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1

Parallel PDE-Based Simulations Using the Common Component Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complexity of parallel PDE-based simulations continues to increase as multimodel, multiphysics, and multi-institutional projects become widespread. A goal of component- based software engineering in such large-scale simulations is to help manage this complexity by enabling better interoperability among various codes that have been independently developed by different groups. The Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum is defining a component architecture

Lois Curfman McInnes; Benjamin A. Allan; Robert Armstrong; Steven J. Benson; David E. Bernholdt; Tamara L. Dahlgren; Lori Freitag Diachin; Manojkumar Krishnan; James A. Kohl; J. Walter Larson; Sophia Lefantzi; Jarek Nieplocha; Boyana Norris; Steven G. Parker; Jaideep Ray; Shujia Zhou

2006-01-01

2

Bringing earth system modeling framework (ESMF) components into the common component architecture (cca)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Typical earth system models involve coupled model components in high performance computing (HPC) environments. Two kinds of potential component-based framework have emerged recently. The Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) defines a common component interface in the context of earth system models. Common Component Architecture (CCA) is developed to support model components in HPC environments. The purpose of this work is

S. Zhou; A. Dasilva; B. Womack; G. Higgins

2003-01-01

3

Coupling climate models with the Earth System Modeling Framework and the Common Component Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Typical Earth system models involve coupled model components in high-performance computing (HPC) environments. In the last few years, several frameworks have been developed for HPC applications. Two of them are component-based frameworks: the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) defining a component interface for Earth system models and the Common Component Architecture (CCA) defining a generic component model. The purpose

Shujia Zhou

2006-01-01

4

A Hands-On Guide to the Common Component Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Assembling and running a CCA application, driver components, creating a component from an existing library, creating a new component from scratch, using TAU to monitor performance of components, understanding arrays and component state, understanding objects and message passing, remote access for CCA environment, building CCA tools and TAU, setting up your environment, tutorial

5

Toward a Common Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes work in progress to develop a standard for interoperability among high-performance scientific components. This research stems from the growing recognition that the scientific community needs to better manage the complexity of multidisciplinary simulations and better address scalable performance issues on parallel and distributed architectures. The driving force for this is the need for fast connections among components that perform

Robert C. Armstrong; Dennis Gannon; Al Geist; Katarzyna Keahey; Scott R. Kohn; Lois C. McInnes; Steve R. Parker; Brent A. Smolinski

1999-01-01

6

Coupling climate models with earth system modeling framework and common component architecture. Concurrency and Computation: Practice and Experience  

E-print Network

Typical Earth system models involve coupled model components in high-performance computing (HPC) environments. In the last few years, several frameworks have been developed for HPC applications. Two of them are component-based frameworks: the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) defining a component interface for Earth system models and the Common Component Architecture (CCA) defining a generic component model. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relationship between ESMF and CCA to deploy the best features of ESMF and CCA into a ESMF–CCA prototype and examine the prototype through a representative coupled climate model. Copyright c ? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEY WORDS: framework; climate model; model coupling 1.

S. J. Zhou

2006-01-01

7

Components of Coated Vesicles and Nuclear Pore Complexes Share a Common Molecular Architecture  

PubMed Central

Numerous features distinguish prokaryotes from eukaryotes, chief among which are the distinctive internal membrane systems of eukaryotic cells. These membrane systems form elaborate compartments and vesicular trafficking pathways, and sequester the chromatin within the nuclear envelope. The nuclear pore complex is the portal that specifically mediates macromolecular trafficking across the nuclear envelope. Although it is generally understood that these internal membrane systems evolved from specialized invaginations of the prokaryotic plasma membrane, it is not clear how the nuclear pore complex could have evolved from organisms with no analogous transport system. Here we use computational and biochemical methods to perform a structural analysis of the seven proteins comprising the yNup84/vNup107–160 subcomplex, a core building block of the nuclear pore complex. Our analysis indicates that all seven proteins contain either a ?-propeller fold, an ?-solenoid fold, or a distinctive arrangement of both, revealing close similarities between the structures comprising the yNup84/vNup107–160 subcomplex and those comprising the major types of vesicle coating complexes that maintain vesicular trafficking pathways. These similarities suggest a common evolutionary origin for nuclear pore complexes and coated vesicles in an early membrane-curving module that led to the formation of the internal membrane systems in modern eukaryotes. PMID:15523559

2004-01-01

8

Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture  

E-print Network

Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture by Philippe Kruchten Rational Fellow Rational of these accepted ideas and show why, in my opinion, they may be misconceptions. "Architecture is design." Yes of abstraction but still be concrete enough to draw definite http://www.therationaledge.com/content/apr_01/m_misconceptions

van der Hoek, André

9

Perceptual-components architecture for digital video  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A perceptual-components architecture for digital video partitions the image stream into signal components in a manner analogous to that used in the human visual system. These components consist of achromatic and opponent color channels, divided into static and motion channels, further divided into bands of particular spatial frequency and orientation. Bits are allocated to an individual band in accord with visual sensitivity to that band and in accord with the properties of visual masking. This architecture is argued to have desirable features such as efficiency, error tolerance, scalability, device independence, and extensibility.

Watson, Andrew B.

1990-01-01

10

Component architecture of the Tecolote framework  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Tecolote Framework is used in conjunction with other libraries by several physical simulations. This paper briefly describes the design and use of Tecolote`s component architecture. A component is a C++ class that meets several requirements imposed by the framework to increase its reusability, configurability, and ease of replacement. The authors discuss both the motives for imposing these requirements upon components and the means by which a generic C++ class may be integrated into Tecolote by satisfying these requirements. They also describe the means by which these components may be combined into a physics application.

Zander, M.; Hall, J.; Painter, J.; O`Rourke, S.

1998-11-01

11

Component vs. application-level MVC architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe our approach to teaching the MVC (Model-View-Controller) architecture for GUI applications. Swing adopts MVC at component level. We use it as a case study to illustrate features of MVC and also help students learn to use the tool for programming projects. To encourage them to see beyond a specific tool, we assign students a project to build a

Yonglei Tao

2002-01-01

12

Common Misconceptions about Service-Oriented Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

You don't have to look far to become aware of the effect that service-oriented architecture (SOA) is having on software systems. Vendors are aggressively marketing hardware, software, tools, and services that support SOA implementation within organizations as diverse as the Department of Defense, banks, federal agencies, manufacturing companies, and health care providers. Even more significantly, customers are embracing SOA as

Grace A. Lewis; Edwin Morris; Soumya Simanta; Lutz Wrage

2007-01-01

13

WHAT DO BUILDING SCIENCE AND ARCHITECTURE HAVE IN COMMON?*  

E-print Network

WHAT DO BUILDING SCIENCE AND ARCHITECTURE HAVE IN COMMON?* Richard Diamond Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California USA * Published in the Proceedings of the 1998 Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Services Organization Introduction What do building science

Diamond, Richard

14

CAPRI : a common architecture for distributed probabilistic Internet fault diagnosis  

E-print Network

This thesis presents a new approach to root cause localization and fault diagnosis in the Internet based on a Common Architecture for Probabilistic Reasoning in the Internet (CAPRI) in which distributed, heterogeneous ...

Lee, George J. (George Janbing), 1979-

2007-01-01

15

CAPRI: A Common Architecture for Distributed Probabilistic Internet Fault Diagnosis  

E-print Network

This thesis presents a new approach to root cause localization and fault diagnosis in the Internet based on a Common Architecture for Probabilistic Reasoning in the Internet (CAPRI) in which distributed, heterogeneous ...

Lee, George J.

2007-06-04

16

Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components  

SciTech Connect

There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and maintenance support. Each product is briefly described in Appendix A. Selection of the most appropriate software package for a particular application will depend on the chosen component, system, or structure. Ongoing research will determine the most appropriate choices for a successful demonstration of PHM systems in aging NPPs.

N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

2011-08-01

17

The AstroGrid Common Execution Architecture (CEA)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The UK Virtual Observatory (VO) project AstroGrid (see http://www.astrogrid.org and related talks at this meeting) began in 2001 and is nearing the successful completion of its first release in December 2004. This paper describes AstroGrid's Common Execution Architecture (CEA). This is an attempt to create a reasonably small set of interfaces and schema to model how to execute a typical astronomical application within the VO. The CEA has been designed primarily to work within a web services framework, with the parameter passing mechanism layered on top of this so that the web interface for all applications is described by a single constant piece of WSDL - the differences between applications are expressed by the registry entries for each application. Within AstroGrid we have created pluggable components that can wrap legacy command-line applications, HTTP GET/POST applications and databases as CEA compliant web services, which when combined with the Astrogrid Workflow component make distributed processing within the VO a reality. See http://www.astrogrid.org/maven/docs/snapshot/applications/ for current information.

Harrison, P.; Winstanley, N.; Taylor, J. D.

2005-12-01

18

A Search Architecture for Grid Software Components Fabrizio Silvestri  

E-print Network

A Search Architecture for Grid Software Components Fabrizio Silvestri HPC-Lab ISTI-CNR, Italy in designing a search service for locating software components on the Grid. In- deed, the specifications of our search engine rely heavily on the concept of Ecosystem of Components. Basically it con- sists

Orlando, Salvatore

19

Designing Component Kits and Architectures with Catalysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

ion --- modelling is used to describe requirements, interfaces to components, highleveldesigns (as well as the detailed design). None of these can be translated directly tocode, requiring other design decisions about, for example, the other interfaces that the componentis required to provide.. Precision --- models can be unambiguous (even though abstract): you can decide whetherany particular component fits the model

Alan Cameron Wills

1999-01-01

20

Presented by How the Common Component  

E-print Network

for performing subsurface simulations � Combining � Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Lagrangian particle mesh (SPH subsurface components Simulation of nonreactive contaminant transport (17M particles) using the CCA-based SPH framework Simulation of transport of contaminant through an array of monitoring wells at the Hanford

21

Component Architectures and Web-Based Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Web has caught the attention of many educators as an efficient communication medium and content delivery system. But we feel there is another aspect of the Web that has not been given the attention it deserves. We call this aspect of the Web its "component architecture." Briefly it means that on the Web one can develop very complex…

Ferdig, Richard E.; Mishra, Punya; Zhao, Yong

2004-01-01

22

Evolutionary Development Of Business Process Centered Architectures Using Component Technologies  

E-print Network

are caused by sponta- neous events during a business process. More precisely, the following problems occurEvolutionary Development Of Business Process Centered Architectures Using Component Technologies-30-31425813 padberg@cs.tu-berlin.de ABSTRACT The process centered paradigm changed the way of to- day's business

23

A Proven Ground System Architecture for Promoting Collaboration and Common Solutions at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's "GMSEC" ground system architecture was presented at GSAW2003 as a concept being studied. GMSEC would utilize a publish/subscribe middleware framework and standardized interfaces to allow custom and COTS ground system components to plug-and-play. This capability, in turn, would reduce integration costs, allow for technology infusion over time, and encourage the development and sharing of common components across missions and organizations. At GSAW2004, GMSEC was presented at a breakout session as a system working well in the NASA lab and being applied as an integral piece of reengineering efforts for several GSFC missions. Today, GMSEC is supporting five satellites at GSFC and has been selected by several future missions. Over 30 plug-and-play components are now available to missions using the GMSEC approach. Other organizations, including Marshall Space Flight Center, Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physic Lab, and the Institute for Scientific Research are each developing GMSEC-compatible components. Based on the success of GMSEC and efforts at other NASA Centers, the message bus approach is now being evaluated as a NASA Agency-wide approach for many future missions involving multiple NASA Centers as we move towards the goals of NASA s new Exploration Initiative. The presentation will explain the basic technical concepts of using a publish/subscribe framework for mission operations support (and its applicability to flight systems as well). Lessons learned on NASA's GMSEC program will allow the audience to better understand the significant benefits of this architecture approach over the traditional "one-off" solution approach. The point of the presentation is to show the long-term benefits of using a ground system architecture which incorporates many of the successful GMSEC concepts - message bus, mix of COTS and custom software, standard interfaces, plug-and-play, etc. The implications for the development process will also be discussed.

Smith, Danford

2005-01-01

24

Missile signal processing common computer architecture for rapid technology upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interceptor missiles process IR images to locate an intended target and guide the interceptor towards it. Signal processing requirements have increased as the sensor bandwidth increases and interceptors operate against more sophisticated targets. A typical interceptor signal processing chain is comprised of two parts. Front-end video processing operates on all pixels of the image and performs such operations as non-uniformity correction (NUC), image stabilization, frame integration and detection. Back-end target processing, which tracks and classifies targets detected in the image, performs such algorithms as Kalman tracking, spectral feature extraction and target discrimination. In the past, video processing was implemented using ASIC components or FPGAs because computation requirements exceeded the throughput of general-purpose processors. Target processing was performed using hybrid architectures that included ASICs, DSPs and general-purpose processors. The resulting systems tended to be function-specific, and required custom software development. They were developed using non-integrated toolsets and test equipment was developed along with the processor platform. The lifespan of a system utilizing the signal processing platform often spans decades, while the specialized nature of processor hardware and software makes it difficult and costly to upgrade. As a result, the signal processing systems often run on outdated technology, algorithms are difficult to update, and system effectiveness is impaired by the inability to rapidly respond to new threats. A new design approach is made possible three developments; Moore's Law - driven improvement in computational throughput; a newly introduced vector computing capability in general purpose processors; and a modern set of open interface software standards. Today's multiprocessor commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) platforms have sufficient throughput to support interceptor signal processing requirements. This application may be programmed under existing real-time operating systems using parallel processing software libraries, resulting in highly portable code that can be rapidly migrated to new platforms as processor technology evolves. Use of standardized development tools and 3rd party software upgrades are enabled as well as rapid upgrade of processing components as improved algorithms are developed. The resulting weapon system will have a superior processing capability over a custom approach at the time of deployment as a result of a shorter development cycles and use of newer technology. The signal processing computer may be upgraded over the lifecycle of the weapon system, and can migrate between weapon system variants enabled by modification simplicity. This paper presents a reference design using the new approach that utilizes an Altivec PowerPC parallel COTS platform. It uses a VxWorks-based real-time operating system (RTOS), and application code developed using an efficient parallel vector library (PVL). A quantification of computing requirements and demonstration of interceptor algorithm operating on this real-time platform are provided.

Rabinkin, Daniel V.; Rutledge, Edward; Monticciolo, Paul

2004-10-01

25

Comparing G matrices: are common principal components informative?  

PubMed Central

Common principal components (CPC) analysis is a technique for assessing whether variance-covariance matrices from different populations have similar structure. One potential application is to compare additive genetic variance-covariance matrices, G. In this article, the conditions under which G matrices are expected to have common PCs are derived for a two-locus, two-allele model and the model of constrained pleiotropy. The theory demonstrates that whether G matrices are expected to have common PCs is largely determined by whether pleiotropic effects have a modular organization. If two (or more) populations have modules and these modules have the same direction, the G matrices have a common PC, regardless of allele frequencies. In the absence of modules, common PCs exist only for very restricted combinations of allele frequencies. Together, these two results imply that, when populations are evolving, common PCs are expected only when the populations have modules in common. These results have two implications: (1) In general, G matrices will not have common PCs, and (2) when they do, these PCs indicate common modular organization. The interpretation of common PCs identified for estimates of G matrices is discussed in light of these results. PMID:14504246

Mezey, Jason G; Houle, David

2003-01-01

26

Is there an unobserved components common cycle for Australasia? Implications for a common currency  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use unobserved components methodology to establish an Australasian common cycle, and assess the extent to which region-specific cycles of Australian states and New Zealand are additionally important. West Australian and New Zealand region-specific growth cycles have exhibited distinctively different features, relative to the common cycle. For every Australasian region, the region-specific cycle variance dominates that of the common cycle,

Viv B. Hall; C. John McDermott

2012-01-01

27

Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document captures the system architecture for a Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) capability needed for electronics maintenance and repair of the Constellation Program (CxP). CLEAR is intended to improve flight system supportability and reduce the mass of spares required to maintain the electronics of human rated spacecraft on long duration missions. By necessity it allows the crew to make repairs that would otherwise be performed by Earth based repair depots. Because of practical knowledge and skill limitations of small spaceflight crews they must be augmented by Earth based support crews and automated repair equipment. This system architecture covers the complete system from ground-user to flight hardware and flight crew and defines an Earth segment and a Space segment. The Earth Segment involves database management, operational planning, and remote equipment programming and validation processes. The Space Segment involves the automated diagnostic, test and repair equipment required for a complete repair process. This document defines three major subsystems including, tele-operations that links the flight hardware to ground support, highly reconfigurable diagnostics and test instruments, and a CLEAR Repair Apparatus that automates the physical repair process.

Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

2011-01-01

28

A Plug and Play GNC Architecture Using FPGA Components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of Plug and Play, or PnP, is to allow hardware and software components to work together automatically, without requiring manual setup procedures. As a result, new or replacement hardware can be plugged into a system and automatically configured with the appropriate resource assignments. However, in many cases it may not be practical or even feasible to physically replace hardware components. One method for handling these types of situations is through the incorporation of reconfigurable hardware such as Field Programmable Gate Arrays, or FPGAs. This paper describes a phased approach to developing a Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) architecture that expands on the traditional concepts of PnP, in order to accommodate hardware reconfiguration without requiring detailed knowledge of the hardware. This is achieved by establishing a functional based interface that defines how the hardware will operate, and allow the hardware to reconfigure itself. The resulting system combines the flexibility of manipulating software components with the speed and efficiency of hardware.

KrishnaKumar, K.; Kaneshige, J.; Waterman, R.; Pires, C.; Ippoloito, C.

2005-01-01

29

Some common misconceptions about the modeling of repairable components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although stochastic point process theory has been successfully applied in many fields of knowledge, in power systems reliability it has not received so much attention what is reflected in the low number of reported applications. This may be due to some common misconceptions about the modeling of repairable components which falsely show this method is the same than other popular

C. J. Zapata; A. Torres; D. S. Kirschen; M. A. Rios

2009-01-01

30

Common and Cluster-Specific Simultaneous Component Analysis  

PubMed Central

In many fields of research, so-called ‘multiblock’ data are collected, i.e., data containing multivariate observations that are nested within higher-level research units (e.g., inhabitants of different countries). Each higher-level unit (e.g., country) then corresponds to a ‘data block’. For such data, it may be interesting to investigate the extent to which the correlation structure of the variables differs between the data blocks. More specifically, when capturing the correlation structure by means of component analysis, one may want to explore which components are common across all data blocks and which components differ across the data blocks. This paper presents a common and cluster-specific simultaneous component method which clusters the data blocks according to their correlation structure and allows for common and cluster-specific components. Model estimation and model selection procedures are described and simulation results validate their performance. Also, the method is applied to data from cross-cultural values research to illustrate its empirical value. PMID:23667463

De Roover, Kim; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Mesquita, Batja; Ceulemans, Eva

2013-01-01

31

Augmenting Software Architectures with Physical Components Ajinkya Bhave1  

E-print Network

for the STARMAC quadrotor. Keywords: Software Architecture, Embedded, Con- trol, Physical Modelling. 1 an ex- ample quadrotor system whose architectural descrip- tion in the CPS style in presented in Section 6. Sec- tion 7 presents two models of the quadrotor in differ- ent formalisms as architectural views

Garlan, David

32

Common global architecture applied to automobile electrical distribution systems  

E-print Network

Electrical and electronic components have a prominent role in today's vehicles. Particularly during the last two decades, functionality has been added at an exponential rate, resulting in increased complexity, especially ...

Azpeitia Camacho, Marcia E. (Marcia Edna)

2010-01-01

33

Most common 'sporadic' cancers have a significant germline genetic component.  

PubMed

Common cancers have been demarcated into 'hereditary' or 'sporadic' ('non-hereditary') types historically. Such distinctions initially arose from work identifying rare, highly penetrant germline mutations causing 'hereditary' cancer. While rare mutations are important in particular families, most cases in the general population are 'sporadic'. Twin studies have suggested that many 'sporadic' cancers show little or no heritability. To quantify the role of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility, we applied a method for estimating the importance of common genetic variants (array heritability, h(2) g) to twelve cancer types. The following cancers showed a significant (P < 0.05) array heritability: melanoma USA set h(2) g = 0.19 (95% CI = 0.01-0.37) and Australian set h(2) g = 0.30 (0.10-0.50); pancreatic h(2) g = 0.18 (0.06-0.30); prostate h(2) g = 0.81 (0.32-1); kidney h(2) g = 0.18 (0.04-0.32); ovarian h(2) g = 0.30 (0.18-0.42); esophageal adenocarcinoma h(2) g = 0.24 (0.14-0.34); esophageal squamous cell carcinoma h(2) g = 0.19 (0.07-0.31); endometrial UK set h(2) g = 0.23 (0.01-0.45) and Australian set h(2) g = 0.39 (0.02-0.76). Three cancers showed a positive but non-significant effect: breast h(2) g = 0.13 (0-0.56); gastric h(2) g = 0.11 (0-0.27); lung h(2) g = 0.10 (0-0.24). One cancer showed a small effect: bladder h(2) g = 0.01 (0-0.11). Among these cancers, previous twin studies were only able to show heritability for prostate and breast cancer, but we can now make much stronger statements for several common cancers which emphasize the important role of genetic variants in cancer susceptibility. We have demonstrated that several 'sporadic' cancers have a significant inherited component. Larger genome-wide association studies in these cancers will continue to find more loci, which explain part of the remaining polygenic component. PMID:24943595

Lu, Yi; Ek, Weronica E; Whiteman, David; Vaughan, Thomas L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D; Thompson, Deborah J; Dunning, Alison M; Hayward, Nicholas K; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Macgregor, Stuart

2014-11-15

34

The dynamic architecture of emotion: Evidence for the component process model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion is conceptualised as an emergent, dynamic process based on an individual's subjective appraisal of significant events. It is argued that theoretical models of emotion need to propose an architecture that reflects the essential nature and functions of emotion as a psychobiological and cultural adaptation mechanism. One proposal for such a model and its underlying dynamic architecture, the component process

Klaus R. Scherer

2009-01-01

35

The Common Structural Architecture of Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium Type Three Secretion  

E-print Network

The Common Structural Architecture of Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium Type Three on the outside face of the needle. Second, a model of the Shigella flexneri needle was generated from a high measurements of wild-type Shigella flexneri needles polymerized in vitro and identified the following secondary

Baker, David

36

Fast GPU-Based CT Reconstruction using the Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) is a fundamentally new programming approach making use of the unified shader design of the most current Graphics Processing Units (CPUs) from NVIDIA. The programming interface allows to implement an algorithm using standard C language and a few extensions without any knowledge about graphics programming using OpenGL, DirectX, and shading languages. We apply this

Holger Scherl; Benjamin Keck; Markus Kowarschik; Joachim Hornegger

2007-01-01

37

Timed Probabilistic Reasoning on UML Specialization for Fault Tolerant Component Based Architectures  

E-print Network

strategies systematically, and · a probabilistic semantics to facilitate fault-tolerance analysisTimed Probabilistic Reasoning on UML Specialization for Fault Tolerant Component Based University, Australia ABSTRACT Architecture-based reasoning about reliability and fault tolerance is gaining

Leavens, Gary T.

38

Distributed Component-Oriented Architecture for Real-Time ECG Data Acquisition Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper presents a distributed component-oriented multi-tier architecture as applied to the multifunctional ECG software system development This approach makes it possible to design flexible and manageable ECG applications with the functionality that ca...

V. A. Nagin, I. V. Potapov, S. V. Selishchev

2001-01-01

39

A Successful Component Architecture for Interoperable and Evolvable Ground Data Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has adopted an open architecture approach for satellite control centers and is now realizing benefits beyond those originally envisioned. The Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) architecture utilizes standardized interfaces and a middleware software bus to allow functional components to be easily integrated. This paper presents the GMSEC architectural goals and concepts, the capabilities enabled and the benefits realized by adopting this framework approach. NASA experiences with applying the GMSEC architecture on multiple missions are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of lessons learned, future directions for GMSEC and the possible applications beyond NASA GSFC.

Smith, Danford S.; Bristow, John O.; Wilmot, Jonathan

2006-01-01

40

A Proven Ground System Architecture for Promoting Collaboration and Common Solutions at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Requirement: Improve how NASA develops and maintains ground data systems for dozens of missions, with a couple new missions always in the development phase. Decided in 2001 on enhanced message-bus architecture. Users offered choices for major components. They plug and play because key interfaces are all the same. Can support COTS, heritage, and new software. Even the middleware can be switched. Project name: GMSEC. Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center.

Smith, Danford

2005-01-01

41

Micro guidance and control synthesis: New components, architectures, and capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New GN&C (guidance, navigation and control) system capabilities are shown to arise from component innovations that involve the synergistic use of microminiature sensors and actuators, microelectronics, and fiber optics. Micro-GN&C system and component concepts are defined that include micro-actuated adaptive optics, micromachined inertial sensors, fiber-optic data nets and light-power transmission, and VLSI microcomputers. The thesis is advanced that these micro-miniaturization products are capable of having a revolutionary impact on space missions and systems, and that GN&C is the pathfinder micro-technology application that can bring that about.

Mettler, Edward; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

1993-01-01

42

Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Overview and Architectural Tenets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: 1) Command and control and mission management for the Suomi National Polar Partnership (S-NPP) mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite and the Polar Free Flyer mission in 2017 2) Data acquisition via a Polar Receptor Network (PRN) for S-NPP, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the Department of Defense (DoD) 3) Data routing over a global fiber Wide Area Network (WAN) for S-NPP, JPSS-1, Polar Free Flyer, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN, which includes several Earth Observing System [EOS] missions), MetOp for the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) 4) Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS architecture will receive a technology refresh in 2015 to satisfy several key objectives: 1) 'Operationalizing' Suomi NPP, which had originally been intended as a risk reduction mission 2) Leveraging lessons learned to date in multi-mission support 3) Taking advantage of newer, more reliable and efficient technologies 4) Satisfying new requirements and constraints due to the continually evolving budgetary environment To meet these needs, we are upgrading the CGS in the following ways: 1) Performing a system-wide technology refresh for enhanced performance and security 2) Establishing a new front end architecture and augmenting the PRN for mission data transport 3) Standardizing data protocols to accommodate an even wider variety of missions 4) Enhancing flexibility and modularity in IDPS for new and evolving algorithms 5) Achieving comprehensive situational awareness 6) Deploying a full backup capability for Continuity of Operations (COOP) 7) Providing an enclave in compliance with the latest security standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 800-53 This paper will provide an overview of the CGS as it is deployed and operating today, along with a summary of the architectural tenets that will facilitate even easier incorporation of new missions and applications in 2015.

Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

2013-12-01

43

Competency-Driven, Component-Based Curriculum Architecture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines an approach to curriculum development that stresses a competency-driven framework including competency identification, curriculum development, and performance measurement, as well as a component-based approach to educational development and training asset management. Set in a professional services firm, the framework could serve as a…

Friedlander, Philip

1996-01-01

44

A Component-Oriented Architecture for the CASE-Tool AUTOFOCUS  

E-print Network

In this paper we explore how the componentware paradigm can be used for realizing a distributed multi-user CASE tool. The case study concentrates on the repository subsystem, as this is the most critical component with respect to the overall design and has strong implications on the possible working modes available to the developers. The proposed architecture will be integrated into the existing CASE tool AUTOFOCUS which was designed originally using an object-oriented architecture.

Klaus Bergner; Andreas Rausch; Marc Sihling

1998-01-01

45

Manned/Unmanned Common Architecture Program (MCAP) net centric flight tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Properly architected avionics systems can reduce the costs of periodic functional improvements, maintenance, and obsolescence. With this in mind, the U.S. Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) initiated the Manned/Unmanned Common Architecture Program (MCAP) in 2003 to develop an affordable, high-performance embedded mission processing architecture for potential application to multiple aviation platforms. MCAP analyzed Army helicopter and unmanned air vehicle (UAV) missions, identified supporting subsystems, surveyed advanced hardware and software technologies, and defined computational infrastructure technical requirements. The project selected a set of modular open systems standards and market-driven commercial-off-theshelf (COTS) electronics and software, and, developed experimental mission processors, network architectures, and software infrastructures supporting the integration of new capabilities, interoperability, and life cycle cost reductions. MCAP integrated the new mission processing architecture into an AH-64D Apache Longbow and participated in Future Combat Systems (FCS) network-centric operations field experiments in 2006 and 2007 at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico and at the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) in 2008. The MCAP Apache also participated in PM C4ISR On-the-Move (OTM) Capstone Experiments 2007 (E07) and 2008 (E08) at Ft. Dix, NJ and conducted Mesa, Arizona local area flight tests in December 2005, February 2006, and June 2008.

Johnson, Dale

2009-04-01

46

Common relationships among proximate composition components in fishes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Relationships between the various body proximate components and dry matter content were examined for five species of fishes, representing anadromous, marine and freshwater species: chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta, Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix and striped bass Morone saxatilis. The dry matter content or per cent dry mass of these fishes can be used to reliably predict the per cent composition of the other components. Therefore, with validation it is possible to estimate fat, protein and ash content of fishes from per cent dry mass information, reducing the need for costly and time-consuming laboratory proximate analysis. This approach coupled with new methods of non-lethal estimation of per cent dry mass, such as from bioelectrical impedance analysis, can provide non-destructive measurements of proximate composition of fishes. ?? 2008 The Authors.

Hartman, K.J.; Margraf, F.J.

2008-01-01

47

Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed MemoryComputer Architectures  

SciTech Connect

A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflop scale computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the Community Climate System Model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice components. Each component is semi-independent and has been developed at a different institution. We study how this multi-component, multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory architectures. For the first time, we clearly identify five effective execution modes and develop the MPH library to support application development utilizing these modes. MPH performs component-name registration, resource allocation and initial component handshaking in a flexible way.

He, Yun; Ding, Chris

2005-03-24

48

An Architecture to Support Dynamic Composition of Service Components and its Applicability to Internet Security  

Microsoft Academic Search

The creation of composite services from service components at runtime can beachieved using several different techniques. In the first approach, two or more componentsare assembled while each component remains distinct, and potentially distributed, within anetwork. To facilitate this, a new common interface must be constructed at runtime whichallows other services to interact with this set of service components as if

David William Mennie

2000-01-01

49

Investigation of a novel common subexpression elimination method for low power and area efficient DCT architecture.  

PubMed

A wide interest has been observed to find a low power and area efficient hardware design of discrete cosine transform (DCT) algorithm. This research work proposed a novel Common Subexpression Elimination (CSE) based pipelined architecture for DCT, aimed at reproducing the cost metrics of power and area while maintaining high speed and accuracy in DCT applications. The proposed design combines the techniques of Canonical Signed Digit (CSD) representation and CSE to implement the multiplier-less method for fixed constant multiplication of DCT coefficients. Furthermore, symmetry in the DCT coefficient matrix is used with CSE to further decrease the number of arithmetic operations. This architecture needs a single-port memory to feed the inputs instead of multiport memory, which leads to reduction of the hardware cost and area. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed scheme uses minimum logic utilizing mere 340 slices and 22 adders. Moreover, this design meets the real time constraints of different video/image coders and peak-signal-to-noise-ratio (PSNR) requirements. Furthermore, the proposed technique has significant advantages over recent well-known methods along with accuracy in terms of power reduction, silicon area usage, and maximum operating frequency by 41%, 15%, and 15%, respectively. PMID:25133249

Siddiqui, M F; Reza, A W; Kanesan, J; Ramiah, H

2014-01-01

50

Investigation of a Novel Common Subexpression Elimination Method for Low Power and Area Efficient DCT Architecture  

PubMed Central

A wide interest has been observed to find a low power and area efficient hardware design of discrete cosine transform (DCT) algorithm. This research work proposed a novel Common Subexpression Elimination (CSE) based pipelined architecture for DCT, aimed at reproducing the cost metrics of power and area while maintaining high speed and accuracy in DCT applications. The proposed design combines the techniques of Canonical Signed Digit (CSD) representation and CSE to implement the multiplier-less method for fixed constant multiplication of DCT coefficients. Furthermore, symmetry in the DCT coefficient matrix is used with CSE to further decrease the number of arithmetic operations. This architecture needs a single-port memory to feed the inputs instead of multiport memory, which leads to reduction of the hardware cost and area. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed scheme uses minimum logic utilizing mere 340 slices and 22 adders. Moreover, this design meets the real time constraints of different video/image coders and peak-signal-to-noise-ratio (PSNR) requirements. Furthermore, the proposed technique has significant advantages over recent well-known methods along with accuracy in terms of power reduction, silicon area usage, and maximum operating frequency by 41%, 15%, and 15%, respectively. PMID:25133249

Siddiqui, M. F.; Reza, A. W.; Kanesan, J.; Ramiah, H.

2014-01-01

51

From monolithic to component-based performance evaluation of software architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Model-based performance evaluation methods for software architectures can help architects to assess design alternatives and\\u000a save costs for late life-cycle performance fixes. A recent trend is component-based performance modelling, which aims at creating\\u000a reusable performance models; a number of such methods have been proposed during the last decade. Their accuracy and the needed\\u000a effort for modelling are heavily influenced by

Anne Martens; Heiko Koziolek; Lutz Prechelt; Ralf Reussner

52

Frequency multiplexed flux locked loop architecture providing an array of DC SQUIDS having both shared and unshared components  

DOEpatents

Architecture for frequency multiplexing multiple flux locked loops in a system comprising an array of DC SQUID sensors. The architecture involves dividing the traditional flux locked loop into multiple unshared components and a single shared component which, in operation, form a complete flux locked loop relative to each DC SQUID sensor. Each unshared flux locked loop component operates on a different flux modulation frequency. The architecture of the present invention allows a reduction from 2N to N+1 in the number of connections between the cryogenic DC SQUID sensors and their associated room temperature flux locked loops. Furthermore, the 1.times.N architecture of the present invention can be paralleled to form an M.times.N array architecture without increasing the required number of flux modulation frequencies.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-01-01

53

Terahertz Behavior of Optical Components and Common Materials Andrew J. Gatesman a  

E-print Network

. Keywords: THz, materials, dielectric, absorbers, attenuation 1. INTRODUCTION Since 1981, Expert Radar, radar absorbing materials development, and obscured object detection. ERADS has developed fullyTerahertz Behavior of Optical Components and Common Materials Andrew J. Gatesman a , Andriy

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

54

Modularity in the mammalian dentition: Mice and monkeys share a common dental genetic architecture  

PubMed Central

The concept of modularity provides a useful tool for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Here, we use quantitative genetics to identify modularity within the mammalian dentition, connecting the genetics of organogenesis to the genetics of population-level variation for a phenotype well represented in the fossil record. We estimated the correlations between dental traits due to the shared additive effects of genes (pleiotropy) and compared the pleiotropic relationships among homologous traits in two evolutionary distant taxa – mice and baboons. We find that in both mice and baboons, who shared a common ancestor >60 Ma, incisor size variation is genetically independent of molar size variation. Furthermore, baboon premolars show independent genetic variation from incisors, suggesting that a modular architecture separates incisors from these posterior teeth as well. Such genetic independence between modules provides an explanation for the extensive diversity of incisor size variation seen throughout mammalian evolution--variation uncorrelated with equivalent levels of postcanine tooth size variation. The modularity identified here is supported by the odontogenic homeobox code proposed for the patterning of the rodent dentition. The baboon postcanine pattern of incomplete pleiotropy is also consistent with predictions from the morphogenetic field model. PMID:20922775

Hlusko, Leslea J.; Sage, Richard D.; Mahaney, Michael C.

2010-01-01

55

Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height.  

PubMed

Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ?2,000, ?3,700 and ?9,500 SNPs explained ?21%, ?24% and ?29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured 60% of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci were enriched for genes, pathways and tissue types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/?-catenin and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants. PMID:25282103

Wood, Andrew R; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Asa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V A; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V

2014-11-01

56

On Studying Common Factor Variance in Multiple-Component Measuring Instruments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A method for examining common factor variance in multiple-component measuring instruments is outlined. The procedure is based on an application of the latent variable modeling methodology and is concerned with evaluating observed variance explained by a global factor and by one or more additional component-specific factors. The approach furnishes…

Raykov, Tenko; Pohl, Steffi

2013-01-01

57

Architectural support for, and parallel execution of, programs constructed from reusable software components  

SciTech Connect

General-purpose reusable software components have a well deserved reputation for being inefficient. The thesis of this work is that this problem is not inherent in generic software, i.e., reusable software can execute efficiently. Furthermore, it is claimed that architectural support and parallel processing can be used to achieve this goal. Due to the differences between RESOLVE and existing programming languages, the issues of hardware and software support are explored anew. The approach is to develop a virtual machine with an instruction set suited to the efficient execution of the kinds of components typically written in RESOLVE. A sequential implementation of the virtual machine is then used as a processing element in a distributed memory parallel computer that realizes the same virtual machine. This work makes several contributions to knowledge. The potential inefficiencies of class of reusable software components are identified and addressed. A virtual machine architecture suited to RESOLVE programs and to the RESOLVE run-time system is introduced.

Welch, L.R.

1990-01-01

58

The common structural architecture of Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium type three secretion needles.  

PubMed

The Type Three Secretion System (T3SS), or injectisome, is a macromolecular infection machinery present in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. It consists of a basal body, anchored in both bacterial membranes, and a hollow needle through which effector proteins are delivered into the target host cell. Two different architectures of the T3SS needle have been previously proposed. First, an atomic model of the Salmonella typhimurium needle was generated from solid-state NMR data. The needle subunit protein, PrgI, comprises a rigid-extended N-terminal segment and a helix-loop-helix motif with the N-terminus located on the outside face of the needle. Second, a model of the Shigella flexneri needle was generated from a high-resolution 7.7-Å cryo-electron microscopy density map. The subunit protein, MxiH, contains an N-terminal ?-helix, a loop, another ?-helix, a 14-residue-long ?-hairpin (Q51-Q64) and a C-terminal ?-helix, with the N-terminus facing inward to the lumen of the needle. In the current study, we carried out solid-state NMR measurements of wild-type Shigella flexneri needles polymerized in vitro and identified the following secondary structure elements for MxiH: a rigid-extended N-terminal segment (S2-T11), an ?-helix (L12-A38), a loop (E39-P44) and a C-terminal ?-helix (Q45-R83). Using immunogold labeling in vitro and in vivo on functional needles, we located the N-terminus of MxiH subunits on the exterior of the assembly, consistent with evolutionary sequence conservation patterns and mutagenesis data. We generated a homology model of Shigella flexneri needles compatible with both experimental data: the MxiH solid-state NMR chemical shifts and the state-of-the-art cryoEM density map. These results corroborate the solid-state NMR structure previously solved for Salmonella typhimurium PrgI needles and establish that Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium subunit proteins adopt a conserved structure and orientation in their assembled state. Our study reveals a common structural architecture of T3SS needles, essential to understand T3SS-mediated infection and develop treatments. PMID:23555258

Demers, Jean-Philippe; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Gupta, Rashmi; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Riedel, Dietmar; Laube, Britta; Kolbe, Michael; Baker, David; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

2013-03-01

59

The Common Structural Architecture of Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium Type Three Secretion Needles  

PubMed Central

The Type Three Secretion System (T3SS), or injectisome, is a macromolecular infection machinery present in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. It consists of a basal body, anchored in both bacterial membranes, and a hollow needle through which effector proteins are delivered into the target host cell. Two different architectures of the T3SS needle have been previously proposed. First, an atomic model of the Salmonella typhimurium needle was generated from solid-state NMR data. The needle subunit protein, PrgI, comprises a rigid-extended N-terminal segment and a helix-loop-helix motif with the N-terminus located on the outside face of the needle. Second, a model of the Shigella flexneri needle was generated from a high-resolution 7.7-Å cryo-electron microscopy density map. The subunit protein, MxiH, contains an N-terminal ?-helix, a loop, another ?-helix, a 14-residue-long ?-hairpin (Q51–Q64) and a C-terminal ?-helix, with the N-terminus facing inward to the lumen of the needle. In the current study, we carried out solid-state NMR measurements of wild-type Shigella flexneri needles polymerized in vitro and identified the following secondary structure elements for MxiH: a rigid-extended N-terminal segment (S2-T11), an ?-helix (L12-A38), a loop (E39-P44) and a C-terminal ?-helix (Q45-R83). Using immunogold labeling in vitro and in vivo on functional needles, we located the N-terminus of MxiH subunits on the exterior of the assembly, consistent with evolutionary sequence conservation patterns and mutagenesis data. We generated a homology model of Shigella flexneri needles compatible with both experimental data: the MxiH solid-state NMR chemical shifts and the state-of-the-art cryoEM density map. These results corroborate the solid-state NMR structure previously solved for Salmonella typhimurium PrgI needles and establish that Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium subunit proteins adopt a conserved structure and orientation in their assembled state. Our study reveals a common structural architecture of T3SS needles, essential to understand T3SS-mediated infection and develop treatments. PMID:23555258

Gupta, Rashmi; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Riedel, Dietmar; Laube, Britta; Kolbe, Michael; Baker, David; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

2013-01-01

60

Fitness and genetic architecture of parent and hybrid willows in common gardens.  

PubMed

Models of hybrid zone dynamics incorporate different patterns of hybrid fitness relative to parental species fitness. An important but understudied source of variation underlying these fitness differences is the environment. We investigated the performance of two willow species and their F1, F2, and backcross hybrids using a common-garden experiment with six replicated gardens that differed in soil moisture. Aboveground biomass, catkin production, seed production per catkin, and seed germination rate were significantly different among genetic classes. For aboveground biomass and catkin production, hybrids generally had intermediate or inferior performance compared to parent species. Salix eriocephala had the highest performance for all performance measures, but in two gardens F, plants had superior or equal performance for aboveground biomass and female catkin production. Salix eriocephala and backcrosses to S. eriocephala had the highest numbers of filled seeds per catkin and the highest estimates of total fitness in all gardens. Measures of filled seeds per catkin and germination rate tend to support the model of endogenous hybrid unfitness, and these two measures had major effects on estimates of total seed production per catkin. We also estimated how the two willow species differ genetically in these fitness measures using line cross analysis. We found a complex genetic architecture underlying the fitness differences between species that involved additive, dominance, and epistatic genetic effects for all fitness measures. The environment was important in the expression of these genetic differences, because the type of epistasis differed among the gardens for above-ground biomass and for female catkin production. These findings suggest that fine-scale environmental variation can have a significant impact on hybrid fitness in hybrid zones where parents and hybrids are widely interspersed. PMID:16892972

Fritz, Robert S; Hochwender, Cris G; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Czesak, Mary Ellen

2006-06-01

61

architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contemporary architecture works according to a linear model, meaning that it takes in fresh air, energy generated from fossil fuels, drinking water, various building and other materi- als necessary for life and having squandered them ine ciently, it releases stale-air, smoke, fumes, sewage, noise and refuse that will chemically pollute the environment. In 1994 at the CIB conference held in

Erzsébet Lányi

62

Standards-and Component-Based Mission Operations Architecture at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) manages many of NASA s earth and space science satellite missions. A wide variety of commercial products and GSFC-developed software components are typically integrated into a unique system configuration for each mission. Independent development of the many mission operations center systems has led to systems that are expensive to integrate, difficult to infuse with new capabilities developed for other programs, and cumbersome to maintain. This traditional approach becomes even more problematic as NASA moves towards satellite constellations, new operations concepts, and even further budgets reductions. The GSFC Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) is creating a new architecture for future missions at GSFC. Instead of selecting the best-in-class components and creating a standard control center system, GMSEC is developing component interface standards so that multiple products can plug-and-play into the configuration. Missions can then select the best components based on the merits of the product and not simply based on recent integration history at NASA. The GMSEC system utilizes a publish/subscribe information bus and standard XML-based key message interfaces. Functional components can either match directly to the interface standard, or adapters can be developed to match the product's interface to the GMSEC standard with out impacting the source product. Applications Program Interfaces (API's) are being developed to isolate the underlying middleware from the applications software and to allow the middleware product to be switched if necessary. Interface Control Documents (ICDs) between each pair of communicating components is replaced by a single message/API specification document. New applications must simply match to the information bus standards and need not worry about all of the other applications in the system. For legacy software, adapters can be developed to facilitate communications between the application and the information bus. As the approach has matured, it has become apparent that it can provide innovative solutions to some of the multi-satellite challenges facing GSFC.

Smith, Danford

2003-01-01

63

Novel precipitate–microstructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fabrication of Cu components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates exhibits a novel example of precipitate–dislocation architecture. Such architectures are seen by optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, to consist generally of equiaxed precipitate–dislocation cell-like arrays (1–3?m) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular

D. A. Ramirez; L. E. Murr; E. Martinez; D. H. Hernandez; J. L. Martinez; B. I. Machado; F. Medina; P. Frigola; R. B. Wicker

2011-01-01

64

Architecture of the major component of the type III secretion system export apparatus  

PubMed Central

Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are bacterial membrane-embedded secretion nanomachines designed to export specifically targeted sets of proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm. Secretion through T3SS is governed by a subset of inner membrane proteins termed the ‘export apparatus’. We show that a key member of the Shigella flexneri export apparatus, MxiA, assembles into a ring essential for secretion in vivo. The ring forming interfaces are well conserved in both non-flagellar and flagellar homologues, implying that the ring is an evolutionary conserved feature in these systems. Electron cryo-tomography reveals a T3SS-associated cytoplasmic torus of size and shape corresponding to the MxiA ring aligned to the secretion channel located between the secretion pore and the ATPase complex. This defines the molecular architecture of the dominant component of the export apparatus and allows us to propose a model for the molecular mechanisms controlling secretion. PMID:23222644

Abrusci, Patrizia; Vergara-Irigaray, Marta; Johnson, Steven; Beeby, Morgan D; Hendrixson, David; Roversi, Pietro; Friede, Miriam E; Deane, Janet E; Jensen, Grant J; Tang, Christoph M; Lea, Susan M

2012-01-01

65

Security Framework for Pervasive Healthcare Architectures Utilizing MPEG-21 IPMP Components  

PubMed Central

Nowadays in modern and ubiquitous computing environments, it is imperative more than ever the necessity for deployment of pervasive healthcare architectures into which the patient is the central point surrounded by different types of embedded and small computing devices, which measure sensitive physical indications, interacting with hospitals databases, allowing thus urgent medical response in occurrences of critical situations. Such environments must be developed satisfying the basic security requirements for real-time secure data communication, and protection of sensitive medical data and measurements, data integrity and confidentiality, and protection of the monitored patient's privacy. In this work, we argue that the MPEG-21 Intellectual Property Management and Protection (IPMP) components can be used in order to achieve protection of transmitted medical information and enhance patient's privacy, since there is selective and controlled access to medical data that sent toward the hospital's servers. PMID:19132095

Fragopoulos, Anastasios; Gialelis, John; Serpanos, Dimitrios

2009-01-01

66

Statistical intercomparison of global climate models: A common principal component approach with application to GCM data  

SciTech Connect

Variables describing atmospheric circulation and other climate parameters derived from various GCMs and obtained from observations can be represented on a spatio-temporal grid (lattice) structure. The primary objective of this paper is to explore existing as well as some new statistical methods to analyze such data structures for the purpose of model diagnostics and intercomparison from a statistical perspective. Among the several statistical methods considered here, a new method based on common principal components appears most promising for the purpose of intercomparison of spatio-temporal data structures arising in the task of model/model and model/data intercomparison. A complete strategy for such an intercomparison is outlined. The strategy includes two steps. First, the commonality of spatial structures in two (or more) fields is captured in the common principal vectors. Second, the corresponding principal components obtained as time series are then compared on the basis of similarities in their temporal evolution.

Sengupta, S.K.; Boyle, J.S.

1993-05-01

67

Muscle architecture of the common chimpanzee ( Pan troglodytes ): perspectives for investigating chimpanzee behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thorpe et al. (Am J Phys Anthropol 110:179–199, 1999) quantified chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) muscle architecture and joint moment arms to determine whether they functionally compensated for structural differences between chimpanzees and humans. They observed enough distinction to conclude that musculoskeletal properties were not compensatory and suggested that chimpanzees and humans do not exhibit dynamically similar movements. These investigators based their

Kristian J. Carlson

2006-01-01

68

Miniaturized Analytical Platforms From Nanoparticle Components: Studies in the Construction, Characterization, and High-Throughput Usage of These Novel Architectures  

SciTech Connect

The scientific community has recently experienced an overall effort to reduce the physical size of many experimental components to the nanometer size range. This size is unique as the characteristics of this regime involve aspects of pure physics, biology, and chemistry. One extensively studied example of a nanometer sized experimental component, which acts as a junction between these three principle scientific theologies, is deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA). These biopolymers not only contain the biological genetic guide to code for the production of life-sustaining materials, but are also being probed by physicists as a means to create electrical circuits and furthermore as controllable architectural and sensor motifs in the chemical disciplines. Possibly the most common nano-sized component between these sciences are nanoparticles composed of a variety of materials. The cross discipline employment of nanoparticles is evident from the vast amount of literature that has been produced from each of the individual communities within the last decade. Along these cross-discipline lines, this dissertation examines the use of several different types of nanoparticles with a wide array of surface chemistries to understand their adsorption properties and to construct unique miniaturized analytical and immunoassay platforms. This introduction will act as a literature review to provide key information regarding the synthesis and surface chemistries of several types of nanoparticles. This material will set the stage for a discussion of assembling ordered arrays of nanoparticles into functional platforms, architectures, and sensors. The introduction will also include a short explanation of the atomic force microscope that is used throughout the thesis to characterize the nanoparticle-based structures. Following the Introduction, four research chapters are presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 examines the self-assembly of polymeric nanoparticles exhibiting a variety of surface chemistries and attempts to deconvolute general adsorption rules for their assembly on various substrates. Chapter 2 extends the usage of self-assembly of polymeric nanoparticles through a layer-by-layer deposition concept and photolithography methodologies to create analytical platforms with a vertical height controlled within the nanometer regime. This platform is then furthered in Chapter 3 by employing this integrated concept as a bio-recognition platform, with the extension of the method to a high-throughput screening system explored. Chapter 4 exploits two different types of nanoparticles, silica and gold, as multiplexed, self-assembled immunoassay sensors. This final research chapter is followed by a general summation and future prospectus section that concludes the dissertation.

Andrew David Pris

2003-08-05

69

Mayo clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES): architecture, component evaluation and applications.  

PubMed

We aim to build and evaluate an open-source natural language processing system for information extraction from electronic medical record clinical free-text. We describe and evaluate our system, the clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES), released open-source at http://www.ohnlp.org. The cTAKES builds on existing open-source technologies-the Unstructured Information Management Architecture framework and OpenNLP natural language processing toolkit. Its components, specifically trained for the clinical domain, create rich linguistic and semantic annotations. Performance of individual components: sentence boundary detector accuracy=0.949; tokenizer accuracy=0.949; part-of-speech tagger accuracy=0.936; shallow parser F-score=0.924; named entity recognizer and system-level evaluation F-score=0.715 for exact and 0.824 for overlapping spans, and accuracy for concept mapping, negation, and status attributes for exact and overlapping spans of 0.957, 0.943, 0.859, and 0.580, 0.939, and 0.839, respectively. Overall performance is discussed against five applications. The cTAKES annotations are the foundation for methods and modules for higher-level semantic processing of clinical free-text. PMID:20819853

Savova, Guergana K; Masanz, James J; Ogren, Philip V; Zheng, Jiaping; Sohn, Sunghwan; Kipper-Schuler, Karin C; Chute, Christopher G

2010-01-01

70

Identifying common components across biological network graphs using a bipartite data model  

PubMed Central

The GeneWeaver bipartite data model provides an efficient means to evaluate shared molecular components from sets derived across diverse species, disease states and biological processes. In order to adapt this model for examining related molecular components and biological networks, such as pathway or gene network data, we have developed a means to leverage the bipartite data structure to extract and analyze shared edges. Using the Pathway Commons database we demonstrate the ability to rapidly identify shared connected components among a diverse set of pathways. In addition, we illustrate how results from maximal bipartite discovery can be decomposed into hierarchical relationships, allowing shared pathway components to be mapped through various parent-child relationships to help visualization and discovery of emergent kernel driven relationships. Interrogating common relationships among biological networks and conventional GeneWeaver gene lists will increase functional specificity and reliability of the shared biological components. This approach enables self-organization of biological processes through shared biological networks. PMID:25374613

2014-01-01

71

A Common Variant in the Telomerase RNA Component Is Associated with Short Telomere Length  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTelomeres shorten as cells divide. This shortening is compensated by the enzyme telomerase. We evaluated the effect of common variants in the telomerase RNA component (TERC) gene on telomere length (TL) in the population-based Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study and in two replication samples (the TwinsUK Study and the Amish Family Osteoporosis Study, AFOS).MethodologyFive variants were identified

Omer T. Njajou; Elizabeth H. Blackburn; Ludmila Pawlikowska; Massimo Mangino; Coleen M. Damcott; Pui-Yan Kwok; Timothy D. Spector; Anne B. Newman; Tamara B. Harris; Steven R. Cummings; Richard M. Cawthon; Alan R. Shuldiner; Ana M. Valdes; Wen-Chi Hsueh

2010-01-01

72

Myogenic Satellite Cell Proliferative and Differentiative Responses to Components of Common Oral Ergogenic Supplements  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the ability of common ergogenic supplement components to alter satellite cell proliferative activity in vitro. Compounds studied were cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, L-glutathione, ?-hydroxybutyric acid, calcium-?-hydroxy-?-methylbutyrate monohydrate, DL-thioctic acid (?-lipoic acid), and ornithine ?-ketoglutarate. Satellite cells were exposed to different levels of ergogenic test compound for a specified amount of time and analyzed by counting mononucleated and

MELINDA E. FERNYHOUGH; DERI L. HELTERLINE; JAN L. VIERCK; MICHAEL V. DODSON; LUKE R. BUCCI; JEFF Feliciano

2004-01-01

73

CSc 165 Computer Game Architecture and Implementation Spring 2014 -Gordon Assignment #1: Building A Game Using Game Engine Components  

E-print Network

at least some of the treasures. The game initialization code should instantiate several such objects1 CSc 165 ­ Computer Game Architecture and Implementation Spring 2014 - Gordon Assignment #1: Building A Game Using Game Engine Components Due: Tuesday, February 25th (2 weeks) The objective

Gordon, Scott

74

A Flexible Component based Access Control Architecture for OPeNDAP Services  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Network data access services such as OPeNDAP enable widespread access to data across user communities. However, without ready means to restrict access to data for such services, data providers and data owners are constrained from making their data more widely available. Even with such capability, the range of different security technologies available can make interoperability between services and user client tools a challenge. OPeNDAP is a key data access service in the infrastructure under development to support the CMIP5 (Couple Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5). The work is being carried out as part of an international collaboration including the US Earth System Grid and Curator projects and the EU funded IS-ENES and Metafor projects. This infrastructure will bring together Petabytes of climate model data and associated metadata from over twenty modelling centres around the world in a federation with a core archive mirrored at three data centres. A security system is needed to meet the requirements of organisations responsible for model data including the ability to restrict data access to registered users, keep them up to date with changes to data and services, audit access and protect finite computing resources. Individual organisations have existing tools and services such as OPeNDAP with which users in the climate research community are already familiar. The security system should overlay access control in a way which maintains the usability and ease of access to these services. The BADC (British Atmospheric Data Centre) has been working in collaboration with the Earth System Grid development team and partner organisations to develop the security architecture. OpenID and MyProxy were selected at an early stage in the ESG project to provide single sign-on capability across the federation of participating organisations. Building on the existing OPeNDAP specification an architecture based on pluggable server side components has been developed at the BADC. These components filter requests to the service they protect and apply the required authentication and authorisation schemes. Filters have been developed for OpenID and SSL client based authentication. The latter enabling access with MyProxy issued credentials. By preserving a clear separation between the security and application functionality, multiple authentication technologies may be supported without the need for modification to the underlying OPeNDAP application. The software has been developed in the Python programming language securing the Python based OPeNDAP implementation, PyDAP. This utilises the Python WSGI (Web Server Gateway Interface) specification to create distinct security filter components. Work is also currently underway to develop a parallel Java based filter implementation to secure the THREDDS Data Server. Whilst the ability to apply this flexible approach to the server side security layer is important, the development of compatible client software is vital to the take up of these services across a wide user base. To date PyDAP and wget based clients have been tested and work is planned to integrate the required security interface into the netCDF API. This forms part of ongoing collaboration with the OPeNDAP user and development community to ensure interoperability.

Kershaw, Philip; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Cinquini, Luca; Lawrence, Bryan; Pascoe, Stephen; Siebenlist, Frank

2010-05-01

75

Genome-wide association studies and genetic architecture of common human diseases  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide association scans provide the first successful method to identify genetic variation contributing to risk for common complex disease. Progress in identifying genes associated with melanoma show complex relationships between genes for pigmentation and the development of melanoma. Novel risk loci account for only a small fraction of the genetic variation contributing to this and many other diseases. Large meta-analyses find additional variants, but there is current debate about the contribution of common polymorphisms, rare polymorphisms or mutations to disease risk. PMID:21645295

2011-01-01

76

Quantitative Trait Loci for Root Architecture Traits Correlated with Phosphorus Acquisition in Common Bean  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low soil P availability is a primary constraint to common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Latin America and Africa. Substantial genotypic variation in bean adaptation to low phosphorus (LP) availability has been linked with root traits that enhance the efficiency of soil foraging. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for P accumulation and

Stephen E. Beebe; Marcela Rojas-Pierce; Xiaolong Yan; Matthew W. Blair; Fabio Pedraza; Fernando Muñoz; Joe Tohme; Jonathan P. Lynch

2006-01-01

77

Symbolics Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

What is an architecture. In computer systems, an architecture is a specification of an interface. To be dignified by the name architecture, an interface should be designed for a long lifespan and should connect system components maintained by different organizations. Often an architecture is part of a product definition and defines characteristics on which purchasers of that product rely, but

David A. Moon

1987-01-01

78

Common Components of Industrial Metal-Working Fluids as Sources of Carbon for Bacterial Growth  

PubMed Central

Water-based metal-working fluids used in large-scale industrial operations consist of many components, but in the most commonly used formulations only three classes of components are present in high enough concentrations that they could, in principle, provide enough carbon to support the high bacterial densities (109 CFU/ml) often observed in contaminated factory fluids. These components are petroleum oil (1 to 5%), petroleum sulfonates (0.1 to 0.5%), and fatty acids (less than 0.1%, mainly linoleic and oleic acids supplied as tall oils). We isolated pure strains of predominating bacteria from contaminated reservoirs of two metal-working systems and randomly selected 12 strains which we tested in liquid culture for growth with each of the metal-working fluid components as the sole source of carbon. Of the 12 strains, 7 reached high density (109 CFU/ml from an initial inoculum of less than 2 × 103) in 24 h, and 1 strain did the same in 48 h with 0.05% oleic or linoleic acid as the carbon source. These same strains also grew on 1% naphthenic petroleum oil but required up to 72 h to reach densities near 108 CFU/ml. One strain grew slightly and the others not at all on the petroleum sulfonates. The four remaining strains did not grow on any of the components, even though they were among the predominating bacteria in the contaminated system. Of the seven strains that grew best on the fatty acids and on the naphthenic petroleum oil, five were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter species and two were identified as Pseudomonas species. Four of the bacteria that did not grow were tentatively identified as species of Pseudomonas, and one could not be identified. PMID:16347072

Foxall-VanAken, S.; Brown, J. A.; Young, W.; Salmeen, I.; McClure, T.; Napier, S.; Olsen, R. H.

1986-01-01

79

The pherophorins: common, versatile building blocks in the evolution of extracellular matrix architecture in Volvocales.  

PubMed

Green algae of the order Volvocales provide an unrivalled opportunity for exploring the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity. They range from unicells, like Chlamydomonas, through homocytic colonial forms with increasing cooperation of individual cells, like Gonium or Pandorina, to heterocytic multicellular forms with different cell types and a complete division of labour, like Volvox. A fundamental requirement for the evolution of multicellularity is the development of a complex, multifunctional extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM has many functions, which can change under developmental control or as a result of environmental factors. Here molecular data from 15 novel proteins are presented. These proteins have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Gonium pectorale, Pandorina morum and Volvox carteri, and all belong to a single protein family, the pherophorins. Pherophorin-V1 is shown to be a glycoprotein localized to the 'cellular zone' of the V. carteri ECM. Pherophorin-V1 and -V2 mRNAs are strongly induced not only by the sex inducer, which triggers sexual development at extremely low concentrations, but also by mechanical wounding. Like the extensins of higher plants, which are also developmentally controlled or sometimes inducible by wounding, the pherophorins contain a (hydroxy-)proline-rich (HR) rod-like domain and are abundant within the extracellular compartment. In contrast to most extensins, pherophorins have additional globular A and B domains on both ends of the HR domains. Therefore pherophorins most closely resemble a particular class of higher plant extensin, the solanaceous lectins (e.g. potato lectin), suggesting multivalent carbohydrate-binding functions are present within the A and B domains and are responsible for cross-linking. Our results suggest that pherophorins are used as the building blocks for the extracellular scaffold throughout the Volvocales, with the characteristic mesh sizes in different ECM structures being a result of the highly diverse extensions of the HR domains. Pherophorins have therefore been a versatile element during the evolution of ECM architecture in these green algae. PMID:16367971

Hallmann, Armin

2006-01-01

80

Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders  

PubMed Central

Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10?5). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes—common to five of six disorders–included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20–30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders.

Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W.; van der Voet, Monique

2014-01-01

81

Molecular manipulation of solid state structure: influences of organic components on vanadium oxide architectures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Among the inorganic materials enjoying widespread contemporary interest, the metal oxide based solid phases occupy a prominent position by virtue of their applications to catalysis, sorption, molecular electronics, energy storage, optical materials and ceramics. The diversity of properties associated with these materials reflects the chemical composition, which allows variations in covalency, geometry and oxidation states, and the crystalline architecture, which may provide different pore structures, coordination sites, or juxtapositions of functional groups. Despite such fundamental and practical significance, the design of the structure of such materials remains a challenge in solid state chemistry. While organic materials have been synthesized which self-assemble into ordered arrays at low temperature and which exhibit molecular recognition and biomimetic activity, the ability to synthesize inorganic materials by rational design remains elusive. Small, soluble molecular building blocks with well-defined reaction chemistries which allow their low-temperature assembly into crystalline solid state inorganic materials are not well known. However, the existence of naturally occurring, structurally complex minerals establishes that hydrothermal synthesis can provide a low temperature pathway to produce open-framework and layered metastable structures utilizing inorganic starting materials. Thus, hydrothermal conditions have been used to prepare microporous tetrahedral framework solids that are capable of shape-selective absorption, like zeolites and aluminophosphates, and more recently in the preparation of complex solid arrays of the M/O/PO 3-4 and M/O/RPO 2-3 systems (M=V and Mo). The hydrothermal technique may be combined with the introduction of organic components which may act as charge compensating groups, space-filling units, structure directing agents, templates, tethers between functional groups, or conventional ligands in the preparation of inorganic/organic composites. In the past decade, this general strategy has been exploited in the evolution of a family of vanadium oxides incorporating structure-directing organic or secondary-metal organic subunits, which are the topic of this review. The synthetic approach to novel vanadium oxide solids occupies the interface between materials science and coordination chemistry. The emerging theme focuses on the association of an organic component, acting as a ligand, tether, or structure directing moiety, with the inorganic framework of the solid to provide unique composites. While some organic components may limit the size of inorganic cluster subunits of a solid by passivating the surface of an aggregate through capping, such ligands may also serve to link inorganic subunits into complex networks. In other cases, the organic subunit, rather than participating as a covalently bound unit of the framework, acts in a structure directing role, producing amphiphilic materials whose structures are determined by hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions. This latter feature is reminiscent of the factors influencing biomineralization, a field which may prove relevant to the development of new strategies for the controlled synthesis of organized inorganic and organic/inorganic composite materials. These various approaches to the "design" of inorganic solids are discussed and assessed in terms of the new structural types recently observed in the vanadium oxide chemistry.

Hagrman, Pamela J.; Finn, Robert C.; Zubieta, Jon

2001-11-01

82

Helplets: A Common Sense-Based Collaborative Help Collection and Retrieval Architecture for Web-Enabled Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All computer software systems, whether online or offline, require a help system. Help texts are traditionally written by software development companies and answer targeted questions in the form of how-tos and troubleshooting procedures. However, when the popularity of an application grows, users of the application themselves start adding to the corpus of help for the system in the form of online tutorials. There is, however, one problem with such tutorials. They have no direct link with the software for which they are written. Users have to search the Internet for different tutorials that are usually hosted on dispersed locations, and there is no ideal way of finding the relevant information without ending up with lots of noise in the search results. In this chapter, we describe a model for a help system which enhances this concept using collaborative tagging for categorization of "helplets." For the knowledge retrieval part of the system, we utilize a previously developed technique based on common sense and user personalization. We use a freely available common sense reasoning toolkit for knowledge retrieval. Our architecture can be implemented in Web-based systems as well as in stand-alone desktop applications.

Nauman, Mohammad; Khan, Shahbaz; Khan, Sanaullah

83

An Open Distributed Architecture for Reuse and Integration of Heterogeneous NLP Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shift from Computational Linguistics to Language Engineering is indicative of new trends in NLP. This paper reviews two NLP engineering problems: reuse and integration, while relating these concerns to the larger context of applied NLP. It presents a software architecture which is geared to support the development of a va- riety of large-scale NLP applications: In- formation Retrieval, Corpus

Rémi Zajac; Mark Casper; Nigel Sharples

1997-01-01

84

Virtual management of radiology examinations in the virtual radiology environment using common object request broker architecture services.  

PubMed

In the Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Medical Command is now embarking on an extremely exciting new project--creating a virtual radiology environment (VRE) for the management of radiology examinations. The business of radiology in the military is therefore being reengineered on several fronts by the VRE Project. In the VRE Project, a set of intelligent agent algorithms determine where examinations are to routed for reading bases on a knowledge base of the entire VRE. The set of algorithms, called the Meta-Manager, is hierarchical and uses object-based communications between medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and medical centers that have digital imaging network picture archiving and communications systems (DIN-PACS) networks. The communications is based on use of common object request broker architecture (CORBA) objects and services to send patient demographics and examination images from DIN-PACS networks in the MTFs to the DIN-PACS networks at the medical centers for diagnosis. The Meta-Manager is also responsible for updating the diagnosis at the originating MTF. CORBA services are used to perform secure message communications between DIN-PACS nodes in the VRE network. The Meta-Manager has a fail-safe architecture that allows the master Meta-Manager function to float to regional Meta-Manager sites in case of server failure. A prototype of the CORBA-based Meta-Manager is being developed by the University of Arizona's Computer Engineering Research Laboratory using the unified modeling language (UML) as a design tool. The prototype will implement the main functions described in the Meta-Manager design specification. The results of this project are expected to reengineer the process of radiology in the military and have extensions to commercial radiology environments. PMID:10342205

Martinez, R; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K; Timboe, H L

1999-05-01

85

Effects of Inoculation with Rhizobium on Seed Yield and Yield Components of Common Vetch (Vicia sativa L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of inoculation with Rhizobium leguminosarum on seed yield and yield components of common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) were evaluated under Black Sea Coastal Region conditions, Turkey, in the 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 growing seasons using common vetch cultivars Kubilay, Ürem, Karaelçi, Uluda¤, Emir, Çubuk and Nilüfer. The experiment was established as a split block design with 3 replications. Inoculation

Sebahattin ALBAYRAK; Cafer S

86

Generation of Component Based Architecture from Business Processes: Model Driven Engineering for SOA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) has significantly enhanced inter-organizational systems enabling business flexibility, Information Technology (IT) agility, and value generation. However, building a SOA that reduces technology-driven business and leverages process management seems referring to the recurrent issues of business process logic and IT alignment. This paper presents a model-driven development approach where long-running business service composition models drive their supporting service

Karim Dahman; Francois Charoy; Claude Godart

2010-01-01

87

Architectural integration of the components necessary for electrical energy storage on the nanoscale and in 3D.  

PubMed

We describe fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) multifunctional nanoarchitectures in which the three critical components of a battery--cathode, separator/electrolyte, and anode--are internally assembled as tricontinuous nanoscopic phases. The architecture is initiated using sol-gel chemistry and processing to erect a 3D self-wired nanoparticulate scaffold of manganese oxide (>200 m(2) g(-1)) with a continuous, open, and mesoporous void volume. The integrated 3D system is generated by exhaustive coverage of the oxide network by an ultrathin, conformal layer of insulating polymer that forms via self-limiting electrodeposition of poly(phenylene oxide). The remaining interconnected void volume is then wired with RuO(2) nanowebs using subambient thermal decomposition of RuO(4). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the three nanoscopic charge-transfer functional components--manganese oxide, polymer separator/cation conductor, and RuO(2)--exhibit the stratified, tricontinuous design of the phase-by-phase construction. This architecture contains all three components required for a solid-state energy storage device within a void volume sized at tens of nanometres such that nanometre-thick distances are established between the opposing electrodes. We have now demonstrated the ability to assemble multifunctional energy-storage nanoarchitectures on the nanoscale and in three dimensions. PMID:21327256

Rhodes, Christopher P; Long, Jeffrey W; Pettigrew, Katherine A; Stroud, Rhonda M; Rolison, Debra R

2011-04-01

88

Performance Management in Component-Oriented Systems Using a Model Driven ArchitectureTM Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developers often lack the time or knowledge to profoundly understand the performance issues in large- scale component-oriented enterprise applications. This situation is further complicated by the fact that such applications are often built using a mix of in-house and Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components. This paper presents a methodology for understanding and predicting the performance of component-oriented distributed systems both during development

Adrian Mos; John Murphy

2002-01-01

89

Learning common sense knowledge from user interaction and principal component analysis  

E-print Network

In this thesis, I present a system for reasoning with common sense knowledge in multiple natural languages, as part of the Open Mind Common Sense project. The knowledge that Open Mind collects from volunteer contributors ...

Speer, Robert (Robert H.)

2007-01-01

90

Site-selective effects on guest-molecular adsorption and fabrication of four-component architecture by higher order networks.  

PubMed

2D porous networks have attracted great attention as they can be used to immobilize functional units as guest molecules in a spatially ordered arrangement. In this work, a novel molecular hybrid network with two kinds of cavities was fabricated. Several kinds of guest molecules, such as coronene, copper(II) phthalocyanine (CuPc), triphenylene, heptanoic acid and fullerene molecules, can be immobilized into this template. Site- and size-selective effects can be observed. Furthermore, we have also fabricated interesting 2D crystal architecture with complex four-component structure at the liquid-solid interface, following investigation by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The current findings provide a convenient approach towards the formation of more complex and functionalized surface nanopatterns, which can benefit the study of host-guest assembly behaviour within a monolayer composed by several components at interfaces. PMID:23632563

Shen, Yong-Tao; Guan, Li; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Wang, Shuai; Gan, Li-Hua; Zeng, Qing-Dao; Wang, Chen

2013-08-14

91

An investigation into tutor training components common among successful development education programs at American institutions of higher education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to create a single criterion for the success of developmental education programs and to investigate tutor training components common among reported successful developmental education programs at American higher education institutions. Using chi-square analyses, (likelihood ratio) with corrections made on invalid chi squares with Fisher's Exact test using Monte Carlo simulation (SPSS, 1996), this study

Susan Jeanne-Seguin Costa

1997-01-01

92

Competency Test Items for Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Common Core Component. A Report of Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An activity was undertaken to develop written criterion-referenced tests for the common core component of Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Intended for tenth grade students who have completed Fundamentals of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations, applied principles were designed to consist of three…

Cheek, Jimmy G.; McGhee, Max B.

93

Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets  

DOEpatents

This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

Alman, David E. (Corvallis, OR); Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR); Davis, Daniel L. (Albany, OR)

2011-03-08

94

Adopting a Component-Based Software Architecture for an Industrial Control System – A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter presents a case study from a global company developing a new generation of programmable controllers to replace\\u000a several existing products. The system needs to incorporate support for a large number of I\\/O systems, network types, and communication\\u000a protocols. To leverage its global development resources and the competency of different development centers, the company decided\\u000a to adopt a component-based

Frank Lüders; Ivica Crnkovic; Per Runeson

95

Executing Aspect-Oriented Component-Based Software Architectures on .NET Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Component-Based Software Development (CBDS) and Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) have emerged in the last few years as new paradigms of software development. Both approaches provide techniques to improve the structure and reusability of the code. In addition, Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP) permits the reduction of the maintainability and development costs of the final code by means of the separation of concerns

Jennifer Pérez; Nour Ali; Cristóbal Costa; Jose A. Carsí; Isidro Ramos

96

The post-ejection evolution of the orbital components during a common envelope phase  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of planetary nebulae containing binary cores (BPNe) have become numerous enough to provide constraints on models of common envelope (CE) evolution. The observed orbital period distribution in BPNe is sharply peaked at approximately 0.3 days, similar to the orbital period distribution found in post-CE binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Theoretical orbital period distributions for BPNe calculated using population synthesis techniques peak at longer periods or are too broad, regardless of the choices for various uncertain input parameters. In this talk, I describe a possible resolution of this discrepancy that involves considering further dynamical evolution of the orbit after the envelope has been ejected. If there is sufficient material within the orbit, the frictional interaction between the secondary and this material will continue to drive spiral-in until the inter-orbit material becomes too small to support itself against collapse onto the core of the giant. Attempts to model this post-ejection phase and determine final orbital separations will be discussed. If available, preliminary results, in which such post-ejection orbital evolution is included into population synthesis calculations, will be presented.

Politano, Michael; Provance, Justin

2014-09-01

97

Evaluating Performance of Components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parallel Component Performance Benchmarks is a computer program developed to aid the evaluation of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) - a software architecture, based on a component model, that was conceived to foster high-performance computing, including parallel computing. More specifically, this program compares the performances (principally by measuring computing times) of componentized versus conventional versions of the Parallel Pyramid 2D Adaptive Mesh Refinement library - a software library that is used to generate computational meshes for solving physical problems and that is typical of software libraries in use at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Katz, Daniel; Tisdale, Edwin; Norton, Charles

2004-01-01

98

Experimental study of impact-cratering damage on brittle cylindrical column model as a fundamental component of space architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cylindrical column of brittle material processed from soil and rock is a fundamental component of architectures on the surface of solid bodies in the solar system. One of the most hazardous events for the structure is damaging by hypervelocity impacts by meteoroids and debris. In such a background, cylindrical columns made of plaster of Paris and glass-bead-sintered ceramic were impacted by spherical projectiles of nylon, glass, and steel at velocity of about 1-4.5 km/s. Measured crater radii, depth, and excavated mass expressed by a function of the cylinder radius are similar irrespective of the target material, if those parameters are normalized by appropriate parameters of the crater produced on the flat-surface target. The empirical scaling relations of the normalized crater radii and depth are provided. Using them, crater dimensions and excavated mass of crater on cylindrical surface of any radius can be predicted from the existing knowledge of those for flat surface. Recommendation for the minimum diameter of a cylinder so as to resist against a given impact is provided.

Fujiwara, Akira; Onose, Naomi; Setoh, Masato; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Hiraoka, Kensuke; Hasegawa, Sunao; Okudaira, Kyoko

2014-10-01

99

A dynamic network architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network software is a critical component of any distributed system. Because of its complexity, network software is commonly layered into a hierarchy of protocols, or more generally, into a protocol graph. Typical protocol graphs—including those standardized in the ISO and TCP\\/IP network architectures—share three important properties; the protocol graph is simple, the nodes of the graph (protocols) encapsulate complex functionality,

Sean W. O'Malley; Larry L. Peterson

1992-01-01

100

Hardware Architecture Study for NASA's Space Software Defined Radios  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study defines a hardware architecture approach for software defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radio frequency (RF) front-ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that comprise a typical communication radio. This paper describes the architecture details, module definitions, and the typical functions on each module as well as the module interfaces. Trade-offs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify the internal physical implementation within each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

Reinhart, Richard C.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Andro, Monty; Smith, Carl; Liebetreu, John

2008-01-01

101

Origin of the Genetic Components of the Vomeronasal System in the Common Ancestor of all Extant Vertebrates  

PubMed Central

Comparative genomics provides a valuable tool for inferring the evolutionary history of physiological systems, particularly when this information is difficult to ascertain by morphological traits. One such example is the vomeronasal system (VNS), a vertebrate nasal chemosensory system that is responsible for detecting intraspecific pheromonal cues as well as environmental odorants. The morphological components of the VNS are found only in tetrapods, but the genetic components of the system have been found in teleost fish, in addition to tetrapods. To determine when the genetic components of the VNS originated, we searched for the VNS-specific genes in the genomes of two early diverging vertebrate lineages: the sea lamprey from jawless fishes and the elephant shark from cartilaginous fishes. Genes encoding vomeronasal type 1 receptors (V1Rs) and Trpc2, two components of the vomeronasal signaling pathway, are present in the sea lamprey genome, and both are expressed in the olfactory organ, revealing that the genetic components of the present-day VNS existed in the common ancestor of all extant vertebrates. Additionally, all three VNS genes, Trpc2, V1Rs, and vomeronasal type 2 receptors (V2Rs), are found in the elephant shark genome. Because V1Rs and V2Rs are related to two families of taste receptors, we also searched the early diverging vertebrate genomes for taste system genes and found them in the shark genome but not in the lamprey. Coupled with known distributions of the genetic components of the vertebrate main olfactory system, our results suggest staggered origins of vertebrate sensory systems. These findings are important for understanding the evolution of vertebrate sensory systems and illustrate the utility of the genome sequences of early diverging vertebrates for uncovering the evolution of vertebrate-specific traits. PMID:19008528

Grus, Wendy E.; Zhang, Jianzhi

2009-01-01

102

GITEWS, an extensible and open integration platform for manifold sensor systems and processing components based on Sensor Web Enablement and the principles of Service Oriented Architectures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) is a multifaceted system consisting of various sensor types like seismometers, sea level sensors or GPS stations, and processing components, all with their own system behavior and proprietary data structure. To operate a warning chain, beginning from measurements scaling up to warning products, all components have to interact in a correct way, both syntactically and semantically. Designing the system great emphasis was laid on conformity to the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) specification by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The technical infrastructure, the so called Tsunami Service Bus (TSB) follows the blueprint of Service Oriented Architectures (SOA). The TSB is an integration concept (SWE) where functionality (observe, task, notify, alert, and process) is grouped around business processes (Monitoring, Decision Support, Sensor Management) and packaged as interoperable services (SAS, SOS, SPS, WNS). The benefits of using a flexible architecture together with SWE lead to an open integration platform: • accessing and controlling heterogeneous sensors in a uniform way (Functional Integration) • assigns functionality to distinct services (Separation of Concerns) • allows resilient relationship between systems (Loose Coupling) • integrates services so that they can be accessed from everywhere (Location Transparency) • enables infrastructures which integrate heterogeneous applications (Encapsulation) • allows combination of services (Orchestration) and data exchange within business processes Warning systems will evolve over time: New sensor types might be added, old sensors will be replaced and processing components will be improved. From a collection of few basic services it shall be possible to compose more complex functionality essential for specific warning systems. Given these requirements a flexible infrastructure is a prerequisite for sustainable systems and their architecture must be tailored for evolution. The use of well-known techniques and widely used open source software implementing industrial standards reduces the impact of service modifications allowing the evolution of a system as a whole. GITEWS implemented a solution to feed sensor raw data from any (remote) system into the infrastructure. Specific dispatchers enable plugging in sensor-type specific processing without changing the architecture. Client components don't need to be adjusted if new sensor-types or individuals are added to the system, because they access them via standardized services. One of the outstanding features of service-oriented architectures is the possibility to compose new services from existing ones. The so called orchestration, allows the definition of new warning processes which can be adapted easily to new requirements. This approach has following advantages: • With implementing SWE it is possible to establish the "detection" and integration of sensors via the internet. Thus a system of systems combining early warning functionality at different levels of detail is feasible. • Any institution could add both its own components as well as components from third parties if they are developed in conformance to SOA principles. In a federation an institution keeps the ownership of its data and decides which data are provided by a service and when. • A system can be deployed at minor costs as a core for own development at any institution and thus enabling autonomous early warning- or monitoring systems. The presentation covers both design and various instantiations (live demonstration) of the GITEWS architecture. Experiences concerning the design and complexity of SWE will be addressed in detail. A substantial amount of attention is laid on the techniques and methods of extending the architecture, adapting proprietary components to SWE services and encoding, and their orchestration in high level workflows and processes. Furthermore the potential of the architecture concerning adaptive behavior, collaboration across boundaries and semantic interoperab

Haener, Rainer; Waechter, Joachim; Fleischer, Jens; Herrnkind, Stefan; Schwarting, Herrmann

2010-05-01

103

Defining product architectures Eric Bonjour, Ghassen Harmel and Maryvonne Dulmet  

E-print Network

Defining product architectures Eric Bonjour, Ghassen Harmel and Maryvonne Dulmet Département modular product architectures can be defined as the clustering of components such that the degree over the last decade since it aims at providing methods to identify common modules and generate product

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

A Pan-Cancer Modular Regulatory Network Analysis to Identify Common and Cancer-Specific Network Components  

PubMed Central

Many human diseases including cancer are the result of perturbations to transcriptional regulatory networks that control context-specific expression of genes. A comparative approach across multiple cancer types is a powerful approach to illuminate the common and specific network features of this family of diseases. Recent efforts from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) have generated large collections of functional genomic data sets for multiple types of cancers. An emerging challenge is to devise computational approaches that systematically compare these genomic data sets across different cancer types that identify common and cancer-specific network components. We present a module- and network-based characterization of transcriptional patterns in six different cancers being studied in TCGA: breast, colon, rectal, kidney, ovarian, and endometrial. Our approach uses a recently developed regulatory network reconstruction algorithm, modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), within a stability selection framework to predict regulators for individual genes and gene modules. Our module-based analysis identifies a common theme of immune system processes in each cancer study, with modules statistically enriched for immune response processes as well as targets of key immune response regulators from the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) families. Comparison of the inferred regulatory networks from each cancer type identified a core regulatory network that included genes involved in chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, and immune response. Regulatory network hubs included genes with known roles in specific cancer types as well as genes with potentially novel roles in different cancer types. Overall, our integrated module and network analysis recapitulated known themes in cancer biology and additionally revealed novel regulatory hubs that suggest a complex interplay of immune response, cell cycle, and chromatin remodeling across multiple cancers. PMID:25374456

Knaack, Sara A; Siahpirani, Alireza Fotuhi; Roy, Sushmita

2014-01-01

105

SECA: security-enhanced communication architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, we propose and investigate the idea of enhancing a System-on-Chip (SoC) communication architecture (the fabric that integrates system components and carries the communication traffic between them) to facilitate higher security. We observe that a wide range of common security attacks are manifested as abnormalities in the system-level communication traffic. Therefore, the communication architecture, with its global system-level

Joel Coburn; Srivaths Ravi; Anand Raghunathan; Srimat T. Chakradhar

2005-01-01

106

Architecture 2030  

E-print Network

Architecture 2030 AIA Houston + 2030 series The data in this presentation is from Architecture 2030, all the information can be found on their website: www.architecture2030.org The 2030 Challenge The 2030 Challenge Architecture2030.org... Architecture2030.org Architecture2030.org The Problem Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org The Building Sector Architecture2030.org Energy Architecture2030.org Energy Architecture2030.org...

Reihl, K.; Tullos, A.

2012-01-01

107

A multi-step phosphorelay two-component system impacts on tolerance against dehydration stress in common wheat.  

PubMed

Wheat is an important staple crop, and its productivity is severely constrained by drought stress (DS). An understanding of the molecular basis of drought tolerance is necessary for genetic improvement of wheat for tolerance to DS. The two-component system (TCS) serves as a common sensor-regulator coupling mechanism implicated in the regulation of diverse biological processes (including response to DS) not only in prokaryotes, but also in higher plants. In the latter, TCS generally consists of two signalling elements, a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR) associated with an intermediate element called histidine phosphotransferase (HPT). Keeping in view the possible utility of TCS in developing water use efficient (WUE) wheat cultivars, we identified and characterized 62 wheat genes encoding TCS elements in a silico study; these included 7 HKs, 45 RRs along with 10 HPTs. Twelve of the 62 genes showed relatively higher alterations in the expression under drought. The quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR)-based expression analysis of these 12 TCS genes was carried out in wheat seedlings of a drought sensitive (HD2967) and a tolerant (Dharwar Dry) cultivar subjected to either dehydration stress or cytokinin treatment. The expression of these 12 genes under dehydration stress differed in sensitive and tolerant genotypes, even though for individual genes, both showed either up-regulation or down-regulation. In response to the treatment of cytokinin, the expression of type-A RR genes was higher in the tolerant genotype, relative to that in the sensitive genotype, the situation being reverse for the type-B RRs. These results have been discussed in the context of the role of TCS elements in drought tolerance in wheat. PMID:25228409

Gahlaut, Vijay; Mathur, Saloni; Dhariwal, Raman; Khurana, Jitendra P; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Balyan, Harindra S; Gupta, Pushpendra K

2014-12-01

108

Architecture College of Architecture  

E-print Network

of History and Theory: Sean Keller Director of Master of Science in Architecture: Vedran Mimica DirectorArchitecture College of Architecture S.R. Crown Hall 3360 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60616 312 of Master of Landscape Architecture Program: Marshall Brown Director of Studios: Frank Flury Director

Heller, Barbara

109

Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) Hardware Architecture Standard: Release 1.0 Hardware Section  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report defines a hardware architecture approach for software-defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general-purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays, and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radiofrequency front ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that compose a typical communication radio. This report describes the architecture details, the module definitions, the typical functions on each module, and the module interfaces. Tradeoffs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify a physical implementation internally on each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John; Hill, Gary; Mortensen, Dale J.; Andro, Monty; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Farrington, Allen

2008-01-01

110

Impact of the Common Genetic Associations of Age-Related Macular Degeneration upon Systemic Complement Component C3d Levels  

PubMed Central

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common condition that leads to severe vision loss and dysregulation of the complement system is thought to be associated with the disease. To investigate associations of polymorphisms in AMD susceptibility genes with systemic complement activation, 2655 individuals were genotyped for 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near 23 AMD associated risk genes. Component 3 (C3) and its catabolic fragment C3d were measured in serum and AMD staging was performed using multimodal imaging. The C3d/C3 ratio was calculated and associations with environmental factors, SNPs and various haplotypes of complement factor H (CFH) genes and complement factor B (CFB) genes were analyzed. Linear models were built to measure the influence of genetic variants on the C3d/C3 ratio. The study cohort included 1387 patients with AMD and 1268 controls. Higher C3d/C3 ratios were found for current smoker (p?=?0.002), higher age (p?=?1.56×10?7), AMD phenotype (p?=?1.15×10?11) and the two SNPs in the C3 gene rs6795735 (p?=?0.04) and rs2230199 (p?=?0.04). Lower C3d/C3 ratios were found for diabetes (p?=?2.87×10?6), higher body mass index (p?=?1.00×10?13), the SNPs rs1410996 (p?=?0.0001), rs800292 (p?=?0.003), rs12144939 (p?=?4.60×10?6) in CFH, rs4151667 (p?=?1.01×10?5) in CFB and individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB. The linear model revealed a corrected R-square of 0.063 including age, smoking status, gender, and genetic polymorphisms explaining 6.3% of the C3d/C3 ratio. After adding the AMD status the corrected R-square was 0.067. In conclusion, none of the evaluated genetic polymorphisms showed an association with increased systemic complement activation apart from two SNPs in the C3 gene. Major genetic and non-genetic factors for AMD were not associated with systemic complement activation. PMID:24675670

Ristau, Tina; Paun, Constantin; Ersoy, Lebriz; Hahn, Moritz; Lechanteur, Yara; Hoyng, Carel; de Jong, Eiko K.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Kirchhof, Bernd; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Fauser, Sascha

2014-01-01

111

Static and Dynamic Visualisation of Software Architectures for Component-based John C. Grundy, Warwick B. Mugridge and John G. Hosking  

E-print Network

Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand jgrundy@cs.waikato.ac.nz Department of Computer Science University of Auckland Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand {rick, john}@cs.auckland.ac.nz Abstract Component are becoming more common as software developers realise these have greater potential for improved reusability

Grundy, John

112

Security Aspects of an Enterprise-Wide Network Architecture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of two projects that concern local area networks and the common point between networks as they relate to network security. Discusses security architectures based on firewall components, packet filters, application gateways, security-management components, an intranet solution, user registration by Web form, and requests for…

Loew, Robert; Stengel, Ingo; Bleimann, Udo; McDonald, Aidan

1999-01-01

113

architecture architecture urban & regional  

E-print Network

landscape architecture architecture urban & regional planning environment + design college of fine.illinois.edu/discover #12;ARCHITECTU Transforming roofs and walls into gardens, vacant lots into playgrounds, and abandoned

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

114

Flexible free-standing luminescent two-component fiber films with tunable hierarchical structures based on hydrogen-bonding architecture.  

PubMed

Although the fabrication of hierarchical architectures with highly ordered functional units is of great importance for both fundamental science and practical application, the development of one-dimensional (1D) organic hierarchical micro/nanostructures based on low-molecular-weight (LMW) building blocks remains at an early stage. Herein, we report two types of micro/nanoscaled multicomponent fluorescent fiber systems with tunable hierarchical morphologies through a one-step coassembly process. With the aid of hydrogen-bonding motifs, LMW precursors (1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl)benzene (A) and two coassembled building blocks: 4-bromotetrafluorobenzene carboxylic acid (B) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenol (C)) have been self-organized into fibers and flexible free-standing films, which show hierarchical micro/nanostructures as well as tunable one-/two-photon luminescence. The disassembly of the multicomponent A.B and A.C fibers occurs at high temperature, which further alters the luminescence properties of the multicomponent materials. Therefore, this work provides a facile wet chemical route for fabricating multicomponent LMW self-assembled fibers and free-standing film systems with tunable hierarchical structures and photoemission behaviors, and such self-organized systems may have potential applications in fields of two-photon luminescence and thermal sensors. PMID:24274340

Yan, Dongpeng; Williams, Gareth R; Zhao, Min; Li, Changming; Fan, Guoling; Yang, Hejia

2013-12-17

115

Identical mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in the gliomatous and the sarcomatous components of gliosarcomas suggest a common origin from glial cells  

SciTech Connect

Gliosarcomas are morphologically heterogeneous tumors of the central nervous system composed of gliomatous and sarcomatous components. The histogenesis of the latter is still a matter of debate. As mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene represent an early event in the development of gliomas, we attempted to determine whether both components of gliosarcomas share identical alterations of the p53 gene. Using single-strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and direct DNA sequencing of the p53 gene, we analyzed dissected gliomatous and sarcomatous parts of 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gliosarcomas. The two tumors that contained a p53 alteration were found to carry the identical mutation (exon 5; codon 151, CCC {r_arrow} TCC; codon 173, GTG {r_arrow} GTA) in the gliomatous and the sarcomatous components. These findings suggest a common origin of the two cellular components from neoplastic glial cells. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Biernat, W.; Aguzzi, A.; Sure, U. [Univ. Hospital, Zuerich (Sweden)] [and others

1995-09-01

116

SPX1 is an important component in the phosphorus signalling network of common bean regulating root growth and phosphorus homeostasis.  

PubMed

Proteins containing the SPX domain are believed to play vital roles in the phosphorus (P) signalling network in plants. However, the functions of SPX proteins in legumes remain largely unknown. In this study, three SPX members, PvSPX1-PvSPX3 were cloned from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). It was found that the transcripts of all three PvSPX members were significantly enhanced in both bean leaves and roots by phosphate (Pi) starvation. Among them, the expression of nuclear localized PvSPX1 showed more sensitive and rapid responses to Pi starvation. Consistently, only overexpression of PvSPX1 resulted in increased root P concentration and modified morphology of transgenic bean hairy roots, such as inhibited root growth and an enlarged root hair zone. It was further demonstrated that PvSPX1 transcripts were up-regulated by overexpressing PvPHR1, and overexpressing PvSPX1 led to increased transcripts of 10 Pi starvation-responsive genes in transgenic bean hairy roots. Taken together, it is suggested that PvSPX1 is a positive regulator in the P signalling network of common bean, and is downstream of PvPHR1. PMID:24790114

Yao, Zhu-Fang; Liang, Cui-Yue; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Xiao, Bi-Xian; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

2014-07-01

117

SPX1 is an important component in the phosphorus signalling network of common bean regulating root growth and phosphorus homeostasis  

PubMed Central

Proteins containing the SPX domain are believed to play vital roles in the phosphorus (P) signalling network in plants. However, the functions of SPX proteins in legumes remain largely unknown. In this study, three SPX members, PvSPX1–PvSPX3 were cloned from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). It was found that the transcripts of all three PvSPX members were significantly enhanced in both bean leaves and roots by phosphate (Pi) starvation. Among them, the expression of nuclear localized PvSPX1 showed more sensitive and rapid responses to Pi starvation. Consistently, only overexpression of PvSPX1 resulted in increased root P concentration and modified morphology of transgenic bean hairy roots, such as inhibited root growth and an enlarged root hair zone. It was further demonstrated that PvSPX1 transcripts were up-regulated by overexpressing PvPHR1, and overexpressing PvSPX1 led to increased transcripts of 10 Pi starvation-responsive genes in transgenic bean hairy roots. Taken together, it is suggested that PvSPX1 is a positive regulator in the P signalling network of common bean, and is downstream of PvPHR1. PMID:24790114

Yao, Zhu-Fang; Liang, Cui-Yue; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Xiao, Bi-Xian; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

2014-01-01

118

Distinguishing the common components of oil- and water-based metalworking fluids for assessment of cancer incidence risk in autoworkers  

PubMed Central

Background Metalworking fluids (MWF) — straight, soluble, and synthetic — have overlapping components. We derived constituent-based metrics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), water-based MWF, biocides, and nitrosamines to account for this overlap and examined their relations with cancer incidence. Methods An autoworkers cohort of 30,000 was followed for cancer incidence. Hazard ratios were estimated for each cancer and cumulative exposure (lagged) to each new metric; soluble MWF contributed variably to several metrics with weight k=0–1. Results For most cancer sites, the constituent-based metrics resulted in stronger exposure-disease associations than the MWF classes alone. Laryngeal and bladder cancer were most strongly associated with PAH (k=0). Protective effects for stomach and lung cancer were observed with biocide, a component that may be a surrogate for endotoxin. Conclusions Our findings provide support and clarification of possible etiologies for previous positive associations and provide support for distinguishing exposure from oil- and water-based MWF in epidemiologic studies. PMID:21328414

Friesen, Melissa C; Costello, Sadie; Thurston, Sally W; Eisen, Ellen A

2012-01-01

119

The MDS autonomous control architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

Gat, E.

2000-01-01

120

Incident diagnoses of common symptoms ("sequelae") following traumatic brain injury, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2012.  

PubMed

Many individuals who suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBI) experience subsequent physical, neurocognitive, or psychological symptoms. This analysis examined the occurrence of 14 such symptoms in service members stratified by severity into three groups of TBI and also in two comparison groups (controls) of service members who had no documented TBI diagnosis. For members of each of the five groups, the proportion who had experienced the 14 symptoms of interest was captured for the first 3 month and 12 month periods after the relevant diagnosis. Service members in the group "TBI, non-current injury" differed considerably from the four other groups by demographic characteristics and by previous history of deployment. In general, individuals with diagnoses indicative of TBI, regardless of severity, had higher proportions of the post-TBI diagnoses than either control group. The most common post-TBI diagnoses were headache disorders, alcohol and substance abuse, post-traumatic stress disorder, and sleep disorders. Proportions with diagnosed symptoms increased from the earliest (2000-2002) to the most recent part (2007-2012) of the surveillance period. Probable reasons for this observation are discussed. PMID:23819535

2013-06-01

121

A Tool for Managing Software Architecture Knowledge  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a tool for managing architectural knowledge and rationale. The tool has been developed to support a framework for capturing and using architectural knowledge to improve the architecture process. This paper describes the main architectural components and features of the tool. The paper also provides examples of using the tool for supporting wellknown architecture design and analysis methods.

Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

2007-08-01

122

Structural insights into the COP9 signalosome and its common architecture with the 26S proteasome lid and eIF3.  

PubMed

The evolutionary conserved COP9 signalosome (CSN), a large multisubunit complex, plays a central role in regulating ubiquitination and cell signaling. Here we report recombinant insect cell expression and two-step purification of human CSN and demonstrate its functional assembly. We further obtain a three-dimensional structure of both native and recombinant CSN using electron microscopy and single particle analysis. Antibody labeling of CSN5 and segmentation of the structure suggest a likely subunit distribution and the architecture of its helical repeat subunits is revealed. We compare the structure of CSN with its homologous complexes, the 26S proteasome lid and eIF3, and propose a conserved architecture implying similar assembly pathways and/or conserved substrate interaction modes. PMID:20399188

Enchev, Radoslav I; Schreiber, Anne; Beuron, Fabienne; Morris, Edward P

2010-03-14

123

Are Architectural Aspects Style-Dependent?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past years, architectural aspects have been often defined as widely-scoped properties that naturally crosscut the boundaries of system components. This definition, however, neglects the concept of architectural style. Architectural styles prescribe different kinds of system decomposition and modularization by adopting distinct component and connector types. This position paper analyzes the influence exerted by architectural styles over the nature

Christina Chavez; Alessandro Garcia; Thais Batista

124

Integrated Knowledge Acquisition Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

An architecture for knowledge acquisition systems is proposed based upon the integration of existing methodologies, techniques and tools developed within the knowledge acquisition, machine learning, expert systems, hypermedia and knowledge representation research communities. Existing tools are analyzed within a common framework to show that their integration can be achieved in a natural and principled fashion. A detailed architecture for integrated

Brian R. Gaines; Mildred L. G. Shaw

1992-01-01

125

The zeaxanthin-independent and zeaxanthin-dependent qE components of nonphotochemical quenching involve common conformational changes within the photosystem II antenna in Arabidopsis.  

PubMed

The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II (LHCII) has the intrinsic capacity to dissipate excess light energy as heat in a process termed nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). Recent studies suggest that zeaxanthin and lutein both contribute to the rapidly relaxing component of NPQ, qE, possibly acting in the minor monomeric antenna complexes and the major trimeric LHCII, respectively. To distinguish whether zeaxanthin and lutein act independently as quenchers at separate sites, or alternatively whether zeaxanthin fulfills an allosteric role regulating lutein-mediated quenching, the kinetics of qE and the qE-related conformational changes (DeltaA535) were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant/antisense plants with altered contents of minor antenna (kolhcb6, aslhcb4), trimeric LHCII (aslhcb2), lutein (lut2, lut2npq1, lut2npq2), and zeaxanthin (npq1, npq2). The kinetics of the two components of NPQ induction arising from zeaxanthin-independent and zeaxanthin-dependent qE were both sensitive to changes in the protein composition of the photosystem II antenna. The replacement of lutein by zeaxanthin or violaxanthin in the internal Lhcb protein-binding sites affected the kinetics and relative amplitude of each component as well as the absolute chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime. Both components of qE were characterized by a conformational change leading to nearly identical absorption changes in the Soret region that indicated the involvement of the LHCII lutein 1 domain. Based on these observations, we suggest that both components of qE arise from a common quenching mechanism based upon a conformational change within the photosystem II antenna, optimized by Lhcb subunit-subunit interactions and tuned by the synergistic effects of external and internally bound xanthophylls. PMID:19011000

Johnson, Matthew P; Pérez-Bueno, María L; Zia, Ahmad; Horton, Peter; Ruban, Alexander V

2009-02-01

126

A Common Language  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the experience and motivation that drove the specific solutions developed for LIPA's EIM and data management strategy. LIPA's EIM has at its core a common information model (CIM)-based enterprise semantic model (ESM), a customized software development life cycle (SDLC), process templates, and LIPA's IT technical architecture design. Data modeling and technical architecture are based wherever possible on

M. Hervey; P. Vujovic

2010-01-01

127

Mapping genomic loci for cotton plant architecture, yield components, and fiber properties in an interspecific (Gossypium hirsutum L. × G. barbadense L.) RIL population.  

PubMed

A quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was conducted to better understand the genetic control of plant architecture (PA), yield components (YC), and fiber properties (FP) in the two cultivated tetraploid species of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. and G. barbadense L.). One hundred and fifty-nine genomic regions were identified on a saturated genetic map of more than 2,500 SSR and SNP markers, constructed with an interspecific recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from the genetic standards of the respective cotton species (G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 × G. barbadense acc. 3-79). Using the single nonparametric and MQM QTL model mapping procedures, we detected 428 putative loci in the 159 genomic regions that confer 24 cotton traits in three diverse production environments [College Station F&B Road (FB), TX; Brazos Bottom (BB), TX; and Shafter (SH), CA]. These putative QTL loci included 25 loci for PA, 60 for YC, and 343 for FP, of which 3, 12, and 60, respectively, were strongly associated with the traits (LOD score ? 3.0). Approximately 17.7 % of the PA putative QTL, 32.9 % of the YC QTL, and 48.3 % of the FP QTL had trait associations under multiple environments. The At subgenome (chromosomes 1-13) contributed 72.7 % of loci for PA, 46.2 % for YC, and 50.4 % for FP while the Dt subgenome (chromosomes 14-26) contributed 27.3 % of loci for PA, 53.8 % for YC, and 49.6 % for FP. The data obtained from this study augment prior evidence of QTL clusters or gene islands for specific traits or biological functions existing in several non-homoeologous cotton chromosomes. DNA markers identified in the 159 genomic regions will facilitate further dissection of genetic factors underlying these important traits and marker-assisted selection in cotton. PMID:25314923

Yu, John Z; Ulloa, Mauricio; Hoffman, Steven M; Kohel, Russell J; Pepper, Alan E; Fang, David D; Percy, Richard G; Burke, John J

2014-12-01

128

Particulate matter components and subclinical atherosclerosis: common approaches to estimating exposure in a Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Concentrations of outdoor fine particulate matter (PM2.5) have been associated with cardiovascular disease. PM2.5 chemical composition may be responsible for effects of exposure to PM2.5. Methods Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) collected in 2000–2002 on 6,256 US adults without clinical cardiovascular disease in six U.S. metropolitan areas, we investigated cross-sectional associations of estimated long-term exposure to total PM2.5 mass and PM2.5 components (elemental carbon [EC], organic carbon [OC], silicon and sulfur) with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcium [CAC] and right common carotid intima-media thickness [CIMT]). Community monitors deployed for this study from 2007 to 2008 were used to estimate exposures at baseline addresses using three commonly-used approaches: (1) nearest monitor (the primary approach), (2) inverse-distance monitor weighting and (3) city-wide average. Results Using the exposure estimate based on nearest monitor, in single-pollutant models, increased OC (effect estimate [95% CI] per IQR: 35.1 ?m [26.8, 43.3]), EC (9.6 ?m [3.6,15.7]), sulfur (22.7 ?m [15.0,30.4]) and total PM2.5 (14.7 ?m [9.0,20.5]) but not silicon (5.2 ?m [?9.8,20.1]), were associated with increased CIMT; in two-pollutant models, only the association with OC was robust to control for the other pollutants. Findings were generally consistent across the three exposure estimation approaches. None of the PM measures were positively associated with either the presence or extent of CAC. In sensitivity analyses, effect estimates for OC and silicon were particularly sensitive to control for metropolitan area. Conclusion Employing commonly-used exposure estimation approaches, all of the PM2.5 components considered, except silicon, were associated with increased CIMT, with the evidence being strongest for OC; no component was associated with increased CAC. PM2.5 chemical components, or other features of the sources that produced them, may be important in determining the effect of PM exposure on atherosclerosis. These cross-sectional findings await confirmation in future work employing longitudinal outcome measures and using more sophisticated approaches to estimating exposure. PMID:23641873

2013-01-01

129

VLSI architecture  

SciTech Connect

This book is a collection of course papers which discusses the latest (1982) milestone of electronic building blocks and its effect on computer architecture. Contributions range from selecting a VLSI process technology to Japan's Fifth Generation Computer Architecture. Contents, abridged: VLSI and machine architecture. Graphic design aids: HED and FATFREDDY. On the LUCIFER system. Clocking of VLSI circuits. Decentralised computer architectures for VLSI. Index.

Randell, B.; Treleaven, P.C.

1983-01-01

130

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

are required to take 4 courses in the history and theory of art and architecture during the freshman88 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School ofArchitecture is to contribute to a more humane environment

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

131

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

to take 4 courses in the history and theory of art and architecture during the freshman and sophomore91 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

132

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

, and methods. Students are required to take four courses in the history and theory of art and architecture1 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design, DArch The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute to a more humane environment

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

133

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

of emphasis: architectural design, with particular attention paid to history, theory, and practice; urban in the history and theory of art and architecture during the freshman90 Architecture The School of Architecture Degrees Offered: BA, BArch, MArch, MArch in Urban Design

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

134

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

of emphasis: architectural design, with particular attention paid to history, theory, and practice; urban. Students are required to take 4 courses in the history and theory of art and architecture during93 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

135

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

,studentsareintroducedtoabroadrange of architectural design issues, processes, and methods. Students are required to take 4 courses in the history86 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. The principal goal of the School of Architecture is to contribute

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

136

Architecture The School of Architecture  

E-print Network

of Architecture I HART 101 Introduction to History of Art PHYS 101 Mechanics (with lab) LPAP 101 Lifetime Physical Principles of Architecture I ARCH 132 Freshman Seminar HART 102 Introduction to History of Art LPAP 10291 Architecture The School of Architecture Dean Lars Lerup Associate Dean John J. Casbarian

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

137

Extracellular Matrix Remodeling: The Common Denominator in Connective Tissue DiseasesPossibilities for Evaluation and Current Understanding of the Matrix as More Than a Passive Architecture, but a Key Player in Tissue Failure  

PubMed Central

Abstract Increased attention is paid to the structural components of tissues. These components are mostly collagens and various proteoglycans. Emerging evidence suggests that altered components and noncoded modifications of the matrix may be both initiators and drivers of disease, exemplified by excessive tissue remodeling leading to tissue stiffness, as well as by changes in the signaling potential of both intact matrix and fragments thereof. Although tissue structure until recently was viewed as a simple architecture anchoring cells and proteins, this complex grid may contain essential information enabling the maintenance of the structure and normal functioning of tissue. The aims of this review are to (1) discuss the structural components of the matrix and the relevance of their mutations to the pathology of diseases such as fibrosis and cancer, (2) introduce the possibility that post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as protease cleavage, citrullination, cross-linking, nitrosylation, glycosylation, and isomerization, generated during pathology, may be unique, disease-specific biochemical markers, (3) list and review the range of simple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that have been developed for assessing the extracellular matrix (ECM) and detecting abnormal ECM remodeling, and (4) discuss whether some PTMs are the cause or consequence of disease. New evidence clearly suggests that the ECM at some point in the pathogenesis becomes a driver of disease. These pathological modified ECM proteins may allow insights into complicated pathologies in which the end stage is excessive tissue remodeling, and provide unique and more pathology-specific biochemical markers. PMID:23046407

Nielsen, Mette J.; Sand, Jannie M.; Henriksen, Kim; Genovese, Federica; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Smith, Victoria; Adamkewicz, Joanne I.; Christiansen, Claus; Leeming, Diana J.

2013-01-01

138

ASCO DESIGN CHARRETTE, OCT. 4 -6, 2012 I a cross-disciplinary design effort by faculty and students from Oklahoma State University's Schools of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior Design A "charrette" is a term commonly used to describe a s  

E-print Network

issues and potential for the facility. This study utilized the School of Architecture's Daylighting Lab and students from Oklahoma State University's Schools of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior and students from Oklahoma State University's Schools of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior

Piao, Daqing

139

Virtual Private Network Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes an architecture how QoS-enabled virtual private networks over the Internet can bebuilt and managed. The basic technologies for secure VPNs and for QoS support are introduced in the firstchapter. The second chapter describes our vision of a QoS-enabled VPN service over the Internet. It also discussesin detail the required components and their interactions of an appropriate architecture.

T. Braun; M. Günter; M. Kasumi; I. Khalil

1999-01-01

140

Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet imaging of the jet in 3C273: a common emission component from optical to X-rays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present far-ultraviolet (far-UV) observations at ~150 nm of the jet of quasar 3C273 obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Solar Blind Channel onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. While the jet morphology is very similar to that in the optical and near-UV, the spectral energy distributions of the jet's subregions show an upturn in ?f? at 150nm compared to 300nm everywhere in the jet. Moreover, the 150-nm flux is compatible with extrapolating the X-ray power law down to the UV region. This constitutes strong support for a common origin of the jet's far-UV and X-ray emission. It implies that even a substantial fraction of the visible light in the X-ray brightest parts of the jet arises from the same spectral component as the X-rays, as had been suggested earlier based on Spitzer Space Telescope observations. We argue that the identification of this UV/X-ray component opens up the possibility to establish the synchrotron origin of the X-ray emission by optical polarimetry. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with HST programme GO-9814. This work was begun at the Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510, USA. ‡ E-mail: jester@mpia.de

Jester, Sebastian; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Martel, André R.; Perlman, Eric S.; Sparks, William B.

2007-09-01

141

Identification of common or distinct genes related to antitumor activities of a medicinal herb and its major component by oligonucleotide microarray.  

PubMed

Although the physiological actions of many herbs are gradually being elucidated at the molecular level, it remains unclear how individual components of herbs contribute to their biological activities. In the present study, the antiproliferative activity of Coptidis rhizoma, a medicinal herb, and the major component berberine was investigated in 8 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Gene expression patterns associated with sensitivities to each agent were analyzed with oligonucleotide arrays that comprised approximately 11,000 genes. We used a tetrazolium dye (MTT) assay to determine ID(50) values after the 8 cell lines were exposed to the 2 agents for 72 hr. The ID(50) value for berberine was correlated positively with that for C. rhizoma (r=0.725, p=0.0401). C. rhizoma killed tumor cells more effectively than purified berberine when normalized to the level of berberine present in the herb. From the oligonucleotide array data, we selected 20 and 13 genes with strong correlations (r(2)>0.81) to ID(50) values for berberine and C. rhizoma, respectively. Among these 33 genes, the levels of expression of 12 were correlated with the ID(50) values of both agents, suggesting that these genes are associated with tumor-killing activity of berberine in C. rhizoma. Expression of the remaining 21 genes was correlated with the ID(50) value of either purified berberine or C. rhizoma. Thus, we identified common and distinct genes responsible for anti-proliferative activities of purified berberine and C. rhizoma. This strategy may improve our understanding of the actions of herbs with antitumor activities. PMID:14520708

Iizuka, Norio; Oka, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Kotaro; Tangoku, Akira; Miyamoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Takanobu; Uchimura, Shunji; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Okita, Kiwamu

2003-11-20

142

Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

Naiman, Cynthia G.

2004-01-01

143

Solar Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term “solar architecture”is a very dangerous one. As we were always told, there is architecture as to create shelter for people. We have architecture for big people, small people, white people, black people, any kind of colour of people, healthy people, disabled people. And you start thinking to yourself, making these classifications. Does that help? And you probably have

S. Behling

1994-01-01

144

Architecture & Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

2010-01-01

145

EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE CHANGE ARCHITECTURES USING A COMPUTABLE GENERAL  

E-print Network

EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE CHANGE ARCHITECTURES USING A COMPUTABLE GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM of Thesis: Evaluation of International Climate Change Architectures Using a Computable General Equilibrium of various components of an international climate change architecture on global and regional emissions price

146

Project Integration Architecture: Application Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications is enabled.

Jones, William Henry

2005-01-01

147

Software Engineering in Practice: Design and Architectures of FLOSS Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) practitioners and developers are typically also users of their own systems: as a result, traditional software engineering (SE) processes (e.g., the requirements and design phases), take less time to articulate and negotiate among FLOSS developers. Design and requirements are kept more as informal knowledge, rather than formally described and assessed. This paper attempts to recover the SE concepts of software design and architectures from three FLOSS case studies, sharing the same application domain (i.e., Instant Messaging). Its first objective is to determine whether a common architecture emerges from the three systems, which can be used as shared knowledge for future applications. The second objective is to determine whether these architectures evolve or decay during the evolution of these systems. The results of this study are encouraging: albeit no explicit effort was done by FLOSS developers to define a high-level view of the architecture, a common shared architecture could be distilled for the Instant Messaging application domain. It was also found that, for two of the three systems, the architecture becomes better organised, and the components better specified, as long as the system evolves in time.

Capiluppi, Andrea; Knowles, Thomas

148

?-ADL: an Architecture Description Language based on the higher-order typed ?-calculus for specifying dynamic and mobile software architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

A key aspect of the design of any software system is its architecture. An architecture description, from a runtime perspective, should provide a formal specification of the architecture in terms of components and connectors and how they are composed together. Further, a dynamic or mobile architecture description must provide a specification of how the architecture of the software system can

Flavio Oquendo

2004-01-01

149

Avionics System Architecture Tool  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Avionics System Architecture Tool (ASAT) is a computer program intended for use during the avionics-system-architecture- design phase of the process of designing a spacecraft for a specific mission. ASAT enables simulation of the dynamics of the command-and-data-handling functions of the spacecraft avionics in the scenarios in which the spacecraft is expected to operate. ASAT is built upon I-Logix Statemate MAGNUM, providing a complement of dynamic system modeling tools, including a graphical user interface (GUI), modeling checking capabilities, and a simulation engine. ASAT augments this with a library of predefined avionics components and additional software to support building and analyzing avionics hardware architectures using these components.

Chau, Savio; Hall, Ronald; Traylor, marcus; Whitfield, Adrian

2005-01-01

150

Standardization and program effect analysis (Study 2.4). Volume 2: Equipment commonality analysis. [cost savings of using flight-proven components in designing spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility and cost savings of using flight-proven components in designing spacecraft were investigated. The components analyzed were (1) large space telescope, (2) stratospheric aerosol and gas equipment, (3) mapping mission, (4) solar maximum mission, and (5) Tiros-N. It is concluded that flight-proven hardware can be used with not-too-extensive modification, and significant savings can be realized. The cost savings for each component are presented.

Shiokari, T.

1975-01-01

151

Synthesis of racemic 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-ol, a pheromone of rice moth and 5,9,13-trimethyltetradecanoic acid, a component of marine sponge from a common intermediate.  

PubMed

A facile synthesis of dl-6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-ol (1) a pheromone component of rice moth, Corcyra cephalonica Stainton and 5,9,13-trimethyltetradecanoic acid (2) a component of marine sponge, Cinachyrella alloclada Uliczka, using a common, intermediate, hexahydrofarnesol is accomplished. The salient features for 1 are: Grignard coupling of 5 with allylmagnesium bromide and oxymercuration-demercuration whereas for 2 they are: Knoevenagel condensation and subsequent hydrogenation. PMID:8087560

Rane, S S; Chadha, M S; Mamdapur, V R

1993-12-01

152

Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

1993-01-01

153

A common architecture for TPS development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test Program Set (TPS) software development for Electro-Optical (EO) testing has traditionally been an expensive and lengthy process. A major cause of this has been the development of new test executive software on an ad hoc basis for each program. Furthermore, there have typically been different needs for production versus lab environments with production needing a set of standard tests,

Alan Irwin; Joe La Veigne; Brian Nehring

2011-01-01

154

An exploration of architectural innovation in professional service firms  

E-print Network

Architectural innovation is achieved using architectural knowledge to reconfigure an established system to link together components in a new way that provides a competitive advantage. Components in professional service ...

Espinosa Vasconcelos, Fernando (Francisco Fernando)

2007-01-01

155

Network architecture and energy analysis of the integration of RFID and Wireless Sensor Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) are two important components of ubiquitous computing. They have different advantages and application areas. The RFID sensor network, which integrates RFID into WSN, has both the advantage of RFID and WSN. In this paper, three common and one new compound network architectures are described in detail. Targeting RFID sensor network systems,

Beiwei Zhang; Kunyuan Hu; Yunlong Zhu

2010-01-01

156

Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

2013-01-01

157

Lunar architecture and urbanism  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human civilization and architecture have defined each other for over 5000 years on Earth. Even in the novel environment of space, persistent issues of human urbanism will eclipse, within a historically short time, the technical challenges of space settlement that dominate our current view. By adding modern topics in space engineering, planetology, life support, human factors, material invention, and conservation to their already renaissance array of expertise, urban designers can responsibly apply ancient, proven standards to the exciting new opportunities afforded by space. Inescapable facts about the Moon set real boundaries within which tenable lunar urbanism and its component architecture must eventually develop.

Sherwood, Brent

1992-01-01

158

College of Architecture 51 College of Architecture  

E-print Network

, architectural history and theorCollege of Architecture 51 College of Architecture www.coa.uncc.edu Dean: Kenneth Lambla Associate Dean: Lee Gray Chair of Instruction: Betsy West The College of Architecture at the University of North

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

159

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

; English; Historic Preservation; History; Landscape Architecture; Planning, Design and the Built Design; and Visual Arts. Courses are offered in art and architectural history, communication studiesCollege of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Stuart, Steven J.

160

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

; English; Historic Preservation; History; Landscape Architecture; Planning, Design and the Built Design; and Visual Arts. Courses are offered in art and architectural history, communication studies25 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Stuart, Steven J.

161

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

and Management; Digital Production Arts; English; Historic Preservation; History; Land- scape Architecture, Communication and Information Design; and Visual Arts. Courses are offered in art and architectural historyCollege of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Bolding, M. Chad

162

Project Integration Architecture: Architectural Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. By being a single, self-revealing architecture, the ability to develop single tools, for example a single graphical user interface, to span all applications is enabled. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications becomes possible, Object-encapsulation further allows information to become in a sense self-aware, knowing things such as its own dimensionality and providing functionality appropriate to its kind.

Jones, William Henry

2001-01-01

163

Performative architecture  

E-print Network

The following thesis explores two central hypotheses. On the one hand it introduces the idea of performative architecture (performance in design), and has done so with the desire to contribute directly to the expansion of ...

Araya, Sergio (Sergio Alejandro)

2011-01-01

164

Electronic Components  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from Jim Lesurf of the University of St. Andrews explains common electronic components in an easily understood format. Resistors, capacitors, diodes, inductors and more are explained here. The difference between passive and active components is also explained. Information about conductors and semiconductors is provided as well.

Lesurf, Jim

2013-08-13

165

Power system commonality study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A limited top level study was completed to determine the commonality of power system/subsystem concepts within potential lunar and Mars surface power system architectures. A list of power system concepts with high commonality was developed which can be used to synthesize power system architectures which minimize development cost. Examples of potential high commonality power system architectures are given in this report along with a mass comparison. Other criteria such as life cycle cost (which includes transportation cost), reliability, safety, risk, and operability should be used in future, more detailed studies to select optimum power system architectures. Nineteen potential power system concepts were identified and evaluated for planetary surface applications including photovoltaic arrays with energy storage, isotope, and nuclear power systems. A top level environmental factors study was completed to assess environmental impacts on the identified power system concepts for both lunar and Mars applications. Potential power system design solutions for commonality between Mars and lunar applications were identified. Isotope, photovoltaic array (PVA), regenerative fuel cell (RFC), stainless steel liquid-metal cooled reactors (less than 1033 K maximum) with dynamic converters, and in-core thermionic reactor systems were found suitable for both lunar and Mars environments. The use of SP-100 thermoelectric (TE) and SP-100 dynamic power systems in a vacuum enclosure may also be possible for Mars applications although several issues need to be investigated further (potential single point failure of enclosure, mass penalty of enclosure and active pumping system, additional installation time and complexity). There are also technical issues involved with development of thermionic reactors (life, serviceability, and adaptability to other power conversion units). Additional studies are required to determine the optimum reactor concept for Mars applications. Various screening criteria (availability, environmental compatibility, mass competitiveness of energy storage, safety, and practicality for the application) were used to define concept applicability for each lunar and Mars application. A screening study resulted in 13 power systems for lunar applications and 15 for Mars applications. A commonality analysis showed several power systems with potentially high commonality (across both lunar and Mars applications). These high commonality systems include d PVA/RFC, dynamic isotope (1033 K Stirling, 1133 K Brayton, and 1300 K Brayton PCU's), SP-100 TE and dynamic derivatives (Mars systems required vacuum enclosure), in-core thermionic reactor, and liquid metal cooled reactor/Stirling cycle (1033 K). The generic commonality results were used to synthesize 3 high commonality power system architectures: (1) predominantly PV (limited nuclear and isotope), (2) predominantly in-core thermionic reactor/DIPS, and (3) predominantly SP-100 reactor/DIPS. The in-core thermionic reactor/DIPS power system architecture had the lowest total mass. Specific outputs from this study included lists of power system requirements, power system candidates, a power system application matrix, power system characteristics (mass), power system commonality ratings, example high commonality power system architectures, architecture masses, and issues/design solutions for lunar/Mars commonality.

Littman, Franklin D.

1992-07-01

166

Terra Harvest software architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under the Terra Harvest Program, the DIA has the objective of developing a universal Controller for the Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) community. The mission is to define, implement, and thoroughly document an open architecture that universally supports UGS missions, integrating disparate systems, peripherals, etc. The Controller's inherent interoperability with numerous systems enables the integration of both legacy and future UGS System (UGSS) components, while the design's open architecture supports rapid third-party development to ensure operational readiness. The successful accomplishment of these objectives by the program's Phase 3b contractors is demonstrated via integration of the companies' respective plug-'n'-play contributions that include controllers, various peripherals, such as sensors, cameras, etc., and their associated software drivers. In order to independently validate the Terra Harvest architecture, L-3 Nova Engineering, along with its partner, the University of Dayton Research Institute, is developing the Terra Harvest Open Source Environment (THOSE), a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) running on an embedded Linux Operating System. The Use Cases on which the software is developed support the full range of UGS operational scenarios such as remote sensor triggering, image capture, and data exfiltration. The Team is additionally developing an ARM microprocessor-based evaluation platform that is both energy-efficient and operationally flexible. The paper describes the overall THOSE architecture, as well as the design decisions for some of the key software components. Development process for THOSE is discussed as well.

Humeniuk, Dave; Klawon, Kevin

2012-06-01

167

Infrared thermography at EDF: common technique for high-voltage lines but new in monitoring and diagnosis of PWR plant components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infrared thermography is a remarkable aid in maintenance, and has been used for a number of years in testing high-voltage lines and transformer substations. Electricite de France (EDF) has developed a special infrared thermography system for this type of application. Until recently, use of IRT in both fossil and nuclear power plants was only sporadic and depended on the interest shown in the technique by individual maintenance managers. In power stations, it was primarily used for tests on switchyards, electrical control cabinets and insulation. The General Engineering Department of the EDF Generation and Transmission Division was responsible for assessing new equipment and studying special development requirements as they arose. Routine infrared thermography tests were performed by two teams from the Division, one handling northern France and the other southern France. Today, infrared thermography has become a fully-fledged monitoring and diagnosis tool in its own right, and related activities are being reorganized accordingly. Its recent success can be attributed to a number of factors: more high-powered IRT techniques, valuable feedback from American utility companies, and technical and economic assessments conducted by EDF over the last two years on equipment such as electrical and mechanical components, valves and insulation. EDF's reorganization of infrared thermography activities will begin with an overview of the resources now existing within the company. This inventory will be carried out by the General Engineering Department. At the same time, a report will be drawn up bearing on IRT testing over the last decade in conventional and nuclear power plants in France and the United States. Lastly, EDF will draw up a list of components to be monitored in this way, essentially on the basis of RCM studies. These measures will provide power plants with a catalogue of infrared thermography applications for specific component/failure combinations.

Provost, Daniel

1996-03-01

168

Service Oriented Architecture vs. Enterprise Architecture: Competition or Synergy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is still in its infancy, with no common agreement on its definition or the\\u000a types and meaning of the artefacts involved in its creation and maintenance. Despite this situation, SOA is sometimes promoted\\u000a as a parallel initiative, a competitor and perhaps even a successor of Enterprise Architecture (EA). In this paper, several\\u000a typical SOA artefacts

Ovidiu Noran; Peter Bernus

2008-01-01

169

42 College of Architecture COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

of coordinated studios, skill-building workshops and seminars,a four-semester sequence of architectural history42 College of Architecture COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Dean: Professor Lambla; Chair: Associate of Architecture (CoA) is to further the discourse between the theory and practice of architecture by the education

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

170

Fractional anisotropy changes in Alzheimer's disease depend on the underlying fiber tract architecture: a multiparametric DTI study using joint independent component analysis.  

PubMed

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows the simultaneous measurement of several diffusion indices that provide complementary information on the substrate of white matter alterations in neurodegenerative diseases. These indices include fractional anisotropy (FA) as measure of fiber tract integrity, and the mode of anisotropy (Mode) reflecting differences in the shape of the diffusion tensor. We used a multivariate approach based on joint independent component analysis of FA and Mode in a large sample of 138 subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia, 37 subjects with cerebrospinal fluid biomarker positive mild cognitive impairment (MCI-AD), and 153 healthy elderly controls from the European DTI Study on Dementia to comprehensively study alterations of microstructural white matter integrity in AD dementia and predementia AD. We found a parallel decrease of FA and Mode in intracortically projecting fiber tracts, and a parallel increase of FA and Mode in the corticospinal tract in AD patients compared to controls. Subjects with MCI-AD showed a similar, but spatially more restricted pattern of diffusion changes. Our findings suggest an early axonal degeneration in intracortical projecting fiber tracts in dementia and predementia stages of AD. An increase of Mode, parallel to an increase of FA, in the corticospinal tract suggests a more linear shape of diffusion due to loss of crossing fibers along relatively preserved cortico-petal and cortico-fugal fiber tracts in AD. Supporting this interpretation, we found three populations of fiber tracts, namely cortico-petal and cortico-fugal, commissural, and intrahemispherically projecting fiber tracts, in the peak area of parallel FA and Mode increase. PMID:24577476

Teipel, Stefan J; Grothe, Michel J; Filippi, Massimo; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Dyrba, Martin; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Meindl, Thomas; Bokde, Arun L W; Hampel, Harald; Klöppel, Stefan; Hauenstein, Karlheinz

2014-01-01

171

Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA s current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

Reinhart, Richard C.

2006-01-01

172

Architectural Treasures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an art lesson for eighth-grade students in which they created their own architectural structures. Stresses a strong discipline-based introduction using slide shows of famous buildings, large metropolitan cities, and 35,00 years of homes. Reports the lesson spanned two weeks. Includes a diagram, directions, and specifies materials. (CMK)

Pietropola, Anne

1998-01-01

173

Architectural Illusion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a lesson plan developed around the work of architectural muralist Richard Haas. Discusses the significance of mural painting and gives key concepts for the lesson. Lists class activities for the elementary and secondary grades. Provides a photograph of the Haas mural on the Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel, 1986. (GG)

Doornek, Richard R.

1990-01-01

174

Architectural Tops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

Mahoney, Ellen

2010-01-01

175

Reactive architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This architectural system explores the idea of using a parametric interface that reacts and changes based on user input while reproducing a series of affects (defined in psychology as the experience of emotion or feeling) on the user. The affects are predetermined, based on real world examples, and the system is designed in accordance. The overall premise for this project

Sophia Sobers

2010-01-01

176

Integrating hospital information systems in healthcare institutions: a mediation architecture.  

PubMed

Many studies have examined the integration of information systems into healthcare institutions, leading to several standards in the healthcare domain (CORBAmed: Common Object Request Broker Architecture in Medicine; HL7: Health Level Seven International; DICOM: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine; and IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). Due to the existence of a wide diversity of heterogeneous systems, three essential factors are necessary to fully integrate a system: data, functions and workflow. However, most of the previous studies have dealt with only one or two of these factors and this makes the system integration unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a flexible, scalable architecture for Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Our main purpose is to provide a practical solution to insure HIS interoperability so that healthcare institutions can communicate without being obliged to change their local information systems and without altering the tasks of the healthcare professionals. Our architecture is a mediation architecture with 3 levels: 1) a database level, 2) a middleware level and 3) a user interface level. The mediation is based on two central components: the Mediator and the Adapter. Using the XML format allows us to establish a structured, secured exchange of healthcare data. The notion of medical ontology is introduced to solve semantic conflicts and to unify the language used for the exchange. Our mediation architecture provides an effective, promising model that promotes the integration of hospital information systems that are autonomous, heterogeneous, semantically interoperable and platform-independent. PMID:22086739

El Azami, Ikram; Cherkaoui Malki, Mohammed Ouçamah; Tahon, Christian

2012-10-01

177

Development of protocol for screening the formulation components and the assessment of common quality problems of nano-structured lipid carriers.  

PubMed

The present study investigates the screening of the formulation components as well as evaluates the quality issues of the nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for the anticancer agent, CPT-11. The stepwise screening of the components for the preparation of NLCs requires the selection of liquid lipid or oil, based on the relative solubility of CPT-11 in different oils. Maximum solubility of the CPT-11 was found in capmul MCM-C8 (81±0.5 mg/ml). Hence, it was selected as the liquid lipid for the development of NLCs. Solid lipids gelucire 39/1, glyceryl mono stearate (GSM) and compritol ATO 888 were observed to have good affinity for the drug on systematic screening of different solid lipids. However, gelucire 39/1 and GSM were found to have lower physical compatibility (miscibility) with capmul MCM C-8. Hence, compritol ATO 888 was selected as the solid lipid phase for the preparation of NLCs. Ratio of liquid lipid (oil) to solid lipid was optimized with the intention of maximizing the oil concentration (as oil was found to have higher solubility of drug) as well as producing a lipid mix with sufficient melting point to maintain solid state. The liquid-solid lipid mixture in the ratio up to 30:70 was observed to have sufficient melting point (52.48±1.2 °C). Pluronic F-68 was selected as the main surfactant for the preparation of NLCs because of its good emulsification efficacy for the solid lipid liquid mix. The optimized formulation was also evaluated for the different quality issues. PXRD data revealed that the characteristic peaks of the compritol were present in the NLC samples and there was no appreciable polymorphic change when the formulation was stored for 6 months. Electron microscopic and DLS studies proved the absence of different colloidal species. Thermal analysis by DSC revealed that the lipid particles maintained sufficiently good melting point even after nanosizing. Absence of gelation on multiple syringing and resilience for the stress provided by autoclaving further established the quality of the developed NLCs. PMID:24345574

Negi, Lalit Mohan; Jaggi, Manu; Talegaonkar, Sushama

2014-01-30

178

Deciphering structural and temporal interplays during the architectural development of mango trees.  

PubMed

Plant architecture is commonly defined by the adjacency of organs within the structure and their properties. Few studies consider the effect of endogenous temporal factors, namely phenological factors, on the establishment of plant architecture. This study hypothesized that, in addition to the effect of environmental factors, the observed plant architecture results from both endogenous structural and temporal components, and their interplays. Mango tree, which is characterized by strong phenological asynchronisms within and between trees and by repeated vegetative and reproductive flushes during a growing cycle, was chosen as a plant model. During two consecutive growing cycles, this study described vegetative and reproductive development of 20 trees submitted to the same environmental conditions. Four mango cultivars were considered to assess possible cultivar-specific patterns. Integrative vegetative and reproductive development models incorporating generalized linear models as components were built. These models described the occurrence, intensity, and timing of vegetative and reproductive development at the growth unit scale. This study showed significant interplays between structural and temporal components of plant architectural development at two temporal scales. Within a growing cycle, earliness of bud burst was highly and positively related to earliness of vegetative development and flowering. Between growing cycles, flowering growth units delayed vegetative development compared to growth units that did not flower. These interplays explained how vegetative and reproductive phenological asynchronisms within and between trees were generated and maintained. It is suggested that causation networks involving structural and temporal components may give rise to contrasted tree architectures. PMID:23585668

Dambreville, Anaëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Trottier, Catherine; Guédon, Yann; Normand, Frédéric

2013-05-01

179

Fabric Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published by the Industrial Fabrics Association International, Fabric Architecture magazine is published bimonthly and is distributed to over 13000 architects working in the field. For those who've never thought about the possibilities and opportunities afforded by this area that straddles the lines between fabrics, design, and architecture, it's quite a find. On this page, users can look through materials that address topics like tents, lightweight structures, graphics, awnings, and truck covers. After perusing these areas, visitors should delve into the current issue. The archives here date back to 2006, and the topics covered within these pages include fabrics in the workplace, flexible design materials, and creating a "green" car park with various fabrics. For those who are interested, there's also information about how to subscribe to the print edition of the magazine.

180

Parametric architecture : performative/responsive assembly components  

E-print Network

Current parametric design generates many possible solutions during modeling and design process, but in the final stage, only allows users to choose one solution to develop. This thesis demonstrates a design strategy for ...

Yu, Huei Sheng

2009-01-01

181

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 4 School of Architecture  

E-print Network

1 ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 4 ARCH 355 School of Architecture McGill University Prof. Annmarie Adams Winter 2013 This fourth course in our Architectural History sequence explores new forms that emerged and cultural history. Each lecture focuses on a specific architectural issue, typology, or place, spinning out

Barthelat, Francois

182

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

and Landscape Architecture. The School of the Humanities includes the departments of Commu- nicationStudies;English;History63 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers one-of-a- kind opportunities for interdisciplinary exploration

Stuart, Steven J.

183

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

and Landscape Architecture. The School of the Humanities includes the departments of Commu- nicationStudies;English;History62 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers one-of-a- kind opportunities for interdisciplinary exploration

Stuart, Steven J.

184

College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

. Courses are offered in art and architectural history, communication studies, geography, languages, lit25 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts, and Humani- ties offers graduate programs in three schools: the School

Stuart, Steven J.

185

College of Architecture College of Architecture  

E-print Network

College of Architecture College of Architecture S.R. Crown Hall 3360 S. State St. Chicago, IL 60616 Director of Doctoral Program: Harry Mallgrave Director of History and Theory: Sean Keller Director of Master of Science in Architecture: Vedram Mimica Director of Master of Landscape Architecture Program

Heller, Barbara

186

A Reference Architecture for Web Browsers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A reference architecture for a domain captures the fun- damental subsystems common to systems of that domain as well as the relationships between these subsystems. Hav- ing a reference architecture available can aid both during maintenance and at design time: it can improve under- standing of a given system, it can aid in analyzing trade- offs between different design options,

Alan Grosskurth; Michael W. Godfrey

2005-01-01

187

CSE: a modular architecture for computational steering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computational steering is the ultimate goal of interactive simulation. Steering enables users to supervise and dynamically control the computation of an ongoing simulation. We describe CSE: a modular architecture for a computational steering environment. The kernel of the architecture is designed to be very simple, flexible and minimalistic. All higher level system functionality is pushed into modular components outside of

Robert van Liere; J. J. van Wijk

1996-01-01

188

Common Wart  

MedlinePLUS

newsletter | contact Share | Common Wart A parent's guide to condition and treatment information A A A This image displays a large wart on ... over 100 types of the human papillomavirus (HPV). Common warts are usually found on areas of the ...

189

Distributed visualization framework architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An architecture for distributed and collaborative visualization is presented. The design goals of the system are to create a lightweight, easy to use and extensible framework for reasearch in scientific visualization. The system provides both single user and collaborative distributed environment. System architecture employs a client-server model. Visualization projects can be synchronously accessed and modified from different client machines. We present a set of visualization use cases that illustrate the flexibility of our system. The framework provides a rich set of reusable components for creating new applications. These components make heavy use of leading design patterns. All components are based on the functionality of a small set of interfaces. This allows new components to be integrated seamlessly with little to no effort. All user input and higher-level control functionality interface with proxy objects supporting a concrete implementation of these interfaces. These light-weight objects can be easily streamed across the web and even integrated with smart clients running on a user's cell phone. The back-end is supported by concrete implementations wherever needed (for instance for rendering). A middle-tier manages any communication and synchronization with the proxy objects. In addition to the data components, we have developed several first-class GUI components for visualization. These include a layer compositor editor, a programmable shader editor, a material editor and various drawable editors. These GUI components interact strictly with the interfaces. Access to the various entities in the system is provided by an AssetManager. The asset manager keeps track of all of the registered proxies and responds to queries on the overall system. This allows all user components to be populated automatically. Hence if a new component is added that supports the IMaterial interface, any instances of this can be used in the various GUI components that work with this interface. One of the main features is an interactive shader designer. This allows rapid prototyping of new visualization renderings that are shader-based and greatly accelerates the development and debug cycle.

Mishchenko, Oleg; Raman, Sundaresan; Crawfis, Roger

2010-01-01

190

Common Cold  

MedlinePLUS

... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In the course of a year, people ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest ...

191

An architectural history of metaphors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a review and an historical perspective on the architectural metaphor. It identifies common characteristics\\u000a and peculiarities—as they apply to given historical periods—and analyses the similarities and divergences. The review provides\\u000a a vocabulary, which will facilitate an appreciation of existing and new metaphors.

Barie Fez-Barringten

2011-01-01

192

Organizing Your Website: Information Architecture  

E-print Network

Organizing Your Website: Information Architecture Harvard Web Publishing provides several common place to include links to intranet sites. Global Footer: University-wide web polices. Social Nav: Your deep, so that content is not buried within the site. When possible, use parallel construction when nami

193

Model 204 Architecture and Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present some of the major architectural principles of MODEL 204, a commercial database product of Computer Corporation of America for the IBM 370 computer, and indicate how these principles result in exceptional performance advantages performing certain common tasks in complex query processing. A few performance measurements comparing MODEL 204 to other commercial products are presented.

Patrick E. O'neil

1987-01-01

194

Intel Architecture Software Developer's  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9 CHAPTER 2 INTRODUCTION TO THE INTEL ARCHITECTURE 2.1. BRIEF HISTORY OF THE INTEL ARCHITECTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2. INCREASING INTEL ARCHITECTURE PERFORMANCE AND MOORE'S LAW . 2-4 2.3. BRIEF HISTORYIntel Architecture Software Developer's Manual Volume 1: Basic Architecture NOTE: The Intel

Dinda, Peter A.

195

Architectural Support for Database Visualization  

E-print Network

axis). While the age map is just the identity, the salary map maintains the natural numeric order visualization is to achieve a comparably effective mapping from data to display. Keim [4,5,6] has achieved visualization. The essential and unique component of this architecture is the mapping functionality, which adds

196

Space Station data management system architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Within the Space Station program, the Data Management System (DMS) functions in a dual role. First, it provides the hardware resources and software services which support the data processing, data communications, and data storage functions of the onboard subsystems and payloads. Second, it functions as an integrating entity which provides a common operating environment and human-machine interface for the operation and control of the orbiting Space Station systems and payloads by both the crew and the ground operators. This paper discusses the evolution and derivation of the requirements and issues which have had significant effect on the design of the Space Station DMS, describes the DMS components and services which support system and payload operations, and presents the current architectural view of the system as it exists in October 1986; one-and-a-half years into the Space Station Phase B Definition and Preliminary Design Study.

Mallary, William E.; Whitelaw, Virginia A.

1987-01-01

197

Optical linear algebra processors - Architectures and algorithms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attention is given to the component design and optical configuration features of a generic optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) architecture, as well as the large number of OLAP architectures, number representations, algorithms and applications encountered in current literature. Number-representation issues associated with bipolar and complex-valued data representations, high-accuracy (including floating point) performance, and the base or radix to be employed, are discussed, together with case studies on a space-integrating frequency-multiplexed architecture and a hybrid space-integrating and time-integrating multichannel architecture.

Casasent, David

1986-01-01

198

An Investigation into Cost Modelling for Design of Distributed Automotive Electrical Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerging automotive electrical architecture is a distributed real-time control system whose functions are integrated by a combination of shared memory, hardwired connections and in-vehicle control networks such as CAN, LIN and FlexRay. The uptake of AUTOSAR for the integration of application software, with common embedded device driver components, offers the opportunity for the partitioning and business model of automotive

C. P. Quigley; R. McMurran; R. P. Jones

199

Art & Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website was created by the Courtauld Institute of Art, a British institute created for the study of Western art. The website is "designed to be explored," and with over 40,000 images and a network of over 500,000 links, there's a great deal to explore. Because of the vast amount of content, visitors might find it helpful to first check out the link at the bottom of the page, entitled "About A&A". From there, click on the "How to Use the Art & Architecture Web Site". This extremely useful link has over a dozen categories of instruction, from "Basics" to "Search Tips" to "Profile and Preferences". The "Quizzes, Polls and Discussions" section on the left hand side of the page is a clever section with quizzes, such as those on the value of watercolors and polls. On the right hand side of the page the "Stories" area contains transcripts of fascinating interviews with artists and architects.

200

A Software Architecture for HPC Grid Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a component software architecture designed for demanding grid computing environments that allows the optimal\\u000a performance of the assembled component applications to be achieved. Performance over the assembled component application is\\u000a maintained through inter-component static and dynamic optimisation techniques. Having defined an application through both\\u000a its component task and data flow graphs we are able to use the associated

Steven Newhouse; Anthony Mayer; John Darlington

201

Design and realization of macroscopic grid architectures mimicking carbon molecules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper shows, through a new geometrical approach, how to build some special deltahedra, which might represent nano-architectures of molecular structures, in nature commonly known as fullerenes, as well as new intriguing macro-architectures for designing innovative structures. We have realized models of these nano and macro architectures including a roof-like structure for a tennis court and educational games.

Gastaldi, Davide; Pugno, Nicola M.

2009-10-01

202

Representing and encoding plant architecture: A review Christophe Godin*  

E-print Network

uses. However, the collection of plant architecture data is an increasingly important issue, which;C. Godin414 1. INTRODUCTION Representations of plant architecture are commonly used to model plantReview Representing and encoding plant architecture: A review Christophe Godin* CIRAD, Programme de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

203

Motivation in software architecture and software project management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software architecture (SA) is considered an active research area nowadays, although it is not a new activity while developing software. Software architecture is a structure represented using Architecture Description Languages (ADLs) and graphical diagrams of the system, showing different components and relationships among them. Software Project Management (SPM) pertains to the management and controlling activities involved in Software Development Life

Syeda Uzma Gardazi; Haroon Khan; Syeda Faiza Gardazi; Arshad Ali Shahid

2009-01-01

204

Adaptive workflow management—an integrated approach and system architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present an integrated approach and a three-tier System Architecture for Adaptive Workflow Management. An important feature of this Architecture, is the inclusion of a Planning component, not seen so far in most Workflow systems, which helps to integrate Planning and Adaptive Workflow Management. Another important feature of this Architecture, is that it has been developed primarily

Nanjangud C. Narendra

2000-01-01

205

Clays, common  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

Virta, R.L.

1998-01-01

206

Savannah River Site computing architecture migration guide  

SciTech Connect

The SRS Computing Architecture is a vision statement for site computing which enumerates the strategies which will guide SRS computing efforts for the 1990s. Each strategy is supported by a number of feature statements which clarify the strategy by providing additional detail. Since it is a strategic planning document, the Architecture has sitewide applicability and endorsement but does not attempt to specify implementation details. It does, however, specify that a document will be developed to guide the migration from the current site environment to that envisioned by the new architecture. The goal of this document, the SRS Computing Architecture Migration Guide, is to identify specific strategic and tactical tasks which would have to be completed to fully implement the architectural vision for site computing as well as a recommended sequence and timeframe for addressing these tasks. It takes into account the expected availability of technology, the existing installed base, and interdependencies among architectural components and objectives.

Not Available

1991-07-30

207

Hybrid image recognition architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current research on artificial vision and pattern recognition tends to concentrate either on numerical processing (filtering, morphological, spectral) or in symbolic or subsymbolic processing (neural networks, fuzzy logic, knowledge-based systems). In this work we combine both kinds of processing in a hybrid image processing architecture. The numerical processing part implements the most usual facilities (equalization, convolution filters, morphological filters, segmentation and description) in a way adequate to transform the input image into a polygonal outline. Then recognition is performed with a rule-based system implemented in Prolog. This allows a neat high-level representation of the patterns to recognize as a set of logical relations (predicates), and also the recognition procedure is represented as a set of logical rules. To integrate the numerical and logical components of our system, we embedded a Prolog interpreter as a software component within a visual programming language. Thus, our architecture features both the speed and versatility of a visual language application, and the abstraction level and modularity of a logical description.

Delrieux, Claudio; Katz, Roman

2002-06-01

208

Automated Synthesis of Architecture of Avionic Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Architecture Synthesis Tool (AST) is software that automatically synthesizes software and hardware architectures of avionic systems. The AST is expected to be most helpful during initial formulation of an avionic-system design, when system requirements change frequently and manual modification of architecture is time-consuming and susceptible to error. The AST comprises two parts: (1) an architecture generator, which utilizes a genetic algorithm to create a multitude of architectures; and (2) a functionality evaluator, which analyzes the architectures for viability, rejecting most of the non-viable ones. The functionality evaluator generates and uses a viability tree a hierarchy representing functions and components that perform the functions such that the system as a whole performs system-level functions representing the requirements for the system as specified by a user. Architectures that survive the functionality evaluator are further evaluated by the selection process of the genetic algorithm. Architectures found to be most promising to satisfy the user s requirements and to perform optimally are selected as parents to the next generation of architectures. The foregoing process is iterated as many times as the user desires. The final output is one or a few viable architectures that satisfy the user s requirements.

Chau, Savio; Xu, Joseph; Dang, Van; Lu, James F.

2006-01-01

209

56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE Arts + Architecture  

E-print Network

leadership. The arts and architecture have a long history of collaboration; they require analysis the School of Architecture and the Departments of Art and Art History, Dance, Music, and Theatre. PROGRAMS; Bachelor of Art History, Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art, Bachelor of Architecture, and Bachelor of Music

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

210

56 COLLEGE OF ARTS + ARCHITECTURE Arts + Architecture  

E-print Network

leadership. The arts and architecture have a long history of collaboration; they require analysis the School of Architecture and the Departments of Art and Art History, Dance, Music, and Theatre. Programs; Bachelor of Art History, Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art, Bachelor of Architecture, and Bachelor of Music

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

211

Common Wart  

MedlinePLUS

newsletter | contact Share | Common Wart Information for adults A A A This image displays an unusual "horseshoe-shaped" wart on chin. Overview Warts ... over 100 types of the human papillomavirus (HPV). Common warts are usually found on areas of the ...

212

Nonlinear principal component analysis of climate data  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the details of the nonlinear principal component analysis of climate data. Topic discussed include: connection with principal component analysis; network architecture; analysis of the standard routine (PRINC); and results.

Boyle, J.; Sengupta, S.

1995-06-01

213

Common cold  

MedlinePLUS

... and before eating and preparing food. Disinfect your environment. Clean commonly touched surfaces (such as sink handles, ... system work properly. Eat yogurt that contains "active cultures." These may help prevent colds. Probiotics may help ...

214

Study Abroad in Architecture  

E-print Network

-solving skills Develop and improve your language skills Study buildings and architectural history of citiesStudy Abroad in Architecture Studying abroad is increasingly important for architecture majors the world and give you the opportunity to gain a new perspective of architecture that will be invaluable

Heller, Barbara

215

The UAS control segment architecture: an overview  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics) directed the Services in 2009 to jointly develop and demonstrate a common architecture for command and control of Department of Defense (DoD) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Groups 2 through 5. The UAS Control Segment (UCS) Architecture is an architecture framework for specifying and designing the softwareintensive capabilities of current and emerging UCS systems in the DoD inventory. The UCS Architecture is based on Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) principles that will be adopted by each of the Services as a common basis for acquiring, integrating, and extending the capabilities of the UAS Control Segment. The UAS Task Force established the UCS Working Group to develop and support the UCS Architecture. The Working Group currently has over three hundred members, and is open to qualified representatives from DoD-approved defense contractors, academia, and the Government. The UCS Architecture is currently at Release 2.2, with Release 3.0 planned for July 2013. This paper discusses the current and planned elements of the UCS Architecture, and related activities of the UCS Community of Interest.

Gregory, Douglas A.; Batavia, Parag; Coats, Mark; Allport, Chris; Jennings, Ann; Ernst, Richard

2013-05-01

216

Most genetic risk for autism resides with common variation.  

PubMed

A key component of genetic architecture is the allelic spectrum influencing trait variability. For autism spectrum disorder (herein termed autism), the nature of the allelic spectrum is uncertain. Individual risk-associated genes have been identified from rare variation, especially de novo mutations. From this evidence, one might conclude that rare variation dominates the allelic spectrum in autism, yet recent studies show that common variation, individually of small effect, has substantial impact en masse. At issue is how much of an impact relative to rare variation this common variation has. Using a unique epidemiological sample from Sweden, new methods that distinguish total narrow-sense heritability from that due to common variation and synthesis of results from other studies, we reach several conclusions about autism's genetic architecture: its narrow-sense heritability is ?52.4%, with most due to common variation, and rare de novo mutations contribute substantially to individual liability, yet their contribution to variance in liability, 2.6%, is modest compared to that for heritable variation. PMID:25038753

Gaugler, Trent; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J; Bodea, Corneliu A; Goldberg, Arthur P; Lee, Ann B; Mahajan, Milind; Manaa, Dina; Pawitan, Yudi; Reichert, Jennifer; Ripke, Stephan; Sandin, Sven; Sklar, Pamela; Svantesson, Oscar; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hultman, Christina M; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn; Buxbaum, Joseph D

2014-08-01

217

Component-Based Integration of Chemistry and Optimization Software  

SciTech Connect

Typical scientific software designs make rigid assumptions regarding programming language and data structures, frustrating software interoperability and scientific collaboration. Component-based software engineering is an emerging approach to managing the increasing complexity of scientific software that facilitates code interoperability and reuse. Through the adoption of methodology and tools developed by the Common Component Architecture Forum, a component architecture for molecular structure optimization has been developed. We present a brief overview of the component development process and a description of abstract interfaces for chemical optimizations. Components conforming to these abstract interfaces have been created, yielding applications that can use different chemistry and mathematics packages interchangeably. Chemistry components, providing capacity for energy and energy derivative evaluation, have been developed that use the NWChem and Massively Parallel Quantum Chemistry packages. Geometry optimization applications have been constructed by integrating the Toolkit for Advanced Optimization, Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation, and Global Arrays packages, which provide optimization and linear algebra capabilities. Initial numerical results for the component software demonstrate good parallel performance and highlight potential research enabled by this platform.

Kenny, Joseph P.; Benson, Steven J.; Alexeev, Yuri; Sarich, Jason J.; Janssen, Curtis; McInnes, L; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Nieplocha, Jarek; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Fahlstrom, Carl A.; Windus, Theresa L.

2004-11-15

218

The Talent system: TEXTRACT architecture and data model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the architecture and data model for TEXTRACT, a document analysis framework for text analysis components. The framework and components have been deployed in research and industrial environments for text analysis and text mining tasks.

MARY S. NEFF; ROY J. BYRD; BRANIMIR K. BOGURAEV

2004-01-01

219

Common Cold  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site provides comprehensive information, selected by medical doctors, about the common cold. "The goal is to provide a framework for critical thinking which will allow informed decisions about medical care for the common cold." The section entitled Understanding Colds gives a detailed overview of how the cold virus invades the human body and how cold symptoms are caused. Information about preventing colds, and some of the complications that can occur are also included. The Special Features section includes one of the most interesting parts of the site -- Myths of the Common Cold. This site should be interesting to almost anyone, but perhaps more so for those of us who have recently had a cold.

1999-01-01

220

PERFORMANCE STUDY OF THE CORBA MULTITHREADED ORB ARCHITECTURES IN VISIBROKER 3.3  

E-print Network

PERFORMANCE STUDY OF THE CORBA MULTI­THREADED ORB ARCHITECTURES IN VISIBROKER 3.3 Yuqing Liu the multi­threading architecture used by applications. The architecture used to multi­thread an ORB has efficiently. Currently, there are six types of the common CORBA multi­threading architectures used by ORB

221

An architectural design selection tool based on design tactics, scenarios and nonfunctional requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses a method and its supporting tool to select the software architecture for a family of software systems (commonly known as architectural styles) that meets the needs of the user. Our approach emphasizes the importance of basing architecture on non-functional requirements (NFRs). To this end, we have utilized a scenario-based approach that will determine NFRs of software architecture.

Hassan Reza; Dan Jurgens; Jamie White; Jason Anderson; Jay Peterson

2005-01-01

222

CONRAD Software Architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Convergent Radio Astronomy Demonstrator (CONRAD) is a collaboration between the computing teams of two SKA pathfinder instruments, MeerKAT (South Africa) and ASKAP (Australia). Our goal is to produce the required common software to operate, process and store the data from the two instruments. Both instruments are synthesis arrays composed of a large number of antennas (40 - 100) operating at centimeter wavelengths with wide-field capabilities. Key challenges are the processing of high volume of data in real-time as well as the remote mode of operations. Here we present the software architecture for CONRAD. Our design approach is to maximize the use of open solutions and third-party software widely deployed in commercial applications, such as SNMP and LDAP, and to utilize modern web-based technologies for the user interfaces, such as AJAX.

Guzman, J. C.; Bennett, T.

2008-08-01

223

A general spacecraft power subsystem architecture  

SciTech Connect

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory`s (JPL`s) Multimission Spacecraft Analysis System (MSAS) Project is working to develop a spacecraft operations system that facilitates rapid configuration for future missions. In support of this effort, a general spacecraft power subsystem architecture has been developed based on recent and ongoing JPL spacecraft designs. This architecture defines in general terms the components and relationships that might be present in a specific power subsystem implementation. The resulting framework allows software modelling of nearly any power subsystem configuration and enhances the reusability of component functional models. The general architecture may also be applicable to modular hardware designs. This paper describes the general architecture and presents several adaptations to specific JPL spacecraft.

Glueck, P.R.; Bahrami, K.A.; Lei, M.O. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

1995-12-31

224

A Cartesian Sigma-Delta transmitter architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a transmitter architecture that enables high peak to average power ratio (PAPR) signals transmission with good linearity and efficiency. The architecture is based on the principle of transforming a non constant envelope modulated signal in a constant one using low-pass Sigma-Delta (SigmaDelta) modulators on the in-phase and quadrature baseband signal components. This conversion enables the use of

M. Penaloza; G. Baudoin; M. Villegas

2009-01-01

225

Making the Common Good Common  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

Chase, Barbara

2011-01-01

226

Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS): Technical Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG s SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA's current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

Reinhart, Richard C.

2006-01-01

227

A new architecture for hyperspectral image processing and analysis system: design and implementation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new architecture for HIPAS (Hyperspectral Image Processing and Analysis System V2.0) was introduced in this paper which was modified and improved based on the first version of HIPAS V1.0. The comprehensive hyperspectral image analyzing system has been developed under VC++6.0 integrated development environment (IDE) and obtained perfect runtime efficiency and stability. The base architecture was specially designed and implemented to meet the requirements for the rapid preprocessing of imaging spectrometer data and easy prototyping of algorithms. Based on the modularized and object oriented software engineering construction, the architecture is compatible for other UNIX platforms with little modification. The most important components of HIPAS were presented in this paper including tools for input/output, preprocessing, data visualization, information extraction, conventional image analysis, advanced tools, and integrated interface to connect with general spectral databases. Some new methodologies for data analysis and processing were realized and applied to reach some valuable results based on the architecture including mineral identification, agriculture investigation, urban mapping etc. With an open storage architecture, HIPAS is entirely compatible with some advanced special commercial software such as ENVI and ERDAS and even the common image processing system Photoshop. At last, a strict and careful software test was carried out and the results were also analyzed and discussed.

Yu, Jianlin; Hu, Xingtang; Zhang, Bing; Ning, Shunian

2003-09-01

228

Experiencing architecture, experiencing nature  

E-print Network

The idea for this thesis came from the recognition of the richness in an architectural experience and the desire to understand more about the meaning of this experience in the larger context of architecture and culture. ...

Torres, MaryAlice

1992-01-01

229

Analogy, cognitive architecture and universal construction: a tale of two systematicities.  

PubMed

Cognitive science recognizes two kinds of systematicity: (1) as the property where certain cognitive capacities imply certain other related cognitive capacities (Fodor and Pylyshyn); and (2) as the principle that analogical mappings based on collections of connected relations are preferred over relations in isolation (Gentner). Whether these kinds of systematicity are two aspects of a deeper property of cognition is hitherto unknown. Here, it is shown that both derive from the formal, category-theoretic notion of universal construction. In conceptual/psychological terms, a universal construction is a form of optimization of cognitive resources: optimizing the re-utilization of common component processes for common task components. Systematic cognitive capacity and the capacity for analogy are hallmarks of human cognition, which suggests that universal constructions (in the category-theoretic sense) are a crucial component of human cognitive architecture. PMID:24586555

Phillips, Steven

2014-01-01

230

Analogy, Cognitive Architecture and Universal Construction: A Tale of Two Systematicities  

PubMed Central

Cognitive science recognizes two kinds of systematicity: (1) as the property where certain cognitive capacities imply certain other related cognitive capacities (Fodor and Pylyshyn); and (2) as the principle that analogical mappings based on collections of connected relations are preferred over relations in isolation (Gentner). Whether these kinds of systematicity are two aspects of a deeper property of cognition is hitherto unknown. Here, it is shown that both derive from the formal, category-theoretic notion of universal construction. In conceptual/psychological terms, a universal construction is a form of optimization of cognitive resources: optimizing the re-utilization of common component processes for common task components. Systematic cognitive capacity and the capacity for analogy are hallmarks of human cognition, which suggests that universal constructions (in the category-theoretic sense) are a crucial component of human cognitive architecture. PMID:24586555

Phillips, Steven

2014-01-01

231

Digital Resource Commons  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ohio Digital Resource Commons (DRC) is a place to learn about the historic, instructional, cultural, and creative works of those in the Ohio University system, as well as the liberal arts colleges of Ohio. Although not all of the Ohio schools save material with the DRC, many of them elect to do so. Higher education institutions, as well as K-12 institutions are allowed to save their work via the central network, as long as the work has archival merit. Visitors will want to click on "Communities and Collections" on the left hand menu to browse the vast resources available. Some of the communities included are "Art and Architecture", "Multi-Subject Video", and "OhioLINK Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Center". Within each community are some notable collections including, "Archaeological Atlas of Ohio", "Encyclopedia of Physics Demonstrations", and the "Kent State Shootings Oral Histories". In order to see a list of the archives available to search, visitors should click on "Advanced Search", under the blank search box near the top of the page. The scrollable box next to the archives category includes such choices as "Oberlin Digital Commons", "Scholarly Commons at Miami University", and "Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives".

232

High performance parallel architectures  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Anderson, R.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1989-09-01

233

New Jersey School of Architecture The Master of Architecture  

E-print Network

of Architecture I (3 credits) Arch 529G: History of Architecture II (3 credits) Arch 555G: Architectural Graphics credits) History/Theory Electives (6 credits) Architecture Electives (9 credits) Free Electives (6 creditsNew Jersey School of Architecture The Master of Architecture New Jersey Institute of Technology #12

Bieber, Michael

234

Foundations for Designing Secure Architectures  

E-print Network

Foundations for Designing Secure Architectures Jan Jürjens Competence Center for IT Security, TU Munich: Foundations for Designing Secure Architectures 2 Foundations for Designing Secure Architectures This talk: foundations for designing software architectures for secure systems, based

Jurjens, Jan

235

Domain specific software architectures: Command and control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

GTE is the Command and Control contractor for the Domain Specific Software Architectures program. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an architecture-driven, component-based capability for the automated generation of command and control (C2) applications. Such a capability will significantly reduce the cost of C2 applications development and will lead to improved system quality and reliability through the use of proven architectures and components. A major focus of GTE's approach is the automated generation of application components in particular subdomains. Our initial work in this area has concentrated in the message handling subdomain; we have defined and prototyped an approach that can automate one of the most software-intensive parts of C2 systems development. This paper provides an overview of the GTE team's DSSA approach and then presents our work on automated support for message processing.

Braun, Christine; Hatch, William; Ruegsegger, Theodore; Balzer, Bob; Feather, Martin; Goldman, Neil; Wile, Dave

1992-01-01

236

Reconfigurable multi-component sensors built from MEMS payloads carried by micro-robots  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field Programmable Robot Arrays (FPRAs) are micro-robots with onboard reconfigurable logic. The primary goal of the FPRAs is to build digital-logic structures by physical motion as well as electronic reconfiguration (commonly used in prior programmable logic). We extend the application of FPRAs here by presenting a sensor-based architecture with the following components: (a) Scratch-Drive-Actuator (SDA) micro-robots carrying MEMS sensor payload

Jung H. Cho; Mayuresh Kothare; Mark G. Arnold

2010-01-01

237

Issues in the Security Architecture of the Computerized Patient Record Enterprise  

E-print Network

is available in electronic form at http: www.bhssf.org IT Projects cpr security architecture- issues y Management Architecture described in 2 . CORBA-compliant ORBs constitute the backbone for the CPR components

238

Java based open architecture controller  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) the authors have been developing an open architecture machine tool controller. This work has been patterned after the General Motors (GM) led Open Modular Architecture Controller (OMAC) work, where they have been involved since its inception. The OMAC work has centered on creating sets of implementation neutral application programming interfaces (APIs) for machine control software components. In the work at LLNL, they were among the early adopters of the Java programming language. As an application programming language, it is particularly well suited for component software development. The language contains many features, which along with a well-defined implementation API (such as the OMAC APIs) allows third party binary files to be integrated into a working system. Because of its interpreted nature, Java allows rapid integration testing of components. However, for real-time systems development, the Java programming language presents many drawbacks. For instance, lack of well defined scheduling semantics and threading behavior can present many unwanted challenges. Also, the interpreted nature of the standard Java Virtual Machine (JVM) presents an immediate performance hit. Various real-time Java vendors are currently addressing some of these drawbacks. The various pluses and minuses of using the Java programming language and environment, with regard to a component-based controller, will be outlined.

Weinert, G F

2000-01-13

239

Concept and architecture of the RHIC LLRF upgrade platform  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the RHIC LLRF upgrade has been the development of a stand alone, generic, high performance, modular LLRF control platform, which can be configured to replace existing systems and serve as a common platform for all new RF systems. The platform is also designed to integrate seamlessly into a distributed network based controls infrastructure, be easy to deploy, and to be useful in a variety of digital signal processing and data acquisition roles. Reuse of hardware, software and firmware has been emphasized to minimize development effort and maximize commonality of system components. System interconnection, synchronization and scaling are facilitated by a deterministic, high speed serial timing and data link, while standard intra and inter chassis communications utilize high speed, non-deterministic protocol based serial links. System hardware configuration is modular and flexible, based on a combination of a main carrier board which can host up to six custom or commercial daughter modules as required to implement desired functionality. This paper will provide an overview of the platform concept, architecture, features and benefits. The RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform has been developed with the goal of providing a flexible, modular and scalable architecture which will support our current applications and satisfy new ones for the foreseeable future. The platform has been recently commissioned at both RHIC and the RHIC EBIS injector. To date the platform has demonstrated its versatility and utility, meeting the design goals as originally defined.

Smith, K.S.; Hayes, T.; Severino, F.

2011-03-28

240

Open Architecture SDR for Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes an open-architecture SDR (software defined radio) infrastructure that is suitable for space-based operations (Space-SDR). SDR technologies will endow space and planetary exploration systems with dramatically increased capability, reduced power consumption, and significantly less mass than conventional systems, at costs reduced by vigorous competition, hardware commonality, dense integration, reduced obsolescence, interoperability, and software re-use. Significant progress has been recorded on developments like the Joint Tactical Radio System (JSTRS) Software Communication Architecture (SCA), which is oriented toward reconfigurable radios for defense forces operating in multiple theaters of engagement. The JTRS-SCA presents a consistent software interface for waveform development, and facilitates interoperability, waveform portability, software re-use, and technology evolution.

Smith, Carl; Long, Chris; Liebetreu, John; Reinhart, Richard C.

2005-01-01

241

Architecture of interiority (architecture of traces)  

E-print Network

In a growing globalized world where ideas of connections, transparency and exposure are becoming commonplace, the need will arise to devise an architecture that addresses issues of identity and belonging by creating places ...

Michel, Nicole Yael, 1977-

2002-01-01

242

A Dynamic AOP based Implementation for Dynamic Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dynamic evolution of software architecture is a necessary requirement for many software systems. A framework and a platform which supports the dynamic software architecture are the crucial aspects. This paper is based on a request\\/invoke component assembling tool(BSAppBuilder) which is developed by our research group, and proposes an approach for dynamic architecture using dynamic AOP technique. This tool contains a

Zhang Xia; Peng Xin; Zhao Wenyun

243

The architecture of an event correlation service for adaptive middleware-based applications  

SciTech Connect

Loosely coupled component communication driven by events is a key mechanism for building middleware- based applications that must achieve reliable qualities of service in an adaptive manner. In such a system, events that encapsulate state snapshots of a running system are generated by monitoring components. Hence, an event correlation service is necessary for correlating monitored events from multiple sources. The requirements for the event correlation raise two challenges: to seamlessly integrate event correlation services with other services and applications; and to provide reliable event management with minimal delay. This paper describes our experience in the design and implementation of an event correlation service. The design encompasses an event correlator and an event proxy that are integrated with an architecture for adaptive middleware components. The implementation utilizes the common-based event (CBE) specification and stateful Web service technologies to support the deployment of the event correlation service in a distributed architecture. We evaluate the performance of the overall solution in a test bed and present the results in terms of the trade-off between the flexibility and the performance overhead of the architecture

Liu, Yan; Gorton, Ian; Lee, Vinh Kah

2008-12-01

244

Integrated Architectural Concepts  

E-print Network

attention to energetical concerns and questions on sustainability and the optimisation of resources, leading to the development of an intelligent and economised, architectural solution amid the border area between architecture and technology, is of great.... The intelligent way of building of which is spoken today refers to a design-approach beyond purely technical and aesthetic thoughts. In it, architecture is to be understood as a vivid organism that reacts to social changes as well as to ecological conditions...

Schossig, E.

2008-01-01

245

Improving modularity of interactive software with the MDPC architecture  

E-print Network

- Controller" model is a refinement of the MVC architecture. It introduces the "Picking View" component, which measured gains in controller code, which is simpler and more focused. Keywords: MVC, interactive software each sub-problem. The Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture is a well-known attempt to improve

246

GrayWulf: Scalable Clustered Architecture for Data Intensive Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data intensive computing presents a significant challenge for traditional supercomputing architectures that maximize FLOPS since CPU speed has surpassed IO capabilities of HPC systems and BeoWulf clusters. We present the architecture for a three tier commodity component cluster designed for a range of data intensive computations operating on petascale data sets named GrayWulf†. The design goal is a balanced system

Alexander S. Szalay; Gordon Bell; Jan Vandenberg; Alainna Wonders; Randal C. Burns; Jim Heasley; Tony Hey; María A. Nieto-santisteban; Ani Thakar; Catharine Van Ingen; Richard Wilton; Dan Fay

2009-01-01

247

Considerations for a TSAT quality of service architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transformation communications SATCOM (TSAT) is planned to be the satellite networking system for tactical and strategic warfighters of the future. TSAT is an integral part of the global information grid (GIG) architecture. The TSAT component of the architecture is used primarily in situations where user mobility, horizon limitations\\/obstructions or \\

D. Voce; D. S. Gokhale; R. David; P. Bose

2004-01-01

248

An IPSec-based Host Architecture for Secure Internet Multicast  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a host architecture for secure IP multi- cast. We identify the basic components of the archi- tecture, describe their functionalities and how they in- teract with one another. The fundamental design tenets of the proposed architecture are simplicity, modularity, and compatibility with existing protocols and systems. More specifically, we try to re-use existing IPSec mech- anisms as far

Ran Canetti; Pau-chen Cheng; Frederique Giraud; Dimitrios E. Pendarakis; Josyula R. Rao; Pankaj Rohatgi; Debanjan Saha

2000-01-01

249

Extensible Hardware Architecture for Mobile Robots  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center has developed a new mobile robot hardware architecture designed for extensibility and reconfigurability. Currently implemented on the k9 rover. and won to be integrated onto the K10 series of human-robot collaboration research robots, this architecture allows for rapid changes in instrumentation configuration and provides a high degree of modularity through a synergistic mix of off-the-shelf and custom designed components, allowing eased transplantation into a wide vane6 of mobile robot platforms. A component level overview of this architecture is presented along with a description of the changes required for implementation on K10 , followed by plans for future work.

Park, Eric; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Susan Y.

2005-01-01

250

Interactive agent generated architecture  

E-print Network

The thesis explores architectural form generation through two behavior based artificial intelligence approaches: the communication of agents in an unpredictable simulation system, and the codification of information within ...

Krause, Jeffrey Charles Stanley

1996-01-01

251

Architectural disruption in aerospace  

E-print Network

Distinctive technology and customer / supplier relationships are currently the primary sources of competitive advantage in the Aerospace industry. Modular Open System Architecture (MOSA) requirements represent a significant ...

Ashworth, Geoffrey (Geoffrey John)

2009-01-01

252

The OPEN Migration Platform Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter establishes a common understanding of the meaning of migration, and introduces the OPEN\\u000a \\u000a functionalities, which enable application\\u000a \\u000a migration. We start by discussing the various definitions of migration, before focusing on the OPEN\\u000a \\u000a take on the concept. The chapter then covers our proposed architecture\\u000a \\u000a , as well as the functionality required, both from the server\\u000a \\u000a and the client\\u000a \\u000a side

Miquel Martin

2011-01-01

253

Robotic collaborative technology alliance: an open architecture approach to integrated research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) seeks to provide adaptive robot capabilities which move beyond traditional metric algorithms to include cognitive capabilities [1]. Research occurs in 5 main Task Areas: Intelligence, Perception, Dexterous Manipulation and Unique Mobility (DMUM), Human Robot Interaction (HRI), and Integrated Research (IR). This last task of Integrated Research is especially critical and challenging. Individual research components can only be fully assessed when integrated onto a robot where they interact with other aspects of the system to create cross-Task capabilities which move beyond the State of the Art. Adding to the complexity, the RCTA is comprised of 12+ independent organizations across the United States. Each has its own constraints due to development environments, ITAR, "lab" vs "real-time" implementations, and legacy software investments from previous and ongoing programs. We have developed three main components to manage the Integration Task. The first is RFrame, a data-centric transport agnostic middleware which unifies the disparate environments, protocols, and data collection mechanisms. Second is the modular Intelligence Architecture built around the Common World Model (CWM). The CWM instantiates a Common Data Model and provides access services. Third is RIVET, an ITAR free Hardware-In-The-Loop simulator based on 3D game technology. RIVET provides each researcher a common test-bed for development prior to integration, and a regression test mechanism. Once components are integrated and verified, they are released back to the consortium to provide the RIVET baseline for further research. This approach allows Integration of new and legacy systems built upon different architectures, by application of Open Architecture principles.

Dean, Robert Michael S.; DiBerardino, Charles A.

2014-06-01

254

Smart Classrooms: Architectural Requirements and Deployment Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an architectural classification of smart classrooms and discusses the types of technologies used in their implementation. It examines the methodologies being used to make distance learning an exciting experience and as effective as the traditional classroom type education. Furthermore, the paper shows how commonly used smart classroom settings can be extended to a model where a single

G. G. D. Nishantha; D. Pishva; Y. Hayashida

2008-01-01

255

Web Service Architecture Framework for Embedded Devices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of Service Oriented Architectures, namely web services, has become a widely adopted method for transfer of data between systems across the Internet as well as the Enterprise. Adopting a similar approach to embedded devices is also starting to emerge as personal devices and sensor networks are becoming more common in the industry. This…

Yanzick, Paul David

2009-01-01

256

Integrated computer control system architectural overview  

SciTech Connect

This overview introduces the NIF Integrated Control System (ICCS) architecture. The design is abstract to allow the construction of many similar applications from a common framework. This summary lays the essential foundation for understanding the model-based engineering approach used to execute the design.

Van Arsdall, P.

1997-06-18

257

Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

2014-01-01

258

Requirements for a common GUI architecture for ultrasound applications  

E-print Network

at least one interface called IUnknown. For example, when a client gains access to the ultrasound application object, he/she will receive at least 37 receive this interface, which allows him/her to control the lifetime of the object and also invoke... for the ultrasound system and we also look at the functioning of RPCs in greater detail. Consider the following example; a user who is making use of the Ultrasound application wants to access the electronic patient record, which is not on his system. The process...

Muthukrishnan, Sreenivas

2012-06-07

259

College of Design ARC Architecture  

E-print Network

of architecture. Prereq: Admission to College of Architecture or permission of dean. ARC 121 HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE I. (3) The first of four courses in the survey of the history and theory of architecture: Admission to the School of Architecture. ARC 212 HISTORY AND THEORY I: 15TH-17TH CENTURIES. (3

MacAdam, Keith

260

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE HISTORY REQUIREMENTS  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE HISTORY REQUIREMENTS BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS B.Arch. students ARCHITECTURE HISTORY SEQUENCES MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS M.Arch. students are required to complete or the same architectural themes. ARCH 610, 20th Century History and Theory, counts as one of the electives

261

Clemson University School of Architecture  

E-print Network

SYLLABUS ARCH 8620 0.1 ARCH 8620 Section 400 Architectural History & Theory III Deciphering architecture with a focus on the history and theory of architecture and urbanism sinceClemson University School of Architecture Clemson Architecture Center in Charleston Spring 2014

Duchowski, Andrew T.

262

Versatile architecture for image recognition applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Architectures for the development of image recognition algorithms must support the implementation of systematic procedures for solving image recognition problems. All too often, designers develop image recognition architectures in an ad hoc fashion which lacks the structure to meet long term needs. Vendors typically supply customers with standard image processing libraries and display tools. Combining these tools and formulating development strategies have remained stumbling blocks in the design of complete image recognition algorithm development environments. In this paper, an architecture is presented which provides a well defined framework, and at the same time is sufficiently flexible to accommodate images of multiple sensor and data types. The primary components of the architecture are: ground-truthing, preprocessing (which includes image processing and segmentation), feature extraction, classification, and performance analysis. Powerful and well defined data structures are exploited for each of the primary components. Groups of programs called tasks manipulate one or more of these data structures, each task belonging to one of the primary components. Multiple tasks can be executed in an unsupervised mode over an entire database of images. Results are then subjected to performance analysis and feedback. A description of the primary components and how they are integrated to facilitate the rapid prototyping and development of image recognition algorithms is presented.

Sacramone, Anthony; Scola, Joseph; Shazeer, Dov J.

1992-03-01

263

Deriving a fault architecture from defect history  

Microsoft Academic Search

As software systems mature, there is the danger that not only code decays, but software architectures as well. We adapt a reverse architecting technique to defect reports of a series of releases. Relationships among system components are identified based on whether they are involved in the same defect report, and for how many defect reports this occurs. There are degrees

A. von Mayrhauser; J. Wang; M. C. Ohlsson; C. Wohlin

1999-01-01

264

A Parallel Architecture perspective on language processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article sketches the Parallel Architecture, an approach to the structure of grammar that contrasts with mainstream generative grammar (MGG) in that (a) it treats phonology, syntax, and semantics as independent generative components whose structures are linked by interface rules; (b) it uses a parallel constraint-based formalism that is nondirectional; (c) it treats words and rules alike as pieces of

Ray Jackendoff

2007-01-01

265

Intelligent system design and architectural patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article introduces design and architectural patterns useful in intelligent systems engineering. Patterns are represented using class, collaboration, and sequence diagrams from the unified modeling language (UML) specialized relative to various components and subsystems of an intelligent system (IS). An IS pattern is seen an entity that is vaguely defined relative to structural and functional features of an intelligent system.

James F. Peters; Sheela Ramanna

2003-01-01

266

The WONDER Testbed: Architecture and Experimental Demonstration  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the latest experimental results within the WONDER project, aiming at the demonstration of an advanced packet-based WDM architecture that recently reached its full maturity. Our results show the feasibility of all-optical networking using commercially available optoelectronic components.

A. Antonino; R. Birke; V. De Feo; J. M. Finocchietto; R. Gaudino; A. La Porta; F. Neri; M. Petracca

267

DBNet: A Service-Oriented Database Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the convergence of peer-to-peer (P2P) and service oriented architectures is the idea of effectively and efficiently managing distribution, heterogeneity and autonomy of information sources and services. In this paper, we take the point of view that next generation database management systems (DBMS) should be a federation of distributed, heterogeneous and autonomous components. Such components constitute Web database services. We

Wee Hyong Tok; Stéphane Bressan

2006-01-01

268

The Mermaid Architecture-workbench for Multicomputers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cache hierarchyBusFigure 3: The template architecture models.defines a bus component. It is a simple forwarding mechanism, carrying out arbitrationupon multiple accesses. The parameters used to configure this component include buswidth,bus cycle-time and arbitration details. Changing the bus to a more complex structure,such as a multistage network, can be done without too much remodelling effort. Inthat case, only a new Pearl

1996-01-01

269

Distributed Architectures for Event-Based Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Event-driven distributed systems have two important characteristics, which differentiate them from other system types: the\\u000a existence of several software or hardware components that run simultaneously on different inter-networked nodes, and the use\\u000a of events as the main vehicle to organize component intercommunication. Clearly, both attributes influence event-driven distributed\\u000a architectures, which are discussed in this chapter. We start with presenting the

Valentin Cristea; Florin Pop; Ciprian Dobre; Alexandru Costan

270

Requirements of federated trust management for service-oriented architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the emergence of an effective infrastructure supporting Grid Computing and Web Services, service-oriented computing has been growing over the last few years, and service-oriented architectures are becoming an important computing paradigm. When different trust domains control different component services, trust management plays a critical role to smooth the collaboration among component services. The federation of these component services makes

Zhengping Wu; Alfred C. Weaver

2006-01-01

271

Generic POCC architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document describes a generic POCC (Payload Operations Control Center) architecture based upon current POCC software practice, and several refinements to the architecture based upon object-oriented design principles and expected developments in teleoperations. The current-technology generic architecture is an abstraction based upon close analysis of the ERBS, COBE, and GRO POCC's. A series of three refinements is presented: these may be viewed as an approach to a phased transition to the recommended architecture. The third refinement constitutes the recommended architecture, which, together with associated rationales, will form the basis of the rapid synthesis environment to be developed in the remainder of this task. The document is organized into two parts. The first part describes the current generic architecture using several graphical as well as tabular representations or 'views.' The second part presents an analysis of the generic architecture in terms of object-oriented principles. On the basis of this discussion, refinements to the generic architecture are presented, again using a combination of graphical and tabular representations.

1989-01-01

272

Information Architecture: Looking Ahead.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers the future of the field of information architecture. Highlights include a comparison with the growth of the field of professional management; the design of information systems since the Web; more demanding users; the need for an interdisciplinary approach; and how to define information architecture. (LRW)

Rosenfeld, Louis

2002-01-01

273

De-Architecturization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

De-architecturization is art about architecture, a catalyst suggesting that public art does not have to respond to formalist doctrine; but rather, may evolve from the informational reservoirs of the city environment, where phenomenology and structure become the fabric of its existence. (Author/RK)

Wines, James

1975-01-01

274

SMRF architecture concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This presents three valuable applications of scalable multif unction RF (SMRF) systems. These systems allow radar, ESM, and communication functionality usin g a single front-end architecture. With the use of a novel system design tool, concepts for SMRF architectures for airborne, ground-based and naval applications have been obtained based on a C-RAM scenario.

W. L. van Rossum; J. J. M. de Wit; M. P. G. Otten; A. G. Huizing

2011-01-01

275

Architecture Engineering Construction (AEC)  

E-print Network

Chrissy QuinnTerry Morse Engineering Services Architecture and #12;Division of Facilities Management Brown Assistant Director Architecture and Engineering Services Terry Morse Assistant Director CampusGraw Terry Hollon Jagdish Jani John Mavrinac Maria Prawirodihardjo Administrative Assistant Lynn Bartell Jeff

Weber, David J.

276

Teaching a Contextual Architecture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An approach to teaching architecture that accommodates external environmental influences called architectural context is described. Contextual issues come under three headings: formal patterns (space, shape, scale, materials, etc.), activity patterns, and climatic patterns. The use of this approach in studio instruction is examined. (MSE)

Gaines, Merrill C.

1980-01-01

277

Epigenetic Robotics Architecture (ERA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we discuss the requirements of cognitive architectures for epigenetic robotics, and highlight the wider role that they can play in the development of the cognitive sciences. We discuss the ambitious goals of ongoing development, scalability, concept use and transparency, and introduce the epigenetic robotics architecture (ERA) as a framework guiding modeling efforts. A formal implementation is provided,

Anthony F. Morse; Joachim de Greeff; Tony Belpaeme; Angelo Cangelosi

2010-01-01

278

Architectural aspect of Prague  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prague is one of the most beautiful European cities, well known for its Gothic and Baroque cathedrals, churches, monasteries, Romanesque castles. Nevertheless, in fact an architectural aspect of the Czech capital is more complex and various: all the artistic and architectural styles are presented there: from Romanesque style to Art Nouveou.

E. V. Smirnova

2008-01-01

279

Introduction Architectural Differences  

E-print Network

in General Generic Programming in C++ Generic Programming in Java 2 Architectural Differences Type Erasure in Java Outline 1 Introduction Generic Programming in General Generic Programming in C++ Generic Programming in Java 2 Architectural Differences Type Erasure Parameterized Type Bounds Metaprogramming Michael

280

Workflow automation architecture standard  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T. [Boeing Computer Services Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-14

281

Emerging supercomputer architectures  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the current and near future trends for commercially available high-performance computers with architectures that differ from the mainstream ''supercomputer'' systems in use for the last few years. These emerging supercomputer architectures are just beginning to have an impact on the field of high performance computing. 7 refs., 1 tab.

Messina, P.C.

1987-01-01

282

Information Architecture Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Information Architecture Library is a selection of resources (articles, books, blogs, and other genres) related to the field of information architecture. The library is browseable by subject, resource type, author, and language. The website also features a list of selected introductory resources for those new to the field and a list of the ten most recently added resources.

283

Studio-based courses in architectural acoustics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Examples of 4 nontraditional, elective courses offered to students in the Master of Architecture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in architecture are presented. Listening to Buildings involves experiential exercises in architectural acoustics for undergraduate students in a required large lecture course to form links between what people hear in a room and the architectural shapes and materials of the room that affects what is heard. The Applied Acoustics Design Lab takes students through each of the major components of an actual consulting project. Student work includes room acoustic design, sound isolation design, sound system design and HVAC noise control design for an actual building project. An Acoustical History of Theaters and Concert Halls teaches fundamentals of computer-based acoustic modeling and has students compare the physical design and aural simulations of a historic and a contemporary performance space. Graduate design studio in acoustics examines sound and silence as potential form-givers in architecture and as generative ideas for the basis of architectural interventions in complex sites and programs. Interior and exterior soundscapes and phenomenological philosophy form the background research for the studio.

Siebein, Gary W.

2003-04-01

284

The Simulation Intranet Architecture  

SciTech Connect

The Simdarion Infranet (S1) is a term which is being used to dcscribc one element of a multidisciplinary distributed and distance computing initiative known as DisCom2 at Sandia National Laboratory (http ct al. 1998). The Simulation Intranet is an architecture for satisfying Sandia's long term goal of providing an end- to-end set of scrviccs for high fidelity full physics simu- lations in a high performance, distributed, and distance computing environment. The Intranet Architecture group was formed to apply current distributed object technologies to this problcm. For the hardware architec- tures and software models involved with the current simulation process, a CORBA-based architecture is best suited to meet Sandia's needs. This paper presents the initial desi-a and implementation of this Intranct based on a three-tier Network Computing Architecture(NCA). The major parts of the architecture include: the Web Cli- ent, the Business Objects, and Data Persistence.

Holmes, V.P.; Linebarger, J.M.; Miller, D.J.; Vandewart, R.L.

1998-12-02

285

Irish Architecture Foundation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Irish Architecture Foundation's website is very inviting with its stylish grey and green-schemed color scheme. The Foundation has multiple goals: encouraging people to value architecture and "champion[ing] the power of architecture and urban design," just to name a few. Visitors will find this website filled with opportunities to learn about, discuss, and debate the role of architecture, at lectures, workshops and events. The "Education" link under the Activity heading at the top of the page contains lesson plans for teachers, lecture series' for adults, programs for children, and details on their Summer School. The "Exhibition" link, also under the Activity heading, has a number of announcements for design competitions, such as one for a public civic space for Dublin. There are also calls for papers, which include one on the politics of architectural destruction and the nature of sculpture is in the 21st century.

286

Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture.  

PubMed

The Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping of plant architecture is a critical step for understanding the genetic determinism of plant architecture. Previous studies adopted simple measurements, such as plant-height, stem-diameter and branching-intensity for QTL mapping of plant architecture. Many of these quantitative traits were generally correlated to each other, which give rise to statistical problem in the detection of QTL. We aim to test the applicability of kernel methods to phenotyping inflorescence architecture and its QTL mapping. We first test Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) over an artificial dataset of simulated inflorescences with different types of flower distribution, which is coded as a sequence of flower-number per node along a shoot. The ability of discriminating the different inflorescence types by SVM and KPCA is illustrated. We then apply the KPCA representation to the real dataset of rose inflorescence shoots (n=1460) obtained from a 98 F1 hybrid mapping population. We find kernel principal components with high heritability (>0.7), and the QTL analysis identifies a new QTL, which was not detected by a trait-by-trait analysis of simple architectural measurements. The main tools developed in this paper could be use to tackle the general problem of QTL mapping of complex (sequences, 3D structure, graphs) phenotypic traits. PMID:24211258

Kawamura, Koji; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Foucher, Fabrice; Thouroude, Tatiana; Loustau, Sébastien

2014-02-01

287

A Self-repair Architecture for Cluster Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the Jade framework for the construction of self-repairable cluster systems. Jade adopts an architecture-based approach to management, and maintains a causally connected view of the software architecture\\u000a of the managed system, itself configured and manipulated as a component-based structure. Self-repair is achieved through a\\u000a combination of component-based design, reflection and active replication of the management subsystem. The

Fabienne Boyer; Noel De Palma; Olivier Gruber; Sylvain Sicard; Jean-Bernard Stefani

2008-01-01

288

Rethinking the common garden in invasion research  

Microsoft Academic Search

In common garden experiments, a number of genotypes are raised in a common environment in order to quantify the genetic component of phenotypic variation. Common gardens are thus ideally suited for disentangling how genetic and environmental factors contribute to the success of invasive species in their new non-native range. Although common garden experiments are increasingly employed in the study of

Kirk A. Moloney; Claus Holzapfel; Katja Tielbörger; Florian Jeltsch; Frank M. Schurr

2009-01-01

289

Formalization and visualization of domain-specific software architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes a domain-specific software design system based on the concepts of software architectures engineering and domain-specific models and languages. In this system, software architectures are used as high level abstractions to formulate a domain-specific software design. The software architecture serves as a framework for composing architectural fragments (e.g., domain objects, system components, and hardware interfaces) that make up the knowledge (or model) base for solving a problem in a particular application area. A corresponding software design is generated by analyzing and describing a system in the context of the software architecture. While the software architecture serves as the framework for the design, this concept is insufficient by itself for supplying the additional details required for a specific design. Additional domain knowledge is still needed to instantiate components of the architecture and develop optimized algorithms for the problem domain. One possible way to obtain the additional details is through the use of domain-specific languages. Thus, the general concept of a software architecture and the specific design details provided by domain-specific languages are combined to create what can be termed a domain-specific software architecture (DSSA).

Bailor, Paul D.; Luginbuhl, David R.; Robinson, John S.

1992-01-01

290

A New VLSI Architecture of a Hierarchical Motion Estimator for Low Bit-Rate Video Coding  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a new hierarchical motion estimator architecture that supports the advanced prediction mode of recent low bit-rate video coders such as H.263 and MPEG-4. In the proposed VLSI architecture, a basic searching unit (BSU) is commonly utilized for all hierarchical levels to make a systematic and small sized motion estimator. Also, since the memory bank of the proposed architecture

Jae Hun Lee; Sung Deuk Kim; Sung Kyu Jang; Jong Beom Ra

1999-01-01

291

PIN: a binary instrumentation tool for computer architecture research and education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer architecture embraces a tremendous number of ever-changing inter-connected concepts and information, yet computer architecture education is very often static, seemingly motionless. Computer architecture is commonly taught using simple piecewise methods of explaining how the hardware performs a given task, rather than characterizing the interaction of software and hardware. Visualization tools allow students to interactively explore basic concepts in computer

Vijay Janapa Reddi; Alex Settle; Daniel A. Connors; Robert S. Cohn

2004-01-01

292

Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

2012-01-01

293

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-print Network

and Behavioral Science. In addition to the facilities housed on the Clemson campus, the College offers third includes the School of Architecture, the Department of Construc- tion Science and Management degree in the field. The accredited Bachelor of Science in Construction Science and Management program

Bolding, M. Chad

294

Database Architecture for Autonomous Transportation Agents for On-Scene Networked Incident Management (ATON)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A collection of distributed databases forms an important architectural component of the ATON project for networked incidence management of highway traffic. The database sub-architecture supports the architectural integration of many thematic areas of the ATON, and provides many high level abstractions that semantically correspond to traffic incidents. These databases are queried for the detection of local or distributed traffic incidents

Mohan M. Trivedi; Shailendra K. Bhonsle; Amarnath Gupta

2000-01-01

295

AMATA: Software Architecture and Implementation of High Availability Support for Beowulf Cluster  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-availability support for Beowulf cluster becomes a critical factor in the acceptance of this platform for mission critical use in enterprise environment. A well defined and extensible HA software architecture is needed. This paper presents the proposed high-availability software architecture called AMATA. AMATA architecture clearly defines the software component and interaction for High Availability support. Many cases such as system

Jullawadee Maneesilp; Putchong Uthayopas

296

Parallel architecture for rapid image generation and analysis  

SciTech Connect

A multiprocessor architecture inspired by the Disney multiplane camera is proposed. For many applications, this approach produces a natural mapping of processors to objects in a scene. Such a mapping promotes parallelism and reduces the hidden-surface work with minimal interprocessor communication and low-overhead cost. Existing graphics architectures store the final picture as a monolithic entity. The architecture here stores each object's image separately. It assembles the final composite picture from component images only when the video display needs to be refreshed. This organization simplifies the work required to animate moving objects that occlude other objects. In addition, the architecture has multiple processors that generate the component images in parallel. This further shortens the time needed to create a composite picture. In addition to generating images for animation, the architecture has the ability to decompose images.

Nerheim, R.J.

1987-01-01

297

TRANSIMS software architecture for IOC-1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the TRANSIMS software architecture and high-level design for the first Interim Operational Capability (IOC-1). Our primary goal in establishing the TRANSIMS software architecture is to lay down a framework for IOC-1. We aim to make sure that the various components of TRANSIMS are effectively integrated, both for IOC-1 and beyond, so that TRANSIMS remains flexible, expandable, portable, and maintainable throughout its lifetime. In addition to outlining the high-level design of the TRANSIMS software, we also set forth the software development environment and software engineering practices used for TRANSIMS.

Berkbigler, K.P.; Bush, B.W.; Davis, J.F.

1997-04-03

298

Fractal Geometry of Architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately, scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also Gothic cathedrals and Indian temples offer self-similarity. This study mainly focuses upon the question whether this concept of self-similarity makes architecture with fractal properties more diverse and interesting than Euclidean Modern architecture. The first part gives an introduction and explains Fractal properties in various natural and architectural objects, presenting the underlying structure by computer programmed renderings. In this connection, differences between the fractal, architectural concept and true, mathematical Fractals are worked out to become aware of limits. This is the basis for dealing with the problem whether fractal-like architecture, particularly facades, can be measured so that different designs can be compared with each other under the aspect of fractal properties. Finally the usability of the Box-Counting Method, an easy-to-use measurement method of Fractal Dimension is analyzed with regard to architecture.

Lorenz, Wolfgang E.

299

Architectural framework for resource management optimization over heterogeneous wireless networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main goal of wireless telecommunication world can be briefly summarized as: "communication anywhere, anytime, any-media and principally at high-data rates." On the other hand, this goal is in conflict with the co-existence of plenty different current and emerging wireless systems covering almost the whole world, since each one follows its own architecture and is based on its particular bedrocks. This results in a heterogeneous depiction of the hyper-set of wireless communications systems. The scope of this paper is to present a highly innovative and scalable architectural framework, which will allow different wireless systems to be interconnected in a common way, able to achieve resource management optimization, augmentation of network performance and maximum utilization of the networks. It will describe a hierarchical management system covering all GSM, GPRS, UMTS and WLAN networks each one individually, as well as a unified and wide wireless telecommunication system including all later, in order to provide enhanced capacity and quality via the accomplished network interworking. The main idea is to monitor all the resources using distributed monitoring components with intention to feed an additional centralized system with alarms, so that a set of management techniques will be selected and applied where needed. In parallel, the centralized system will be able to combine the aforementioned alarms with business models for the efficient use of the available networks according to the type of user, the type of application as well as the user"s location.

Tselikas, Nikos; Kapellaki, Sofia; Koutsoloukas, Eleftherios; Venieris, Iakovos S.

2003-11-01

300

SPIM Architecture for MVC based Web Applications  

E-print Network

The Model / View / Controller design pattern divides an application environment into three components to handle the user-interactions, computations and output respectively. This separation greatly favors architectural reusability. The pattern works well in the case of single-address space and not proven to be efficient for web applications involving multiple address spaces. Web applications force the designers to decide which of the components of the pattern are to be partitioned between the server and client(s) before the design phase commences. For any rapidly growing web application, it is very difficult to incorporate future changes in policies related to partitioning. One solution to this problem is to duplicate the Model and controller components at both server and client(s). However, this may add further problems like delayed data fetch, security and scalability issues. In order to overcome this, a new architecture SPIM has been proposed that deals with the partitioning problem in an alternative way. S...

Sridaran, R; Iyakutti, K; Mani, M N S

2010-01-01

301

Architecture for Verifiable Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Verifiable MDS Architecture (VMA) is a software architecture that facilitates the construction of highly verifiable flight software for NASA s Mission Data System (MDS), especially for smaller missions subject to cost constraints. More specifically, the purpose served by VMA is to facilitate aggressive verification and validation of flight software while imposing a minimum of constraints on overall functionality. VMA exploits the state-based architecture of the MDS and partitions verification issues into elements susceptible to independent verification and validation, in such a manner that scaling issues are minimized, so that relatively large software systems can be aggressively verified in a cost-effective manner.

Reinholtz, William; Dvorak, Daniel

2005-01-01

302

Further Explorations of Common-Sense Representations of Common Illnesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple method is presented for measuring people’s illness cognitions—their common-sense representations of common illnesses. Data were collected from 1,628 different respondents who described a recent illness from 1 to 3 separate times over a 17-month period. A free-clustering task performed by a set of naive participants confirmed that these cognitions fall into the five components that have been previously

Richard R. Lau; Teresa M. Bernard; Karen A. Hartman

1989-01-01

303

Gravity response mechanisms of lateral organs and the control of plant architecture in Arabidopsis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most research on gravity responses in plants has focused on primary roots and shoots, which typically grow in a vertical orientation. However, the patterns of lateral organ formation and their growth orientation, which typically are not vertical, govern plant architecture. For example, in Arabidopsis, when lateral roots emerge from the primary root, they grow at a nearly horizontal orientation. As they elongate, the roots slowly curve until they eventually reach a vertical orientation. The regulation of this lateral root orientation is an important component affecting the overall root system architecture. We have found that this change in orientation is not simply due to the onset of gravitropic competence, as non-vertical lateral roots are capable of both positive and negative gravitropism. Thus, the horizontal growth of the new lateral roots is determined by what is called the gravitropic set-point angle (GSA). In Arabidopsis shoots, rosette leaves and inflorescence branches also display GSA-dependent developmental changes in their orientation. The developmental control of the GSA of lateral organs in Arabidopsis provides us with a useful system for investigating the components involved in regulating directionality of tropistic responses. We have identified several Arabidopsis mutants that have either altered lateral root orientations, altered orientation of lateral organs in the shoot, or both, but maintain normal primary organ orientation. The mgsa ({m}odified {g}ravitropic {s}et-point {a}ngle) mutants with both altered lateral root and shoot orientation show that there are common components in the regulation of growth orientation in the different organs. Rosette leaves and lateral roots also have in common a regulation of positioning by red light. Further molecular and physiological analyses of the GSA mutants will provide insight into the basis of GSA regulation and, thus, a better understanding of how gravity controls plant architecture. [This work was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through grant no. NCC 2-1200.

Mullen, J.; Hangarter, R.

304

Sustainability in architecture  

E-print Network

Current standard practice in architecture does not take into account the external societal costs that a building creates. To understand the total consequences of a building, one must consider all of the ecological and human ...

Cordero, Elizabeth, 1959-

2001-01-01

305

Introduction to Multicore architecture  

E-print Network

Density(W/cm2) Hot Plate Nuclear Reactor Rocket Nozzle Sun's Surface #12;ECE 4100/6100 (19) The Memory Wall, Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, 4th edition, 2006 Sea change in chip design: multiple

306

Distance in architecture  

E-print Network

The document which follows represents an exploration of distance and its connection to architecture. This exploration is threefold. On one level it regards distance as an ontological question, researching for precedent ...

Criparacos, George C

1987-01-01

307

Methodology in architectural design  

E-print Network

The act of designing in architecture is a complex process. Many designers, when probed for reasons to explain their actions, are either unable to answer questions, or provide explanations that are not true descriptions of ...

Wiggins, Glenn E

1989-01-01

308

Assimilating hybridized architecture  

E-print Network

The thesis searches for means of operation to deal with hybridized architecture. As a conceptual framework, sociology theory appears to be an insightful precedent, for it analyzes and classifies how multiple constituents ...

Wu, Jane C., 1977-

2005-01-01

309

METRIC context unit architecture  

SciTech Connect

METRIC is an architecture for a simple but powerful Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC). Its speed comes from the simultaneous processing of several instruction streams, with instructions from the various streams being dispatched into METRIC's execution pipeline as they become available for execution. The pipeline is thus kept full, with a mix of instructions for several contexts in execution at the same time. True parallel programming is supported within a single execution unit, the METRIC Context Unit. METRIC's architecture provides for expansion through the addition of multiple Context Units and of specialized Functional Units. The architecture thus spans a range of size and performance from a single-chip microcomputer up through large and powerful multiprocessors. This research concentrates on the specification of the METRIC Context Unit at the architectural level. Performance tradeoffs made during METRIC's design are discussed, and projections of METRIC's performance are made based on simulation studies.

Simpson, R.O.

1988-01-01

310

OBBL Architecture Blocks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive applet gives students the opportunity to compose architectural structures using geometric and irregular elements. Learners must consider the effects of gravity and the methods of joining parts. Links to Help and Ideas sections are included.

2011-01-01

311

Bridge : an unraveled architecture  

E-print Network

The bridge is an inhabitable structure housing live/work artists studios, galleries and workshops. It is an urban/architectural/personal intervention that strives to explore issues of Iatent/potential narratives within a ...

ElHusseiny, Ahmed

2006-01-01

312

Lunar Architecture and Urbanism.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Human civilization and architecture have defined each other for over 5000 years on Earth. Even in the novel environment of space, persistent issues of human urbanism will eclipse, within a historically short time, the technical challenges of space settlem...

B. Sherwood

1992-01-01

313

International Architecture Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Drawing on the contributions from persons across much of Europe, the International Architecture Database website has served as a valuable clearinghouse for thousands of architectural projects (both built and unrealized) since 1996. Currently, the database contains information on more than 13,000 projects, most from the 20th and 21st centuries. Visitors can begin by browsing the database by name, location, or keyword. Looking at a single record, visitors will be presented with a host of information, such as building type, primary architect, location, years of construction, and in certain cases with external links, photographs, and plans. Looking through the lists of keywords can actually be quite useful, as each keyword is linked to examples that are demonstrative of the idea suggested by the keyword, such as early Gothic or elementary school. Overall, this is a fine resource for those persons who wish to learn a bit more about architecture or for those looking for information on different architectural projects.

314

Open Design Architecture for Round Trip Engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter introduces a component design of application logic in special type of information system architecture called Open Design Architecture for Round Trip Engineering (ODARTE). This architecture supports model-driven development and integrates information system design with its executable form. It is possible to extract design anytime, modify it, and load back to change the activity and behavior of information system. In this approach, the application logic represents solely functionality and can be described either by sequential model of Windows Workflow Foundation or by UML activity or interaction diagrams. This approach allows creation of flexible and modifiable meta-design of application logic. Finally, an experimental simulation is shown demonstrating the effect of proposal which relates to pilot version of runtime environment for ODARTE support.

Beli?ák, Miroslav; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Richta, Karel

315

A Parallel Architecture perspective on language processing.  

PubMed

This article sketches the Parallel Architecture, an approach to the structure of grammar that contrasts with mainstream generative grammar (MGG) in that (a) it treats phonology, syntax, and semantics as independent generative components whose structures are linked by interface rules; (b) it uses a parallel constraint-based formalism that is nondirectional; (c) it treats words and rules alike as pieces of linguistic structure stored in long-term memory. In addition to the theoretical advantages offered by the Parallel Architecture, it lends itself to a direct interpretation in processing terms, in which pieces of structure stored in long-term memory are assembled in working memory, and alternative structures are in competition. The resulting model of processing is compared both with processing models derived from MGG and with lexically driven connectionist architectures. PMID:17045978

Jackendoff, Ray

2007-05-18

316

Dynamic Adaptation of Aspect-Oriented Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current works address self-adaptability of software architectures to build more autonomous and flexible systems. However,\\u000a most of these works only perform adaptations at configuration-level: a component is adapted by being replaced with a new one.\\u000a The state of the replaced component is lost and related components can undergo undesirable changes. This paper presents a\\u000a generic solution to design components that

Cristóbal Costa Soria; Jennifer Pérez; José Ángel Carsí

2007-01-01

317

Computational field programmable architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a new field-programmable architecture that is targeted at compute-intensive applications. These applications are important because of their use in the expanding multi-media markets in signal and data processing. We explain the design methodology, layout and implementation of the new architecture. A synthesis method has also been developed with which we have mapped several circuits to the new

Alireza Kaviani; Daniel Vranesic; Stephen Brown

1998-01-01

318

Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture  

SciTech Connect

A Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture is described that allows a simulation to be automatically distributed over a heterogeneous network of computers and executed with very little human direction. A prototype Framework is presented that implements the elements of the Architecture and demonstrates the feasibility of the concepts. It provides a basis for a future, improved Framework that will support legacy models. Because the Framework is implemented in Java, it may be installed on almost any modern computer system.

Booker, C.P.

1999-05-14

319

Languages for parallel architectures  

SciTech Connect

This book presents mathematical methods for modelling parallel computer architectures, based on the results of ESPRIT's project 415 on computer languages for parallel architectures. Presented are investigations incorporating a wide variety of programming styles, including functional,logic, and object-oriented paradigms. Topics cover include Philips's parallel object-oriented language POOL, lazy-functional languages, the languages IDEAL, K-LEAF, FP2, and Petri-net semantics for the AADL language.

Bakker, J.W.

1989-01-01

320

A Component-Based Framework for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Reactive Fluid Flow in Porous Media.  

SciTech Connect

The development of a framework to support smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of fluid flow and transport in porous media is described. The framework is built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) toolkit and supports SPH simulations using a variety of different SPH models and setup formats. The SPH simulation code is decomposed into independent components that represent self-contained units of functionality. Different physics models can be developed within the framework by re-implementing key components but no modification of other components is required. The model for defining components and developing abstract interfaces for them that support a high degree of modularity and minimal dependencies between components is discussed in detail.

Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Palmer, Bruce J.

2010-05-02

321

Optics inspired logic architecture.  

PubMed

Conventional architectures for the implementation of Boolean logic are based on a network of bistable elements assembled to realize cascades of simple Boolean logic gates. Since each such gate has two input signals and only one output signal, such architectures are fundamentally dissipative in information and energy. Their serial nature also induces a latency in the processing time. In this paper we present a new, principally non-dissipative digital logic architecture which mitigates the above impediments. Unlike traditional computing architectures, the proposed architecture involves a distributed and parallel input scheme where logical functions are evaluated at the speed of light. The system is based on digital logic vectors rather than the Boolean scalars of electronic logic. The architecture employs a novel conception of cascading which utilizes the strengths of both optics and electronics while avoiding their weaknesses. It is inherently non-dissipative, respects the linear nature of interactions in pure optics, and harnesses the control advantages of electrons without reducing the speed advantages of optics. This new logic paradigm was specially developed with optical implementation in mind. However, it is suitable for other implementations as well, including conventional electronic devices. PMID:19532231

Hardy, James; Shamir, Joseph

2007-01-01

322

Works19632013 Alumni in Architecture,  

E-print Network

Stuckeman Works1963­2013 Alumni in Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Graphic Design showcase their impact on design throughout the past five decades #12;architectur Penn State'S DePartment of architecture iS increaSing its profile. its faculty boasts a rich history of research, with considerable participation

Lee, Dongwon

323

Collaborative architecture design and evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we describe a collaborative environment created to support distributed evaluation of a complex system architecture. The approach couples an interactive architecture browser with collaborative walkthroughs of an evolving architectural representation. The collaborative architecture browser was created to facilitate involvement of project stakeholders from geographically dispersed, heterogeneous organizations. The paper provides a rationale for the approach, describes the

Steven R. Haynes; Amie L. Skattebo; Jonathan A. Singel; Mark A. Cohen; Jodi L. Himelright

2006-01-01

324

Trends in compilable DSP architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review the evolution of DSP architectures and compiler technology, and describe how compiler techniques are being used to optimize emerging DSP architectures. Such new architectures are characterized by the exploitation of data and instruction level parallelism while being an amenable target for a compiler, thereby reducing or eliminating the need to rely on assembly language programming and\\/or architecture-specific compiler

John Glossner; Jaime Moreno; Mayan Moudgill; Jeff Derby; Erdem Hokenek; David Meltzer; Uzi Shvadron; Malcolm Ware

2000-01-01

325

Lightweight Prevention of Architectural Erosion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Avoiding architectural erosion helps extend the lifetime of an evolving software system. Erosion can be reduced by ensuring that (i) developers share a good understanding of a system's architecture; (ii) alignment is preserved between the architectural description and its implementation at all stages of system construction and maintenance; and (iii) architectural changes are treated with the same care and attention

Ciaran O'reilly; Philip J. Morrow; David W. Bustard

2003-01-01

326

Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

Malony, Allen D.

2007-05-08

327

Transformation of painting into architecture : museum for the works of F. Lembersky  

E-print Network

Art and architecture share a common goal and similar formal principles. Their common goal is to express and abstract spiritual content through harmonious, pure and beautiful material form. The shared principles of form ...

Lembersky, Yelena

1994-01-01

328

Partially Decentralized Control Architectures for Satellite Formations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a partially decentralized control architecture, more than one but less than all nodes have supervisory capability. This paper describes an approach to choosing the number of supervisors in such au architecture, based on a reliability vs. cost trade. It also considers the implications of these results for the design of navigation systems for satellite formations that could be controlled with a partially decentralized architecture. Using an assumed cost model, analytic and simulation-based results indicate that it may be cheaper to achieve a given overall system reliability with a partially decentralized architecture containing only a few supervisors, than with either fully decentralized or purely centralized architectures. Nominally, the subset of supervisors may act as centralized estimation and control nodes for corresponding subsets of the remaining subordinate nodes, and act as decentralized estimation and control peers with respect to each other. However, in the context of partially decentralized satellite formation control, the absolute positions and velocities of each spacecraft are unique, so that correlations which make estimates using only local information suboptimal only occur through common biases and process noise. Covariance and monte-carlo analysis of a simplified system show that this lack of correlation may allow simplification of the local estimators while preserving the global optimality of the maneuvers commanded by the supervisors.

Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, Frank H.

2002-01-01

329

Automated component creation for legacy C++ and fortran codes.  

SciTech Connect

A significant amount of work has been spent creating component models and programming environments, but little support exists for automation in the process of creating components from existing codes. To entice users to adopt the component-based paradigm over traditional programming models, integration of legacy codes must be as simple and fast as possible, We present a system for automating the IDL generation stage of component development based on source code analysis of legacy C, C-t-4 and Fortran codes using the Program Database Toolkit. Together with IDL compilation tools such as Babel, we provide an alternative to hand-written IDL code for legacy applications and libraries. In addition to generating IDL, we propose an XML-based method for specifying meta-data related to type mapping and wrapper generation that can be shared between our tools and IDL compilers. The component model of choice for this work is the Common Component Architecture (CCA) using the Scientific Interface Definition Language (SIDL), though the concepts presented can be applied to other models.

Sottile, M. J. (Matthew J.); Rasmussen, C. E. (Craig E.)

2001-01-01

330

Common Conditions in Newborns  

MedlinePLUS

... Baby > Common Conditions in Newborns Ages & Stages Listen Common Conditions in Newborns Article Body Some physical conditions are especially common during the first couple of weeks after birth. ...

331

Parallel supercomputing with commodity components  

SciTech Connect

We have implemented a parallel computer architecture based entirely upon commodity personal computer components. Using 16 Intel Pentium Pro microprocessors and switched fast ethernet as a communication fabric, we have obtained sustained performance on scientific applications in excess of one Gigaflop. During one production astrophysics treecode simulation, we performed 1.2 x 10{sup 15} floating point operations (1.2 Petaflops) over a three week period, with one phase of that simulation running continuously for two weeks without interruption. We report on a variety of disk, memory and network benchmarks. We also present results from the NAS parallel benchmark suite, which indicate that this architecture is competitive with current commercial architectures. In addition, we describe some software written to support efficient message passing, as well as a Linux device driver interface to the Pentium hardware performance monitoring registers.

Warren, M.S.; Goda, M.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Becker, D.J. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

1997-09-01

332

Composability in the time-triggered system-on-chip architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The composition of a large SoC out of pre-validated IP-cores requires an architecture that enables the seamless integration of components, i.e. composability. In this paper we present the five principles of composability that must be supported by any architecture that claims to enable the constructive composition of components. After the introduction of the TTSoC architecture and a description of a

Hermann Kopetz; Christian El Salloum; Bernhard Huber; Roman Obermaisser; Christian Paukovits

2008-01-01

333

Computational Quality of Service for Scientific Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientific computing on massively parallel computers presents unique challenges to component-based software engineering (CBSE). While CBSE is at least as enabling for scientific computing as it is for other arenas, the require- ments are different. We briefly discuss how these requirements shape the Com- mon Component Architecture, and we describe some recent research on quality- of-service issues to address the

Boyana Norris; Jaideep Ray; Robert C. Armstrong; Lois C. Mcinnes; David E. Bernholdt; Wael R. Elwasif; Allen D. Malony; Sameer Shende

2004-01-01

334

Moving From Federated to Integrated Architectures in Automotive: The Role of Standards, Methods and Tools  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cost pressure, flexibility, extensibility and the need for coping with increased functional complexity are changing the fundamental paradigms for the definition of automotive and aeronautics architectures. Traditional designs are based on the concept of a Federated Architecture in which integrated hardware\\/software components [Electronic Control Units (ECUs)] realize mostly independent or loosely interconnected functions. These components are connected by bus and

Marco Di Natale

2010-01-01

335

REVISITING COMMONS – ARE COMMON PROPERTY REGIMES IRRATIONAL?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper revisits the debate about communal management of natural resources and brings together various issues confronting it. Much of the criticism against common property regimes stems from an incorrect modeling of a common property situation, and misunderstandings about the terms and their wrong usage. Models of collective action (Hardin’s tragedy of the Commons, Olson’s Logic of Collective Action, and

Lubna Hasan

2002-01-01

336

Updates to the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes an update of the Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) open architecture for NASA space based radios. The STRS architecture has been defined as a framework for the design, development, operation and upgrade of space based software defined radios, where processing resources are constrained. The architecture has been updated based upon reviews by NASA missions, radio providers, and component vendors. The STRS Standard prescribes the architectural relationship between the software elements used in software execution and defines the Application Programmer Interface (API) between the operating environment and the waveform application. Modeling tools have been adopted to present the architecture. The paper will present a description of the updated API, configuration files, and constraints. Minimum compliance is discussed for early implementations. The paper then closes with a summary of the changes made and discussion of the relevant alignment with the Object Management Group (OMG) SWRadio specification, and enhancements to the specialized signal processing abstraction.

Kacpura, Thomas J.; Handler, Louis M.; Briones, Janette; Hall, Charles S.

2008-01-01

337

Error Propagation in the Reliability Analysis of Component Based Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Component based development is gaining popularity in the software engineering community. The reliability of components affects the reliability of the system. Different models and theories have been developed to estimate system reliability given the information about system architecture and the quality of the components. Almost always in these models a key attribute of component-based systems, the error propagation between the

Petar Popic; Dejan Desovski; Walid Abdelmoez; Bojan Cukic

2005-01-01

338

Agent Architectures for Compliance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

339

"Architectural Elements and Sculptures"  

E-print Network

pedestal with column base L. The Synagogue Building (Field f) Architecture Plate Bz l-2 Synagogue Interior Columns AF = architectural fragmenu Scale 1:10 97 no. feld/area AF number locus no. column number description I 2 1.2 1.2 6 5 2007 200r z I T unfluted.... Synagogue 3 (8-column Synagogue) Note: not to scale AF = 61.1ri,.ctural Fragment Numbers in bold indicate elemenrs ,ho*-., o'Architecture plates = pedestal/base + shaft; I = pedestal/base o2 tr4 l6 tr1 r3 l5 ET8 l7 79 tSI Col. No. Shafi pedestat 1 2 L2, AF...

Younger, John G.

2009-01-01

340

Society of Architectural Historians  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) was founded at Harvard University in 1940 and "promotes the study, interpretation, and conservation of architecture, design, landscapes and urbanism worldwide for the benefit of all." The SAH's outreach programs include the "Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians," an annual conference, study tours, and more. On the homepage, visitors can peruse the SAH News, the Association's informative and creative blog, and the Publications and Research area, which contains some member-only sections. The general public, however, can still take advantage of a number of digital resources here. Resources include the SAH Archipedia Classic Buildings, and external archives, such as the Julia Morgan Collection, Building Canada, and the Drawings & Documents Archive at Ball State University. Finally, visitors may also wish to look over the Jobs and Careers area for information about new and exciting careers in the field.

2013-04-22

341

Deriving test plans from architectural descriptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents an approach to derive test plansfor the conformance testing of a system implementationwith respect to the formal description of its SoftwareArchitecture (SA). The SA describes a system in termsof its components and connections, therefore the derivedtest plans address the integration testing phase.We base our approach on a Labelled Transition System(LTS) modeling the SA dynamics, and on suitable

Antonia Bertolino; Flavio Corradini; Henry Muccini

2000-01-01

342

Generalized Release Planning for Product Line Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper elaborates on the coordination and management of evolving software product-lines, where development teams work around a shared and reusable domain infrastructure. The trend away from monolithic applications and towards component-based, product-line architectures has enabled the development of complex software to be undertaken by autonomous and often, geographically separated teams. To deliver a complete product or product-line requires significant

Louis J. M. Taborda

2004-01-01

343

IDD Archival Hardware Architecture and Workflow  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the functionality of every component in the DHS/IDD archival and storage hardware system shown in Fig. 1. The document describes steps by step process of image data being received at LLNL then being processed and made available to authorized personnel and collaborators. Throughout this document references will be made to one of two figures, Fig. 1 describing the elements of the architecture and the Fig. 2 describing the workflow and how the project utilizes the available hardware.

Mendonsa, D; Nekoogar, F; Martz, H

2008-10-09

344

Mindshare: PC System Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mindshare is a company that specializes in technical training for a variety of computer technologies. Five short courses can be accessed from the Mindshare home page at no charge, after completing a quick registration. The online courses give an overview of the "PCI-X System Architecture, Rambus, USB 2.0, PCI Power Management, and Infiniband System Architecture." Each of these technologies is introduced with a virtual presentation, which shows video of the speaker and the slides used in the talk. The Web interface is very well designed and easy to use. The presentations range from 45 minutes to over two hours.

345

The RICHE Reference Architecture.  

PubMed

The RICHE Reference Architecture defines an open framework for health care information systems. Developed within the ESPRIT II programme, it is now the basis of several implementations in hospitals in Italy, Portugal, Ireland, France and the UK, and of follow-up initiatives such as EDITH (ESPRIT, no. 7508), NUCLEUS (AIM II, no. 2025) and REFERENCE (a French hospitals' project). This contribution describes the RICHE Reference Architecture in detail. Special concern is centred on the modulus that constitute the basic platform of RICHE, and on the methodology applied to design the interactions between them. PMID:7934300

Frandji, B; Schot, J; Joubert, M; Soady, I; Kilsdonk, A

1994-01-01

346

Evaluation of streaming aggregation on parallel hardware architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a case study parallelizing streaming aggregation on three different parallel hardware architectures. Aggregation is a performance-critical operation for data summarization in stream computing, and is commonly found in sense-and-respond applications. Currently available commodity parallel hardware provides promise as accelerators for streaming aggregation. However, how streaming aggregation can map to the different parallel architectures is still an open question.

Scott Schneidert; Henrique Andrade; Bugra Gedik; Kun-Lung Wu; Dimitrios S. Nikolopoulos

2010-01-01

347

Particle-in-Cell algorithms for emerging computer architectures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have designed Particle-in-Cell algorithms for emerging architectures. These algorithms share a common approach, using fine-grained tiles, but different implementations depending on the architecture. On the GPU, there were two different implementations, one with atomic operations and one with no data collisions, using CUDA C and Fortran. Speedups up to about 50 compared to a single core of the Intel i7 processor have been achieved. There was also an implementation for traditional multi-core processors using OpenMP which achieved high parallel efficiency. We believe that this approach should work for other emerging designs such as Intel Phi coprocessor from the Intel MIC architecture.

Decyk, Viktor K.; Singh, Tajendra V.

2014-03-01

348

MAGMA: a multiagent architecture for metaheuristics.  

PubMed

In this work, we introduce a multiagent architecture called the MultiAGent Metaheuristic Architecture (MAGMA) conceived as a conceptual and practical framework for metaheuristic algorithms. Metaheuristics can be seen as the result of the interaction among different kinds of agents: The basic architecture contains three levels, each hosting one or more agents. Level-0 agents build solutions, level-1 agents improve solutions, and level-2 agents provide the high level strategy. In this framework, classical metaheuristic algorithms can be smoothly accommodated and extended. The basic three level architecture can be enhanced with the introduction of a fourth level of agents (level-3 agents) coordinating lower level agents. With this additional level, MAGMA can also describe, in a uniform way, cooperative search and, in general, any combination of metaheuristics. We describe the entire architecture, the structure of agents in each level in terms of tuples, and the structure of their coordination as a labeled transition system. We propose this perspective with the aim to achieve a better and clearer understanding of metaheuristics, obtain hybrid algorithms, suggest guidelines for a software engineering-oriented implementation and for didactic purposes. Some specializations of the general architecture will be provided in order to show that existing metaheuristics [e.g., greedy randomized adaptive procedure (GRASP), ant colony optimization (ACO), iterated local search (ILS), memetic algorithms (MAs)] can be easily described in our framework. We describe cooperative search and large neighborhood search (LNS) in the proposed framework exploiting level-3 agents. We show also that a simple hybrid algorithm, called guided restart ILS, can be easily conceived as a combination of existing components in our framework. PMID:15376840

Milano, Michela; Roli, Andrea

2004-04-01

349

Common Control System Vulnerability  

SciTech Connect

The Control Systems Security Program and other programs within the Idaho National Laboratory have discovered a vulnerability common to control systems in all sectors that allows an attacker to penetrate most control systems, spoof the operator, and gain full control of targeted system elements. This vulnerability has been identified on several systems that have been evaluated at INL, and in each case a 100% success rate of completing the attack paths that lead to full system compromise was observed. Since these systems are employed in multiple critical infrastructure sectors, this vulnerability is deemed common to control systems in all sectors. Modern control systems architectures can be considered analogous to today's information networks, and as such are usually approached by attackers using a common attack methodology to penetrate deeper and deeper into the network. This approach often is composed of several phases, including gaining access to the control network, reconnaissance, profiling of vulnerabilities, launching attacks, escalating privilege, maintaining access, and obscuring or removing information that indicates that an intruder was on the system. With irrefutable proof that an external attack can lead to a compromise of a computing resource on the organization's business local area network (LAN), access to the control network is usually considered the first phase in the attack plan. Once the attacker gains access to the control network through direct connections and/or the business LAN, the second phase of reconnaissance begins with traffic analysis within the control domain. Thus, the communications between the workstations and the field device controllers can be monitored and evaluated, allowing an attacker to capture, analyze, and evaluate the commands sent among the control equipment. Through manipulation of the communication protocols of control systems (a process generally referred to as ''reverse engineering''), an attacker can then map out the control system processes and functions. With the detailed knowledge of how the control data functions, as well as what computers and devices communicate using this data, the attacker can use a well known Man-in-the-Middle attack to perform malicious operations virtually undetected. The control systems assessment teams have used this method to gather enough information about the system to craft an attack that intercepts and changes the information flow between the end devices (controllers) and the human machine interface (HMI and/or workstation). Using this attack, the cyber assessment team has been able to demonstrate complete manipulation of devices in control systems while simultaneously modifying the data flowing back to the operator's console to give false information of the state of the system (known as ''spoofing''). This is a very effective technique for a control system attack because it allows the attacker to manipulate the system and the operator's situational awareness of the perceived system status. The three main elements of this attack technique are: (1) network reconnaissance and data gathering, (2) reverse engineering, and (3) the Man-in-the-Middle attack. The details of this attack technique and the mitigation techniques are discussed.

Trent Nelson

2005-12-01

350

Safarchie Studio: ArgoUML Extensions to Build Safe Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays, no standard and universal definition of software architecture was accepted by all the community. Various points\\u000a of view on different studies bring to several approaches. These approaches focus on only one or two concerns such as component\\u000a interfaces specification, behavioral analysis or software reconfiguration. This paper argues that, in order to accrue the\\u000a true benefits of software architecture approaches,

Olivier Barais; Laurence Duchien

351

System Architectural Considerations on Reliable Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN and C) for Constellation Program (CxP) Spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report summarizes the results of a comparative assessment of the fault tolerance and reliability of different Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) architectural approaches. This study was proactively performed by a combined Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Draper Laboratory team as a GN&C "Discipline-Advancing" activity sponsored by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). This systematic comparative assessment of GN&C system architectural approaches was undertaken as a fundamental step towards understanding the opportunities for, and limitations of, architecting highly reliable and fault tolerant GN&C systems composed of common avionic components. The primary goal of this study was to obtain architectural 'rules of thumb' that could positively influence future designs in the direction of an optimized (i.e., most reliable and cost-efficient) GN&C system. A secondary goal was to demonstrate the application and the utility of a systematic modeling approach that maps the entire possible architecture solution space.

Dennehy, Cornelius J.

2010-01-01

352

Novel architecture for measurements in resistive MEMS sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A low voltage, low power, resistive sensor architecture is proposed in this paper. The architecture is novel as it enhances the sensitivity along the main axis as well as reducing the impact of cross axes components. The proposed scheme also allows the simultaneous measurement of sensitivity along six different axes. With less than 15% of the power of its Wheatstone bridge [1] counterpart and with a voltage level as low as 2.25 V, this architecture also enables the realization of the sensor using fewer resistive elements. The modified sensor structure, along with the front-end signal processing circuit, is discussed.

Nandi, Prajit; Biswas, Riju; Sundar Dhar, Anindya; Das, Soumen

2014-05-01

353

SEAL: Common Core Libraries and Services for LHC Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CERN LHC experiments have begun the LHC Computing Grid project in 2001. One of the project's aims is to develop common software infrastructure based on a development vision shared by the participating experiments. The SEAL project will provide common foundation libraries, services and utilities identified by the project's architecture blueprint report. This requires a broad range of functionality that

J. Generowicz; P. Mato; L. Moneta; S. Roiser; M. Marino; L A Tuura

2003-01-01

354

Neural network architecture for crossbar switch control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Hopfield neural network architecture for the real-time control of a crossbar switch for switching packets at maximum throughput is proposed. The network performance and processing time are derived from a numerical simulation of the transitions of the neural network. A method is proposed to optimize electronic component parameters and synaptic connections, and it is fully illustrated by the computer simulation of a VLSI implementation of 4 x 4 neural net controller. The extension to larger size crossbars is demonstrated through the simulation of an 8 x 8 crossbar switch controller, where the performance of the neural computation is discussed in relation to electronic noise and inhomogeneities of network components.

Troudet, Terry P.; Walters, Stephen M.

1991-01-01

355

HYDRA : High-speed simulation architecture for precision spacecraft formation simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

e Hierarchical Distributed Reconfigurable Architecture- is a scalable simulation architecture that provides flexibility and ease-of-use which take advantage of modern computation and communication hardware. It also provides the ability to implement distributed - or workstation - based simulations and high-fidelity real-time simulation from a common core. Originally designed to serve as a research platform for examining fundamental challenges in formation flying simulation for future space missions, it is also finding use in other missions and applications, all of which can take advantage of the underlying Object-Oriented structure to easily produce distributed simulations. Hydra automates the process of connecting disparate simulation components (Hydra Clients) through a client server architecture that uses high-level descriptions of data associated with each client to find and forge desirable connections (Hydra Services) at run time. Services communicate through the use of Connectors, which abstract messaging to provide single-interface access to any desired communication protocol, such as from shared-memory message passing to TCP/IP to ACE and COBRA. Hydra shares many features with the HLA, although providing more flexibility in connectivity services and behavior overriding.

Martin, Bryan J.; Sohl, Garett.

2003-01-01

356

Stemming Architectural Erosion by Coupling Architectural Discovery and Recovery  

E-print Network

, into an operation and maintenance phase. The software system's architecture is in many ways the linchpin reflected in the sys- tem's implementation. Furthermore, the architecture is meant to guide system evolution the discovered and recovered architectural models. While promising, the approach presented in the paper is a work

Egyed, Alexander

357

ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

DOELLE, LESLIE L.

358

Ancient Egyptian Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Time to learn about Temples, Pyramids, and Obelisks in Ancient Egypt! Please use the links below to help you find the answers to the questions on your worksheets. Ancient Egypt (click on the pyramids and temples links) Architecture(use this link to answer questions in the Temples section) Obelisks pyramids ...

Myers, Mr.

2011-10-06

359

EYP Architecture & Engineering -Washington  

E-print Network

design is in progress. The advancement of this project is subject to Department of General Services cost in several educational and general facilities on campus. Fire alarm systems will be installed or expanded and Technology, Norris Hall, Lane Hall, Patton Hall, Litton Reaves Hall, Whittemore Hall, Architecture Annex

Buehrer, R. Michael

360

Specifying Distributed Software Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a real need for clear and sound design specifications of distributed systems at the architectural level. This is the level of the design which deals with the high-level organisation of computational elements and the interactions between those elements. The paper presents the Darwin notation for specifying this high-level organisation. Darwin is in essence a declarative binding language which

Jeff Magee; Naranker Dulay; Susan Eisenbach; Jeff Kramer

1995-01-01

361

Test Architecture, Test Retrofit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Just like buildings, tests are designed and built for specific purposes, people, and uses. However, both buildings and tests grow and change over time as the needs of their users change. Sometimes, they are also both used for purposes other than those intended in the original designs. This paper explores architecture as a metaphor for language…

Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred

2009-01-01

362

Game Architecture Introduction  

E-print Network

Game Architecture #12;Introduction · When you sit down and start typing code, what do you type language do I write my game in" ­ C / Assembly ­ Maybe C++, without advanced features, if you were feeling an order of magnitude longer to write · Games usually try to play it a little safe and use a mixture ­ C

Stephenson, Ben

363

Financial System Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article builds a theory of financial system architecture. We ask: what is a financial market, what is a bank, and what determines the economic role of each? Starting with basic assumptions about primitives--the types of agents and the nature of the informational asymmetries--we provide a theory that explains which agents coalesce to form banks and which trade in the

Arnoud W A Boot; Anjan V Thakor

1997-01-01

364

The Architecture of Personality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a theoretical framework for analyzing psychological systems that contribute to the variability, consistency, and cross-situational coherence of personality functioning. In the proposed knowledge-and-appraisal personality architecture (KAPA), personality structures and processes are delineated by combining 2 principles:…

Cervone, Daniel

2004-01-01

365

Architecture master's programme  

E-print Network

Landscape Architecture ­ master's programme at SLU, Alnarp, Sweden* Starts in September 2011. Last date for application is January, 15 at www.studera.nu. This new master's programme gives you. The programme will give you a strong platform and the accurate tools for a forthcoming professional career

366

[Architecture, budget and dignity].  

PubMed

Drawing on its dynamic strengths, a psychiatric unit develops various projects and care techniques. In this framework, the institute director must make a number of choices with regard to architecture. Why renovate the psychiatry building? What financial investments are required? What criteria should be followed? What if the major argument was based on the respect of the patient's dignity? PMID:22741502

Morel, Etienne

2012-01-01

367

Tutorial on architectural acoustics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

2002-11-01

368

bachelor of architecture  

E-print Network

, and seminars. Taubman College students understand the nature of complex design, have knowledgebachelor of science in architecture (B.S.) #12;Student working in studio The B.S. degree prepares students for future work in a myriad of areas. After graduating, some students choose to pursue graduate

Kamat, Vineet R.

369

Community architecture : myth and reality  

E-print Network

This thesis examines the origins and the claims of the community architecture movement. Community architecture, which has recently attracted considerable professional attention in the U.K., is a movement that argues for ...

Mongold, Neal J. (Neal Joseph)

1988-01-01

370

Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis.  

PubMed

Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy. PMID:25063994

Speed, Doug; O'Brien, Terence J; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G; Balding, David J; Johnson, Michael R

2014-10-01

371

Sustainable Internet Architecture PROJECT DESCRIPTION  

E-print Network

Sustainable Internet Architecture PROJECT DESCRIPTION 1 Introduction The Internet currently plays of challenges. Numerous research studies on a new Internet architecture (e.g., [16, 37, 48, 54, 55]) have on both the new Internet architecture itself and the underlying problems that motivate it. We look

Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

372

Architectural Adventures in Your Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to architecture's complexity, it can be challenging to develop lessons for the students, and consequently, the teaching of architecture is frequently overlooked. Every community has an architectural history. For example, the community in which the author's students live has a variety of historic houses from when the community originated (the…

Henn, Cynthia A.

2007-01-01

373

Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Engineering 11 12 12 Ann Arbor 12 Department History 13 Naval Architecture and MarineNaval Architecture and Marine Engineering Undergraduate Program The University of Michigan #12;2 The Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Educational Objectives The Educational Objectives

Eustice, Ryan

374

Introduction The idea of architecture  

E-print Network

: A GENTLE INTRODUCTION TO SOAR, AN ARCHITECTURE FOR HUMAN COGNITION: 2006 UPDATE by Jill Fain Lehman, John, action and cognition Detecting a lack of knowledge Learning The SOAR architecture in review Cognition Few, action and cognition Detecting a lack of knowledge Learning The SOAR architecture in review Cognition Few

Bremen, Universität

375

Integrated cognitive architectures: a survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to present an account of the state of the art research in the fleld of integrated cognitive architectures by providing a review of six cognitive architectures, namely Soar, ACT-R, ICARUS, BDI, the subsumption architecture and CLARION. We conduct a detailed functional comparison by looking at a wide range of cognitive com- ponents, including perception, memory, goal representation,

Hui-Qing Chong; Ah-Hwee Tan; Gee-Wah Ng

2007-01-01

376

A Semantic Web Services Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The semantic Web services initiative architecture (SWSA) committee has created a set of architectural and protocol abstractions that serve as a foundation for semantic Web service technologies. This article summarizes the committee's findings, emphasizing its review of requirements gathered from several different environments. We also identify the scope and potential requirements for a semantic Web services architecture.

Mark H. Burstein; Christoph Bussler; Michal Zaremba; Timothy W. Finin; Michael N. Huhns; Massimo Paolucci; Amit P. Sheth; Stuart K. Williams

2005-01-01

377

Cognitive Architectures for Multimedia Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a tutorial overview of cognitive architectures that can form a theoretical foundation for designing multimedia instruction. Cognitive architectures include a description of memory stores, memory codes, and cognitive operations. Architectures that are relevant to multimedia learning include Paivio's dual coding theory,…

Reed, Stephen K.

2006-01-01

378

Cell wall peptidoglycan architecture in Bacillus subtilis  

PubMed Central

The bacterial cell wall is essential for viability and shape determination. Cell wall structural dynamics allowing growth and division, while maintaining integrity is a basic problem governing the life of bacteria. The polymer peptidoglycan is the main structural component for most bacteria and is made up of glycan strands that are cross-linked by peptide side chains. Despite study and speculation over many years, peptidoglycan architecture has remained largely elusive. Here, we show that the model rod-shaped bacterium Bacillus subtilis has glycan strands up to 5 ?m, longer than the cell itself and 50 times longer than previously proposed. Atomic force microscopy revealed the glycan strands to be part of a peptidoglycan architecture allowing cell growth and division. The inner surface of the cell wall has a regular macrostructure with ?50 nm-wide peptidoglycan cables [average 53 ± 12 nm (n = 91)] running basically across the short axis of the cell. Cross striations with an average periodicity of 25 ± 9 nm (n = 96) along each cable are also present. The fundamental cabling architecture is also maintained during septal development as part of cell division. We propose a coiled-coil model for peptidoglycan architecture encompassing our data and recent evidence concerning the biosynthetic machinery for this essential polymer. PMID:18784364

Hayhurst, Emma J.; Kailas, Lekshmi; Hobbs, Jamie K.; Foster, Simon J.

2008-01-01

379

Communication architecture based power management for battery efficient system design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Communication-based power management (CBPM) is a new battery-driven system-level power management methodology in which the system-level communication architecture regulates the execution of various system components, with the aim of improving battery efficiency, and hence, battery life. Unlike conventional power management policies (that attempt to efficiently shut down idle components), CBPM may delay the execution of selected system components even when

Kanishka Lahiri; Sujit Dey; Anand Raghunathan

2002-01-01

380

An architectural framework and a middleware for cooperating smart components  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a future networked physical world, a myriad of smart sensors and actuators assess and control aspects of their environments and autonomously act in response to it. Examples range in telematics, traffic management, team robotics or home automation to name a few. To a large extent, such systems operate proactively and independently of direct human control driven by the perception

António Casimiro; Jörg Kaiser; Paulo Veríssimo

2004-01-01

381

An Architectural Framework and a Middleware for Cooperating Smart Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a future networked physical world, a myriad of smart sensors and actuators assess and control aspects of their en- vironments and autonomously act in response to it. Exam- ples range in telematics, tra-c management, team robotics or home automation to name a few. To a large extent, such systems operate proactively and independently of direct hu- man control driven

U. Ulm; Paulo Ver ´ issimo

382

ARCHITECTURE AND MAIN HARDWARE COMPONENTS OF THE FEL CONTROL SYSTEM  

E-print Network

characteristics of different communications standards used in the FEL control system are given as well of parameters of subsystems and other interprogram communication are performed via the protocol Epics Channel. It is seen from the table that the FEL control subsystems use several communication standards, which can

Kozak, Victor R.

383

BOSTON UNIVERSITY HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE  

E-print Network

BOSTON UNIVERSITY HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE GRADUATE PROGRAM 2012-2013 Information ..................................................................... 5 THE MA DEGREE IN HISTORY OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE ........................ 5 History of Art and Architecture ..................................................................... 5 History of Architecture

Goldberg, Bennett

384

WWW Computer Architecture Home Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The WWW Computer Architecture Home Page, created by Mark Hill and maintained by Milo Martin at the University of Wisconsin Computer Sciences Department, contains a wealth of up-to-date and useful links to myriad resources about computer architecture. Site features include timely calls for papers and calls for participation, useful links to information on commercial hardware, a white pages listing of people involved in computer architecture, links to architecture research groups and projects around the world, and many other pages of informative links. While not searchable, the organization, size, and usefulness of the collection make it a valuable starting point for computer architecture research.

385

Interplay between spindle architecture and function.  

PubMed

The mitotic spindle performs the universal and crucial function of segregating chromosomes to daughter cells, and all spindles share common characteristics that facilitate this task. The spindle is built from microtubule (MT) polymers and hundreds of associated factors that assemble into a dynamic steady-state structure that is tuned to the cellular environment. In this review, we discuss the phenomenology and underlying mechanisms that describe how spindle architecture is optimized to promote robust chromosome segregation in diverse cell types. We focus on the role of MT dynamics, stabilization, and transport in an effort to understand how the molecular mechanisms governing these processes lead to the formation of the functional, steady-state spindle structure. Finally, we investigate the basis of spindle variation and discuss why spindles take on certain forms in different cell types. The recent advances in understanding spindle biology have shown that spindle assembly utilizes multiple but common pathways weighted differently in different cells and organisms. These assembly differences are correlated with variations in spindle architectures that may influence the regulation of molecules in the spindle. Overall, as architectural features of different spindles are elucidated, the available comparative genomic data should provide structural and mechanistic insight into how a spindle is built, how dynamic interactions lead to a steady-state structure, and how spindle function is disrupted in disease. PMID:24016524

Helmke, Kara J; Heald, Rebecca; Wilbur, Jeremy D

2013-01-01

386

Software testing at the architectural level  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper argues that with the advent of explicitly specifiedsoftware architectures, testing can be done effectivelyat the architectural level. A software architecture specificationprovides a solid foundation for developing a plan fortesting at this level. We propose several architecture-basedtest criteria based on the Chemical Abstract Machine modelof software architecture. An architectural (integration) testplan, developed by applying selected of these criteria, can

Debra J. Richardson; Alexander L. Wolf

1996-01-01

387

Instrumented Architectural Simulation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulation of systems at an architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs executing significant code bodies, not just toy problems or small application fragements, (2) the details of the simulation include the critical details of the design, (3) the view of the design presented by the simulator instrumentation leads to useful insights on the problems with the design, and (4) there is enough flexibility in the simulation system so that the asking of unplanned questions is not suppressed by the weight of the mechanics involved in making changes either in the design or its measurement. A simulation system with these goals is described together with the approach to its implementation. Its application to the study of a particular class of multiprocessor hardware system architectures is illustrated.

Delagi, B. A.; Saraiya, N.; Nishimura, S.; Byrd, G.

1987-01-01

388

Architecture.com  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The official homepage of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), this site offers a number of architecture-related resources. The heart of the site is an indexed collection of over 1000 annotated links to architecture resources from around the world, though it currently focuses mainly on Britain. The links may be searched by keyword or browsed by category and subject. A "raw" list of another 1000 sites compiled by the RIBA staff and organized by topic (some annotated) is also provided. From the site visitors can also access the RIBA Library online catalog, which is searchable by keyword, author, title, subject, and series. Detailed information on the library and its holdings is also available. Other features at the site include a registry of architects in the UK, career and job information (UK-based), information on events and competitions, site of the day, and a bookshop.

389

World Architecture Community  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The World Architecture Community website is the genuine article, and even a cursory look reveals that people are posting items to this site from Bangalore to Buffalo. New users can go to the left-hand side of the site to register, and then they can look through the various architectural directories, which include architects, buildings, critics, and theorists. In the buildings area, the buildings available for consideration are divided into more detailed thematic categories, including "Work Places", "Public Buildings", and "Public Infrastructure". Moving on, the site also includes an excellent section dedicated to "Theory and Issues". Here visitors can read about sustainable development, semiotics, design, and urban issues. All told, this site is a tremendous resource for architects, urban planners, and students of cities in general.

390

Lincoln Park Architectural Photographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lincoln Park neighborhood in Chicago is home to a number of architectural landmarks, including 19th century mansions with bold mansard roofs, a former seminary on the grounds of DePaul University, and other delights. In 2000, DePaul sociologist Wanda Harold set out to photograph a number of these unique structures. This digital collection includes 200 of her images, and this project was made possible in part through a grant from the Library Services and Technology Act. First-time visitors can get started by using a clickable map of Lincoln Park to explore the photos, and they can also browse around by architect or street. Visitors shouldn't miss the photos of the workers' cottages at 1756 N. Clybourn and 2715 N. Kenmore Avenue. Overall, the site is a nice resource for students of Chicago architecture and urban geography.

Harold, Wanda

2012-01-13

391

Northwest Architectural Archives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Started in 1970, the Northwest Architectural Archives at the University of Minnesota brings together the records of architects, engineers, contractors, landscape architects, and interior designers from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and the Dakotas. Many of these primary documents have been placed into digital collections, and visitors can use this page to navigate through these delightful and useful offerings. One good place to start is the American Terra Cotta Company Photographs collection. Here visitors can look through examples of the company's work everywhere from Atchison to Winona. Moving on, visitors can also make their way through finding aids for the work of Clarence "Cap" Wigington, who happened to be the first registered African-American architect in Minnesota. All told, there are four digital collections on the site, and well over a dozen finding aids. It's a site that will be very useful to architectural historians and others working in related fields.

392

The anonymity service architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Business-to-business is the most important area in E-commerce. With the growth of this area, the importance of multimedia transfers increases as the business partners want to actually see each other during negotiations. We present an architecture that provides confidential multimedia transfers in the Internet, ie, the transmitted data is protected against espionage from third parties by protecting the contents. Moreover,

Mark Borning

2001-01-01

393

PROGRAM POP. Architecture 435  

E-print Network

386 Health & Physical Edu/Fitness UofM 151 164 192 274 218 203 183 188 196.63 Natl. Norm 174 185 174.25 -40.62% Physics UofM 142 138 143 149 206 199 196 213 173.25 Natl. Norm 253 281 234 238 254 285 277 270- 2010 8-YEAR AVERAGE DISCREP. (UofM - Norm) % OF DISCREP. FROM NATL. NORM Architecture 435 307 City

Dasgupta, Dipankar

394

Information systems definition architecture  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

Calapristi, A.J.

1996-06-20

395

Architectural Methodology Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The establishment of conventions between two communicating entities in the end systems is essential for communications. Examples of the kind of decisions that need to be made in establishing a protocol convention include the nature of the data representation, the for-mat and the speed of the date representation over the communications path, and the sequence of control messages (if any) which are sent. One of the main functions of a protocol is to establish a standard path between the communicating entities. This is necessary to create a virtual communications medium with certain desirable characteristics. In essence, it is the function of the protocol to transform the characteristics of the physical communications environment into a more useful virtual communications model. The final function of a protocol is to establish standard data elements for communications over the path; that is, the protocol serves to create a virtual data element for exchange. Other systems may be constructed in which the transferred element is a program or a job. Finally, there are special purpose applications in which the element to be transferred may be a complex structure such as all or part of a graphic display. NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs in communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space. GRC tasked Computer Networks and Software Inc. (CNS) to describe the methodologies used in developing a protocol architecture for an in-space Internet node. The node would support NASA:s four mission areas: Earth Science; Space Science; Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS); Aerospace Technology. This report presents the methodology for developing the protocol architecture. The methodology addresses the architecture for a computer communications environment. It does not address an analog voice architecture.

Dhas, Chris

2000-01-01

396

Fractal Geometry of Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately,\\u000a scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects\\u000a of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also

Wolfgang E. Lorenz

397

Components in the Pipeline  

SciTech Connect

Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan (Jenny); Yin, Jian

2011-02-24

398

Common Career Technical Core: Common Standards, Common Vision for CTE  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides an overview of the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium's (NASDCTEc) Common Career Technical Core (CCTC), a state-led initiative that was created to ensure that career and technical education (CTE) programs are consistent and high quality across the United States. Forty-two states,…

Green, Kimberly

2012-01-01

399

Capital Architecture: Situating symbolism parallel to architectural methods and technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Capital Architecture is a symbol of a nation's global presence and the cultural and social focal point of its inhabitants. Since the advent of High-Modernism in Western cities, and subsequently decolonised capitals, civic architecture no longer seems to be strictly grounded in the philosophy that national buildings shape the legacy of government and the way a nation is regarded through its built environment. Amidst an exceedingly globalized architectural practice and with the growing concern of key heritage foundations over the shortcomings of international modernism in representing its immediate socio-cultural context, the contextualization of public architecture within its sociological, cultural and economic framework in capital cities became the key denominator of this thesis. Civic architecture in capital cities is essential to confront the challenges of symbolizing a nation and demonstrating the legitimacy of the government'. In today's dominantly secular Western societies, governmental architecture, especially where the seat of political power lies, is the ultimate form of architectural expression in conveying a sense of identity and underlining a nation's status. Departing with these convictions, this thesis investigates the embodied symbolic power, the representative capacity, and the inherent permanence in contemporary architecture, and in its modes of production. Through a vast study on Modern architectural ideals and heritage -- in parallel to methodologies -- the thesis stimulates the future of large scale governmental building practices and aims to identify and index the key constituents that may respond to the lack representation in civic architecture in capital cities.

Daoud, Bassam

400

Evaluation of digital fault-tolerant architectures for nuclear power plant control systems  

SciTech Connect

Four fault tolerant architectures were evaluated for their potential reliability in service as control systems of nuclear power plants. The reliability analyses showed that human- and software-related common cause failures and single points of failure in the output modules are dominant contributors to system unreliability. The four architectures are triple-modular-redundant (TMR), both synchronous and asynchronous, and also dual synchronous and asynchronous. The evaluation includes a review of design features, an analysis of the importance of coverage, and reliability analyses of fault tolerant systems. An advantage of fault-tolerant controllers over those not fault tolerant, is that fault-tolerant controllers continue to function after the occurrence of most single hardware faults. However, most fault-tolerant controllers have single hardware components that will cause system failure, almost all controllers have single points of failure in software, and all are subject to common cause failures. Reliability analyses based on data from several industries that have fault-tolerant controllers were used to estimate the mean-time-between-failures of fault-tolerant controllers and to predict those failures modes that may be important in nuclear power plants. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

Battle, R.E.

1990-01-28

401

Architectural Implications for Spatial Object Association Algorithms  

SciTech Connect

Spatial object association, also referred to as cross-match of spatial datasets, is the problem of identifying and comparing objects in two or more datasets based on their positions in a common spatial coordinate system. In this work, we evaluate two crossmatch algorithms that are used for astronomical sky surveys, on the following database system architecture configurations: (1) Netezza Performance Server R, a parallel database system with active disk style processing capabilities, (2) MySQL Cluster, a high-throughput network database system, and (3) a hybrid configuration consisting of a collection of independent database system instances with data replication support. Our evaluation provides insights about how architectural characteristics of these systems affect the performance of the spatial crossmatch algorithms. We conducted our study using real use-case scenarios borrowed from a large-scale astronomy application known as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

Kumar, V S; Kurc, T; Saltz, J; Abdulla, G; Kohn, S R; Matarazzo, C

2009-01-29

402

Getty Art and Architecture Thesaurus On Line  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed as a public online resource by the Getty Institute, the Art and Architecture Thesaurus is a structured vocabulary containing 125,000 terms and other information that may be used to describe art, architecture, decorative arts, material culture, and archival materials. Each record within the Thesaurus is returned as a concept, which in turn, is linked to various terms, related concepts, sources for the data, and notes. For example, if a user types in the term "gargoyle," all of this valuable information is returned, including a chart that notes the terms hierarchical position within the Thesaurus. An online help feature will assist first-time visitors get better acquainted with the system, and a FAQ section provides answers to a number of common queries. Finally, users can provide feedback to the editors via an online form. [KMG

403

A Software Architecture for High Level Applications  

SciTech Connect

A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

Shen,G.

2009-05-04

404

Savannah River Site information technology architecture  

SciTech Connect

This document enumerates the principles, scenarios, and strategies which capt the essence of architectural design decisions which have been made for the computing infrastructure. Its objective is to guide the designers of infrastructure components to reduce the number of design decisions which must be made, to document and justify decisions which have already been made, and to promote consistent, interoperable, cost-effective implementations. Designers and implementers should consult the Design Architecture throughout the life of a project to ensure compliance and to guarantee that conceptual integrity is maintained. Changing needs of the site, as well as emerging technologies, will cause future implementation changes. This document attempts to provide guidance for an approximately three-year window to the future, and will be updated periodically. In some areas, such as multimedia computing, implementation issues are still be identified. These areas will be further addressed in updated versions of this document.

Not Available

1993-02-01

405

A resource management architecture for metacomputing systems.  

SciTech Connect

Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and/or concurrent use of geographically distributed computational resources. Resource management in such systems is complicated by five concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy extensibility, co-allocation, and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that addresses these concerns. This architecture distributes the resource management problem among distinct local manager, resource broker, and resource co-allocator components and defines an extensible resource specification language to exchange information about requirements. We describe how these techniques have been implemented in the context of the Globus metacomputing toolkit and used to implement a variety of different resource management strategies. We report on our experiences applying our techniques in a large testbed, GUSTO, incorporating 15 sites, 330 computers, and 3600 processors.

Czajkowski, K.; Foster, I.; Karonis, N.; Kesselman, C.; Martin, S.; Smith, W.; Tuecke, S.

1999-08-24

406

An open architecture for medical image workstation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dealing with the difficulties of integrating various medical image viewing and processing technologies with a variety of clinical and departmental information systems and, in the meantime, overcoming the performance constraints in transferring and processing large-scale and ever-increasing image data in healthcare enterprise, we design and implement a flexible, usable and high-performance architecture for medical image workstations. This architecture is not developed for radiology only, but for any workstations in any application environments that may need medical image retrieving, viewing, and post-processing. This architecture contains an infrastructure named Memory PACS and different kinds of image applications built on it. The Memory PACS is in charge of image data caching, pre-fetching and management. It provides image applications with a high speed image data access and a very reliable DICOM network I/O. In dealing with the image applications, we use dynamic component technology to separate the performance-constrained modules from the flexibility-constrained modules so that different image viewing or processing technologies can be developed and maintained independently. We also develop a weakly coupled collaboration service, through which these image applications can communicate with each other or with third party applications. We applied this architecture in developing our product line and it works well. In our clinical sites, this architecture is applied not only in Radiology Department, but also in Ultrasonic, Surgery, Clinics, and Consultation Center. Giving that each concerned department has its particular requirements and business routines along with the facts that they all have different image processing technologies and image display devices, our workstations are still able to maintain high performance and high usability.

Liang, Liang; Hu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiangyun

2005-04-01

407

Satellite ATM Networks: Architectures and Guidelines Developed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An important element of satellite-supported asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networking will involve support for the routing and rerouting of active connections. Work published under the auspices of the Telecommunications Industry Association (http://www.tiaonline.org), describes basic architectures and routing protocol issues for satellite ATM (SATATM) networks. The architectures and issues identified will serve as a basis for further development of technical specifications for these SATATM networks. Three ATM network architectures for bent pipe satellites and three ATM network architectures for satellites with onboard ATM switches were developed. The architectures differ from one another in terms of required level of mobility, supported data rates, supported terrestrial interfaces, and onboard processing and switching requirements. The documentation addresses low-, middle-, and geosynchronous-Earth-orbit satellite configurations. The satellite environment may require real-time routing to support the mobility of end devices and nodes of the ATM network itself. This requires the network to be able to reroute active circuits in real time. In addition to supporting mobility, rerouting can also be used to (1) optimize network routing, (2) respond to changing quality-of-service requirements, and (3) provide a fault tolerance mechanism. Traffic management and control functions are necessary in ATM to ensure that the quality-of-service requirements associated with each connection are not violated and also to provide flow and congestion control functions. Functions related to traffic management were identified and described. Most of these traffic management functions will be supported by on-ground ATM switches, but in a hybrid terrestrial-satellite ATM network, some of the traffic management functions may have to be supported by the onboard satellite ATM switch. Future work is planned to examine the tradeoffs of placing traffic management functions onboard a satellite as opposed to implementing those functions at the Earth station components.

vonDeak, Thomas C.; Yegendu, Ferit

1999-01-01

408

Architecture and Data Processing Alternatives for TSE Computer. Volume 1: Tse Logic Design Concepts and the Development of Image Processing Machine Architectures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Digital computer components which perform two dimensional array logic operations (Tse logic) on binary data arrays are described. The properties of Golay transforms which make them useful in image processing are reviewed, and several architectures for Gol...

D. A. Rickard, R. E. Bodenheimer

1976-01-01

409

A Design for Standards-based Knowledge Components.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes ongoing work in designing modular software components based on open standards and a specific instructional design theoryuinstructional transaction theory. Focuses on applied technological solutions to overcome identified limitations of current authoring environments, including proprietary architectures, instructional design theory…

Anderson, Thor A.; Merrill, M. David

2000-01-01

410

Design and Analysis of Architectures for Structural Health Monitoring Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the two-year project period, we have worked on several aspects of Health Usage and Monitoring Systems for structural health monitoring. In particular, we have made contributions in the following areas. 1. Reference HUMS architecture: We developed a high-level architecture for health monitoring and usage systems (HUMS). The proposed reference architecture is shown. It is compatible with the Generic Open Architecture (GOA) proposed as a standard for avionics systems. 2. HUMS kernel: One of the critical layers of HUMS reference architecture is the HUMS kernel. We developed a detailed design of a kernel to implement the high level architecture.3. Prototype implementation of HUMS kernel: We have implemented a preliminary version of the HUMS kernel on a Unix platform.We have implemented both a centralized system version and a distributed version. 4. SCRAMNet and HUMS: SCRAMNet (Shared Common Random Access Memory Network) is a system that is found to be suitable to implement HUMS. For this reason, we have conducted a simulation study to determine its stability in handling the input data rates in HUMS. 5. Architectural specification.

Mukkamala, Ravi; Sixto, S. L. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

411

BADD phase II: DDS information management architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The DARPA Battlefield Awareness and Data Dissemination (BADD) Phase II Program will provide the next generation multimedia information management architecture to support the warfighter. One goal of this architecture is proactive dissemination of information to the warfighter through strategies such as multicast and 'smart push and pull' designed to minimize latency and make maximum use of available communications bandwidth. Another goal is to support integration of information from widely distributed legacy repositories. This will enable the next generation of battlefield awareness applications to form a common operational view of the battlefield to aid joint service and/or multi-national peacekeeping forces. This paper discusses the approach we are taking to realize such an architecture for BADD. Our architecture and its implementation, known as the Distributed Dissemination Serivces (DDS) are based on two key concepts: a global database schema and an intelligent, proactive caching scheme. A global schema provides a common logical view of the information space in which the warfighter operates. This schema (or subsets of it) is shared by all warfighters through a distributed object database providing local access to all relevant metadata. This approach provides both scalability to a large number of warfighters, and it supports tethered as well as autonomous operations. By utilizing DDS information integration services that provide transparent access to legacy databases, related information from multiple 'stovepipe' systems are now available to battlefield awareness applications. The second key concept embedded in our architecture is an intelligent, hierarchical caching system supported by proactive dissemination management services which push both lightweight and heavyweight data such as imagery and video to warfighters based on their information profiles. The goal of this approach is to transparently and proactively stage data which is likely to be requested by the warfighter in caches which are physically close to the warfighter. Through a global schema and intelligent caching, the BADD DDS architecture will provide a virtual information repository in which warfighter access to information is both fast and transparent with respect to its original source.

Stephenson, Thomas P.; DeCleene, Brian T.; Speckert, Glen; Voorhees, Harry L.

1997-06-01

412

A Ground Systems Architecture Transition for a Distributed Operations System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground Systems Department (GSD) recently undertook an architecture change in the product line that serves the ISS program. As a result, the architecture tradeoffs between data system product lines that serve remote users versus those that serve control center flight control teams were explored extensively. This paper describes the resulting architecture that will be used in the International Space Station (ISS) payloads program, and the resulting functional breakdown of the products that support this architecture. It also describes the lessons learned from the path that was followed, as a migration of products cause the need to reevaluate the allocation of functions across the architecture. The result is a set of innovative ground system solutions that is scalable so it can support facilities of wide-ranging sizes, from a small site up to large control centers. Effective use of system automation, custom components, design optimization for data management, data storage, data transmissions, and advanced local and wide area networking architectures, plus the effective use of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) products, provides flexible Remote Ground System options that can be tailored to the needs of each user. This paper offers a description of the efficiency and effectiveness of the Ground Systems architectural options that have been implemented, and includes successful implementation examples and lessons learned.

Sellers, Donna; Pitts, Lee; Bryant, Barry

2003-01-01

413

An Optoelectronic Architecture for Multilayer Learning in a Single Photorefractive Crystal  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a simple architecture for implementing supervised neural network models optically with photorefractive technology. The architecture is very versatile: a wide range of supervised learning algorithms can be implemented including mean-field-theory, backpropagation, and Kanerva-style networks. Our architecture is based on a single crystal with spatial multiplexing rather than the more commonly used angular multiplexing. It handles hidden units and

Carsten Peterson; Stephen Redfield; James D. Keeler; Eric Hartman

1990-01-01

414

MD-Adapt: A Proposed Architecture for Open-Source Medical Device Interoperability  

Microsoft Academic Search

MD-adapt is an architecture for shamble common interfaces for medical devices in support of the goals of MDPnP. This paper proposes an architecture for enabling an open source, community-based effort to create a pool of reusable device interface implementations. The MD-adapt architecture consists of a standardized API (application programming interface) and a device metadata format, and supports building modular and

J. Hotchkiss; J. Robbins; M. Robkin

2007-01-01

415

Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard. Release 1.02.1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the NASA architecture standard for software defined radios used in space- and ground-based platforms to enable commonality among radio developments to enhance capability and services while reducing mission and programmatic risk. Transceivers (or transponders) with functionality primarily defined in software (e.g., firmware) have the ability to change their functional behavior through software alone. This radio architecture standard offers value by employing common waveform software interfaces, method of instantiation, operation, and testing among different compliant hardware and software products. These common interfaces within the architecture abstract application software from the underlying hardware to enable technology insertion independently at either the software or hardware layer.

Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Handler, Louis M.; Hall, C. Steve; Mortensen, Dale J.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Briones, Janette C.; Nappier, Jennifer M.; Downey, Joseph A.; Lux, James P.

2012-01-01

416

The flight telerobotic servicer: From functional architecture to computer architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After a brief tutorial on the NASA/National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Model for Telerobot Control System Architecture (NASREM) functional architecture, the approach to its implementation is shown. First, interfaces must be defined which are capable of supporting the known algorithms. This is illustrated by considering the interfaces required for the SERVO level of the NASREM functional architecture. After interface definition, the specific computer architecture for the implementation must be determined. This choice is obviously technology dependent. An example illustrating one possible mapping of the NASREM functional architecture to a particular set of computers which implements it is shown. The result of choosing the NASREM functional architecture is that it provides a technology independent paradigm which can be mapped into a technology dependent implementation capable of evolving with technology in the laboratory and in space.

Lumia, Ronald; Fiala, John

1989-01-01

417

The basis and architecture for the reduction of tones in a sigma-delta DAC  

Microsoft Academic Search

A basis and architecture for a digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) technique that allows a significant, if not complete, reduction of the in-band tones found in single-bit sigma-delta modulators, while easing the component matching requirements compared to conventional multibit architectures, is presented. The architecture uses a combination of coarse and fine quantization levels, which resolves the input data at a rate that

Robert C. Ledzius; James Irwin

1993-01-01

418

Reconciling requirements and architectures with the CBSP approach in an iPhone app project  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are only few methods available that help refining software requirements to software architectures. An example is the CBSP (Component-Bus-System-Property) approach that uses general architectural concerns to classify and refine requirements and to capture architectural trade-off issues and options. This paper reports about experiences of applying CBSP in an industrial project in the area of mobile applications. We illustrate CBSP

Harald Vogl; Klaus Lehner; Paul Grunbacher; Alexander Egyed

2011-01-01

419

Performance evaluation of network processor architectures: combining simulation with analytical estimation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design of most systems-on-a-chip (SoC) architectures rely on simulation as a means for performance estimation. Such designs usually start with a parameterizable template architecture, and the design space exploration is restricted to identifyi ng the suitable parameters for all the ar- chitectural components. However, in the case of heterogeneous SoC architectures such as network processors the design space exploration

Samarjit Chakraborty; Simon Künzli; Lothar Thiele; Andreas Herkersdorf; Patricia Sagmeister

2003-01-01

420

Formalism Challenges of the Cougaar Model Driven Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Cognitive Agent Architecture (Cougaar) is one of the most sophisticated distributed agent architectures developed today. As part of its research and evolution, Cougaar is being studied for application to large, logistics-based applications for the Department of Defense (DoD). Anticipiting future complex applications of Cougaar, we are investigating the Model Driven Architecture (MDA) approach to understand how effective it would be for increasing productivity in Cougar-based development efforts. Recognizing the sophistication of the Cougaar development environment and the limitations of transformation technologies for agents, we have systematically developed an approach that combines component assembly in the large and transformation in the small. This paper describes some of the key elements that went into the Cougaar Model Driven Architecture approach and the characteristics that drove the approach.

Bohner, Shawn A.; George, Boby; Gracanin, Denis; Hinchey, Michael G.

2004-01-01

421

Open Architecture Standard for NASA's Software-Defined Space Telecommunications Radio Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is developing an architecture standard for software-defined radios used in space- and ground-based platforms to enable commonality among radio developments to enhance capability and services while reducing mission and programmatic risk. Transceivers (or transponders) with functionality primarily defined in software (e.g., firmware) have the ability to change their functional behavior through software alone. This radio architecture standard offers value by employing common waveform software interfaces, method of instantiation, operation, and testing among different compliant hardware and software products. These common interfaces within the architecture abstract application software from the underlying hardware to enable technology insertion independently at either the software or hardware layer. This paper presents the initial Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture for NASA missions to provide the desired software abstraction and flexibility while minimizing the resources necessary to support the architecture.

Reinhart, Richard C.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Hall, Charles S.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John

2008-01-01

422

The Dimensions of Common Factors in Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Common factors is a concept that offers an explanation as to what makes counseling effective. Evidence from outcome studies has implications for training and practice. The particular purpose of this paper is to review the components of a popular model of common factors, the evidence supporting them, and subsequent implications for counselor…

Leibert, Todd W.

2011-01-01

423

Commonality analysis as a knowledge acquisition problem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Commonality analysis is a systematic attempt to reduce costs in a large scale engineering project by discontinuing development of certain components during the design phase. Each discontinued component is replaced by another component that has sufficient functionality to be considered an appropriate substitute. The replacement strategy is driven by economic considerations. The System Commonality Analysis Tool (SCAT) is based on an oversimplified model of the problem and incorporates no knowledge acquisition component. In fact, the process of arriving at a compromise between functionality and economy is quite complex, with many opportunities for the application of expert knowledge. Such knowledge is of two types: general knowledge expressible as heuristics or mathematical laws potentially applicable to any set of components, and specific knowledge about the way in which elements of a given set of components interrelate. Examples of both types of knowledge are presented, and a framework is proposed for integrating the knowledge into a more general and useable tool.

Yeager, Dorian P.

1987-01-01

424

Common Tests for Arrhythmia  

MedlinePLUS

Common Tests for Arrhythmia Updated:Dec 7,2012 Several tests can help your doctor diagnose an arrhythmia ( ... a lot about the heart and its rhythm. Common Tests for Arrhythmia Electrocardiography (ECG or EKG) An ...

425

How Common Is PTSD?  

MedlinePLUS

... Guidelines Hospital Quality Data Medical Inspector Patient Safety Organizations Administrative Clinical Quick Links Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here How Common is PTSD? How Common is PTSD? Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can occur after you have been ...

426

Architecture, constraints, and behavior  

PubMed Central

This paper aims to bridge progress in neuroscience involving sophisticated quantitative analysis of behavior, including the use of robust control, with other relevant conceptual and theoretical frameworks from systems engineering, systems biology, and mathematics. Familiar and accessible case studies are used to illustrate concepts of robustness, organization, and architecture (modularity and protocols) that are central to understanding complex networks. These essential organizational features are hidden during normal function of a system but are fundamental for understanding the nature, design, and function of complex biologic and technologic systems. PMID:21788505

Doyle, John C.; Csete, Marie

2011-01-01

427

Mind and Language Architecture  

PubMed Central

A distinction is made between the brain and the mind. The architecture of the mind and language is then described within a neo-dualistic framework. A model for the origin of language based on emergence theory is presented. The complexity of hominid existence due to tool making, the control of fire and the social cooperation that fire required gave rise to a new level of order in mental activity and triggered the simultaneous emergence of language and conceptual thought. The mind is shown to have emerged as a bifurcation of the brain with the emergence of language. The role of language in the evolution of human culture is also described. PMID:20922045

Logan, Robert K

2010-01-01

428

TROPIX power system architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains results obtained in the process of performing a power system definition study of the TROPIX power management and distribution system (PMAD). Requirements derived from the PMADs interaction with other spacecraft systems are discussed first. Since the design is dependent on the performance of the photovoltaics, there is a comprehensive discussion of the appropriate models for cells and arrays. A trade study of the array operating voltage and its effect on array bus mass is also presented. A system architecture is developed which makes use of a combination of high efficiency switching power convertors and analog regulators. Mass and volume estimates are presented for all subsystems.

Manner, David B.; Hickman, J. Mark

1995-01-01

429

Common ratio using delay  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an experiment in which we add a common delay in a choice between two risky prospects. The results show that delay\\u000a produces the same change in preferences as in the well-documented common ratio effect in risky lotteries. The added common\\u000a delay acts as if the probabilities were divided by some common ratio. Moreover, we show that there is

Manel Baucells; Franz H. Heukamp

2010-01-01

430

Model Integration with Model Weaving: a Case Study in System Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex metamodels are often decomposed into several views, in particular for architecture framework metamodels such as DoDAF (Department of Defense Architecture Framework). Designing models that conform to this kind of metamodels implies data integration problems between the different views. Usually, different views from a same metamodel share a common core. This is the reason why those views are interrelated The

A. Jossic; M. D. Del Fabro; J.-P. Lerat; J. Bezivin; F. Jouault

2007-01-01

431

A Web of Things Application Architecture -Integrating the Real-World into the Web  

E-print Network

for a Common Internet of Things Application Architecture Application development with smart things: Requires of Internet of Things applications and bring it closer to non-specialists?» 15.08.2011 4Dominique Guinard [Mot Development in the Internet of Things [flickr.com/photos/docman] #12;Web of Things Application Architecture 15

432

Addressing reality: an architectural response to real-world demands on the evolving Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system as complex as the Internet can only be designed effectively if it is based on a core set of design principles, or tenets, that identify points in the architecture where there must be common understanding and agreement. The tenets of the original Internet architecture [6] arose as a response to the technical, governmental, and societal environment of internetworking's

David D. Clark; Karen Sollins; John Wroclawski; Ted Faber

2003-01-01

433

A Trustworthy Monadic Formalization of the ARMv7 Instruction Set Architecture  

E-print Network

that various techniques scale and are not purely "academic" in nature. Common commercial architectures include]. In the past, academic work has frequently examined the pedagogical DLX architecture, see [6]. When compared form). This has been motivated by a desire to carry out demonstrably realistic case studies, showing

Sewell, Peter

434

Low-cost scalable switching solutions for broadband networking: the ATLANTA architecture and chipset  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ATLANTATM switching architecture has the following distinguishing characteristics: (1) is nonblocking, (2) scales modularly over a wide range of switching and buffering capacities using commonly available implementation technology, (3) achieves high buffer utilization while using distributed buffers, (4) has low complexity, and (5) provides a clear path for future growth in features. The ATLANTA architecture uses an innovative structure

Fabio M. Chiussi; Joseph G. Kneuer; Vijay P. Kumar

1997-01-01

435

Statistical Simulation of Multithreaded Architectures Joshua L. Kihm and Daniel A. Connors  

E-print Network

Statistical Simulation of Multithreaded Architectures Joshua L. Kihm and Daniel A. Connors. At the same time, multithreaded multi-core designs are in- creasingly common, and require increased to the simulation of multithreaded and multi-core architecture models. Moreover, multithreaded processor simulation

Colorado at Boulder, University of

436

State-determinate foraging decisions and web architecture in the spider Dictyna volucripes  

E-print Network

State-determinate foraging decisions and web architecture in the spider Dictyna volucripes (Araneae informa- tion about the environment. We examined the relationship of web architecture and foraging decisions in the tangle web-building spider Dictyna volucripes Key- serling, a common spider in North

Blackledge, Todd

437

Introducing Manakin: Overview and Architecture  

E-print Network

Manakin Architecture: understanding modularity in Manakin Scott Philips, Cody Gren, Alexey Maslov, Adam Mikeal, John Legget Manakin is the second release of the DSpace XML UI project. Manakin introduces a modular interface layer, enabling...Introducing Manakin: Overview & Architecture Scott Phillips, Cody Green, Alexey Maslov, Adam Mikeal, and John Leggett Outline Overview Architecture Demonstration Manakin Overview 1 ( non-technical ) What is Manakin? Interface framework Modular...

Phillips, Scott; Green, Cody; Maslov, Alexey; Mikeal, Adam; Leggett, John

2007-07-16

438

Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

2012-11-01

439

Re-engineering Nascom's network management architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of Nascom systems for ground communications began in 1958 with Project Vanguard. The low-speed systems (rates less than 9.6 Kbs) were developed following existing standards; but, there were no comparable standards for high-speed systems. As a result, these systems were developed using custom protocols and custom hardware. Technology has made enormous strides since the ground support systems were implemented. Standards for computer equipment, software, and high-speed communications exist and the performance of current workstations exceeds that of the mainframes used in the development of the ground systems. Nascom is in the process of upgrading its ground support systems and providing additional services. The Message Switching System (MSS), Communications Address Processor (CAP), and Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) Automated Control System (MACS) are all examples of Nascom systems developed using standards such as, X-windows, Motif, and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). Also, the Earth Observing System (EOS) Communications (Ecom) project is stressing standards as an integral part of its network. The move towards standards has produced a reduction in development, maintenance, and interoperability costs, while providing operational quality improvement. The Facility and Resource Manager (FARM) project has been established to integrate the Nascom networks and systems into a common network management architecture. The maximization of standards and implementation of computer automation in the architecture will lead to continued cost reductions and increased operational efficiency. The first step has been to derive overall Nascom requirements and identify the functionality common to all the current management systems. The identification of these common functions will enable the reuse of processes in the management architecture and promote increased use of automation throughout the Nascom network. The MSS, CAP, MACS, and Ecom projects have indicated the potential value of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and standards through reduced cost and high quality. The FARM will allow the application of the lessons learned from these projects to all future Nascom systems.

Drake, Brian C.; Messent, David

1994-01-01

440

Mechanisms of Component-Oriented Software Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains componentware, a new paradigm in software development that is based on the concept of a software component, a self-contained unit of software which can be distributed over large networks. Discusses the need for new, Internet-based search and retrieval mechanisms, and the architectural requirements and mechanisms of componentware.…

Hofmann, Holger D.; Muench, Volker; Stynes, Jeanne

1999-01-01

441

PAS Domains COMMON STRUCTURE AND COMMON FLEXIBILITY*  

E-print Network

at the amino acid sequence level. The photoac- tive yellow protein, a bacterial light sensor, has been proposed of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) domains are a family of sensor protein domains in their conformational flexibilities. The observed motions point to a possible common mecha- nism for communicating

van Aalten, Daan

442

MAPPING SOCIAL NETWORK TO SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE TO DETECT STRUCTURE CLASHES IN AGILE SOFTWARE  

E-print Network

have observed that the technological dependencies drive the need for coordination. The technological due to technical dependencies that exist when components of one part of the architecture requires with the betweenness centrality index) in relation to the task dependencies due to the software architecture. Keywords

Vellekoop, Michel

443

A Reference Architecture for Web Browsers Alan Grosskurth and Michael W. Godfrey  

E-print Network

A Reference Architecture for Web Browsers Alan Grosskurth and Michael W. Godfrey School of Computer develop a reference architecture for web browsers based on two well known open source implementations components among different browsers and the emergence of extensive web standards have caused the browsers

Godfrey, Michael W.

444

Database Architecture for Autonomous Transportation Agents for On-scene Networked Incident Management (ATON)  

E-print Network

Management (ATON) Mohan Trivedi, Shailendra Bhonsle, and Amarnath Gupta* Department of Electrical component of the ATON project for networked incidence management of highway traffic. The database sub-architecture supports the architectural integration of many thematic areas of the ATON, and provides many high level

Gupta, Amarnath

445

Peircean Interpretation of Postmodern Architecture  

E-print Network

(Hedonic Adaptation Process) ................. 216 VII.8 Architectural Formal System (Tripartition) ................................................. 223 VII.9 Formal System of Peircean Semeiotic and Logic ........................................ 225 VII...

Takahashi, Iwao

2013-12-11

446

American Institute of Architecture Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The AIAS is an independent, non-profit and student-run organization. This grassroots association is a cooperative between thousands of students (of all ages and academic degrees) committed to helping those in the field of Architecture. The AIAS is also a professional organization that is the official voice of architecture students. The site contains a few select sites in their Speak Up section that highlight member sites related to architectural design. Furthermore, in the student resources section they provide helpful tools for current and prospective architecture students.

2006-12-26

447

Architecture of product lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

A product line is a family of products designed to take advantage of their common aspects (commonalities) and predicted variabilities. A product line may be software only, e.g., a family of GUIs; software + hardware, e.g., a family of televisions; or hardware only. Where software is a part of the product line, the variability accommodated by the product line is

David M. Weiss

2009-01-01

448

Canadian Centre for Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1979 by Phyllis Lambert, the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) is an international research center and museum founded on the conviction that "architecture is a public concern." This website is a delightful mix of commentary, digital projects, and information about events at the Centre. A good place to start is at the CCA Recommends area. Here visitors can learn about recent books, musings, and other things that have crossed over the CCA's transom as of late. Recent entries have included thoughts on new books about the Seagram Building in New York and a rather novel piece on the history of guidebooks to Montreal. The Collection area contains information about the CCA's physical holdings, along with finding aids to its digital collections. These collections number almost two dozen and they include materials that deal with Expo 67 in Montreal and the professional practice of Aldo Rossi. Users shouldn't miss the Calendar, as it may inspire a visit to Canada to see one or more upcoming lectures, exhibits, or special events. [KMG

449

Protocol Architecture Model Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs in communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space. GRC tasked Computer Networks and Software Inc. (CNS) to examine protocols and architectures for an In-Space Internet Node. CNS has developed a methodology for network reference models to support NASA's four mission areas: Earth Science, Space Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space (REDS), Aerospace Technology. This report applies the methodology to three space Internet-based communications scenarios for future missions. CNS has conceptualized, designed, and developed space Internet-based communications protocols and architectures for each of the independent scenarios. The scenarios are: Scenario 1: Unicast communications between a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) spacecraft inspace Internet node and a ground terminal Internet node via a Tracking and Data Rela Satellite (TDRS) transfer; Scenario 2: Unicast communications between a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) International Space Station and a ground terminal Internet node via a TDRS transfer; Scenario 3: Multicast Communications (or "Multicasting"), 1 Spacecraft to N Ground Receivers, N Ground Transmitters to 1 Ground Receiver via a Spacecraft.

Dhas, Chris

2000-01-01

450

Integrated Energy and Communications System Architecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A consortium of the Electricity Innovation Institute is developing an "an open, standards-based systems architecture for the data communications and distributed computing infrastructure that will enable the integration of a wide variety of intelligent electric power system components." Citing the overloaded U.S. power grid and changing trends in electricity demand, the consortium is advocating new technologies such as a self-healing grid and advanced monitoring capabilities. This Web site outlines the scope of the project and the motivation for conducting the work. Additionally, a white paper is provided that discusses the finer technical and implementation details of the proposed changes.

451

Extensible Hardware Architecture for Mobile Robots  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—The,Intelligent Robotics Group,at NASA Ames Research Center has developed,a new,mobile robot hardware architecture,designed,for extensibility and,reconfigurability. Currently implemented on the K9 rover, and soon to be integrated onto the K10 series of human-robot,collaboration research robots, this achitecture allows for rapid changes in instrumentation configuration and provides a high degree of modularity,through,a synergistic mix,of off-the-shelf and custom designed components, allowing eased transplantation

Eric Park; Linda Kobayashi; Susan Y. Lee

2005-01-01

452

Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture  

SciTech Connect

Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) engineers John Zimmerman and Tom Bender directed separate projects within this CRADA. This Project Accomplishments Summary contains their reports independently. Zimmerman: In 1998 Honeywell FM&T partnered with the Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) Cooperative Business Management Program to pilot the Supply Chain Integration Planning Prototype (SCIP). At the time, FM&T was developing an enterprise-wide supply chain management prototype called the Integrated Programmatic Scheduling System (IPSS) to improve the DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) supply chain. In the CRADA partnership, FM&T provided the IPSS technical and business infrastructure as a test bed for SCIP technology, and this would provide FM&T the opportunity to evaluate SCIP as the central schedule engine and decision support tool for IPSS. FM&T agreed to do the bulk of the work for piloting SCIP. In support of that aim, DAMA needed specific DOE Defense Programs opportunities to prove the value of its supply chain architecture and tools. In this partnership, FM&T teamed with Sandia National Labs (SNL), Division 6534, the other DAMA partner and developer of SCIP. FM&T tested SCIP in 1998 and 1999. Testing ended in 1999 when DAMA CRADA funding for FM&T ceased. Before entering the partnership, FM&T discovered that the DAMA SCIP technology had an array of applications in strategic, tactical, and operational planning and scheduling. At the time, FM&T planned to improve its supply chain performance by modernizing the NWC-wide planning and scheduling business processes and tools. The modernization took the form of a distributed client-server planning and scheduling system (IPSS) for planners and schedulers to use throughout the NWC on desktops through an off-the-shelf WEB browser. The planning and scheduling process within the NWC then, and today, is a labor-intensive paper-based method that plans and schedules more than 8,000 shipped parts per month based on more than 50 manually-created document types. The fact that DAMA and FM&T desired to move from paper-based manual architectures to digitally based computer architectures gave further incentive for the partnership to grow. FM&T's greatest strength was its knowledge of NWC-wide scheduling and planning with its role as the NWC leader in manufacturing logistics. DAMA's asset was its new knowledge gained in the research and development of advanced architectures and tools for supply chain management in the textiles industry. These complimentary strengths allowed the two parties to provide both the context and the tools for the pilot. Bender: Honeywell FM&T participated in a four-site supply chain project, also referred to as an Inter-Enterprise Pipeline Evaluation. The MSAD project was selected because it involves four NWC sites: FM&T, Pantex, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). FM&T had previously participated with Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY98 to model a two-site supply chain project, between FM&T and LANL. Evaluation of a Supply Chain Methodology is a subset of the DAMA project for the AMTEX consortium. LANL organization TSA-7, Enterprise Modeling and Simulation, has been involved in AMTEX and DAMA through development of process models and simulations for LANL, the NWC, and others. The FY 1998 and this FY 1999 projects directly involved collaboration between Honeywell and the Enterprise Modeling and Simulation (TSA-7) and Detonation Science and Technology (DX1) organizations at LANL.

Bender, T.R.; Zimmerman, J.J.

2001-02-07

453

Towards a distributed information architecture for avionics data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Avionics data at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL consists of distributed, unmanaged, and heterogeneous information that is hard for flight system design engineers to find and use on new NASA/JPL missions. The development of a systematic approach for capturing, accessing and sharing avionics data critical to the support of NASA/JPL missions and projects is required. We propose a general information architecture for managing the existing distributed avionics data sources and a method for querying and retrieving avionics data using the Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) framework. OODT uses XML messaging infrastructure that profiles data products and their locations using the ISO-11179 data model for describing data products. Queries against a common data dictionary (which implements the ISO model) are translated to domain dependent source data models, and distributed data products are returned asynchronously through the OODT middleware. Further work will include the ability to 'plug and play' new manufacturer data sources, which are distributed at avionics component manufacturer locations throughout the United States.

Mattmann, Chris; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan

2003-01-01

454

COLLEGE of ARCHITECTURE, ART & PLANNING Department of Architecture  

E-print Network

. Arch., M. Arch., M.A., & Ph.D. Cornell University #12;COLLEGE of ARCHITECTURE, ART & PLANNING fertilization of ideas between important figures in landscape architecture such as Jean Adolphe Alphand, Eugene innovative approaches affecting each city's open space designs. The course will emphasize three broad periods

455

Comparative Architecture The NASA-ESA Comparative Architecture Assessment  

E-print Network

-Alone Capabilities o Automated Lunar Cargo Landing System: This capability (approximately 1.5 metric tons of payload a basic capability for communication to be secured by NASA, ESA systems for enhanced communicationThe NASA-ESA Comparative Architecture Assessment #12;The NASA-ESA Comparative Architecture

456

The Relationship between Service Oriented Architecture and Enterprise Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The adoption of Enterprise Architecture (EA) concepts within organizations is causing an interest in the methodologies and supporting technologies available. Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) supports EA in many facets. However, there is much dissolution with regard to the relationship between EA and SOA within organizations. There are also potential problems that may arise if this relationship between SOA and EA

Christopher Kistasamy; Alta van der Merwe; Andre De La Harpe

2010-01-01

457

Architecture Of A Family Of Medical Imaging Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Digital radiography, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy planning and diagnostic ultrasound share common requirements for image acquisition, storage, recall and processing. An architecture which has unified the design, manufacture, installation and servicing of systems for these medical imaging applications is described in this paper. Bounds on system performance imposed by physical constraints which have proven useful to aid in the system designs are also described.

Scheibe, Paul O.

1982-01-01

458

Handling Variability in Software Architecture: Problems and Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variability helps manage differences and commonalities within and across software systems. As variability is reflected in and facilitated through the software architecture, it is important to understand the problems that architects face when carrying out their tasks. This would help us improve methods for architecting variability-intensive software systems. In this paper, we therefore present an exploratory study to identify problems

Matthias Galster

2011-01-01

459

Predictors of Future Performance in Architectural Design Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The link between academic performance in secondary education and the subsequent performance of students studying architecture at university level is commonly questioned by educators and admissions tutors. This paper investigates the potential for using measures of cognitive style and spatial ability as predictors of future potential in…

Roberts, A. S.

2007-01-01

460

Sensor Web Architecture: Core Services #Xingchen Chu1  

E-print Network

Sensor Web Architecture: Core Services #Xingchen Chu1 , Tom Kobialka2 , Rajkumar Buyya1 GRIDS Lab1 The University of Melbourne, Australia {xchu,tkob,raj}@csse.unimelb.edu.au Abstract As sensor network deployments heterogeneous sensor resources. Common data operations and transformations exist in deployment scenarios which

Buyya, Rajkumar

461

Open Sensor Web Architecture: Core Services Xingchen Chu1  

E-print Network

Open Sensor Web Architecture: Core Services Xingchen Chu1 , Tom Kobialka2 , Bohdan Durnota1 The University of Melbourne, Australia http://gridbus.csse.unimelb.edu.au/sensorweb/ Abstract As sensor network heterogeneous sensor resources. Common data operations and transformations exist in deployment scenarios and can

Buyya, Rajkumar

462

Open Sensor Web Architecture: Stateful Web Tom Kobialka 1  

E-print Network

Open Sensor Web Architecture: Stateful Web Services Tom Kobialka 1 , Rajkumar Buyya 2 , Christopher As sensor networks become more pervasive there emerges a need for interfacing applications to perform common operations and transformations on sensor data. Web Services provide an interoperable and platform independent

Melbourne, University of

463

GPU-ABiSort: optimal parallel sorting on stream architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present a novel approach for par- allel sorting on stream processing architectures. It is based on adaptive bitonic sorting. For sorting n val- ues utilizing p stream processor units, this approach achieves the optimal time complexity O((n log n)\\/p). While this makes our approach competitive with common sequential sorting algorithms not only from a theoretical viewpoint,

Alexander Greß; Gabriel Zachmann

2006-01-01

464

Collaborative, Distributed Information Management and Retrieval Architecture for the Enterprises  

Microsoft Academic Search

The volume of published, digital content on the Internet grows rapidly each year. Locating and obtaining papers rel- evant to a particular topic becomes di cult as the sources are dispersed extensively making tracking and collection a lengthy and highly involved task. A solution to this frag- mentation of publications is to dene a common architecture whereby publishing rm s

Tony Abou-Assaleh; Oliver Baltzer; Chris Jordan; Philip O'Brien; Hathai Tanta-ngai

465

Feedback loops and temporal misalignment in component-based hydrologic modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In component-based modeling, a complex system is represented as a series of loosely integrated components with defined interfaces and data exchanges that allow the components to be coupled together through shared boundary conditions. Although the component-based paradigm is commonly used in software engineering, it has only recently been applied for modeling hydrologic and earth systems. As a result, research is needed to test and verify the applicability of the approach for modeling hydrologic systems. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate two aspects of using component-based software architecture for hydrologic modeling: (1) simulation of feedback loops between components that share a boundary condition and (2) data transfers between temporally misaligned model components. We investigated these topics using a simple case study where diffusion of mass is modeled across a water-sediment interface. We simulated the multimedia system using two model components, one for the water and one for the sediment, coupled using the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) standard. The results were compared with a more conventional numerical approach for solving the system where the domain is represented by a single multidimensional array. Results showed that the component-based approach was able to produce the same results obtained with the more conventional numerical approach. When the two components were temporally misaligned, we explored the use of different interpolation schemes to minimize mass balance error within the coupled system. The outcome of this work provides evidence that component-based modeling can be used to simulate complicated feedback loops between systems and guidance as to how different interpolation schemes minimize mass balance error introduced when components are temporally misaligned.

Elag, Mostafa M.; Goodall, Jonathan L.; Castronova, Anthony M.

2011-12-01

466

Information architecture: Profile of adopted standards  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), like other Federal agencies, is under increasing pressure to use information technology to improve efficiency in mission accomplishment as well as delivery of services to the public. Because users and systems have become interdependent, DOE has enterprise wide needs for common application architectures, communication networks, databases, security, and management capabilities. Users need open systems that provide interoperability of products and portability of people, data, and applications that are distributed throughout heterogeneous computing environments. The level of interoperability necessary requires the adoption of DOE wide standards, protocols, and best practices. The Department has developed an information architecture and a related standards adoption and retirement process to assist users in developing strategies and plans for acquiring information technology products and services based upon open systems standards that support application software interoperability, portability, and scalability. This set of Departmental Information Architecture standards represents guidance for achieving higher degrees of interoperability within the greater DOE community, business partners, and stakeholders. While these standards are not mandatory, particular and due consideration of their applications in contractual matters and use in technology implementations Department wide are goals of the Chief Information Officer.

NONE

1997-09-01

467

Optimal expression evaluation for data parallel architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A data parallel machine represents an array or other composite data structure by allocating one processor (at least conceptually) per data item. A pointwise operation can be performed between two such arrays in unit time, provided their corresponding elements are allocated in the same processors. If the arrays are not aligned in this fashion, the cost of moving one or both of them is part of the cost of the operation. The choice of where to perform the operation then affects this cost. If an expression with several operands is to be evaluated, there may be many choices of where to perform the intermediate operations. An efficient algorithm is given to find the minimum-cost way to evaluate an expression, for several different data parallel architectures. This algorithm applies to any architecture in which the metric describing the cost of moving an array is robust. This encompasses most of the common data parallel communication architectures, including meshes of arbitrary dimension and hypercubes. Remarks are made on several variations of the problem, some of which are solved and some of which remain open.

Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

1990-01-01

468

A Distributed Prognostic Health Management Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper introduces a generic distributed prognostic health management (PHM) architecture with specific application to the electrical power systems domain. Current state-of-the-art PHM systems are mostly centralized in nature, where all the processing is reliant on a single processor. This can lead to loss of functionality in case of a crash of the central processor or monitor. Furthermore, with increases in the volume of sensor data as well as the complexity of algorithms, traditional centralized systems become unsuitable for successful deployment, and efficient distributed architectures are required. A distributed architecture though, is not effective unless there is an algorithmic framework to take advantage of its unique abilities. The health management paradigm envisaged here incorporates a heterogeneous set of system components monitored by a varied suite of sensors and a particle filtering (PF) framework that has the power and the flexibility to adapt to the different diagnostic and prognostic needs. Both the diagnostic and prognostic tasks are formulated as a particle filtering problem in order to explicitly represent and manage uncertainties; however, typically the complexity of the prognostic routine is higher than the computational power of one computational element ( CE). Individual CEs run diagnostic routines until the system variable being monitored crosses beyond a nominal threshold, upon which it coordinates with other networked CEs to run the prognostic routine in a distributed fashion. Implementation results from a network of distributed embedded devices monitoring a prototypical aircraft electrical power system are presented, where the CEs are Sun Microsystems Small Programmable Object Technology (SPOT) devices.

Bhaskar, Saha; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

2009-01-01

469

Formally analyzing software architectural specifications using SAM  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past decade, software architecture has emerged as a major research area in software engineering. Many architecture description languages have been proposed and some analysis techniques have also been explored. In this paper, we present a graphical formal software architecture description model called software architecture model (SAM). SAM is a general software architecture development framework based on two complementary

Xudong He; Huiqun Yu; Tianjun Shi; Junhua Ding; Yi Deng

2004-01-01

470

IA-32 Intel Architecture Software Developer's  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9 CHAPTER 2 INTRODUCTION TO THE IA-32 INTEL ARCHITECTURE 2.1. BRIEF HISTORY OF THE IA-32IA-32 Intel® Architecture Software Developer's Manual Volume 1: Basic Architecture NOTE: The IA-32 Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual consists of three volumes: Basic Architecture, Order

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

471

College of Architecture and the Arts  

E-print Network

of the history of architecture, one year of archi tectural design studio, and one year of build ing scienceCollege of Architecture and the Arts ARCHITECTURE Mailing Address: School of Architecture (MC 030 Director, School of Architecture: Daniel H. Wheeler, FAIA Director of Graduate Studies: Xavier Vendrell

Illinois at Chicago, University of

472

Exploring Quality Attributes Using Architectural Prototyping  

E-print Network

architectural prototyping to design or evaluate a software architecture? ­ What is the cost/benefit there is a need for architectural evaluation--ensuring the architecture's support for de- sired quality attributes--and a variety of evaluation techniques have been developed, described, and used. Architectural prototyping

Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

473

SpaceWire Architectures: Present and Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A viewgraph presentation on current and future spacewire architectures is shown. The topics include: 1) Current Spacewire Architectures: Swift Data Flow; 2) Current SpaceWire Architectures : LRO Data Flow; 3) Current Spacewire Architectures: JWST Data Flow; 4) Current SpaceWire Architectures; 5) Traditional Systems; 6) Future Systems; 7) Advantages; and 8) System Engineer Toolkit.

Rakow, Glen Parker

2006-01-01