions efficiently and with minimal cost, schedule and risk, while strengthening global partnerships in weather and environmental monitoring. The CGS architecture will be upgraded to Block 2.0 in 2015 to satisfy several key objectives, including: "operationalizing" S-NPP, which had originally been intended as a risk reduction mission; leveraging lessons learned to date in multi-mission support; taking advantage of newer, more reliable and efficient technologies; and satisfying new requirements and constraints due to the continually evolving budgetary environment. To ensure the CGS meets these needs, we have developed 48 Technical Performance Measures (TPMs) across 9 categories: Data Availability, Data Latency, Operational Availability, Margin, Scalability, Situational Awareness, Transition (between environments and sites), WAN Efficiency, and Data Recovery Processing. This paper will provide an overview of the CGS Block 2.0 architecture, with particular focus on the 9 TPM categories listed above. We will describe how we ensure the deployed architecture meets these TPMs to satisfy our multi-mission objectives with the deployment of Block 2.0 in 2015.

  4. Fast GPU-Based CT Reconstruction using the Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holger Scherl; Benjamin Keck; Markus Kowarschik; Joachim Hornegger

    2007-01-01

    The Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) is a fundamentally new programming approach making use of the unified shader design of the most current Graphics Processing Units (CPUs) from NVIDIA. The programming interface allows to implement an algorithm using standard C language and a few extensions without any knowledge about graphics programming using OpenGL, DirectX, and shading languages. We apply this

  5. The dynamic architecture of emotion: Evidence for the component process model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klaus R. Scherer

    2009-01-01

    Emotion is conceptualised as an emergent, dynamic process based on an individual's subjective appraisal of significant events. It is argued that theoretical models of emotion need to propose an architecture that reflects the essential nature and functions of emotion as a psychobiological and cultural adaptation mechanism. One proposal for such a model and its underlying dynamic architecture, the component process

  6. Service Component Architecture for Vending Machine System in Cloud Computing Infrastructure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng-cheng Lin; Yi-shiou Lee; Chih-Hao Hsu; Kuan-Yu Chen; Tzu-chun Weng

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a software integration model of service component architecture in the vending industry. We use this architecture to rapidly integrate related services, substantially reduce development costs, establish innovative services, and provide consumers with a brand new experiential shopping environment in retail domain. Meanwhile, we apply a cloud computing technology to solve the following problem: service over loading in

  7. Component-Based Software Architectures: A Framework Based on Inheritance of Behavior

    E-print Network

    van der Aalst, Wil

    Planning (ERP) systems (e.g., SAP R/3 middleware). Both lines of research are characterized by a focusComponent-Based Software Architectures: A Framework Based on Inheritance of Behavior W.M.P. van der-0430, USA Abstract Software architectures shift the focus of developers from lines-of-code to coarser

  8. Preserving Architectural Choices throughout the Component-based Software Development Process

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Preserving Architectural Choices throughout the Component-based Software Development Process Chouki development process, or not preserved from one stage to another. In this paper, we present an Ar- chitectural stage are subsequently preserved. 1 Introduction Software architectures need to be well documented, so

  9. Reusable Connectors in Component-Based Software Architecture Abdelkrim Amirat and Mourad Oussalah

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Reusable Connectors in Component-Based Software Architecture Abdelkrim Amirat and Mourad Oussalah.amirat;mourad.oussalah}@univ-nantes.fr Abstract In component-based system, connectors are used to compose components. Connectors should have. For connector construction, compositionality would be particularly useful, since it would facilitate systematic

  10. Minor component fatty acids of common vegetable oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. F. Kuemmel; Miami Valley

    1964-01-01

    A combination of gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) and oxidative cleavage on fractions isolated by mercury derivative chromatography\\u000a has shown the presence of previously unreported minor component fatty acids in olive, soybean, cottonseed, corn, peanut, rapeseed\\u000a and safflower oil. All of the oils examined contain small amt of saturated acids above arachidic, some as high as hexacosanoic\\u000a acid.Cis-11-octadecenoic acid was found in

  11. Sulfate Storage and Stability on Common Lean NOx Trap Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, Nathan A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Roop, Justin T [ORNL; Choi, Jae-Soon [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Components found in a commercial lean NO{sub x} trap have been studied in order to determine their impact on sulfate storage and release. A micro-reactor and a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS) were used to compare components MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Pt/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/Ba/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, and Pt/Ba/CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, as well as physical mixtures of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Pt/Ba/CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} + MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Desulfation temperature profiles as well as DRIFTS NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} storage spectra are presented for all components. This systematic approach highlighted the ability of the underlying support to impact sulfate stability, in particular when Ba was supported on ceria-zirconia rather than alumina the desulfation temperature decreased by 60-120 C. A conceptual model of sulfation progression on the ceria-zirconia support is proposed that explains the high uptake of sulfur and low temperature release when it is employed. It was also determined that the close proximity of platinum is not necessary for much of the sulfation and desulfation chemistry that occurs, as physical mixtures with platinum dispersed on only one phase displayed similar behavior to samples with platinum dispersed on both phases.

  12. A Successful Component Architecture for Interoperable and Evolvable Ground Data Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Danford S.; Bristow, John O.; Wilmot, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has adopted an open architecture approach for satellite control centers and is now realizing benefits beyond those originally envisioned. The Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) architecture utilizes standardized interfaces and a middleware software bus to allow functional components to be easily integrated. This paper presents the GMSEC architectural goals and concepts, the capabilities enabled and the benefits realized by adopting this framework approach. NASA experiences with applying the GMSEC architecture on multiple missions are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of lessons learned, future directions for GMSEC and the possible applications beyond NASA GSFC.

  13. Antiradical activity of water soluble components in common diet vegetables.

    PubMed

    Racchi, Marco; Daglia, Maria; Lanni, Cristina; Papetti, Adele; Govoni, Stefano; Gazzani, Gabriella

    2002-02-27

    The antiradical activity of water-soluble components contained in mushrooms (Psalliota campestris), onions (Allium cepa), white cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. alba), and yellow bell peppers (Capsicum annuum) against hydroxyl radicals was tested in a chemical and biological system. The vegetable juices were obtained by centrifugation of a vegetable homogenate processed at 2 degrees C or heated at 102 degrees C. The chemical system consisted of a buffered reaction mixture composed of Fe(III)-EDTA, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, ascorbic acid, and H(2)O(2) generating the hydroxyl radical. The antiradical activity was expressed as an inhibition of deoxyribose degradation. The biological system consisted of IMR32 neuroblastoma cells exposed to H(2)O(2) in the presence or absence of the vegetable juices. Cells were pretreated for either 24 h or 1 h with the vegetable juices, and reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used as a cell viability assay. All vegetable juices inhibited the degradation of deoxyribose and increased the viability of H(2)O(2) treated cells. Raw mushroom juice proved to be the most active in both cases. Boiling significantly affected the activity of mushroom juice, but did not change significantly the effect on onions and yellow bell peppers, and partially increased the activity of white cabbage juice. Mushroom antiradical activity was also confirmed by a cytofluorimetric analysis. PMID:11853517

  14. Integrating COTS Software Components into Dependable Software Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo Asterio De Castro Guerra; Alexander B. Romanovsky; Rogério De Lemos

    2003-01-01

    sents some concluding remarks and discusses future work. This paper considers the problem of integrating com- mercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software components into systems with high dependability requirements. These components, by their very nature, are built to be reused as black boxes that cannot be modified. Instead, the sys- tem architect has to rely on techniques external with re- spect to

  15. A Proven Ground System Architecture for Promoting Collaboration and Common Solutions at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Danford

    2005-01-01

    Requirement: Improve how NASA develops and maintains ground data systems for dozens of missions, with a couple new missions always in the development phase. Decided in 2001 on enhanced message-bus architecture. Users offered choices for major components. They plug and play because key interfaces are all the same. Can support COTS, heritage, and new software. Even the middleware can be switched. Project name: GMSEC. Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center.

  16. Integrating COTS Software Components into Dependable Software Architectures Paulo Asterio de C. Guerra Alexander Romanovsky Rogrio de Lemos

    E-print Network

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    Integrating COTS Software Components into Dependable Software Architectures Paulo Asterio de C Estadual de Campinas, Brazil School of Computing Science University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Computing components into systems with high dependability requirements. These components, by their very nature

  17. Optical network architecture, technology and component challenges in aircraft network applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. F. Habiby; R. Dutt

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the key challenges associated with the development of optical network architectures, technologies and components for WDM-based optical networks in aircraft applications. The architecture and technology challenges highlighted are in part based on recent results from the DARPA RONIA project (contract HR0011-07-C-0028) and the DARPA\\/Navy NEW-HIP program (contract N00421-03-9-0002).

  18. Micro guidance and control synthesis: New components, architectures, and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

    1993-01-01

    New GN&C (guidance, navigation and control) system capabilities are shown to arise from component innovations that involve the synergistic use of microminiature sensors and actuators, microelectronics, and fiber optics. Micro-GN&C system and component concepts are defined that include micro-actuated adaptive optics, micromachined inertial sensors, fiber-optic data nets and light-power transmission, and VLSI microcomputers. The thesis is advanced that these micro-miniaturization products are capable of having a revolutionary impact on space missions and systems, and that GN&C is the pathfinder micro-technology application that can bring that about.

  19. Differences and Commonalities of Service-Oriented Device Architectures, Wireless Sensor Networks and Networks-on-Chip

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guido Moritz; Claas Cornelius; Frank Golatowski; Dirk Timmermann; Regina Stoll

    2009-01-01

    Device centric Service-oriented Architectures have shown to be applicable in the automation industry for interconnecting manufacturing devices and enterprise systems, thus, establishing a comprehensive, heterogeneous service architecture. A similar scenario can also be found in the domain of integrated circuits where a growing number of components is being interconnected by a network inside a single chip. Thus, service-oriented concepts seem

  20. The Cost Effects of Component Commonality: A Literature Review Through a Management-Accounting Lens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Labro

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I review the component commonality literature through a management-accounting lens, focusing on the cost effects of an increase in the use of the same version of a component across multiple products. The bulk of this literature is of a theoretical nature, for example, analytical models, programming models, or conjectures based on casual observations of practice. Some of

  1. Intelligent mechatronic components: control system engineering using an open distributed architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Vyatkin

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the results of case study on application of open distributed software architecture IEC61499 to the organization of intelligence, embedded to smart mechatronic components. The presented approach targets the issues related to integration and reconfiguration of automation systems, where the software integration plays an important role. Based on the testbed studies, a classification of \\

  2. Component architectures in the next generation of ultrascale scientific computing: challenges and opportunities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Bernholdt

    2007-01-01

    Component architectures for high-end scientific computing are still a relatively new idea, and their most effective use and benefits are active areas of research for both developers and users of such approaches. At the same time, however, the scale of both scientific simulations and the computer hardware on which they're run has been growing rapidly, generating an increasing desire for

  3. A Component-Based Architecture for Power-Efficient Media Access Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    Maróti, Miklós

    A Component-Based Architecture for Power-Efficient Media Access Control in Wireless Sensor Networks requirements of wireless sensor network ap- plications necessitate the development of multiple media ac- cess control (MAC) protocols to meet their varying through- put, latency, and network lifetime needs. Building

  4. Component Architecture and Modeling for Microkernel-Based Embedded System Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Liu; Ted Wong

    2008-01-01

    Microkernel-based approach provides operating system support for developing embedded systems with high performance and safety through memory protection. This allows us to introduce architectural mechanisms that enable good separation of concerns, while still satisfy the performance, security and reliability needs of embedded systems. Organizing embedded software as interacting components with well-defined interfaces is compatible with modeling methods. The challenge issue

  5. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific David E. Bernholdt1

    E-print Network

    A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing David E. Bernholdt1 , Benjamin A , Sameer Shende11 , Theresa L. Windus13 , and Shujia Zhou14 Submitted to Intl. J. High Performance of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 3490, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 7Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  6. Comparison of pelvic muscle architecture between humans and commonly used laboratory species

    PubMed Central

    Alperin, Marianna; Tuttle, Lori J.; Conner, Blair R.; Dixon, Danielle M.; Mathewson, Margie A.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Pelvic floor muscles (PFM) are deleteriously affected by vaginal birth, which contributes to the development of pelvic floor disorders. To mechanistically link these events, experiments using animal models are required, as access to human PFM tissue is challenging. In choosing an animal model, a comparative study of PFM design is necessary, since gross anatomy alone is insufficient to guide the selection. Methods Human PFM architecture was measured using micromechanical dissection and then compared with mouse (n=10), rat (n=10), and rabbit (n=10) using the Architectural Difference Index (ADI) (parameterizing a combined measure of sarcomere length-to-optimal-sarcomere ratio, fiber-to-muscle-length ratio, and fraction of total PFM mass and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) contributed by each muscle). Coccygeus (C), iliocaudalis (IC), and pubocaudalis (PC) were harvested and subjected to architectural measurements. Parameters within species were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc Tukey's tests. The scaling relationships of PFM across species were quantified using least-squares regression of log-10-transformed variables. Results Based on the ADI, rat was found to be the most similar to humans (ADI = 2.5), followed by mouse (ADI = 3.3). When animals' body mass was regressed against muscle mass, muscle length, fiber length, and PCSA scaling coefficients showed a negative allometric relationship or smaller increase than predicted by geometric scaling. Conclusion In terms of muscle design among commonly used laboratory animals, rat best approximates the human PFM, followed by mouse. Negative allometric scaling of PFM architectural parameters is likely due to the multifaceted function of these muscles. PMID:24915840

  7. Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed MemoryComputer Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris

    2005-03-24

    A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflop scale computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the Community Climate System Model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice components. Each component is semi-independent and has been developed at a different institution. We study how this multi-component, multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory architectures. For the first time, we clearly identify five effective execution modes and develop the MPH library to support application development utilizing these modes. MPH performs component-name registration, resource allocation and initial component handshaking in a flexible way.

  8. Investigation of a Novel Common Subexpression Elimination Method for Low Power and Area Efficient DCT Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. F.; Reza, A. W.; Kanesan, J.; Ramiah, H.

    2014-01-01

    A wide interest has been observed to find a low power and area efficient hardware design of discrete cosine transform (DCT) algorithm. This research work proposed a novel Common Subexpression Elimination (CSE) based pipelined architecture for DCT, aimed at reproducing the cost metrics of power and area while maintaining high speed and accuracy in DCT applications. The proposed design combines the techniques of Canonical Signed Digit (CSD) representation and CSE to implement the multiplier-less method for fixed constant multiplication of DCT coefficients. Furthermore, symmetry in the DCT coefficient matrix is used with CSE to further decrease the number of arithmetic operations. This architecture needs a single-port memory to feed the inputs instead of multiport memory, which leads to reduction of the hardware cost and area. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed scheme uses minimum logic utilizing mere 340 slices and 22 adders. Moreover, this design meets the real time constraints of different video/image coders and peak-signal-to-noise-ratio (PSNR) requirements. Furthermore, the proposed technique has significant advantages over recent well-known methods along with accuracy in terms of power reduction, silicon area usage, and maximum operating frequency by 41%, 15%, and 15%, respectively. PMID:25133249

  9. Statistical intercomparison of global climate models: A common principal component approach with application to GCM data

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S.K.; Boyle, J.S.

    1993-05-01

    Variables describing atmospheric circulation and other climate parameters derived from various GCMs and obtained from observations can be represented on a spatio-temporal grid (lattice) structure. The primary objective of this paper is to explore existing as well as some new statistical methods to analyze such data structures for the purpose of model diagnostics and intercomparison from a statistical perspective. Among the several statistical methods considered here, a new method based on common principal components appears most promising for the purpose of intercomparison of spatio-temporal data structures arising in the task of model/model and model/data intercomparison. A complete strategy for such an intercomparison is outlined. The strategy includes two steps. First, the commonality of spatial structures in two (or more) fields is captured in the common principal vectors. Second, the corresponding principal components obtained as time series are then compared on the basis of similarities in their temporal evolution.

  10. Frequency multiplexed flux locked loop architecture providing an array of DC SQUIDS having both shared and unshared components

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

    2002-01-01

    Architecture for frequency multiplexing multiple flux locked loops in a system comprising an array of DC SQUID sensors. The architecture involves dividing the traditional flux locked loop into multiple unshared components and a single shared component which, in operation, form a complete flux locked loop relative to each DC SQUID sensor. Each unshared flux locked loop component operates on a different flux modulation frequency. The architecture of the present invention allows a reduction from 2N to N+1 in the number of connections between the cryogenic DC SQUID sensors and their associated room temperature flux locked loops. Furthermore, the 1.times.N architecture of the present invention can be paralleled to form an M.times.N array architecture without increasing the required number of flux modulation frequencies.

  11. Integrating COTS Software Components into Dependable Software Architectures Paulo Asterio de C. Guerra Alexander Romanovsky Rogrio de Lemos

    E-print Network

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    architecture. The feasibility of the proposed approach is presented in the context of a steam boiler system which contains a COTS controller. 1. Introduction Component-based software development (CBSD dependability requirements we should employ solutions at the architectural level to ensure

  12. CHEMICAL STIMULANTS FOR A COMPONENT OF FEEDING BEHAVIOR IN THE COMMON GULFWEED SHRIMP LEANDER TENUICORNIS (SAY)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRUCE R. JOHNSON; JELLE ATEMA

    1986-01-01

    ABSTRACr In a shipboardstudy we examined the chemical feeding cues for a component of feeding behaviorin the common gulf-weedshrimp, Leandertenuicornis,a dominant crustaceanwithinthe pelagicSargassumcommunity. We usedthe frequencyof flexion of the chelae on the second legs to the mouth or maxillipeds as an assay for chemo sensitivity. Of 28 single compounds tested, taunne was the most stimulatoryfollowed by beta-alanine, glutathione, trimethylamine, and

  13. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Ken [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan) [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Sagane, Yoshimasa [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Miyata, Keita [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan) [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Suzuki, Tomonori [Department of Bacteriology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)] [Department of Bacteriology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Shikamori, Yasuyuki [Agilent Technologies International Japan, Ltd. Takaura-cho 9-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan)] [Agilent Technologies International Japan, Ltd. Takaura-cho 9-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan); Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-watana@bioindustry.nodai.ac.jp [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)] [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X{sub 35}-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  14. Modularity in the mammalian dentition: Mice and monkeys share a common dental genetic architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hlusko, Leslea J.; Sage, Richard D.; Mahaney, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of modularity provides a useful tool for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Here, we use quantitative genetics to identify modularity within the mammalian dentition, connecting the genetics of organogenesis to the genetics of population-level variation for a phenotype well represented in the fossil record. We estimated the correlations between dental traits due to the shared additive effects of genes (pleiotropy) and compared the pleiotropic relationships among homologous traits in two evolutionary distant taxa – mice and baboons. We find that in both mice and baboons, who shared a common ancestor >60 Ma, incisor size variation is genetically independent of molar size variation. Furthermore, baboon premolars show independent genetic variation from incisors, suggesting that a modular architecture separates incisors from these posterior teeth as well. Such genetic independence between modules provides an explanation for the extensive diversity of incisor size variation seen throughout mammalian evolution--variation uncorrelated with equivalent levels of postcanine tooth size variation. The modularity identified here is supported by the odontogenic homeobox code proposed for the patterning of the rodent dentition. The baboon postcanine pattern of incomplete pleiotropy is also consistent with predictions from the morphogenetic field model. PMID:20922775

  15. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian’an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna AE; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loďc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex SF; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Ĺsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor VA; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferričres, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explain one-fifth of heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ~2,000, ~3,700 and ~9,500 SNPs explained ~21%, ~24% and ~29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured the majority (60%) of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci enriched for genes, pathways, and tissue-types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/beta-catenin, and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants. PMID:25282103

  16. The K-Component Architecture Metamodel for Self-Adaptive Software

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim Dowling; Vinny Cahill

    2001-01-01

    Software architectures have recently emerged as a level of design concerned with specifying the overall structure of a system. Traditionally, software architectures only provide static descriptions of the participants and interaction structures in a system. Dynamic software architectures, however, can be reconfigured at runtime and therefore provide support for building dynamically adaptable applications. Software architectures can be specified using architectural

  17. The Architecture of EssB, an Integral Membrane Component of the Type VII Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Zoltner, Martin; Norman, David G.; Fyfe, Paul K.; El Mkami, Hassane; Palmer, Tracy; Hunter, William N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The membrane-bound EssB is an integral and essential component of the bacterial type VII secretion system that can contribute to pathogenicity. The architecture of Geobacillus thermodenitrificans EssB has been investigated by combining crystallographic and EPR spectroscopic methods. The protein forms a dimer that straddles the cytoplasmic membrane. A helical fold is observed for the C-terminal segment, which is positioned on the exterior of the membrane. This segment contributes most to dimer formation. The N-terminal segment displays a structure related to the pseudokinase fold and may contribute to function by recognizing substrates or secretion system partners. The remaining part of EssB may serve as an anchor point for the secretion apparatus, which is embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane with the C-terminal domain protruding out to interact with partner proteins or components of peptidoglycan. PMID:23499020

  18. Fitness and genetic architecture of parent and hybrid willows in common gardens.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Robert S; Hochwender, Cris G; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Czesak, Mary Ellen

    2006-06-01

    Models of hybrid zone dynamics incorporate different patterns of hybrid fitness relative to parental species fitness. An important but understudied source of variation underlying these fitness differences is the environment. We investigated the performance of two willow species and their F1, F2, and backcross hybrids using a common-garden experiment with six replicated gardens that differed in soil moisture. Aboveground biomass, catkin production, seed production per catkin, and seed germination rate were significantly different among genetic classes. For aboveground biomass and catkin production, hybrids generally had intermediate or inferior performance compared to parent species. Salix eriocephala had the highest performance for all performance measures, but in two gardens F, plants had superior or equal performance for aboveground biomass and female catkin production. Salix eriocephala and backcrosses to S. eriocephala had the highest numbers of filled seeds per catkin and the highest estimates of total fitness in all gardens. Measures of filled seeds per catkin and germination rate tend to support the model of endogenous hybrid unfitness, and these two measures had major effects on estimates of total seed production per catkin. We also estimated how the two willow species differ genetically in these fitness measures using line cross analysis. We found a complex genetic architecture underlying the fitness differences between species that involved additive, dominance, and epistatic genetic effects for all fitness measures. The environment was important in the expression of these genetic differences, because the type of epistasis differed among the gardens for above-ground biomass and for female catkin production. These findings suggest that fine-scale environmental variation can have a significant impact on hybrid fitness in hybrid zones where parents and hybrids are widely interspersed. PMID:16892972

  19. Accessing and distributing EMBL data using CORBA (common object request broker architecture)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lichun; Rodriguez-Tomé, Patricia; Redaschi, Nicole; McNeil, Phil; Robinson, Alan; Lijnzaad, Philip

    2000-01-01

    Background: The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database is a comprehensive database of DNA and RNA sequences and related information traditionally made available in flat-file format. Queries through tools such as SRS (Sequence Retrieval System) also return data in flat-file format. Flat files have a number of shortcomings, however, and the resources therefore currently lack a flexible environment to meet individual researchers' needs. The Object Management Group's common object request broker architecture (CORBA) is an industry standard that provides platform-independent programming interfaces and models for portable distributed object-oriented computing applications. Its independence from programming languages, computing platforms and network protocols makes it attractive for developing new applications for querying and distributing biological data. Results: A CORBA infrastructure developed by EMBL-EBI provides an efficient means of accessing and distributing EMBL data. The EMBL object model is defined such that it provides a basis for specifying interfaces in interface definition language (IDL) and thus for developing the CORBA servers. The mapping from the object model to the relational schema in the underlying Oracle database uses the facilities provided by PersistenceTM, an object/relational tool. The techniques of developing loaders and 'live object caching' with persistent objects achieve a smart live object cache where objects are created on demand. The objects are managed by an evictor pattern mechanism. Conclusions: The CORBA interfaces to the EMBL database address some of the problems of traditional flat-file formats and provide an efficient means for accessing and distributing EMBL data. CORBA also provides a flexible environment for users to develop their applications by building clients to our CORBA servers, which can be integrated into existing systems. PMID:11178259

  20. The impact of component commonality in an assemble-to-order environment under supply and demand uncertainty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Mohebbi; F. Choobineh

    2005-01-01

    A material requirements planning simulator with a two-level bill-of-material is used to study the impact of introducing component commonality into an assemble-to-order environment when demand is subject to random variations, and component procurement orders experience random delays. By using simulated data, our ANOVA results show that component commonality significantly interacts with existence of demand and supply chain uncertainties, and benefits

  1. Podosomes and Invadopodia: Related structures with Common Protein Components that May Promote Breast Cancer Cellular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Daniel C.; Cho, YoungJin; Vincent, Deanne; Cunnick, Jess M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: A rate-limiting step in breast cancer progression is acquisition of the invasive phenotype, which can precede metastasis. Expression of cell-surface proteases at the leading edge of a migrating cell provides cells with a mechanism to cross tissue barriers. A newly appreciated mechanism that may be relevant for breast cancer cell invasion is the formation of invadopodia, well-defined structures that project from the ventral membrane and promote degradation of the extracellular matrix, allowing the cell to cross a tissue barrier. Recently, there has been some controversy and discussion as to whether invadopodia, which are associated with carcinoma cells, are related to a similar structure called podosomes, which are associated with normal cells. Invadopodia and podosomes share many common characteristics, including a similar size, shape, subcellular localization and an ability to promote invasion. These two structures also share many common protein components, which we outline herein. It has been speculated that podosomes may be precursors to invadopodia and by extension both structures may be relevant to cancer cell invasion. Here, we compare and contrast the protein components of invadopodia and podosomes and discuss a potential role for these proteins and the evidence that supports a role for invadopodia and podosomes in breast cancer invasion. PMID:21655365

  2. Common evolutionary origin of alpha 2-macroglobulin and complement components C3 and C4.

    PubMed Central

    Sottrup-Jensen, L; Stepanik, T M; Kristensen, T; Lřnblad, P B; Jones, C M; Wierzbicki, D M; Magnusson, S; Domdey, H; Wetsel, R A; Lundwall, A

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the sequence of the subunit of human alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M; 1451 amino acid residues) with that of murine complement component pro-C3 (1639 amino acid residues) reveals eight extended regions of sequence similarity. These regions contain between 19% and 31% identically placed residues and account for 75% and 67%, respectively, of the polypeptide chains of alpha 2M and pro-C3. Published sequence data for complement component C4 show that segments of this protein match well with corresponding stretches in alpha 2M and pro-C3. It is proposed that alpha 2M, C3 and C4, which all contain a unique activatable beta-cysteinyl-gamma-glutamyl thiol ester, have a common evolutionary origin and are homologous proteins. Several larger regions of low sequence similarity indicate the presence of structural domains in each of these proteins that specifically modify an underlying common gross structure. The quartets of basic residues in pro-C3 and pro-C4, at which cleavage takes place to produce the mature subunits of these proteins, and most of the residues forming the anaphylatoxin peptides of C3 and C4 (C3a and C4a) are absent in alpha 2M. In addition, C3 and C4 contain large portions, which extend beyond the COOH terminus of alpha 2M. PMID:2578664

  3. Common Components of Industrial Metal-Working Fluids as Sources of Carbon for Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Foxall-VanAken, S.; Brown, J. A.; Young, W.; Salmeen, I.; McClure, T.; Napier, S.; Olsen, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Water-based metal-working fluids used in large-scale industrial operations consist of many components, but in the most commonly used formulations only three classes of components are present in high enough concentrations that they could, in principle, provide enough carbon to support the high bacterial densities (109 CFU/ml) often observed in contaminated factory fluids. These components are petroleum oil (1 to 5%), petroleum sulfonates (0.1 to 0.5%), and fatty acids (less than 0.1%, mainly linoleic and oleic acids supplied as tall oils). We isolated pure strains of predominating bacteria from contaminated reservoirs of two metal-working systems and randomly selected 12 strains which we tested in liquid culture for growth with each of the metal-working fluid components as the sole source of carbon. Of the 12 strains, 7 reached high density (109 CFU/ml from an initial inoculum of less than 2 × 103) in 24 h, and 1 strain did the same in 48 h with 0.05% oleic or linoleic acid as the carbon source. These same strains also grew on 1% naphthenic petroleum oil but required up to 72 h to reach densities near 108 CFU/ml. One strain grew slightly and the others not at all on the petroleum sulfonates. The four remaining strains did not grow on any of the components, even though they were among the predominating bacteria in the contaminated system. Of the seven strains that grew best on the fatty acids and on the naphthenic petroleum oil, five were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter species and two were identified as Pseudomonas species. Four of the bacteria that did not grow were tentatively identified as species of Pseudomonas, and one could not be identified. PMID:16347072

  4. Standards-and Component-Based Mission Operations Architecture at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Danford

    2003-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) manages many of NASA s earth and space science satellite missions. A wide variety of commercial products and GSFC-developed software components are typically integrated into a unique system configuration for each mission. Independent development of the many mission operations center systems has led to systems that are expensive to integrate, difficult to infuse with new capabilities developed for other programs, and cumbersome to maintain. This traditional approach becomes even more problematic as NASA moves towards satellite constellations, new operations concepts, and even further budgets reductions. The GSFC Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) is creating a new architecture for future missions at GSFC. Instead of selecting the best-in-class components and creating a standard control center system, GMSEC is developing component interface standards so that multiple products can plug-and-play into the configuration. Missions can then select the best components based on the merits of the product and not simply based on recent integration history at NASA. The GMSEC system utilizes a publish/subscribe information bus and standard XML-based key message interfaces. Functional components can either match directly to the interface standard, or adapters can be developed to match the product's interface to the GMSEC standard with out impacting the source product. Applications Program Interfaces (API's) are being developed to isolate the underlying middleware from the applications software and to allow the middleware product to be switched if necessary. Interface Control Documents (ICDs) between each pair of communicating components is replaced by a single message/API specification document. New applications must simply match to the information bus standards and need not worry about all of the other applications in the system. For legacy software, adapters can be developed to facilitate communications between the application and the information bus. As the approach has matured, it has become apparent that it can provide innovative solutions to some of the multi-satellite challenges facing GSFC.

  5. Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W.; van der Voet, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10?5). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes—common to five of six disorders–included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20–30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders. PMID:25414627

  6. Abstract Interfaces for Data Analysis - Component Architecture for Data Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Barrand, Guy

    2002-08-20

    The fast turnover of software technologies, in particular in the domain of interactivity (covering user interface and visualization), makes it difficult for a small group of people to produce complete and polished software-tools before the underlying technologies make them obsolete. At the HepVis '99 workshop, a working group has been formed to improve the production of software tools for data analysis in HENP. Beside promoting a distributed development organization, one goal of the group is to systematically design a set of abstract interfaces based on using modern OO analysis and OO design techniques. An initial domain analysis has come up with several categories (components) found in typical data analysis tools: Histograms, Ntuples, Functions, Vectors, Fitter, Plotter, Analyzer and Controller. Special emphasis was put on reducing the couplings between the categories to a minimum, thus optimizing re-use and maintainability of any component individually. The interfaces have been defined in Java and C++ and implementations exist in the form of libraries and tools using C++ (Anaphe/Lizard, OpenScientist) and Java (Java Analysis Studio). A special implementation aims at accessing the Java libraries (through their Abstract Interfaces) from C++. This paper gives an overview of the architecture and design of the various components for data analysis as discussed in AIDA.

  7. Security Framework for Pervasive Healthcare Architectures Utilizing MPEG-21 IPMP Components

    PubMed Central

    Fragopoulos, Anastasios; Gialelis, John; Serpanos, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays in modern and ubiquitous computing environments, it is imperative more than ever the necessity for deployment of pervasive healthcare architectures into which the patient is the central point surrounded by different types of embedded and small computing devices, which measure sensitive physical indications, interacting with hospitals databases, allowing thus urgent medical response in occurrences of critical situations. Such environments must be developed satisfying the basic security requirements for real-time secure data communication, and protection of sensitive medical data and measurements, data integrity and confidentiality, and protection of the monitored patient's privacy. In this work, we argue that the MPEG-21 Intellectual Property Management and Protection (IPMP) components can be used in order to achieve protection of transmitted medical information and enhance patient's privacy, since there is selective and controlled access to medical data that sent toward the hospital's servers. PMID:19132095

  8. Security Framework for Pervasive Healthcare Architectures Utilizing MPEG-21 IPMP Components.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulos, Anastasios; Gialelis, John; Serpanos, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays in modern and ubiquitous computing environments, it is imperative more than ever the necessity for deployment of pervasive healthcare architectures into which the patient is the central point surrounded by different types of embedded and small computing devices, which measure sensitive physical indications, interacting with hospitals databases, allowing thus urgent medical response in occurrences of critical situations. Such environments must be developed satisfying the basic security requirements for real-time secure data communication, and protection of sensitive medical data and measurements, data integrity and confidentiality, and protection of the monitored patient's privacy. In this work, we argue that the MPEG-21 Intellectual Property Management and Protection (IPMP) components can be used in order to achieve protection of transmitted medical information and enhance patient's privacy, since there is selective and controlled access to medical data that sent toward the hospital's servers. PMID:19132095

  9. Architecture of the major component of the type III secretion system export apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Abrusci, Patrizia; Vergara–Irigaray, Marta; Johnson, Steven; Beeby, Morgan D; Hendrixson, David; Roversi, Pietro; Friede, Miriam E; Deane, Janet E; Jensen, Grant J; Tang, Christoph M; Lea, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are bacterial membrane-embedded secretion nanomachines designed to export specifically targeted sets of proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm. Secretion through T3SS is governed by a subset of inner membrane proteins termed the ‘export apparatus’. We show that a key member of the Shigella flexneri export apparatus, MxiA, assembles into a ring essential for secretion in vivo. The ring forming interfaces are well conserved in both non-flagellar and flagellar homologues, implying that the ring is an evolutionary conserved feature in these systems. Electron cryo-tomography reveals a T3SS-associated cytoplasmic torus of size and shape corresponding to the MxiA ring aligned to the secretion channel located between the secretion pore and the ATPase complex. This defines the molecular architecture of the dominant component of the export apparatus and allows us to propose a model for the molecular mechanisms controlling secretion. PMID:23222644

  10. Chromium and zinc contamination of parenteral nutrient solution components commonly used in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Hak, E B; Storm, M C; Helms, R A

    1998-01-15

    Chromium and zinc contamination of components of parenteral nutrient (PN) solutions used in infants and children was studied. Solutions of amino acids, L-cysteine hydrochloride, dextrose, electrolytes, minerals, vitamins, multiple trace elements, and individual trace elements were obtained. A variety of manufacturers, lots, and expiration dates were represented when possible. The solutions were analyzed for chromium and zinc by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In all amino acid products, chromium concentration was below the limit of detection and zinc concentration ranged from 0.06 to 4.97 mg/L. In the L-cysteine hydrochloride products, chromium was measurable in only two lots (0.11 and 0.23 mg/L); zinc was measurable in all lots (32-86 mg/L). Sodium and potassium salts of chloride and acetate had chromium concentrations of 0.02-0.23 mg/L and zinc concentrations of 0.35-0.56 mg/L. Phosphate salts contained chromium 0.39-0.44 mg/L and zinc 0.91-2.33 mg/L. In calcium gluconate, zinc concentration was 0.28-2.38 mg/L. In four lots of multiple trace elements, chromium was 92-104% and zinc was 100-113.5% of the labeled amount. A PN solution for a < 10-kg infant compounded from the components assayed would provide up to an additional 0.7 microgram of chromium per kilogram and 200 micrograms of zinc per kilogram. Zinc and chromium contaminants were detected in many of the products that are common components of PN solutions for infants and children; the contamination may be sufficient to result in the administration of zinc and chromium in amounts exceeding current recommendations. PMID:9465979

  11. Making Components Contract Aware

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antoine Beugnard; Jean-marc Jézéquel; Noël Plouzeau; D. Watkins

    1999-01-01

    Components have long promised to encapsulate data and programs into a box that operates predictably without requiring that users know the specifics of how it does so. Many advocates have predicted that components will bring about widespread software reuse, spawning a market for components usable with such mainstream software buses as the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and the

  12. Comparing the Magnitude of Two Fractions with Common Components: Which Representations Are Used by 10- and 12-Year-Olds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meert, Gaelle; Gregoire, Jacques; Noel, Marie-Pascale

    2010-01-01

    This study tested whether 10- and 12-year-olds who can correctly compare the magnitudes of fractions with common components access the magnitudes of the whole fractions rather than only compare the magnitudes of their components. Time for comparing two fractions was predicted by the numerical distance between the whole fractions, suggesting an…

  13. This is the JavaBeans API specification. It describes the core specification for the JavaBeans component architecture.

    E-print Network

    Demurjian, Steven A.

    This is the JavaBeans API specification. It describes the core specification for the JavaBeans component architecture. This version (1.01) of the specification describes the JavaBeans APIs the change history on page 112. Because of the volume of interest in JavaBeans we can't normally respond

  14. CSc 165 Computer Game Architecture and Implementation Spring 2014 -Gordon Assignment #1: Building A Game Using Game Engine Components

    E-print Network

    Gordon, Scott

    extend sage.app.BaseGame, and override initGame() and update(). All game logic must reside inside1 CSc 165 ­ Computer Game Architecture and Implementation Spring 2014 - Gordon Assignment #1: Building A Game Using Game Engine Components Due: Tuesday, February 25th (2 weeks) The objective

  15. Comprehensive common spatial patterns with temporal structure information of EEG data: minimizing nontask related EEG component.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haixian; Xu, Dong

    2012-09-01

    In the context of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI), common spatial patterns (CSP) is widely used for spatially filtering multichannel EEG signals. CSP is a supervised learning technique depending on only labeled trials. Its generalization performance deteriorates due to overfitting occurred when the number of training trials is small. On the other hand, a large number of unlabeled trials are relatively easy to obtain. In this paper, we contribute a comprehensive learning scheme of CSP (cCSP) that learns on both labeled and unlabeled trials. cCSP regularizes the objective function of CSP by preserving the temporal relationship among samples of unlabeled trials in terms of linear representation. The intrinsically temporal structure is characterized by an l(1) graph. As a result, the temporal correlation information of unlabeled trials is incorporated into CSP, yielding enhanced generalization capacity. Interestingly, the regularizer of cCSP can be interpreted as minimizing a nontask related EEG component, which helps cCSP alleviate nonstationarities. Experiment results of single-trial EEG classification on publicly available EEG datasets confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:22736634

  16. Strategies for a Component-Based Self-adaptability Model in Peer-to-Peer Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sascha Alda; Armin B. Cremers

    2004-01-01

    Current peer-to-peer architectures are hardly resistant against unan- ticipated exceptions such as the failure of single peers. This can be justified by the absence of sophisticated models for exception detection and resolution in peer-to-peer architectures. On the other hand, existing generic models for such self-adaptable architectures are rather theoretical and less suitable for the usage by end-users. In this work,

  17. Component-Based Self-Adaptability in Peer-to-Peer Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sascha Alda

    2004-01-01

    Current peer-to-peer architectures are hardly resistantagainst unanticipated exceptions such as the failure ofsingle peers. This can be justified by the absence of sophisticatedmodels for detecting and handling exceptionin peer-to-peer architectures. On the other hand, existingmodels for such self-adaptable architectures are rathergeneric and less practical for end-users. In this work, acomponent-based self-adaptability model for peer-to-peerarchitectures is presented that supports end-users in

  18. Towards Composition Management for Component-based Peer-to-Peer Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sascha Alda; Armin B. Cremers

    2005-01-01

    Recent peer-to-peer architectures do not fulfill the idea of a service-oriented archi- tecture to allow the flexible composition of services towards concrete applications. This can be justified by the absence of flexible notations for the composition of ser- vices that incorporate the dynamic nature exposed by peer-to-peer architectures. In this work, the peer-to-peer architecture DeEvolve is presented that provides novel

  19. Learning common sense knowledge from user interaction and principal component analysis

    E-print Network

    Speer, Robert (Robert H.)

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, I present a system for reasoning with common sense knowledge in multiple natural languages, as part of the Open Mind Common Sense project. The knowledge that Open Mind collects from volunteer contributors ...

  20. Component-based Architecture Recovery from Object Oriented Systems via Relational Concept Analysis

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    an important phase of the development process of complex software systems. Using software architecture of the computer systems size and complexity, software ar- chitectures are emerging as a valuable ally for both, seriai, elhamdouni}@lirmm.fr Abstract. Software architecture modelling and representation has become

  1. Quantitative Trait Loci for Root Architecture Traits Correlated with Phosphorus Acquisition in Common Bean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen E. Beebe; Marcela Rojas-Pierce; Xiaolong Yan; Matthew W. Blair; Fabio Pedraza; Fernando Muńoz; Joe Tohme; Jonathan P. Lynch

    2006-01-01

    Low soil P availability is a primary constraint to common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Latin America and Africa. Substantial genotypic variation in bean adaptation to low phosphorus (LP) availability has been linked with root traits that enhance the efficiency of soil foraging. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for P accumulation and

  2. architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erzsébet Lányi

    Contemporary architecture works according to a linear model, meaning that it takes in fresh air, energy generated from fossil fuels, drinking water, various building and other materi- als necessary for life and having squandered them ine ciently, it releases stale-air, smoke, fumes, sewage, noise and refuse that will chemically pollute the environment. In 1994 at the CIB conference held in

  3. Tutorial on single- and two-component two-phase flow and heat transfer: Commonality and difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delil, A. A. M.

    2002-01-01

    It is assessed to what extent the results of two-phase two-component flow and heat transfer research can be usefully applied to support research on the flow and heat transfer in two-phase single-component systems. The latter single-component two-phase systems, envisaged for spacecraft thermal control applications, are Mechanically Pumped and Vapor Pressure Driven Loops, Capillary Pumped Loops, and Loop Heat Pipes. In these single-component systems the working fluid is a mixture of a liquid (for example ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethanol, or other refrigerants, etc.) and its saturated vapor. The two-component systems considered consist of liquid-gas mixtures, e.g. water-air. Various aspects are discussed qualitatively and quantitatively to determine commonality and difference between two physically looking similar and close, but essentially different systems. It is focused on the different pressure gradient constituents and total pressure gradients, on flow regime mapping (including evaporating and condensing flow trajectories in the flow pattern maps), on adiabatic flow and the impact of flashing, and on thermal-gravitational scaling issues. It is elucidated that, though there is a certain degree of commonality, the differences are appreciable. The conclusion is that one shall be very careful in interpreting two-component outcomes to develop single-component two-phase thermal control systems. .

  4. Systems-level quantification of division timing reveals a common genetic architecture controlling asynchrony and fate asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; Wong, Ming-Kin; An, Xiaomeng; Guan, Daogang; Shao, Jiaofang; Ng, Hon Chun Kaoru; Ren, Xiaoliang; He, Kan; Liao, Jinyue; Ang, Yingjin; Chen, Long; Huang, Xiaotai; Yan, Bin; Xia, Yiji; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Chow, King Lau; Yan, Hong; Zhao, Zhongying

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of cell division timing is crucial for proper cell fate specification and tissue growth. However, the differential regulation of cell division timing across or within cell types during metazoan development remains poorly understood. To elucidate the systems-level genetic architecture coordinating division timing, we performed a high-content screening for genes whose depletion produced a significant reduction in the asynchrony of division between sister cells (ADS) compared to that of wild-type during Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We quantified division timing using 3D time-lapse imaging followed by computer-aided lineage analysis. A total of 822 genes were selected for perturbation based on their conservation and known roles in development. Surprisingly, we find that cell fate determinants are not only essential for establishing fate asymmetry, but also are imperative for setting the ADS regardless of cellular context, indicating a common genetic architecture used by both cellular processes. The fate determinants demonstrate either coupled or separate regulation between the two processes. The temporal coordination appears to facilitate cell migration during fate specification or tissue growth. Our quantitative dataset with cellular resolution provides a resource for future analyses of the genetic control of spatial and temporal coordination during metazoan development. PMID:26063786

  5. Systems-level quantification of division timing reveals a common genetic architecture controlling asynchrony and fate asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; Wong, Ming-Kin; An, Xiaomeng; Guan, Daogang; Shao, Jiaofang; Ng, Hon Chun Kaoru; Ren, Xiaoliang; He, Kan; Liao, Jinyue; Ang, Yingjin; Chen, Long; Huang, Xiaotai; Yan, Bin; Xia, Yiji; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Chow, King Lau; Yan, Hong; Zhao, Zhongying

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of cell division timing is crucial for proper cell fate specification and tissue growth. However, the differential regulation of cell division timing across or within cell types during metazoan development remains poorly understood. To elucidate the systems-level genetic architecture coordinating division timing, we performed a high-content screening for genes whose depletion produced a significant reduction in the asynchrony of division between sister cells (ADS) compared to that of wild-type during Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We quantified division timing using 3D time-lapse imaging followed by computer-aided lineage analysis. A total of 822 genes were selected for perturbation based on their conservation and known roles in development. Surprisingly, we find that cell fate determinants are not only essential for establishing fate asymmetry, but also are imperative for setting the ADS regardless of cellular context, indicating a common genetic architecture used by both cellular processes. The fate determinants demonstrate either coupled or separate regulation between the two processes. The temporal coordination appears to facilitate cell migration during fate specification or tissue growth. Our quantitative dataset with cellular resolution provides a resource for future analyses of the genetic control of spatial and temporal coordination during metazoan development. PMID:26063786

  6. Competency Test Items for Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Common Core Component. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; McGhee, Max B.

    An activity was undertaken to develop written criterion-referenced tests for the common core component of Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Intended for tenth grade students who have completed Fundamentals of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations, applied principles were designed to consist of three…

  7. Formal Modeling and Analysis of Software Architecture: Components, Connectors, and Events

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Garlan

    2003-01-01

    Developing a good software architecture for a complex sys- tem is a critically important step for insuring that the system will satisfy its principal objectives. Unfortunately, today descriptions of software ar- chitecture are largely based on informal \\

  8. Molecular manipulation of solid state structure: influences of organic components on vanadium oxide architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagrman, Pamela J.; Finn, Robert C.; Zubieta, Jon

    2001-11-01

    Among the inorganic materials enjoying widespread contemporary interest, the metal oxide based solid phases occupy a prominent position by virtue of their applications to catalysis, sorption, molecular electronics, energy storage, optical materials and ceramics. The diversity of properties associated with these materials reflects the chemical composition, which allows variations in covalency, geometry and oxidation states, and the crystalline architecture, which may provide different pore structures, coordination sites, or juxtapositions of functional groups. Despite such fundamental and practical significance, the design of the structure of such materials remains a challenge in solid state chemistry. While organic materials have been synthesized which self-assemble into ordered arrays at low temperature and which exhibit molecular recognition and biomimetic activity, the ability to synthesize inorganic materials by rational design remains elusive. Small, soluble molecular building blocks with well-defined reaction chemistries which allow their low-temperature assembly into crystalline solid state inorganic materials are not well known. However, the existence of naturally occurring, structurally complex minerals establishes that hydrothermal synthesis can provide a low temperature pathway to produce open-framework and layered metastable structures utilizing inorganic starting materials. Thus, hydrothermal conditions have been used to prepare microporous tetrahedral framework solids that are capable of shape-selective absorption, like zeolites and aluminophosphates, and more recently in the preparation of complex solid arrays of the M/O/PO 3-4 and M/O/RPO 2-3 systems (M=V and Mo). The hydrothermal technique may be combined with the introduction of organic components which may act as charge compensating groups, space-filling units, structure directing agents, templates, tethers between functional groups, or conventional ligands in the preparation of inorganic/organic composites. In the past decade, this general strategy has been exploited in the evolution of a family of vanadium oxides incorporating structure-directing organic or secondary-metal organic subunits, which are the topic of this review. The synthetic approach to novel vanadium oxide solids occupies the interface between materials science and coordination chemistry. The emerging theme focuses on the association of an organic component, acting as a ligand, tether, or structure directing moiety, with the inorganic framework of the solid to provide unique composites. While some organic components may limit the size of inorganic cluster subunits of a solid by passivating the surface of an aggregate through capping, such ligands may also serve to link inorganic subunits into complex networks. In other cases, the organic subunit, rather than participating as a covalently bound unit of the framework, acts in a structure directing role, producing amphiphilic materials whose structures are determined by hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions. This latter feature is reminiscent of the factors influencing biomineralization, a field which may prove relevant to the development of new strategies for the controlled synthesis of organized inorganic and organic/inorganic composite materials. These various approaches to the "design" of inorganic solids are discussed and assessed in terms of the new structural types recently observed in the vanadium oxide chemistry.

  9. Helplets: A Common Sense-Based Collaborative Help Collection and Retrieval Architecture for Web-Enabled Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Mohammad; Khan, Shahbaz; Khan, Sanaullah

    All computer software systems, whether online or offline, require a help system. Help texts are traditionally written by software development companies and answer targeted questions in the form of how-tos and troubleshooting procedures. However, when the popularity of an application grows, users of the application themselves start adding to the corpus of help for the system in the form of online tutorials. There is, however, one problem with such tutorials. They have no direct link with the software for which they are written. Users have to search the Internet for different tutorials that are usually hosted on dispersed locations, and there is no ideal way of finding the relevant information without ending up with lots of noise in the search results. In this chapter, we describe a model for a help system which enhances this concept using collaborative tagging for categorization of "helplets." For the knowledge retrieval part of the system, we utilize a previously developed technique based on common sense and user personalization. We use a freely available common sense reasoning toolkit for knowledge retrieval. Our architecture can be implemented in Web-based systems as well as in stand-alone desktop applications.

  10. Heritabilities of Common and Measure-Specific Components of the Big Five Personality Factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Loehlin; Robert R. McCrae; Paul T. Costa; Oliver P. John

    1998-01-01

    Three different measures of the Big Five personality dimensions were developed from the battery of questionnaires used in the National Merit Twin Study: one from trait self-rating scales, one from personality inventory items, and one from an adjective check list. Behavior-genetic models were fit to what the three measures had in common, and to the variance distinctive to each. The

  11. A COMPONENT-BASED EVENT-DRIVEN INTERACTIVE VISUALIZATION SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert F. Erbacher

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes our research to develop an effective visualization environment for real-time intrusion detection and the resultant architecture. The environment requirements necessitate that effective interaction be maintained while performing real-time visualization of system log data. Additionally, the environment design is based on the understanding that potentially different data sources and visualization techniques would be used, requiring the ability to

  12. Missing data and forecasting in multivariate time series: An application of the common components dynamic linear model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabio Corradi; Giuseppina Guagnano

    1993-01-01

    Summary  The paper deals with missing data and forecasting problems in multivariate time series making use of the Common Components\\u000a Dynamic Linear Model (DLMCC), presented in Quintana (1985), and West and Harrison (1989).\\u000a \\u000a Some results are presented and discussed: exploiting the correlation between series, estimated by the DLMCC, the paper shows\\u000a as it is possible to update state vector posterior distributions

  13. Common-mode components comparison for different SVM schemes in three-phase four-legged converter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Changrong Liu; Jason Lai; Fred C. Lee; Dan Chen; Richard Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Currently, space vector modulation (SVM) schemes are employed widely in three-phase power converter control. The impacts of different two-dimensional SVM (2D SVM) schemes on THD, switching losses and output ripple for three-legged converters have been discussed in literature. In this paper, the impact of various 3D SVM schemes on the common mode component is investigated. Nine different 3D SVM schemes

  14. Sublimation of Icy Planetesimals Around Main Sequence Stars--Common Dust Temperatures & Multiple Components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Farisa Y. Morales; G. Rieke; M. Werner; K. Su; G. Bryden; K. Stapelfeldt

    2011-01-01

    We compare the properties of warm dust emission from main-sequence A-type stars to those of dust around solar-type sources with similar Spitzer Space Telescope IRS\\/MIPS data and similar ages. Both samples have spectral energy distributions which show evidence of multiple components. Over the range of stellar types considered, we obtain nearly the same characteristic dust temperatures ( 190 K &

  15. ClockWorks: Visual Programming of Component-Based Software Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. Nicholas Graham; Catherine A. Morton; Tore Urnes

    1996-01-01

    ClockWorks is a programming environment supporting the visual programming ofobject-oriented software architectures. In developing ClockWorks, we used user interfaceevaluation techniques, including heuristic evaluation, cognitive walkthrough anduser evaluation. The development of ClockWorks was based on a task analysis of ClockWorksprogrammers. This task analysis revealed that programmers work incrementally.Incremental development implies the need for good support for information...

  16. Evaluating Performance of Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel; Tisdale, Edwin; Norton, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Parallel Component Performance Benchmarks is a computer program developed to aid the evaluation of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) - a software architecture, based on a component model, that was conceived to foster high-performance computing, including parallel computing. More specifically, this program compares the performances (principally by measuring computing times) of componentized versus conventional versions of the Parallel Pyramid 2D Adaptive Mesh Refinement library - a software library that is used to generate computational meshes for solving physical problems and that is typical of software libraries in use at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  17. Abnormal structure or function of the amygdala is a common component of neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Cynthia M.; Bauman, Melissa D.; Amaral, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The amygdala, perhaps more than any other brain region, has been implicated in numerous neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. It is part of a system initially evolved to detect dangers in the environment and modulate subsequent responses, which can profoundly influence human behavior. If its threshold is set too low, normally benign aspects of the environment are perceived as dangers, interactions are limited, and anxiety may arise. If set too high, risk taking increases and inappropriate sociality may occur. Given that many neurodevelopmental disorders involve too little or too much anxiety or too little of too much social interaction, it is not surprising that the amygdala has been implicated in many of them. In this chapter, we begin by providing a brief overview of the phylogeny, ontogeny, and function of the amygdala and then appraise data from neurodevelopmental disorders which suggest amygdala dysregulation. We focus on neurodevelopmental disorders where there is evidence of amygdala dysregulation from postmortem studies, structural MRI analyses or functional MRI. However, the results are often disparate and it is not totally clear whether this is due to inherent heterogeneity or differences in methodology. Nonetheless, the amygdala is a common site for neuropathology in neurodevelopmental disorders and is therefore a potential target for therapeutics to alleviate associated symptoms. PMID:20950634

  18. A Fault-Tolerant Software Architecture for Component-Based Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo Asterio De Castro Guerra; Cecília M. F. Rubira; Rogério De Lemos

    2002-01-01

    Component-based software built from reusable software components is being used in a wide range of applications that have high\\u000a dependability requirements. In order to achieve the required levels of dependability, it is necessary to incorporate into\\u000a these complex systems means for coping with software faults. However, the problem is exacerbated if we consider the current\\u000a trend of integrating off-the-shelf software

  19. Limits of Principal Components Analysis for Producing a Common Trait Space: Implications for Inferring Selection, Contingency, and Chance in Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Kevin J.; Cooper, W. James; Albertson, R. Craig

    2009-01-01

    Background Comparing patterns of divergence among separate lineages or groups has posed an especially difficult challenge for biologists. Recently a new, conceptually simple methodology called the “ordered-axis plot” approach was introduced for the purpose of comparing patterns of diversity in a common morphospace. This technique involves a combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and linear regression. Given the common use of these statistics the potential for the widespread use of the ordered axis approach is high. However, there are a number of drawbacks to this approach, most notably that lineages with the greatest amount of variance will largely bias interpretations from analyses involving a common morphospace. Therefore, without meeting a set of a priori requirements regarding data structure the ordered-axis plot approach will likely produce misleading results. Methodology/Principal Findings Morphological data sets from cichlid fishes endemic to Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi, and Victoria were used to statistically demonstrate how separate groups can have differing contributions to a common morphospace produced by a PCA. Through a matrix superimposition of eigenvectors (scale-free trajectories of variation identified by PCA) we show that some groups contribute more to the trajectories of variation identified in a common morphospace. Furthermore, through a set of randomization tests we show that a common morphospace model partitions variation differently than group-specific models. Finally, we demonstrate how these limitations may influence an ordered-axis plot approach by performing a comparison on data sets with known alterations in covariance structure. Using these results we provide a set of criteria that must be met before a common morphospace can be reliably used. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that a common morphospace produced by PCA would not be useful for producing biologically meaningful results unless a restrictive set of criteria are met. We therefore suggest biologists be aware of the limitations of the ordered-axis plot approach before employing it on their own data, and possibly consider other, less restrictive methods for addressing the same question. PMID:19956767

  20. Common components of industrial metal-working fluids as sources of carbon for bacterial growth. [Acinetobacter; Pseudomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall-vanAken, S.; Brown, J.A. Jr.; Young, W.; Salmeen, I.; McClure, T.; Napier, S. Jr.; Olsen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Water-based metal-working fluids in large-scale industrial operations consist of many components, but in the most commonly used formulations only three classes of components are present in high enough concentrations that they could, in principle, provide enough carbon to support the high bacterial densities (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml) often observed in contaminated factory fluids. These components are petroleum oil (1 to 5%), petroleum sulfonates (0.1 to 0.5%), and fatty acids (less than 0.1%, mainly linoleic and oleic acids supplied as tall oils). Pure strains of predominating bacteria were isolated from contaminated reservoirs of two metal-working systems and randomly selected 12 strains which were tested in liquid culture for growth with each of the metal-working fluid components as the sole source of carbon. Of the 12 strains, 7 reached high density (10/sup 9/ CFU/ml from an initial inoculum of less than 2 x 10/sup 3/) in 24 h, and 1 strain did the same in 48 h with 0.05% oleic or linoleic acid as the carbon source. These same strains also grew on 1% naphthenic petroleum oil but required up to 72 h to reach densities near 10/sup 8/ CFU/ml. One strain grew slightly and the others not at all on the petroleum sulfonates. The four remaining strains did not grow on any of the components, even though they were among the predominating bacteria in the contaminated system. Of the seven strains that grew best on the fatty acids and on the naphthenic petroleum oil, five were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter species and two were identified as Pseudomonas species. Four of the bacteria that did not grow were tentatively identified as species of Pseudomonas, and one could not be identified.

  1. Renal cell carcinomas with papillary architecture and clear cell components: the utility of immunohistochemical and cytogenetical analyses in differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, Stefano; Eble, John N; Maclennan, Gregory T; Grignon, David J; Shah, Rajal B; Zhang, Shaobo; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Cheng, Liang

    2008-12-01

    Although histologic features enable an accurate diagnosis in most renal carcinomas, overlapping morphologic findings between some renal neoplasms make subclassification difficult. Some renal carcinomas show papillary architecture but are composed extensively of cells with clear cytoplasm, and it is unclear whether they should be classified as clear cell renal cell carcinomas or papillary renal cell carcinomas. We analyzed the immunohistochemical profiles and the cytogenetic patterns of 14 renal carcinomas showing papillary architecture in which there were variable amounts of cells with clear cytoplasm. The patients were 8 women and 6 men (mean age: 54 y). Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis distinguished 2 different groups. The first consisted of 10 renal cell carcinomas with strong immunoreactivity for alpha-methyl coenzyme A racemase, of which 9 also expressed cytokeratin 7. All of these neoplasms showed gains of chromosome 7 or 17 and chromosome Y was lost in all the male patients whereas 3p deletion was detected only in one case. In the other 4 renal cell carcinomas, cytokeratin 7 was not detected and alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase was positive in only 1. In these neoplasms, no gain of chromosome 7 or 17 and no loss of chromosome Y were observed, whereas 3p deletion was detected in 3 of them. None of the 14 neoplasms showed immunoreactivity for TFE3. The combined use of immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics enabled us to provide a definitive diagnosis for 12 of 14 renal cell carcinomas with papillary architecture and clear cell components: 9 cases were confirmed to be papillary renal cell carcinomas and 3 cases were confirmed to be clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite these ancillary techniques, 2 cases remained unclassified. Our study establishes the utility of these procedures in accurately classifying the great majority of renal cell carcinomas with these findings. PMID:18779729

  2. Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets

    DOEpatents

    Alman, David E. (Corvallis, OR); Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR); Davis, Daniel L. (Albany, OR)

    2011-03-08

    This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

  3. Power system commonality study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franklin D. Littman

    1992-01-01

    A limited top level study was completed to determine the commonality of power system\\/subsystem concepts within potential lunar and Mars surface power system architectures. A list of power system concepts with high commonality was developed which can be used to synthesize power system architectures which minimize development cost. Examples of potential high commonality power system architectures are given in this

  4. Plastic and Heritable Components of Phenotypic Variation in Nucella lapillus: An Assessment Using Reciprocal Transplant and Common Garden Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pascoal, Sonia; Carvalho, Gary; Creer, Simon; Rock, Jenny; Kawaii, Kei; Mendo, Sonia; Hughes, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of plastic and heritable components of phenotypic variation is crucial for understanding the evolution of adaptive character traits in heterogeneous environments. We assessed the above in relation to adaptive shell morphology of the rocky intertidal snail Nucella lapillus by reciprocal transplantation of snails between two shores differing in wave action and rearing snails of the same provenance in a common garden. Results were compared with those reported for similar experiments conducted elsewhere. Microsatellite variation indicated limited gene flow between the populations. Intrinsic growth rate was greater in exposed-site than sheltered-site snails, but the reverse was true of absolute growth rate, suggesting heritable compensation for reduced foraging opportunity at the exposed site. Shell morphology of reciprocal transplants partially converged through plasticity toward that of native snails. Shell morphology of F2s in the common garden partially retained characteristics of the P-generation, suggesting genetic control. A maternal effect was revealed by greater resemblance of F1s than F2s to the P-generation. The observed synergistic effects of plastic, maternal and genetic control of shell-shape may be expected to maximise fitness when environmental characteristics become unpredictable through dispersal. PMID:22299035

  5. Plastic and heritable components of phenotypic variation in Nucella lapillus: an assessment using reciprocal transplant and common garden experiments.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Sonia; Carvalho, Gary; Creer, Simon; Rock, Jenny; Kawaii, Kei; Mendo, Sonia; Hughes, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of plastic and heritable components of phenotypic variation is crucial for understanding the evolution of adaptive character traits in heterogeneous environments. We assessed the above in relation to adaptive shell morphology of the rocky intertidal snail Nucella lapillus by reciprocal transplantation of snails between two shores differing in wave action and rearing snails of the same provenance in a common garden. Results were compared with those reported for similar experiments conducted elsewhere. Microsatellite variation indicated limited gene flow between the populations. Intrinsic growth rate was greater in exposed-site than sheltered-site snails, but the reverse was true of absolute growth rate, suggesting heritable compensation for reduced foraging opportunity at the exposed site. Shell morphology of reciprocal transplants partially converged through plasticity toward that of native snails. Shell morphology of F(2)s in the common garden partially retained characteristics of the P-generation, suggesting genetic control. A maternal effect was revealed by greater resemblance of F(1)s than F(2)s to the P-generation. The observed synergistic effects of plastic, maternal and genetic control of shell-shape may be expected to maximise fitness when environmental characteristics become unpredictable through dispersal. PMID:22299035

  6. Architecture of a Coarse-Grained Upper Middle Cambrian Alluvial Delta Dominated by Braidplain and Gilbert-Style Delta Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    The ~500-m thick upper Middle Cambrian Lockett Conglomerate was deposited as part of an alluvial delta that includes Gilbert-type mega-crossbeds as well as braidplain conglomerates, and was constructed across an accretionary prism. Internal Lockett Conglomerate architecture indicates at least three phases of progradation are recorded by Gilbert-type, delta-front deposits that are separated by delta-top distributaries and/or braidplain deposits, all of which form discontinuous sheets and lenses, and record aggradation. Evaluation of sedimentary features (particle size and organization, bedding features) allows identification of eight facies within the Lockett Conglomerate; sedimentary features were used to infer transportational and depositional mechanisms. Conglomerate facies HL-1 - HL-8 were assigned to one or more of the following depositional associations: Beachface/shoreface, Deltafront, Alluvial fan, Braidplain (fluvial, unchannelized), Delta-top distributaries, and Mouth-bars. A series of Depositional Packages was identified, and mapped; integration with measured sections allowed development of a facies model for an alluvial delta in which the subaerial component is dominated by the braidplain association, and the subaqueous component by the (Gilbert-type) deltafront association as well as the delta-top distributary and mouthbar associations. Locally, the beachface association marks the transition between the subaqueous and subaerial components of the alluvial delta. Alluvial fan deposits are absent, but the rounded pebbles, cobbles and boulders with a new and distinctive provenance signature indicate derivation from a newly exposed igneous and metamorphic basement, and abrasion during transport through the fluvial (braidplain) system prior to deposition as part of the alluvial delta.

  7. Mapping genomic loci for cotton plant architecture, yield components, and fiber properties in an interspecific (Gossypium hirsutum L. x G. barbadense L.) RIL population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was conducted to better understand the genetic control of plant architecture (PA), yield components (YC), and fiber properties (FP) in the two cultivated tetraploid species of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. and G. barbadense L.). Genomic regions were identifi...

  8. An Intelligent Architecture Based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays Designed to Detect Moving Objects by Using Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Ignacio; Mazo, Manuel; Lázaro, José L.; Gardel, Alfredo; Jiménez, Pedro; Pizarro, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a complete implementation of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithm in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices applied to high rate background segmentation of images. The classical sequential execution of different parts of the PCA algorithm has been parallelized. This parallelization has led to the specific development and implementation in hardware of the different stages of PCA, such as computation of the correlation matrix, matrix diagonalization using the Jacobi method and subspace projections of images. On the application side, the paper presents a motion detection algorithm, also entirely implemented on the FPGA, and based on the developed PCA core. This consists of dynamically thresholding the differences between the input image and the one obtained by expressing the input image using the PCA linear subspace previously obtained as a background model. The proposal achieves a high ratio of processed images (up to 120 frames per second) and high quality segmentation results, with a completely embedded and reliable hardware architecture based on commercial CMOS sensors and FPGA devices. PMID:22163406

  9. Components of the Plasminogen Activation System Promote Engraftment of Porous Polyethylene Biomaterial via Common and Distinct Effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Christoph A.; Hessenauer, Maximilian E. T.; Pflieger, Kerstin; Rehberg, Markus; Kanse, Sandip M.; Zahler, Stefan; Krombach, Fritz; Berghaus, Alexander; Strieth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid fibrovascularization is a prerequisite for successful biomaterial engraftment. In addition to their well-known roles in fibrinolysis, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or their inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have recently been implicated as individual mediators in non-fibrinolytic processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Since these events are critical for fibrovascularization of biomaterial, we hypothesized that the components of the plasminogen activation system contribute to biomaterial engraftment. Employing in vivo and ex vivo microscopy techniques, vessel and collagen network formation within porous polyethylene (PPE) implants engrafted into dorsal skinfold chambers were found to be significantly impaired in uPA-, tPA-, or PAI-1-deficient mice. Consequently, the force required for mechanical disintegration of the implants out of the host tissue was significantly lower in the mutant mice than in wild-type controls. Conversely, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, non-catalytic uPA, or PAI-1, but not with non-catalytic tPA, accelerated implant vascularization in wild-type mice. Thus, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 contribute to the fibrovascularization of PPE implants through common and distinct effects. As clinical perspective, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, or PAI-1 might provide a novel strategy for accelerating the vascularization of this biomaterial. PMID:25658820

  10. Coqcots & Pycots: non-stopping components for safe dynamic reconfiguration

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Coqcots & Pycots: non-stopping components for safe dynamic reconfiguration J´er´emy Buisson reconfiguration has been commonly adopted for modifying some components and/or the architecture at runtime: (i) the integration of DSU techniques in a component model, and; (ii) a reconfiguration development

  11. Information architecture for a planetary 'exploration web'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamarra, N.; McVittie, T.

    2002-01-01

    'Web services' is a common way of deploying distributed applications whose software components and data sources may be in different locations, formats, languages, etc. Although such collaboration is not utilized significantly in planetary exploration, we believe there is significant benefit in developing an architecture in which missions could leverage each others capabilities. We believe that an incremental deployment of such an architecture could significantly contribute to the evolution of increasingly capable, efficient, and even autonomous remote exploration.

  12. Improving the Discoverability and Availability of Sample Data and Imagery in NASA's Astromaterials Curation Digital Repository Using a New Common Architecture for Sample Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, N. S.; Evans, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) is the designated facility for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. The suite of collections includes the lunar samples from the Apollo missions, cosmic dust particles falling into the Earth's atmosphere, meteorites collected in Antarctica, comet and interstellar dust particles from the Stardust mission, asteroid particles from the Japanese Hayabusa mission, and solar wind atoms collected during the Genesis mission. To support planetary science research on these samples, NASA's Astromaterials Curation Office hosts the Astromaterials Curation Digital Repository, which provides descriptions of the missions and collections, and critical information about each individual sample. Our office is implementing several informatics initiatives with the goal of better serving the planetary research community. One of these initiatives aims to increase the availability and discoverability of sample data and images through the use of a newly designed common architecture for Astromaterials Curation databases.

  13. Tests of human olfactory function: Principal components analysis suggests that most measure a common source of variance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard L. Doty; Richard Smith; Donald A. Mckeown; Jaya Raj

    1994-01-01

    It is not known whether nominally different olfactory tests actually measure dissimilar perceptual attributes. In this study,\\u000a we administered nine olfactory tests, including tests of odor identification, discrimination, detection, memory, and suprathreshold\\u000a intensity and pleasantness perception, to 97 healthy subjects. Aprincipal components analysis performed on the intercorrelation\\u000a matrix revealed four meaningful components. The first was comprised of strong primary loadings

  14. Identifications and limited spectroscopy for Luyten common proper motion stars with probable white dwarf components. I - Pair brighter than 17th magnitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswalt, Terry D.; Hintzen, Paul M.; Luyten, Willem J.

    1988-01-01

    Identifications are provided for 103 bright Luyten common proper motion (CPM) stellar systems with m(pg) less than 17.0 mag containing likely white dwarf (WD) components. New spectral types are presented for 55 components, and spectral types for 51 more are available in the literature. With the CPM systems previously published by Giclas et al. (1978), the Luyten stars provide a uniform sample of nearly 200 pairs or multiples brighter than 17h magnitude. Selection effects biasing the combined samples are discussed; in particular, evidence is presented that fewer than 1 percent of wide WD binaries have been detected.

  15. Chip-package co-design of common emitter LNA in system-on-package with on-chip versus off-chip passive component analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xinzhong Duo; Li-Rong Zheng; Hannu Tenhunen

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present common emitter LNAs (low noise amplifiers) in system-on-package for 5GHz WLAN application. Innovation of this module is that it is chip-package co-designed and co-simulated with performance trade-offs for on-chip versus off-chip passive component integration. It thus provides an optimal total solution for embedded RF electronics in system-level integration. Analytical equations for key performance parameters, noise

  16. Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) Hardware Architecture Standard: Release 1.0 Hardware Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John; Hill, Gary; Mortensen, Dale J.; Andro, Monty; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Farrington, Allen

    2008-01-01

    This report defines a hardware architecture approach for software-defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general-purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays, and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radiofrequency front ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that compose a typical communication radio. This report describes the architecture details, the module definitions, the typical functions on each module, and the module interfaces. Tradeoffs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify a physical implementation internally on each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

  17. Security Aspects of an Enterprise-Wide Network Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loew, Robert; Stengel, Ingo; Bleimann, Udo; McDonald, Aidan

    1999-01-01

    Presents an overview of two projects that concern local area networks and the common point between networks as they relate to network security. Discusses security architectures based on firewall components, packet filters, application gateways, security-management components, an intranet solution, user registration by Web form, and requests for…

  18. Modular architecture for real-time contract-based framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michal Sojka; Zdenek Hanzálek

    2009-01-01

    Component-based development of distributed real-time applications is a challenging task since satisfying timing requirements of individual components after system integration requires support from the component middleware which is not common today. This paper presents a software architecture of contract-based on-line resource reservation framework which can be used as a basis for a real-time component-based middleware. The main contribution of this

  19. Distinguishing the common components of oil- and water-based metalworking fluids for assessment of cancer incidence risk in autoworkers

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Melissa C; Costello, Sadie; Thurston, Sally W; Eisen, Ellen A

    2012-01-01

    Background Metalworking fluids (MWF) — straight, soluble, and synthetic — have overlapping components. We derived constituent-based metrics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), water-based MWF, biocides, and nitrosamines to account for this overlap and examined their relations with cancer incidence. Methods An autoworkers cohort of 30,000 was followed for cancer incidence. Hazard ratios were estimated for each cancer and cumulative exposure (lagged) to each new metric; soluble MWF contributed variably to several metrics with weight k=0–1. Results For most cancer sites, the constituent-based metrics resulted in stronger exposure-disease associations than the MWF classes alone. Laryngeal and bladder cancer were most strongly associated with PAH (k=0). Protective effects for stomach and lung cancer were observed with biocide, a component that may be a surrogate for endotoxin. Conclusions Our findings provide support and clarification of possible etiologies for previous positive associations and provide support for distinguishing exposure from oil- and water-based MWF in epidemiologic studies. PMID:21328414

  20. IAIMS Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hripcsak, George

    1997-01-01

    Abstract An information system architecture defines the components of a system and the interfaces among the components. A good architecture is essential for creating an Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) that works as an integrated whole yet is flexible enough to accommodate many users and roles, multiple applications, changing vendors, evolving user needs, and advancing technology. Modularity and layering promote flexibility by reducing the complexity of a system and by restricting the ways in which components may interact. Enterprise-wide mediation promotes integration by providing message routing, support for standards, dictionary-based code translation, a centralized conceptual data schema, business rule implementation, and consistent access to databases. Several IAIMS sites have adopted a client-server architecture, and some have adopted a three-tiered approach, separating user interface functions, application logic, and repositories. PMID:9067884

  1. Architecture 2030 

    E-print Network

    Reihl, K.; Tullos, A.

    2012-01-01

    2030.org Climate Change Architecture2030.org Climate Change Architecture2030.org Climate Change Architecture2030.org Economy Architecture2030.org Economy The 2030 Challenge Architecture2030.org Architecture2030.org Architecture2030.org AIA...

  2. Software Architecture Transformations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hoda Fahmy; Richard C. Holt

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand and improve software, we commonly examine and manipulate its architecture. For example, we may want to examine the architecture at different levels of abstraction or zoom-in on one portion of the system. We may discover that the extracted architecture has deviated from our mental model of the software and hence we may want to repair it.

  3. The zeaxanthin-independent and zeaxanthin-dependent qE components of nonphotochemical quenching involve common conformational changes within the photosystem II antenna in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew P; Pérez-Bueno, María L; Zia, Ahmad; Horton, Peter; Ruban, Alexander V

    2009-02-01

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II (LHCII) has the intrinsic capacity to dissipate excess light energy as heat in a process termed nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). Recent studies suggest that zeaxanthin and lutein both contribute to the rapidly relaxing component of NPQ, qE, possibly acting in the minor monomeric antenna complexes and the major trimeric LHCII, respectively. To distinguish whether zeaxanthin and lutein act independently as quenchers at separate sites, or alternatively whether zeaxanthin fulfills an allosteric role regulating lutein-mediated quenching, the kinetics of qE and the qE-related conformational changes (DeltaA535) were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant/antisense plants with altered contents of minor antenna (kolhcb6, aslhcb4), trimeric LHCII (aslhcb2), lutein (lut2, lut2npq1, lut2npq2), and zeaxanthin (npq1, npq2). The kinetics of the two components of NPQ induction arising from zeaxanthin-independent and zeaxanthin-dependent qE were both sensitive to changes in the protein composition of the photosystem II antenna. The replacement of lutein by zeaxanthin or violaxanthin in the internal Lhcb protein-binding sites affected the kinetics and relative amplitude of each component as well as the absolute chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime. Both components of qE were characterized by a conformational change leading to nearly identical absorption changes in the Soret region that indicated the involvement of the LHCII lutein 1 domain. Based on these observations, we suggest that both components of qE arise from a common quenching mechanism based upon a conformational change within the photosystem II antenna, optimized by Lhcb subunit-subunit interactions and tuned by the synergistic effects of external and internally bound xanthophylls. PMID:19011000

  4. Dissertation Network Architectures

    E-print Network

    Carle, Georg

    and anonymous Peer-to-Peer Systems Heiko Niedermayer Network Architectures and Services Department of Computer Lehrstuhl f¨ur Netzarchitekturen und Netzdienste Architecture and Components of secure and anonymous Peer-to-Peer and anonymous Peer-to-Peer Systems Dissertation, July 2010 Network Architectures and Services, Department

  5. A Reference Architecture for Space Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Hughes, J. Steven; Ramirez, Paul M.; Berrios, Daniel C.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a reference architecture for space information management systems that elegantly overcomes the rigid design of common information systems in many domains. The reference architecture consists of a set of flexible, reusable, independent models and software components that function in unison, but remain separately managed entities. The main guiding principle of the reference architecture is to separate the various models of information (e.g., data, metadata, etc.) from implemented system code, allowing each to evolve independently. System modularity, systems interoperability, and dynamic evolution of information system components are the primary benefits of the design of the architecture. The architecture requires the use of information models that are substantially more advanced than those used by the vast majority of information systems. These models are more expressive and can be more easily modularized, distributed and maintained than simpler models e.g., configuration files and data dictionaries. Our current work focuses on formalizing the architecture within a CCSDS Green Book and evaluating the architecture within the context of the C3I initiative.

  6. Business Capabilities Centric Enterprise Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thiago Barroero; Gianmario Motta; Giovanni Pignatelli

    \\u000a In the field of Enterprise Architecture, The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) is a well known framework, that links\\u000a Business Architecture, Data Architecture, Application Architecture, Technology. A key concept within Business Architecture\\u000a domain is Business Capabilities, that are delivered by Business Component (BC). A BC is a business unit that encompasses a\\u000a coherent set of activities, supported by assets including

  7. Architecture 2030

    E-print Network

    Reihl, K.; Tullos, A.

    2012-01-01

    Architecture 2030 AIA Houston + 2030 series The data in this presentation is from Architecture 2030, all the information can be found on their website: www.architecture2030.org The 2030 Challenge The 2030 Challenge Architecture2030.org... Architecture2030.org Architecture2030.org The Problem Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org Energy Architecture2030.org Energy Architecture2030.org...

  8. The Ubiquitous Nature of Epistasis in Determining Susceptibility to Common Human Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason H. Moore

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing awareness that epistasis or gene-gene interaction plays a role in susceptibility to common human diseases. In this paper, we formulate a working hypothesis that epistasis is a ubiquitous component of the genetic architecture of common human diseases and that complex interactions are more important than the independent main effects of any one susceptibility gene. This working hypothesis

  9. Architecture College of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Architecture College of Architecture S.R. Crown Hall 3360 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60616 312 of History and Theory: Sean Keller Director of Master of Science in Architecture: Vedran Mimica Director of Master of Landscape Architecture Program: Marshall Brown Director of Studios: Frank Flury Director

  10. AN IMPLEMENTATION OF A TELEOPERATED ROBOT CONTROL ARCHITECTURE ON A PLC AND FIELD-BUS BASED PLATFORM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Ortiz; B. Álvarez; F. Losilla; D. Rodríguez; N. Ortega; IZAR Carenas Cartagena

    Teleoperated robots are used to perform hazardous tasks that human operators cannot carry out. The purpose of this paper is to present a new architecture (ACROSET) for the development of these systems that takes into account the current advances in robotic architectures while adopting the component-oriented approach. ACROSET provides a common framework for developing this kind of robotized systems and

  11. Mechanistic studies on the Cu-catalyzed three-component reactions of sulfonyl azides, 1-alkynes and amines, alcohols, or water: dichotomy via a common pathway.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Eun Jeong; Ahlquist, Mĺrten; Bae, Imhyuck; Sharpless, K Barry; Fokin, Valery V; Chang, Sukbok

    2008-07-18

    Combined analyses of experimental and computational studies on the Cu-catalyzed three-component reactions of sulfonyl azides, terminal alkynes and amines, alcohols, or water are described. A range of experimental data including product distribution ratio and trapping of key intermediates support the validity of a common pathway in the reaction of 1-alkynes and two distinct types of azides substituted with sulfonyl and aryl(alkyl) groups. The proposal that bimolecular cycloaddition reactions take place initially between triple bonds and sulfonyl azides to give N-sulfonyl triazolyl copper intermediates was verified by a trapping experiment. The main reason for the different outcome from reactions between sulfonyl and aryl(alkyl) azides is attributed to the lability of the N-sulfonyl triazolyl copper intermediates. These species are readily rearranged to another key intermediate, ketenimine, into which various nucleophiles such as amines, alcohols, or water add to afford the three-component coupled products: amidines, imidates, or amides, respectively. In addition, the proposed mechanistic framework is in good agreement with the obtained kinetics and competition studies. A computational study (B3LYP/LACV3P*+) was also performed confirming the proposed mechanistic pathway that the triazolyl copper intermediate plays as a branching point to dictate the product distribution. PMID:18557650

  12. Reference Avionics Architecture for Lunar Surface Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somervill, Kevin M.; Lapin, Jonathan C.; Schmidt, Oron L.

    2010-01-01

    Developing and delivering infrastructure capable of supporting long-term manned operations to the lunar surface has been a primary objective of the Constellation Program in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Several concepts have been developed related to development and deployment lunar exploration vehicles and assets that provide critical functionality such as transportation, habitation, and communication, to name a few. Together, these systems perform complex safety-critical functions, largely dependent on avionics for control and behavior of system functions. These functions are implemented using interchangeable, modular avionics designed for lunar transit and lunar surface deployment. Systems are optimized towards reuse and commonality of form and interface and can be configured via software or component integration for special purpose applications. There are two core concepts in the reference avionics architecture described in this report. The first concept uses distributed, smart systems to manage complexity, simplify integration, and facilitate commonality. The second core concept is to employ extensive commonality between elements and subsystems. These two concepts are used in the context of developing reference designs for many lunar surface exploration vehicles and elements. These concepts are repeated constantly as architectural patterns in a conceptual architectural framework. This report describes the use of these architectural patterns in a reference avionics architecture for Lunar surface systems elements.

  13. Automated Configuration of Distributed Applications from Reusable Software Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan Gomaa; Ghulam A. Farrukh

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a reuse-oriented perspective is taken to designing and implementing configurable distributed applications. An application domain is defined as a family of systems that have some features in common and others that differentiate them. During domain engineering, reusable specifications, architectures and component types are developed, which capture the similarities and variations of the family of systems that compose

  14. A Unified Architecture for the Implementation of Security Protocols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ibrahim S. Abdullah; Daniel A. Menascé

    2003-01-01

    Most security protocols share a similar set of algorithms and functions and exhibit common sequences and patterns in the way they operate. These observations led us to propose a unified architecture for the implementation of security protocols in the form of a security toolbox system. Our design, based on the concepts of Component Based Software Engineering (CBSE), provides fast and

  15. Improving the Build Architecture of Legacy C\\/C++ Software Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Homayoun Dayani-fard; Yijun Yu; John Mylopoulos; Periklis Andritsos

    2005-01-01

    The build architecture of legacy C\\/C++ software systems, groups pro- gram files in directories to represent logical components. The interfaces of these components are loosely defined by a set of header files that are typically grouped in one common include directory. As legacy systems evolve, these interfaces de- cay, which contribute to an increase in the build time and the

  16. Architectural Patterns Revisited - A Pattern Language

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uwe Zdun

    2005-01-01

    Architectural patterns are a key concept in the field of software architecture: they offer well-established solutions to architectural problems, help to document the architectural design decisions, facilitate communication between stakeholders through a common vo- cabulary, and describe the quality attributes of a software system as forces. Regrettably, finding and applying the appropriate architectural patterns in practice still remains largely ad-hoc

  17. A Reference Architecture for Situated Multiagent Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danny Weyns; Tom Holvoet

    2006-01-01

    A reference architecture integrates a set of architectural pat- terns that have proven their value for a family of applications. Such fam- ily of applications is characterized by specific functionality and quality requirements. A reference architecture provides a blueprint for develop- ing software architectures for applications that share that common base. As such, a reference architecture provides a means for

  18. A Tool for Managing Software Architecture Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes a tool for managing architectural knowledge and rationale. The tool has been developed to support a framework for capturing and using architectural knowledge to improve the architecture process. This paper describes the main architectural components and features of the tool. The paper also provides examples of using the tool for supporting wellknown architecture design and analysis methods.

  19. ASAAM: Aspectual Software Architecture Analysis Method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bedir Tekinerdo

    Software architecture analysis methods aim to predict the quality of a system before it has been developed. In general, the quality of the architecture is validated by analyzing the impact of predefined scenarios on architectural components. Hereby, it is implicitly assumed that an appropriate refactoring of the architecture design can help in coping with critical scenarios and mending the architecture.

  20. Modulation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu 2) elicits common changes in rat and mice sleep–wake architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdellah Ahnaou; Frank M. Dautzenberg; Helena Geys; Hassan Imogai; Antoine Gibelin; Dieder Moechars; Thomas Steckler; Wilhelmus H. I. M. Drinkenburg

    2009-01-01

    Compiling pharmacological evidence implicates metabotropic glutamate mGlu2 receptors in the regulation of emotional states and suggests positive modulators as a novel therapeutic approach of Anxiety\\/Depression and Schizophrenia. Here, we investigated subcutaneous effects of the metabotropic glutamate mGlu2\\/3 agonist (LY354740) on sleep–wake architecture in rat. To confirm the specific effects on rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were mediated via metabotropic glutamate

  1. CS 570: Advanced Computer Architecture To learn the science and art of selecting and interconnecting hardware components to create a computer that

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    . To learn qualitative and quantitative examination of computer design tradeoffs. Prerequisites CS 470-13-185644-8. Online Resources Computer Architecture Web site. Syllabus Introduction Computer platforms and models technology System interconnects and gigabit networks I/O Parallel architecture Clusters of servers

  2. Dimensions of Component Based Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin Atkinson; Thomas Kühne; Christian Bunse

    1999-01-01

    As the properties of components have gradually become clearer, attention has started to turn to the architectural issues which govern their interaction and composition. In this paper we identify some of the major architectural questions affecting component-based software develop- ment and describe the predominant architectural dimensions. Of these, the most interesting is the \\

  3. The Software Architecture of Global Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K. A.; Easterbrook, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    It has become common to compare and contrast the output of multiple global climate models (GCMs), such as in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). However, intercomparisons of the software architecture of GCMs are almost nonexistent. In this qualitative study of seven GCMs from Canada, the United States, and Europe, we attempt to fill this gap in research. We describe the various representations of the climate system as computer programs, and account for architectural differences between models. Most GCMs now practice component-based software engineering, where Earth system components (such as the atmosphere or land surface) are present as highly encapsulated sub-models. This architecture facilitates a mix-and-match approach to climate modelling that allows for convenient sharing of model components between institutions, but it also leads to difficulty when choosing where to draw the lines between systems that are not encapsulated in the real world, such as sea ice. We also examine different styles of couplers in GCMs, which manage interaction and data flow between components. Finally, we pay particular attention to the varying levels of complexity in GCMs, both between and within models. Many GCMs have some components that are significantly more complex than others, a phenomenon which can be explained by the respective institution's research goals as well as the origin of the model components. In conclusion, although some features of software architecture have been adopted by every GCM we examined, other features show a wide range of different design choices and strategies. These architectural differences may provide new insights into variability and spread between models.

  4. Communication Infrastructure in High-Performance Component-Based Scientific Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Bernholdt; Wael R. Elwasif; James Arthur Kohl

    2002-01-01

    Component-based programming has been recognized as an effective technique to manage the increasing complexity of high performance\\u000a scientific code. Yet the adoption of the component approach introduces new challenges that are unique to the parallel and\\u000a distributed high performance scientific computing domain. The Common Component Architecture (CCA) is an ongoing effort to\\u000a develop a component model targeted specifically to the

  5. STRATEGIESEMPLOYERSAREAS ARCHITECTURE

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    STRATEGIESEMPLOYERSAREAS ARCHITECTURE RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE Description: Designing new homes or renovat- ing existing ones for either single or multiple families. Architecture firms Real estate Housing COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE Private Industry Public/Government Description: Designing office buildings

  6. Formalizing architectural connection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert B. Allen; David Garlan

    1994-01-01

    As software systems become more complex the overall system structure – or software architecture – becomes a central design problem. An important step towards an engineering discipline of sofware is a formal basis for describing and analyzing these designs. In this paper we present a theory for one aspect of architectural description: the interactions between components. The key idea is

  7. Introduction The idea of architecture

    E-print Network

    Bremen, Universität

    Introduction The idea of architecture What cognitve behaviors have in common Behavior as movement through problem spaces Tying the content to the architecture Memory, perception, action and cognition Detecting a lack of knowledge Learning The SOAR architecture in review Introduction to SOAR based on

  8. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling: The Common Denominator in Connective Tissue DiseasesPossibilities for Evaluation and Current Understanding of the Matrix as More Than a Passive Architecture, but a Key Player in Tissue Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Mette J.; Sand, Jannie M.; Henriksen, Kim; Genovese, Federica; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Smith, Victoria; Adamkewicz, Joanne I.; Christiansen, Claus; Leeming, Diana J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Increased attention is paid to the structural components of tissues. These components are mostly collagens and various proteoglycans. Emerging evidence suggests that altered components and noncoded modifications of the matrix may be both initiators and drivers of disease, exemplified by excessive tissue remodeling leading to tissue stiffness, as well as by changes in the signaling potential of both intact matrix and fragments thereof. Although tissue structure until recently was viewed as a simple architecture anchoring cells and proteins, this complex grid may contain essential information enabling the maintenance of the structure and normal functioning of tissue. The aims of this review are to (1) discuss the structural components of the matrix and the relevance of their mutations to the pathology of diseases such as fibrosis and cancer, (2) introduce the possibility that post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as protease cleavage, citrullination, cross-linking, nitrosylation, glycosylation, and isomerization, generated during pathology, may be unique, disease-specific biochemical markers, (3) list and review the range of simple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that have been developed for assessing the extracellular matrix (ECM) and detecting abnormal ECM remodeling, and (4) discuss whether some PTMs are the cause or consequence of disease. New evidence clearly suggests that the ECM at some point in the pathogenesis becomes a driver of disease. These pathological modified ECM proteins may allow insights into complicated pathologies in which the end stage is excessive tissue remodeling, and provide unique and more pathology-specific biochemical markers. PMID:23046407

  9. A Hybrid Model for Research on Subjective Well-Being: Examining Common- and Component-Specific Sources of Variance in Life Satisfaction, Positive Affect, and Negative Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael; Sadava, Stanley; DeCourville, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The primary components of subjective well-being (SWB) include life satisfaction (LS), positive affect (PA), and negative affect (NA). There is little consensus, however, concerning how these components form a model of SWB. In this paper, six longitudinal studies varying in demographic characteristics, length of time between assessment periods,…

  10. Anatomical architecture of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) with special reference to the derivation and course of its unique branches.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, S; Kawashima, T; Murakami, K; Takayanagi, M; Inoue, Y; Aoyagi, R; Sato, F

    2012-08-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), which has not been previously reported, was first examined bilaterally in a newborn hippopotamus. Our observations clarified the following: (1) the brachial plexus comprises the fifth cervical (C5) to first thoracic (T1) nerves. These formed two trunks, C5-C6 and C7-T1; in addition, the axillary artery passed in between C6 and C7, (2) unique branches to the brachialis muscle and those of the lateral cutaneous antebrachii nerves ramified from the median nerve, (3) nerve fibre analysis revealed that these unique nerve branches from the median nerve were closely related and structurally similar to the musculocutaneous (MC) nerve; however, they had changed course from the MC to the median nerve, and (4) this unique branching pattern is likely to be a common morphological feature of the brachial plexus in amphibians, reptiles and certain mammals. PMID:22250889

  11. Electronic Components

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lesurf, Jim

    This page from Jim Lesurf of the University of St. Andrews explains common electronic components in an easily understood format. Resistors, capacitors, diodes, inductors and more are explained here. The difference between passive and active components is also explained. Information about conductors and semiconductors is provided as well.

  12. The NASA Integrated Information Technology Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This document defines an Information Technology Architecture for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), where Information Technology (IT) refers to the hardware, software, standards, protocols and processes that enable the creation, manipulation, storage, organization and sharing of information. An architecture provides an itemization and definition of these IT structures, a view of the relationship of the structures to each other and, most importantly, an accessible view of the whole. It is a fundamental assumption of this document that a useful, interoperable and affordable IT environment is key to the execution of the core NASA scientific and project competencies and business practices. This Architecture represents the highest level system design and guideline for NASA IT related activities and has been created on the authority of the NASA Chief Information Officer (CIO) and will be maintained under the auspices of that office. It addresses all aspects of general purpose, research, administrative and scientific computing and networking throughout the NASA Agency and is applicable to all NASA administrative offices, projects, field centers and remote sites. Through the establishment of five Objectives and six Principles this Architecture provides a blueprint for all NASA IT service providers: civil service, contractor and outsourcer. The most significant of the Objectives and Principles are the commitment to customer-driven IT implementations and the commitment to a simpler, cost-efficient, standards-based, modular IT infrastructure. In order to ensure that the Architecture is presented and defined in the context of the mission, project and business goals of NASA, this Architecture consists of four layers in which each subsequent layer builds on the previous layer. They are: 1) the Business Architecture: the operational functions of the business, or Enterprise, 2) the Systems Architecture: the specific Enterprise activities within the context of IT systems, 3) the Technical Architecture: a common, vendor-independent framework for design, integration and implementation of IT systems and 4) the Product Architecture: vendor=specific IT solutions. The Systems Architecture is effectively a description of the end-user "requirements". Generalized end-user requirements are discussed and subsequently organized into specific mission and project functions. The Technical Architecture depicts the framework, and relationship, of the specific IT components that enable the end-user functionality as described in the Systems Architecture. The primary components as described in the Technical Architecture are: 1) Applications: Basic Client Component, Object Creation Applications, Collaborative Applications, Object Analysis Applications, 2) Services: Messaging, Information Broker, Collaboration, Distributed Processing, and 3) Infrastructure: Network, Security, Directory, Certificate Management, Enterprise Management and File System. This Architecture also provides specific Implementation Recommendations, the most significant of which is the recognition of IT as core to NASA activities and defines a plan, which is aligned with the NASA strategic planning processes, for keeping the Architecture alive and useful.

  13. ROBOTIC LUNAR LANDERS IN THE CONTEXT OF THE VISION FOR SPACE EXPLORATION USE CASES AND COMMONALITY

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    lifecycle cost and risk of the portfolio [7,8,9,10,11,12]. In the context of space systems architecture and component design and development" [7]. Specific advantages of commonality in space system portfolios may include: - Reduced lifecycle DDT&E (Design, Development, Test & Evaluation) cost and risk due to a reduced

  14. Syntaxin 5 Is a Common Component of the NSF and p97-Mediated Reassembly Pathways of Golgi Cisternae from Mitotic Golgi Fragments In Vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Rabouille; Hisao Kondo; Richard Newman; Norman Hui; Paul Freemont; Graham Warren

    1998-01-01

    A cell-free system that mimics the reassembly of Golgi stacks at the end of mitosis requires two ATPases, NSF and p97, to rebuild Golgi cisternae. Morphological studies now show that ?-SNAP, a component of the NSF pathway, can inhibit the p97 pathway, whereas p47, a component of the p97 pathway, can inhibit the NSF pathway. Anti-syntaxin 5 antibodies and a

  15. ASCO DESIGN CHARRETTE, OCT. 4 -6, 2012 I a cross-disciplinary design effort by faculty and students from Oklahoma State University's Schools of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior Design A "charrette" is a term commonly used to describe a s

    E-print Network

    Piao, Daqing

    of Landscape Architecture, and Interior Design came together and worked in cross-disciplinary teams University's Schools of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior Design 2 #12;ASCO DESIGN CHARRETTE University's Schools of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior Design 3 #12;ASCO DESIGN CHARRETTE

  16. A Reflection Mechanism for Reusing Software Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi Ying; Zaoqing Liang; Junli Wang; Fudi Wang

    2006-01-01

    Reusing software architecture and its constituents, which are a kind of coarse-grained software resources, are confronted with great difficulty. Reflection mechanism has been successfully applied in the reuse of code component, but scarcely applied in the reuse of architecture and its constituents. Architectural reflection is the computation performed by a system about its own architecture, and currently confined in the

  17. Foundations for the study of software architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dewayne E. Perry; Alexander L. Wolf

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to build the foundation for software architecture. We first develop an intuition for software architecture by appealing to several well-established architectural disciplines. On the basis of this intuition, we present a model of software architecture that consists of three components: elements, form, and rationale. Elements are either processing, data, or connecting elements. Form is

  18. STRATEGIESEMPLOYERSAREAS ARCHITECTURE

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    STRATEGIESEMPLOYERSAREAS ARCHITECTURE RESIDENTIALARCHITECTURE Description: Designing new homes or renovat- ing existing ones for either single or multiple families. Architecture firms Real estate-UnitResidential TractHomes Senior/AssitedLiving Remodeling/Renovations COMMERCIAL/INSTITUTIONAL ARCHITECTURE Private

  19. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan [University of Maryland

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  20. Scientists Find Many Common Genetic Variations Play a Role in Common Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the most predominant components of the genetic architecture that has yet to be explained. There are ... Plenge RM. Bayesian inference analyses of the polygenic architecture of rheumatoid arthritis. Nat Genet. 2012 Mar 25; ...

  1. The Zeaxanthin-Independent and Zeaxanthin-Dependent qE Components of Nonphotochemical Quenching Involve Common Conformational Changes within the Photosystem II Antenna in Arabidopsis 1(W)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew P. Johnson; Ahmad Zia; Peter Horton; Alexander V. Ruban

    2009-01-01

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II (LHCII) has the intrinsic capacity to dissipate excess light energy as heat in a process termed nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). Recent studies suggest that zeaxanthin and lutein both contribute to the rapidly relaxing component of NPQ, qE, possibly acting in the minor monomeric antenna complexes and the major trimeric LHCII, respectively. To distinguish

  2. Software Engineering in Practice: Design and Architectures of FLOSS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capiluppi, Andrea; Knowles, Thomas

    Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) practitioners and developers are typically also users of their own systems: as a result, traditional software engineering (SE) processes (e.g., the requirements and design phases), take less time to articulate and negotiate among FLOSS developers. Design and requirements are kept more as informal knowledge, rather than formally described and assessed. This paper attempts to recover the SE concepts of software design and architectures from three FLOSS case studies, sharing the same application domain (i.e., Instant Messaging). Its first objective is to determine whether a common architecture emerges from the three systems, which can be used as shared knowledge for future applications. The second objective is to determine whether these architectures evolve or decay during the evolution of these systems. The results of this study are encouraging: albeit no explicit effort was done by FLOSS developers to define a high-level view of the architecture, a common shared architecture could be distilled for the Instant Messaging application domain. It was also found that, for two of the three systems, the architecture becomes better organised, and the components better specified, as long as the system evolves in time.

  3. Agile Software Architecture: Why Your Project Needs It

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    · Architecture within the Software Lifecycle · Software Architecture and Lean Software Development · Software · Software architecture is the fundamental organization of a system, embodied in its components Used During the Software Lifecycle? · It depends on the lifecycle · Waterfall Lifecycle

  4. Bocca: A Development Environment for HPC Components

    SciTech Connect

    Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Norris, Boyana [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Benjamin, Allan A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Armstrong, Robert C. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

    2007-01-01

    In high-performance scientific software development, the emphasis is often on short time to first solution. Even when the development of new components mostly reuses existing components or libraries and only small amounts of new code must be created, dealing with the component glue code and software build processes to obtain complete applications is still tedious and error-prone. Component-based soft ware meant to reduce complexity at the application level increases complexity with the attendant glue code. To address these needs, we introduce Bocca, the first tool to enable application developers to perform rapid component prototyping while maintaining robust software-engineering practices suitable to HPC environments. Bocca provides project management and a comprehensive build environment for creating and managing applications composed of Common Component Architecture components. Of critical importance for HPC applications, Bocca is designed to operate in a language-agnostic way, simultaneously handling components written in any of the languages commonly used in scientific applications: C, C++, Fortran, Fortran77, Python, and Java. Bocca automates the tasks related to the component glue code, freeing the user to focus on the scientific aspects of the application. Bocca embraces the philosophy pioneered by Ruby Rails for web applications: Start with something that works and evolve it to the user's purpose.

  5. Bocca : A development environment for HPC components.

    SciTech Connect

    Elwasif, W.; Norris, B.; Allan, B.; Armstrong, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; ORNL; SNL

    2007-01-01

    In high-performance scientific software development, the emphasis is often on short time to first solution. Even when the development of new components mostly reuses existing components or libraries and only small amounts of new code must be created, dealing with component glue code to obtain complete applications is still tedious and error prone. Component-based software meant to reduce complexity at the application level increases complexity with the attendant glue code. To address these needs, we introduce Bocca, the first tool to enable application developers to perform rapid component prototyping while maintaining robust software engineering practices suitable to HPC environments. Bocca provides project management and a comprehensive build environment for creating and managing applications composed of Common Component Architecture components. Of critical importance for HPC applications, Bocca is designed to operate in a language-agnostic way, simultaneously handling components written in any of the common HPC workstation languages: C, C++, Fortran, Fortran77, Python, and Java. Bocca automates the tasks related to the component glue code, freeing the user to focus on the scientific aspects of the application. Bocca embraces the philosophy pioneered by Ruby Rails for web applications: Start with something that works and evolve it to the user's purpose.

  6. Current Trends Driving Aircraft and Automotive Systems Architectures and their impacts on CMMI® Organizational Structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilberto da Cunha Trivelato

    In this work we discuss current trends driving Aircraft and Automotive Systems Architectures and their impacts on CMMI® Organizational Structures. This includes trends as: 1) pos -globalization and regionalization; 2) the formation of knowledge oligopolies; 3) commonality, standardization and even synergy (of components, tools, development process, certification agents, standards); 4) reuse and scalability, 5) synergy of knowledge and tools convergence;

  7. Applying Complex Event Processing and Extending Sensor Web Enablement to a Health Care Sensor Network Architecture

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Network Architecture J Foley and G E Churcher University College London and BT Plc, British Telecommunications Plc Abstract: The limited reuse of middleware components for wireless sensor networking projects methods to virtualize sensor data into a common, self- describing format, using access mechanisms based

  8. Mathematics in Architecture

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Fox, Lauretta J.

    To produce structures that are functional as well as models of architectural beauty, designers must apply principles of mathematics in their work. Scale drawings, commonly known as plans, are used as patterns in the construction of buildings. Proper ratios and proportions relate each feature of a building with every other one and with the whole structure to obtain a pleasing appearance. This unit addresses basic mathematical principles used in architecture, discussing the concepts of measurement, scale drawing, ratio, proportion, and symmetry.

  9. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K..; McDonald, C.E.

    1997-03-18

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 14 figs.

  10. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Drost, M. Kevin (Richland, WA); McDonald, Carolyn E. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  11. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

  12. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    86 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute liberal education for undergraduates in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional

  13. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    89 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The NationalArchitecturalAccreditingBoard,whichisthesoleagencyauthorizedto accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes 2 types of degree: the Bachelor

  14. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    88 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School ofArchitecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in architecture and urban design. Intimate student-faculty interaction, academic freedom, and unre- stricted

  15. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

  16. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    91 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

  17. COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE 51 Architecture

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE 51 College of Architecture www.coa.uncc.edu Dean: Kenneth Lambla Associate. Kazebee Mission. The mission of the College of Architecture (CoA) is to further the discourse between the theory and practice of architecture by the education and training of students, the work and research

  18. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    93 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian.Arch. The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment. The school in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

  19. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    91 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute liberal education for undergraduates in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional

  20. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    90 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School ofArchitecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in architecture and urban design. Intimate student-faculty interaction, academic freedom, and unre- stricted

  1. Architecture The School of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    97 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment in the allied sciences and arts of architecture, and professional graduate and postgraduate education

  2. A murine monoclonal antibody, MoAb HMSA-5, against a melanosomal component highly expressed in early stages, and common to normal and neoplastic melanocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Der, J. E.; Dixon, W. T.; Jimbow, K.; Horikoshi, T.

    1993-01-01

    The melanosome is a secretory organelle unique to the melanocyte and its neoplastic counterpart, malignant melanoma. The synthesis and assembly of these intracytoplasmic organelles is not yet fully understood. We have developed a murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against melanosomes isolated from human melanocytes (newborn foreskin) cultured in the presence of 12-O tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). This MoAb, designated HMSA-5 (Human Melanosome-Specific Antigen-5) (IgG1), recognised a cytoplasmic antigen in both normal human melanocytes and neoplastic cells, such as common and dysplastic melanocytic nevi, and malignant melanoma. None of the carcinoma or sarcoma specimens tested showed positive reactivity with MoAb HMSA-5. Under immunoelectron microscopy, immuno-gold deposition was seen on microvesicles associated with melanosomes, and a portion of the ER-Golgi complexes. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis showed that the HMSA-5 reactive antigen was a glycoprotein of M(r) 69 to 73 kDa. A pulse-chase time course study showed that the amount of antigen detected by MoAb HMSA-5 decreased over a 24 h period without significant expression on the cell surface, or corresponding appearance of the antigen in the culture supernatant. This glycoprotein appears to play a role in the early stages of melanosomal development, and the HMSA-5 reactive epitope may be lost during subsequent maturation processes. Importantly, HMSA-5 can be identified in all forms of human melanocytes, hence it can be considered a new common melanocytic marker even on routine paraffin sections. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:7678981

  3. Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

    1993-01-01

    An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

  4. FORM: A Feature-Oriented Reuse Method with Domain-Specific Reference Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyo Chul Kang; Sajoong Kim; Jaejoon Lee; Kijoo Kim; Euiseob Shin; Moonhang Huh

    1998-01-01

    Systematic discovery and exploitation of commonality across related software systems is a fundamental technical requirement for achieving successful software reuse. By examining a class\\/family of related systems and the commonality underlying those systems, it is possible to obtain a set of reference models, i.e., software architectures and components needed for implementing applications in the class. FORM (Feature-Oriented Reuse Method) supports

  5. FORM: A feature-;oriented reuse method with domain-;specific reference architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyo C. Kang; Sajoong Kim; Jaejoon Lee; Kijoo Kim; Euiseob Shin; Moonhang Huh

    1998-01-01

    Systematic discovery and exploitation of commonality across related software systems is a fundamental technical requirement\\u000a for achieving successful software reuse. By examining a class\\/family of related systems and the commonality underlying those\\u000a systems, it is possible to obtain a set of reference models, i.e., software architectures and components needed for implementing\\u000a applications in the class. FORM (Feature-;Oriented Reuse Method) supports

  6. Molecular Profiling of Stomatal Meristemoids Reveals New Component of Asymmetric Cell Division and Commonalities among Stem Cell Populations in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Peterson, Kylee M.; Horst, Robin J.; Torii, Keiko U.

    2011-01-01

    The balance between maintenance and differentiation of stem cells is a central question in developmental biology. Development of stomata in Arabidopsis thaliana begins with de novo asymmetric divisions producing meristemoids, proliferating precursor cells with stem cell–like properties. The transient and asynchronous nature of the meristemoid has made it difficult to study its molecular characteristics. Synthetic combination of stomatal differentiation mutants due to loss- or gain-of-function mutations in SPEECHLESS, MUTE, and SCREAM create seedlings with an epidermis overwhelmingly composed of pavement cells, meristemoids, or stomata, respectively. Through transcriptome analysis, we define and characterize the molecular signatures of meristemoids. The reporter localization studies of meristemoid-enriched proteins reveals pathways not previously associated with stomatal development. We identified a novel protein, POLAR, and demonstrate through time-lapse live imaging that it exhibits transient polar localization and segregates unevenly during meristemoid asymmetric divisions. The polar localization of POLAR requires BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of the transcriptional profiles of a meristemoid with shoot and root apical meristems highlighted cytokinin signaling and the ERECTA family receptor-like kinases in the broad regulation of stem cell populations. Our work reveals molecular constituents of stomatal stem cells and illuminates a common theme among stem cell populations in plants. PMID:21963668

  7. Software Architecture of Wireless Services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jarmo Kaloja; Tuomas Ihme; Patricia Lago; Eila Niemela; Marco Torchiano

    Software architecture can be defined as the overall structure of a software system. Specifically, it defines the components\\u000a of the system and their relationships [3] [21]. Architecture usually provides several perspectives on the same system to answer\\u000a the varying concerns of different system stakeholders. Defining the software architecture of an application or service is\\u000a a key activity in the overall

  8. Architecture of inherited susceptibility to common cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivia Fletcher; Richard S. Houlston

    2010-01-01

    This Timeline article looks back at 40 years of research into the inherited genetic basis of cancer and the insights these studies have yielded. Early epidemiological research provided evidence for the 'two-hit' model of cancer predisposition. During the 1980s and 1990s linkage and positional cloning analyses led to the identification of high-penetrance cancer susceptibility genes. The past decade has seen

  9. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  10. Witherspoon Architecture

    E-print Network

    Burr Garden Theatre 114 Architecture 1879 Marx Woolworth Prospect House Prospect Gardens Lockhart Shea Rowing Center Class of 1887 Boathouse Lake Carnegie Jadwin Gym Architecture Lab Caldwell Association (Maclean House, F2) Art Museum (G4) Auditoriums: Betts (Architecture School, H3) Dodds (Robertson

  11. Witherspoon Architecture

    E-print Network

    Garden 122 Labyrinth Books Theatre 114 Architecture 1879 Marx Woolworth Prospect House Prospect Gardens Carnegie Jadwin Gym Architecture Lab Caldwell Fieldhouse DeNunzio Pool Elementary Particle Labs Fitz, F2 Art Museum G4 Auditoriums: Betts, Architecture School, H3 Dodds, Robertson Hall, I4 Helm, 50 Mc

  12. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 2: Army fault tolerant architecture design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) hardware architecture and components and the operating system. The architectural and operational theory of the AFTA Fault Tolerant Data Bus is discussed. The test and maintenance strategy developed for use in fielded AFTA installations is presented. An approach to be used in reducing the probability of AFTA failure due to common mode faults is described. Analytical models for AFTA performance, reliability, availability, life cycle cost, weight, power, and volume are developed. An approach is presented for using VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) to describe and design AFTA's developmental hardware. A plan is described for verifying and validating key AFTA concepts during the Dem/Val phase. Analytical models and partial mission requirements are used to generate AFTA configurations for the TF/TA/NOE and Ground Vehicle missions.

  13. Avionics System Architecture Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio; Hall, Ronald; Traylor, marcus; Whitfield, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Avionics System Architecture Tool (ASAT) is a computer program intended for use during the avionics-system-architecture- design phase of the process of designing a spacecraft for a specific mission. ASAT enables simulation of the dynamics of the command-and-data-handling functions of the spacecraft avionics in the scenarios in which the spacecraft is expected to operate. ASAT is built upon I-Logix Statemate MAGNUM, providing a complement of dynamic system modeling tools, including a graphical user interface (GUI), modeling checking capabilities, and a simulation engine. ASAT augments this with a library of predefined avionics components and additional software to support building and analyzing avionics hardware architectures using these components.

  14. Architectural Graphics Course Syllabus

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Payton, Dorothy

    This document is a syllabus for an architectural graphics course taught by Dorothy Payton of Portland Community College. The course provides "an introduction to the design process and the common drawing types for residential design." This syllabus provides a list of desired student learning outcomes, including class activities to be completed throughout the course. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

  15. Appendix H – CORBA Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yván Valdivia

    CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture) [1] provides programming interfaces and models for portable distributed\\u000a object-oriented computing applications. It offers independence from programming languages, computing platforms and networking\\u000a protocols. This makes CORBA suitable for the development of new applications and their integration into existing distributed\\u000a systems.

  16. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  17. Using Software Architecture for Code Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry Muccini; Antonia Bertolino; Paola Inverardi

    2004-01-01

    Our research deals with the use of Software Architecture (SA) as a reference model for testing the conformance of an implemented system with respect to its architectural specification. We exploit the specification of SA dynamics to identify useful schemes of interactions between system components and to select test classes corresponding to relevant architectural behaviors. The SA dynamics is modeled by

  18. A formal basis for architectural connection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Allen; David Garlan

    1997-01-01

    As software systems become more complex, the overall system structure—or software architecture—becomes a central design problem. An important step toward an engineering discipline of software is a formal basis for describing and analyzing these designs. In the article we present a formal approach to one aspect of architectural design: the interactions among components. The key idea is to define architectural

  19. Component-Based Robotic Engineering (Part II)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Davide Brugali; Azamat Shakhimardanov

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the role of software components as architectural units of large, possibly distributed, software-intensive robotic systems. The focus is on technologies to manage the heterogeneity of hardware, computational, and communication resources and on design techniques to assemble components into systems .A component-based system is a composition of components, and the way components interact with other components and with

  20. SAAM: a method for analyzing the properties of software architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rick Kazman; Leonard J. Bass; Mike Webb

    1994-01-01

    While software architecture has become an increasingly important research topic in recent years, insufficient atten- tion has been paid to methods for evaluation of these archi- tectures. Evaluating architectures is difficult for two main reasons. First, there is no common language used to de- scribe different architectures. Second, there is no clear way of understanding an architecture with respect to

  1. Lunar architecture and urbanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    Human civilization and architecture have defined each other for over 5000 years on Earth. Even in the novel environment of space, persistent issues of human urbanism will eclipse, within a historically short time, the technical challenges of space settlement that dominate our current view. By adding modern topics in space engineering, planetology, life support, human factors, material invention, and conservation to their already renaissance array of expertise, urban designers can responsibly apply ancient, proven standards to the exciting new opportunities afforded by space. Inescapable facts about the Moon set real boundaries within which tenable lunar urbanism and its component architecture must eventually develop.

  2. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  3. An Architecture for Intrusion Detection Using Autonomous Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jai Sundar Balasubramaniyan; Jose Omar Garcia-Fernandez; David Isacoff; Eugene H. Spafford; Diego Zamboni

    1998-01-01

    The Intrusion Detection System architectures commonly used in commercial and research systems have a number of problems that limit their configurability, scalability or efficiency. The most common shortcoming in the existing architectures is that they are built around a single mono- lithic entity that does most of the data collection and pro- cessing. In this paper, we review our architecture

  4. Component specification for parallel coupling infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J. W.; Norris, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Australian National Univ.

    2007-01-01

    Coupled systems comprise multiple mutually interacting subsystems, and are an increasingly common computational science application, most notably as multiscale and multiphysics models. Parallel computing, and in particular message-passing programming have spurred the development of these models, but also present a parallel coupling problem (PCP) in the form of intermodel data dependencies. The PCP complicates model coupling through requirements for the description, transfer, and transformation of the distributed data that models in a parallel coupled system exchange. Component-based software engineering has been proposed as one means of conquering software complexity in scientific applications, and given the compound nature of coupled models, it is a natural approach to addressing the parallel coupling problem. We define a software component specification for solving the parallel coupling problem. This design draws from the already successful Common Component Architecture (CCA). We abstract the parallel coupling problem's elements and map them onto a set of CCA components, defining a parallel coupling infrastructure toolkit. We discuss a reference implementation based on the Model Coupling Toolkit. We demonstrate how these components might be deployed to solve a relevant coupling problems in climate modeling.

  5. Integrating hospital information systems in healthcare institutions: a mediation architecture.

    PubMed

    El Azami, Ikram; Cherkaoui Malki, Mohammed Ouçamah; Tahon, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Many studies have examined the integration of information systems into healthcare institutions, leading to several standards in the healthcare domain (CORBAmed: Common Object Request Broker Architecture in Medicine; HL7: Health Level Seven International; DICOM: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine; and IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). Due to the existence of a wide diversity of heterogeneous systems, three essential factors are necessary to fully integrate a system: data, functions and workflow. However, most of the previous studies have dealt with only one or two of these factors and this makes the system integration unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a flexible, scalable architecture for Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Our main purpose is to provide a practical solution to insure HIS interoperability so that healthcare institutions can communicate without being obliged to change their local information systems and without altering the tasks of the healthcare professionals. Our architecture is a mediation architecture with 3 levels: 1) a database level, 2) a middleware level and 3) a user interface level. The mediation is based on two central components: the Mediator and the Adapter. Using the XML format allows us to establish a structured, secured exchange of healthcare data. The notion of medical ontology is introduced to solve semantic conflicts and to unify the language used for the exchange. Our mediation architecture provides an effective, promising model that promotes the integration of hospital information systems that are autonomous, heterogeneous, semantically interoperable and platform-independent. PMID:22086739

  6. Capturing Product Line Architectures Andr van der Hoek

    E-print Network

    van der Hoek, André

    in a product line architecture. ComponentType VariantComponentType name revision {interface [, optionalPropNameCapturing Product Line Architectures André van der Hoek Institute for Software Research Department@ics.uci.edu Abstract Although product line architectures serve an increasingly important role in the software

  7. Modeling Complex Architectures Based on Granular Computing on Ontology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong Liu; Yunliang Jiang; Lican Huang

    2010-01-01

    We propose granular computing (GrC) on ontology as a solution to the problem of modeling complex architectures. We expressed the architectures formally as ontology domains, which include two components: the set of basic vocabularies and a knowledge library of rules. The set of basic vocabularies contains elements or basic architecture components. The knowledge library comprises rules that control the combination

  8. Common Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS)

    A web resource that contains Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Numbers for approximately 7,800 chemicals of widespread general public interest. Common Chemistry is helpful to non-chemists who know either a name or CAS Registry Number® of a common chemical and want to pair both pieces of information.

  9. College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Communication, Technology and Society; Construc- tion Science

  10. MCS Common ICD Steve Ellingson

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    MCS Common ICD Ver. 1.0 Steve Ellingson April 4, 2009 Contents 1 Introduction and Scope 2 2 Summary;1 Introduction and Scope MCS stands for "monitoring and control system". As described in the LWA station architecture document [1], MCS monitors and controls ASP ("analog signal processing"), DP ("digital process

  11. Capturing interactions in architectural patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dharmendra K Yadav; Rushikesh K Joshi

    2010-01-01

    Patterns of software architecture help in describing structural and functional properties of a system in terms of smaller components. The emphasis of this work is on capturing the aspects of pattern descriptions and the properties of inter-component interactions including non-deterministic behavior. Through these descriptions we, capture structural and behavioral specifications as well as properties against which the specifications are verified.

  12. Newt : an architecture for lineage -based replay and debugging in DISC systems

    E-print Network

    De, Soumyarupa

    2012-01-01

    this through a scalable peer-based architecture for lineagein peers. Figure 5.1 shows the basic Newt architecture. Newtpeer and creates a ranked list of faulty actors. This chapter describes different components of the Newt architecture.

  13. Improve Component-Based Programs with Connectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joachim Hans Fröhlich; Manuel Schwarzinger

    2006-01-01

    \\u000a Interfaces rather than components carry component-based software architectures. This follows directly from the design of component\\u000a interfaces and contractual obligations before the implementation of components. We suggest separating component interfaces\\u000a and component services such as protocol checking, synchronization, parallelization and caching into dedicated components which\\u000a we call connectors. Connectors channel the communication so that components do not communicate directly with

  14. Low voltage amplifier architecture for high speed switched capacitor circuits 

    E-print Network

    Shankar, Asit

    2001-01-01

    requirements of OTA's used in switched capacitor circuits are discussed. An OTA architecture, suitable for low voltage supplies and standard CMOS processes, is proposed. This architecture makes use of common mode feedforward (CMFF). The benefits of CMFF...

  15. FPGA Architecture Characterization for System Level Performance Analysis

    E-print Network

    Densmore, Douglas

    FPGA Architecture Characterization for System Level Performance Analysis Douglas Densmore a set of FPGA-based architecture topologies. This information is used dynamically during simulation representing common designs using FPGA technologies of interest. Their characterization is done only once

  16. Low voltage amplifier architecture for high speed switched capacitor circuits

    E-print Network

    Shankar, Asit

    2001-01-01

    requirements of OTA's used in switched capacitor circuits are discussed. An OTA architecture, suitable for low voltage supplies and standard CMOS processes, is proposed. This architecture makes use of common mode feedforward (CMFF). The benefits of CMFF...

  17. The Current State of Software Component Adaptation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xie Xiong; Zhang Weishi

    2005-01-01

    Component adaptation is widely recognized to be a crucial problem. Components that partially satisfy the constraints of a design problem are adapted using different adaptation methods and adaptation architecture. In this paper, we describe the component and component adaptation informal specification and present several adaptation types, then present an overview of the component adaptation methodology proposed by the prior researchers

  18. Mediating Connector Patterns for Components Interoperability

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mediating Connector Patterns for Components Interoperability Romina Spalazzese and Paola Inverardi Mediating Connector, that is the key enabler for communication. In addition, we present a set of Basic, and their corresponding solutions. Keywords: Heterogeneous Components Interoperability, Mediating Connector Architectural

  19. Software Agent Architecture for Consistency Management in Distributed Documents

    E-print Network

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    framework components, thus enabling the resulting architecture to effectively and efficiently provide to seamlessly co-ordinate and integrate heterogeneous concurrent checks to achieve efficient collaborationSoftware Agent Architecture for Consistency Management in Distributed Documents Anthony Finkelstein

  20. Software Architecture: The Next Step

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan Bosch

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a This position paper makes the following claims that, in our opinion, are worthwhile to discuss at the workshop. 1) The first\\u000a phase of software architecture research, where the key concepts are components and connectors, has matured the technology\\u000a to a level where industry adoption is wide-spread and few fundamental issues remain. 2) The traditional view on software architecture\\u000a suffers from

  1. On Three-Layer Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erann Gat

    1997-01-01

    ion is used as a tool to isolate aspects ofreality that can be tracked or predicted reliably, andignore aspects that cannot.3. The Anatomy of the Three LayerArchitectureThe three-layer architecture consists of threecomponents: a reactive feedback control mechanism, areactive plan execution mechanism, and a mechanismfor performing time-consuming deliberativecomputations. These components run as separatecomputational processes. This is most easilyaccomplished by using a

  2. LEDA: A SPECIFICATION LANGUAGE FOR SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Canal; Ernesto Pimentel; Jose M. Troya

    Software Architecture refers to the level of design in which a system is described as a collection of interconnected components. Most concepts in the object-oriented paradigm can be applied to Software Architecture, where the more general term component-oriented is preferred. However, object-oriented notations often fail to de- scribe the interaction patterns that the components of a system must follow. On

  3. Microcomponent chemical process sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Drost, M. Kevin (Richland, WA); Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA); Birmingham, Joseph G. (Richland, WA); McDonald, Carolyn Evans (Richland, WA); Kurath, Dean E. (Benton County, WA); Friedrich, Michele (Prosser, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one chemical process unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  4. Microcomponent chemical process sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K.; Call, C.J.; Birmingham, J.G.; McDonald, C.E.; Kurath, D.E.; Friedrich, M.

    1998-09-22

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one chemical process unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 26 figs.

  5. Using multiple FPGA architectures for real-time processing of low-level machine vision functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas H. Drayer; William E. King; Joeseph G. Tront; R. W. Conners; Philip A. Araman

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of multiple field programmable gate array (FPGA) architectures for real-time machine vision processing. The use of FPGAs for low level processing represents an excellent tradeoff between software and special purpose hardware implementations. A library of modules that implement common low-level machine vision operations is presented. These modules are designed with gate-level hardware components

  6. Architecture Week

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Based in Eugene, Oregon, Architecture Week is a magazine that is intended for design and building professionals, and their work includes profiles of new building techniques, historic preservation issues, and architectural practice. Visitors can view the current issues online here, and they will also want to look through their "And More" area. Here they will find sections like "Blog Center", "New Products", "Jobs" and "Conferences". Also, visitors can subscribe to their "ArchitectureWeek Notes", which is a weekly email newsletter. Recent articles on the site have included a piece on historic sites in the United States that are at risk of being demolished and another piece on the importance of listening to clients before starting a major architectural project.

  7. Performative architecture

    E-print Network

    Araya, Sergio (Sergio Alejandro)

    2011-01-01

    The following thesis explores two central hypotheses. On the one hand it introduces the idea of performative architecture (performance in design), and has done so with the desire to contribute directly to the expansion of ...

  8. Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA s current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  9. Analyzing Commonality In A System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacheco, Alfred; Pool, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    Cost decreased by use of fewer types of parts. System Commonality Analysis Tool (SCAT) computer program designed to aid managers and engineers in identifying common, potentially common, and unique components of system. Incorporates three major functions: program for creation and maintenance of data base, analysis of commonality, and such system utilities as host-operating-system commands and loading and unloading of data base. Produces reports tabulating maintenance, initial configurations, and expected total costs. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Component architecture for web based EMR applications.

    PubMed Central

    Berkowicz, D. A.; Barnett, G. O.; Chueh, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    The World Wide Web provides the means for the collation and display of disseminated clinical information of use to the healthcare provider. However, the heterogeneous nature of clinical data storage and formats makes it very difficult for the physician to use one consistent client application to view and manipulate information. Similarly, developers are faced with a multitude of possibilities when creating interfaces for their users. A single patients records may be distributed over a number of different record keeping systems, and/or a physician may see patients whose individual records are stored at different sites. Our goal is to provide the healthcare worker with a consistent application interface independent of the parent database and at the same time allow developers the opportunity to customize the GUI in a well controlled, stable application environment. PMID:9929193

  11. Structural components and architectures of RNA exosomes.

    PubMed

    Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D

    2010-01-01

    A large body of structural work conducted over the past ten years has elucidated mechanistic details related to 3' to 5' processing and decay of RNA substrates by the RNA exosome. This chapter will focus on the structural organization of eukaryotic exosomes and their evolutionary cousins in bacteria and archaea with an emphasis on mechanistic details related to substrate recognition and to 3' to 5' phosphorolytic exoribonucleolytic activities of bacterial and archaeal exosomes as well as the hydrolytic exoribonucleolytic and endoribonucleolytic activities of eukaryotic exosomes. These points will be addressed in large part through presentation of crystal structures ofphosphorolytic enzymes such as bacterial RNase PH, PNPase and archaeal exosomes and crystal structures ofthe eukaryotic exosome and exosome sub-complexes in addition to standalone structures of proteins that catalyze activities associated with the eukaryotic RNA exosome, namely Rrp44, Rrp6 and their bacterial counterparts. PMID:21618871

  12. Parametric architecture : performative/responsive assembly components

    E-print Network

    Yu, Huei Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Current parametric design generates many possible solutions during modeling and design process, but in the final stage, only allows users to choose one solution to develop. This thesis demonstrates a design strategy for ...

  13. Common Cold

    MedlinePLUS

    ... en espańol] National Library of Medicine, Medline Plus ? Common Cold Skip Content Marketing Share this: JavaScript is disabled in your browser. To view this content, please enable JavaScript and refresh the page. Click here for instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your browser. ...

  14. Common Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college common areas considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,…

  15. Common Chuckwalla

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Common Chuckwalla is primarily found across the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the United States and Mexico, at elevations ranging from sea level to 1,370 m. This large (125–180 mm) lizard is dorsoventrally flattened and has wrinkles on its belly and neck. Chuckwallas are strongly associa...

  16. Component-based design approach for multicore SoCs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wander O. Cesário; Amer Baghdadi; Lovic Gauthier; Damien Lyonnard; Gabriela Nicolescu; Yanick Paviot; Sungjoo Yoo; Ahmed Amine Jerraya; Mario Diaz-Nava

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a high-level component-based methodology and design environment for application-specific multicore SoC architectures. Component-based design provides primitives to build complex architectures from basic components. This bottom-up approach allows design-architects to explore efficient custom solutions with best performances. This paper presents a high-level component-based methodology and design environment for application-specific multicore SoC architectures. The system specifications are represented as

  17. ARCHITECTURE www.pdx.edu/architecture

    E-print Network

    ARCHITECTURE www.pdx.edu/architecture For additional information about the Architecture Department: Department of Architecture School of Fine and Performing Arts, Portland State University P.O. Box 751 Portland, OR 97207-0751 Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Arts in Architecture Bachelor of Science

  18. College of Architecture College of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    College of Architecture College of Architecture S.R. Crown Hall 3360 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60616 of Master of Science in Architecture: Vedram Mimica Director of Master of Landscape Architecture Program Manager of Academic Affairs: Sarah Pariseau Mission The College of Architecture's graduate degree programs

  19. 42 College of Architecture COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    42 College of Architecture COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Dean: Professor Lambla; Chair: Associate of Architecture (CoA) is to further the discourse between the theory and practice of architecture by the education, the profession, and the community. Architecture in the narrow sense includes important public monuments and

  20. Most genetic risk for autism resides with common variation

    PubMed Central

    Gaugler, Trent; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J.; Bodea, Corneliu A.; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Lee, Ann B.; Mahajan, Milind; Manaa, Dina; Pawitan, Yudi; Reichert, Jennifer; Ripke, Stephan; Sandin, Sven; Sklar, Pamela; Svantesson, Oscar; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hultman, Christina M.; Devlin, Bernie

    2014-01-01

    A key component of genetic architecture is the allelic spectrum influencing trait variability. For autism spectrum disorder (henceforth autism) the nature of its allelic spectrum is uncertain. Individual risk genes have been identified from rare variation, especially de novo mutations1–8. From this evidence one might conclude that rare variation dominates its allelic spectrum, yet recent studies show that common variation, individually of small effect, has substantial impact en masse9,10. At issue is how much of an impact relative to rare variation. Using a unique epidemiological sample from Sweden, novel methods that distinguish total narrow-sense heritability from that due to common variation, and by synthesizing results from other studies, we reach several conclusions about autism’s genetic architecture: its narrow-sense heritability is ?54% and most traces to common variation; rare de novo mutations contribute substantially to individuals’ liability; still their contribution to variance in liability, 2.6%, is modest compared to heritable variation. PMID:25038753

  1. Common modeling system for digital simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, Rick

    1994-01-01

    The Joint Modeling and Simulation System is a tri-service investigation into a common modeling framework for the development digital models. The basis for the success of this framework is an X-window-based, open systems architecture, object-based/oriented methodology, standard interface approach to digital model construction, configuration, execution, and post processing. For years Department of Defense (DOD) agencies have produced various weapon systems/technologies and typically digital representations of the systems/technologies. These digital representations (models) have also been developed for other reasons such as studies and analysis, Cost Effectiveness Analysis (COEA) tradeoffs, etc. Unfortunately, there have been no Modeling and Simulation (M&S) standards, guidelines, or efforts towards commonality in DOD M&S. The typical scenario is an organization hires a contractor to build hardware and in doing so an digital model may be constructed. Until recently, this model was not even obtained by the organization. Even if it was procured, it was on a unique platform, in a unique language, with unique interfaces, and, with the result being UNIQUE maintenance required. Additionally, the constructors of the model expended more effort in writing the 'infrastructure' of the model/simulation (e.g. user interface, database/database management system, data journalizing/archiving, graphical presentations, environment characteristics, other components in the simulation, etc.) than in producing the model of the desired system. Other side effects include: duplication of efforts; varying assumptions; lack of credibility/validation; and decentralization in policy and execution. J-MASS provides the infrastructure, standards, toolset, and architecture to permit M&S developers and analysts to concentrate on the their area of interest.

  2. Assembly of components based on interface automata and UML component model

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Assembly of components based on interface automata and UML component model Samir Chouali , Sebti, smouelhi, hmountassir }@lifc.univ-fcomte.fr Abstract. We propose an approach which combines component UML specify component based system architecture with compo- nent UML model, and component interfaces

  3. The Component-Based Application for GAMESS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Peng

    2008-05-01

    GAMESS, a quantum chetnistry program for electronic structure calculations, has been freely shared by high-performance application scientists for over twenty years. It provides a rich set of functionalities and can be run on a variety of parallel platforms through a distributed data interface. While a chemistry computation is sophisticated and hard to develop, the resource sharing among different chemistry packages will accelerate the development of new computations and encourage the cooperation of scientists from universities and laboratories. Common Component Architecture (CCA) offers an enviromnent that allows scientific packages to dynamically interact with each other through components, which enable dynamic coupling of GAMESS with other chetnistry packages, such as MPQC and NWChem. Conceptually, a cotnputation can be constructed with "plug-and-play" components from scientific packages and require more than componentizing functions/subroutines of interest, especially for large-scale scientific packages with a long development history. In this research, we present our efforts to construct cotnponents for GAMESS that conform to the CCA specification. The goal is to enable the fine-grained interoperability between three quantum chemistry programs, GAMESS, MPQC and NWChem, via components. We focus on one of the three packages, GAMESS; delineate the structure of GAMESS computations, followed by our approaches to its component development. Then we use GAMESS as the driver to interoperate integral components from the other tw"o packages, arid show the solutions for interoperability problems along with preliminary results. To justify the versatility of the design, the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) components have been coupled with GAMESS and its components, so that the performance of GAMESS and its components may be analyzed for a wide range of systetn parameters.

  4. Space Station data management system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallary, William E.; Whitelaw, Virginia A.

    1987-01-01

    Within the Space Station program, the Data Management System (DMS) functions in a dual role. First, it provides the hardware resources and software services which support the data processing, data communications, and data storage functions of the onboard subsystems and payloads. Second, it functions as an integrating entity which provides a common operating environment and human-machine interface for the operation and control of the orbiting Space Station systems and payloads by both the crew and the ground operators. This paper discusses the evolution and derivation of the requirements and issues which have had significant effect on the design of the Space Station DMS, describes the DMS components and services which support system and payload operations, and presents the current architectural view of the system as it exists in October 1986; one-and-a-half years into the Space Station Phase B Definition and Preliminary Design Study.

  5. Control architectures for autonomous underwater vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimon P. Valavanis; Denis Gracanin; Maja Matijasevic; Ramesh Kolluru; Georgios A. Demetriou

    1997-01-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) share common control problems with other air, land, and water unmanned vehicles. In addition to requiring high-dimensional and computationally intensive sensory data for real-time mission execution, power and communication limitations in an underwater environment make it more difficult to develop a control architecture for an AUV. In this article, the four types of control architectures being

  6. How enterprise architectures can support integration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor Anaya; Angel Ortiz

    2005-01-01

    This article states the importance of Enterprise Architectures as a way to identify interoperability problems. Enterprise Architectures provide a common view of the primary resources of any enterprise (people, processes and technology) and how they integrate to provide the primary drivers of the enterprise. The authors of this work sketch an example where different kinds of integration problems are detected.

  7. Evaluation of the SPUR Lisp architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George S. Taylor; Paul N. Hilfinger; James R. Larus; David A. Patterson; Benjamin G. Zorn

    1986-01-01

    The SPUR microprocessor has a 40-bit tagged architecture designed to improve its performance for Lisp programs. Although SPUR includes just a small set of enhancements to the Berkeley RISC-II architecture, simulation results show that with a 150-ns cycle time SPUR will run Common Lisp programs at least as fast as a Symbolies 3600 or a DEC VAX 8600. This paper

  8. Architectural Digest

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Architectural Digest is one of the world's premier periodicals dedicated to architecture and interior design. Their website is a trove of materials for those dabbling in such matters. On this site, visitors can look through one of six sections: Interiors + Inspiration, Celebrity Style, Architecture + Design, Shopping + Sources, News, Culture + Travel, and In the Magazine. These areas are rich in content and commentary from diverse caravansaries. First-timers might enjoy a jaunt on over to the Daily AD to get their daily dose of what's happening in the field. A random visit to the site might bring up a photo gallery of 25 inspiring staircases from around the world, a renovation of a chateau in the Loire Valley, or a look into the homes of some of Southern California's movers and shakers. Additionally, users can sign up to receive updates about their special editions and website only features.

  9. Introduction Subsumption Architecture

    E-print Network

    Leeds, University of

    Introduction Subsumption Architecture Metabolic Architecture Comparison Conclusions A metabolic subsumption architecture for cooperative control of the e-puck Verena Fischer and Simon Hickinbotham Verena Verena Fischer and Simon Hickinbotham A metabolic subsumption architecture 1 #12;Introduction Subsumption

  10. Concrete Architecture of LEAP Database Management System

    E-print Network

    Shihada, Basem

    Concrete Architecture of LEAP Database Management System Analyzed by BASEM SHIHADA bshihada CONCRETE ARCITECTURE 3.1 Reverse Engineering Toolkit 3.2 LEAP Sub-systems Graph 3.3 LEAP Components source software goes to end. This assignment presents a concrete architecture for the open source LEAP

  11. Digital Resource Commons

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Ohio Digital Resource Commons (DRC) is a place to learn about the historic, instructional, cultural, and creative works of those in the Ohio University system, as well as the liberal arts colleges of Ohio. Although not all of the Ohio schools save material with the DRC, many of them elect to do so. Higher education institutions, as well as K-12 institutions are allowed to save their work via the central network, as long as the work has archival merit. Visitors will want to click on "Communities and Collections" on the left hand menu to browse the vast resources available. Some of the communities included are "Art and Architecture", "Multi-Subject Video", and "OhioLINK Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Center". Within each community are some notable collections including, "Archaeological Atlas of Ohio", "Encyclopedia of Physics Demonstrations", and the "Kent State Shootings Oral Histories". In order to see a list of the archives available to search, visitors should click on "Advanced Search", under the blank search box near the top of the page. The scrollable box next to the archives category includes such choices as "Oberlin Digital Commons", "Scholarly Commons at Miami University", and "Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives".

  12. A Software Architecture for HPC Grid Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Newhouse; Anthony Mayer; John Darlington

    We introduce a component software architecture designed for demanding grid computing environments that allows the optimal\\u000a performance of the assembled component applications to be achieved. Performance over the assembled component application is\\u000a maintained through inter-component static and dynamic optimisation techniques. Having defined an application through both\\u000a its component task and data flow graphs we are able to use the associated

  13. Common world model for unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Robert Michael S.

    2013-05-01

    The Robotic Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) seeks to provide adaptive robot capabilities which move beyond traditional metric algorithms to include cognitive capabilities. Key to this effort is the Common World Model, which moves beyond the state-of-the-art by representing the world using metric, semantic, and symbolic information. It joins these layers of information to define objects in the world. These objects may be reasoned upon jointly using traditional geometric, symbolic cognitive algorithms and new computational nodes formed by the combination of these disciplines. The Common World Model must understand how these objects relate to each other. Our world model includes the concept of Self-Information about the robot. By encoding current capability, component status, task execution state, and histories we track information which enables the robot to reason and adapt its performance using Meta-Cognition and Machine Learning principles. The world model includes models of how aspects of the environment behave, which enable prediction of future world states. To manage complexity, we adopted a phased implementation approach to the world model. We discuss the design of "Phase 1" of this world model, and interfaces by tracing perception data through the system from the source to the meta-cognitive layers provided by ACT-R and SS-RICS. We close with lessons learned from implementation and how the design relates to Open Architecture.

  14. architecture 2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option

    E-print Network

    Papalambros, Panos

    master of architecture (M.Arch.) #12;2-year master of architecture option deadlinesmaster of architecture 3-year master of architecture option Taubman College's 2-year master of architecture option is for applicants who hold a bachelor of science degree in architecture or its equivalent. This 60 credit

  15. Pipeline Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. V. Ramamoorthy; Hon F. Li

    1977-01-01

    Pipelined computer architecture has re ceived considerable attention since the 1960s when the need for faster and more cost-effective systems became critical. The merit of pipelining is that it can help to match the speeds of various subsystems without duplicating the cost of the entire system involved. As technology evolves, faster and cheaper LSI circuits become available, and the future

  16. Class Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Michael J.

    This compendium contains more than 40 schools that show new directions in design and the changing demands on this building type. It discusses the design challenges in new schools and how each one of the projects meets the demands of an architecture for learning. An introduction by architect Raymond Bordwell explains many of the trends in new…

  17. Cobot architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Peshkin; J. Edward Colgate; Witaya Wannasuphoprasit; Carl A. Moore; R. Brent Gillespie; Prasad Akella

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new robot architecture: the collaborative robot, or cobot. Cobots are intended for direct physical interaction with a human operator. The cobot can create smooth, strong virtual surfaces and other haptic effects within a shared human\\/cobot workspace. The kinematic properties of cobots differ markedly from those of robots. Most significantly, cobots have only one mechanical degree of freedom,

  18. Architecture Composition

    E-print Network

    Raman, Bhaskaran

    : Unix piping gunzip ­­stdout file.gz | grep string1 | awk '{print $2;}' Quickly enable new functionality and fix failures quickly Performance, Load Balancing: choose least loaded service instances Scalability issues and Challenges Failure detection in the wide­area Internet Architecture for wide­area composition

  19. Architectural Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Harold E.; Hurni, Andre

    1978-01-01

    Suggests building models as a way to reinforce and enhance related subjects such as architectural drafting, structural carpentry, etc., and discusses time, materials, scales, tools or equipment needed, how to achieve realistic special effects, and the types of projects that can be built (model of complete building, a panoramic model, and model…

  20. ARCHITECTURES SCALABILITY

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    called ``Pomegranate'', which is de­ signed around efficient and scalable communication. Pomegranate; Pomegranate's scalability is achieved with a novel ``sort­everywhere'' architecture that dis­ tributes work to be used for com­ municating between the pipelines. Pomegranate provides one interface per pipeline

  1. Architectural Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doornek, Richard R.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan developed around the work of architectural muralist Richard Haas. Discusses the significance of mural painting and gives key concepts for the lesson. Lists class activities for the elementary and secondary grades. Provides a photograph of the Haas mural on the Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel, 1986. (GG)

  2. Computer ArchitectureComputer Architecture (15 Jan 2008)

    E-print Network

    Park, Seung-Jong "Jay"

    Processor Computer Memory Devices I t Keyboard, Mouse Disk Control ("brain") Datapath ("brawn") (where, I/O, Memory Instruction set architecture Memory & Cache I/O & Storage CISC vs RISC 3 Performance Processor/Memory determine how fast instructions are executed AT LEAST, Know how to order components

  3. Organizing Your Website: Information Architecture

    E-print Network

    place to include links to intranet sites. Global Footer: University-wide web polices. Social Nav: Your deep, so that content is not buried within the site. When possible, use parallel construction when namiOrganizing Your Website: Information Architecture Harvard Web Publishing provides several common

  4. Fundamentals of product family architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianxin Jiao; Mitchell M. Tseng

    2000-01-01

    Recognizing the rationale of a product family architecture (PFA) with respect to design for mass customization (DFMC), this paper discusses the fundamental issues underlying a PFA, including product information modeling, structural implications of product families, functional variety versus technical variety, class-member relationships inherent in variety, modularity and commonality, PFA design spaces, and PFA composition. The background research is reviewed in

  5. Architecture selection for neural networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pythagoras Karampiperis; Nikos Manouselis; Theodore B. Trafalis

    2002-01-01

    Researchers worldwide converge into the fact that the exhaustive search over the space of network architectures is computationally infeasible even for networks of modest size. The use of heuristic strategies that dramatically reduce the search complexity is a common technique. These heuristic approaches employ directed search algorithms, such as selection of the number of nodes via sequential network construction (SNC),

  6. Efficient exploration of service-oriented architectures using aspects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingolf H. Krüger; Reena Mathew; Michael Meisinger

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the development of large-scale distributed, reactive systems is the design of architectures that effectively support the systems' purposes. Early prototypes help to decide upon the most effective architecture for a given situation. Questions to answer include the boundaries of components, communication topologies and of replication. It is desirable to evaluate and compare architectures for functionality and

  7. Efficient exploration of service-oriented architectures using aspects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingolf H. Krüger; Reena Mathew; Michael Meisinger

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the development of large-scale dis- tributed, reactive systems is the design of architectures that effectively support the systems' purposes. Early prototypes help to decide upon the most effective architecture for a given situation. Questions to answer include the bound- aries of components, communication topologies and of repli- cation. It is desirable to evaluate and compare architectures

  8. A plug-in architecture for generating collaborative agent responses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Rich; Neal Lesh; Andrew Garland; Jeff Rickel

    2002-01-01

    We describe an implemented architecture for programming the responses of collaborative interface agents out of easily composable and reusable plug-in components, and discuss the underlying theoretical and practical issues. The power of the architecture comes primarily from a rich representation of collaborative discourse state, which includes a focus stack and plan tree. The architecture also provides a useful separation between

  9. Introducing Manakin: Overview and Architecture

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Scott; Green, Cody; Maslov, Alexey; Mikeal, Adam; Leggett, John

    2007-07-16

    with DSpace. Next an architectural overview of the primary components wil be given: • DRI: The Digital Repository Interface (DRI) is an XML schema defining a language that alows aspects and themes to communicate. Manakin uses DRI as the abstraction layer... betwen the repository’s busines logic and presentation. The schema is adapted for digital repositories through the use of embedded METS- based metadata packages. • Aspects: Manakin aspects are components that provide features for the digital repository...

  10. Optical linear algebra processors - Architectures and algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the component design and optical configuration features of a generic optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) architecture, as well as the large number of OLAP architectures, number representations, algorithms and applications encountered in current literature. Number-representation issues associated with bipolar and complex-valued data representations, high-accuracy (including floating point) performance, and the base or radix to be employed, are discussed, together with case studies on a space-integrating frequency-multiplexed architecture and a hybrid space-integrating and time-integrating multichannel architecture.

  11. The NAPA Adaptive Processing Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charlé R. Rupp; Mark Landguth; Tim Garverick; Edson Gomersall; Harry Holt; Jeffrey M. Arnold; Maya Gokhale

    1998-01-01

    The National Adaptive Processing Architecture (NAPA) is a major effort to integrate the resources needed to develop teraops class computing systems based on the principles of adaptive computing. The primary goals for this effort include: (1) the development of an example NAPA component which achieves an order of magnitude cost\\/performance improvement compared to traditional FPGA based systems, (2) the creation

  12. The component model of UPML in a nutshell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dieter Fensel; V. Richard Benjamins; Stefan Decker; Mauro Gaspari; Rix Groenboom; William Grosso; Mark Musen; Enrico Motta; Enric Plaza; A. T. Schreiber; Rudi Studer; Bob Wielinga

    1999-01-01

    Problem-solving methods provide reusable architectures and components for implementing the reasoning part of knowledge-based systems. The Unified Problem-solving Method description Language UPML has been developed to describe such architectures and components to facilitate their semiautomatic reuse and adaptation. This paper sketches the components and connectors provided by UPML.

  13. Distributed visualization framework architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Oleg; Raman, Sundaresan; Crawfis, Roger

    2010-01-01

    An architecture for distributed and collaborative visualization is presented. The design goals of the system are to create a lightweight, easy to use and extensible framework for reasearch in scientific visualization. The system provides both single user and collaborative distributed environment. System architecture employs a client-server model. Visualization projects can be synchronously accessed and modified from different client machines. We present a set of visualization use cases that illustrate the flexibility of our system. The framework provides a rich set of reusable components for creating new applications. These components make heavy use of leading design patterns. All components are based on the functionality of a small set of interfaces. This allows new components to be integrated seamlessly with little to no effort. All user input and higher-level control functionality interface with proxy objects supporting a concrete implementation of these interfaces. These light-weight objects can be easily streamed across the web and even integrated with smart clients running on a user's cell phone. The back-end is supported by concrete implementations wherever needed (for instance for rendering). A middle-tier manages any communication and synchronization with the proxy objects. In addition to the data components, we have developed several first-class GUI components for visualization. These include a layer compositor editor, a programmable shader editor, a material editor and various drawable editors. These GUI components interact strictly with the interfaces. Access to the various entities in the system is provided by an AssetManager. The asset manager keeps track of all of the registered proxies and responds to queries on the overall system. This allows all user components to be populated automatically. Hence if a new component is added that supports the IMaterial interface, any instances of this can be used in the various GUI components that work with this interface. One of the main features is an interactive shader designer. This allows rapid prototyping of new visualization renderings that are shader-based and greatly accelerates the development and debug cycle.

  14. Communication architecture tuners: a methodology for the design of high-performance communication architectures for systems-on-chips

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanishka Lahiri; Anand Raghunathan; Ganesh Lakshminarayana; Sujit Dey

    2000-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a general methodology for the design of custom system-on-chip communication architectures. Our technique is based on the addition of a layer of circuitry, called the Communication Architecture Tuner (CAT), around any existing communication architecture topology. The added layer enhances the ability of the system to adapt to changing communication needs of its constituent components. For

  15. Communication architecture tuners: a methodology for the design of high-performance communication architectures for system-on-chips

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanishka Lahiri; Anand Raghunathan; Ganesh Lakshminarayana; Sujit Dey

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general methodology for the design of custom system-on-chip communication architectures. Our technique is based on the addition of a layer of circuitry, called the Communica- tion Architecture Tuner (CAT), around any existing communication architecture topology. The added layer enhances the ability of the system to adapt to changing communication needs of its constituent components.

  16. On the architecture of cell regulation networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With the rapid development of high-throughput experiments, detecting functional modules has become increasingly important in analyzing biological networks. However, the growing size and complexity of these networks preclude structural breaking in terms of simplest units. We propose a novel graph theoretic decomposition scheme combined with dynamics consideration for probing the architecture of complex biological networks. Results Our approach allows us to identify two structurally important components: the "minimal production unit"(MPU) which responds quickly and robustly to external signals, and the feedback controllers which adjust the output of the MPU to desired values usually at a larger time scale. The successful application of our technique to several of the most common cell regulation networks indicates that such architectural feature could be universal. Detailed illustration and discussion are made to explain the network structures and how they are tied to biological functions. Conclusions The proposed scheme may be potentially applied to various large-scale cell regulation networks to identify functional modules that play essential roles and thus provide handles for analyzing and understanding cell activity from basic biochemical processes. PMID:21362203

  17. College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Construction Science and Management; Digital Pro- duction Arts

  18. 56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE Arts + Architecture

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE College of Arts + Architecture www.coaa.uncc.edu Dean: Kenneth Lambla Associate Dean: Lee Gray Mission and Objectives. The College of Arts + Architecture consists leadership. The arts and architecture have a long history of collaboration; they require analysis

  19. 56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE Arts + Architecture

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE College of Arts + Architecture coaa.uncc.edu Dean: Mr. Kenneth Lambla Associate Dean: Dr. Lee Gray MISSION AND OBJECTIVES The College of Arts + Architecture consists leadership. The arts and architecture have a long history of collaboration; they require analysis

  20. College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    62 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers one-of-a- kind opportunities for interdisciplinary exploration, but the enduring questions. The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities is organized into three schools

  1. College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    63 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers one-of-a- kind opportunities for interdisciplinary exploration, but the enduring questions. The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities is organized into three schools

  2. College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    56 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities 56 COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The collaboration of Architecture (Landscape Ar- chitecture, Construction Science and Management, City and Regional Planning, and Architecture) with Arts (Visual Arts and Performing Arts) and the Humanities (Communication

  3. Architecture TAKING ARCHITECTURE TO NEW HEIGHTS

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    School of Architecture #12;TAKING ARCHITECTURE TO NEW HEIGHTS This is a time of tremendous momentum at the School of Architecture. Looking ahead, we have the unique opportunity to build on our strengths immediate and long term, and enable us to stake our ground as one of the country's premier architecture

  4. College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    57 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The collaboration of Architecture (Landscape Ar- chitecture, Construction Science and Management, City and Regional Planning, and Architecture) with Arts (Visual Arts and Performing Arts) and the Humanities (Communication

  5. College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    25 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Construction Science and Management; Digital Pro- duction Arts

  6. College of Architecture 41 COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    College of Architecture 41 COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Dean: Professor Lambla; Chair: Betsy West, Farris, Cole; Emeritus Professors: Hight, MacLean. Mission. The mission of the College of Architecture (CoA) is to further the discourse between the theory and practice of architecture by the education

  7. College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    25 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts, and Humani- ties offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Construction Science and Management; Digital Production Arts; English

  8. College of Architecture College of Architecture

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    College of Architecture College of Architecture S.R. Crown Hall 3360 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60616 Academic Affairs: TBD Director, Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture Program: Mahjoub Elnimeiri Director of Thesis: Dirk Denison, FAIA Director of Master of Landscape Architecture Program: Peter L. Osler Director

  9. Common cold

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Each year, children suffer up to 5 colds and adults have two to three infections, leading to time off school or work, and considerable discomfort. Most symptoms resolve within 1 week, but coughs often persist for longer. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for common cold? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews and RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: analgesics or anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, antihistamines, decongestants for short-term and for long-term relief, decongestants plus antihistamines, echinacea, steam inhalation, vitamin C, and zinc (intranasal gel or lozenges). PMID:21406124

  10. Analogy, Cognitive Architecture and Universal Construction: A Tale of Two Systematicities

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive science recognizes two kinds of systematicity: (1) as the property where certain cognitive capacities imply certain other related cognitive capacities (Fodor and Pylyshyn); and (2) as the principle that analogical mappings based on collections of connected relations are preferred over relations in isolation (Gentner). Whether these kinds of systematicity are two aspects of a deeper property of cognition is hitherto unknown. Here, it is shown that both derive from the formal, category-theoretic notion of universal construction. In conceptual/psychological terms, a universal construction is a form of optimization of cognitive resources: optimizing the re-utilization of common component processes for common task components. Systematic cognitive capacity and the capacity for analogy are hallmarks of human cognition, which suggests that universal constructions (in the category-theoretic sense) are a crucial component of human cognitive architecture. PMID:24586555

  11. Adding User-Level SPACe: Security, Privacy, and Context to Intelligent Multimedia Information Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dawn N. Jutla; Dimitri Kanevsky

    2006-01-01

    We provide a unified architecture, called SPACe, for Secure, Privacy-Aware, and Contextual multimedia systems in organizations. Many key and important architectural components already exist which contribute to a unified platform, including the classic data mining, security, and privacy-preserving components in conventional intelligent systems. After presenting an overview of our unified architecture, we focus on the state-of-the-art architectural components for user

  12. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  13. Code injection attacks on harvard-architecture devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aurélien Francillon; Claude Castelluccia

    2008-01-01

    Harvard architecture CPU design is common in the embed- ded world. Examples of Harvard-based architecture devices are the Mica family of wireless sensors. Mica motes have limited memory and can process only very small packets. Stack-based buer overow techniques that inject code into the stack and then execute it are therefore not applicable. It has been a common belief that

  14. Automated Synthesis of Architecture of Avionic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio; Xu, Joseph; Dang, Van; Lu, James F.

    2006-01-01

    The Architecture Synthesis Tool (AST) is software that automatically synthesizes software and hardware architectures of avionic systems. The AST is expected to be most helpful during initial formulation of an avionic-system design, when system requirements change frequently and manual modification of architecture is time-consuming and susceptible to error. The AST comprises two parts: (1) an architecture generator, which utilizes a genetic algorithm to create a multitude of architectures; and (2) a functionality evaluator, which analyzes the architectures for viability, rejecting most of the non-viable ones. The functionality evaluator generates and uses a viability tree a hierarchy representing functions and components that perform the functions such that the system as a whole performs system-level functions representing the requirements for the system as specified by a user. Architectures that survive the functionality evaluator are further evaluated by the selection process of the genetic algorithm. Architectures found to be most promising to satisfy the user s requirements and to perform optimally are selected as parents to the next generation of architectures. The foregoing process is iterated as many times as the user desires. The final output is one or a few viable architectures that satisfy the user s requirements.

  15. Architecture for autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broten, Gregory S.; Monckton, Simon P.; Collier, Jack; Giesbrecht, Jared

    2006-05-01

    In 2002 Defence R&D Canada changed research direction from pure tele-operated land vehicles to general autonomy for land, air, and sea craft. The unique constraints of the military environment coupled with the complexity of autonomous systems drove DRDC to carefully plan a research and development infrastructure that would provide state of the art tools without restricting research scope. DRDC's long term objectives for its autonomy program address disparate unmanned ground vehicle (UGV), unattended ground sensor (UGS), air (UAV), and subsea and surface (UUV and USV) vehicles operating together with minimal human oversight. Individually, these systems will range in complexity from simple reconnaissance mini-UAVs streaming video to sophisticated autonomous combat UGVs exploiting embedded and remote sensing. Together, these systems can provide low risk, long endurance, battlefield services assuming they can communicate and cooperate with manned and unmanned systems. A key enabling technology for this new research is a software architecture capable of meeting both DRDC's current and future requirements. DRDC built upon recent advances in the computing science field while developing its software architecture know as the Architecture for Autonomy (AFA). Although a well established practice in computing science, frameworks have only recently entered common use by unmanned vehicles. For industry and government, the complexity, cost, and time to re-implement stable systems often exceeds the perceived benefits of adopting a modern software infrastructure. Thus, most persevere with legacy software, adapting and modifying software when and wherever possible or necessary -- adopting strategic software frameworks only when no justifiable legacy exists. Conversely, academic programs with short one or two year projects frequently exploit strategic software frameworks but with little enduring impact. The open-source movement radically changes this picture. Academic frameworks, open to public scrutiny and modification, now rival commercial frameworks in both quality and economic impact. Further, industry now realizes that open source frameworks can reduce cost and risk of systems engineering. This paper describes the Architecture for Autonomy implemented by DRDC and how this architecture meets DRDC's current needs. It also presents an argument for why this architecture should also satisfy DRDC's future requirements as well.

  16. Enterprise information security architecture a review of frameworks, methodology, and case studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Michelle Oda; Huirong Fu; Ye Zhu

    2009-01-01

    The use of enterprise architecture frameworks has become more common in the past five years within corporations as well as higher education. Only in the past two years has enterprise information security architecture been introduced as a subset of enterprise architecture aligning IT security with business strategy. This paper will review industry accepted enterprise information security architecture frameworks and methodology,

  17. michigan architecture 20082009

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    2008­2009 michigan architecture Programs + Courses #12;#12;2008­2009 ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMS + COURSE This bulletin provides an overview of policies, procedures, degree options, and courses for the U-M architecture of Architecture + Urban Planning 2150 Art + Architecture Building 2000 Bonisteel Boulevard Ann Arbor, MI 48109

  18. A Meta-Level Architecture for Adaptive Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabricio J. Barth; Edson S. Gomi

    The goal of this work is to investigate meta-level architectures for adaptive systems. The main application area is the user modeling for mobile and digital television systems. The results of a set of experiments performed on the proposed architecture showed that it is possible to reuse the components responsible for user modeling if they are designed as meta-level components.

  19. Software architecture critics in the Argo design environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason E. Robbins; David F. Redmiles

    1998-01-01

    Software architectures are high-level design representations of software systems that focus on composition o f software components and how those components interact. Software architectures abstract the details o f implementation and allow the designer to focus on essential design decisions. Regardless of notation, designers are faced with the task of making good design decisions that demand a broad range of

  20. Architecture Engineering Construction (AEC)

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    Architecture Engineering Construction (AEC) Presented to FM Staff February 25, 2009 Updated March 1, 2010 #12;University of Maryland Baltimore Director Architecture, Engineering and Construction Vacant Administration & Finance Kathleen M. Byington #12;Division of Facilities Management Architecture, Engineering

  1. Early prediction of software component reliability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie Cheung; Roshanak Roshandel; Nenad Medvidovic; Leana Golubchik

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict the reliability of a software system early in its development, e.g., during architectural design, can help to improve the system's quality in a cost-effective manner. Existing architecture-level reliability prediction approaches focus on system-level reliability and assume that the reliabilities of individual components are known. In general, this assumption is unreasonable, making component reliability prediction an important

  2. Application Protocol Reference Architecture Application Protocol Reference Architecture

    E-print Network

    van Sinderen, Marten

    Application Protocol Reference Architecture 165 Chapter 7 Application Protocol Reference Architecture This chapter proposes an alternative reference architecture for application protocols. The proposed reference architecture consists of the set of possible architectures for application protocols

  3. Master of Architecture Bylaws School of Architecture and Construction Management

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Master of Architecture Bylaws School of Architecture and Construction Management Washington State University Administrative Home: School of Architecture and Construction Management I. Objectives Degrees offered: Master of Architecture: Professional Accredited Degree. Discipline: Architecture is a general

  4. Noncontextuality with marginal selectivity in reconstructing mental architectures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ru; Dzhafarov, Ehtibar N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a general theory of series-parallel mental architectures with selectively influenced stochastically non-independent components. A mental architecture is a hypothetical network of processes aimed at performing a task, of which we only observe the overall time it takes under variable parameters of the task. It is usually assumed that the network contains several processes selectively influenced by different experimental factors, and then the question is asked as to how these processes are arranged within the network, e.g., whether they are concurrent or sequential. One way of doing this is to consider the distribution functions for the overall processing time and compute certain linear combinations thereof (interaction contrasts). The theory of selective influences in psychology can be viewed as a special application of the interdisciplinary theory of (non)contextuality having its origins and main applications in quantum theory. In particular, lack of contextuality is equivalent to the existence of a “hidden” random entity of which all the random variables in play are functions. Consequently, for any given value of this common random entity, the processing times and their compositions (minima, maxima, or sums) become deterministic quantities. These quantities, in turn, can be treated as random variables with (shifted) Heaviside distribution functions, for which one can easily compute various linear combinations across different treatments, including interaction contrasts. This mathematical fact leads to a simple method, more general than the previously used ones, to investigate and characterize the interaction contrast for different types of series-parallel architectures. PMID:26136694

  5. Design of common communication platform of microgrid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rui Bi; Ming Ding; Ting Ting Xu

    2010-01-01

    Communication system in microgrid is very important to microgrid operation. Except for meeting the demand of reliability, it should fulfill the characteristics of plug and play, dispersion in distributed devices, and the need of data information in controlling. A constraint set and a common communication platform are designed considering architecture and control of microgrid. In the process of designing platform,

  6. Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D.

    2007-05-08

    Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

  7. A general spacecraft power subsystem architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Glueck, P.R.; Bahrami, K.A.; Lei, M.O. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1995-12-31

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory`s (JPL`s) Multimission Spacecraft Analysis System (MSAS) Project is working to develop a spacecraft operations system that facilitates rapid configuration for future missions. In support of this effort, a general spacecraft power subsystem architecture has been developed based on recent and ongoing JPL spacecraft designs. This architecture defines in general terms the components and relationships that might be present in a specific power subsystem implementation. The resulting framework allows software modelling of nearly any power subsystem configuration and enhances the reusability of component functional models. The general architecture may also be applicable to modular hardware designs. This paper describes the general architecture and presents several adaptations to specific JPL spacecraft.

  8. LibraRing: An Architecture for Distributed Digital Libraries Based on DHTs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christos Tryfonopoulos; Stratos Idreos; Manolis Koubarakis

    2005-01-01

    We present a digital library architecture based on distributed hash tables. We discuss the main components of this architecture and the protocols for offering information retrieval and information filtering functionality. We present an experimental evaluation of our proposals.

  9. Probabilistic common-cause failures analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liudong Xing; Wendai Wang

    2008-01-01

    Common-cause failures (CCF) are simultaneous failures of multiple components within a system due to a common-cause or a shared root cause. CCF can contribute significantly to the overall system unreliability. Therefore, it is important to incorporate CCF into the system reliability analysis. Traditional CCF analyses have assumed that the occurrence of a common-cause results in the deterministic\\/guaranteed failure of components

  10. Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities at NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

    2014-01-01

    Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world's largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

  11. Automated component creation for legacy C++ and fortran codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Sottile, M. J. (Matthew J.); Rasmussen, C. E. (Craig E.)

    2001-01-01

    A significant amount of work has been spent creating component models and programming environments, but little support exists for automation in the process of creating components from existing codes. To entice users to adopt the component-based paradigm over traditional programming models, integration of legacy codes must be as simple and fast as possible, We present a system for automating the IDL generation stage of component development based on source code analysis of legacy C, C-t-4 and Fortran codes using the Program Database Toolkit. Together with IDL compilation tools such as Babel, we provide an alternative to hand-written IDL code for legacy applications and libraries. In addition to generating IDL, we propose an XML-based method for specifying meta-data related to type mapping and wrapper generation that can be shared between our tools and IDL compilers. The component model of choice for this work is the Common Component Architecture (CCA) using the Scientific Interface Definition Language (SIDL), though the concepts presented can be applied to other models.

  12. Common optical interconnect for systems and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Rick C.

    2001-06-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of a single optical backbone interconnect that can accommodate the wide variety of information that must be exchanged within a typical avionics system. The building block elements of this common optical backbone are based on products that have been developed for the commercial telecommunications and cable TV industries. During the development of this architecture a subsystem interconnect domain analysis was performed. This analysis focused primarily on the three most demanding interconnect domains in an avionics system; 1) the Vehicle Management System (VMS), 2) the Integrated RF (IRF), and 3) the Integrated Core Processor (ICP). The results of this analysis were used to create an approach for a single fiber optic backbone connecting multiple systems and subsystems together. Each group of communication sources and destinations can use their native format (analog/digital), signaling rate (100KHz to 20GHz), protocol (Fibre Channel, ATM, Mil-Std-1553, etc.), and topology (linear ring, point- to-point). All of these communication types coexist on this single optical backbone. The interconnect media is generally topology, protocol, performance, and signaling format independent. A laboratory system has been developed and demonstrated using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This system can also be used to provide a common interconnect for a variety of fiber optic sensors used in the creation of smart structures. This can provide a single backbone, distributed throughout the platform, for sensors that exploit various optical properties. Some of the sensor types could be Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs), Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometers (EFPIs), and Mach- Zehnder interferometers.

  13. Generic architectures for future flight systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Generic architecture for future flight systems must be based on open system architectures (OSA). This provides the developer and integrator the flexibility to optimize the hardware and software systems to match diverse and unique applications requirements. When developed properly OSA provides interoperability, commonality, graceful upgradability, survivability and hardware/software transportability to greatly minimize life cycle costs and supportability. Architecture flexibility can be achieved to take advantage of commercial developments by basing these developments on vendor-neutral commercially accepted standards and protocols. Rome Laboratory presently has a program that addresses requirements for OSA.

  14. Dictionary of architectural and building technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, H.J.; Smith, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    This book has been revised and expanded to include over 6000 entries pertaining to both architectural design and engineering. Compiled from subject indexes of some 200 textbooks in the field, the Dictionary aims to provide coverage of all but the most commonly understood terms within the field of architectural science proper-that is, structures, building materials, acoustics, thermal environment, lighting, and building services. In addition, definitions are provided for frequently encountered terms from neighboring field, including civil and mechanical engineering, physics, chemistry, architectural history, and fine art. Computer abbreviations for FORTRAN programs are provided, and appendixes and references supplement the main work.

  15. Architecture Composition

    E-print Network

    Raman, Bhaskaran

    components Example: Unix piping gunzip ­­stdout file.gz | grep string1 | awk '{print $2;}' Quickly enable new Availability: Detect and fix failures quickly Performance, Load Balancing: choose least loaded service and goals Related work Research issues and Challenges Failure detection in the wide­area Internet

  16. Architecture of a distributed multimission operations system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Takahiro

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture to develop a multimission operations systems, which we call DIOSA. In this architecture, a component used as a building block is called a functional block. Each functional block has a standard structure, and the interface between functional blocks are defined with a set of standard protocols. This paper shows the structure of the database used by functional blocks, the structure of interfaces between functional blocks, and the structure of system management. Finally, examples of typical functional blocks and an example of a system constructed with this architecture is shown.

  17. House of Commons Defence Committee

    E-print Network

    Schrijver, Karel

    weather 10 The probability 11 Potential impact on electronic infrastructure 11 High Altitude Nuclear EMP Weapons (HEMP) 13 The EMP components 14 Practical experience 15 Potential impact on electronicHC 1552 House of Commons Defence Committee Developing Threats: Electro-Magnetic Pulses (EMP) Tenth

  18. Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS): Technical Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG s SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA's current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  19. Domain specific software architectures: Command and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Christine; Hatch, William; Ruegsegger, Theodore; Balzer, Bob; Feather, Martin; Goldman, Neil; Wile, Dave

    1992-01-01

    GTE is the Command and Control contractor for the Domain Specific Software Architectures program. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an architecture-driven, component-based capability for the automated generation of command and control (C2) applications. Such a capability will significantly reduce the cost of C2 applications development and will lead to improved system quality and reliability through the use of proven architectures and components. A major focus of GTE's approach is the automated generation of application components in particular subdomains. Our initial work in this area has concentrated in the message handling subdomain; we have defined and prototyped an approach that can automate one of the most software-intensive parts of C2 systems development. This paper provides an overview of the GTE team's DSSA approach and then presents our work on automated support for message processing.

  20. Component Change and Version Identification Premysl Brada

    E-print Network

    ], software configuration management (SCM) is- sues related to component technology have received less; http://nenya.ms.mff.cuni.cz/ #12;As in `ordinary' software systems, the role of SCM in the component- quent updates. The rest of this section briefly introduces SOFA principles and architecture. Section 2

  1. Overview of the CORBA Component Model. Chapter 38, Section 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W. (Technical Monitor); Wang, Nanbor; Schmidt, Douglas C.; ORyan, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) object model is increasingly gaining acceptance as the industry standard, cross-platform, cross-language distributed object computing model. The recent addition of the CORBA Component Model (CCM) integrates a successful component programming model from EJB, while maintaining the interoperability and language-neutrality of CORBA. The CCM programming model is thus suitable for leveraging proven technologies and existing services to develop the next-generation of highly scalable distributed applications. However, the CCM specification is large and complex. Therefore, ORB providers have only started implementing the specification recently. As with first-generation CORBA implementations several years ago, it is still hard to evaluate the quality and performance of CCM implementations. Moreover, the interoperability of components and containers from different providers is not well understood yet. By the end of next year, we expect that CCM providers will implement the complete specification, as well as support value-added enhancements to their implementations, just as operating system and ORB providers have done historically. In particular, containers provided by the CCM component model implementation provide quality of service (QoS) capabilities for CCM components, and can be extended to provide more services to components to relieve components from implementing these functionalities in an ad-hoc way (Wang, 2000b). These container QoS extensions provide services that can monitor and control certain aspects of components behaviors that cross-cut different programming layers or require close interaction among components, containers, and operating systems. As CORBA and the CCM evolve, we expect some of these enhancements will be incorporated into the CCM specification.

  2. A Review on System Architectures for Sensor Fusion Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilfried Elmenreich

    2007-01-01

    In the literature there exist many proposed architectures for sensor fusion applications. This paper briefly reviews some\\u000a of the most common approaches, i.e the JDL fusion architecture, the Waterfall model, the Intelligence cycle, the Boyd loop,\\u000a the LAAS architecture, the Omnibus model, Mr. Fusion, the DFuse framework, and the Time-Triggered Sensor Fusion Model, and\\u000a categorizes them into abstract models, generic

  3. No Common Opinion on the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael B.; Peterson, Paul E.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    According to the three authors of this article, the 2014 "EdNext" poll yields four especially important new findings: (1) Opinion with respect to the Common Core has yet to coalesce. The idea of a common set of standards across the country has wide appeal, and the Common Core itself still commands the support of a majority of the public.…

  4. REVISITING COMMONS – ARE COMMON PROPERTY REGIMES IRRATIONAL?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lubna Hasan

    2002-01-01

    This paper revisits the debate about communal management of natural resources and brings together various issues confronting it. Much of the criticism against common property regimes stems from an incorrect modeling of a common property situation, and misunderstandings about the terms and their wrong usage. Models of collective action (Hardin’s tragedy of the Commons, Olson’s Logic of Collective Action, and

  5. Citizen Observatories: A Standards Based Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonis, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    A number of large-scale research projects are currently under way exploring the various components of citizen observatories, e.g. CITI-SENSE (http://www.citi-sense.eu), Citclops (http://citclops.eu), COBWEB (http://cobwebproject.eu), OMNISCIENTIS (http://www.omniscientis.eu), and WeSenseIt (http://www.wesenseit.eu). Common to all projects is the motivation to develop a platform enabling effective participation by citizens in environmental projects, while considering important aspects such as security, privacy, long-term storage and availability, accessibility of raw and processed data and its proper integration into catalogues and international exchange and collaboration systems such as GEOSS or INSPIRE. This paper describes the software architecture implemented for setting up crowdsourcing campaigns using standardized components, interfaces, security features, and distribution capabilities. It illustrates the Citizen Observatory Toolkit, a software suite that allows defining crowdsourcing campaigns, to invite registered and unregistered participants to participate in crowdsourcing campaigns, and to analyze, process, and visualize raw and quality enhanced crowd sourcing data and derived products. The Citizen Observatory Toolkit is not a single software product. Instead, it is a framework of components that are built using internationally adopted standards wherever possible (e.g. OGC standards from Sensor Web Enablement, GeoPackage, and Web Mapping and Processing Services, as well as security and metadata/cataloguing standards), defines profiles of those standards where necessary (e.g. SWE O&M profile, SensorML profile), and implements design decisions based on the motivation to maximize interoperability and reusability of all components. The toolkit contains tools to set up, manage and maintain crowdsourcing campaigns, allows building on-demand apps optimized for the specific sampling focus, supports offline and online sampling modes using modern cell phones with built-in sensing technologies, automates the upload of the raw data, and handles conflation services to match quality requirements and analysis challenges. The strict implementation of all components using internationally adopted standards ensures maximal interoperability and reusability of all components. The Citizen Observatory Toolkit is currently developed as part of the COBWEB research project. COBWEB is partially funded by the European Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement n° 308513; part of the topic ENV.2012.6.5-1 "Developing community based environmental monitoring and information systems using innovative and novel earth observation applications.

  6. Parallel supercomputing with commodity components

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.S.; Goda, M.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Becker, D.J. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    We have implemented a parallel computer architecture based entirely upon commodity personal computer components. Using 16 Intel Pentium Pro microprocessors and switched fast ethernet as a communication fabric, we have obtained sustained performance on scientific applications in excess of one Gigaflop. During one production astrophysics treecode simulation, we performed 1.2 x 10{sup 15} floating point operations (1.2 Petaflops) over a three week period, with one phase of that simulation running continuously for two weeks without interruption. We report on a variety of disk, memory and network benchmarks. We also present results from the NAS parallel benchmark suite, which indicate that this architecture is competitive with current commercial architectures. In addition, we describe some software written to support efficient message passing, as well as a Linux device driver interface to the Pentium hardware performance monitoring registers.

  7. Connectionism and Cognitive Architecture Connectionism and Cognitive Architecture

    E-print Network

    Pylyshyn, Zenon

    Connectionism and Cognitive Architecture Connectionism and Cognitive Architecture: 1A Critical architecture and the sorts of models that have traditionally been assumed in cognitive science. We claim that the major distinction is that, while both Connectionist and Classical architectures postulate

  8. Kaleidoscope: A Reference Architecture for Monitoring and Control Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Savigni; Francesco Tisato

    1999-01-01

    Although monitoring and control systems can be applied to a great variety of application domains, they exhibit a number of common characteristics, particularly the extensive use of abstraction layers and information streams. This paper presents a reference architecture upon which a number of monitoring and control systems for a wide range of application domains can be designed. The architecture is

  9. DRAFT (abstract only): Dynamically Reconfigurable Architecture for Factoring Tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald M. Chiarulli; Walter G. Rudd; Duncan A. Buell

    1985-01-01

    The Draft architecture is a 256 bit system design for extended precision integer arithmetic. It is intended primarily for high speed factoring of large integers. Major architectural features include a segmentable RDO which allows parallel computations in up to eight independent All segments. Each segment operates from a local control store with a common micro-instruction address broadcast to all segments

  10. Software Architectures for Human-Computer Interaction: Analysis and Construction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rick Kazman

    Software architectures have long been a focus of research and development in human- computer interaction. This paper analyzes the history of architectures for user interface software in terms of their evolution in response to the pressures of non-functional quality goals. These goals are things like modifiability, integrability, and performance that expert software designers commonly endeavor to satisfy when creating large

  11. THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL ARCHITECTURE Judith S. Dahmann

    E-print Network

    THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL ARCHITECTURE Judith S. Dahmann Defense Modeling and Simulation of a common technical architecture for use across all classes of simulations in the US Department of Defense) for distributed simulations are described. 1. INTRODUCTION The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO

  12. Organizational Multi-Agent Architectures for Information Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Tung Do; Stéphane Faulkner; Manuel Kolp

    2003-01-01

    A Multi-Agent System (MAS) architecture is an organization of coordinated autonomous agents that interact in order to achieve particular, possibly common goals. Considering real-world organizations as an analogy, this paper proposes MAS architectural patterns for information systems which adopt concepts from organizational theories. The patterns are modeled using the i* framework which offers the notions of actor, goal and actor

  13. Java based open architecture controller

    SciTech Connect

    Weinert, G F

    2000-01-13

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) the authors have been developing an open architecture machine tool controller. This work has been patterned after the General Motors (GM) led Open Modular Architecture Controller (OMAC) work, where they have been involved since its inception. The OMAC work has centered on creating sets of implementation neutral application programming interfaces (APIs) for machine control software components. In the work at LLNL, they were among the early adopters of the Java programming language. As an application programming language, it is particularly well suited for component software development. The language contains many features, which along with a well-defined implementation API (such as the OMAC APIs) allows third party binary files to be integrated into a working system. Because of its interpreted nature, Java allows rapid integration testing of components. However, for real-time systems development, the Java programming language presents many drawbacks. For instance, lack of well defined scheduling semantics and threading behavior can present many unwanted challenges. Also, the interpreted nature of the standard Java Virtual Machine (JVM) presents an immediate performance hit. Various real-time Java vendors are currently addressing some of these drawbacks. The various pluses and minuses of using the Java programming language and environment, with regard to a component-based controller, will be outlined.

  14. ReArchJBs: A Tool for Automated Software Architecture Recovery of JavaBeans-Based Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang-ai Sun; Jun Zhou; Jiannong Cao; Maozhong Jin; Chao Liu; Yanfang Shen

    2005-01-01

    Currently, more and more software systems are developed based on the component technologies, such as JavaBeans. It is significant to recover software architecture from the implementation for the purpose of software maintenance and evolution. In this paper, a general framework for architecture recovery of component-based applications is proposed, identifying the principle and requirements for architecture recovery. Based on this framework,

  15. ARCHITECTURE AT McGILL Bachelor of Science in Architecture

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    ARCHITECTURE AT McGILL Bachelor of Science in Architecture What is architecture? Architecture. Is this the program for me? Architecture students come to McGill with a wide variety of backgrounds and life? You will need a professional degree in architecture in order to practice as an architect. At Mc

  16. 1 Interior Architecture and Design INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE AND

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Interior Architecture and Design INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN GW's interior architecture. UNDERGRADUATE Bachelor's program · Bachelor of Fine Arts with a major in interior architecture and design (http://bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/interior- architecture-design/bfa) GRADUATE Master's program · Master of Fine Arts in the field of interior architecture

  17. Improving modularity of interactive software with the MDPC architecture

    E-print Network

    - Controller" model is a refinement of the MVC architecture. It introduces the "Picking View" component, which measured gains in controller code, which is simpler and more focused. Keywords: MVC, interactive software each sub-problem. The Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture is a well-known attempt to improve

  18. Exploring Intentional Modeling and Analysis for Enterprise Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric S. K. Yu; Markus Strohmaier; Xiaoxue Deng

    2006-01-01

    An enterprise architecture is intended to be a comprehensive blueprint describing the key components and relationships for an enterprise from strategies to business processes to information systems and technologies. Enterprise architectures have become essential for managing change in complex organizations. While \\

  19. A software architecture for user transparent parallel image processing

    E-print Network

    Geusebroek, Jan-Mark

    A software architecture for user transparent parallel image processing F.J. Seinstra *, D. Koelma image processing researchers to de- velop parallel applications in a transparent manner. The architecture's main component is an extensive library of data parallel low level image operations capable

  20. Engineering the architectural diversity of heterogeneous metallic nanocrystals

    E-print Network

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Engineering the architectural diversity of heterogeneous metallic nanocrystals Yue Yu, Qingbo Zhang. Y Yue), however, believe that metallic nanocrystals (NCs) can provide a solution to the assembly nanocrystals, or HMNCs) where every architectural element (number, type, shape, size and location of component

  1. ADVISOR: A Machine Learning Architecture for Intelligent Tutor Construction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Beck; Beverly Park Woolf; Carole R. Beal

    2000-01-01

    We have constructed ADVISOR, a two-agent machine learning architecture for intelligent tutoring systems (ITS). The purpose of this architecture is to centralize the reasoning of an ITS into a single component to al- low customization of teaching goals and to simplify im- proving the ITS. The first agent is responsible for learn- ing a model of how students perform using

  2. A software architecture for user transparent parallel image processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank J. Seinstra; Dennis Koelma; Jan-mark Geusebroek

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a software architecture that allows image processing researchers to de- velop parallel applications in a transparent manner. The architecture's main component is an extensive library of data parallel low level image operations capable of running on homoge- neous distributed memory MIMD-style multicomputers. Since the library has an application programming interface identical to that of an existing sequential

  3. Experiencing architecture, experiencing nature

    E-print Network

    Torres, MaryAlice

    1992-01-01

    The idea for this thesis came from the recognition of the richness in an architectural experience and the desire to understand more about the meaning of this experience in the larger context of architecture and culture. ...

  4. ARCHITECTURAL Portfolio package

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES Portfolio package Carleton University requires a portfolio package as part of your application to the Bachelor of Architectural Studies program. The portfolio package. This brochure should help eliminate any anxiety about the portfolio package by providing explanations, answering

  5. Architecture master's programme

    E-print Network

    Landscape Architecture ­ master's programme at SLU, Alnarp, Sweden* Starts in September 2011. Last a possibility to in-depth studies in varied areas in the field of Landscape Architecture, for example in open

  6. School of Architecture College of Architecture

    E-print Network

    1 School of Architecture College of Architecture Georgia Institute of Technology Ph.D. WITH A MAJOR for acceptance by Georgia Institute of Technology is 550 paper-based or 79 internet-based; however, the Ph was approved and initiated in 1982. The program strengthens the knowledge base that supports the profession

  7. Abstractions for Software Architecture and Tools to Support Them

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Shaw; Robert Deline; Daniel V. Klein; Theodore L. Ross; David M. Young; Gregory Zelesnik

    1995-01-01

    Architectures for software use rich abstractions and idioms to describe system components, the nature of interactions among the components, and the patterns that guide the composition of components into systems. These abstractions are higher-level than the elements usually supported by programming languages and tools. They capture packaging and interaction is- sues as well as computational functionality. Well-established (if informal) patterns

  8. The Common Test Station (CTS) for guided weapons testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. W. Larson

    1996-01-01

    The Common Test Station (CTS) was originally designated as a member of the CASS DoD Automatic Test Equipment (ATE) family. This designation was a result of expected commonality of design architecture and equipment selection between CASS and the CTS. The Navy's CASS was originally targeted for a broad range of avionics systems in support of Naval aviation and other shipboard

  9. On developmental mental architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juyang Weng

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a computational theory of developmental mental architectures for artificial and natural systems, motivated by neuroscience. The work is an attempt to approximately model biological mental architectures using mathematical tools. Six types of architecture are presented, beginning with the observation-driven Markov decision process as Type-1. From Type-1 to Type-6, the architecture progressively becomes more complete toward the necessary

  10. Missile signal processing common computer architecture for rapid technology upgrade

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel V. Rabinkin; Edward Rutledge; Paul Monticciolo

    2004-01-01

    Interceptor missiles process IR images to locate an intended target and guide the interceptor towards it. Signal processing requirements have increased as the sensor bandwidth increases and interceptors operate against more sophisticated targets. A typical interceptor signal processing chain is comprised of two parts. Front-end video processing operates on all pixels of the image and performs such operations as non-uniformity

  11. Common management architecture for third generation wireless networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Rayes

    2000-01-01

    The wireless market can be divided into mobile\\/cellular and fixed wireless. The mobile\\/cellular world is progressively transitioning from 2G (e.g. GSM, 2G-CDMA) to 2.5G (e.g. GPRS, 2.G-CDMA) to 3G (e.g. CDMA-2000, UMTS) technologies. The broadband fixed wireless technology is targeted as one of the “last mile” services available to residents and businesses. It typically requires a licensed frequency with a

  12. Requirements for a common GUI architecture for ultrasound applications 

    E-print Network

    Muthukrishnan, Sreenivas

    2001-01-01

    Database (OLE DB). We explain both these methods in this section. 5. 1. 4. 1 ODBC ODBC is a standard that facilitates accessing any Relational Database. (RDBMS) by providing an SQL dialect. We use ODBC to carry out the SQL commands to store.... CreateObject("ADODB. Connection" ) Conn. ConnectionString = "DBQ=C iprogram Filesl Sample. mdb;DRIVER=(MS Access (*. mdb) }" Conn. Open Conn. Close 44 5. 1. 4. 2 OLE DB OLEDB is a set of interfaces and methods conforming to the COM model. It helps...

  13. Common Control System Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Nelson

    2005-12-01

    The Control Systems Security Program and other programs within the Idaho National Laboratory have discovered a vulnerability common to control systems in all sectors that allows an attacker to penetrate most control systems, spoof the operator, and gain full control of targeted system elements. This vulnerability has been identified on several systems that have been evaluated at INL, and in each case a 100% success rate of completing the attack paths that lead to full system compromise was observed. Since these systems are employed in multiple critical infrastructure sectors, this vulnerability is deemed common to control systems in all sectors. Modern control systems architectures can be considered analogous to today's information networks, and as such are usually approached by attackers using a common attack methodology to penetrate deeper and deeper into the network. This approach often is composed of several phases, including gaining access to the control network, reconnaissance, profiling of vulnerabilities, launching attacks, escalating privilege, maintaining access, and obscuring or removing information that indicates that an intruder was on the system. With irrefutable proof that an external attack can lead to a compromise of a computing resource on the organization's business local area network (LAN), access to the control network is usually considered the first phase in the attack plan. Once the attacker gains access to the control network through direct connections and/or the business LAN, the second phase of reconnaissance begins with traffic analysis within the control domain. Thus, the communications between the workstations and the field device controllers can be monitored and evaluated, allowing an attacker to capture, analyze, and evaluate the commands sent among the control equipment. Through manipulation of the communication protocols of control systems (a process generally referred to as ''reverse engineering''), an attacker can then map out the control system processes and functions. With the detailed knowledge of how the control data functions, as well as what computers and devices communicate using this data, the attacker can use a well known Man-in-the-Middle attack to perform malicious operations virtually undetected. The control systems assessment teams have used this method to gather enough information about the system to craft an attack that intercepts and changes the information flow between the end devices (controllers) and the human machine interface (HMI and/or workstation). Using this attack, the cyber assessment team has been able to demonstrate complete manipulation of devices in control systems while simultaneously modifying the data flowing back to the operator's console to give false information of the state of the system (known as ''spoofing''). This is a very effective technique for a control system attack because it allows the attacker to manipulate the system and the operator's situational awareness of the perceived system status. The three main elements of this attack technique are: (1) network reconnaissance and data gathering, (2) reverse engineering, and (3) the Man-in-the-Middle attack. The details of this attack technique and the mitigation techniques are discussed.

  14. Naval Architecture Marine Engineering

    E-print Network

    Eustice, Ryan

    Naval Architecture Marine Engineering Graduate Program Brochure 2014-2015 The University of Michigan #12;Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering More than 70% of our planet is covered by water environment. In the Department of Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering (NA&ME), at the University

  15. Naval Architecture Marine Engineering

    E-print Network

    Eustice, Ryan

    Naval Architecture Marine Engineering Graduate Program Brochure 2011-2012 The University of Michigan #12;Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering More than 70% of our planet is covered by water environment. In the Department of Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering (NA&ME), at the University

  16. Software Resource Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Murray Woodside

    2001-01-01

    Performance is determined by a system's resources and its workload. Some of the resources are software resources which are embedded in the software architec- ture; some of them are even created by the software behav- iour. This paper describes software resources and resource architecture, and shows how resource architecture can be determined from software architecture and behaviour. It considers how

  17. On Archiving Architecture Documents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rambabu Duddukuri; T. V. Prabhakar

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel perspective on archiving architecture documents in large organizations. Designing and architecting a system deals with modeling the high level structure of a system in terms of views, architectural patterns and styles. Aspects such as knowledge management and archiving of architecture work done on artifacts of software projects challenge the large organizations. Knowledge management in such

  18. MCS Architecture Steve Ellingson

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    MCS Architecture Ver. 4 Steve Ellingson November 7, 2009 Contents 1 Architecture 2 2 Document Institute & State University, Blacksburg VA 24061 USA. E-mail: ellingson@vt.edu 1 #12;1 Architecture MCS stands for "monitoring and control system". MCS is defined in [1]. The purpose of this doc- ument

  19. UMTS network architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoen, J. P.; Saiedi, A.; Baccaro, I.

    1994-05-01

    This paper proposes a Functional Architecture and a corresponding Network Architecture for the Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS). Procedures like call handling, location management, and handover are considered. The architecture covers the domestic, business, and public environments. Integration with existing and forthcoming networks for fixed communications is anticipated and the Intelligent Network (IN) philosophy is applied.

  20. High performance parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Engineering and Architecture (FEA)

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (FEA) #12;362 Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (FEA) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (FEA) Officers of the Faculty Peter F as 1913 the University recognized the need for engineering education and training in the Middle East

  2. Architecture MSc Programme

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    Architecture Designing for contemporary demands for continuity and change Architects play an important role in determining the design and layout of the built environment and the shape of our cityscapes. The Architecture and design) and the way they influence the elaboration and realisation of an architectural design

  3. Multisensor data fusion architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. G. Al-Dhaher; D. Mackesy

    2004-01-01

    In this work we present multi-sensor data fusion architecture. The objective of the architecture is to obtain fused measured data that represent the measured parameter as accurate as possible. The architecture is based on the use of adaptive Kalman filter formed by using Kalman filter and fuzzy logic techniques. Measurements generated from each sensor are fed into an adaptive Kalman

  4. bachelor of architecture

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    bachelor of science in architecture (B.S.) #12;Student working in studio The B.S. degree prepares studies in a professional degree program in architecture or a related field, including landscape architecture, engineering, art, construction, urban planning, urban design, or historic preservation. Others

  5. IIT Architecture Undergraduate

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    IIT Architecture Chicago Undergraduate Programs #12;#12;NOWNESS is our approach. There are no more boundaries, no eternal forms. We should not attempt to define architecture in an all-encompassing way but instead make possible an architecture of freedom. Now is the time for opportunities of innovation. Now

  6. Architecture AddressingModes

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Dat H.

    MIPS R2000 Architecture and Assembly (Part 1) 1. CPU Registers 2. Byte Order 3. AddressingModes 4­endian byte order 3 2 1 0 0 1 2 3 Or Byte number #12; AddressingModes . MIPS is a load/store architecture . RICS -- Load/Store architecture -- All instructions have equal length of 4 bytes -- Every register can

  7. Brain components

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  8. Blood Components

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of volume) suspended in plasma (~55% of volume). Red cells Red cells, or erythrocytes , carry oxygen from the lungs ... frozen plasma. Transfusable Blood Components Summary Whole Blood Red Blood Cells Platelets Plasma Cryoprecipitated AHF COLOR OF ...

  9. An advanced integrated architecture for wireless voicemail retrieval. 

    E-print Network

    Koumpis, Konstantinos; Ladas, C; Renals, Steve

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative architecture for voicemail data retrieval on the move. It is comprised of three distinct components: a speech recognizer, a text summarizer and a WAP push service initiator, enabling ...

  10. AUTONOMY ARCHITECTURES FOR A CONSTELLATION OF SPACECRAFT Anthony Barrett

    E-print Network

    Schaffer, Steven

    AUTONOMY ARCHITECTURES FOR A CONSTELLATION OF SPACECRAFT Anthony Barrett Jet Propulsion Laboratory a hundred spacecraft (such as for interferometer or magnetospheric constellation missions). 1. INTRODUCTION software components of autonomous spacecraft and constellations, the next section describes a master

  11. Layered Connectors Revisiting the Formal Basis of Architectural Connection

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Layered Connectors Revisiting the Formal Basis of Architectural Connection for Complex Distributed using layered connectors. Layered connectors describe components interaction at both the application provide formal semantics of layered connectors and present an approach for the synthesis of layered

  12. Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

    2012-01-01

    The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

  13. migr: Metalevel Architecture and Migratory Work Paul Dourish and Andr van der Hoek

    E-print Network

    Dourish,Paul

    on the use of architectural meta-level representations to support rapid development and semi-automated run to each of those settings. Our hypothesis is that meta-level architectures provide a convenient and effective approach for addressing this question. One common problem of meta-level architectures, however

  14. PIN: a binary instrumentation tool for computer architecture research and education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vijay Janapa Reddi; Alex Settle; Daniel A. Connors; Robert S. Cohn

    2004-01-01

    Computer architecture embraces a tremendous number of ever-changing inter-connected concepts and information, yet computer architecture education is very often static, seemingly motionless. Computer architecture is commonly taught using simple piecewise methods of explaining how the hardware performs a given task, rather than characterizing the interaction of software and hardware. Visualization tools allow students to interactively explore basic concepts in computer

  15. Components in the Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan (Jenny); Yin, Jian

    2011-02-24

    Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

  16. Hydrotesting of fossil plant components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Foulds; S. Andrew; R. Viswanathan

    2004-01-01

    Hydrotesting (hydrostatic testing in the ASME Code, and pressure testing in the National Board Inspection Code or NBIC) is a common means of helping assure fitness for future service of pressure boundary components in power plants. In the US, pre-service hydrotesting requirements are generally specified by various sections of the ASME Code (I for boilers, III for nuclear plant components,

  17. COMPONENT User's Guide Consensus trees

    E-print Network

    Page, Roderic

    COMPONENT User's Guide Chapter 4 Consensus trees Consensus trees are a convenient way to summarise the agreement between two or more trees. This chapter describes the consensus methods available in COMPONENT subtree (Kubicka et al, 1992; also called the common pruned tree [Finden and Gordon, 1985]). This method

  18. Extensible Hardware Architecture for Mobile Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Eric; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Susan Y.

    2005-01-01

    The Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center has developed a new mobile robot hardware architecture designed for extensibility and reconfigurability. Currently implemented on the k9 rover. and won to be integrated onto the K10 series of human-robot collaboration research robots, this architecture allows for rapid changes in instrumentation configuration and provides a high degree of modularity through a synergistic mix of off-the-shelf and custom designed components, allowing eased transplantation into a wide vane6 of mobile robot platforms. A component level overview of this architecture is presented along with a description of the changes required for implementation on K10 , followed by plans for future work.

  19. Common Breastfeeding Challenges

    MedlinePLUS

    Home > Breastfeeding > Common breastfeeding challenges Breastfeeding This information in Spanish ( en espańol ) Common breastfeeding challenges Sore nipples Low milk supply Oversupply of milk Engorgement Plugged ducts Breast ...

  20. VLSI architectures for hierarchical block matching algorithms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Komarek; P. Pirsch

    1990-01-01

    An application-specific multiprocessor system is investigated for real-time implementation of the hierarchical block matching algorithm. The proposed architecture is based on parallel processing units and local memories which are globally preloaded via a common bus. The performance is estimated for the data transfer and the parallel computation time schedule

  1. A communications interface for systems application architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JACK P. SANDERS; MEL R. JONES; J. E. Fetvedt; MARSHA E. FERREE

    1989-01-01

    The requirements for program-to-program communication that prompted the creation of the communications interface for IBM's Systems Application Architecture (SAA), the considerations that went into the design of its function, and the basic concepts of the interface are discussed. An example of two programs using the Communications Interface is also included. The authors conclude that the evolving SAA Common Programming Interface

  2. Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic architecture refers to the numbers and genome locations of genes affecting a trait, the magnitude of their effects, and the relative contributions of additive, dominant, and epistatic gene effects. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping techniques are commonly used to investigate genetic ar...

  3. Architecture-Based Conformance Testing Elena Leroux, Flavio Oquendo, and Qin Xiong

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Architecture-Based Conformance Testing Elena Leroux, Flavio Oquendo, and Qin Xiong IRISA--In the last two decades, software architecture has played a central role in the development of software abstractions of the system's components and their interactions. In our work, the software architecture

  4. Smart City: An Event Driven Architecture for Monitoring Public Spaces with Heterogeneous Sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luca Filipponi; Andrea Vitaletti; Giada Landi; Vincenzo Memeo; Giorgio Laura; Paolo Pucci

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Smart City Architecture developed in the context of the ARTEMIS JU SP3 SOFIA project. It is an Event Driven Architecture that allows the management and cooperation of heterogeneous sensors for monitoring public spaces. The main components of the architecture are implemented in a testbed on a subway scenario with the objective to demonstrate that

  5. The Mermaid Architecture-workbench for Multicomputers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1996-01-01

    Cache hierarchyBusFigure 3: The template architecture models.defines a bus component. It is a simple forwarding mechanism, carrying out arbitrationupon multiple accesses. The parameters used to configure this component include buswidth,bus cycle-time and arbitration details. Changing the bus to a more complex structure,such as a multistage network, can be done without too much remodelling effort. Inthat case, only a new Pearl

  6. An Architecture for Next Generation Middleware

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Blair; G. Coulson; P. Robin; M. Papathomas

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to the design of configurable and open middleware platforms based on the concept of reflection. More specifically, the paper introduces a language-independent reflective architecture featuring a per- object meta-space, the use of meta-models to structure meta-space, and a consistent use of object graphs for composite components. This is complemented by a component framework supporting the

  7. PAS Domains COMMON STRUCTURE AND COMMON FLEXIBILITY*

    E-print Network

    van Aalten, Daan

    ligand binding/activation to downstream transducer proteins. PAS1 domains are structural modules that can sequences of the different PAS domains show little similarity, their three-dimensional structures appearPAS Domains COMMON STRUCTURE AND COMMON FLEXIBILITY* Received for publication, February 19, 2003

  8. Calculating Architectural Reliability via Modeling and Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roshanak Roshandel

    2004-01-01

    We present a software architecture-based approach tocompositional estimation of systemýs reliability. Ourapproach is applicable to early stages of developmentwhen the implementation artifacts are not yet available,and exact execution profile is unknown. The uncertainty ofthe execution profile is modeled using stochastic processeswith unknown parameters. The compositional approachcalculates overall reliability of the system as a function ofthe reliability of its constituent components

  9. Distributed dialogue management in a blackboard architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antti Kerminen; Kristiina Jokinen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a distributed dia- logue management scheme for speech- based information seeking dialogue. The dialogue management is distributed to several components, supported by a general blackboard-type architecture for speech systems. By breaking down the dialogue management, we can achieve more general solutions and support so- phisticated decision making algorithms.

  10. Designing modular architectures in the framework AKIRA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giovanni Pezzulo; Gianguglielmo Calvi

    2007-01-01

    AKIRA is an open source framework designed for parallel, asynchronous and distributed computation, on the basis of some general architectural principles which are inspired by modular organization in biological systems. We introduce the motivation behind its design, the components of the framework and some examples of use: 1) a case study in a simple number domain, in which its capabilities

  11. Formal Methods in Testing Software Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonia Bertolino; Henry Muccini

    2003-01-01

    SAs provide a high-level model of large, complex systems using suitable abstractions of the system components and their interac- tions. SA dynamic descriptions can be usefully employed in testing and analysis. We describe here an approach for SA-based conformance test- ing: architectural tests are selected from a Labelled Transition System (LTS) representing the SA behavior and are then refined into

  12. Pattern-based Software Architecture Recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kamran Sartipi; Kostas Kontogiannis

    This paper presents a technique for recovering the high level design of legacy software systems based on pattern matching and user defined architectural patterns. Architec- tural patterns are represented using a description language that is mapped to an attributed relational graph and al- lows to specify the legacy system components and their data and control flow interactions. Such pattern descriptions

  13. Intelligent system design and architectural patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James F. Peters; Sheela Ramanna

    2003-01-01

    This article introduces design and architectural patterns useful in intelligent systems engineering. Patterns are represented using class, collaboration, and sequence diagrams from the unified modeling language (UML) specialized relative to various components and subsystems of an intelligent system (IS). An IS pattern is seen an entity that is vaguely defined relative to structural and functional features of an intelligent system.

  14. Compatibility and inheritance in software architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Canal; Ernesto Pimentel; José M. Troya

    2001-01-01

    The application of formal methods to the development of software depends on the availability of adequate models and formalisms for each of the stages of the de- velopment process. In this work, we focus on the level of design called Software Architecture. At this level, the system is described as a collection of interrelated components, and it is here where

  15. The Dimensions of Common Factors in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibert, Todd W.

    2011-01-01

    Common factors is a concept that offers an explanation as to what makes counseling effective. Evidence from outcome studies has implications for training and practice. The particular purpose of this paper is to review the components of a popular model of common factors, the evidence supporting them, and subsequent implications for counselor…

  16. A Component Approach to Collaborative Scientific Software Development: Tools and Techniques Utilized by the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kenny, Joseph P.; Janssen, Curtis L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Sosonkina, Masha; Windus, Theresa L.

    2008-01-01

    Cutting-edge scientific computing software is complex, increasingly involving the coupling of multiple packages to combine advanced algorithms or simulations at multiple physical scales. Component-based software engineering (CBSE) has been advanced as a technique for managing this complexity, and complex component applications have been created in the quantum chemistry domain, as well as several other simulation areas, using the component model advocated by the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum. While programming models do indeed enable sound software engineering practices, the selection of programming model is just one building block in a comprehensive approach to large-scale collaborative development which must also addressmore »interface and data standardization, and language and package interoperability. We provide an overview of the development approach utilized within the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership, identifying design challenges, describing the techniques which we have adopted to address these challenges and highlighting the advantages which the CCA approach offers for collaborative development.« less

  17. Space application of airborne common modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, R. A.; Mosher, T. O.; Fleischman, D. L.; Bond, D. G.

    It is shown that, with some early planning, common electronics modules designed for combat aircraft can be used in space applications. It is shown that architectures, made up of common modules, can be constructed in a manner that will resolve reliability, safety, environmental and cost concerns. Growth path and capability are shown for near-term projects (heavy launch vehicle) through far-term (manned Mars mission) applications. Performance requirements, environmental specifications, validation methods, and testing philosophy for missions in space transportation are addressed.

  18. Transformation of painting into architecture : museum for the works of F. Lembersky

    E-print Network

    Lembersky, Yelena

    1994-01-01

    Art and architecture share a common goal and similar formal principles. Their common goal is to express and abstract spiritual content through harmonious, pure and beautiful material form. The shared principles of form ...

  19. Commonality analysis as a knowledge acquisition problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, Dorian P.

    1987-01-01

    Commonality analysis is a systematic attempt to reduce costs in a large scale engineering project by discontinuing development of certain components during the design phase. Each discontinued component is replaced by another component that has sufficient functionality to be considered an appropriate substitute. The replacement strategy is driven by economic considerations. The System Commonality Analysis Tool (SCAT) is based on an oversimplified model of the problem and incorporates no knowledge acquisition component. In fact, the process of arriving at a compromise between functionality and economy is quite complex, with many opportunities for the application of expert knowledge. Such knowledge is of two types: general knowledge expressible as heuristics or mathematical laws potentially applicable to any set of components, and specific knowledge about the way in which elements of a given set of components interrelate. Examples of both types of knowledge are presented, and a framework is proposed for integrating the knowledge into a more general and useable tool.

  20. Importance of balanced architectures in the design of high-performance imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgro, Joseph A.; Stanton, Paul C.

    1999-03-01

    Imaging systems employed in demanding military and industrial applications, such as automatic target recognition and computer vision, typically require real-time high-performance computing resources. While high- performances computing systems have traditionally relied on proprietary architectures and custom components, recent advances in high performance general-purpose microprocessor technology have produced an abundance of low cost components suitable for use in high-performance computing systems. A common pitfall in the design of high performance imaging system, particularly systems employing scalable multiprocessor architectures, is the failure to balance computational and memory bandwidth. The performance of standard cluster designs, for example, in which several processors share a common memory bus, is typically constrained by memory bandwidth. The symptom characteristic of this problem is failure to the performance of the system to scale as more processors are added. The problem becomes exacerbated if I/O and memory functions share the same bus. The recent introduction of microprocessors with large internal caches and high performance external memory interfaces makes it practical to design high performance imaging system with balanced computational and memory bandwidth. Real word examples of such designs will be presented, along with a discussion of adapting algorithm design to best utilize available memory bandwidth.

  1. Simulation of a word recognition system on two parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, M.A.; Jamieson, L.H. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1989-09-01

    When designing a parallel architecture it is advantageous to consider the applications for which the architecture will be used. This paper examines the use of two parallel architectures, a single instruction stream multiple data stream (SIMD) machine and a VLSI processor array, to implement an isolated word recognition system. SIMD and VLSI processor array algorithms were written for each of the components of the recognition system. The component parallel algorithms were simulated along with two complete recognition systems, one composed of SIMD algorithms and the other composed of VLSI processor array algorithms.

  2. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  3. An evolutionarily structured universe of protein architecture.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Caetano-Anollés, Derek

    2003-07-01

    Protein structural diversity encompasses a finite set of architectural designs. Embedded in these topologies are evolutionary histories that we here uncover using cladistic principles and measurements of protein-fold usage and sharing. The reconstructed phylogenies are inherently rooted and depict histories of protein and proteome diversification. Proteome phylogenies showed two monophyletic sister-groups delimiting Bacteria and Archaea, and a topology rooted in Eucarya. This suggests three dramatic evolutionary events and a common ancestor with a eukaryotic-like, gene-rich, and relatively modern organization. Conversely, a general phylogeny of protein architectures showed that structural classes of globular proteins appeared early in evolution and in defined order, the alpha/beta class being the first. Although most ancestral folds shared a common architecture of barrels or interleaved beta-sheets and alpha-helices, many were clearly derived, such as polyhedral folds in the all-alpha class and beta-sandwiches, beta-propellers, and beta-prisms in all-beta proteins. We also describe transformation pathways of architectures that are prevalently used in nature. For example, beta-barrels with increased curl and stagger were favored evolutionary outcomes in the all-beta class. Interestingly, we found cases where structural change followed the alpha-to-beta tendency uncovered in the tree of architectures. Lastly, we traced the total number of enzymatic functions associated with folds in the trees and show that there is a general link between structure and enzymatic function. PMID:12840035

  4. Architecture of interiority (architecture of traces)

    E-print Network

    Michel, Nicole Yael, 1977-

    2002-01-01

    In a growing globalized world where ideas of connections, transparency and exposure are becoming commonplace, the need will arise to devise an architecture that addresses issues of identity and belonging by creating places ...

  5. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  6. Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Koji; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Foucher, Fabrice; Thouroude, Tatiana; Loustau, Sébastien

    2014-02-01

    The Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping of plant architecture is a critical step for understanding the genetic determinism of plant architecture. Previous studies adopted simple measurements, such as plant-height, stem-diameter and branching-intensity for QTL mapping of plant architecture. Many of these quantitative traits were generally correlated to each other, which give rise to statistical problem in the detection of QTL. We aim to test the applicability of kernel methods to phenotyping inflorescence architecture and its QTL mapping. We first test Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) over an artificial dataset of simulated inflorescences with different types of flower distribution, which is coded as a sequence of flower-number per node along a shoot. The ability of discriminating the different inflorescence types by SVM and KPCA is illustrated. We then apply the KPCA representation to the real dataset of rose inflorescence shoots (n=1460) obtained from a 98 F1 hybrid mapping population. We find kernel principal components with high heritability (>0.7), and the QTL analysis identifies a new QTL, which was not detected by a trait-by-trait analysis of simple architectural measurements. The main tools developed in this paper could be use to tackle the general problem of QTL mapping of complex (sequences, 3D structure, graphs) phenotypic traits. PMID:24211258

  7. Common Career Technical Core: Common Standards, Common Vision for CTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium's (NASDCTEc) Common Career Technical Core (CCTC), a state-led initiative that was created to ensure that career and technical education (CTE) programs are consistent and high quality across the United States. Forty-two states,…

  8. Gaia Data Processing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mullane, W.; Lammers, U.; Bailer-Jones, C.; Bastian, U.; Brown, A. G. A.; Drimmel, R.; Eyer, L.; Huc, C.; Katz, D.; Lindegren, L.; Pourbaix, D.; Luri, X.; Torra, J.; Mignard, F.; van Leeuwen, F.

    2007-10-01

    Gaia is the European Space Agency's (ESA's) ambitious space astrometry mission with a main objective to map astrometrically and spectro-photometrically not less than 1000 million celestial objects in our galaxy with unprecedented accuracy. The announcement of opportunity (AO) for the data processing will be issued by ESA late in 2006. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) has been formed recently and is preparing an answer to this AO. The satellite will downlink around 100 TB of raw telemetry data over a mission duration of 5--6 years. To achieve its required astrometric accuracy of a few tens of microarcseconds, a highly involved processing of this data is required. In addition to the main astrometric instrument Gaia will host a radial-velocity spectrometer and two low-resolution dispersers for multi-color photometry. All instrument modules share a common focal plane consisting of a CCD mosaic about 1 m^2 in size and featuring close to 10^9 pixels. Each of the various instruments requires relatively complex processing while at the same time being interdependent. We describe the composition and structure of the DPAC and the envisaged overall architecture of the system. We shall delve further into the core processing---one of the nine so-called coordination units comprising the Gaia processing system.

  9. Architecture Rationalization: A Methodology for Architecture Verifiability, Traceability and Completeness

    E-print Network

    Han, Jun

    Architecture Rationalization: A Methodology for Architecture Verifiability, Traceability-mail: {atang, jhan}@it.swin.edu.au Abstract Architecture modeling is practiced extensively in the software of architecture designs. Deficiencies in any of these three areas in an architecture model can be costly and risky

  10. POP Frameworks: Amortizing the Cost of Using Applications as Components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Coppit; Kevin J. Sullivan

    Package-oriented programming (POP) is a promising approach to component-based software design. POP treats suites of mass - market application packages as component libraries. Their stan- dardized architectures, programmability, interoperability, rich orthogonal functions, and low cost make them attractive candi- dates as components. However, they also have characteristics that make it hard and risky to find workable designs. Each de- signer

  11. Simple components for a reconfigurable modular robotic system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew S. Moses; Gregory S. Chirikjian

    2009-01-01

    A set of modular components is presented for use in reconfigurable robots. The proposed architecture for large systems built with these components is a number of active mobile devices operating within a larger, passive structural grid. The mobile devices and grid are constructed from the same class of heterogeneous modular components. The compo- nents themselves are designed for low-cost simple

  12. An Efficient Component Model for the Construction of Adaptive Middleware

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Clarke; Gordon S. Blair; Geoff Coulson; Nikos Parlavantzas

    2001-01-01

    Middleware has emerged as an important architectural component in modern distributed systems. Most recently, i ndustry has witnessed the emergence of component-based middleware platforms, such as Enterprise JavaBeans and the CORBA Component Model, aimed at supporting third party development, configuration and subsequent deployment of software. The goal of our research is to extend this work in order to exploit the

  13. Software Connectors and their Role in Component Deployment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dusan Bálek; Frantisek Plasil

    2001-01-01

    To support rapid software evolution, it is desirable to construct software systems from reusable components. In this approach,\\u000a the architecture of a system is described as a collection of components along with the interactions among these components.\\u000a Whereas the main system functional blocks are components, the properties of the system also strongly depend on the character\\u000a of the component interactions.

  14. Model-Drive Architecture for Agent-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradanin, Denis; Singh, H. Lally; Bohner, Shawn A.; Hinchey, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    The Model Driven Architecture (MDA) approach uses a platform-independent model to define system functionality, or requirements, using some specification language. The requirements are then translated to a platform-specific model for implementation. An agent architecture based on the human cognitive model of planning, the Cognitive Agent Architecture (Cougaar) is selected for the implementation platform. The resulting Cougaar MDA prescribes certain kinds of models to be used, how those models may be prepared and the relationships of the different kinds of models. Using the existing Cougaar architecture, the level of application composition is elevated from individual components to domain level model specifications in order to generate software artifacts. The software artifacts generation is based on a metamodel. Each component maps to a UML structured component which is then converted into multiple artifacts: Cougaar/Java code, documentation, and test cases.

  15. Feedback loops and temporal misalignment in component-based hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, Mostafa M.; Goodall, Jonathan L.; Castronova, Anthony M.

    2011-12-01

    In component-based modeling, a complex system is represented as a series of loosely integrated components with defined interfaces and data exchanges that allow the components to be coupled together through shared boundary conditions. Although the component-based paradigm is commonly used in software engineering, it has only recently been applied for modeling hydrologic and earth systems. As a result, research is needed to test and verify the applicability of the approach for modeling hydrologic systems. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate two aspects of using component-based software architecture for hydrologic modeling: (1) simulation of feedback loops between components that share a boundary condition and (2) data transfers between temporally misaligned model components. We investigated these topics using a simple case study where diffusion of mass is modeled across a water-sediment interface. We simulated the multimedia system using two model components, one for the water and one for the sediment, coupled using the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) standard. The results were compared with a more conventional numerical approach for solving the system where the domain is represented by a single multidimensional array. Results showed that the component-based approach was able to produce the same results obtained with the more conventional numerical approach. When the two components were temporally misaligned, we explored the use of different interpolation schemes to minimize mass balance error within the coupled system. The outcome of this work provides evidence that component-based modeling can be used to simulate complicated feedback loops between systems and guidance as to how different interpolation schemes minimize mass balance error introduced when components are temporally misaligned.

  16. SPIM Architecture for MVC based Web Applications

    E-print Network

    Sridaran, R; Iyakutti, K; Mani, M N S

    2010-01-01

    The Model / View / Controller design pattern divides an application environment into three components to handle the user-interactions, computations and output respectively. This separation greatly favors architectural reusability. The pattern works well in the case of single-address space and not proven to be efficient for web applications involving multiple address spaces. Web applications force the designers to decide which of the components of the pattern are to be partitioned between the server and client(s) before the design phase commences. For any rapidly growing web application, it is very difficult to incorporate future changes in policies related to partitioning. One solution to this problem is to duplicate the Model and controller components at both server and client(s). However, this may add further problems like delayed data fetch, security and scalability issues. In order to overcome this, a new architecture SPIM has been proposed that deals with the partitioning problem in an alternative way. S...

  17. Implementation of a PC-based Robot Controller with Open Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pan Liandong; Huang Xinhan

    2004-01-01

    The demand for increased capability and flexibility has led to a dramatic increase in the use of controllers based on open architecture. Knowledge from past research on open architecture system indicates that a component-based philosophy should be the solution. In this paper, a PC-based open architecture robot control system is presented and the technologies related to component-ware are investigated. By

  18. LOTTERYBUS: a new high-performance communication architecture for system-on-chip designs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanishka Lahiri; Anand Raghunathan; Ganesh Lakshminarayana

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents Lotterybus, a novel high-performance communication architecture for system-on-chip (SoC) designs. The Lotterybus architecture was designed to address the following limitations of current communication architectures: (i) lack of control over the allocation of communication bandwidth to different system components or data flows (e.g., in static priority based shared buses), leading to starvation of lower priority components in some

  19. Component separations.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options. PMID:23372455

  20. IN MUSIC AND ARCHITECTURE

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    IN MUSIC AND ARCHITECTURE 14 APRIL 2014 ALEX PORTER C O L U M B I A U N I V E R S I T Y, C O L U M B I A C O L L E G E DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE OF MATOLOGY #12;With much thanks, then the first diagram in architecture would be a dialogue between "positive" or "built" things, and the spaces

  1. Mathematics and Architecture Design

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Morgan, Winnifred

    A unit about architecture and its unique relation to mathematics, incorporating the study of such mathematical concepts as ratio, proportion, scales, symmetry, and similarity, and providing definitions and explanations of the mathematical concepts of elementary geometry, stating their connection to architecture. Activities include lesson plans on ratio and proportion as they relate to architectural designing, model building, the need for mathematical accuracy in measuring, and the analysis of buildings from drawings.

  2. ArchiTecTUre UNDERGRADUATE

    E-print Network

    University of Technology, Sydney

    UTS: DeSign ArchiTecTUre & BUilDing UNDERGRADUATE COURSES GUIDE 2014 dab.uts.edu.au ThINk.ChANGE.DO #12;2 WElCOmETOUTS: DESIGN, ARChITECTURE & bUIlDING CONTENTS Why Design, Architecture & building 14 bachelor of Design in Visual Communication 16 ARChITECTURE 18 bachelor of Design in Architecture

  3. Evolution of a common controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, D.; Barbour, D.; Gilbreath, G.

    2012-06-01

    Precedent has shown common controllers must strike a balance between the desire for an integrated user interface design by human factors engineers and support of project-specific data requirements. A common user-interface requires the project-specific data to conform to an internal representation, but project-specific customization is impeded by the implicit rules introduced by the internal data representation. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) developed the latest version of the Multi-robot Operator Control Unit (MOCU) to address interoperability, standardization, and customization issues by using a modular, extensible, and flexible architecture built upon a sharedworld model. MOCU version 3 provides an open and extensible operator-control interface that allows additional functionality to be seamlessly added with software modules while providing the means to fully integrate the information into a layered game-like user interface. MOCU's design allows it to completely decouple the human interface from the core management modules, while still enabling modules to render overlapping regions of the screen without interference or a priori knowledge of other display elements, thus allowing more flexibility in project-specific customization.

  4. Architectural disruption in aerospace

    E-print Network

    Ashworth, Geoffrey (Geoffrey John)

    2009-01-01

    Distinctive technology and customer / supplier relationships are currently the primary sources of competitive advantage in the Aerospace industry. Modular Open System Architecture (MOSA) requirements represent a significant ...

  5. Science Center Cambridge Common

    E-print Network

    Johnston Gate Science Center Fire HQ Cambridge LAW SCHOOL Cambridge Common HARVARD YARD HA HAMMOND STREETLibrary Center Holyoke Science Center Widener Fire HQ Cambridge LAW SCHOOL Cambridge Common HARVARD BROADW AY PRESCOTTS QUINCYSTREET EVERETT STREET STREET MASSACHUSETTSAVENUE CAMBRIDGE MASSACHUSETTSAVENUE

  6. Manufacturing and applications of structural sandwich components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kicki F. Karlsson; B. Tomas Ĺström

    1997-01-01

    Techniques to manufacture sandwich components for structural applications are summarized and discussed in terms of processing steps, characteristics of both technique and manufactured components, and application examples. The emphasis is on the commercially most common manufacturing techniques, though less common processing routes are briefly discussed as well. The intentions of this review are twofold: first, the paper aims to provide

  7. Components Interoperability through Mediating Connector Patterns

    E-print Network

    Spalazzese, Romina; 10.4204/EPTCS.37.3

    2010-01-01

    A key objective for ubiquitous environments is to enable system interoperability between system's components that are highly heterogeneous. In particular, the challenge is to embed in the system architecture the necessary support to cope with behavioral diversity in order to allow components to coordinate and communicate. The continuously evolving environment further asks for an automated and on-the-fly approach. In this paper we present the design building blocks for the dynamic and on-the-fly interoperability between heterogeneous components. Specifically, we describe an Architectural Pattern called Mediating Connector, that is the key enabler for communication. In addition, we present a set of Basic Mediator Patterns, that describe the basic mismatches which can occur when components try to interact, and their corresponding solutions.

  8. Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

    E-print Network

    Eustice, Ryan

    Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Undergraduate Program The University of Michigan #12;2 The Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Educational Objectives The Educational Objectives knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering within naval architecture and marine engineering

  9. College of Design ARC Architecture

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Design ARC Architecture KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped,landscape,andarchitecturalspaceswithattentiontotheirapplicationtothearchitecturalexperience.Studio:4hoursperweek. Prereq: Admission to the School of Architecture. ARC 102 DRAWING II: OBSERVATIONAL OF ARCHITECTURE. (3

  10. System Architectural Considerations on Reliable Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN and C) for Constellation Program (CxP) Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2010-01-01

    This final report summarizes the results of a comparative assessment of the fault tolerance and reliability of different Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) architectural approaches. This study was proactively performed by a combined Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Draper Laboratory team as a GN&C "Discipline-Advancing" activity sponsored by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). This systematic comparative assessment of GN&C system architectural approaches was undertaken as a fundamental step towards understanding the opportunities for, and limitations of, architecting highly reliable and fault tolerant GN&C systems composed of common avionic components. The primary goal of this study was to obtain architectural 'rules of thumb' that could positively influence future designs in the direction of an optimized (i.e., most reliable and cost-efficient) GN&C system. A secondary goal was to demonstrate the application and the utility of a systematic modeling approach that maps the entire possible architecture solution space.

  11. How Common Is the Common Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Amande; Edson, Alden J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) in 2010, stakeholders in adopting states have engaged in a variety of activities to understand CCSSM standards and transition from previous state standards. These efforts include research, professional development, assessment and modification of curriculum resources,…

  12. Architecture for distributed design and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlrath, Michael B.; Boning, Duane S.; Troxel, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a flexible, distributed system architecture capable of supporting collaborative design and fabrication of semi-conductor devices and integrated circuits. Such capabilities are of particular importance in the development of new technologies, where both equipment and expertise are limited. Distributed fabrication enables direct, remote, physical experimentation in the development of leading edge technology, where the necessary manufacturing resources are new, expensive, and scarce. Computational resources, software, processing equipment, and people may all be widely distributed; their effective integration is essential in order to achieve the realization of new technologies for specific product requirements. Our architecture leverages is essential in order to achieve the realization of new technologies for specific product requirements. Our architecture leverages current vendor and consortia developments to define software interfaces and infrastructure based on existing and merging networking, CIM, and CAD standards. Process engineers and product designers access processing and simulation results through a common interface and collaborate across the distributed manufacturing environment.

  13. Component Verification and Certification in NASA Missions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitra Giannakopoulou; John Penix

    Software development for NASA missions is a particularly challenging task. Missions are extremely ambitious scientifically, have very strict time frames, and must be accomplished with a maximum degree of reliability. Verification technologies must therefore be pushed far beyond their current capabilities. Moreover, reuse and adaptation of software architectures and components must be incorporated in software development within and across missions.

  14. Communication of IT-Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Koning

    2008-01-01

    This PhD thesis contains the results of various research activities that fall under the topic ‘communication of IT-architecture’. The term IT-architecture defines the various types of architecture that can be found in the domain of Information Technology (software architecture, enterprise architecture, etc). Our overall conclusion is that good communication of IT-architecture is a matter of “meaningful structuring”. This has been

  15. ARCHITECTURE AND PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR IMAGERY AND VIRTUAL Advanced architectures and algorithms for embedded vision systems

    E-print Network

    Baudoin, Genevičve

    , graph transformation etc) that allows to overcome the algorithm disparity problem. Thus we can to bridge-Component-Tree construction algorithms based on line-independent building and progressive merging of partial 1-D trees. TwoNUMA architecture. With N. Ngan et F. Contou-Carrčre, we propose the first efficient hardware accelerator for CCT

  16. The Technology of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how career and technical education is helping students draw up plans for success in architectural technology. According to the College of DuPage (COD) in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, one of the two-year schools offering training in architectural technology, graduates have a number of opportunities available to them. They may work…

  17. Information Architecture Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Information Architecture Library is a selection of resources (articles, books, blogs, and other genres) related to the field of information architecture. The library is browseable by subject, resource type, author, and language. The website also features a list of selected introductory resources for those new to the field and a list of the ten most recently added resources.

  18. Graduate Program Review Architecture

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    Graduate Program Review 2001-2006 College of Architecture Michael Peters, Associate Dean of Academics Andrew Vernooy, Dean November 2008 #12;PROGRAM REVIEW OUTLINE Architecture I. Program Overview Data (Peer info table) - Program Degrees Awarded (table) C. Undergraduate and Graduate semester credit

  19. EPFL / ENAC / SAR Architecture

    E-print Network

    Picasso, Marco

    #12;EPFL / ENAC / SAR Architecture infos ateliers 2013­2014 #12;#12;Sommaire Direction 6 Section d'architecture (SAR) roberto.gargiani@epfl.ch 021 693 32 15 BP 4142 Laure Palluel Kochnitzky Adjointe à la direction SAR laure.palluel@epfl.ch 021 693 73 06 BP 2232 Corinne Chaumont Ganty Secrétariat

  20. Dissertation Network Architectures

    E-print Network

    Carle, Georg

    Dissertation Network Architectures and Services NET 2011-06-1 Strategic Resource Management-937201-21-1 ISSN 1868-2634 (print) ISSN 1868-2642 (electronic) Network Architectures and Services NET-2011 in computer networks. Resource Management during Denial-of-Service Attacks During a denial-of-service (Do

  1. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  2. Architecture, design, implementation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amnon H. Eden; Rick Kazman

    2003-01-01

    The terms architecture, design, and implementation are typically used informally in partitioning software specifications into three coarse strata of abstraction. Yet these strata are not well-defined in either research or practice, causing miscommunication and needless debate.To remedy this problem we formalize the Intension and the Locality criteria, which imply that the distinction between architecture, design, and implementation is qualitative and

  3. Emerging supercomputer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper will examine the current and near future trends for commercially available high-performance computers with architectures that differ from the mainstream ''supercomputer'' systems in use for the last few years. These emerging supercomputer architectures are just beginning to have an impact on the field of high performance computing. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Information Architecture: Looking Ahead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis

    2002-01-01

    Considers the future of the field of information architecture. Highlights include a comparison with the growth of the field of professional management; the design of information systems since the Web; more demanding users; the need for an interdisciplinary approach; and how to define information architecture. (LRW)

  5. Architectural Physics: Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, R. G.

    The author coordinates the many diverse branches of knowledge which have dealt with the field of lighting--physiology, psychology, engineering, physics, and architectural design. Part I, "The Elements of Architectural Physics", discusses the physiological aspects of lighting, visual performance, lighting design, calculations and measurements of…

  6. An Architecture for Autonomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachid Alami; Raja Chatilla; Sara Fleury; Malik Ghallab; F'elix Ingrand

    1998-01-01

    An autonomous robot offers a challenging and ideal field for the study of intelligentarchitectures. Autonomy within a rational behavior could be evaluated by therobot's effectiveness and robustness in carrying out tasks in different and ill-knownenvironments. It raises major requirements on the control architecture. Furthermore,a robot as a programmable machine brings up other architectural needs, such as theease and quality of

  7. Color in architecture 

    E-print Network

    Vrooman, Richard

    1952-01-01

    Good design can be spoiled by poor color. Weak design can be helped by good color. Color is therefore of prime importance as an integral element of architectural design. Color is vitally related to man in many fields. The study of architecture...

  8. Enriching software architecture documentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anton Jansen; Jan Salvador Van Der Ven

    2009-01-01

    The eective documentation of Architectural Knowledge (AK) is one of the key factors in leveraging the paradigm shift toward sharing and reusing AK. However, current documentation approaches have severe shortcomings in capturing the knowl- edge of large and complex systems and subsequently facilitating its usage. In this paper, we propose to tackle this problem through the enrichment of traditional architectural

  9. Architectural design for resilience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong Liu; Ralph Deters; W. J. Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Resilience has become a new nonfunctional requirement for information systems. Many design decisions have to be made at the architectural level in order to deliver an information system with the resilience property. This paper discusses the relationships between resilience and other architectural properties such as scalability, reliability, and consistency. A corollary is derived from the CAP theorem, and states that

  10. Corporate architectures for sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Griffiths; Joseph A. Petrick

    2001-01-01

    While there exists a growing literature on corporate “green” strategies, there is a research gap about which corporate architectures and organizational change processes enable “green” strategies. This article addresses the research gap in an interdisciplinary manner by focusing on two questions: What conditions characterize ecological and humanly sustainable corporations? What alternative architectures can generate and institutionalize corporate sustainability? Three alternative

  11. VLSI architecture for fast 2D discrete orthonormal wavelet transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry Y. H. Chuang; Ling Chen

    1995-01-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) provides a new method for signal\\/image analysis where high frequency components are studied with finer time resolution and low frequency components with coarser time resolution. It decomposes a signal or an image into localized contributions for multiscale analysis. In this paper, we present a parallel pipelined VLSI array architecture for 2D dyadic separable DWT. The

  12. Networks of Neuronal Genes Affected by Common and Rare Variants in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ben-David, Eyal; Shifman, Sagiv

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders with phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Recent studies have reported rare and de novo mutations in ASD, but the allelic architecture of ASD remains unclear. To assess the role of common and rare variations in ASD, we constructed a gene co-expression network based on a widespread survey of gene expression in the human brain. We identified modules associated with specific cell types and processes. By integrating known rare mutations and the results of an ASD genome-wide association study (GWAS), we identified two neuronal modules that are perturbed by both rare and common variations. These modules contain highly connected genes that are involved in synaptic and neuronal plasticity and that are expressed in areas associated with learning and memory and sensory perception. The enrichment of common risk variants was replicated in two additional samples which include both simplex and multiplex families. An analysis of the combined contribution of common variants in the neuronal modules revealed a polygenic component to the risk of ASD. The results of this study point toward contribution of minor and major perturbations in the two sub-networks of neuronal genes to ASD risk. PMID:22412387

  13. Master of Science in Architecture

    E-print Network

    Design Studio, Town Planning Design, Architectural Restoration Studio. Second year: Architectural Design Helg, Ernesto Nathan Rogers, Aldo Rossi, etc. Beside curricular activities, the School provides

  14. Can architecture be barbaric?

    PubMed

    Hürol, Yonca

    2009-06-01

    The title of this article is adapted from Theodor W. Adorno's famous dictum: 'To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.' After the catastrophic earthquake in Kocaeli, Turkey on the 17th of August 1999, in which more than 40,000 people died or were lost, Necdet Teymur, who was then the dean of the Faculty of Architecture of the Middle East Technical University, referred to Adorno in one of his 'earthquake poems' and asked: 'Is architecture possible after 17th of August?' The main objective of this article is to interpret Teymur's question in respect of its connection to Adorno's philosophy with a view to make a contribution to the politics and ethics of architecture in Turkey. Teymur's question helps in providing a new interpretation of a critical approach to architecture and architectural technology through Adorno's philosophy. The paper also presents a discussion of Adorno's dictum, which serves for a better understanding of its universality/particularity. PMID:19107386

  15. Irish Architecture Foundation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Irish Architecture Foundation's website is very inviting with its stylish grey and green-schemed color scheme. The Foundation has multiple goals: encouraging people to value architecture and "champion[ing] the power of architecture and urban design," just to name a few. Visitors will find this website filled with opportunities to learn about, discuss, and debate the role of architecture, at lectures, workshops and events. The "Education" link under the Activity heading at the top of the page contains lesson plans for teachers, lecture series' for adults, programs for children, and details on their Summer School. The "Exhibition" link, also under the Activity heading, has a number of announcements for design competitions, such as one for a public civic space for Dublin. There are also calls for papers, which include one on the politics of architectural destruction and the nature of sculpture is in the 21st century.

  16. Standardizing the information architecture for spacecraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an information architecture developed for the Space Station Freedom as a model from which to derive an information architecture standard for advanced spacecraft. The information architecture provides a way of making information available across a program, and among programs, assuming that the information will be in a variety of local formats, structures and representations. It provides a format that can be expanded to define all of the physical and logical elements that make up a program, add definitions as required, and import definitions from prior programs to a new program. It allows a spacecraft and its control center to work in different representations and formats, with the potential for supporting existing spacecraft from new control centers. It supports a common view of data and control of all spacecraft, regardless of their own internal view of their data and control characteristics, and of their communications standards, protocols and formats. This information architecture is central to standardizing spacecraft operations, in that it provides a basis for information transfer and translation, such that diverse spacecraft can be monitored and controlled in a common way.

  17. Partially Decentralized Control Architectures for Satellite Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, Frank H.

    2002-01-01

    In a partially decentralized control architecture, more than one but less than all nodes have supervisory capability. This paper describes an approach to choosing the number of supervisors in such au architecture, based on a reliability vs. cost trade. It also considers the implications of these results for the design of navigation systems for satellite formations that could be controlled with a partially decentralized architecture. Using an assumed cost model, analytic and simulation-based results indicate that it may be cheaper to achieve a given overall system reliability with a partially decentralized architecture containing only a few supervisors, than with either fully decentralized or purely centralized architectures. Nominally, the subset of supervisors may act as centralized estimation and control nodes for corresponding subsets of the remaining subordinate nodes, and act as decentralized estimation and control peers with respect to each other. However, in the context of partially decentralized satellite formation control, the absolute positions and velocities of each spacecraft are unique, so that correlations which make estimates using only local information suboptimal only occur through common biases and process noise. Covariance and monte-carlo analysis of a simplified system show that this lack of correlation may allow simplification of the local estimators while preserving the global optimality of the maneuvers commanded by the supervisors.

  18. Failure Prediction of Banks using threshold Accepting Trained Kernel Principal Component Neural Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pediredla Ravisankar; V. Ravi

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new neural network architecture kernel principal component neural network (KPCNN) trained by threshold accepting based training algorithm with different kernels like polynomial, sigmoid and Gaussian and its application to bankruptcy prediction in banks. KPCNN is a non linear version of the PCNN proposed elsewhere. In this architecture, dimensionality reduction is taken care of kernel principal component

  19. Towards Automatic Construction of Reusable Prediction Models for Component-Based Performance Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Kappler; Heiko Koziolek; Klaus Krogmann; Ralf H. Reussner

    2008-01-01

    Performance predictions for software architectures can reveal performance bottlenecks and quantitatively support design decisions for different architectural al- ternatives. As software architects aim at reusing existing software components, their performance properties should be included into performance predictions without the need for manual modelling. However, most prediction approaches do not include au- tomated support for modelling implemented components. Therefore, we propose

  20. Comparative Analysis of Wolbachia Genomes Reveals Streamlining and Divergence of Minimalist Two-Component Systems

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Steen; Serbus, Laura Renee

    2015-01-01

    Two-component regulatory systems are commonly used by bacteria to coordinate intracellular responses with environmental cues. These systems are composed of functional protein pairs consisting of a sensor histidine kinase and cognate response regulator. In contrast to the well-studied Caulobacter crescentus system, which carries dozens of these pairs, the streamlined bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis encodes only two pairs: CckA/CtrA and PleC/PleD. Here, we used bioinformatic tools to compare characterized two-component system relays from C. crescentus, the related Anaplasmataceae species Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and 12 sequenced Wolbachia strains. We found the core protein pairs and a subset of interacting partners to be highly conserved within Wolbachia and these other Anaplasmataceae. Genes involved in two-component signaling were positioned differently within the various Wolbachia genomes, whereas the local context of each gene was conserved. Unlike Anaplasma and Ehrlichia, Wolbachia two-component genes were more consistently found clustered with metabolic genes. The domain architecture and key functional residues standard for two-component system proteins were well-conserved in Wolbachia, although residues that specify cognate pairing diverged substantially from other Anaplasmataceae. These findings indicate that Wolbachia two-component signaling pairs share considerable functional overlap with other ?-proteobacterial systems, whereas their divergence suggests the potential for regulatory differences and cross-talk. PMID:25809075

  1. Comparative analysis of wolbachia genomes reveals streamlining and divergence of minimalist two-component systems.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Steen; Serbus, Laura Renee

    2015-01-01

    Two-component regulatory systems are commonly used by bacteria to coordinate intracellular responses with environmental cues. These systems are composed of functional protein pairs consisting of a sensor histidine kinase and cognate response regulator. In contrast to the well-studied Caulobacter crescentus system, which carries dozens of these pairs, the streamlined bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis encodes only two pairs: CckA/CtrA and PleC/PleD. Here, we used bioinformatic tools to compare characterized two-component system relays from C. crescentus, the related Anaplasmataceae species Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and 12 sequenced Wolbachia strains. We found the core protein pairs and a subset of interacting partners to be highly conserved within Wolbachia and these other Anaplasmataceae. Genes involved in two-component signaling were positioned differently within the various Wolbachia genomes, whereas the local context of each gene was conserved. Unlike Anaplasma and Ehrlichia, Wolbachia two-component genes were more consistently found clustered with metabolic genes. The domain architecture and key functional residues standard for two-component system proteins were well-conserved in Wolbachia, although residues that specify cognate pairing diverged substantially from other Anaplasmataceae. These findings indicate that Wolbachia two-component signaling pairs share considerable functional overlap with other ?-proteobacterial systems, whereas their divergence suggests the potential for regulatory differences and cross-talk. PMID:25809075

  2. Memory, reasoning, and categorization: parallels and common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan; Rotello, Caren M

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, memory, reasoning, and categorization have been treated as separate components of human cognition. We challenge this distinction, arguing that there is broad scope for crossover between the methods and theories developed for each task. The links between memory and reasoning are illustrated in a review of two lines of research. The first takes theoretical ideas (two-process accounts) and methodological tools (signal detection analysis, receiver operating characteristic curves) from memory research and applies them to important issues in reasoning research: relations between induction and deduction, and the belief bias effect. The second line of research introduces a task in which subjects make either memory or reasoning judgments for the same set of stimuli. Other than broader generalization for reasoning than memory, the results were similar for the two tasks, across a variety of experimental stimuli and manipulations. It was possible to simultaneously explain performance on both tasks within a single cognitive architecture, based on exemplar-based comparisons of similarity. The final sections explore evidence for empirical and processing links between inductive reasoning and categorization and between categorization and recognition. An important implication is that progress in all three of these fields will be expedited by further investigation of the many commonalities between these tasks. PMID:24987380

  3. Situational Architecture Engineering (SAE) - Improving Strategic Change Through Architecture Methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne Leist; Gregor Zellner

    2008-01-01

    Market and environmental requirements call for constant changes in enterprises. To be able to record these changes in a structured way and to manage them it is helpful to use enterprise architectures as stable regulation frameworks. To support the development and the adaptation of the enterprise architectures there are numerous architecture methods (e.g. Zachman Framework, ARIS (Architecture of Integrated Information

  4. Software Resource Architecture and Performance Evaluation of Software Architectures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Murray Woodside

    2001-01-01

    Performance is determined by a system's resources and its workload. Some of these resources are software resources which are embedded in the software architecture; some of them are even created by the software architecture. This paper considers software resources and resource architec- ture, as an aspect of software architecture, It considers how resource architecture emerges, the relationship of software and

  5. UNLV School of Architecture BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ARCHITECTURE

    E-print Network

    Hemmers, Oliver

    UNLV School of Architecture BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ARCHITECTURE 4505 south maryland parkway, las vegas, nevada 89145-4018 telephone: 702 895 3031 fax: 702 895 1119 http://architecture.unlv.edu #12;UNLV School of Architecture "Anarchitecturaleducationhelpsusthink about place, how place is made, and how

  6. Federated querying architecture for clinical & translational health IT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oren E. Livne; N. Dustin Schultz; Scott P. Narus

    2010-01-01

    We present software architecture to federate data from multiple heterogeneous health informatics data sources owned by multiple organizations. The architecture builds upon state-of-the-art open-source Java and XML frameworks in innovative ways. It consists of (a) federated query engine, which manages federated queries and result set aggregation; and (b) data source facades, which translate the physical data models into a common

  7. Using the ODP reference model for Enterprise Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lea Kutvonen

    2007-01-01

    The Open Distributed Processing Reference Model (ODP-RM) provides viewpoints and abstract infrastructure guidelines that can be used for a basis for enterprise architecture, especially for an inter-enterprise architecture. The ODP-RM does not prescribe methodology for modeling itself, but provides common vocabulary and focus for description. This paper performs a brief analysis of the ODP-RM (and Pilarcos extensions to it) in

  8. Optical tolerances of active telescope architectures for adaptive optics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Marchis; S. Cuevas

    1999-01-01

    We have studied four multi-pupil telescope architectures giving 6.5-m equivalent collecting diameter in order to find the optimum design for adaptive optics applications. The studied architectures are: a multi-mirror telescope with 4 × 3.25-m independent telescopes mounted on the same yoke (MMMT); a primary mirror composed of seven 2.7-m speherical mirrors with a common secondary (TEMOS), and two Keck type

  9. Secure thin client architecture for DICOM image analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harsha V. R. Mogatala; Jacqueline Gallet

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a concept of Secure Thin Client (STC) Architecture for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image analysis over Internet. STC Architecture provides in-depth analysis and design of customized reports for DICOM images using drag-and-drop and data warehouse technology. Using a personal computer and a common set of browsing software, STC can be used for analyzing and

  10. Radiomarked Common Loon

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A juvenile common loon wearing a satellite transmitter antenna follows an adult. USGS scientists and partners captured and radiomarked juvenile common loons on lakes scattered across Minnesota and Wisconsin during the last two weeks of August 2014 to track their movements and wintering ground...

  11. Common Platform Enumeration: Dictionary

    E-print Network

    who reviewed drafts of this document and contributed to its technical content. The authors would like the development of the document. Abstract This report defines the Common Platform Enumeration (CPE) DictionaryCommon Platform Enumeration: Dictionary Specification Version 2.3 Paul Cichonski David Waltermire

  12. DICCCOL: dense individualized and common connectivity-based cortical landmarks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dajiang; Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Degang; Chen, Hanbo; Deng, Fan; Faraco, Carlos; Jin, Changfeng; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Yuan, Yixuan; Lv, Peili; Yin, Yan; Hu, Xiaolei; Duan, Lian; Hu, Xintao; Han, Junwei; Wang, Lihong; Shen, Dinggang; Miller, L Stephen; Li, Lingjiang; Liu, Tianming

    2013-04-01

    Is there a common structural and functional cortical architecture that can be quantitatively encoded and precisely reproduced across individuals and populations? This question is still largely unanswered due to the vast complexity, variability, and nonlinearity of the cerebral cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the common cortical architecture can be effectively represented by group-wise consistent structural fiber connections and take a novel data-driven approach to explore the cortical architecture. We report a dense and consistent map of 358 cortical landmarks, named Dense Individualized and Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOLs). Each DICCCOL is defined by group-wise consistent white-matter fiber connection patterns derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. Our results have shown that these 358 landmarks are remarkably reproducible over more than one hundred human brains and possess accurate intrinsically established structural and functional cross-subject correspondences validated by large-scale functional magnetic resonance imaging data. In particular, these 358 cortical landmarks can be accurately and efficiently predicted in a new single brain with DTI data. Thus, this set of 358 DICCCOL landmarks comprehensively encodes the common structural and functional cortical architectures, providing opportunities for many applications in brain science including mapping human brain connectomes, as demonstrated in this work. PMID:22490548

  13. A Key for the Identification of Eighteen Common Timbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dichotomous key for 18 woods in common domestic and architectural use in Britain is provided. It is based upon structures visible with the naked eye and a hand-lens. Descriptions of the necessary anatomy and terminology are given. Timbers include yew, pine, spruce, oak, sweet chestnut, elm, ash, teak, cherry, walnut, mahogany, box, beech,…

  14. Adding Selfhealing capabilities to the Common Language Runtime Rean Griffith

    E-print Network

    Adding Self­healing capabilities to the Common Language Runtime Rean Griffith Columbia University rg2023@cs.columbia.edu Gail Kaiser Columbia University kaiser@cs.columbia.edu Abstract Self­healing to enable repair in a self­healing system is to use an externalized repair/adaptation architecture rather

  15. Service differentiating supporting output circuiting shared optical buffer architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wu Dapeng; Wang Ruyan; Huang Sheng; Zhang Jie; Long Keping

    A novel buffer architecture for Optical Packet Switching Networks is proposed. The utilization of fiber delay lines and corresponding\\u000a switch component can be improved obviously; moreover, service differentiating can be achieved effectively. Results and analysis\\u000a show that the packet delivery ratio is enhanced and the average packet delay is decreased; comparing to the output buffer\\u000a architecture, the number of optical

  16. Towards architecture-based self-healing systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric M. Dashofy; André van der Hoek; Richard N. Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Our approach to creating self-healing systems is based on software architecture, where repairs are done at the level of a software system's components and connectors. In our approach, event-based software architectures are targeted because they offer significant benefits for run-time adaptation. Before an automated planning agent can decide how to repair a self-healing system, a significant infrastructure must be in

  17. An architecture for integrating distributed and cooperating knowledge-based Air Force decision aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, Richard O.; Tucker, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    MITRE has been developing a Knowledge-Based Battle Management Testbed for evaluating the viability of integrating independently-developed knowledge-based decision aids in the Air Force tactical domain. The primary goal for the testbed architecture is to permit a new system to be added to a testbed with little change to the system's software. Each system that connects to the testbed network declares that it can provide a number of services to other systems. When a system wants to use another system's service, it does not address the server system by name, but instead transmits a request to the testbed network asking for a particular service to be performed. A key component of the testbed architecture is a common database which uses a relational database management system (RDBMS). The RDBMS provides a database update notification service to requesting systems. Normally, each system is expected to monitor data relations of interest to it. Alternatively, a system may broadcast an announcement message to inform other systems that an event of potential interest has occurred. Current research is aimed at dealing with issues resulting from integration efforts, such as dealing with potential mismatches of each system's assumptions about the common database, decentralizing network control, and coordinating multiple agents.

  18. architecture study (M.Arch)

    E-print Network

    Papalambros, Panos

    architecture graduate study (M.Arch) #12;3G option deadlinesmaster of architecture (M.Arch) 2G option Taubman College's Master of Architecture 3G option is designed for applicants who have received an undergraduate degree in a discipline other than architecture. This 105 credit hour degree draws upon the diverse

  19. Architecture and Environmental Building Design

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    1 56% 2% 7% 2% 5% 28% Architecture and Environmental Building Design 33% response rate Full Seeking Employment as of the date they completed the survey- 27% 69% 19% 12% Landscape Architecture 46" Architecture, Master of Architecture (M.Arch) Fulltime Employment Amanda Levete Architects, Design, Part II

  20. Preliminary Panda Architecture Peter Reiher

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Preliminary Panda Architecture Peter Reiher August 12, 1998 1. Introduction The Panda system architecture they are developing sets certain limits on what is possible in Panda. This document describes a preliminary architecture for the Panda system. This preliminary architecture is meant purely to serve