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Sample records for common hiv-associated opportunistic

  1. Common features of opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O

    2015-05-01

    Recently it has been estimated that the annual cost of diseases caused by the waterborne pathogens Legionella pneumonia, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is $500 million. For the period 2001-2012, the estimated cost of hospital admissions for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease, the majority caused by M. avium, was almost $1 billion. These three waterborne opportunistic pathogens are normal inhabitants of drinking water--not contaminants--that share a number of key characteristics that predispose them to survival, persistence, and growth in drinking water distribution systems and premise plumbing. Herein, I list and describe these shared characteristics that include: disinfectant-resistance, biofilm-formation, growth in amoebae, growth at low organic carbon concentrations (oligotrophic), and growth under conditions of stagnation. This review is intended to increase awareness of OPPPs, identify emerging OPPPs, and challenge the drinking water industry to develop novel approaches toward their control. PMID:25918909

  2. Common Features of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    Recently it has been estimated that the annual cost of diseases caused by the waterborne pathogens Legionella pneumonia, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is $500 million. For the period 2001–2012, the estimated cost of hospital admissions for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease, the majority caused by M. avium, was almost $1 billion. These three waterborne opportunistic pathogens are normal inhabitants of drinking water—not contaminants—that share a number of key characteristics that predispose them to survival, persistence, and growth in drinking water distribution systems and premise plumbing. Herein, I list and describe these shared characteristics that include: disinfectant-resistance, biofilm-formation, growth in amoebae, growth at low organic carbon concentrations (oligotrophic), and growth under conditions of stagnation. This review is intended to increase awareness of OPPPs, identify emerging OPPPs, and challenge the drinking water industry to develop novel approaches toward their control. PMID:25918909

  3. HIV-Associated Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (http://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > HIV-Associated Cancers HIV-Associated Cancers [1] The Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG)Opens in a New Tab [2], along with the Office of HIV and AIDS Malignancies (OHAM)Opens in a New

  4. HIV-Associated Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (https://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > HIV-Associated Cancers HIV-Associated Cancers [1] The Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG)Opens in a New Tab [2], along with the Office of HIV and AIDS Malignancies (OHAM)Opens in a New

  5. HIV-associated pruritus: etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Singh, Fiza; Rudikoff, Donald

    2003-01-01

    With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), life-threatening opportunistic infection has become less common in patients with HIV infection and longevity has increased dramatically. With increased longevity, the problems of living with a chronic disease have become more prominent in this patient population. Disorders such as fat redistribution and metabolic abnormalities can result from antiviral medications and from HIV disease itself. Pruritus is one of the most common symptoms encountered in patients with HIV. The spectrum of skin diseases in such patients encompasses dermatoses of diverse etiologies; a few are peculiar to patients with HIV while others are not. Some of these conditions may cause severe and sometimes intractable pruritus that provokes scratching, picking, disfigurement, sleep loss, and significant psychological stress. Moreover, the expense of ongoing medical treatments can be daunting. Skin rash can sometimes be the initial presentation of HIV infection or serve as a harbinger of disease progression. Causes of pruritus include skin infections, infestations, papulosquamous disorders, photodermatitis, xerosis, drug reactions, and occasionally lymphoproliferative disorders. Drug eruptions are particularly common in patients who are HIV positive, presumably as a result of immune dysregulation, altered drug metabolism, and polypharmacy. Itching can also result from systemic diseases such as chronic renal failure, liver disease, or systemic lymphoma. Workup of pruritus should include a careful examination of the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes to establish a primary dermatologic diagnosis. If no dermatologic cause is found, a systemic cause or medication-related etiology should be sought. Idiopathic HIV pruritus is a diagnosis of exclusion and should only be considered when a specific diagnosis cannot be established. The management of HIV-associated pruritus should be directed at the underlying condition. Phototherapy has been found to be useful in the treatment of several HIV-associated dermatoses and idiopathic pruritus as well. Unfortunately, some of the treatments that have been suggested for patients with HIV are anecdotal or based on small uncontrolled studies. The last decade has seen a surge in the utilization of HAART which, to some degree, reconstitutes the immune system and ameliorates some dermatologic diseases. On the other hand, some skin diseases flare temporarily when HAART is started. Unless frank drug allergy is suspected, HAART does not need to be stopped. PMID:12627993

  6. Understanding the contribution of common childhood illnesses and opportunistic infections to morbidity and mortality in children living with HIV in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Surbhi; Chiu, Alex; Ng’eno, Bernadette; Kellerman, Scott E.; Sugandhi, Nandita; Muhe, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although antiretroviral treatment (ART) has reduced the incidence of HIV-related opportunistic infections among children living with HIV, access to ART remains limited for children, especially in resource-limited settings. This paper reviews current knowledge on the contribution of opportunistic infections and common childhood illnesses to morbidity and mortality in children living with HIV, highlights interventions known to improve the health of children, and identifies research gaps for further exploration. Design and Methods Literature review of peer-reviewed articles and abstracts combined with expert opinion and operational experience. Results Morbidity and mortality due to opportunistic infections has decreased in both developed and resource-limited countries. However, the burden of HIV-related infections remains high, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of HIV-infected children live. Limitations in diagnostic capacity in resource-limited settings have resulted in a relative paucity of data on opportunistic infections in children. Additionally, the reliance on clinical diagnosis means that opportunistic infections are often confused with common childhood illnesses which also contribute to excess morbidity and mortality in these children. Although several preventive interventions have been shown to decrease opportunistic infection-related mortality, implementation of many of these interventions remains inconsistent. Conclusions In order to reduce opportunistic infection-related mortality, early ART must be expanded, training for front-line clinicians must be improved, and additional research is needed to improve screening and diagnostic algorithms. PMID:24361625

  7. Biomarkers of HIV-associated Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Flepisi, Brian Thabile; Bouic, Patrick; Sissolak, Gerhard; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Cancer biomarkers have provided great opportunities for improving the management of cancer patients by enhancing the efficiency of early detection, diagnosis, and efficacy of treatment. Every cell type has a unique molecular signature, referred to as biomarkers, which are identifiable characteristics such as levels or activities of a myriad of genes, proteins, or other molecular features. Biomarkers can facilitate the molecular definition of cancer, provide information about the course of cancer, and predict response to chemotherapy. They offer the hope of early detection as well as tracking disease progression and recurrence. Current progress in the characterization of molecular genetics of HIV-associated cancers may form the basis for improved patient stratification and future targeted or individualized therapies. Biomarker use for cancer staging and personalization of therapy at the time of diagnosis could improve patient care. This review focuses on the relevance of biomarkers in the most common HIV-associated malignancies, namely, Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and invasive cervical cancer. PMID:25057241

  8. Tryptophan, Neurodegeneration and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Nicholas W.S.; Guillemin, Gilles; Brew, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    This review presents an up-to-date assessment of the role of the tryptophan metabolic and catabolic pathways in neurodegenerative disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. The kynurenine pathway and the effects of each of its enzymes and products are reviewed. The differential expression of the kynurenine pathway in cells within the brain, including inflammatory cells, is explored given the increasing recognition of the importance of inflammation in neurodegenerative disease. An overview of common mechanisms of neurodegeneration is presented before a review and discussion of the evidence for a pathogenetic role of the kynurenine pathway in Alzheimer’s disease, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, Huntington’s disease, motor neurone disease, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22084594

  9. Disturbed Amino Acid Metabolism in HIV: Association with Neuropsychiatric Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gostner, Johanna M.; Becker, Kathrin; Kurz, Katharina; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Blood levels of the amino acid phenylalanine, as well as of the tryptophan breakdown product kynurenine, are found to be elevated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. Both essential amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, are important precursor molecules for neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Thus, dysregulated amino acid metabolism may be related to disease-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as development of depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment. Increased phenylalanine/tyrosine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios are associated with immune activation in patients with HIV-1 infection and decrease upon effective antiretroviral therapy. Recent large-scale metabolic studies have confirmed the crucial involvement of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV-associated disease. Herein, we summarize the current status of the role of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV disease and discuss how inflammatory stress-associated dysregulation of amino acid metabolism may be part of the pathophysiology of common HIV-associated neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:26236243

  10. Disturbed Amino Acid Metabolism in HIV: Association with Neuropsychiatric Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Kathrin; Kurz, Katharina; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Blood levels of the amino acid phenylalanine, as well as of the tryptophan breakdown product kynurenine, are found to be elevated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. Both essential amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, are important precursor molecules for neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Thus, dysregulated amino acid metabolism may be related to disease-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as development of depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment. Increased phenylalanine/tyrosine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios are associated with immune activation in patients with HIV-1 infection and decrease upon effective antiretroviral therapy. Recent large-scale metabolic studies have confirmed the crucial involvement of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV-associated disease. Herein, we summarize the current status of the role of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV disease and discuss how inflammatory stress-associated dysregulation of amino acid metabolism may be part of the pathophysiology of common HIV-associated neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:26236243

  11. Opportunistic Pathogens and Elements of the Resistome that Are Common in Bottled Mineral Water Support the Need for Continuous Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Falcone-Dias, Maria Fernanda; Centrón, Daniela; Pavan, Fernando; Moura, Adriana Candido da Silva; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; de Souza, Victor Costa; Farache Filho, Adalberto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2015-01-01

    Several differences concerning bacterial species, opportunistic pathogens, elements of the resistome as well as variations concerning the CFU/mL counts were identified in some of the five most marketed bottled mineral water from Araraquara city, São Paulo, Brazil. Two out of five brands tested were confirmed as potential source of opportunistic pathogens, including Mycobacterium gordonae, Ralstonia picketti and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). A total of one hundred and six isolates were recovered from four of these bottled mineral water brands. Betaproteobacteria was predominant followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Ninety percent of the bacteria isolated demonstrated resistance to seventeen of the nineteen antimicrobials tested. These antimicrobials included eight different classes, including 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins, carbapenems and fluoroquinolones. Multidrug resistant bacteria were detected for fifty-nine percent of isolates in three water brands at counts up to 103 CFU/ml. Of major concern, the two bottled mineral water harboring opportunistic pathogens were also source of elements of the resistome that could be directly transferred to humans. All these differences found among brands highlight the need for continuous bacteriological surveillance of bottled mineral water. PMID:25803794

  12. Opportunistic pathogens and elements of the resistome that are common in bottled mineral water support the need for continuous surveillance.

    PubMed

    Falcone-Dias, Maria Fernanda; Centrón, Daniela; Pavan, Fernando; Moura, Adriana Candido da Silva; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; de Souza, Victor Costa; Farache Filho, Adalberto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2015-01-01

    Several differences concerning bacterial species, opportunistic pathogens, elements of the resistome as well as variations concerning the CFU/mL counts were identified in some of the five most marketed bottled mineral water from Araraquara city, São Paulo, Brazil. Two out of five brands tested were confirmed as potential source of opportunistic pathogens, including Mycobacterium gordonae, Ralstonia picketti and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). A total of one hundred and six isolates were recovered from four of these bottled mineral water brands. Betaproteobacteria was predominant followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Ninety percent of the bacteria isolated demonstrated resistance to seventeen of the nineteen antimicrobials tested. These antimicrobials included eight different classes, including 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins, carbapenems and fluoroquinolones. Multidrug resistant bacteria were detected for fifty-nine percent of isolates in three water brands at counts up to 103 CFU/ml. Of major concern, the two bottled mineral water harboring opportunistic pathogens were also source of elements of the resistome that could be directly transferred to humans. All these differences found among brands highlight the need for continuous bacteriological surveillance of bottled mineral water. PMID:25803794

  13. Recent advances in HIV-associated cardiovascular diseases in Africa.

    PubMed

    Syed, Faisal F; Sani, Mahmoud Umar

    2013-08-01

    The last decade has witnessed major advances in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of HIV-related cardiovascular disease in sub-Saharan Africa. In this review, we summarise these and discuss clinically relevant advances in diagnosis and treatment. In the Heart of Soweto Study, 10% of patients with newly diagnosed cardiovascular disease were HIV positive, and the most common HIV-related presentations were cardiomyopathy (38%), pericardial disease (13%) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (8%). HIV-related cardiomyopathy is more common with increased immunosuppression and HIV viraemia. With adequate antiretroviral therapy, the prevalence is low. Contributing factors such as malnutrition and genetic predisposition are under investigation. In other settings, pericardial disease is the most common presentation of HIV-related cardiovascular disease (over 40%), and over 90% of pericardial effusions are due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) pericarditis. HIV-associated TB pericarditis is associated with a greater prevalence of myopericarditis, a lower rate of progression to constriction, and markedly increased mortality. The role of steroids is currently under investigation in the form of a randomised controlled trial. HIV-associated pulmonary hypertension is significantly more common in sub-Saharan Africa than in developed countries, possibly as a result of interactions between HIV and other infectious agents, with very limited treatment options. It has recently been recognised that patients with HIV are at increased risk of sudden death. Infection with HIV is independently associated with QT prolongation, which is more marked with hepatitis C co-infection and associated with a 4.5-fold higher than expected rate of sudden death. The contribution of coronary disease to the overall burden of HIV-associated cardiovascular disease is still low in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:23680889

  14. Opportunistic Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Infections Opportunistic Infections and Their Relationship to HIV/AIDS People with healthy immune systems can be exposed ... Disease Dementia Hospitalization & Palliative Care Related Topics on AIDS.gov Signs and Symptoms Immune System 101 Stages ...

  15. Pneumocystis carinii (jirovecii) pneumonia (PCP): the most common opportunistic infection observed in HIV/AIDS cases at the University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Jamaiah, I; Rohela, M; Tok, E L; Tan, C L; Tan, W H; Teo, W S; Leow, H F

    2012-07-01

    This retrospective study was conducted among 59 HIV/AIDS patients with opportunistic infections admitted to the University Malaya Medical Centre between 2000 and 2009. Fifty-five point nine percent of cases were Chinese, 25.4% were Malays, 11.9% were Indians and 6.8% were of unknown ethnic origin. The male:female ratio was 2.9:1 (44 males and 15 females). The highest prevalence (38.9%) occurred in the 30-39 year old age group. Men comprised 47.7% and women 53.3%; the majority of both were married. The majority of cases were Malaysians (89.8%) and the rest (10.2%) were immigrants. Most of the patients (18.6%) were non-laborers, followed by laborers (11.9%), the unemployed (5.1%) and housewives (3.4%). The most common risk factor was unprotected sexual activity (20.3%). The two most common HIV/AIDS related opportunistic infections were Pneumocystis carinii (jirovecii) pneumonia (PCP) (62.7%) and toxoplasmosis (28.8%). Seventy-two point nine percent of patients had a CD4 count <200 cells/microl and 5.1% had a CD4 count >500 cells/microl. Eleven point nine percent of cases died during study period. A low CD4 count had a greater association with opportunistic infections. Most of the patients presented with fever (44.1%), cough (42.4%) and shortness of breath (28.8%). Detection of the etiologic pathogens aids clinicians in choosing appropriate management strategies. PMID:23077803

  16. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations. PMID:25887082

  17. HIV-associated dementia: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Daniel; Beniwal, Sumit; Bhattacharya, Labanya; Srivastava, Kalpana

    2011-01-01

    Background: Considerable clinical research has been conducted to increase our knowledge in understanding the underlying neuropathological significance of HIV viral infection. Aim: To find the incidence of HIV Associated Dementia in a suburban part of India. Materials and Methods: 6135 prospective cases from January 2008 to August 2010 were subjected to pretest counseling. Those willing were tested for HIV status using western blot test. Results: 5688 (92.71%) underwent for detection of HIV.273 (4.8%) were tested positive. 246 out of these (90.10%) were put on ART. 1 (0.37%) was detected to have HAD stage II.38 cases (18.92%) had varied psychiatric symptoms. Conclusion: HAART has considerably reduced morbidity in HIV infection. PMID:23271867

  18. Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Barbara; Keithley, Joyce K.; Johnson, Angela; Fogg, Louis; Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin; Sha, Beverly E.; Snell, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP), a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n = 12, control group n = 13). No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations. PMID:25922615

  19. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders persist in the era of potent antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, R.K.; Clifford, D.B.; Franklin, D.R.; Woods, S.P.; Ake, C.; Vaida, F.; Ellis, R.J.; Letendre, S.L.; Marcotte, T.D.; Atkinson, J.H.; Rivera-Mindt, M.; Vigil, O.R.; Taylor, M.J.; Collier, A.C.; Marra, C.M.; Gelman, B.B.; McArthur, J.C.; Morgello, S.; Simpson, D.M.; McCutchan, J.A.; Abramson, I.; Gamst, A.; Fennema-Notestine, C.; Jernigan, T.L.; Wong, J.; Grant, I.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This is a cross-sectional, observational study to determine the frequency and associated features of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in a large, diverse sample of infected individuals in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). Methods: A total of 1,555 HIV-infected adults were recruited from 6 university clinics across the United States, with minimal exclusions. We used standardized neuromedical, psychiatric, and neuropsychological (NP) examinations, and recently published criteria for diagnosing HAND and classifying 3 levels of comorbidity (minimal to severe non-HIV risks for NP impairment). Results: Fifty-two percent of the total sample had NP impairment, with higher rates in groups with greater comorbidity burden (40%, 59%, and 83%). Prevalence estimates for specific HAND diagnoses (excluding severely confounded cases) were 33% for asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, 12% for mild neurocognitive disorder, and only 2% for HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Among participants with minimal comorbidities (n = 843), history of low nadir CD4 was a strong predictor of impairment, and the lowest impairment rate on CART occurred in the subset with suppressed plasma viral loads and nadir CD4 ?200 cells/mm3 (30% vs 47% in remaining subgroups). Conclusions: The most severe HAND diagnosis (HAD) was rare, but milder forms of impairment remained common, even among those receiving CART who had minimal comorbidities. Future studies should clarify whether early disease events (e.g., profound CD4 decline) may trigger chronic CNS changes, and whether early CART prevents or reverses these changes. GLOSSARY ANI = asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment; CART = combination antiretroviral therapy; CHARTER = CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research; CIDI = Composite International Diagnostic Interview; CLIA = Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments; CPE = CNS penetration effectiveness; HAD = HIV-associated dementia; HAND = HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder; IADL = instrumental activities of daily living; LP = lumbar puncture; MND = mild neurocognitive disorder; NP = neuropsychological; PAOFI = Patient's Assessment of Own Functioning Inventory. PMID:21135382

  20. HIV Associated Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akanbi, Maxwell O; Taiwo, Babafemi O; Achenbach, Chad J; Ozoh, Obianuju B; Obaseki, Daniel O; Sule, Halima; Agbaji, Oche O; Ukoli, Christiana O

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among HIV-infected adults in Nigeria. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods HIV-infected adults aged ? 30 years with no acute ailments accessing care at the antiretroviral therapy clinic of Jos University Teaching Hospital were enrolled consecutively. Participants were interviewed to obtain pertinent demographic and clinical information, including exposure to risk factors for COPD. Post-bronchodilator spirometry was carried out. HIV related information was retrieved from the clinic medical records. COPD case-definition was based on the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria using post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC <0.7. COPD prevalence was also calculated using the lower limit of normal for FEV1/FVC criteria (LLN) from the European Respiratory Society normative equation. Factors associated with COPD were determined using logistic regression models Results Study population comprised 356 HIV infected adults with mean age of 44.5 (standard deviation, 7.1) years and 59% were female. The mean time elapsed since HIV diagnosis was 7.0 (SD, 2.6) years and 97.5% of the respondents were on stable ART with virologic suppression present in 67.2%. Prevalence of COPD were 15.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.7-19.2), 12.07% (95% CI 8.67-15.48), 22.19% (95% CI 18.16-26.83) using GOLD, ERS LLN and GLI LLN diagnostic criteria respectively. In multivariate analyses adjusting for gender, exposure to cigarette smoke or biomass, history of pulmonary tuberculosis, use of antiretroviral therapy, current CD4 T-cell count and HIV RNA, only age > 50 years was independently associated with COPD with OR 3.4; 95% CI 1.42-8.17 when compared to ages 30-40 years. Conclusion HIV-associated COPD is common in our population of HIV patients. PMID:26236557

  1. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder: Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lindl, Kathryn A.; Marks, David R.; Kolson, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection presently affects more that 40 million people worldwide, and is associated with central nervous system (CNS) disruption in at least 30% of infected individuals. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy has lessened the incidence, but not the prevalence of mild impairment of higher cognitive and cortical functions (HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders) as well as substantially reduced a more severe form dementia (HIV-associated dementia). Furthermore, improving neurological outcomes will require novel, adjunctive therapies that are targeted towards mechanisms of HIV-induced neurodegeneration. Identifying such molecular and pharmacological targets requires an understanding of the events preceding irreversible neuronal damage in the CNS, such as actions of neurotoxins (HIV proteins and cellular factors), disruption of ion channel properties, synaptic damage, and loss of adult neurogenesis. By considering the specific mechanisms and consequences of HIV neuropathogenesis, unified approaches for neuroprotection will likely emerge using a tailored, combined, and non-invasive approach. PMID:20396973

  2. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders: Perspective on Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Nabha, Linda; Duong, Lan; Timpone, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Potent combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in dramatic improvement in AIDS associated morbidity and mortality. Although combination ART has resulted in a significant reduction in HIV associated dementia, the most severe form of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), the overall prevalence of HAND among this population is estimated at 40%. It has been recognized that the central nervous system (CNS) serves as a reservoir for HIV, and neuronal damage begins at the time of acute infection and persists due to chronic infection of microglial and perivascular macrophages. Although combination ART has resulted in virologic control in the plasma compartment, virologic breakthrough can potentially ensue within the CNS compartment due to limited ART drug exposure. The purpose of this review is to discuss the definition, clinical spectrum and risk factors associated with HAND, review the pathogenesis of HAND, and address the pharmacologic challenges associated with ART drug exposure in the CNS compartment. PMID:23733447

  3. Minocycline treatment for HIV-associated cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, S.; Deng, L.; Evans, S.; Schifitto, G.; Cohen, B.A.; Paul, R.; Robertson, K.; Jarocki, B.; Scarsi, K.; Coombs, R.W.; Zink, M.C.; Nath, A.; Smith, E.; Ellis, R.J.; Singer, E.; Weihe, J.; McCarthy, S.; Hosey, L.; Clifford, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a study of minocycline to assess its safety, tolerability, and efficacy for the treatment of HIV-associated cognitive impairment. Methods: HIV-1-infected individuals with progressive neurocognitive decline were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of minocycline. Participants were randomized to receive minocycline 100 mg or matching placebo orally every 12 hours. The primary efficacy measure was change in a neuropsychological test composite z score (NPZ-8) from baseline to week 24. Measures of safety included the frequency of adverse events and changes over time in laboratory tests. After 50% of participants completed the double-blind phase, an interim analysis of futility for the primary outcome measure was performed, and our Data and Safety Monitoring Board recommended early study termination. Results: A total of 107 HIV-1-infected individuals with cognitive impairment were enrolled. The minocycline group did not show improvement in the primary outcome measure (NPZ-8) (mean 24-week change = 0.12) compared to placebo (mean 24-week change = 0.17) (95% confidence interval = [?0.26, 0.39], p = 0.70). There were few severe adverse events or laboratory abnormalities in either treatment group. Conclusion: Minocycline was safe and well-tolerated in individuals with HIV-associated cognitive impairment, but cognitive improvement was not observed. Classification of evidence. This interventional study provides Class II evidence for the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of minocycline for the treatment of HIV-associated cognitive impairment. PMID:21900636

  4. Onychomycosis due to opportunistic molds*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrera, Erick Obed; Arroyo-Camarena, Stefanie; Tejada-García, Diana Luz; Porras-López, Carlos Francisco; Arenas, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Onychomycosis are caused by dermatophytes and Candida, but rarely by non- dermatophyte molds. These opportunistic agents are filamentous fungi found as soil and plant pathogens. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of opportunistic molds in onychomycosis. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 4,220 cases with onychomycosis, diagnosed in a 39-month period at the Institute of Dermatology and Skin surgery "Prof. Dr. Fernando A. Cordero C." in Guatemala City, and confirmed with a positive KOH test and culture. RESULTS: 32 cases (0.76%) of onychomycosis caused by opportunistic molds were confirmed. The most affected age group ranged from 41 to 65 years (15 patients, 46.9%) and females were more commonly affected (21 cases, 65.6%) than males. Lateral and distal subungual onychomycosis (OSD-L) was detected in 20 cases (62.5%). The microscopic examination with KOH showed filaments in 19 cases (59.4%), dermatophytoma in 9 cases (28.1%), spores in 2 cases (6.25%), and filaments and spores in 2 cases (6.25%). Etiologic agents: Aspergillus sp., 11 cases (34.4%); Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, 8 cases (25.0%); Cladosporium sp., 3 cases (9.4%); Acremonium sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Paecilomyces sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Tritirachium oryzae, 2 cases (6.25%); Fusarium sp., Phialophora sp., Rhizopus sp. and Alternaria alternate, 1 case (3.1%) each. CONCLUSIONS: We found onychomycosis by opportunistic molds in 0.76% of the cases and DLSO was present in 62.5%. The most frequent isolated etiological agents were: Aspergillus sp. and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. PMID:26131862

  5. Script Generation of Activities of Daily Living in HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J. Cobb; Woods, Steven Paul; Vigil, Ofilio; Heaton, Robert K.; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J.; Marcotte, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Script generation describes one’s ability to produce complex, sequential action plans derived from mental representations of everyday activities. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of HIV infection on script generation performance. Sixty HIV+ individuals (48% of whom had HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders [HAND]) and 26 demographically comparable HIV? participants were administered a novel, standardized test of script generation, which required participants to verbally generate and organize the necessary steps for completing six daily activities. HAND participants evidenced significantly more total errors, intrusions, and script boundary errors compared to the HIV-sample, indicating difficulties inhibiting irrelevant actions and staying within the prescribed boundaries of scripts, but had adequate knowledge of the relevant actions required for each script. These findings are generally consistent with the executive dysfunction and slowing common in HAND and suggest that script generation may play a role in everyday functioning problems in HIV. PMID:22882813

  6. HIV-Associated Histoplasmosis Early Mortality and Incidence Trends: From Neglect to Priority

    PubMed Central

    Adenis, Antoine; Nacher, Mathieu; Hanf, Matthieu; Vantilcke, Vincent; Boukhari, Rachida; Blachet, Denis; Demar, Magalie; Aznar, Christine; Carme, Bernard; Couppie, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background Histoplasmosis is an endemic fungal infection in French Guiana. It is the most common AIDS-defining illness and the leading cause of AIDS-related deaths. Diagnosis is difficult, but in the past 2 decades, it has improved in this French overseas territory which offers an interesting model of Amazonian pathogen ecology. The objectives of the present study were to describe the temporal trends of incidence and mortality indicators for HIV-associated histoplasmosis in French Guiana. Methods A retrospective study was conducted to describe early mortality rates observed in persons diagnosed with incident cases of HIV-associated Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum histoplasmosis admitted in one of the three main hospitals in French Guiana between 1992 and 2011. Early mortality was defined by death occurring within 30 days after antifungal treatment initiation. Data were collected on standardized case report forms and analysed using standard statistical methods. Results There were 124 deaths (45.3%) and 46 early deaths (16.8%) among 274 patients. Three time periods of particular interest were identified: 1992–1997, 1998–2004 and 2005–2011. The two main temporal trends were: the proportion of early deaths among annual incident histoplasmosis cases significantly declined four fold (?2, p<0.0001) and the number of annual incident histoplasmosis cases increased three fold between 1992–1997 and 1998–2004, and subsequently stabilized. Conclusion From an occasional exotic diagnosis, AIDS-related histoplasmosis became the top AIDS-defining event in French Guiana. This was accompanied by a spectacular decrease of early mortality related to histoplasmosis, consistent with North American reference center mortality rates. The present example testifies that rapid progress could be at reach if awareness increases and leads to clinical and laboratory capacity building in order to diagnose and treat this curable disease. PMID:25144374

  7. Severe enophthalmos and lagophthalmos secondary to HIV-associated lipoatrophy.

    PubMed

    De Niro, Jennifer Edith; Silkiss, Rona Z

    2011-01-01

    HIV-associated lipoatrophy has been closely linked to the use of the thymidine nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors stavudine and zidovudine. The lipoatrophy can have severe psychological effects and is associated with increased risk of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. The authors present a case of a 45-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with severe bilateral enophthalmos (recession of the eyes) and lagophthamos (inability to fully close the eyes) from orbital fat atrophy. He had taken zidovudine for 8 years and stavudine for 13 years. Cessation of the causative drugs usually does not result in noticeable improvement of the lipoatrophy. Placement of bilateral orbital floor implants decreased our patient's orbital volume and substantially improved his eyelid function and cosmetic appearance. PMID:22687682

  8. Understanding and intervening in HIV-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Neesha; Wilkinson, Robert John

    2015-12-01

    HIV-associated tuberculosis can present as extremes, ranging from acute life-threatening disseminated disease to occult asymptomatic infection. Both ends of this spectrum have distinct pathological correlates and require specific diagnostic and treatment approaches. Novel therapeutics, targeting both pathogen and host, are needed to augment pathogen clearance. In latent tuberculosis infection, enhancement of immune activation could be desirable. Antiretroviral therapy augments the beneficial effects of antitubercular therapy. However, in the context of high bacillary burden, antiretroviral therapy can also result in pathology (tuberculosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome). In the immune reconstituting patient, modulation of immune activation controls tissue destruction. Interventions should also be appropriate and sustainable within the programmatic setting. PMID:26634681

  9. Spontaneous clinical improvement in HIV-associated follicular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blasdale, C; Turner, R J; Leonard, N; Ong, E L C; Lawrence, C M

    2004-09-01

    Since 1991 infrequent reports have described a distinctive triad of nodulocystic acne, striking follicular spines and an eruption resembling pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) in HIV-positive patients. It has been suggested that this may represent a subtype of PRP, or alternatively that it should be viewed as a unique HIV-associated follicular occlusion triad. Clinical manifestations may be severe, and in several cases have been ultimately fatal, with death occurring due to complications of cutaneous sepsis. We describe a case demonstrating severe conglobate acne, follicular keratotic spines and histologically confirmed PRP in association with HIV infection. Clinical features and treatment modalities of previously reported cases are reviewed. Despite refusing all topical and systemic treatment our patient showed spontaneous remission of skin signs after 2 years. PMID:15347329

  10. Host and Viral Factors Influencing the Pathogenesis of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) invades the central nervous system early in the course of infection and establishes a protected viral reservoir. However, neurocognitive consequences of HIV infection, known collectively as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), develop in only a small portion of infected patients. The precise mechanisms of pathogenesis involved in HIV-induced central nervous system injury are still not completely understood. In particular, most theories of HAND pathogenesis cannot account for either the selective vulnerability of specific neuronal populations to HIV-induced neurodegeneration or why only a subset of patients develop clinically detectable nervous system disease. Epidemiological and virological studies have identified a variety of host and viral factors that are associated with increased risk of developing HAND. Some host factors that predispose HIV-infected patients to HAND overlap with those associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), suggesting the possibility that common pathogenic mechanisms may participate in both diseases. Here, we will review reports of host and viral factors associated with HAND and place these studies in the context of the data employed to support current theories regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to HIV-induced neurodegeneration with additional focus on mechanisms common to AD pathogenesis. PMID:19373562

  11. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  12. Opportunistic biases: Their origins, effects, and an integrated solution.

    PubMed

    DeCoster, Jamie; Sparks, Erin A; Sparks, Jordan C; Sparks, Glenn G; Sparks, Cheri W

    2015-09-01

    Researchers commonly explore their data in multiple ways before deciding which analyses they will include in the final versions of their papers. While this improves the chances of researchers finding publishable results, it introduces an "opportunistic bias," such that the reported relations are stronger or otherwise more supportive of the researcher's theories than they would be without the exploratory process. The magnitudes of opportunistic biases can often be stronger than those of the effects being investigated, leading to invalid conclusions and a lack of clarity in research results. Authors typically do not report their exploratory procedures, so opportunistic biases are very difficult to detect just by reading the final version of a research report. In this article, we explain how a number of accepted research practices can lead to opportunistic biases, discuss the prevalence of these practices in psychology, consider the different effects that opportunistic biases have on psychological science, evaluate the strategies that methodologists have proposed to prevent or correct for the effects of these biases, and introduce an integrated solution to reduce the prevalence and influence of opportunistic biases. The recent prominence of articles discussing questionable research practices both in scientific journals and in the public media underscores the importance of understanding how opportunistic biases are created and how we might undo their effects. PMID:26348333

  13. Host genetic factors predisposing to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kallianpur, Asha R; Levine, Andrew J

    2014-09-01

    The success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in transforming the lives of HIV-infected individuals with access to these drugs is tempered by the increasing threat of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) to their overall health and quality of life. Intensive investigations over the past two decades have underscored the role of host immune responses, inflammation, and monocyte-derived macrophages in HAND, but the precise pathogenic mechanisms underlying HAND remain only partially delineated. Complicating research efforts and therapeutic drug development are the sheer complexity of HAND phenotypes, diagnostic imprecision, and the growing intersection of chronic immune activation with aging-related comorbidities. Yet, genetic studies still offer a powerful means of advancing individualized care for HIV-infected individuals at risk. There is an urgent need for 1) longitudinal studies using consistent phenotypic definitions of HAND in HIV-infected subpopulations at very high risk of being adversely impacted, such as children, 2) tissue studies that correlate neuropathological changes in multiple brain regions with genomic markers in affected individuals and with changes at the RNA, epigenomic, and/or protein levels, and 3) genetic association studies using more sensitive subphenotypes of HAND. The NIH Brain Initiative and Human Connectome Project, coupled with rapidly evolving systems biology and machine learning approaches for analyzing high-throughput genetic, transcriptomic and epigenetic data, hold promise for identifying actionable biological processes and gene networks that underlie HAND. This review summarizes the current state of understanding of host genetic factors predisposing to HAND in light of past challenges and suggests some priorities for future research to advance the understanding and clinical management of HAND in the cART era. PMID:24996618

  14. Current knowledge on HIV-associated Plasmablastic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bibas, Michele; Castillo, Jorge J.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated PBL is an AIDS-defining cancer, classified by WHO as a distinct entity of aggressive DLBCL. To date less than 250 cases have been published, of them 17 are pediatric. The pathogenesis of this rare disease is related to immunodeficiency, chronic immune stimulation and EBV. Clinically is a rapid growing destructive disease mainly involving the oral cavity even if extraoral and extranodal sites are not infrequent. The diagnosis requires tissue mass or lymph node biopsy and core needle or fine needle biopsy is acceptable only for difficult access sites. Classically immunophenotype is CD45, CD20, CD79a negative and CD38, CD138, MUM1 positive, EBER and KI67 is >80%. Regarding the therapy, standard treatment is, usually, CHOP or CHOP-like regimens while more intensive regimens as CODOX-M/IVAC or DA-EPOCH are possible options. Use of cART is recommended during chemotherapy, keeping in mind the possible overlapping toxicities. Rituximab is not useful for this CD20 negative disease and CNS prophylaxis is mandatory. Intensification with ABMT in CR1 may be considered for fit patients. For refractory/relapsed patients, therapy is, usually, considered palliative, however, in chemo-sensitive disease, intensification + ABMT or new drugs as Bortezomib may be considered. Factors affecting outcome are achieving complete remission, PS, clinical stage, MYC, IPI score. Reported median PFS ranges between 6–7 months and median OS ranges between 11–13 months. Long term survivors are reported but mostly in pediatric patients. Finally, due to the scarcity of data on this subtype of NHL we suggest that the diagnosis and the management of HIV-positive PBL patients should be performed in specialized centers. PMID:25408850

  15. Heel pain and HIV-associated lipodystrophy: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Stupar, Maja; Tibbles, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is diagnosed based on a pathognomonic clinical presentation and physical examination including plantar heel pain with the initial few steps after a period of inactivity. People living with HIV/AIDS, who are taking anti-retroviral medications, often have an associated redistribution of body fat (lipodystrophy). Lipoatrophy of the extremities may involve the heel fat-pad in this population and result in the signs and symptoms of plantar fasciitis. Two cases of plantar heel pain in HIV-associated lipodystrophy are presented to discuss the possible clinical association between the two conditions. Although conservative therapies have limited evidence, they are commonly used and have been seen, clinically, to result in a resolution of symptoms. In the presented cases, the individuals benefited from soft tissue therapy, modalities, activity modification and education on proper footwear. Clinicians should be aware that the association between these two conditions may be a significant cause of morbidity in a population of patients with HIV. PMID:18516231

  16. Opportunistic Infections and Other Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... toxo) Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) Tuberculosis (TB) Vaginal yeast infections Treatments for HIV/AIDS Research and clinical ... fact sheet Urinary tract infections fact sheet Vaginal yeast infections fact sheet More information on opportunistic infections ...

  17. Recurrent HIV-associated immune complex glomerulonephritis with lupus-like features after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sindhu; Jen, Kuang-Yu; Laszik, Zoltan G

    2013-08-01

    A spectrum of kidney diseases besides classic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) exists in HIV-infected patients. Immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis has emerged as a significant contributor to the burden of kidney disease in this population, particularly in patients of non-African descent. Lupus-like nephritis, a form of immune complex glomerulonephritis with histologic features identical to lupus nephritis in the absence of clinical or serologic markers of lupus, is well recognized as a cause of end-stage renal disease in HIV-infected patients. None of the HIV-associated kidney lesions, whether classic HIVAN or non-HIVAN, has been reported to recur in kidney transplants. We report here for the first time clinical and histologic recurrence of HIV-associated lupus-like nephritis after successful kidney transplantation, causing proteinuria, hematuria, and impaired kidney transplant function. PMID:23481367

  18. APOL1 Risk Variants Are Strongly Associated with HIV-Associated Nephropathy in Black South Africans.

    PubMed

    Kasembeli, Alex N; Duarte, Raquel; Ramsay, Michèle; Mosiane, Pulane; Dickens, Caroline; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Limou, Sophie; Sezgin, Efe; Nelson, George W; Fogo, Agnes B; Goetsch, Stewart; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl A; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-11-01

    APOL1 variants are associated with HIV-associated nephropathy and FSGS in African Americans. The prevalence of these variants in African populations with CKD in HIV-1 infection has not been investigated. We determined the role of APOL1 variants in 120 patients with HIV-associated nephropathy and CKD and 108 controls from a South-African black population. Patients with CKD were selected on the basis of histology. Genotypes were successfully determined for APOL1 G1 and G2 variants and 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms, including 18 ancestry informative markers, for 116 patients with CKD (96.7%; 38 patients with HIV-associated nephropathy, 39 patients with HIV-positive CKD, and 39 patients with HIV-negative CKD), and 108 controls (100%). Overall, 79% of patients with HIV-associated nephropathy and 2% of population controls carried two risk alleles. In a recessive model, individuals carrying any combination of two APOL1 risk alleles had 89-fold higher odds (95% confidence interval, 18 to 912; P<0.001) of developing HIV-associated nephropathy compared with HIV-positive controls. Population allele frequencies were 7.3% for G1 and 11.1% for G2. APOL1 risk alleles were not significantly associated with other forms of CKD. These results indicate HIV-positive, antiretroviral therapy-naïve South-African blacks with two APOL1 risk alleles are at very high risk for developing HIV-associated nephropathy. Further studies are required to determine the effect of APOL1 risk variants on kidney diseases in other regions of sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25788523

  19. Practical Management of HIV-Associated Anemia in Resource-Limited Settings: Prospective Observational Evaluation of a New Mozambican Guideline.

    PubMed

    Brentlinger, Paula E; Silva, Wilson P; Vermund, Sten H; Valverde, Emilio; Buene, Manuel; Moon, Troy D

    2016-01-01

    Mozambique's updated guideline for management of HIV-associated anemia prompts clinicians to consider opportunistic conditions, adverse drug reactions, and untreated immunosuppression in addition to iron deficiency, intestinal helminthes, and malaria. We prospectively evaluated this guideline in rural Zambézia Province. Likely cause(s) of anemia were determined through prespecified history, physical examination, and laboratory testing. Diagnoses were "etiologic" if laboratory confirmed (sputum microscopy, blood culture, Plasmodium falciparum malaria rapid test) or "syndromic" if not. To assess hemoglobin response, we used serial point-of-care measurements. We studied 324 ambulatory, anemic (hemoglobin <10?g/dl) HIV-infected adults. Study clinicians treated nearly all [315 (97.2%)] for suspected iron deficiency and/or helminthes; 56 (17.3%) had laboratory-confirmed malaria. Other assigned diagnoses included tuberculosis [30 (9.3%)], adverse drug reactions [26 (8.0%)], and bacteremia [13 (4.1%)]. Etiologic diagnosis was achieved in 79 (24.4%). Of 169 (52.2%) subjects who improved (hemoglobin increase of ?1?g/dl without indications for hospitalization), only 65 (38.5%) received conventional management (iron supplementation, deworming, and/or antimalarials) alone. Thirty (9.3%) died and/or were hospitalized, and 125 (38.6%) were lost to follow-up. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models described better hemoglobin responses and/or outcomes in subjects with higher CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts, pre-enrollment antiretroviral therapy and/or co-trimoxazole prophylaxis, discontinuation of zidovudine for suspected adverse reaction, and smear-positive tuberculosis. Adverse outcomes were associated with fever, low body mass index, bacteremia, esophageal candidiasis, and low or missing CD4(+) T cell counts. In this severely resource-limited setting, successful anemia management often required interventions other than conventional presumptive treatment, thus supporting Mozambique's guideline revision. PMID:26178574

  20. Asymptomatic HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment increases risk for symptomatic decline

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Donald R.; Deutsch, Reena; Woods, Steven P.; Vaida, Florin; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Atkinson, J.H.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Clifford, David B.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McArthur, Justin C.; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; McCutchan, John A.; Abramson, Ian; Gamst, Anthony; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Smith, Davey M.; Heaton, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: While HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain prevalent despite combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), the clinical relevance of asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI), the most common HAND diagnosis, remains unclear. We investigated whether HIV-infected persons with ANI were more likely than those who were neurocognitively normal (NCN) to experience a decline in everyday functioning (symptomatic decline). Methods: A total of 347 human participants from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort were NCN (n = 226) or had ANI (n = 121) at baseline. Neurocognitive assessments occurred approximately every 6 months, with median (interquartile range) follow-up of 45.2 (28.7–63.7) months. Symptomatic decline was based on self-report (SR) or objective, performance-based (PB) problems in everyday functioning. Proportional hazards modeling was used to generate risk ratios for progression to symptomatic HAND after adjusting for baseline and time-dependent covariates, including CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (CD4), virologic suppression, CART, and mood. Results: The ANI group had a shorter time to symptomatic HAND than the NCN after adjusting for baseline predictors: adjusted risk ratios for symptomatic HAND were 2.0 (confidence interval [CI] 1.1–3.6; p = 0.02) for SR, 5.8 (CI 3.2–10.7; p < 0.0001) for PB, and 3.2 (CI 2.0–5.0; p < 0.0001) for either SR or PB. Current CD4 and depression were significant time-dependent covariates, but antiretroviral regimen, virologic suppression, and substance abuse or dependence were not. Conclusions: This longitudinal study demonstrates that ANI conveys a 2-fold to 6-fold increase in risk for earlier development of symptomatic HAND, supporting the prognostic value of the ANI diagnosis in clinical settings. Identifying those at highest risk for symptomatic decline may offer an opportunity to modify treatment to delay progression. PMID:24814848

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phylogeny and Ecophysiology of Opportunistic "Snow Molds"

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phylogeny and Ecophysiology of Opportunistic "Snow Molds" from a Subalpine Forest, LLC 2008 Abstract Mats of coenocytic "snow molds" are commonly observed covering the soil and litter of "snow mold" covering plant litter and soil as snow banks recede in the spring at alpine and sub

  2. AIRBORNE HYPERSPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF INVASIVE AND OPPORTUNISTIC WETLANDS PLANT SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal wetlands are among the most fragmented and disturbed ecosystems and the Great Lakes are no exception. One possible result is the observed increase in the presence and dominance of invasive and other opportunistic plant species, such as the common reed (Phragmites australi...

  3. OPPORTUNISTIC ORGANISMS AND THE WATER SUPPLY CONNECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organisms that established in water supply may also be opportunistic pathogens. epresentative opportunistic pathogens that are waterborne include acid-fast bacteria, fecal klebsiellae, Legionella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. hese organisms may be found in the heterotroph ic bacter...

  4. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: an Emerging Global Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging multidrug-resistant global opportunistic pathogen. The increasing incidence of nosocomial and community-acquired S. maltophilia infections is of particular concern for immunocompromised individuals, as this bacterial pathogen is associated with a significant fatality/case ratio. S. maltophilia is an environmental bacterium found in aqueous habitats, including plant rhizospheres, animals, foods, and water sources. Infections of S. maltophilia can occur in a range of organs and tissues; the organism is commonly found in respiratory tract infections. This review summarizes the current literature and presents S. maltophilia as an organism with various molecular mechanisms used for colonization and infection. S. maltophilia can be recovered from polymicrobial infections, most notably from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients, as a cocolonizer with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Recent evidence of cell-cell communication between these pathogens has implications for the development of novel pharmacological therapies. Animal models of S. maltophilia infection have provided useful information about the type of host immune response induced by this opportunistic pathogen. Current and emerging treatments for patients infected with S. maltophilia are discussed. PMID:22232370

  5. Are MMSE and HDS-R neuropsychological tests adequate for screening HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders?

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Ai; Tominaga, Daisuke; Tasato, Daisuke; Miyagi, Kyoko; Nakamura, Hideta; Haranaga, Shusaku; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2014-03-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are one of major comorbidities in patients with HIV-1 infection. There are currently no standardized tests for screening HAND in such patients. The sensitivity of the cognitive function tests routinely used in clinical practice, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Revised Hasegawa's Dementia Scale, is inadequate to rule out HAND, even in patients with clear abnormal behavior. We report a 41-year-old man with HIV-associated dementia, the most severe form of HAND, in whom the simplified methods did not show abnormal results, and a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests which covering several cognitive domains was needed to detect cognitive impairment. PMID:24462448

  6. Timing of Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)–Associated Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Török, M. Estee; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Mai, Pham Phuong; Dung, Nguyen Thi; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Tien, Nguyen Anh; Minh, N. H.; Hien, Nguyen Quang; Thai, Phan Vuong Khac; Dong, Doan The; Anh, Do Thi Tuong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Cam; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Quy, Hoang Thi; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Simmons, Cameron Paul; de Jong, Menno; Wolbers, Marcel; Farrar, Jeremy James

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated tuberculous meningitis is unknown. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of immediate versus deferred ART in patients with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis to determine whether immediate ART reduced the risk of death. Antiretroviral drugs (zidovudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz) were started either at study entry or 2 months after randomization. All patients were treated with standard antituberculosis treatment, adjunctive dexamethasone, and prophylactic co-trimoxazole and were followed up for 12 months. We conducted intention-to-treat, per-protocol, and prespecified subgroup analyses. Results A total of 253 patients were randomized, 127 in the immediate ART group and 126 in the deferred ART group; 76 and 70 patients died within 9 months in the immediate and deferred ART groups, respectively. Immediate ART was not significantly associated with 9-month mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], .81–1.55; P = .50) or the time to new AIDS events or death (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, .87–1.55; P = .31). The percentage of patients with severe (grade 3 or 4) adverse events was high in both arms (90% in the immediate ART group and 89% in the deferred ART group; P = .84), but there were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm (102 in the immediate ART group vs 87 in the deferred ART group; P = .04). Conclusions Immediate ART initiation does not improve outcome in patients presenting with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. There were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm, supporting delayed initiation of ART in HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. Clinical Trials Registration ISRCTN63659091. PMID:21596680

  7. ASTROCYTE-ENDOTHELIAL INTERACTIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR HIV-ASSOCIATED NEUROCOGNITIVE DISORDER

    E-print Network

    Bethel-Brown, Crystal

    2011-08-31

    ………………………………………………..……………..……HIV Encephalitis SIV……………………………………………….…...Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVE…………………………………………………………...……….SIV Encephalitis SHIV……………………………………………………………………………...SIV/HIV ANI……………………………………….….Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Disorder MCMD... that the severity of HIV-associated dementia (HAD)/HIV-encephalitis (HIVE), the two extreme forms of HAND, correlates with the presence of activated glial cells rather than with the presence and amount of 2 HIV-infected cells or virus replication in the CNS [2...

  8. Towards New Antifolates Targeting Eukaryotic Opportunistic Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Bolstad, E; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Trimethoprim, an antifolate commonly prescribed in combination with sulfamethoxazole, potently inhibits several prokaryotic species of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). However, several eukaryotic pathogenic organisms are resistant to trimethoprim, preventing its effective use as a therapeutic for those infections. We have been building a program to reengineer trimethoprim to more potently and selectively inhibit eukaryotic species of DHFR as a viable strategy for new drug discovery targeting several opportunistic pathogens. We have developed a series of compounds that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of DHFR from the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma as well as the fungus Candida glabrata. A comparison of the structures of DHFR from the fungal species Candida glabrata and Pneumocystis suggests that the compounds may also potently inhibit Pneumocystis DHFR.

  9. Pathogen-specific T cell susceptibility to HIV influences the natural history of opportunistic infections

    PubMed Central

    Saharia, Kapil K.; Koup, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    During HIV infection, the timing of opportunistic infections is not always associated with severity of CD4 T cell depletion and different opportunistic pathogens reactivate at different CD4 T cell thresholds. Here we review how differences in the phenotype and function of pathogen-specific CD4 T cells influence susceptibility to HIV infection. By focusing on three common opportunistic infections (Mycobacterium tuberculosis, human papillomavirus, and cytomegalovirus) we examine how differential depletion of pathogen-specific CD4 T cells impacts the natural history of these pathogens in HIV infection. A broader understanding of this relationship can better inform treatment strategies against co-pathogens. PMID:24243010

  10. Medical marijuana for HIV-associated sensory neuropathy: legal and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Larriviere, Daniel G

    2014-10-01

    The number of states legalizing medical marijuana is increasing. Medical marijuana is possibly effective therapy for HIV-associated sensory neuropathy. Despite legalization at the state level, however, the current and contradictory federal drug enforcement policy creates the risk that physicians who recommend medical marijuana to their patients will lose their ability to prescribe medications. The federal-state tension has legal and ethical implications for neurologists who receive a request for medical marijuana from their patients since neurologists must strive to both relieve suffering and obey relevant laws. Recommendation of medical marijuana by neurologists to their patients is ethically permissible but is not ethically mandatory. PMID:25299291

  11. Prospective memory in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND): the neuropsychological dynamics of time monitoring.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Katie L; Loft, Shayne; Morgan, Erin E; Weber, Erica; Cushman, Clint; Johnston, Elaine; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2013-01-01

    Strategic monitoring during a delay interval is theorized to be an essential feature of time-based prospective memory (TB PM), the cognitive architecture of which is thought to rely heavily on frontostriatal systems and executive functions. This hypothesis was examined in 55 individuals with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and 108 seronegative comparison participants who were administered the Memory for Intentions Screening Test (MIST), during which time-monitoring (clock-checking) behavior was measured. Results revealed a significant interaction between HAND group and the frequency of clock checking, in which individuals with HAND checked the clock significantly less often than the comparison group across the TB PM retention intervals of the MIST. Subsequent analyses in the HAND sample revealed that the frequency of clocking checking was positively related to overall TB performance, as well as to standard clinical measures of retrospective memory and verbal fluency. These findings add support to a growing body of research elucidating TB PM's reliance on strategic monitoring processes dependent upon intact frontostriatal systems. HIV-associated TB strategic time-monitoring deficits may manifest in poorer functioning outcomes, including medication nonadherence and dependence in activities of daily living. Future research is needed to further delineate the cognitive mechanisms underlying strategic time monitoring in order to advise rehabilitation strategies for reducing HAND-related TB PM deficits. PMID:23465043

  12. Opportunistic scheduling using cognitive radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohler, Mischa; Ghorashi, Seyed A.; Ghozzi, Mohamed; Arndt, Marylin; Said, Fatin; Aghvami, A. Hamid

    2006-09-01

    Traditional cognitive approaches based on interference scanning discard a certain communication band once interference is detected, irrespective of the temporal characteristics of the interference. The aim of this article is to alert the community that interference exhibits temporal fluctuations, which can be exploited by a cognitive radio in an opportunistic manner. To this end, we present some mathematical approaches that describe the temporal behaviour of interference signals obeying a lognormal shadowing distribution. We derive some key quantities, such as throughput, for an example hierarchical cell structure configuration of a microcell hotspot being operated within a macrocell using the same frequency band. To cite this article: M. Dohler et al., C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  13. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators. PMID:26066311

  14. Opportunistic tangible user interfaces for augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Steven; Feiner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Opportunistic Controls are a class of user interaction techniques that we have developed for augmented reality (AR) applications to support gesturing on, and receiving feedback from, otherwise unused affordances already present in the domain environment. By leveraging characteristics of these affordances to provide passive haptics that ease gesture input, Opportunistic Controls simplify gesture recognition, and provide tangible feedback to the user. In this approach, 3D widgets are tightly coupled with affordances to provide visual feedback and hints about the functionality of the control. For example, a set of buttons can be mapped to existing tactile features on domain objects. We describe examples of Opportunistic Controls that we have designed and implemented using optical marker tracking, combined with appearance-based gesture recognition. We present the results of two user studies. In the first, participants performed a simulated maintenance inspection of an aircraft engine using a set of virtual buttons implemented both as Opportunistic Controls and using simpler passive haptics. Opportunistic Controls allowed participants to complete their tasks significantly faster and were preferred over the baseline technique. In the second, participants proposed and demonstrated user interfaces incorporating Opportunistic Controls for two domains, allowing us to gain additional insights into how user interfaces featuring Opportunistic Controls might be designed. PMID:19910657

  15. Hemichorea in a patient with HIV-associated central nervous system histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Bellmann, Ingrid; Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Flores-Cantu, Hazael; Calderon-Hernandez, Hector J; Villareal-Velazquez, Hector J

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system histoplasmosis is a rare opportunistic infection with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. We describe the first case of human immunodeficiency virus-associated cerebral histoplasmosis presenting with hemichorea. The patient recovered after treatment with conventional amphotericin B and itraconazole. PMID:25505048

  16. Opportunistic Infections—Coming to the Limits of Immunosuppression?

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Jay A.

    2013-01-01

    Possible etiologies of infection in the solid organ recipient are diverse, ranging from common bacterial and viral pathogens to opportunistic pathogens that cause invasive disease only in immunocompromised hosts. The recognition of infectious syndromes in this population is limited by alterations in the clinical manifestations by immunosuppression. The risk of serious infections in the organ transplant patient is determined by the interaction between the patients’ recent and distant epidemiological exposures and all factors that contribute to the patient’s net state of immune suppression. This risk is altered by antimicrobial prophylaxis and changes in immunosuppressive therapies. In addition to the direct effects of infection, opportunistic infections, and the microbiome may adversely shape the host immune responses with diminished graft and patient survivals. Antimicrobial therapies are more complex than in the normal host with a significant incidence of drug toxicity and a propensity for drug interactions with the immunosuppressive agents used to maintain graft function. Rapid and specific microbiologic diagnosis is essential. Newer microbiologic assays have improved the diagnosis and management of opportunistic infections. These tools coupled with assays that assess immune responses to infection and to graft antigens may allow optimization of management for graft recipients in the future. PMID:24086067

  17. Opportunistic, collaborative and synchronized, proximal device ecology

    E-print Network

    Toledano, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    CoSync is an on-device software framework for coordinating proximal consumer electronic devices in order to create a synchronized, opportunistic and collaborative device ecology. The CoSync device ecology combines multiple ...

  18. Opportunistic Behavior in Motivated Learning Agents.

    PubMed

    Graham, James; Starzyk, Janusz A; Jachyra, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    This paper focuses on the novel motivated learning (ML) scheme and opportunistic behavior of an intelligent agent. It extends previously developed ML to opportunistic behavior in a multitask situation. Our paper describes the virtual world implementation of autonomous opportunistic agents learning in a dynamically changing environment, creating abstract goals, and taking advantage of arising opportunities to improve their performance. An opportunistic agent achieves better results than an agent based on ML only. It does so by minimizing the average value of all need signals rather than a dominating need. This paper applies to the design of autonomous embodied systems (robots) learning in real-time how to operate in a complex environment. PMID:25291798

  19. Novel Approaches to Targeting Visceral and Hepatic Adiposities in HIV-Associated Lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tien, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Visceral and hepatic adiposities have been associated with both cardiovascular and liver disease and are of concern in HIV-infected persons in the modern era of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). The development of therapeutic targets to reduce visceral and hepatic adiposities in HIV-infected persons has been slow, because of early reports that attributed the excess adiposity to specific antiretroviral drugs. Visceral adiposity was initially thought to occur as part of a protease inhibitor-induced "HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome." Subsequent studies show that visceral adiposity is likely a result of effective ART, recovery of health, and the normal aging process. Visceral adiposity is an established risk factor for hepatic adiposity. Identifying drug targets for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is under active investigation. The present review summarizes the recent literature on the pathogenesis of visceral and hepatic adiposities in HIV-infected persons, current therapeutic strategies, and novel interventions in HIV-infected and uninfected persons. PMID:26493063

  20. Cornoid Lamella-Like Structures in HIV-Associated Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis: A Unique Histopathologic Finding.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Courtney; Moore, Lindsey; Reule, Ross; Dyer, Jonathan A; Rady, Peter; Tyring, Stephen K; North, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is an uncommon inherited skin condition with increased vulnerability to widespread infection by certain human papillomavirus types, resulting in extensive verruca plana-like papules coalescing to large confluent plaques. Since the AIDS epidemic starting in the 1980s, an acquired type of EV has been described in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. The histopathologic features of EV consist of papillated epidermal hyperplasia with hypergranulosis and a distinct bluish-gray color in the large human papillomavirus-infected keratinocytes in the stratum granulosum. The authors present a case of HIV-associated EV with a unique histopathologic finding of multiple cornoid lamella-like structures. To the authors' knowledge, this finding has not been previously described in the literature. PMID:26588337

  1. Central Nervous System Complications in HIV Disease: HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Letendre

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is the result of neural damage caused by HIV replication and immune activation. Potent antiretroviral therapy has reduced the prevalence of severe HAND but not mild to moderate HAND. Brief symptom questionnaires, screening tests, and neuropsychological tests can be used with relative ease in the clinic to identify cognitive and neurologic deficits and to track patient status. Increasing data on pharmacokinetics of antiretrovirals in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have permitted formulation of central nervous system (CNS) penetration-effectiveness (CPE) rankings for single drugs and combinations. Available data indicate that regimens with higher CPE scores are associated with lower HIV RNA levels in CSF and improvement in neurocognitive functioning. This article summarizes a presentation by Scott Letendre, MD, at the IAS–USA live continuing medical education course held in San Francisco in May 2011. PMID:22156215

  2. Developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of HIV-associated neurocognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rumbaugh, Jeffrey A; Steiner, Joseph; Sacktor, Ned; Nath, Avindra

    2009-01-01

    Important advances have been made in recent years in identifying the molecular mechanisms of HIV neuropathogenesis. Defining the pathways leading to HIV dementia has created an opportunity to therapeutically target many steps in the pathogenic process. HIV itself rarely infects neurons, but significant neuronal damage is caused both by viral proteins and by inflammatory mediators produced by the host in response to infection. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) does not target these mediators of neuronal damage, and the prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive dysfunction has actually been rising in the post-HAART era. This review will briefly summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms of HIV-induced neurological disease, and emphasize translation of this basic research into potential clinical applications. PMID:19774095

  3. Challenges in Evaluating the Cost-effectiveness of New Diagnostic Tests for HIV-Associated Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jason R.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Dowdy, David W.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2013-01-01

    With an emerging array of rapid diagnostic tests for tuberculosis, cost-effectiveness analyses are needed to inform scale-up in various populations and settings. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated tuberculosis poses unique challenges in estimating and interpreting the cost-effectiveness of novel diagnostic tools. First, gains in sensitivity and specificity do not directly correlate with impact on clinical outcomes. Second, the cost-effectiveness of implementing tuberculosis diagnostics in HIV-infected populations is heavily influenced by downstream costs of HIV care. As a result, tuberculosis diagnostics may appear less cost-effective in this population than among HIV-uninfected individuals, raising important ethical and policy questions about the design and interpretation of cost-effectiveness analyses in this setting. Third, conventional cost-effectiveness benchmarks may be inadequate for making decisions about whether to adopt new diagnostics. If we are to appropriately deploy novel diagnostics for tuberculosis to people living with HIV in resource-constrained settings, these challenges in measuring cost-effectiveness must be more widely recognized and addressed. PMID:23788239

  4. Altered Oligodendrocyte Maturation and Myelin Maintenance: The Role of Antiretrovirals in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brigid K; Monnerie, Hubert; Mannell, Maggie V; Gannon, Patrick J; Espinoza, Cagla Akay; Erickson, Michelle A; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Gelman, Benjamin B; Briand, Lisa A; Pierce, R Christopher; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L; Grinspan, Judith B

    2015-11-01

    Despite effective viral suppression through combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), approximately half of HIV-positive individuals have HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Studies of antiretroviral-treated patients have revealed persistent white matter abnormalities including diffuse myelin pallor, diminished white matter tracts, and decreased myelin protein mRNAs. Loss of myelin can contribute to neurocognitive dysfunction because the myelin membrane generated by oligodendrocytes is essential for rapid signal transduction and axonal maintenance. We hypothesized that myelin changes in HAND are partly due to effects of antiretroviral drugs on oligodendrocyte survival and/or maturation. We showed that primary mouse oligodendrocyte precursor cell cultures treated with therapeutic concentrations of HIV protease inhibitors ritonavir or lopinavir displayed dose-dependent decreases in oligodendrocyte maturation; however, this effect was rapidly reversed after drug removal. Conversely, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine had no effect. Furthermore, in vivo ritonavir administration to adult mice reduced frontal cortex myelin protein levels. Finally, prefrontal cortex tissue from HIV-positive individuals with HAND on cART showed a significant decrease in myelin basic protein compared with untreated HIV-positive individuals with HAND or HIV-negative controls. These findings demonstrate that antiretrovirals can impact myelin integrity and have implications for myelination in juvenile HIV patients and myelin maintenance in adults on lifelong therapy. PMID:26469251

  5. The spatial relationship between neurons and astrocytes in HIV-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eleanor S; Chana, Gursharan; Nguyen, Timothy B; Perera, Gayathri; Landau, Sabine; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Glass, Jonathan D; McArthur, Justin; Everall, Ian Paul

    2013-04-01

    Specific neuronal spatial distributional patterns have previously been correlated with increasing severity of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). As astrocytes are also a putative site of neurotoxicity, we investigated the spatial relationships of astrocytes with pyramidal and interneurons in the superior frontal gyrus from 29 patients who died from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Frontal cortical brain tissue was taken from diseased HIV patients who had been assessed for the presence and severity of HAD using the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Scale. No correlation was found between neuronal density and severity of dementia. However, the pattern of astrocytes became more clustered as dementia progressed. Bivariate spatial pattern analysis of neuronal populations with astrocytes revealed that, with increasing dementia severity, astrocytes and large pyramidal neurons increasingly "repelled" each other, while astrocytes and interneurons evidenced increasing "attraction." This implies that astrocytes may be more likely to be situated in the vicinity of surviving interneurons but less likely to be situated near surviving large pyramidal neurons in the setting of progressing HAD. PMID:23430713

  6. The cross-talk of HIV-1 Tat and methamphetamine in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mediouni, Sonia; Garibaldi Marcondes, Maria Cecilia; Miller, Courtney; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Valente, Susana T.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the lives of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals. Nonetheless, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which range from undetectable neurocognitive impairments to severe dementia, still affect approximately 50% of the infected population, hampering their quality of life. The persistence of HAND is promoted by several factors, including longer life expectancies, the residual levels of virus in the central nervous system (CNS) and the continued presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins such as the transactivator of transcription (Tat) in the brain. Tat is a secreted viral protein that crosses the blood–brain barrier into the CNS, where it has the ability to directly act on neurons and non-neuronal cells alike. These actions result in the release of soluble factors involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and excitotoxicity, ultimately resulting in neuronal damage. The percentage of methamphetamine (MA) abusers is high among the HIV-1-positive population compared to the general population. On the other hand, MA abuse is correlated with increased viral replication, enhanced Tat-mediated neurotoxicity and neurocognitive impairments. Although several strategies have been investigated to reduce HAND and MA use, no clinically approved treatment is currently available. Here, we review the latest findings of the effects of Tat and MA in HAND and discuss a few promising potential therapeutic developments. PMID:26557111

  7. Interactive Effects of Morphine on HIV Infection: Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Pichili Vijaya Bhaskar; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Saiyed, Zainulabedin; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2012-01-01

    HIV epidemic continues to be a severe public health problem and concern within USA and across the globe with about 33 million people infected with HIV. The frequency of drug abuse among HIV infected patients is rapidly increasing and is another major issue since injection drug users are at a greater risk of developing HIV associated neurocognitive dysfunctions compared to non-drug users infected with HIV. Brain is a major target for many of the recreational drugs and HIV. Evidences suggest that opiate drug abuse is a risk factor in HIV infection, neural dysfunction and progression to AIDS. The information available on the role of morphine as a cofactor in the neuropathogenesis of HIV is scanty. This review summarizes the results that help in understanding the role of morphine use in HIV infection and neural dysfunction. Studies show that morphine enhances HIV-1 infection by suppressing IL-8, downregulating chemokines with reciprocal upregulation of HIV coreceptors. Morphine also activates MAPK signaling and downregulates cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Better understanding on the role of morphine in HIV infection and mechanisms through which morphine mediates its effects may help in devising novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection in opiate using HIV-infected population. PMID:22666564

  8. Risky decision-making in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Woods, Steven Paul; Cattie, Jordan E.; Doyle, Katie; Grant, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Individuals infected with HIV show moderate deficits in decision-making, but the ecological relevance of such deficits on everyday functioning has not previously been described. This study sought to examine the magnitude, cognitive correlates, and everyday functioning impact of risky decision-making impairment in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Participants included 68 HIV+ individuals with HAND, 78 HIV+ individuals without HAND, and 51 HIV- comparison participants, who were administered the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) alongside a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and self-report measures assessing aspects of everyday functioning. HIV+ individuals with HAND performed more poorly on the IGT relative to the other two groups, most notably during the last three trial blocks. Within the HIV+ group, IGT performance during the last three trial blocks was most strongly associated with cognitive flexibility, but was not significantly related to declines in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), unemployment, or medication non-adherence. While overall IGT performance across the last three trial blocks may be helpful diagnostically in identifying decision-making impairment in HAND, examination of alternate, more specific metrics (e.g., individual deck selections across trial blocks) may be more useful in delineating the role of poor decision-making in HIV-related disability, and should be examined in future research. PMID:23181946

  9. Genetic, transcriptomic, and epigenetic studies of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Andrew J.; Panos, Stella E.; Horvath, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Human Genome Project, coupled with rapidly evolving high throughput technologies, has opened the possibility of identifying heretofore unknown biological processes underlying human disease. Due to the opaque nature of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) neuropathogenesis, the utility of such methods has gained notice among NeuroAIDS researchers. Further, the merging of genetics with other research areas has also allowed for application of relatively nascent fields, such as neuroimaging genomics and pharmacogenetics, to the context of HAND. In this review, we detail the development of genetic, transcriptomic, and epigenetic studies of HAND, beginning with early candidate gene association studies and culminating in current “omics” approaches that incorporate methods from systems biology to interpret data from multiple levels of biological functioning. Challenges with this line of investigation are discussed; including the difficulty of defining a valid phenotype for HAND. We propose that leveraging known associations between biology and pathology across multiple levels will lead to a more reliable and valid phenotype. We also discuss the difficulties of interpreting the massive and multi-tiered mountains of data produced by current high-throughput omics assays, and explore the utility of systems biology approaches in this regard. PMID:24583618

  10. HIV infection and HIV-associated behaviors among injecting drug users - 20 cities, United States, 2009.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    Despite a recent reduction in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections attributed to injecting drug use in the United States, 9% of new U.S. HIV infections in 2009 occurred among injecting drug users (IDUs). To monitor HIV-associated behaviors and HIV prevalence among IDUs, CDC's National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS) conducts interviews and HIV testing in selected metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). This report summarizes data from 10,073 IDUs interviewed and tested in 20 MSAs in 2009. Of IDUs tested, 9% had a positive HIV test result, and 45% of those testing positive were unaware of their infection. Among the 9,565 IDUs with HIV negative or unknown HIV status before the survey, 69% reported having unprotected vaginal sex, 34% reported sharing syringes, and 23% reported having unprotected heterosexual anal sex during the 12 previous months. Although these risk behavior prevalences appear to warrant increased access to HIV testing and prevention services, for the previous 12-month period, only 49% of the IDUs at risk for acquiring HIV infection reported having been tested for HIV, and 19% reported participating in a behavioral intervention. Increased HIV prevention and testing efforts are needed to further reduce HIV infections among IDUs. PMID:22377843

  11. Exploiting Opportunistic Overhearing to Improve Performance of Mutual Exclusion in

    E-print Network

    Vaidya, Nitin

    Exploiting Opportunistic Overhearing to Improve Performance of Mutual Exclusion in Wireless Ad Hoc mutual exclusion algorithms for wireless net- works. Our mutual exclusion algorithms are distributed: Wireless networks; opportunistic overhearing; mutual ex- clusion. 1 Introduction A wireless ad hoc network

  12. Exploiting Opportunistic Overhearing to Improve Performance of Mutual Exclusion in

    E-print Network

    Vaidya, Nitin

    Exploiting Opportunistic Overhearing to Improve Performance of Mutual Exclusion in Wireless Ad Hoc. We design two mutual exclusion algorithms for wireless net- works. Our mutual exclusion algorithms messages. Keywords: Wireless networks; opportunistic overhearing; mutual ex- clusion. 1 Introduction

  13. Trading structure for randomness in wireless opportunistic routing

    E-print Network

    Chachulski, Szymon (Szymon Kazimierz)

    2007-01-01

    Opportunistic routing is a recent technique that achieves high throughput in the face of lossy wireless links. The current opportunistic routing protocol, ExOR, ties the MAC with routing, imposing a strict schedule on ...

  14. MORE: A Network Coding Approach to Opportunistic Routing

    E-print Network

    Chachulski, Szymon

    2006-06-30

    Opportunistic routing has the potential to substantially increase wireless network throughput. Prior work on opportunistic routing, however, requires tight node coordination. Different nodes in a network must have knowledge ...

  15. Spectrum Characterization for Opportunistic Cognitive Radio Systems

    E-print Network

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    1 Spectrum Characterization for Opportunistic Cognitive Radio Systems Tevfik Y¨ucek and H, Tampa, FL, 33620 yucek@eng.usf.edu and arslan@eng.usf.edu Abstract-- Spectrum sensing is one of the most challenging problems in cognitive radio systems. The spectrum of interest needs to be characterized and unused

  16. Identifying Risk Factors for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders Using the International HIV Dementia Scale

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Sara; Önen, Nur; Gase, Amber; Overton, Edgar Turner; Ances, Beau M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist despite great advancements in combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). The gold standard for diagnosing cognitive impairment consists of a time-consuming neuropsychological battery of tests given by a trained neuropsychologist, however in the outpatient HIV clinic this is not feasible. The International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) was developed to help identify individuals with cognitive impairment in the outpatient setting. The IHDS is moderately sensitive for detecting more symptomatic forms of HAND but sensitivity has been shown to be poor in mild impairment. The IHDS has not been evaluated in developed countries in large cohort populations. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of only HIV+ individuals in an urban clinic and evaluated the prevalence of HAND and associated risk factors for cognitive impairment using the IHDS. A total of 507 HIV+ individuals participated in the study of which the majority were male (65%) and African American (68%); and 41% had cognitive impairment. On multivariate analysis, African American race (p=2.21), older age (p=1.03), high school education or less (p=2.03) and depression (p=1.05) were associated with cognitive impairment. The high prevalence of HAND in this group suggests that more severe forms of HAND persist despite cART. Identified risk factors were non-HIV-related and suggest that environmental and sociodemographic factors have a significant impact on cognitive functioning and should be given more attention. The IHDS should be further evaluated in large cohort HIV+ and HIV? populations in the United States, as there remains a significant need to identify an effective brief screening tool for cognitive impairment. PMID:24114509

  17. Efficient phagocytosis and laccase activity affect the outcome of HIV-associated cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabiiti, Wilber; Robertson, Emma; Beale, Mathew A.; Johnston, Simon A.; Brouwer, Annemarie E.; Loyse, Angela; Jarvis, Joseph N.; Gilbert, Andrew S.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Harrison, Thomas S.; May, Robin C.; Bicanic, Tihana

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a leading cause of HIV-associated mortality globally. High fungal burden in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at diagnosis and poor fungal clearance during treatment are recognized adverse prognostic markers; however, the underlying pathogenic factors that drive these clinical manifestations are incompletely understood. We profiled a large set of clinical isolates for established cryptococcal virulence traits to evaluate the contribution of C. neoformans phenotypic diversity to clinical presentation and outcome in human cryptococcosis. Methods. Sixty-five C. neoformans isolates from clinical trial patients with matched clinical data were assayed in vitro to determine murine macrophage uptake, intracellular proliferation rate (IPR), capsule induction, and laccase activity. Analysis of the correlation between prognostic clinical and host immune parameters and fungal phenotypes was performed using Spearman’s r, while the fungal-dependent impact on long-term survival was determined by Cox regression analysis. Results. High levels of fungal uptake by macrophages in vitro, but not the IPR, were associated with CSF fungal burden (r = 0.38, P = 0.002) and long-term patient survival (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6, 95% CI 1.2–5.5, P = 0.012). High-uptake strains were hypocapsular (r = –0.28, P = 0.05) and exhibited enhanced laccase activity (r = 0.36, P = 0.003). Fungal isolates with greater laccase activity exhibited heightened survival ex vivo in purified CSF (r = 0.49, P < 0.0001) and resistance to clearance following patient antifungal treatment (r = 0.39, P = 0.003). Conclusion. These findings underscore the contribution of cryptococcal-phagocyte interactions and laccase-dependent melanin pathways to human clinical presentation and outcome. Furthermore, characterization of fungal-specific pathways that drive clinical manifestation provide potential targets for the development of therapeutics and the management of CM. Funding. This work was made possible by funding from the Wellcome Trust (WT088148MF), the Medical Research Council (MR/J008176/1), the NIHR Surgical Reconstruction and Microbiology Research Centre and the Lister Institute for Preventive Medicine (to R.C. May), and a Wellcome Trust Intermediate fellowship (089966, to T. Bicanic). The C. neoformans isolates were collected within clinical trials funded by the British Infection Society (fellowship to T. Bicanic), the Wellcome Trust (research training fellowships WT069991, to A.E. Brouwer and WT081794, to J.N. Jarvis), and the Medical Research Council, United Kingdom (76201). The funding sources had no role in the design or conduct of this study, nor in preparation of the manuscript. PMID:24743149

  18. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4+ cell count drops below 200 cells/?l, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections. PMID:23961436

  19. Neuroretinal Degeneration in HIV Patients Without Opportunistic Ocular Infections in the cART Era.

    PubMed

    Demirkaya, Nazli; Wit, Ferdinand; Schlingemann, Reinier; Verbraak, Franciscus

    2015-10-01

    Subtle structural and functional retinal abnormalities, termed 'HIV-associated Neuroretinal Disorder (HIV-NRD)', have been reported in HIV patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), without infectious retinitis or any apparent fundus abnormalities otherwise. In this review, we provide an overview of studies investigating HIV-NRD in HIV patients without opportunistic ocular infections in the cART era, and try to elucidate underlying mechanisms and associated risk factors. Most studies focused on patients with severe immune-deficiency and demonstrated that patients with nadir CD4 counts<100 cells/?L are most at risk for neuroretinal damage, with a thinner retinal nerve fiber layer, subtle loss of color vision and/or contrast sensitivity, visual field deficits, and subnormal electrophysiological responses. In contrast, alterations in retinal vascular calibers and retinal blood flow were not associated with nadir CD4 counts, but instead with detectable viremia, suggesting a role for (chronic) inflammation in microvascular damage. Although the alterations in visual function are subtle, they can lead to difficulties in activities, such as reading or driving, thereby affecting quality of life. Since HIV has become a chronic disease, its long-term effects with respect to visual function loss become more important, as is recently emphasized by a longitudinal study, reporting that AIDS patients with HIV-NRD have higher risks of developing bilateral visual impairment and even blindness than patients without HIV-NRD. The question remains whether patients with high (>350 cells/?L) nadir CD4 counts and well-suppressed HIV infection on cART remain at risk for HIV-NRD, as this group constitutes a growing part of the aging HIV-infected population. PMID:26258992

  20. [Effect of heavy metal salts on the growth and pathogenicity factors of opportunistic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Obukhova, O V

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents experimental data on the effect of different concentrations of the salts of cadmium, copper, and zinc on the adaptive potentialities of the most common opportunistic microflora in the Volga-Caspian region. The findings suggest that natural microorganisms (Aeromonas and Citrobacter) show a high metal resistance that seems to be associated with steadily increased background levels of these metals in the waters of the Volga-Caspian basin. PMID:21510046

  1. Reconfigurable cognitive transceiver for opportunistic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maso, Marco; Ba?tu?, Ejder; Cardoso, Leonardo S.; Debbah, Mérouane; Özdemir, Özgür

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we provide the implementation and analysis of a cognitive transceiver for opportunistic networks. We focus on a previously introduced dynamic spectrum access (DSA) - cognitive radio (CR) solution for primary-secondary coexistence in opportunistic orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) networks, called cognitive interference alignment (CIA). The implementation is based on software-defined radio (SDR) and uses GNU Radio and the universal software radio peripheral (USRP) as the implementation toolkit. The proposed flexible transceiver architecture allows efficient on-the-fly reconfigurations of the physical layer into OFDM, CIA or a combination of both. Remarkably, its responsiveness is such that the uplink and downlink channel reciprocity from the medium perspective, inherent to time division duplex (TDD) communications, can be effectively verified and exploited. We show that CIA provides approximately 10 dB of interference isolation towards the OFDM receiver with respect to a fully random precoder. This result is obtained under suboptimal conditions, which indicates that further gains are possible with a better optimization of the system. Our findings point towards the usefulness of a practical CIA implementation, as it yields a non-negligible performance for the secondary system, while providing interference shielding to the primary receiver.

  2. Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial of Amitriptyline for Analgesia in Painful HIV-Associated Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dinat, Natalya; Marinda, Edmore; Moch, Shirra; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Kamerman, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study at a single center in South Africa, to ascertain whether amitriptyline is an effective analgesic for painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy of moderate to severe intensity in: i) antiretroviral drug naive individuals, and ii) antiretroviral drug users. 124 HIV-infected participants (antiretroviral drug naive = 62, antiretroviral drug users = 62) who met the study criteria for painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy were randomized to once-daily oral amitriptyline (titrated to a median: interquartile range of 50: 25-50 mg) or placebo for six weeks, followed by a three-week washout period and subsequent treatment crossover. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline in worst pain intensity of the feet (measured by participant self-report using an 11-point numerical pain rating scale) after six weeks of treatment. 122 of 124 participants completed all study visits and were included in the analysis of the primary outcome. In the antiretroviral drug-naive group (n = 61) there was no significant difference in the mean change in pain score from baseline after six weeks of treatment with placebo or amitriptyline [amitriptyline: 2.8 (SD 3.3) vs. placebo: 2.8 (3.4)]. Similarly, there was no significant difference in the change in pain score after six weeks of treatment with placebo or amitriptyline in the antiretroviral drug-user group (n = 61) [amitriptyline: 2.7 (3.3) vs. placebo: 2.1 (2.8)]. Controlling for period effects and treatment order effects did not alter the outcome of the analyses. Nor did analyzing the intention-to-treat cohort (missing data interpolated using baseline observation carried forward) alter the outcome of the analyses. In summary, amitriptyline, at the doses used here, was no more effective than an inactive placebo at reducing pain intensity in individuals with painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy of moderate to severe intensity, irrespective of whether they were on antiretroviral therapy or not. Trial Registration ISRCTN 54452526 PMID:25974287

  3. Utilization and Fairness in Spectrum Assignment for Opportunistic Spectrum Access

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Ben Y.

    1 Utilization and Fairness in Spectrum Assignment for Opportunistic Spectrum Access Chunyi Peng, Haitao Zheng, Ben Y. Zhao Abstract--- The Open Spectrum approach to spectrum access can achieve near­optimal utilization by allowing devices to sense and utilize available spectrum opportunistically. However, a naive

  4. Exploiting and Defending Opportunistic Scheduling in Cellular Data Networks

    E-print Network

    Chen, Hao

    Exploiting and Defending Opportunistic Scheduling in Cellular Data Networks Radmilo Racic, Denys Ma, Hao Chen, Member, IEEE, and Xin Liu, Member, IEEE Abstract--Third Generation (3G) cellular networks broadband services. Under fairness and QoS constraints, they use opportunistic scheduling to efficiently

  5. Opportunistic Strategies for Lightweight Signal Processing for Body Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    for wearable signal processing, but it allows for opportunistic sensing strategies, in which many networks, opportunistic sensing, health monitoring, wearable computing, energy expenditure, physical of our BSN platform, which is now based on a smartphone running the Android operating system. We propose

  6. Novel p75 neurotrophin receptor ligand stabilizes neuronal calcium, preserves mitochondrial movement and protects against HIV associated neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meeker, Rick B; Poulton, Winona; Clary, Gillian; Schriver, Michael; Longo, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) rapidly penetrates into the brain and establishes a persistent infection of macrophages/microglia. Activation of these cells by HIV results in the secretion of soluble factors that destabilize neuronal calcium homeostasis, encourage oxidative stress and result in neural damage. This damage is thought to underlie the cognitive-motor dysfunction that develops in many HIV-infected patients. Studies have suggested that neurotrophins may protect neurons from the toxic effects of HIV-associated proteins. To better understand the pathogenic mechanisms and the neuroprotective potential of neurotrophin ligands, we evaluated neuronal damage, calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial functions after exposure of cultured rat neurons directly to HIV gp120 or to conditioned medium from human monocyte-derived macrophages treated with gp120. We then assessed the ability of a new non-peptide p75 neurotrophin receptor ligand, LM11A-31, to stabilize calcium homeostasis and prevent the development of pathology. Each toxic challenge resulted in a delayed accumulation of intracellular calcium coupled to a decrease in the rate of calcium clearance from the cell. The delayed calcium accumulation correlated with the development of focal dendritic swellings (beading), cytoskeletal damage and impaired movement of mitochondria. Addition of LM11A-31 to the cultures at nanomolar concentrations eliminated cell death, significantly reduced the pathology, suppressed the delayed accumulation of calcium and restored mitochondrial movements. The potent neuroprotection and the stabilization of calcium homeostasis indicate that LM11A-31 may have excellent potential for the treatment of HIV-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:26424436

  7. Directional navigation improves opportunistic communication for emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kokuti, Andras; Gelenbe, Erol

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel direction based shortest path search algorithm to guide evacuees during an emergency. It uses opportunistic communications (oppcomms) with low-cost wearable mobile nodes that can exchange packets at close range of a few to some tens of meters without help of an infrastructure. The algorithm seeks the shortest path to exits which are safest with regard to a hazard, and is integrated into an autonomous Emergency Support System (ESS) to guide evacuees in a built environment. The algorithm proposed that ESSs are evaluated with the DBES (Distributed Building Evacuation Simulator) by simulating a shopping centre where fire is spreading. The results show that the directional path finding algorithm can offer significant improvements for the evacuees. PMID:25140633

  8. Directional Navigation Improves Opportunistic Communication for Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Kokuti, Andras.; Gelenbe, Erol.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel direction based shortest path search algorithm to guide evacuees during an emergency. It uses opportunistic communications (oppcomms) with low-cost wearable mobile nodes that can exchange packets at close range of a few to some tens of meters without help of an infrastructure. The algorithm seeks the shortest path to exits which are safest with regard to a hazard, and is integrated into an autonomous Emergency Support System (ESS) to guide evacuees in a built environment. The algorithm proposed that ESSs are evaluated with the DBES (Distributed Building Evacuation Simulator) by simulating a shopping centre where fire is spreading. The results show that the directional path finding algorithm can offer significant improvements for the evacuees. PMID:25140633

  9. Antibiotic resistance in the opportunistic pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, María B.

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an environmental bacterium found in the soil, associated with plants and animals, and in aquatic environments. It is also an opportunistic pathogen now causing an increasing number of nosocomial infections. The treatment of S. maltophilia is quite difficult given its intrinsic resistance to a number of antibiotics, and because it is able to acquire new resistances via horizontal gene transfer and mutations. Certainly, strains resistant to quinolones, cotrimoxale and/or cephalosporins—antibiotics commonly used to treat S. maltophilia infections—have emerged. The increasing number of available S. maltophilia genomes has allowed the identification and annotation of a large number of antimicrobial resistance genes. Most encode inactivating enzymes and efflux pumps, but information on their role in intrinsic and acquired resistance is limited. Non-typical antibiotic resistance mechanisms that also form part of the intrinsic resistome have been identified via mutant library screening. These include non-typical antibiotic resistance genes, such as bacterial metabolism genes, and non-inheritable resistant phenotypes, such as biofilm formation and persistence. Their relationships with resistance are complex and require further study. PMID:26175724

  10. Antibiotic resistance in the opportunistic pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María B

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an environmental bacterium found in the soil, associated with plants and animals, and in aquatic environments. It is also an opportunistic pathogen now causing an increasing number of nosocomial infections. The treatment of S. maltophilia is quite difficult given its intrinsic resistance to a number of antibiotics, and because it is able to acquire new resistances via horizontal gene transfer and mutations. Certainly, strains resistant to quinolones, cotrimoxale and/or cephalosporins-antibiotics commonly used to treat S. maltophilia infections-have emerged. The increasing number of available S. maltophilia genomes has allowed the identification and annotation of a large number of antimicrobial resistance genes. Most encode inactivating enzymes and efflux pumps, but information on their role in intrinsic and acquired resistance is limited. Non-typical antibiotic resistance mechanisms that also form part of the intrinsic resistome have been identified via mutant library screening. These include non-typical antibiotic resistance genes, such as bacterial metabolism genes, and non-inheritable resistant phenotypes, such as biofilm formation and persistence. Their relationships with resistance are complex and require further study. PMID:26175724

  11. Toxicity of Amphotericin B Deoxycholate-Based Induction Therapy in Patients with HIV-Associated Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Christian; Loyse, Angela; Brouwer, Annemarie E.; Muzoora, Conrad; Taseera, Kabanda; Jackson, Arthur; Phulusa, Jacob; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; van der Horst, Charles; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; White, Nicholas J.; Wilson, Douglas; Wood, Robin; Meintjes, Graeme; Harrison, Thomas S.; Jarvis, Joseph N.

    2015-01-01

    Amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmBd) is the recommended induction treatment for HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis (CM). Its use is hampered by toxicities that include electrolyte abnormalities, nephrotoxicity, and anemia. Protocols to minimize toxicity are applied inconsistently. In a clinical trial cohort of AmBd-based CM induction treatment, a standardized protocol of preemptive hydration and electrolyte supplementation was applied. Changes in blood counts, electrolyte levels, and creatinine levels over 14 days were analyzed in relation to the AmBd dose, treatment duration (short course of 5 to 7 days or standard course of 14 days), addition of flucytosine (5FC), and outcome. In the 368 patients studied, the hemoglobin levels dropped by a mean of 1.5 g/dl (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0 to 1.9 g/dl) following 7 days of AmBd and by a mean of 2.3 g/dl (95% CI, 1.1 to 3.6 g/dl) after 14 days. Serum creatinine levels increased by 37 ?mol/liter (95% CI, 30 to 45 ?mol/liter) by day 7 and by 49 ?mol/liter (95% CI, 35 to 64?mol/liter) by day 14 of AmBd treatment. Overall, 33% of patients developed grade III/IV anemia, 5.6% developed grade III hypokalemia, 9.5% had creatinine levels that exceeded 220 ?mol, and 6% discontinued AmBd prematurely. The addition of 5FC was associated with a slight increase in anemia but not neutropenia. Laboratory abnormalities stabilized or reversed during the second week in patients on short-course induction. Grade III/IV anemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.3; P = 0.028) and nephrotoxicity (aOR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.8 to 11; P = 0.001) were risk factors for 10-week mortality. In summary, routine intravenous saline hydration and preemptive electrolyte replacement during AmBd-based induction regimens for HIV-associated CM minimized the incidence of hypokalemia and nephrotoxicity. Anemia remained a concerning adverse effect. The addition of flucytosine was not associated with increased neutropenia. Shorter AmBd courses were less toxic, with rapid reversibility. PMID:26349818

  12. Toxicity of Amphotericin B Deoxycholate-Based Induction Therapy in Patients with HIV-Associated Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bicanic, Tihana; Bottomley, Christian; Loyse, Angela; Brouwer, Annemarie E; Muzoora, Conrad; Taseera, Kabanda; Jackson, Arthur; Phulusa, Jacob; Hosseinipour, Mina C; van der Horst, Charles; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; White, Nicholas J; Wilson, Douglas; Wood, Robin; Meintjes, Graeme; Harrison, Thomas S; Jarvis, Joseph N

    2015-12-01

    Amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmBd) is the recommended induction treatment for HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis (CM). Its use is hampered by toxicities that include electrolyte abnormalities, nephrotoxicity, and anemia. Protocols to minimize toxicity are applied inconsistently. In a clinical trial cohort of AmBd-based CM induction treatment, a standardized protocol of preemptive hydration and electrolyte supplementation was applied. Changes in blood counts, electrolyte levels, and creatinine levels over 14 days were analyzed in relation to the AmBd dose, treatment duration (short course of 5 to 7 days or standard course of 14 days), addition of flucytosine (5FC), and outcome. In the 368 patients studied, the hemoglobin levels dropped by a mean of 1.5 g/dl (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0 to 1.9 g/dl) following 7 days of AmBd and by a mean of 2.3 g/dl (95% CI, 1.1 to 3.6 g/dl) after 14 days. Serum creatinine levels increased by 37 ?mol/liter (95% CI, 30 to 45 ?mol/liter) by day 7 and by 49 ?mol/liter (95% CI, 35 to 64?mol/liter) by day 14 of AmBd treatment. Overall, 33% of patients developed grade III/IV anemia, 5.6% developed grade III hypokalemia, 9.5% had creatinine levels that exceeded 220 ?mol, and 6% discontinued AmBd prematurely. The addition of 5FC was associated with a slight increase in anemia but not neutropenia. Laboratory abnormalities stabilized or reversed during the second week in patients on short-course induction. Grade III/IV anemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.3; P = 0.028) and nephrotoxicity (aOR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.8 to 11; P = 0.001) were risk factors for 10-week mortality. In summary, routine intravenous saline hydration and preemptive electrolyte replacement during AmBd-based induction regimens for HIV-associated CM minimized the incidence of hypokalemia and nephrotoxicity. Anemia remained a concerning adverse effect. The addition of flucytosine was not associated with increased neutropenia. Shorter AmBd courses were less toxic, with rapid reversibility. PMID:26349818

  13. Opportunistic yeast infections: candidiasis, cryptococcosis, trichosporonosis and geotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-González, Denisse; Perusquía-Ortiz, Ana María; Hundeiker, Max; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2013-05-01

    Opportunistic yeast infections are diseases caused by fungi which normally are saprophytic and do not cause disease in humans or animals. The prevalence of these diseases has been increasing due to immunosuppressive, corticosteroid, and long-term antibiotic treatment following organ transplantation or after serious metabolic, hematological, or immunological diseases. We review epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of the four "big" opportunistic yeast infections: candidiasis, cryptococcosis, trichosporonosis, and geotrichosis. PMID:23621330

  14. The role of opportunistic migration in cyclic games.

    PubMed

    Buesser, Pierre; Tomassini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We study cyclic evolutionary games in a spatial diluted grid environment in which agents strategically interact locally but can also opportunistically move to other positions within a given migration radius. We find that opportunistic migration can inverse the cyclic prevalence between the strategies when the frequency of random imitation is large enough compared to the payoff-driven imitation. At the transition the average size of the patterns diverges and this threatens diversity of strategies. PMID:24892660

  15. Gene expression profiles and protein–protein interaction network analysis in AIDS patients with HIV-associated encephalitis and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Shityakov, Sergey; Dandekar, Thomas; Förster, Carola

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system dysfunction is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and acquired immunodeficiency virus syndrome (AIDS). Patients with AIDS are usually affected by HIV-associated encephalitis (HIVE) with viral replication limited to cells of monocyte origin. To examine the molecular mechanisms underlying HIVE-induced dementia, the GSE4755 Affymetrix data were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database and the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the samples from AIDS patients with and without apparent features of HIVE-induced dementia were identified. In addition, protein–protein interaction networks were constructed by mapping DEGs into protein–protein interaction data to identify the pathways that these DEGs are involved in. The results revealed that the expression of 1,528 DEGs is mainly involved in the immune response, regulation of cell proliferation, cellular response to inflammation, signal transduction, and viral replication cycle. Heat-shock protein alpha, class A member 1 (HSP90AA1), and fibronectin 1 were detected as hub nodes with degree values >130. In conclusion, the results indicate that HSP90A and fibronectin 1 play important roles in HIVE pathogenesis. PMID:26604827

  16. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Theranostic quantum dots for crossing blood–brain barrier in vitro and providing therapy of HIV-associated encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gaixia; Mahajan, Supriya; Roy, Indrajit; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological checkpoint that restricts the free diffusion of circulating molecules from the blood into the central nervous system. Delivering of drugs and other active agents across the BBB is one of the major technical challenges faced by scientists and medical practitioners. Therefore, development of novel methodologies to address this challenge holds the key for both the diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases, such as HIV-associated encephalopathy. Bioconjugated quantum dots (QDs) are excellent fluorescent probes and nano-vectors, being designed to transverse across the BBB and visualize drug delivery inside the brain. This paper discusses the use of functionalized QDs for crossing the blood–brain barrier and treating brain disease. We highlight the guidelines for using in vitro BBB models for brain disease studies. The theranostic QDs offers a strategy to significantly improve the effective dosages of drugs to transverse across the BBB and orientate to the targets inside the brain. PMID:24298256

  18. HIV-1 gp120 induces antioxidant response element-mediated expression in primary astrocytes: Role in HIV associated neurocognitive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Pichili Vijaya Bhaskar; Gandhi, Nimisha; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Saiyed, Zainulabedin; Agudelo, Marisela; Yndart, Adriana; Khatavkar, Pradnya; Nair, Madhavan PN

    2011-01-01

    HIV infection affects the central nervous system resulting in HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), which is characterized by depression, behavioral and motor dysfunctions. The HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp120 is known to induce the release of neurotoxic factors which lead to apoptotic cell death. Although the exact mechanisms involved in HIV-1 gp120-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, oxidative stress is suggested to play a vital role in the neuropathogenesis of HAND. Astrocytes represent major population of the non-neuronal cell type in the brain and play a critical role in the neuropathogenesis of HAND. Increased oxidative stress is known to induce nuclear factor erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor which is known to regulate the antioxidant defensive mechanism. However, the role of Nrf2 in HAND has not been elucidated. We report that gp120 significantly upregulates Nrf2 in human astrocytes and is associated with stimulation of key antioxidant defensive enzymes Hemoxygenase (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone1 (Nqo1). Pretreatment of the astrocytes with antioxidants or a specific calcium chelator BAPTA-AM, significantly blocked the upregulation of Nrf2, HO-1 and Nqo1. These results suggest a possible role of the intracellular calcium and oxidative stress in Nrf2 mediated antioxidant defense mechanism, which may have protective role in promoting cell survival. PMID:21756955

  19. Planning deficits in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders: component processes, cognitive correlates, and implications for everyday functioning.

    PubMed

    Cattie, Jordan E; Doyle, Katie; Weber, Erica; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2012-01-01

    Executive dysfunction remains among the most prevalent cognitive domains impaired in persons with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). However, little is known specifically about the cognitive architecture or everyday functioning implications of planning, which is an aspect of executive functions involving the identification, organization, and completion of sequential behaviours toward the accomplishment of a goal. The current study examined these issues using the Tower of London(DX) in 53 individuals with HAND, 109 HIV-infected persons without HAND, and 82 seronegative participants. The HAND+ group performed significantly more poorly than HIV-infected individuals without HAND on number of correct moves, total moves, execution time, time violations, and rule violations. Within the HIV+ group as a whole, greater total move scores and rule violations were most strongly associated with executive dysfunction. Of clinical relevance, elevated total moves and rule violations were significant, independent predictors of self-reported declines in instrumental activities of daily living and unemployment status in HIV. These results suggest that planning accuracy, efficiency, and rule-bound control are impaired in HAND and may meaningfully affect more cognitively complex aspects of everyday living. PMID:22731608

  20. Modeling HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in mice: new approaches in the changing face of HIV neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Laura B.; Nath, Avindra

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) leads to immune suppression. Less well known is the fact that long-term, progressive HIV disease is associated with the development of cognitive deficits. Since the introduction of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), the clinical presentation of HIV infection has evolved into a chronic illness with very low levels of viral replication and chronic immune activation, with compliant affected individuals surviving for decades with a high quality of life. Despite these advances, many HIV-infected individuals develop some degree of neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are not well understood, and there are no effective treatments. Thus, there is an unmet need for animal models that enable the study of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and the testing of new therapeutic approaches to combat them. Here, we review the pros and cons of existing mouse models of HIV infection for addressing these aims and propose a detailed strategy for developing a new mouse model of HIV infection. PMID:22563057

  1. Methamphetamine and Inflammatory Cytokines Increase Neuronal Na+/K+-ATPase Isoform 3: Relevance for HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Buescher, James L.; Fox, Howard S.

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse in conjunction with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exacerbates neuropathogenesis and accelerates neurocognitive impairments in the central nervous system (CNS), collectively termed HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND). Since both HIV and METH have been implicated in altering the synaptic architecture, this study focused on investigating alterations in synaptic proteins. Employing a quantitative proteomics approach on synaptosomes isolated from the caudate nucleus from two groups of rhesus monkeys chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) differing by one regimen, METH treatment, we identified the neuron specific Na+/K+-ATPase alpha 1 isoform 3 (ATP1A3) to be up regulated after METH treatment, and validated its up regulation by METH in vitro. Further studies on signaling mechanisms revealed that the activation of ATP1A3 involves the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Given its function in maintaining ionic gradients and emerging role as a signaling molecule, changes in ATP1A3 yields insights into the mechanisms associated with HAND and interactions with drugs of abuse. PMID:22662178

  2. Microbiology of HIV associated bacteraemia and diarrhoea in adults from Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, B I; Kimari, J N; Brindle, R J

    1996-08-01

    We undertook a retrospective descriptive comparison of the spectrum of pathogens responsible for bacteraemia and diarrhoea in HIV antibody positive and negative patients over 4 years (1988-92), in Nairobi, Kenya. The study population was recruited from primary to tertiary centres of clinical care and consisted of 2858 adults (15 years or older). There were 415 significant blood culture isolates, 192 from 1785 HIV negative patients and 223 from 953 HIV positive patients. There were 233 significant faecal isolates, 22 from 115 HIV negative patients and 211 from 531 HIV positive patients. The most common pathogens detected in blood were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium and in faeces Shigella flexneri, S. typhimurium and Cryptosporidium parvum. The agents causing illness in HIV positive patients in Nairobi are similar to those prevalent in the HIV negative community and the investigation of a febrile illness with or without diarrhoea in an HIV positive patient should reflect this. PMID:8760961

  3. A Cohort Pilot Study on HIV-Associated Neuropsychological Impairments in Hemophilia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Silvia; Cutica, Ilaria; Krampe, Caspar; Reinecke, Laura F.; Russell-Edu, William; Santoro, Cristina; Rocino, Angiola; Santagostino, Elena; Rusconi, Vega; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the management of HIV infection with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, it is well known that HIV can directly infect the central nervous system and, as a result of such infection, neuropsychological impairments can be manifested. In this study, we tried to determine whether seropositivity was associated with a poor neuropsychological performance in patients with hemophilia and HIV. Such a cohort of patients is very often underrepresented and understudied in the HIV literature. To amend such a gap, we carried out an extensive neuropsychological evaluation on these patients, and compared their performance with that of a group of seronegative hemophilia patients. The results revealed that HIV infection in HIV-seropositive (HIV+) hemophilia patients was associated with deficits in attention, short-term memory, abstraction, and visual recognition. Such results are still preliminary and explorative due to the small cohort of patients enrolled. However, the results do seem to have some important implications for day-to-day functioning, as the level of impairment detected may cause difficulties in completing common everyday tasks such as maintaining adherence to complex medication regimens or maintaining social life activities. Continued research into the mechanisms related to HIV and neurocognitive dysfunction may provide targets for interventions that could have meaningful consequences in the real world for HIV hemophilia patients. PMID:26082706

  4. A Degenerative Retinal Process in HIV-Associated Non-Infectious Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, William R.; Sprague, L. James; Gomez, Maria Laura; Cheng, Lingyun; El-Emam, Sharif; Mojana, Francesca; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Bosten, Jenny; Ayyagari, Radha; Hardiman, Gary

    2013-01-01

    HIV retinopathy is the most common non-infectious complication in the eyes of HIV-positive individuals. Oncotic lesions in the retinal nerve fiber layer, referred to as cotton wool spots (CWS), and intraretinal (IR) hemorrhages are frequently observed but are not unique to this pathology. HIV-positive patients have impaired color vision and contrast sensitivity, which worsens with age. Evidence of inner–retinal lesions and damage have been documented ophthalmoscopically, however their long term structural effect has not been investigated. It has been hypothesized that they may be partially responsible for loss of visual function and visual field. In this study we utilized clinical data, retinal imaging and transcriptomics approaches to comprehensively interrogate non-infectious HIV retinopathy. The methods employed encompassed clinical examinations, fundus photography, indirect ophthalmoscopy, Farmsworth-Munsell 100 hue discrimination testing and Illumina BeadChip analyses. Here we show that changes in the outer retina, specifically in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor outer segments (POS) contribute to vision changes in non-infectious HIV retinopathy. We find that in HIV-positive retinae there is an induction of rhodopsin and other transcripts (including PDE6A, PDE6B, PDE6G, CNGA1, CNGB1, CRX, NRL) involved in visual transduction, as well as structural components of the rod photoreceptors (ABCA4 and ROM1). This is consistent with an increased rate of renewal of rod outer segments induced via increased phagocytosis by HIV-infected RPE previously reported in culture. Cone-specific transcripts (OPN1SW, OPN1LW, PDE6C, PDE6H and GRK7) are uniformly downregulated in HIV positive retina, likely due to a partial loss of cone photoreceptors. Active cotton wool spots and intraretinal hemorrhages (IRH) may not affect photoreceptors directly and the interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients. PMID:24069333

  5. Opportunistic Infections in Patients with HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Sekioka, Toshio; Usui, Masakatsu

    2015-01-01

    As an acquired immunodeficiency, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is primarily responsible for opportunistic infections in infected patients. However, opportunistic infections also occur in individuals with human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here, we report opportunistic infections in two Japanese HTLV-1-seropositive patients. The first patient was a 67-year-old male, who had cytomegalovirus infection associated with esophagogastritis and terminal ileitis. The patient was HTLV-1-positive and was diagnosed with smoldering adult T cell leukemia (ATL). High levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R; 4,304?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (75.5%) in peripheral blood were also detected. The second patient was a 78-year-old female, a known asymptomatic HTLV-1 carrier, who presented with persistent herpes zoster, followed by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Disease progression of smoldering ATL along opportunistic infections was observed with very high levels of serum sIL-2R (14,058?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (87.2%) in peripheral blood. In patients with suspected opportunistic infections, both HTLV-1 and HIV should be considered. In HTLV-1-positive patients, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ T cell subset may have its value as a prognostic marker. PMID:26693362

  6. Opportunistic Infections in Patients with HTLV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Sekioka, Toshio; Usui, Masakatsu; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2015-01-01

    As an acquired immunodeficiency, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is primarily responsible for opportunistic infections in infected patients. However, opportunistic infections also occur in individuals with human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here, we report opportunistic infections in two Japanese HTLV-1-seropositive patients. The first patient was a 67-year-old male, who had cytomegalovirus infection associated with esophagogastritis and terminal ileitis. The patient was HTLV-1-positive and was diagnosed with smoldering adult T cell leukemia (ATL). High levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R; 4,304?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (75.5%) in peripheral blood were also detected. The second patient was a 78-year-old female, a known asymptomatic HTLV-1 carrier, who presented with persistent herpes zoster, followed by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Disease progression of smoldering ATL along opportunistic infections was observed with very high levels of serum sIL-2R (14,058?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (87.2%) in peripheral blood. In patients with suspected opportunistic infections, both HTLV-1 and HIV should be considered. In HTLV-1-positive patients, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ T cell subset may have its value as a prognostic marker. PMID:26693362

  7. Opportunistic MSPA Demonstration #1: Final Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, D. S.; Finley, S. G.; Heckman, D. P.; Lay, N. E.; Lush, C. M.; MacNeal, B. E.

    2015-02-01

    The Opportunistic Multiple Spacecraft Per Antenna (OMSPA) concept seeks to provide smallsat missions with a low-attributed-aperture-fee technique for obtaining routine downlink in a manner that is very low cost to the Deep Space Network (DSN). Unlike traditional MSPA in which the number of spacecraft that can be supported is limited by the number of available receivers, OMSPA makes use of a digital recorder at each station that is capable of capturing IF signals from every spacecraft in the antenna beam within the frequency bands of interest. When smallsat missions see one or more opportunities to intercept the traditionally scheduled antenna beam of a "host" spacecraft, they can transmit open loop during those opportunities. Via a secure Internet site, the smallsat mission operators can then retrieve relevant portions of the digital recording for subsequent demodulation and decoding or subscribe to a service that does it for them. The demonstration discussed in this article was intended to provide prospective smallsat users and the DSN, as the prospective service provider, with demonstrable proof that the OMSPA concept is, in fact, an operationally viable means for obtaining routine downlink telemetry. To do this, the demonstration began by treating Mars Odyssey as a "smallsat" and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) as the "host" spacecraft. Using a specially created Beam Intercept Planning System (BIPS) and a DSN 7-Day Schedule Cross-Comparison (7-DSC) tool, opportunities were identified when Mars Odyssey would be transmitting while in MRO's ground antenna beam. Existing Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receivers (VSRs) were used to record the Mars Odyssey downlink telemetry during these opportunities. The recordings were played back to a secure server outside the Flight Operations Network firewall, but inside the JPL firewall. The demonstration team's signal processing personnel retrieved the recordings from this secure server and downloaded them to a workstation containing an OMSPA Software Demodulator (OSD) tool that was developed to demodulate and decode the Mars Odyssey signal. Validation of the recovered data was then accomplished by comparing the transfer frames obtained through OMSPA with those recovered via Mars Odyssey's formally scheduled downlink. The demonstration successfully achieved its intended purpose. All of the above steps were accomplished within an operationally viable timeframe, with at least 99.95 percent of the transfer frames being successfully recovered from each demonstration recording.

  8. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tudor J.C.; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D.; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W.; Williams, Amanda C. de C.; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L.H.; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7 day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n = 28), of whom 75% (n = 21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN. PMID:24973717

  9. Neuroinflammation-Induced Interactions between Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Proprotein Convertases in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, WooJin; Zekas, Erin; Lodge, Robert; Susan-Resiga, Delia; Marcinkiewicz, Edwidge; Essalmani, Rachid; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Asahchop, Eugene; Gelman, Benjamin; Cohen, Éric A; Power, Christopher; Hollenberg, Morley D; Seidah, Nabil G

    2015-11-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) furin, PC5, PACE4, and PC7 cleave secretory proteins after basic residues, including the HIV envelope glycoprotein (gp160) and Vpr. We evaluated the abundance of PC mRNAs in postmortem brains of individuals exhibiting HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), likely driven by neuroinflammation and neurotoxic HIV proteins (e.g., envelope and Vpr). Concomitant with increased inflammation-related gene expression (interleukin-1? [IL-1?]), the mRNA levels of the above PCs are significantly increased, together with those of the proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), an inflammation-associated receptor that is cleaved by thrombin at ProArg41? (where the down arrow indicates the cleavage location), and potentially by PCs at Arg41XXXXArg46?. The latter motif in PAR1, but not its R46A mutant, drives its interactions with PCs. Indeed, PAR1 upregulation leads to the inhibition of membrane-bound furin, PC5B, and PC7 and inhibits gp160 processing and HIV infectivity. Additionally, a proximity ligation assay revealed that furin and PC7 interact with PAR1. Reciprocally, increased furin expression reduces the plasma membrane abundance of PAR1 by trapping it in the trans-Golgi network. Furthermore, soluble PC5A/PACE4 can target/disarm cell surface PAR1 through cleavage at Arg46?. PACE4/PC5A decreased calcium mobilization induced by thrombin stimulation. Our data reveal a new PC-PAR1-interaction pathway, which offsets the effects of HIV-induced neuroinflammation, viral infection, and potentially the development of HAND. PMID:26283733

  10. Interactive effects of cocaine on HIV infection: implication in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder and neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Santosh; Chitti, Sai V. P.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.; Saxena, Shailendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial epidemiological studies suggest that not only, being one of the reasons for the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but drug abuse also serves its role in determining the disease progression and severity among the HIV infected population. This article focuses on the drug cocaine, and its role in facilitating entry of HIV into the CNS and mechanisms of development of neurologic complications in infected individuals. Cocaine is a powerfully addictive central nervous system stimulating drug, which increases the level of neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) in the brain, by blocking the dopamine transporters (DAT) which is critical for DA homeostasis and neurocognitive function. Tat protein of HIV acts as an allosteric modulator of DAT, where as cocaine acts as reuptake inhibitor. When macrophages in the CNS are exposed to DA, their number increases. These macrophages release inflammatory mediators and neurotoxins, causing chronic neuroinflammation. Cocaine abuse during HIV infection enhances the production of platelet monocyte complexes (PMCs), which may cross transendothelial barrier, and result in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). HAND is characterized by neuroinflammation, including astrogliosis, multinucleated giant cells, and neuronal apoptosis that is linked to progressive virus infection and immune deterioration. Cocaine and viral proteins are capable of eliciting signaling transduction pathways in neurons, involving in mitochondrial membrane potential loss, oxidative stress, activation of JNK, p38, and ERK/MAPK pathways, and results in downstream activation of NF-?B that leads to HAND. Tat-induced inflammation provokes permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in the platelet dependent manner, which can potentially be the reason for progression to HAND during HIV infection. A better understanding on the role of cocaine in HIV infection can give a clue in developing novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection in cocaine using HIV infected population. PMID:26441868

  11. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tudor J C; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W; Williams, Amanda C de C; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L H; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K; Rice, Andrew S C

    2014-09-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n=28), of whom 75% (n=21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN. PMID:24973717

  12. Translational spatial task and its relationship to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and apolipoprotein E in HIV-seropositive women.

    PubMed

    Morales, Diana; Acevedo, Summer F; Skolasky, Richard L; Hechavarria, Rosa; Santiago, Sharon; De La Torre, Tania; Maldonado, Elizabeth; Wojna, Valerie

    2012-12-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continue to be a neurological complication of HIV infection in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy. Hippocampal neurodegeneration and dysfunction occurs as a result of HIV infection, but few studies to date have assesses spatial learning and memory function in patients with HAND. We used the Memory Island (MI) test to study the effects of HIV infection, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele status, and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) ApoE protein levels on spatial learning and memory in our cohort of Hispanic women. The MI test is a virtual reality-based computer program that tests spatial learning and memory and was designed to resemble the Morris Water Maze test of hippocampal function widely used in rodent studies. In the current study, HIV-seropositive women (n?=?20) and controls (n?=?16) were evaluated with neuropsychological (NP) tests, the MI test, ApoE, and CSF ApoE assays. On the MI, the HIV-seropositive group showed significant reduced learning and delayed memory performance compared with HIV-seronegative controls. When stratified by cognitive performance on NP tests, the HIV-seropositive, cognitively impaired group performed worse than HIV-seronegative controls in ability to learn and in the delayed memory trial. Interestingly, differences were observed in the results obtained by the NP tests and the MI test for ?4 carriers and noncarriers: NP tests showed effects of the ?4 allele in HIV-seronegative women but not HIV-seropositive ones, whereas the converse was true for the MI test. Our findings suggest that the MI test is sensitive in detecting spatial deficits in HIV-seropositive women and that these deficits may arise relatively early in the course of HAND. PMID:22972599

  13. Uncommon opportunistic fungal infections of oral cavity: A review

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, AG; Nair, Bindu J; Sivakumar, TT; Joseph, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    The majority of opportunistic oral mucosal fungal infections are due to Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus species. Mucor and Cryptococcus also have a major role in causing oral infections, whereas Geotrichum, Fusarium, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces and Penicillium marneffei are uncommon pathogens in the oral cavity. The broad spectrum of clinical presentation includes pseudo-membranes, abscesses, ulcers, pustules and extensive tissue necrosis involving bone. This review discusses various uncommon opportunistic fungal infections affecting the oral cavity including their morphology, clinical features and diagnostic methods. PMID:25328305

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) CD8+ T-Cells That Express Interferon-Gamma Contribute to HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Rachel D.; Hong, Suzi; Crescini, Melanie; Ellis, Ronald; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Spina, Celsa; Letendre, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continue to affect cognition and everyday functioning despite anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Previous studies focused on mechanisms related to monocyte/macrophage mediated inflammation. However, in the ART era, there is increasing evidence for the involvement of CD8+ T-cells in CNS pathogenesis. Methods To investigate the relationship between T-cell responses and neurocognitive impairment (NCI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell intracellular cytokine (IFN?, IL-2, TNF?) and lytic marker (CD107a) expression were assessed in HIV infected subjects who underwent comprehensive neurocognitive (NC) evaluation and either initiated or changed ART. Results Data were collected from 31 participants at 70 visits. The frequency of cytokine expressing T-cells in CSF was significantly higher than in peripheral blood for CD4+T-cells: TNF?, IL-2, IFN? and CD8+T-cells: IL-2 and IFN?. Analysis of T-cell activity and NCI as a function of CSF HIV RNA levels suggested a general association between NCI, high CSF CD8+ (but not CD4+T-cell) cytokine expression and CSF HIV RNA <103 copies/ml (p<0.0001). Specifically, CSF CD8+ T-cell IFN? expression correlated with severity of NCI (r = 0.57, p = 0.004). Multivariable analyses indicated that CSF CD8+T-cell IFN? and myeloid activation (CD163) contributed equally and independently to cognitive status and a composite variable produced the strongest correlation with NCI (r = 0.83, p = 0.0001). In contrast, CD8+ cytolytic activity (CD107a expression) was negatively correlated with NCI (p = 0.05) but was dependent on CD4 levels >400/?l and low CSF HIV RNA levels (<103 copies/ml). In our longitudinal analysis of 16 subjects, higher CSF CD8+IFN? expression at baseline predicted NC decline at follow-up (p = 0.02). Severity of NCI at follow-up correlated with level of residual HIV RNA in CSF. Conclusions Presence of IFN? expressing CD8+ T-cells, absence of cytolytic CD8+ T-cells, high myeloid activation, and failure of ART to suppress HIV replication in CSF contribute to increased risk of HAND. PMID:25719800

  15. Cytoplasmic HIV-RNA in monocytes determines microglial activation and neuronal cell death in HIV-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Faissner, Simon; Ambrosius, Björn; Schanzmann, Kirsten; Grewe, Bastian; Potthoff, Anja; Münch, Jan; Sure, Ulrich; Gramberg, Thomas; Wittmann, Sabine; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Uberla, Klaus; Gold, Ralf; Grunwald, Thomas; Chan, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Despite highly active antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are still highly prevalent. Direct neurotoxicity of microglia activated by HIV-infected monocytes independent from viral replication may account for this observation. To investigate underlying molecular and viral determinants, human monocytoid cells (U937) transduced with HIV-particles were co-cultured with primary human microglia or astrocytes. Using genetically-engineered HIV-particles key steps of infection were examined. Levels of pro-inflammatory/neurotoxic cytokines were investigated in co-culture supernatants by flow cytometry. Neurotoxicity mediated by the supernatants was analysed using primary cortical rat neurons. To corroborate our findings, cytokine profiles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of neuropsychologically asymptomatic HIV positive (HIV(+)) patients (n=45) were correlated with neurofilament H (NfH) as surrogate of neuronal/axonal degeneration. In contrast to direct exposure of HIV to microglia, only the presence of HIV-transduced monocytoid cells strongly activated human microglia as evidenced by enhanced secretion of CXCL10, CCL5, CCL2, and IL-6 (1.3-7.1-fold; p<0.01) leading to two-fold increased neurotoxicity (p<0.001). In direct comparison, astrocyte activation by HIV-transduced monocytoid cells was limited. Using different mutant HIV-particles we show that the presence of cytoplasmic HIV-RNA in monocytoid cells is the viral determinant for this unique microglial activation pattern and subsequent neuronal cell death; reverse transcription and expression of viral genes were not essential. In CSF of presymptomatic HIV(+) patients, CXCL10, CCL5 and IL-6 were correlated with NfH as surrogate marker of neurodegeneration as well as CSF-pleocytosis. In conclusion, cytosolic viral RNA in monocytes is mandatory for subsequent microglial activation and neurotoxicity; activated astrocytes may augment neuroinflammation. In addition, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration occur even in preclinical HIV(+) patients and are associated with cytokines regulated in vitro. Our data may aid in the development of biomarkers and glia-directed therapeutic approaches of HAND. PMID:25150097

  16. RESEARCH NEEDS FOR OPPORTUNISTIC PATHOGENS IN PREMISE PLUMBING

    EPA Science Inventory

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OBJECTIVES. The objectives of this project were to: 1.) Host an expert workshop to identify research needs for opportunistic premise (i.e., building) plumbing pathogens (OPPPs); 2.) With the assistance of the workshop participants, prepare this research repor...

  17. Mobile Data Offloading through Opportunistic Communications and Social Participation

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, Aravind

    trace. Moreover, to investigate the feasibility of opportunistic communications for mobile phones, we data traffic over cellular networks. We propose three algorithms, called Greedy, Heuristic, and Random, for this problem and evaluate their performance through an extensive trace-driven simulation study. Our simulation

  18. Opportunistic Source Coding for Data Gathering in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    1 Opportunistic Source Coding for Data Gathering in Wireless Sensor Networks Tao Cui, Lijun Chen capacity of multihop wireless networks, an important topic addressed by wireless sensor networks community for correlated data gathering in wireless sensor networks, which ex- ploits the broadcast nature of wireless

  19. Energy Efficiency of Opportunistic Routing with Unreliable Links

    E-print Network

    Jaffrès-Runser, Katia

    , Rongping Dong, Katia Jaffr`es-Runser Universit´e de Lyon, INRIA, INSA-Lyon, CITI, F-69621, FRANCE Dept: ruifeng.zhang, jean-marie.gorce, rongping.dong, katia.runser@insa-lyon.fr Abstract--During the last decadeEnergy Efficiency of Opportunistic Routing with Unreliable Links Ruifeng Zhang, Jean-Marie Gorce

  20. Hacking, Mashing, Gluing: A Study of Opportunistic Design and Development

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    1 Hacking, Mashing, Gluing: A Study of Opportunistic Design and Development Björn Hartmann, Scott and digital hot glue and duct tape. It is about the hacks and prototypes of lowbrow experimentation, hacking ACM Classification Keywords D.2.11. [Software Engineering]: Software Architectures -- Patterns. K

  1. Designing Opportunistic User Interfaces to Support a Collaborative Museum Exhibit

    E-print Network

    Lyons, Leilah

    Designing Opportunistic User Interfaces to Support a Collaborative Museum Exhibit Leilah Lyons-based museum exhibit. The sophisticated graphical capabilities of modern mobile devices have the potential, Dierking, Rennie, & Cohen Jones, 2004; Paris & Hapgood, 2002). By structuring exhibits to accommodate more

  2. Reproductive Endocrinology of a Free-Living, Opportunistically Breeding Passerine

    E-print Network

    Deviche, Pierre

    Reproductive Endocrinology of a Free-Living, Opportunistically Breeding Passerine (White in photoperiod and differences in the timing of breeding in different years correlate with the secretion in May­December 1994 and July 1998­August 1999. The birds were in breeding condition in May­July 1994

  3. A Distributed Opportunistic Scheduling Scheme for Wireless Network Coding

    E-print Network

    Leung, Kin K.

    Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK. 1 a.gkelias@imperial.ac.uk Abstract--Network coding (NC into account in the design of efficient network-coding aware scheduling algorithms that can maximizeA Distributed Opportunistic Scheduling Scheme for Wireless Network Coding Athanasios Gkelias #1

  4. Impact of Human Mobility on Opportunistic Forwarding Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Chaintreau, Augustin

    Impact of Human Mobility on Opportunistic Forwarding Algorithms Augustin Chaintreau, Pan Hui, Jon opportunities between wireless devices carried by humans. We observe that the distribution of the intercontact models. In this paper, we study how this newly uncovered characteristic of human mobility impacts one

  5. Analysis of Smartphone User Mobility Traces for Opportunistic Data Collection

    E-print Network

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    (temperature, humidity, etc.). In case that the sensor readings are not n sensor networks, we focus on using smartphones to col- lect data from sensor nodes opportunistically Mobility, Wireless Sensor Network, Data Collection 1. INTRODUCTION As wireless sensor networks mature, we

  6. OPPORTUNISTIC NETWORKS: THE CONCEPT AND RESEARCH CHALLENGES IN PRIVACY AND

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Ajay

    of Computer Science, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI 49008, USA 2. Affiliated with the Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS), Purdue University West Lafayette networks. One of us invented opportunistic sensor networks [3]. The idea was #12;2 later generalized by two

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, an Emergent Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Deligios, Massimo; Fraumene, Cristina; Abbondio, Marcello; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a yeast with valuable biotechnological features, has also been recorded as an emergent opportunistic pathogen that might cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of R. mucilaginosa strain C2.5t1, which was isolated from cacao seeds in Cameroon. PMID:25858834

  8. Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998 To avoid opportunistic infections, plants

    E-print Network

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Nature © Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998 8 To avoid opportunistic infections, plants and animals have peptide (relative molecular mass 4,000) from 50-g samples of psoriatic scales. Amino-acid sequence primers based on amino-acid sequence data, we generated the complete complementary DNA sequence from RNA

  9. OASIS: Onboard Autonomous Science Investigation System for Opportunistic Rover Science

    E-print Network

    Schaffer, Steven

    , uncovering profound new insights into Mars' current and past environment, the history of its rocks. Using the FIDO rover in the Mars Yard at JPL, we have successfully demonstrated a fully autonomous opportunistic science system. The closed loop system tests included the rover acquiring image data, finding

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, an Emergent Opportunistic Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Deligios, Massimo; Fraumene, Cristina; Abbondio, Marcello; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Uzzau, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a yeast with valuable biotechnological features, has also been recorded as an emergent opportunistic pathogen that might cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of R. mucilaginosa strain C2.5t1, which was isolated from cacao seeds in Cameroon. PMID:25858834

  11. What's Happening?: Promoting Community Awareness through Opportunistic, Peripheral Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Stasko, John T.

    What's Happening?: Promoting Community Awareness through Opportunistic, Peripheral Interfaces Qiang Atlanta, GA 30332-0280 USA +1 404 894 5617 stasko@cc.gatech.edu ABSTRACT Maintaining an awareness-supported cooperative work General Terms Algorithms, Design, Experimentation, Human Factors Keywords Community awareness

  12. What's Happening?: Promoting Community Awareness through Opportunistic, Peripheral Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Stasko, John T.

    community awareness in such situations. In particular, a large body of research in Computer SupportedWhat's Happening?: Promoting Community Awareness through Opportunistic, Peripheral Interfaces Qiang of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332-0280 USA +1 404 894 5617 stasko@cc.gatech.edu ABSTRACT Maintaining an awareness

  13. Some Help on the Way: Opportunistic Routing under Uncertainty

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, Eric

    of an entity or service, such as a rest stop or a refueling or recharging station while driving to a target are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full recommendations on waypoint candidates in an autonomous manner. RELATED WORK The problem of mobile opportunistic

  14. Opportunistic Interaction in the Challenged Internet of Things

    E-print Network

    Opportunistic Interaction in the Challenged Internet of Things Hanno Wirtz, Jan Rüth, Martin Serror with Augmented Reality (AR) interaction based on visual object recognition within the tangible interaction sphere ways for mobile users to interact with them. Contrary to their name, Internet of Things (IoT) devices

  15. Opportunistic Network Coding for Video Streaming over Wireless

    E-print Network

    Markopoulou, Athina

    Opportunistic Network Coding for Video Streaming over Wireless Hulya Seferoglu, Athina Markopoulou,athina}@uci.edu Abstract-- In this paper, we study video streaming over wireless networks with network coding capabilities the information content per transmission. Our key insight is that, when the transmitted flows are video streams

  16. Non-cytomegalovirus ocular opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gangaputra, Sapna; Drye, Lea; Vaidya, Vijay; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Jabs, Douglas A; Lyon, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the incidence and clinical outcomes of non-cytomegalovirus (non-CMV) ocular opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Design Multicenter, prospective, observational study of patients with AIDS Methods Medical history, ophthalmologic examination, and laboratory tests were performed at enrollment and every 6 months subsequently. Once an ocular opportunistic infection was diagnosed, patients were seen every 3 months for outcomes. Results At enrollment, 37 non-CMV ocular opportunistic infections were diagnosed: 16 patients, herpetic retinitis; 11 patients, toxoplasmic retinitis; and 10 patients, choroiditis. During the follow-up period, the estimated incidences (and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of these were: herpetic retinitis, 0.007/100 person-years (PY) (95% CI 0.0004, 0.039); toxoplasmic retinitis, 0.007/100 PY (95% CI 0.004, 0.039); and choroiditis 0.014/100 PY (95% CI 0.0025, 0.050). The mortality rates appeared higher among those patients with newly diagnosed or incident herpetic retinitis and choroiditis (rates=21.7 deaths/100 PY [P=0.02] and 12.8 deaths/100 PY [P=0.04]) respectively, than that for patients with AIDS without an ocular opportunistic infection (4.1 deaths/100 PY); Toxoplasmic retinitis did not appear to be associated with greater mortality (6.4/100 PY, P=0.47). Eyes with newly-diagnosed herpetic retinitis appeared to have a poor visual prognosis with high rates of visual impairment (37.9/100 PY) and blindness (17.5/100 PY), whereas those outcomes in eyes with choroiditis appeared to be lower (2.3/100 PY and 0/100 PY, respectively). Conclusions Although uncommon, non-CMV ocular opportunistic infections may be associated with high rates of visual loss and/or mortality. PMID:23068916

  17. Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success

    SciTech Connect

    Druzhinina, Irina S.; Seiboth, Verena Seidl; Estrella, Alfredo Herrera; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Kenerley, Charles M.; Monte, Enrique; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Zeilinger, Susanne; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2011-01-01

    Trichoderma is a genus of common filamentous fungi that display a remarkable range of lifestyles and interactions with other fungi, animals and plants. Because of their ability to antagonize plant-pathogenic fungi and to stimulate plant growth and defence responses, some Trichoderma strains are used for biological control of plant diseases. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in molecular ecology and genomics which indicate that the interactions of Trichoderma spp. with animals and plants may have evolved as a result of saprotrophy on fungal biomass (mycotrophy) and various forms of parasitism on other fungi (mycoparasitism), combined with broad environmental opportunism.

  18. Phaeohyphomycoses, Emerging Opportunistic Diseases in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmousavi, S.; Guillot, J.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging fungal diseases due to black yeasts and relatives in domestic or wild animals and in invertebrates or cold- and warm-blooded vertebrates are continually being reported, either as novel pathogens or as familiar pathogens affecting new species of hosts. Different epidemiological situations can be distinguished, i.e., occurrence as single infections or as zoonoses, and infection may occur sporadically in otherwise healthy hosts. Such infections are found mostly in mammals but also in cold-blooded animals, are frequently subcutaneous or cerebral, and bear much similarity to human primary disorders. Infections of the nervous system are mostly fatal, and the source and route of infection are currently unknown. A third epidemiological situation corresponds to pseudoepidemics, i.e., infection of a large host population due to a common source. It is often observed and generally hypothesized that the susceptible animals are under stress, e.g., due to poor housing conditions of mammals or to a change of basins in the case of fishes. The descriptions in this article represent an overview of the more commonly reported and recurring black fungi and the corresponding diseases in different types of animals. PMID:23297257

  19. Experience and challenges presented by a multicenter crossover study of combination analgesic therapy for the treatment of painful HIV-associated polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Taylor; Miyahara, Sachiko; Lee, Anthony; Evans, Scott; Bastow, Barbara; Simpson, David; Gilron, Ian; Dworkin, Robert; Daar, Eric S.; Wieclaw, Linda; Clifford, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is limited evidence for efficacy of analgesics as monotherapy for neuropathic pain associated with HIV-associated polyneuropathies, in spite of demonstrated efficacy in other neuropathic pain conditions. We evaluated the tolerability and analgesic efficacy of duloxetine, methadone, and the combination of duloxetine-methadone compared to placebo. Design This study was a phase II, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, four-period crossover multi-center study of analgesic therapy for patients with at least moderate neuropathic pain due to HIV-associated polyneuropathy. Duloxetine, methadone, combination duloxetine-methadone, and placebo were administered in four different possible sequences. The primary outcome measure was mean pain intensity (MPI) measured daily in a study-supplied pain diary. Results A total of 15 patients were enrolled from 8 study sites and 8 patients completed the entire trial. Study treatments failed to show statistically significant change in MPI compared to placebo. Adverse events were frequent and associated with high rates of drug discontinuation and study drop-out. Conclusions Challenges with participant recruitment and poor retention precluded trial completion to its planned targets, limiting our evaluation of the analgesic efficacy of the study treatments. Challenges to successful completion of this study and lessons learned are discussed. PMID:23565581

  20. Opportunistic Channel Scheduling for Ad Hoc Networks with Queue Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Wang, Yongchao

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a distributed opportunistic channel access strategy in ad hoc network is proposed. We consider the multiple sources contend for the transmission opportunity, the winner source decides to transmit or restart contention based on the current channel condition. Owing to real data assumption at all links, the decision still needs to consider the stability of the queues. We formulate the channel opportunistic scheduling as a constrained optimization problem which maximizes the system average throughput with the constraints that the queues of all links are stable. The proposed optimization model is solved by Lyapunov stability in queueing theory. The successive channel access problem is decoupled into single optimal stopping problem at every frame and solved with Lyapunov algorithm. The threshold for every frame is different, and it is derived based on the instantaneous queue information. Finally, computer simulations are conducted to demonstrate the validity of the proposed strategy.

  1. Bordetella holmesii: initial genomic analysis of an emerging opportunist

    PubMed Central

    Planet, Paul J.; Narechania, Apurva; Hymes, Saul R.; Gagliardo, Christina; Huard, Richard C.; Whittier, Susan; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Ratner, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii is an emerging opportunistic pathogen that causes respiratory disease in healthy individuals and invasive infections among patients lacking splenic function. We used 16S rRNA analysis to confirm B. holmesii as the cause of bacteremia in a child with sickle cell disease. Semiconductor-based draft genome sequencing provided insight into B. holmesii phylogeny and potential virulence mechanisms and also identified a toluene-4-monoxygenase locus unique among bordetellae. PMID:23620158

  2. Incidence, Clinical Spectrum, Risk Factors and Impact of HIV-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, Lewis John; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus Suleman; Mosam, Anisa; Moodley, Pravi; Parboosing, Raveen; Easterbrook, Philippa Jane

    2012-01-01

    Background Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a widely recognised complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART), but there are still limited data from resource-limited settings. Our objective was to characterize the incidence, clinical spectrum, risk factors and contribution to mortality of IRIS in two urban ART clinics in South Africa. Methods and Findings 498 adults initiating ART in Durban, South Africa were followed prospectively for 24 weeks. IRIS diagnosis was based on consensus expert opinion, and classified by mode of presentation (paradoxical worsening of known opportunistic infection [OI] or unmasking of subclinical disease). 114 patients (22.9%) developed IRIS (36% paradoxical, 64% unmasking). Mucocutaneous conditions accounted for 68% of IRIS events, mainly folliculitis, warts, genital ulcers and herpes zoster. Tuberculosis (TB) accounted for 25% of IRIS events. 18/135 (13.3%) patients with major pre-ART OIs (e.g. TB, cryptococcosis) developed paradoxical IRIS related to the same OI. Risk factors for this type of IRIS were baseline viral load >5.5 vs. <4.5 log10 (adjusted hazard ratio 7.23; 95% confidence interval 1.35–38.76) and ?30 vs. >30 days of OI treatment prior to ART (2.66; 1.16–6.09). Unmasking IRIS related to major OIs occurred in 25/498 patients (5.0%), and risk factors for this type of IRIS were baseline C-reactive protein ?25 vs. <25 mg/L (2.77; 1.31–5.85), haemoglobin <10 vs. >12 g/dL (3.36; 1.32–8.52), ?10% vs. <10% weight loss prior to ART (2.31; 1.05–5.11) and mediastinal lymphadenopathy on pre-ART chest x-ray (9.15; 4.10–20.42). IRIS accounted for 6/25 (24%) deaths, 13/65 (20%) hospitalizations and 10/35 (29%) ART interruptions or discontinuations. Conclusion IRIS occurred in almost one quarter of patients initiating ART, and accounted for one quarter of deaths in the first 6 months. Priority strategies to reduce IRIS-associated morbidity and mortality in ART programmes include earlier ART initiation before onset of advanced immunodeficiency, improved pre-ART screening for TB and cryptococcal infection, optimization of OI therapy prior to ART initiation, more intensive clinical monitoring in initial weeks of ART, and education of health care workers and patients about IRIS. PMID:23152745

  3. Adaptive phase rolling for opportunistic beamforming in OFDMA systems with a small number of users.

    PubMed

    Rim, Minjoong

    2014-01-01

    The performance of opportunistic beamforming might be degraded if the number of users is small. This paper proposes an adaptive opportunistic beamforming technique for orthogonal frequency division multiple access systems, which can produce good results even with a small number of users. This paper also proposes a modified proportional fairness scheduling algorithm, which can further improve the performance of the proposed opportunistic beamforming technique. PMID:24892062

  4. Adaptive Phase Rolling for Opportunistic Beamforming in OFDMA Systems with a Small Number of Users

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Minjoong

    2014-01-01

    The performance of opportunistic beamforming might be degraded if the number of users is small. This paper proposes an adaptive opportunistic beamforming technique for orthogonal frequency division multiple access systems, which can produce good results even with a small number of users. This paper also proposes a modified proportional fairness scheduling algorithm, which can further improve the performance of the proposed opportunistic beamforming technique. PMID:24892062

  5. The 12th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-12)

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Louis M.; Cushion, Melanie T.; Didier, Elizabeth; Xiao, Lihua; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Sinai, Anthony P.; Matos, Olga; Calderon, Enrique J.; Kaneshiro, Edna S.

    2013-01-01

    The 12th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-12) was held in August 2012 in Tarrytown, New York. The objectives of the IWOP meetings are to: (1) serve as a forum for exchange of new information among active researchers concerning the basic biology, molecular genetics, immunology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, drug development, therapy, and epidemiology of these immunodeficiency-associated pathogenic eukaryotic microorganisms that are seen in patients with AIDS and (2) foster the entry of new and young investigators into these underserved research areas. The IWOP meeting focuses on opportunistic protists, e.g. the free-living amoebae, Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, the Microsporidia, and kinetoplastid flagellates. This conference represents the major conference that brings together research groups working on these opportunistic pathogens. Slow but steady progress is being achieved on understanding the biology of these pathogenic organisms, their involvement in disease causation in both immune-deficient and immune-competent hosts, and is providing critical insights into these emerging and reemerging pathogens. This IWOP meeting demonstrated the importance of newly developed genomic level information for many of these pathogens and how analysis of such large data sets is providing key insights into the basic biology of these organisms. A great concern is the loss of scientific expertise and diversity in the research community due to the ongoing decline in research funding. This loss of researchers is due to the small size of many of these research communities and a lack of appreciation by the larger scientific community concerning the state of art and challenges faced by researchers working on these organisms. PMID:23560871

  6. Opportunistic Ports and Spaces of Exchange in Late Roman Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leidwanger, Justin

    2013-12-01

    Ports served not only as interfaces between land and sea, but as central gathering spaces for economic and cultural exchange. Drawing on case studies from the eastern Mediterranean island of Cyprus, this paper situates opportunistic ports lacking built facilities within a broader socioeconomic context of diverse maritime communications, expanding rural settlement, and increased agricultural productivity during late antiquity. Though simple, these sites served as active agents in the development of new maritime networks as well as local markets throughout their hinterlands, adding flexibility and dynamism to the economic ties between city, countryside, and the wider late Roman world.

  7. Treatment of pulmonary disease caused by opportunist mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Banks, J

    1989-01-01

    Opportunist mycobacterial infections localised to the chest may be treated with combinations of standard antimycobacterial drugs. The combination of rifampicin and ethambutol seems to be particularly effective, both in vivo and in vitro. In vitro sensitivity testing with single drugs may have a role in the future when the levels of in vitro resistance compatible with the clinical response to treatment are eventually established. Sensitivity testing against drugs in combination may prove useful for modifying treatment regimens in those patients who either fail to respond to initial chemotherapy or relapse. Further evidence on this will, it is hoped, emerge from the prospective studies currently in progress. PMID:2669223

  8. Psychological predictors of opportunistic snacking in the absence of hunger.

    PubMed

    Fay, Stephanie H; White, Melanie J; Finlayson, Graham; King, Neil A

    2015-08-01

    Increased frequency of eating in the absence of homeostatic need, notably through snacking, is an important contributor to overconsumption and may be facilitated by increased availability of palatable food in the obesogenic environment. Opportunistic initiation of snacking is likely to be subject to individual differences, although these are infrequently studied in laboratory-based research paradigms. This study examined psychological factors associated with opportunistic initiation of snacking, and predictors of intake in the absence of homeostatic need. Fifty adults (mean age 34.5years, mean BMI 23.9kg/m(2), 56% female) participated in a snack taste test in which they ate a chocolate snack to satiation, after which they were offered an unanticipated opportunity to initiate a second eating episode. Trait and behavioural measures of self control, sensitivity to reward, dietary restraint and disinhibited eating were taken. Results showed that, contrary to expectations, those who initiated snacking were better at inhibitory control compared with those who did not initiate. However, amongst participants who initiated snacking, intake (kcal) was predicted by higher food reward sensitivity, impulsivity and BMI. These findings suggest that snacking initiation in the absence of hunger is an important contributor to overconsumption. Consideration of the individual differences promoting initiation of eating may aid in reducing elevated eating frequency in at-risk individuals. PMID:26102429

  9. Common Cold

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  10. Opportunistic Vote Delegation for e-Voting based on Liquid Democracy

    E-print Network

    Opportunistic Vote Delegation for e-Voting based on Liquid Democracy [Work in Progress] Jó Ágila.bitsch|angel.tchorbadjiiski|klaus.wehrle}@rwth-aachen.de ABSTRACT We present an approach for implementing the liquid democracy concept in a secure, anonymous and publicly verifiable manner via opportunistic networks. Liquid democracy is gaining traction in open

  11. Lobby Influence: Opportunistic forwarding algorithm based on Human social relationship patterns

    E-print Network

    Tokarchuk, Laurissa

    1 Lobby Influence: Opportunistic forwarding algorithm based on Human social relationship patterns- Social Networks; forwarding algorithm; Opportunistic routing; Adhoc communication; Human relationships I. These methods are based on the assumption that there are individuals in the network that can play a central role

  12. MOAR: A Multi-channel Opportunistic Auto-rate Media Access Protocol for Ad Hoc Networks

    E-print Network

    Knightly, Edward W.

    at the physical (PHY) layer. Moreover, various auto rate adaptation mechanisms at the medium access layer haveMOAR: A Multi-channel Opportunistic Auto-rate Media Access Protocol for Ad Hoc Networks V. Kanodia- channel Opportunistic Auto Rate (MOAR), an enhanced MAC pro- tocol for multi-channel and multi-rate IEEE

  13. Friend or Flood? Social prevention of flooding attacks in mobile opportunistic networks

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Tristan

    Friend or Flood? Social prevention of flooding attacks in mobile opportunistic networks Iain Parris. In this paper we define a simple flooding attack that can deny service in an opportunistic network. We simulate untraceably flood the network with spoofed messages. As the available resources of participating devices (e

  14. MOON: MapReduce On Opportunistic eNvironments Virginia Tech

    E-print Network

    Ma, Xiaosong

    MOON: MapReduce On Opportunistic eNvironments Heshan Lin Virginia Tech hlin2@cs.vt.edu Xiaosong Ma this, we propose MOON, short for MapReduce On Opportunistic eNvironments. MOON extends Hadoop, an open, demonstrate that MOON can deliver a three-fold performance improvement to Hadoop in volatile, volunteer

  15. Spectrum-Sensing Opportunistic Wireless Relay Networks: Outage and Diversity Performance

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    Spectrum-Sensing Opportunistic Wireless Relay Networks: Outage and Diversity Performance Kyounghwan a spectrum-sensing opportunistic wire- less relay network which is defined by a source node, a destination spectrum nomi- nally assigned to a primary node. We aim to understand the per- formance of this system

  16. Activation-induced Cell Death Drives Profound Lung CD4+ T-Cell Depletion in HIV-associated Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Iulia; Drummond, M. Bradley; Gama, Lucio; Coon, Tiffany; Merlo, Christian A.; Wise, Robert A.; Clements, Janice E.; Kirk, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: As overall survival improves, individuals with HIV infection become susceptible to other chronic diseases, including accelerated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: To determine whether individuals with HIV-associated COPD exhibit dysregulated lung mucosal T-cell immunity compared with control subjects. Methods: Using flow cytometry, we evaluated peripheral blood and lung mucosal T-cell immunity in 14 HIV+COPD+, 13 HIV+COPD?, and 7 HIV?COPD+ individuals. Measurements and Main Results: HIV+COPD+ individuals demonstrated profound CD4+ T-cell depletion with reduced CD4/CD8 T-cell ratios in bronchoalveolar lavage–derived lung mononuclear cells, not observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and diminished CD4+ T cell absolute numbers, compared with control subjects. Furthermore, HIV+COPD+ individuals demonstrated decreased pulmonary HIV-specific and staphylococcal enterotoxin B–reactive CD4+ memory responses, including loss of multifunctionality, compared with HIV+COPD? control subjects. In contrast, lung mucosal HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses were preserved. Lung CD4+ T cells from HIV+COPD+ individuals expressed increased surface Fas death receptor (CD95) and programmed death-1, but similar bronchoalveolar lavage viral loads as control subjects. However, programmed death-1 expression inversely correlated with HIV-specific lung CD4+IFN-?+ T-cell responses, suggesting functional exhaustion. Moreover, lung CD4+ T cells from HIV+COPD+ patients demonstrated increased basal and HIV antigen-induced expression of the early apoptosis marker annexin V compared with control subjects, which was significantly attenuated with anti-Fas blockade. Lastly, lung mucosal, but not blood, CD4+/CD8+ ratios from HIV+ patients significantly correlated with the FEV1, but not in HIV?COPD+ patients. Conclusions: Together, our results provide evidence for profound lung mucosal CD4+ T-cell depletion via a Fas-dependent activation-induced cell death mechanism, along with impaired HIV-specific CD4+ immunity as immunologic features of HIV-associated COPD. PMID:25137293

  17. HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND) in Malawian Adults and Effect on Adherence to Combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Christine M.; van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Ngwalo, Chisomo; Stewart, Robert C.; Benjamin, Laura; Robertson, Kevin R.; Khoo, Saye; Allain, Theresa J.; Solomon, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the prevalence and burden of HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) among patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in sub-Saharan Africa. We estimated the prevalence of HAND in adult Malawians on cART and investigated the relationship between HAND and adherence to cART. Methods HIV positive adults in Blantyre, Malawi underwent a full medical history, neurocognitive test battery, depression score, Karnofsky Performance Score and adherence assessment. The Frascati criteria were used to diagnose HAND and the Global Deficit Score (GDS) was also assessed. Blood was drawn for CD4 count and plasma nevirapine and efavirenz concentrations. HIV negative adults were recruited from the HIV testing clinic to provide normative scores for the neurocognitive battery. Results One hundred and six HIV positive patients, with median (range) age 39 (18–71) years, 73% female and median (range) CD4 count 323.5 (68–1039) cells/µl were studied. Symptomatic neurocognitive impairment was present in 15% (12% mild neurocognitive disorder [MND], 3% HIV associated dementia [HAD]). A further 55% fulfilled Frascati criteria for asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI); however factors other than neurocognitive impairment could have confounded this estimate. Neither the symptomatic (MND and HAD) nor asymptomatic (ANI) forms of HAND were associated with subtherapeutic nevirapine/efavirenz concentrations, adjusted odds ratio 1.44 (CI. 0.234, 8.798; p?=?0.696) and aOR 0.577 (CI. 0.09, 3.605; p?=?0.556) respectively. All patients with subtherapeutic nevirapine/efavirenz levels had a GDS of less than 0.6, consistent with normal neurocognition. Discussion/Conclusion Fifteen percent of adult Malawians on cART had a diagnosis of MND or HAD. Subtherapeutic drug concentrations were found exclusively in patients with normal neurocognitive function suggesting HAND did not affect cART adherence. Further study of HAND requires more robust locally derived normative neurocognitive values and determination of the clinical relevance of ANI. PMID:24915530

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of IGF-I on Adiposity in HIV-associated Metabolic Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Roy J.; Vaghani, Sumit; Zifchak, Larisa M.; Quinn, Joseph H.; He, Weimian; Tebas, Pablo; Frank, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims We tested the effects of recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in an adipocyte model of HIV lipodystrophy and in an open label study on body composition and metabolism in patients with HIV lipodystrophy. Methods The effects of IGF-I on ritonavir-induced adipocyte cell death were studied in vitro. We assessed lipid accumulation, IGF signaling, apoptosis, and gene expression. We conducted a 24-week open label trial of recombinant IGF-I in ten adults with HIV associated lipoatrophy. Laboratory assessments included glucose, insulin, lipids, and IGF-I. At weeks 0 and 24, body composition studies were performed including skinfold measurement, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and computed tomography of the abdomen and thigh. Results In vitro, ritonavir increased delipidation and apoptosis of adipocytes, whereas co-treatment with IGF-I attenuated the effect. In the clinical study, subcutaneous adipose tissue did not increase in patients after treatment with IGF-I; however, there was a decrease in the proportion of abdominal fat (39.8 ± 7% vs. 34.6 ± 7%, p = 0.007). IGF-I levels increased with treatment (143 ± 28 µg/L at week 0 vs. 453 ± 212 µg/L at week 24, p = 0.002), whereas IGFBP-3 levels declined (3.554 ± 1.146 mg/L vs. 3.235 ± 1.151 mg/L, p = 0.02). Insulin at week 12 week decreased significantly (90.1 ± 39.8 pmol/L vs. 33.2 ± 19.6 pmol/L, p = 0.002). There was a nonsignificant decrease in visceral adipose tissue (155.2 ± 68 cm2 at week 0 vs. 140.6 ± 70 cm2 at week 24, p = 0.08). Conclusions Use of recombinant IGF-I may lower fasting insulin and abdominal fat in patients with lipoatrophy associated with HIV infection. Further evaluation of this agent for treatment of HIV-associated lipodystrophy may be warranted. PMID:23867790

  19. Biofilms and the survival of opportunistic pathogens in recycled water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, M.; Ford, T.; Maki, J. S.; Mitchell, R.

    1991-01-01

    Microorganisms are likely to develop an organic film on pipes, water reservoirs and filters used for waste water reclamation during extended missions in space. These biofilms can serve to protect and concentrate potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Our investigation has emphasized the survival strategy of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in distilled water. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were used as test organisms. Cultures were incubated at 10 degrees, 25 degrees, and 37 degrees C. No viable Staphylococcus cells were detected after the first week of incubation. P. aeruginosa, however, survived in distilled water up to 5 months at all three temperatures tested. The starved cells were able to form a biofilm layer on stainless steel. The cells exhibited a negative surface charge. The charge may be involved in the adhesion of this bacterium to metal substrata. We are currently investigating the importance of adhesion in the survival of this and other potential human pathogens found in water recycling systems.

  20. Evidence of cryptic individual specialization in an opportunistic insectivorous bat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cryan, Paul M.; Stricker, Craig A.; Wunder, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Habitat use and feeding behaviors of cryptic animals are often poorly understood. Analyses of stable isotope ratios in animal body tissues can help reveal an individual's location and resource use during tissue growth. We investigated variation in stable isotope ratios of 4 elements (H, C, N, and S) in the hair of a sedentary species of insectivorous bat (Eptesicus fuscus) inhabiting a chemically complex urban landscape. Our objective was to quantify population-level isotopic variation and test for evidence of resource specialization by individuals. Bats were sampled over 3 annual molt cycles at maternity roosts in buildings and variance components analysis was used to test whether intraindividual isotopic variation among molts differed from interindividual variation, after controlling for year and roost-group effects. Consistent with prior evidence that E. fuscus is opportunistic in its habitat use and foraging at the population level, we observed wide population-level variation for all isotopes. This variation likely reflects the chemical complexity of the urban landscape studied. However, isotopic variation among years within marked individuals was lower than variation among marked individuals within year for all isotopes, and carbon signatures indicated resource specialization by roost groups and individuals. This is the 1st study to examine variation in stable isotope ratios of individual wild bats over multiple years. Although our results suggest this population tends toward opportunistic habitat use or prey selection, or both, during molt periods, results also indicate that individuals and groups of bats composing the population might be habitat or dietary specialists—a novel finding for insectivorous bats.

  1. Recognizing and Conducting Opportunistic Experiments in Education: A Guide for Policymakers and Researchers. REL 2014-037

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resch, Alexandra; Berk, Jillian; Akers, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    An opportunistic experiment is a type of randomized controlled trial that studies the effects of a planned intervention or policy change with minimal added disruption and cost. This guide defines opportunistic experiments and provides examples, discusses issues to consider when identifying potential opportunistic experiments, and outlines the…

  2. Task importance affects event-based prospective memory performance in adults with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and HIV-infected young adults with problematic substance use.

    PubMed

    Woods, Steven Paul; Doyle, Katie L; Morgan, Erin E; Naar-King, Sylvie; Outlaw, Angulique Y; Nichols, Sharon L; Loft, Shayne

    2014-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the effects of task importance on event-based prospective memory (PM) in separate samples of adults with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and HIV-infected young adults with substance use disorders (SUD). All participants completed three conditions of an ongoing lexical decision task: (1) without PM task requirements; (2) with PM task requirements that emphasized the importance of the ongoing task; and (3) with PM task requirements that emphasized the importance of the PM task. In both experiments, all HIV+ groups showed the expected increase in response costs to the ongoing task when the PM task's importance was emphasized. In Experiment 1, individuals with HAND showed significantly lower PM accuracy as compared to HIV+ subjects without HAND when the importance of the ongoing task was emphasized, but improved significantly and no longer differed from HIV+ subjects without HAND when the PM task was emphasized. A similar pattern of findings emerged in Experiment 2, whereby HIV+ young adults with SUD (especially cannabis) showed significant improvements in PM accuracy when the PM task was emphasized. Findings suggest that both HAND and SUD may increase the amount of cognitive attentional resources that need to be allocated to support PM performance in persons living with HIV infection. PMID:24834469

  3. The comorbidity of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and Alzheimer’s disease: a foreseeable medical challenge in post-HAART era

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiqing; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2008-01-01

    Although the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a strong reduction of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) incidence, the prevalence of minor HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is rising among AIDS patients. HAART medication has shifted neuropathology from a subacute encephalitic condition to a subtle neurodegenerative process involving synaptic and dendritic degeneration, particularly of hippocampal neurons that are spared prior to HAART medication. Considerable neuroinflammation coupled with mononuclear phagocyte activation is present in HAART-medicated brains, particularly in the hippocampus. Accumulating evidence suggests that the resultant elevated secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-? (IFN-?), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) can increase amyloid-? peptide (A?) generation and reduce A? clearance. Recent advancements in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research identified A? biogenesis and clearance venues that are potentially influenced by HIV viral infection, providing new insights into beta-amyloidosis segregation in HIV patients. Our study suggests enhanced beta-amyloidosis in ART-treated HAD and HIVE brains, and suppression of A? clearance by viral infection of human primary macrophages. A growing awareness of potential convergent mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration shared by HIV and A? points to a significant chance of comorbidity of AD and HAND in senile HIV patients, which calls for a need of basic studies. PMID:19016329

  4. Neuroimaging of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with and without immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Branding, Gordian; Jefferys, Laura; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut; Siebert, Eberhard

    2016-02-01

    To determine the frequency, imaging characteristics, neuroanatomical distribution and dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging findings in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients we compared patients without antiretroviral therapy with patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Neuroimaging and clinical data of 21 consecutive patients presenting to a German HIV centre in a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging findings related to cryptococcal disease: five patients without antiretroviral therapy and three patients receiving effective antiretroviral therapy resulting in immune reconstitution. The pattern of magnetic resonance imaging manifestations was different in the two groups. In patients not on antiretroviral therapy, pseudocysts (n?=?3) and lacunar ischaemic lesions (n?=?2) were detected. Contrast-enhancing focal leptomeningeal and/or parenchymal lesions were found in all patients under immune reconstitution (n?=?3). Magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of leptomeningitis or meningoencephalitis were detected in all patients with a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution, which differs from the classical magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients without antiretroviral therapy. In antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with past medical history of cryptococcal meningitis, detection of contrast-enhancing focal meningeal and/or parenchymal lesions should prompt further investigations for a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution. PMID:25693580

  5. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hilborn, Elizabeth D.; Arduino, Matthew J.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexisting risk factors and frequently require hospitalization. Objectives The objectives of this report are to alert professionals of the impact of OPPPs, the fact that 30% of the population may be exposed to OPPPs, and the need to develop means to reduce OPPP exposure. We herein present a review of the epidemiology and ecology of these three bacterial OPPPs, specifically to identify common and unique features. Methods A Water Research Foundation–sponsored workshop gathered experts from across the United States to review the characteristics of OPPPs, identify problems, and develop a list of research priorities to address critical knowledge gaps with respect to increasing OPPP-associated disease. Discussion OPPPs share the common characteristics of disinfectant resistance and growth in biofilms in water distribution systems or premise plumbing. Thus, they share a number of habitats with humans (e.g., showers) that can lead to exposure and infection. The frequency of OPPP-infected individuals is rising and will likely continue to rise as the number of at-risk individuals is increasing. Improved reporting of OPPP disease and increased understanding of the genetic, physiologic, and structural characteristics governing the persistence and growth of OPPPs in drinking water distribution systems and premise plumbing is needed. Conclusions Because broadly effective community-level engineering interventions for the control of OPPPs have yet to be identified, and because the number of at-risk individuals will continue to rise, it is likely that OPPP-related infections will continue to increase. However, it is possible that individuals can take measures (e.g., raise hot water heater temperatures and filter water) to reduce home exposures. Citation Falkinham JO III, Hilborn ED, Arduino MJ, Pruden A, Edwards MA. 2015. Epidemiology and ecology of opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Environ Health Perspect 123:749–758; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408692 PMID:25793551

  6. Common Cold

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Studies Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  7. Lipopolysaccharides from Commensal and Opportunistic Bacteria: Characterization and Response of the Immune System of the Host Sponge Suberites domuncula.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bedoux, Gilles; Koutsouveli, Vasiliki; Crequer, Sterenn; Desriac, Florie; Pennec, Gaël Le

    2015-08-01

    Marine sponges harbor a rich bacterioflora with which they maintain close relationships. However, the way these animals make the distinction between bacteria which are consumed to meet their metabolic needs and opportunistic and commensal bacteria which are hosted is not elucidated. Among the elements participating in this discrimination, bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) could play a role. In the present study, we investigated the LPS chemical structure of two bacteria associated with the sponge Suberites domuncula: a commensal Endozoicomonas sp. and an opportunistic Pseudoalteromonas sp. Electrophoretic patterns indicated different LPS structures for these bacteria. The immunomodulatory lipid A was isolated after mild acetic acid hydrolysis. The electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectra revealed monophosphorylated molecules corresponding to tetra- and pentaacylated structures with common structural features between the two strains. Despite peculiar structural characteristics, none of these two LPS influenced the expression of the macrophage-expressed gene S. domuncula unlike the Escherichia coli ones. Further research will have to include a larger number of genes to understand how this animal can distinguish between LPS with resembling structures and discriminate between bacteria associated with it. PMID:26262625

  8. Lipopolysaccharides from Commensal and Opportunistic Bacteria: Characterization and Response of the Immune System of the Host Sponge Suberites domuncula

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bedoux, Gilles; Koutsouveli, Vasiliki; Crequer, Sterenn; Desriac, Florie; Le Pennec, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges harbor a rich bacterioflora with which they maintain close relationships. However, the way these animals make the distinction between bacteria which are consumed to meet their metabolic needs and opportunistic and commensal bacteria which are hosted is not elucidated. Among the elements participating in this discrimination, bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) could play a role. In the present study, we investigated the LPS chemical structure of two bacteria associated with the sponge Suberites domuncula: a commensal Endozoicomonas sp. and an opportunistic Pseudoalteromonas sp. Electrophoretic patterns indicated different LPS structures for these bacteria. The immunomodulatory lipid A was isolated after mild acetic acid hydrolysis. The electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectra revealed monophosphorylated molecules corresponding to tetra- and pentaacylated structures with common structural features between the two strains. Despite peculiar structural characteristics, none of these two LPS influenced the expression of the macrophage-expressed gene S. domuncula unlike the Escherichia coli ones. Further research will have to include a larger number of genes to understand how this animal can distinguish between LPS with resembling structures and discriminate between bacteria associated with it. PMID:26262625

  9. Opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans elicits a temporal response in primary human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, José Pedro; Stylianou, Marios; Nilsson, Gunnar; Urban, Constantin F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressed patients are frequently afflicted with severe mycoses caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens. Besides being a commensal, colonizing predominantly skin and mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Mast cells are present in tissues prone to fungal colonization being expectedly among the first immune cells to get into contact with C. albicans. However, mast cell-fungus interaction remains a neglected area of study. Here we show that human mast cells mounted specific responses towards C. albicans. Collectively, mast cell responses included the launch of initial, intermediate and late phase components determined by the secretion of granular proteins and cytokines. Initially mast cells reduced fungal viability and occasionally internalized yeasts. C. albicans could evade ingestion by intracellular growth leading to cellular death. Furthermore, secreted factors in the supernatants of infected cells recruited neutrophils, but not monocytes. Late stages were marked by the release of cytokines that are known to be anti-inflammatory suggesting a modulation of initial responses. C. albicans-infected mast cells formed extracellular DNA traps, which ensnared but did not kill the fungus. Our results suggest that mast cells serve as tissue sentinels modulating antifungal immune responses during C. albicans infection. Consequently, these findings open new doors for understanding fungal pathogenicity. PMID:26192381

  10. Opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans elicits a temporal response in primary human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, José Pedro; Stylianou, Marios; Nilsson, Gunnar; Urban, Constantin F

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressed patients are frequently afflicted with severe mycoses caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens. Besides being a commensal, colonizing predominantly skin and mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Mast cells are present in tissues prone to fungal colonization being expectedly among the first immune cells to get into contact with C. albicans. However, mast cell-fungus interaction remains a neglected area of study. Here we show that human mast cells mounted specific responses towards C. albicans. Collectively, mast cell responses included the launch of initial, intermediate and late phase components determined by the secretion of granular proteins and cytokines. Initially mast cells reduced fungal viability and occasionally internalized yeasts. C. albicans could evade ingestion by intracellular growth leading to cellular death. Furthermore, secreted factors in the supernatants of infected cells recruited neutrophils, but not monocytes. Late stages were marked by the release of cytokines that are known to be anti-inflammatory suggesting a modulation of initial responses. C. albicans-infected mast cells formed extracellular DNA traps, which ensnared but did not kill the fungus. Our results suggest that mast cells serve as tissue sentinels modulating antifungal immune responses during C. albicans infection. Consequently, these findings open new doors for understanding fungal pathogenicity. PMID:26192381

  11. The oxidative stress response of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Briones-Martin-Del-Campo, Marcela; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Juarez-Cepeda, Jacqueline; Gutierrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Organisms have evolved different strategies to respond to oxidative stress generated as a by-product of aerobic respiration and thus maintain the redox homeostasis within the cell. In particular, fungal pathogens are exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) when they interact with the phagocytic cells of the host which are the first line of defense against fungal infections. These pathogens have co-opted the enzymatic (catalases, superoxide dismutases (SODs), and peroxidases) and non-enzymatic (glutathione) mechanisms used to maintain the redox homeostasis within the cell, to resist oxidative stress and ensure survival within the host. Several virulence factors have been related to the response to oxidative stress in pathogenic fungi. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) is the second most common cause of candidiasis after Candida albicans (C. albicans). C. glabrata has a well defined oxidative stress response (OSR), which include both enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms. C. glabrata OSR is controlled by the well-conserved transcription factors Yap1, Skn7, Msn2 and Msn4. In this review, we describe the OSR of C. glabrata, what is known about its core elements, its regulation and how C. glabrata interacts with the host. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270068

  12. Challenges in the Detection, Prevention, and Treatment of HIV-Associated Malignancies in Low- and Middle-Income Countries in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adebamowo, Clement A.; Casper, Corey; Bhatia, Kishor; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Sasco, Annie J.; Phipps, Warren; Vermund, Sten H.; Krown, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancers associated with immunosuppression and infections have long been recognized as a major complication of HIV/AIDS. More recently, persons living with HIV are increasingly diagnosed with a wider spectrum of HIV-associated malignancies (HIVAM) as they live longer on combination antiretroviral therapy. This has spurred research to characterize the epidemiology and determine the optimal management of HIVAM with a focus on low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). Given background coinfections, environmental exposures, host genetic profiles, antiretroviral therapy usage, and varying capacities for early diagnosis and treatment, one can expect the biology of cancers in HIV-infected persons in LMICs to have a significant impact on chronic HIV care, as is now the case in high-income countries. Thus, new strategies must be developed to effectively prevent, diagnose, and treat HIVAM in LMICs; provide physical/clinical infrastructures; train the cancer and HIV workforce; and expand research capacity—particularly given the challenges posed by the limitations on available transportation and financial resources and the population’s general rural concentration. Opportunities exist to extend resources supported by the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria to improve the health-care infrastructure and train the personnel required to prevent and manage cancers in persons living with HIV. These HIV chronic care infrastructures could also serve cancer patients regardless of their HIV status, facilitating long-term care and treatment for persons who do not live near cancer centers, so that they receive the same degree of care as those receiving chronic HIV care today. PMID:25117957

  13. Challenges in the detection, prevention, and treatment of HIV-associated malignancies in low- and middle-income countries in Africa.

    PubMed

    Adebamowo, Clement A; Casper, Corey; Bhatia, Kishor; Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Sasco, Annie J; Phipps, Warren; Vermund, Sten H; Krown, Susan E

    2014-09-01

    Cancers associated with immunosuppression and infections have long been recognized as a major complication of HIV/AIDS. More recently, persons living with HIV are increasingly diagnosed with a wider spectrum of HIV-associated malignancies (HIVAM) as they live longer on combination antiretroviral therapy. This has spurred research to characterize the epidemiology and determine the optimal management of HIVAM with a focus on low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). Given background coinfections, environmental exposures, host genetic profiles, antiretroviral therapy usage, and varying capacities for early diagnosis and treatment, one can expect the biology of cancers in HIV-infected persons in LMICs to have a significant impact on chronic HIV care, as is now the case in high-income countries. Thus, new strategies must be developed to effectively prevent, diagnose, and treat HIVAM in LMICs; provide physical/clinical infrastructures; train the cancer and HIV workforce; and expand research capacity-particularly given the challenges posed by the limitations on available transportation and financial resources and the population's general rural concentration. Opportunities exist to extend resources supported by the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria to improve the health-care infrastructure and train the personnel required to prevent and manage cancers in persons living with HIV. These HIV chronic care infrastructures could also serve cancer patients regardless of their HIV status, facilitating long-term care and treatment for persons who do not live near cancer centers, so that they receive the same degree of care as those receiving chronic HIV care today. PMID:25117957

  14. Raised Venous Lactate and Markers of Intestinal Translocation Are Associated With Mortality Among In-Patients With HIV-Associated TB in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Katalin A.; van Halsema, Clare L.; Rao, Suhasini Subba; Boyles, Tom; Utay, Netanya S.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Case fatality among in-patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis (HIV-TB) in Africa is high. We investigated the factors associated with mortality in a rural South African hospital. Methods: This was a prospective observational study of HIV-TB in-patients, with death by 8 weeks the endpoint. Results: Of 99 patients (median CD4 count 72 cells/mm3), 32 (32%) died after median 8-day TB treatment. TB was diagnosed microbiologically in 75/99 and clinico-radiologically in 24, with no mortality difference between these groups [31% versus 38% (P = 0.53)]. Median venous lactate was 5.5 mmol/L (interquartile range 3.9–6.2) in those who died and 3.1 mmol/L (interquartile range 2.2–4.1) in survivors (P < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, lactate ?4 mmol/L [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 9.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.0 to 32.2], Glasgow Coma Score <15 (aOR 6.6, 95% CI: 1.5 to 29.6), CD4 count <50 cells per cubic millimeter (aOR 5.5, 95% CI: 1.6 to 18.5), and age ?50 (aOR 7.7, 95% CI: 1.2 to 46.9) independently predicted death. In a nested case–control study, comparing those who died versus CD4-matched survivors, median plasma lipopolysaccharide concentrations were 93 and 57 pg/mL (P = 0.026) and intestinal fatty acid–binding protein, 132 and 0 pg/mL (P = 0.002). Conclusions: Mortality was high and predicted by elevated lactate, likely reflecting a sepsis-syndrome secondary to TB or bacterial coinfection with intestinal barrier dysfunction appearing to contribute. PMID:26186506

  15. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder in Australia: a case of a high-functioning and optimally treated cohort and implications for international neuroHIV research.

    PubMed

    Cysique, Lucette A; Heaton, Robert K; Kamminga, Jody; Lane, Tammy; Gates, Thomas M; Moore, Danielle M; Hubner, Emma; Carr, Andrew; Brew, Bruce J

    2014-06-01

    The Australian HIV-infected (HIV+) population is largely comprised of high-functioning men who have sex with men (MSM). Like other English-speaking countries, Australia mostly relies on US neuropsychological normative standards to detect and determine the prevalence of neurological disorders. Whether the US neuropsychological (NP) normative standards are appropriate in Australian HIV+ MSM has not been established. Ninety virally suppressed HIV+ and 49 HIV-uninfected (HIV-) men (respectively 86 and 85 % self-reported MSM; mean age 54 and 56 years, mean premorbid verbal IQ estimate 110 and 111) undertook standard NP testing. The raw neuropsychological data were transformed using the following: (1) US standards as uncorrected scaled scores and demographically corrected T scores (US norms); and (2) z scores (without demographic corrections) derived from Australian comparison group scaled scores (local norms). To determine HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder prevalence, we used a standard definition of impairment based upon a battery-wide summary score: the global deficit score (GDS). Impairment classification (GDS???0.5) based on the local norms was best at discriminating between the two groups (HIV-?=?14.3 % vs. HIV+?=?53.3 %; p?

  16. Extending the Reach of Online Social Networks to Opportunistic Networks with PodNet

    E-print Network

    Braun, Torsten

    in an opportunistic fashion using Wifi. Content can originate from the Internet (e.g., YouTube, BBC) but it can also- tunistic networks will facilitate and foster applications like user generated content (videos), travel

  17. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  18. ACCURACY ASSESSMENTS OF AIRBORNE HYSPERSPECTRAL DATA FOR MAPPING OPPORTUNISTIC PLANT SPECIES IN FRESHWATER COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airbome hyperspectral data were used to detect dense patches of Phragmites australis, a native opportunist plant species, at the Pointe Mouillee coastal wetland complex (Wayne and Monroe Counties, Michigan). This study provides initial results from one of thirteen coastal wetland...

  19. Third IJCAI Workshop on Engineering Problems for Qualitative Reasoning, Nagoya, Japan, August 1997. Opportunistic Modeling

    E-print Network

    Stolle, Reinhard

    . Opportunistic Modeling Reinhard Stolle and Elizabeth Bradley #3; University of Colorado at Boulder Department. The program Pret [ Bradley and Stolle, 1996 ] auto- mates both stages of the system identi#12;cation process

  20. OPPORTUNISTIC ASPERGILLUS PATHOGENS MEASURED IN HOME AND HOSPITAL TAP WATER BY MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR (MSQPCR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens are a concern because of the increasing number of immunocompromised patients. The goal of this research was to test a simple extraction method and rapid quantitative PCR (QPCR) measurement of the occurrence of potential pathogens, Aspergillus fumiga...

  1. Use of traditional medicines in the management of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Tanzania: a case in the Bukoba rural district

    PubMed Central

    Kisangau, Daniel P; Lyaruu, Herbert VM; Hosea, Ken M; Joseph, Cosam C

    2007-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical surveys were carried out to document herbal remedies used in the management of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Bukoba Rural district, Tanzania. The district is currently an epicenter of HIV/AIDS and although over 90% of the population in the district relies on traditional medicines to manage the disease, this knowledge is impressionistic and not well documented. The HIV/AIDS opportunistic conditions considered during the study were Tuberculosis (TB), Herpes zoster (Shingles), Herpes simplex (Genital herpes), Oral candidiasis and Cryptococcal meningitis. Other symptomatic but undefined conditions considered were skin rashes and chronic diarrhea. Methods An open-ended semi-structured questionnaire was used in collecting field information. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the ethnobotanical data collected. Factor of informant consensus (Fic) was used to analyze the ethnobotanical importance of the plants. Results In the present study, 75 plant species belonging to 66 genera and 41 families were found to be used to treat one or more HIV/AIDS related infections in the district. The study revealed that TB and oral candidiasis were the most common manifestations of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections affecting most of the population in the area. It unveils the first detailed account of ethnomedical documentation of plants focusing the management of HIV/AIDS related infections in the district. Conclusion It is concluded that the ethnopharmacological information reported forms a basis for further research to identify and isolate bioactive constituents that can be developed to drugs for the management of the HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections. PMID:17623081

  2. Opportunistic and Other Infections in HIV-Infected Children in Latin America Compared to a Similar Cohort in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, Jorge O.; Freimanis-Hance, Laura; Krauss, Margot; Reyes, Mary F.; Cardoso, Claudete Aparecida Araújo; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M.; Cardoso, Edmundo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Opportunistic and other infections have declined since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in developed countries but few studies have addressed the impact of HAART in HIV-infected children from developing countries. This study examines the prevalence and incidence of opportunistic and other infections in Latin America during the HAART era. Vertically HIV-infected children enrolled in a cohort study between 2002 and 2007 were followed for the occurrence of 29 targeted infections. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were performed to calculate the prevalence of infections before enrollment and the incidence rates of opportunistic and other infections after enrollment. Comparisons were made with data from a U.S. cohort (PACTG 219C). Of the 731 vertically HIV-infected children 568 (78%) had at least one opportunistic or other infection prior to enrollment. The most prevalent infections were bacterial pneumonia, oral candidiasis, varicella, tuberculosis, herpes zoster, and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. After enrollment, the overall incidence was 23.5 per 100 person-years; the most common infections (per 100 person-years) were bacterial pneumonia (7.8), varicella (3.0), dermatophyte infections (2.9), herpes simplex (2.5), and herpes zoster (1.8). All of these incidence rates were higher than those reported in PACTG 219C. The types and relative distribution of infections among HIV-infected children in Latin America in this study are similar to those seen in the United States but the incidence rates are higher. Further research is necessary to determine the reasons for these higher rates. PMID:21902581

  3. [New gram-positive opportunistic bacteria: pathogenic role and treatment].

    PubMed

    Philippon, A; Barbut, F

    1997-05-17

    NOVEL BACTERIA: The appearance of novel bacterial species among Gram positive microorganisms is mainly related to progress in bacterial taxonomy justifying such nomen species, i.e. C. jeikeium, C. urealyticum or R. equi. Another feature of such emergence of "Novel" bacteria is related to the rise in the number of clinical observations mediated by some well-known species described elsewhere such as in food bacteriology. PREDISPOSING FACTORS: Among Gram positive microorganisms, emergence for some species and renaissance or rebirth for others is mainly explained by natural resistance to widely used antibiotics including beta-lactams such as third generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, or more recently glycopeptides and the combined effect of several predisposing factors (hospitalized patients, underlying disease or prematurity, interruption of the normal integumentary defense via intravascular catheters). Clinical features depend on the bacterial species. Bacteriological diagnosis is easily obtained in terms of isolation and identification. Nevertheless, as for any opportunistic pathogen, a distinction must be made between colonization and infection. Finally successful treatment regimens depend on the bacterial species and may include surgery. PMID:9205480

  4. Robust and Opportunistic Autonomous Science for a Potential Titan Aerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, Daniel M.; Estlin, Tara; Schaffer, Steve; Castano, Rebecca; Elfes, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    We are developing onboard planning and execution technologies to provide robust and opportunistic mission operations for a potential Titan aerobot. Aerobot have the potential for collecting a vast amount of high priority science data. However, to be effective, an aerobot must address several challenges including communication constraints, extended periods without contact with Earth, uncertain and changing environmental conditions, maneuverability constraints and potentially short-lived science opportunities. We are developing the AerOASIS system to develop and test technology to support autonomous science operations for a potential Titan Aerobot. The planning and execution component of AerOASIS is able to generate mission operations plans that achieve science and engineering objectives while respecting mission and resource constraints as well as adapting the plan to respond to new science opportunities. Our technology leverages prior work on the OASIS system for autonomous rover exploration. In this paper we describe how the OASIS planning component was adapted to address the unique challenges of a Titan Aerobot and we describe a field demonstration of the system with the JPL prototype aerobot.

  5. Community-based immunization in opportunistic social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Peiyan; Tang, Shaojie

    2015-02-01

    Immunizing important nodes has been shown to be an effective solution to suppress the epidemic spreading. Most studies focus on the globally important nodes in a network, but neglect the locally important nodes in different communities. We claim that given the temporal community feature of opportunistic social networks (OSN), this strategy has a biased understanding of the epidemic dynamics, leading us to conjecture that it is not 'the more central, the better' for the implementation of control strategy. In this paper, we track the evolution of community structure and study the effect of community-based immunization strategy on epidemic spreading. We first break the OSN traces down into different communities, and find that the community structure helps to delay the outbreak of epidemic. We then evaluate the local importance of nodes in communities, and show that immunizing nodes with high local importance can remarkably suppress the epidemic. More interestingly, we find that high local importance but non-central nodes play a big role in epidemic spreading process, removing them improves the immunization efficiency by 25% to 150% at different scenarios.

  6. Common cold

    MedlinePLUS

    The common cold most often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. You may also have a sore throat, ... It is called the common cold for good reason. There are over one billion colds in the United States each year. You and your children will ...

  7. Genome-Wide Patterns of Recombination in the Opportunistic Human Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dettman, Jeremy R.; Rodrigue, Nicolas; Kassen, Rees

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a significant cause of acute nosocomial infections as well as chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Recent reports of the intercontinental spread of a CF-specific epidemic strain, combined with high intrinsic levels of antibiotic resistance, have made this opportunistic pathogen an important public health concern. Strain-specific differences correlate with variation in clinical outcomes of infected CF patients, increasing the urgency to understand the evolutionary origin of genetic factors conferring important phenotypes that enable infection, virulence, or resistance. Here, we describe the genome-wide patterns of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in P. aeruginosa, and the extent to which the genomes are affected by these diversity-generating processes. Based on whole-genome sequence data from 32 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, we examined the rate and distribution of recombination along the genome, and its effect on the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. Multiple lines of evidence suggested that recombination was common and usually involves short stretches of DNA (200–300 bp). Although mutation was the main source of nucleotide diversity, the import of polymorphisms by homologous recombination contributed nearly as much. We also identified the genomic regions with frequent recombination, and the specific sequences of recombinant origin within epidemic strains. The functional characteristics of the genes contained therein were examined for potential associations with a pathogenic lifestyle or adaptation to the CF lung environment. A common link between many of the high-recombination genes was their functional affiliation with the cell wall, suggesting that the products of recombination may be maintained by selection for variation in cell-surface molecules that allows for evasion of the host immune system. PMID:25480685

  8. Clinical profile of human immunodeficiency virus patients with opportunistic infections: A descriptive case series study

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, K; Gandhi, Sangeetha; Rao, Vishwas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virus, causative agent in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is fast becoming a major threat in the Indian subcontinent, with an estimated 3.7 million persons being infected with HIV. HIV infection is complicated by various opportunistic infections (OIs) such as tuberculosis (TB), candidiasis, herpes zoster, Pneumocystis jirvoceii, cytomegalovirus (CMV) etc., This study carried out to know the clinical profile of HIV patients with OIs. Methods: A case series study was carried out at a tertiary care hospital in Bellary, Karnataka, India. A hospital based case series study was conducted among 164 HIV patients with OIs admitted to various wards as well as attending outpatient department at Vijayanagara Institute of Medical Sciences Hospital, Bellary during Jan 2013 to Nov 2013. Both primary and secondary data was collected to gather information on clinical profile. The statistical tests used were descriptive statistics and independent t test. Results: Among 164 patients, 29.3% were females and 68.3% males. High proportions of patients were observed in 28-37 years of age group and heterosexual route was the most common mode of transmission. TB (50%) is the most frequent OI followed by candidiasis (49%), pneumocystis (16%) and others. The mean CD4 cell count in TB was 237.02/mL and in candidiasis 189.07/mL. Low values were observed in promyelocytic leukemia (18.10/mL), CMV (18.5/mL) and in toxoplasmosis (73.1/mL). Conclusions: Respiratory system was the most common system involved by OIs and most of patients with OIs had CD4 T cell count below 200/mL, whereas there were no patients in the study with counts above 500/mL. PMID:26097820

  9. Metal toxicity and opportunistic binding of Pb2+ in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kirberger, Michael; Wong, Hing C.; Jiang, Jie; Yang, Jenny J

    2014-01-01

    Lead toxicity is associated with various human diseases. While Ca2+ binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM) are often reported to be molecular targets for Pb2+-binding and lead toxicity, the effect of Pb2+ on the Ca2+/CaM regulated biological activities cannot be described by the primary mechanism of ionic displacement (e.g., ionic mimicry). The focus of this study was to investigate the mechanism of lead toxicity through binding differences between Ca2+ and Pb2+ for CaM, an essential intracellular trigger protein with two EF-Hand Ca2+-binding sites in each of its two domains that regulates many molecular targets via Ca2+-induced conformational change. Fluorescence changes in phenylalanine indicated that Pb2+ binds with 8-fold higher affinity than Ca2+ in the N-terminal domain. Additionally, NMR chemical shift changes and an unusual biphasic response observed in tyrosine fluorescence associated with C-terminal domain sites EF-III and EF-IV suggest a single higher affinity Pb2+-binding site with a 3-fold higher affinity than Ca2+, coupled with a second site exhibiting affinity nearly equivalent to that of the N-terminal domain sites. Our results further indicate that Pb2+ displaces Ca2+ only in the N-terminal domain, with minimal perturbation of the C-terminal domain, however significant structural/dynamic changes are observed in the trans-domain linker region which appear to be due to Pb2+-binding outside of the known calcium-binding sites. These data suggest that opportunistic Pb2+-binding in Ca2+/CaM has a profound impact on the conformation and dynamics of the essential molecular recognition sites of the central helix, and provides insight into the molecular toxicity of non-essential metal ions. PMID:23692958

  10. A randomized controlled trial of HAART versus HAART and chemotherapy in therapy-naïve patients with HIV-associated Kaposi sarcoma in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mosam, Anisa; Shaik, Fahmida; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Esterhuizen, Tonya; Friedland, Gerald H.; Scadden, David T.; Aboobaker, Jamila; Coovadia, Hoosen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The optimal approach to HIV-associated KS (HIV-KS) in sub-Saharan Africa is unknown. With large-scale rollout of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in South Africa, we hypothesized survival in HIV-KS would improve and administration of chemotherapy in addition to HAART would be feasible and improve KS-specific outcomes. Methods We conducted a randomized, controlled, open-label trial with intention-to-treat analysis. Treatment-naïve patients from King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, South Africa, a public-sector tertiary referral center, with HIV-KS, but no symptomatic visceral disease or fungating lesions requiring urgent chemotherapy, were randomized to HAART alone or HAART and chemotherapy (CXT). HAART arm received stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine (Triomune®); CXT arm received Triomune® plus bleomycin, doxorubicin, and vincristine (ABV) every 3 weeks. When ABV was not available, oral etoposide (50-100 mg days 1-21 of a 28 day cycle) was substituted. Primary outcome was overall KS response using AIDS Clinical Trial Group criteria 12 months after HAART initiation. Secondary comparisons included: time to response, progression-free survival, overall survival, adverse events, HIV control, CD4 reconstitution, adherence and quality-of-life. Results 59 subjects were randomized to HAART, 53 to CXT. 12-month overall KS response was 39% in the HAART arm and 66% in the CXT arm (difference 27%; 95% CI 9%-43%, p=0.005). At 12 months, 77% were alive (no survival difference between arms, p=0.49), 82% had HIV viral load <50 copies/mL without difference between arms, (p=0.47); CD4 counts and QOL measures improved in all patients. Conclusions HAART with chemotherapy produced higher overall KS response over 12 months, while HAART alone provided similar improvement in survival and select measures of morbidity. In Africa, with high prevalence of HIV and HHV-8 and limited resources, HAART alone provides important benefit in patients with HIV-KS. PMID:22395672

  11. Common Chuckwalla

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Common Chuckwalla is primarily found across the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the United States and Mexico, at elevations ranging from sea level to 1,370 m. This large (125–180 mm) lizard is dorsoventrally flattened and has wrinkles on its belly and neck. Chuckwallas are strongly associa...

  12. Feeding Habits And Natural Diet of the Intertidal Crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus: Opportunistic Browser or Selective Feeder?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannicci, S.; Gomei, M.; Boddi, B.; Vannini, M.

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the feeding habits of the European intertidal crabPachygrapsus marmoratus . Since this species is widely distributed in southern Europe, four south-western European sites far apart from each other were selected: southern Portugal, central Portugal, central Tyrrhenian coast, Italy, and northern Adriatic coast, Istria. In summer, crabs were collected and the contents of their stomachs were assessed in the laboratory. In parallel, at each collection site the relative abundance of algae species and of sessile and slow-moving animals was assessed for comparison with the relative frequency of the same items in the P. marmoratus diet. The detailed analysis of its feeding habits showed that this species is omnivorous but that it cannot simply be considered an opportunistic feeder. In all populations, algal and animal diet components were almost equally abundant; thus these crabs actively regulate their feeding to cope with the dietary needs of their fast-moving, semi-terrestrial life-style. Descriptive and quantitative analyses showed that P. marmoratus has definite preferences for animal prey and algae. Limpets and mussels proved to be the commonest prey, followed by conspecific crabs. The highly preferred plant item was filamentous algae, although corticated macroalgae and articulated calcareous algae were also common in the diet. Cyanobacteria were preferred only at the Atlantic sites and crustose algae were represented only by Ralfsia sp., a species with high protein and lipid contents. Both univariate and multivariate statistical methods confirmed that the different populations of P. marmoratus were minimally influenced by the relative abundance of the food items within their environment and their diet composition was constant throughout the sampled area. In conclusion, the relative abundance of different ingested foods can best be explained by considering the diet of P. marmoratus to be related mainly to its population structure and, for some food items, to the feeding physiology of the crab itself.

  13. Antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS patients: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Jo; Bhagani, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has entirely changed the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and dramatically reduced the rates of opportunistic infections (OI). However, OI continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in both developed countries, where presentation with advanced HIV infection is common, and also in developing countries where ART is less widely available. Evidence to direct OI guidelines is partly limited by the fact that many large-scale studies date from the pre-ART era and more recent studies are sometimes poorly powered due to the falling rates of OI. Treatment of OI is now known to be as much about antimicrobials as about immune reconstitution with ART, and recent studies help guide the timing of initiation of ART in different infections. OI have also become complicated by the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome phenomenon which may occur once successful immune recovery begins. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has long been one of the most important antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of OI and remains paramount. It has a broad spectrum of activity against Pneumocystis jiroveci, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial infections and has an important role to play in preventing life-threatening OI. New advances in treating OI are coming from a variety of quarters: in cytomegalovirus eye disease, the use of oral rather than intravenous drugs is changing the face of therapy; in cryptococcal meningitis, improved drug formulations and combination therapy is improving clearance rates and reducing drug toxicities; and in gut disease, the possibility of rapid immune restitution with ART is replacing the need for antimicrobials against cryptosporidia and microsporidia. PMID:22096404

  14. Incidence of Selected Opportunistic Infections Among Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Beukelman, Timothy; Xie, Fenglong; Baddley, John W; Chen, Lang; Delzell, Elizabeth; Grijalva, Carlos G; Mannion, Melissa L; Patkar, Nivedita M; Saag, Kenneth G; Winthrop, Kevin L; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare incidence rates of selected opportunistic infections (OI) among children with and without juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Using United States national Medicaid administrative claims data from 2000 through 2005, we identified a cohort of children with JIA based on physician diagnosis codes and dispensed medications. We defined a non-JIA comparator cohort of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We defined 15 types of OI using physician diagnosis or hospital discharge codes, and 7 of these types also required evidence of treatment with specific antimicrobials. We calculated infection incidence rates (IR). The rates in the ADHD comparator cohort were standardized to the age, sex, and race distribution of the JIA cohort. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRR) to compare infection rates. Results The JIA cohort included 8,503 children with 13,990 person-years (p-y) of follow-up. The ADHD comparator cohort included 360,362 children with 477,050 p-y of follow-up. When all OI were considered together as a single outcome, there were 42 infections in the JIA cohort (IR 300 per 100,000 p-y; IRR 2.4 [1.7–3.3] versus ADHD). The most common OI among children with JIA were 3 Coccidioides (IR 21 per 100,000 p-y; IRR 101 [8.1–5319] versus ADHD); 5 Salmonella (IR 35 per 100,000 p-y; IRR 3.8 [1.2–9.5]); and 32 herpes zoster (IR 225 per 100,000 p-y; IRR 2.1 [1.4–3.0]). Conclusions OI are rare among children with JIA. Nevertheless, children with JIA had a higher rate of OI, including Coccidioides, Salmonella, and herpes zoster, than children with ADHD. PMID:23460423

  15. Distributed opportunistic argumentation guided by autonomous agent interaction 

    E-print Network

    Martin, Paul William

    2011-01-01

    Within a distributed system, autonomous agents may find it necessary to cooperate in order to achieve their objectives. Interaction protocols provide standard frameworks within which to conduct common classes of interaction, ...

  16. Preventing Opportunistic Infections in HIV (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in soil and areas contaminated with bat or bird droppings; it is more common in certain areas, ... high risk activities, such as disturbing soil under bird roosting sites, demolishing old buildings, or exploring caves. ...

  17. Opportunistic Resource Exchange in Inter-vehicle Ad-hoc Bo Xu and Aris Ouksel and Ouri Wolfson

    E-print Network

    Wolfson, Ouri E.

    Opportunistic Resource Exchange in Inter-vehicle Ad-hoc Networks Bo Xu and Aris Ouksel and Ouri and experimental analysis indicates that the opportunistic exchange algorithm automatically limits the distribution in these vehicles are interested in information relevant to their trip. For example, a driver would like his

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 303 Opportunistic Routing for Smart Grid With Power

    E-print Network

    Bahk, Saewoong

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 303 Opportunistic Routing for Smart communications (PLCs) have recently absorbed interest in the smart grid since they offer communi- cation--Access network, narrowband PLC, opportunistic routing, power line communications, smart grid. I. INTRODUCTION

  19. Energy-efficient opportunistic scheduling schemes in wireless networks Sung-Guk Yoon a

    E-print Network

    Bahk, Saewoong

    -efficient opportunistic (EEFO) scheduling. Our goal is to maximize the performance of bits per energy unit under to Physical (PHY) and Media Access Control (MAC) layers. In the PHY layer, minimum power allocation has been used under quality of service (QoS) constraints [12], and in the MAC layer, sleep/awake scheduling has

  20. Effective Service Capacity Analysis of Opportunistic Multi-Carrier OFDMA Systems

    E-print Network

    Gross, James

    . Categories and Subject Descriptors G.3 [Probability and Statistics]: Queuing Theory Keywords QoS, Effective@tkn.tu-berlin.de ABSTRACT Exact queuing-theoretic modeling of wireless systems is tough due to the complex service processes apply recent insights into approximation ap- proaches for queuing systems to opportunistic OFDMA sys

  1. Context-aware Opportunistic Routing in Mobile Ad-hoc Networks Incorporating Node Mobility

    E-print Network

    Braun, Torsten

    @ufpa.br Abstract--Opportunistic routing (OR) employs a list of candi- dates to improve reliability of wireless it hard to route packets. Node mobility also incurs frequent topology changes, which causes significant with the minimum end-to-end ETX is assigned with the highest priority. However, it is hard to get the ETX of a path

  2. Using an Event Based Priority Queue for Reliable and Opportunistic Scheduling of Bulk Data Transfers in

    E-print Network

    Welzl, Michael

    -This paper proposes an opportunistic, reliable and realistic QoS mechanism for bulk data transfers in Grids related overhead is assumed, our mechanism works with realistic network conditions, taking possible packet. The metrics that have been studied in the evaluation of elastic scheduling heuristics are the acceptance

  3. On the Energy Efficiency of Device Discovery in Mobile Opportunistic Networks: A Systematic

    E-print Network

    Yao, Frances Foong

    Discovery, as the first step to bootstrapping opportunistic communications for smartphones, the most popular mobile on our measurement study of their energy consumption on smartphones. eDiscovery adaptively changes the dura- tion and interval of Bluetooth inquiry in dynamic environ- ments, by leveraging history

  4. OAR: An Opportunistic Auto-rate Media Access Protocol for Ad Hoc Networks

    E-print Network

    Knightly, Edward W.

    OAR: An Opportunistic Auto-rate Media Access Protocol for Ad Hoc Networks B. Sadeghi, V. Kanodia standard supports multiple data rates at the physical layer. Moreover, vari- ous auto rate adaptation mechanisms at the medium access layer have been proposed to utilize this multi-rate capabil- ity

  5. Optimization of opportunistic replacement activities: A case study in the aircraft industry

    E-print Network

    Patriksson, Michael

    Optimization of opportunistic replacement activities: A case study in the aircraft industry Torgny Svensson # Abstract In the aircraft industry maximizing availability is essential. Maintenance schedules maintenance to enable the minimization of the total expected cost to have a functional aircraft engine

  6. Impact of Human Mobility on the Design of Opportunistic Forwarding Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Hand, Steven

    Impact of Human Mobility on the Design of Opportunistic Forwarding Algorithms Augustin Chaintreau wireless devices carried by humans, we observe that the distribution of the inter-contact time how this new characteristic of human mobility impacts a class of previously proposed forwarding

  7. The MicroOppnet Tool for Collaborative Computing Experiments with Class 2 Opportunistic Networks

    E-print Network

    Yang, Zijiang "James"

    Department of Computer Science Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA {zkamal, gupta, llilien by this growth [1]. (Oppnets evolved from our initial idea of opportunistic sensor networks [2]). Effectively Affiliated with the Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS), Purdue

  8. Opportunistically-assisted parking service discovery: now it helps, now it does not

    E-print Network

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    , they opportunistically collect and share with each other information on the location and status of each parking spot"blind"non-assisted search and a centralized approach, where the allocation of parking spots is managed by a central server visit the city center and other popular in-city destinations. Part of this task is the effective

  9. Co-evolution of Content Spread and Popularity in Mobile Opportunistic Networks

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Anurag

    1 Co-evolution of Content Spread and Popularity in Mobile Opportunistic Networks Srinivasan in receiving the content (referred to as relays). We consider a model for the evolution of popularity and study the joint evolution of content popularity and its spread in the population. Copying the content

  10. ConSens: Consistency-Sensitive Opportunistic Data Access in Wireless Networks

    E-print Network

    Lim, Sunho

    services and information wirelessly. For example, smart cell phone is receiving a great attention in 2010 [1]. 47% and 40% of all adult Americans are the wireless Internet users with laptop and cell phoneConSens: Consistency-Sensitive Opportunistic Data Access in Wireless Networks Sunho Lim and Yumin

  11. Epithelial IL-22RA1-Mediated Fucosylation Promotes Intestinal Colonization Resistance to an Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tu Anh N.; Clare, Simon; Goulding, David; Arasteh, Julia M.; Stares, Mark D.; Browne, Hilary P.; Keane, Jacqueline A.; Page, Andrew J.; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Kane, Leanne; Mottram, Lynda; Harcourt, Katherine; Hale, Christine; Arends, Mark J.; Gaffney, Daniel J.; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our intestinal microbiota harbors a diverse microbial community, often containing opportunistic bacteria with virulence potential. However, mutualistic host-microbial interactions prevent disease by opportunistic pathogens through poorly understood mechanisms. We show that the epithelial interleukin-22 receptor IL-22RA1 protects against lethal Citrobacter rodentium infection and chemical-induced colitis by promoting colonization resistance against an intestinal opportunistic bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis. Susceptibility of Il22ra1?/? mice to C. rodentium was associated with preferential expansion and epithelial translocation of pathogenic E. faecalis during severe microbial dysbiosis and was ameloriated with antibiotics active against E. faecalis. RNA sequencing analyses of primary colonic organoids showed that IL-22RA1 signaling promotes intestinal fucosylation via induction of the fucosyltransferase Fut2. Additionally, administration of fucosylated oligosaccharides to C. rodentium-challenged Il22ra1?/? mice attenuated infection and promoted E. faecalis colonization resistance by restoring the diversity of anaerobic commensal symbionts. These results support a model whereby IL-22RA1 enhances host-microbiota mutualism to limit detrimental overcolonization by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:25263220

  12. Opportunistic Collaboration: Unlocking the Archives of the Birmingham Institute of Art and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everitt, Sian

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review a small specialist repository's strategic and opportunistic approach to utilising collaborative regional and national digital initiatives to increase access. The Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD) Archives activity is evaluated to determine whether a project-based approach recognises and meets the needs of historians,…

  13. A common opportunistic foraminiferal species as an indicator of rapidly changing conditions in a range of environments

    E-print Network

    Alve, Elisabeth

    settings and, consequently, high abundance of this species occurs in habitats with very different. There is some evidence that, in some places such as the Southern Bight of the North Sea, algal proliferation

  14. Microbial Monitoring of Common Opportunistic Pathogens by Comparing Multiple Real-time PCR Platforms for Potential Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monserrate C.; Jones, Kathy U.; Oubre, Cherie M.; Castro, Victoria; Ott, Mark C.; Birmele, Michele; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2013-01-01

    Current methods for microbial detection: a) Labor & time intensive cultivation-based approaches that can fail to detect or characterize all cells present. b) Requires collection of samples on orbit and transportation back to ground for analysis. Disadvantages to current detection methods: a) Unable to perform quick and reliable detection on orbit. b) Lengthy sampling intervals. c) No microbe identification.

  15. Microbial Monitoring of Common Opportunistic Pathogens by Comparing Multiple Real-Time PCR Platforms for Potential Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oubre, Cherie M.; Birmele, Michele N.; Castro, Victoria A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Jones, Kathy U.; Singhal, Adesh; Johnston, Angela S.; Roman, Monserrate C.; Ozbolt, Tamra A.; Jett, Daniel X.; Roberts, Michael S.; Ott, C. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Because the International Space Station is a closed environment with rotations of astronauts and equipment that each introduce their own microbial flora, it is necessary to monitor the air, surfaces, and water for microbial contamination. Current microbial monitoring includes labor- and time-intensive methods to enumerate total bacterial and fungal cells, with limited characterization, during in-flight testing. Although this culture-based method is sufficient for monitoring the International Space Station, on future long-duration missions more detailed characterization will need to be performed during flight, as sample return and ground characterization may not be available. At a workshop held in 2011 at NASA's Johnson Space Center to discuss alternative methodologies and technologies suitable for microbial monitoring for these long-term exploration missions, molecular-based methodologies such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were recommended. In response, a multi-center (Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Kennedy Space Center) collaborative research effort was initiated to explore novel commercial-off-the-shelf hardware options for space flight environmental monitoring. The goal was to evaluate quantitative or semi-quantitative PCR approaches for low-cost in-flight rapid identification of microorganisms that could affect crew safety. The initial phase of this project identified commercially available platforms that could be minimally modified to perform nominally in microgravity. This phase was followed by proof-of-concept testing of the highest qualifying candidates with a universally available challenge organism, Salmonella enterica. The analysis identified two technologies that were able to perform sample-to-answer testing with initial cell sample concentrations between 50 and 400 cells. In addition, the commercial systems were evaluated for initial flight safety and readiness.

  16. Opportunistic Parasites among Immunosuppressed Children in Minia District, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Azza K.; Ali, Basma A.; Moslam, Fadia A.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 450 stool samples were collected from inpatient and outpatient clinics of Pediatric Department, Minia University Hospital, Minia District, Egypt. Two groups of patients were studied, including 200 immunosuppressed and 250 immunocompetent children. Stool samples were subjected to wet saline and iodine mounts. A concentration technique (formol-ether sedimentation method) was carried out for stool samples diagnosed negative by wet saline and iodine mounts. Samples were stained by 2 different methods; acid fast stain (modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain) and Giemsa stain. Total 188 cases (94%) were diagnosed positive for parasitic infections among immunosuppressed children, whereas 150 cases (60%) were positive in immunocompetent children (P<0.0001). The most common protozoan infection in immunosuppressed group was Cryptosporidium parvum (60.2%), followed by Blastocystis hominis (12.1%), Isospora belli (9.7%), and Cyclospora caytenensis (7.8%). On the other hand, Entamoeba histolytica (24.6%) and Giardia lamblia (17.6%) were more common than other protozoans in immunocompetent children. PMID:22451735

  17. Recent Taxonomic Developments with Candida and Other Opportunistic Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in susceptible patient populations and advances in identification methods have resulted in the continued recognition of novel yeasts as agents of human infection. Most of these agents are members of the well-recognized genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon, and Rhodotorula. Some of these agents are “cryptic species,” members of species complexes, and may not be detectable using classical carbohydrate assimilation-based methods of yeast identification. Such species require DNA- or MALDI-based methods for correct identification, although sporadic isolates may not routinely require delineation to the individual species level. The coming end of the fungal taxonomy rules requiring separate names for sexual and asexual forms of the same fungus will hopefully allow greater clarity, as names for medically important yeast can now be based on the needs of the medical mycology community and the common goal of better communication between laboratory and clinician. PMID:26526658

  18. Opportunistic deep cutaneous mycoses in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Tessari, G; Cagalli, A; Girolomoni, G

    2014-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among organ transplant recipients, despite many progresses concerning diagnosis, preventions and treatment. Risk factors for invasive fungal infections in transplanted recipients include type and severity of immunosuppression, especially in life-saving organs as lung or liver, older age at transplantation, and technical complexity of surgery, living in endemic areas or exposure to a contaminated environment. Superficial fungal infections are caused by Candida, Dermatophytes, and Malassezia. In invasive mycoses, skin lesions may occur as a consequence of the systemic dissemination of invasive mycoses, or after direct inoculation in the skin. Aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, Zygomycoses, dark mould infections, fusariosis and infections attributable to Scedosporium and Pseudallescheria species are the most common etiological agents. Cutaneous manifestations of fungal infection are not specific, and a high degree of suspicion is required, and prompt biopsy for histology and culture is needed. Therapy with lyposomal amphotericin B and new triazoles are effective. PMID:25068229

  19. Opportunistic deep cutaneous mycoses in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Tessari, G; Cagalli, A; Girolomoni, G

    2014-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among organ transplant recipients, despite many progresses concerning diagnosis, preventions and treatment. Risk factors for invasive fungal infections in transplanted recipients include type and severity of immunosuppression, especially in life-saving organs as lung or liver, older age at transplantation, and technical complexity of surgery, living in endemic areas or exposure to a contaminated environment. Superficial fungal infections are caused by Candida, Dermatophytes, and Malassezia. In invasive mycoses, skin lesions may occur as a consequence of the systemic dissemination of invasive mycoses, or after direct inoculation in the skin. Aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, Zygomycoses, dark mould infections, fusariosis and infections attributable to Scedosporium and Pseudallescheria species are the most common etiological agents. Cutaneous manifestations of fungal infection are not specific, and a high degree of suspicion is required, and prompt biopsy for histology and culture is needed. Therapy with lyposomal amphotericin B and new triazoles are effective. PMID:24938725

  20. Opportunistic Infections among People Living with HIV (PLHIV) with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Coastal City of South India

    PubMed Central

    Shalini, Shenoy; Vaman, Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS and Diabetes Mellitus are the diseases’ known to supress cell mediated immunity and predispose patients for opportunistic infections. Hence, we conducted a study to compare the common opportunistic infections (OIs) between People Living with HIV with DM (PLHIV-DM) and PLHIV without DM (PLHIV). Methodology PLHIV with DM and without DM (1:1) were prospectively included in the study from January 2011 to January 2012 at a tertiary care hospital in Mangalore city. Patients were classified as Diabetic if their fasting plasma glucose was ? 7.0mmol/l (126mg/dl) or 2–h plasma glucose was ?11.1mmol/l (200mg/dl). Standard procedures and techniques were followed for diagnosis of OIs as per WHO guidelines. The data was entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 11.5. Findings The study included 37 PLHIV with DM and 37 PLHIV without DM and both groups were treated with Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART). The median age was 47 years (IQR: 41-55years) for PLHIV-DM as compared to 40 years (IQR: 35–45.5 years) for PLHIV (p<0.0001). PLHIV-DM had median CD4 counts of 245 (IQR: 148–348) cells/?l compared to 150(IQR: 70–278) cells/?l for PLHIV (p = 0.02). Common OIs included oral candidiasis (49% of PLHIV-DM and 35% of PLHIV); Cryptococcal meningitis (19% of PLHIV-DM and 16% of PLHIV); Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (5% of PLHIV-DM and 18% of PLHIV); extra pulmonary tuberculosis (22% of PLHIV-DM and 34.5% of PLHIV); and Cerebral toxoplasmosis (11% of PLHIV–DM and 13.5% of PLHIV). Microbiological testing of samples from PLHIV- DM, C krusei was the most common Candida species isolated from 9 out of 18 samples. Out of six pulmonary TB samples cultured, four grew Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) and two Mycobacterium tuberculosis complexes. Conclusions Study did not identify any significant difference in profile of opportunistic infections (OIs) between PLHIV with and without Diabetes. PMID:26287949

  1. Use of Opportunistic Clinical Data and a Population Pharmacokinetic Model to Support Dosing of Clindamycin for Premature Infants to Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Melloni, Chiara; Yogev, Ram; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Mendley, Susan R.; Delmore, Paula; Sullivan, Janice E.; Autmizguine, Julie; Lewandowski, Andrew; Harper, Barrie; Watt, Kevin M.; Lewis, Kenneth C.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Clindamycin is commonly prescribed to treat children with skin and skin structure infections (including those caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA]), yet little is known about the pharmacokinetics (PK) across pediatric age groups. A population PK analysis was performed in NONMEM using samples collected in an opportunistic study from children receiving intravenous clindamycin per standard of care. The final model was used to optimize pediatric dosing to match adult exposure proven effective against CA-MRSA. A total of 194 plasma PK samples collected from 125 children were included in the analysis. Median age (range) was 3.3 years (0–20). Median dosing was 9.9 mg/kg/dose (3.8–15.1). A 1-compartment model described the data well. The final model included body weight and a sigmoidal maturation relationship between postmenstrual age (PMA) and clearance (CL): CL (L/h)=13.7*(weight/70)0.75*(PMA3.1/(43.63.1+PMA3.1)); V (L)=61.8*(weight/70). Maturation reached 50% adult CL values at ~44 weeks PMA. Our findings support age-based dosing. PMID:24949994

  2. Use of opportunistic clinical data and a population pharmacokinetic model to support dosing of clindamycin for premature infants to adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, D; Melloni, C; Yogev, R; Poindexter, B B; Mendley, S R; Delmore, P; Sullivan, J E; Autmizguine, J; Lewandowski, A; Harper, B; Watt, K M; Lewis, K C; Capparelli, E V; Benjamin, D K; Cohen-Wolkowiez, M

    2014-10-01

    Clindamycin is commonly prescribed to treat children with skin and skin-structure infections (including those caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA)), yet little is known about its pharmacokinetics (PK) across pediatric age groups. A population PK analysis was performed in NONMEM using samples collected in an opportunistic study from children receiving i.v. clindamycin per standard of care. The final model was used to optimize pediatric dosing to match adult exposure proven effective against CA-MRSA. A total of 194 plasma PK samples collected from 125 children were included in the analysis. A one-compartment model described the data well. The final model included body weight and a sigmoidal maturation relationship between postmenstrual age (PMA) and clearance (CL): CL (l/h) = 13.7 × (weight/70)(0.75) × (PMA(3.1)/(43.6(3.1) + PMA(3.1))); V (l) = 61.8 × (weight/70). Maturation reached 50% of adult CL values at ~44 weeks PMA. Our findings support age-based dosing. PMID:24949994

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Serratia rubidaea CIP 103234T Reference Strain, a Human-Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Bonnin, Rémy A.; Girlich, Delphine; Imanci, Dilek; Dortet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We provide here the first genome sequence of a Serratia rubidaea isolate, a human-opportunistic pathogen. This reference sequence will permit a comparison of this species with others of the Serratia genus. PMID:26586886

  4. GLXP BMT: Lunar Lander Mission Definition & Opportunistic Science during Nominal Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenarejo, P.; Mammarella, M.; Zaballa, M.; Claramunt, X.; García, C.; Martínez, A.

    2012-09-01

    The GLXP BMT "MoonRaise" mission is the Barcelona Moon Team Lunar Lander and Lunar exploration mission within the GLXP initiative. GMV is the mission technical leader and is in charge of the primary mission analysis that will later derive into the different mission subsystems and elements requirements and specifications for design and manufacturing. The classical scientific missions pivot around the scientific requirement and most of the mission elements design have the final purpose of fulfilling with the scientific requirements. This has the advantage of producing a dedicated mission to cope with all the scientific objectives (design-toperformance). The main drawback being the usually high mission complexity and cost. The GLXP BMT "MoonRaise" mission is a low cost mission and, thus, design-to-cost approach is used instead. Even if the "MoonRaise" mission will have some dedicated scientific objectives and dedicated resources, the maximization of the scientific content of the mission is a challenge in itself, and emphasis has to be placed in the imagination and achievement of opportunistic science while in nominal (nonscientific) operational phases. This paper presents the GLXP BMT "MoonRaise" mission architecture and mission approach and will identify potential opportunistic science targets with minimum impact on the Lunar Lander module and Rover module systems and at quasi-zero cost. The first section/s will be devoted to analyse the mission aspects, while the later section/s will be devoted to identification of interesting opportunistic science.

  5. Antifungal activity of synthetic naphthoquinones against dermatophytes and opportunistic fungi: preliminary mechanism-of-action tests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the antifungal activities of synthetic naphthoquinones against opportunistic and dermatophytic fungi and their preliminary mechanisms of action. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of four synthetic naphthoquinones for 89 microorganisms, including opportunistic yeast agents, dermatophytes and opportunistic filamentous fungi, were determined. The compound that exhibited the best activity was assessed for its action against the cell wall (sorbitol test), for interference associated with ergosterol interaction, for osmotic balance (K+ efflux) and for membrane leakage of substances that absorb at the wavelength of 260 nm. All tested naphthoquinones exhibited antifungal activity, and compound IVS320 (3a,10b-dihydro-1H-cyclopenta [b] naphtho [2,3-d] furan-5,10-dione)-dione) demonstrated the lowest MICs across the tested species. The MIC of IVS320 was particularly low for dermatophytes (values ranging from 5–28 ?g/mL) and Cryptococcus spp. (3–5 ?g/mL). In preliminary mechanism-of-action tests, IVS320 did not alter the fungal cell wall but did cause problems in terms of cell membrane permeability (efflux of K+ and leakage of substances that absorb at 260 nm). This last effect was unrelated to ergosterol interactions with the membrane. PMID:24998949

  6. Opportunistic Hybrid Transport Protocol (OHTP) for Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zikria, Yousaf Bin; Nosheen, Summera; Ishmanov, Farruh; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    The inefficient assignment of spectrum for different communications purposes, plus technology enhancements and ever-increasing usage of wireless technology is causing spectrum scarcity. To address this issue, one of the proposed solutions in the literature is to access the spectrum dynamically or opportunistically. Therefore, the concept of cognitive radio appeared, which opens up a new research paradigm. There is extensive research on the physical, medium access control and network layers. The impact of the transport layer on the performance of cognitive radio ad hoc sensor networks is still unknown/unexplored. The Internet's de facto transport protocol is not well suited to wireless networks because of its congestion control mechanism. We propose an opportunistic hybrid transport protocol for cognitive radio ad hoc sensor networks. We developed a new congestion control mechanism to differentiate true congestion from interruption loss. After such detection and differentiation, we propose methods to handle them opportunistically. There are several benefits to window- and rate-based protocols. To exploit the benefits of both in order to enhance overall system performance, we propose a hybrid transport protocol. We empirically calculate the optimal threshold value to switch between window- and rate-based mechanisms. We then compare our proposed transport protocol to Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)-friendly rate control, TCP-friendly rate control for cognitive radio, and TCP-friendly window-based control. We ran an extensive set of simulations in Network Simulator 2. The results indicate that the proposed transport protocol performs better than all the others. PMID:26694396

  7. Regrowth of Potential Opportunistic Pathogens and Algae in Reclaimed-Water Distribution Systems ?

    PubMed Central

    Jjemba, Patrick K.; Weinrich, Lauren A.; Cheng, Wei; Giraldo, Eugenio; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the quality of reclaimed water in treated effluent, after storage, and at three points in the distribution system of four plants in California, Florida, Massachusetts, and New York was conducted for 1 year. The plants had different treatment processes (conventional versus membrane bioreactor), production capacities, and methods for storage of the water, and the intended end uses of the water were different. The analysis focused on the occurrence of indicator bacteria (heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms, Escherichia coli, and enterococci) and opportunistic pathogens (Aeromonas spp., enteropathogenic E. coli O157:H7, Legionella spp., Mycobacterium spp., and Pseudomonas spp.), as well as algae. Using immunological methods, E. coli O157:H7 was detected in the effluent of only one system, but it was not detected at the sampling points, suggesting that its survival in the system was poor. Although all of the treatment systems effectively reduced the levels of bacteria in the effluent, bacteria regrew in the reservoir and distribution systems because of the loss of residual disinfectant and high assimilable organic carbon levels. In the systems with open reservoirs, algal growth reduced the water quality by increasing the turbidity and accumulating at the end of the distribution system. Opportunistic pathogens, notably Aeromonas, Legionella, Mycobacterium, and Pseudomonas, occurred more frequently than indicator bacteria (enterococci, coliforms, and E. coli). The Mycobacterium spp. were very diverse and occurred most frequently in membrane bioreactor systems, and Mycobacterium cookii was identified more often than the other species. The public health risk associated with these opportunistic pathogens in reclaimed water is unknown. Collectively, our results show the need to develop best management practices for reclaimed water to control bacterial regrowth and degradation of water before it is utilized at the point of use. PMID:20453149

  8. Epidemiology and genotype distribution of high risk human papillomavirus in population of hospital opportunistic screening

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Qiao; He, Xin; Xu, Sha-Sha; Qu, Jiu-Xin; Wang, Yue; Diao, Xiao-Li; Liu, Jun; Wang, Shu-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) in population of hospital opportunistic screening and to identify the correlation of prevalent genotypes and cervical cytological abnormalities. A cross-sectional study was employed between July 2013 and July 2014 in the Chaoyang hospital, in Beijing. Cervical samples were collected for the Type-specific HPV and the cervical cytological analyses in the population of hospital opportunistic screening. Total of 8975 samples from female patients aged 17-86 years were tested. Of these, 10.4% were infected by HR-HPV, the highest prevalence of HR-HPV in the youngest group and decreasing with aging (X2=19.68, P=0.02). Of these, 78.73% were single infections and 21.27% were multiple infections. Age-specific prevalence of multiple HPV exhibited a “U” shaped curve (X2=19.98, P=0.018). The most prevalent genotype is HPV 52, then descending order of frequency were HPV-58, 16, 39, 51, 56, 59, 18, 31, 33, 35, 68 and 45. 15.9% had an abnormal cytology in HR-HPV positive women, vs 4.13% in HR-HPV negative women. The prevalence of HR-HPV were 9.2%, 26.8%, 32%, 35.3% and 36.4% in normal cell, ASCUS, LSIL, ASC-H and HSIL, respectively (X2=234.67, P=0.000). Women with HPV 52, 16, 18, 58, 39, 51, 59, 56, 33, 31 infections related to the abnormal cytology, while the HPV68, 45, 35 didn’t. The prevalent characteristic in population of the hospital opportunistic screening is similar to the population of cervical screen, But the most five prevalent genotype in rank are different .Women with HR-HPV infections were more likely to have the cervical abnormal cytology. PMID:26629105

  9. Species Diversity and Polymorphism in the Exophiala spinifera Clade Containing Opportunistic Black Yeast-Like Fungi

    PubMed Central

    de Hoog, G. S.; Vicente, V.; Caligiorne, R. B.; Kantarcioglu, S.; Tintelnot, K.; Gerrits van den Ende, A. H. G.; Haase, G.

    2003-01-01

    A monophyletic group of black yeast-like fungi containing opportunistic pathogens around Exophiala spinifera is analyzed using sequences of the small-subunit (SSU) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of ribosomal DNA. The group contains yeast-like and annellidic species (anamorph genus Exophiala) in addition to sympodial taxa (anamorph genera Ramichloridium and Rhinocladiella). The new species Exophiala oligosperma, Ramichloridium basitonum, and Rhinocladiella similis are introduced and compared with their morphologically similar counterparts at larger phylogenetic distances outside the E. spinifera clade. Exophiala jeanselmei is redefined. New combinations are proposed in Exophiala: Exophiala exophialae for Phaeococcomyces exophialae and Exophiala heteromorpha for E. jeanselmei var. heteromorpha. PMID:14532218

  10. Evaluation of Robotic Systems to Carry Out Traverse Execution, Opportunistic Science, and Landing Site Evaluation Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Leonard, Matther J.; Pacal, Lee

    2011-01-01

    This report covers the execution of and results from the activities proposed and approved in Exploration Analogs and Mission Development (EAMD) Field Test Protocol HMP2010: Evaluation of Robotic Systems to carry out Traverse Execution, Opportunistic Science, and Landing Site Evaluation Tasks. The field tests documented in this report examine one facet of a larger program of planetary surface exploration. This program has been evolving and maturing for several years, growing from a broad policy statement with a few specified milestones for NASA to an international effort with much higher fidelity descriptions of systems and operations necessary to accomplish this type of exploration.

  11. Opportunistic Beamforming with Wireless Powered 1-bit Feedback Through Rectenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikidis, Ioannis

    2015-11-01

    This letter deals with the opportunistic beamforming (OBF) scheme for multi-antenna downlink with spatial randomness. In contrast to conventional OBF, the terminals return only 1-bit feedback, which is powered by wireless power transfer through a rectenna array. We study two fundamental topologies for the combination of the rectenna elements; the direct-current combiner and the radio-frequency combiner. The beam outage probability is derived in closed form for both combination schemes, by using high order statistics and stochastic geometry.

  12. Recent trends in the spectrum of opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy in South India

    PubMed Central

    Shahapur, Praveen R.; Bidri, Rajendra C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Opportunistic infections (OI) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals. The pattern of OIs differs widely, hence it is necessary to correlate spectrum of OIs and CD4 counts among HIV infected individuals in specific localities. Materials and Methods: The present study describes the clinical and laboratory profiles of different OIs among 55 HIV seropositive patients. CD4 count was estimated and antiretroviral therapy (ART) was started in 27 patients as per National Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Control Organization guidelines. These 27 patients were classified into stage 1, stage 2 and stage 3 based on CD4 counts of >500 cells/?l, 200-499 cells/?l and <200 cells/?l respectively. The OIs presented by respective groups were documented. Results: Pulmonary tuberculosis was found to be the most common OI constituting 43.6% of all cases followed by candidiasis (30.9%), cryptosporidial diarrhea (21.8%), herpes zoster (16.3%), cryptococcal meningitis (3.63%), Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (1.81%), and other miscellaneous infections (23.6%). Only 1 patient was found in stage I while 13 patients each were grouped in stage II or stage III. The mean CD4 count in our study population who were on ART was 230 ± 150 cells/µl. Conclusion: The pattern of OIs among our study group did not differ significantly from patients not receiving ART. The effect of ART on CD4 count differs from patient to patient based on the degree of depletion of CD4 count before the initiation of ART, drug adherence, concomitant OIs and their treatment. PMID:25097422

  13. Opportunistic Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... single page in Microsoft Word (.doc) format or Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. Click on the links below ... document in your browser and then print it. Adobe Acrobat PDF Microsoft Word You can print directly ...

  14. ALL THAT "PHRAG": BRINGING ENGINEERING, WETLAND ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, AND LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY TO BEAR ON THE QUESTION OF COMMON REED IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal wetlands are among the most fragmented and disturbed ecosystems and the Great Lakes are no exception. One possible result is the observed increase in the presence and dominance of invasive and other opportunistic plant species, such as the common reed (Phragmites australi...

  15. Linking the occurrence of cutaneous opportunistic fungal invaders with elemental concentrations in false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) skin.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Marnel; Przybylowicz, Wojciech; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Postma, Ferdinand; Thornton, Meredith; Archer, Edward; Botha, Alfred

    2015-10-01

    Cetaceans, occupying the top levels in marine food chains, are vulnerable to elevated levels of potentially toxic trace elements, such as aluminium (Al), mercury (Hg) and nickel (Ni). Negative effects associated with these toxic metals include infection by opportunistic microbial invaders. To corroborate the link between the presence of cutaneous fungal invaders and trace element levels, skin samples from 40 stranded false killer whales (FKWs) were analysed using culture techniques and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. Twenty-two skin samples yielded 18 clinically relevant fungal species. While evidence for bioaccumulation of Hg in the skin of the FKWs was observed, a strong link was found to exist between the occurrence of opportunistic fungal invaders and higher Al?:?Se and Al?:?Zn ratios. This study provides indications that elevated levels of some toxic metals, such as Al, contribute to immunotoxicity rendering FKWs susceptible to colonization by cutaneous opportunistic fungal invaders. PMID:26034019

  16. The presence of opportunistic pathogens, Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex, in South Australian reuse water distribution pipelines.

    PubMed

    Whiley, H; Keegan, A; Fallowfield, H; Bentham, R

    2015-06-01

    Water reuse has become increasingly important for sustainable water management. Currently, its application is primarily constrained by the potential health risks. Presently there is limited knowledge regarding the presence and fate of opportunistic pathogens along reuse water distribution pipelines. In this study opportunistic human pathogens Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction along two South Australian reuse water distribution pipelines at maximum concentrations of 10?, 10³ and 10? copies/mL, respectively. During the summer period of sampling the concentration of all three organisms significantly increased (P < 0.05) along the pipeline, suggesting multiplication and hence viability. No seasonality in the decrease in chlorine residual along the pipelines was observed. This suggests that the combination of reduced chlorine residual and increased water temperature promoted the presence of these opportunistic pathogens. PMID:26042986

  17. Allelopathic Interactions between the Opportunistic Species Ulva prolifera and the Native Macroalga Gracilaria lichvoides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Yitao; Li, Demao; Wang, Wei; Zhuang, Zhimeng; Ye, Naihao

    2012-01-01

    Allelopathy, one type of direct plant competition, can be a potent mechanism through which plant communities are structured. The aim of this study was to determine whether allelopathic interactions occur between the opportunistic green tide-forming species Ulva prolifera and the native macroalga Gracilaria lichvoides, both of which were collected from the coastline of East China sea. In laboratory experiments, the presence of G. lichvoides at 1.25 g wet weight L?1 significantly inhibited growth and photosynthesis of U. prolifera at concentrations of 1.25, 2.50, and 3.75 g wet weight L?1 (p<0.05) in both semi-continuous co-culture assays and in co-culture assays without nutrient supplementation. In contrast, although U. prolifera had a density effect on G. lichvoides, the differences among treatments were not significant (p>0.05). Culture medium experiments further confirmed that some allelochemicals may be released by both of the tested macroalgae, and these could account for the observed physiological inhibition of growth and photosynthesis. Moreover, the native macroalgae G. lichvoides was a stronger competitor than the opportunistic species U. prolifera. Collectively, the results of the present study represent a significant advance in exploring ecological questions about the effects of green tide blooms on the macroalgal community. PMID:22496758

  18. Heavy Metal Distribution in Opportunistic Beach Nourishment: A Case Study in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, Nikolaos G.; Synolakis, Costas

    2013-01-01

    The existence and distribution of persistent pollutants, such as heavy metals, in coastal sediment used for opportunistic beach nourishment, is a problem that has not received much attention. Here, we assessed the coastal sediments in one restoration project for the occurrence and distribution of heavy metals, by utilizing an Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) system. Heavy metal point sources included (i) the effluents of small industries (tanneries), (ii) wastewater treatment plant effluents, and (iii) paint and oil scraps from substandard ship maintenance activities that take place on ports breakwaters. A few neighboring beaches were found to have similar heavy metal concentrations, with mean values of Cu, Zn, and Pb ranging from 80 to 130, 15 to 25, and 25 to 40?mg/kg, respectively. Existing legislation regarding dredging activities in Greece appears insufficient for sustainable and environmentally friendly nourishment. We conclude that before opportunistic beach restoration projects materialize with material borrowed from ports and harbors the quality of the dredged material needs to be assessed. PMID:24379742

  19. From Environment to Man: Genome Evolution and Adaptation of Human Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Aujoulat, Fabien; Roger, Frédéric; Bourdier, Alice; Lotthé, Anne; Lamy, Brigitte; Marchandin, Hélène; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    Environment is recognized as a huge reservoir for bacterial species and a source of human pathogens. Some environmental bacteria have an extraordinary range of activities that include promotion of plant growth or disease, breakdown of pollutants, production of original biomolecules, but also multidrug resistance and human pathogenicity. The versatility of bacterial life-style involves adaptation to various niches. Adaptation to both open environment and human specific niches is a major challenge that involves intermediate organisms allowing pre-adaptation to humans. The aim of this review is to analyze genomic features of environmental bacteria in order to explain their adaptation to human beings. The genera Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Ochrobactrum provide valuable examples of opportunistic behavior associated to particular genomic structure and evolution. Particularly, we performed original genomic comparisons among aeromonads and between the strictly intracellular pathogens Brucella spp. and the mild opportunistic pathogens Ochrobactrum spp. We conclude that the adaptation to human could coincide with a speciation in action revealed by modifications in both genomic and population structures. This adaptation-driven speciation could be a major mechanism for the emergence of true pathogens besides the acquisition of specialized virulence factors. PMID:24704914

  20. [AIDS in Denmark. 1. Opportunistic infections and malignant diseases. Danish Study Group for HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Lundgren, J D; Bentsen, K D; Pedersen, C; Gerstoft, J; Seefeldt-Nielsen, T; Nielsen, T L; Jensen, G F

    1995-03-01

    To examine the distribution of AIDS-defining illnesses among Danish AIDS patients, data on 687 AIDS patients diagnosed in the period from 1980 to 1990 (93% of all reported cases in the period) were collected. The most frequent AIDS-defining illness was Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia followed by candida oesophagitis and Kaposis sarcoma. The proportion of homo/bisexual men presenting with Kaposis sarcoma as the initial AIDS-defining illness declined over time. Patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis had higher CD4 cell counts than patients presenting with other illnesses. Cytomegalovirus chorioretinitis and atypical mycobacteriosis were seen more frequently after the time of the AIDS diagnosis, and a low CD4 cell count at time of the AIDS diagnosis was a significant predictor for the development of these opportunistic infections during follow-up. Danish AIDS patients present with a wide spectrum of HIV-related illnesses, reflecting their exposure to opportunistic microorganisms and the degree of immune deficiency. The pattern of HIV-related illnesses is changing over time, and therefore continuous surveillance is needed to optimize therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. PMID:7709482

  1. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... headaches . Home > Migraine and Common Morbidities Print Email Migraine and Common Morbidities ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine and Common Morbidities For many patients, migraine is ...

  2. Common Breastfeeding Challenges

    MedlinePLUS

    ... email address Submit Home > Breastfeeding > Common breastfeeding challenges Breastfeeding This information in Spanish ( en español ) Common breastfeeding challenges Sore nipples Low milk supply Oversupply of ...

  3. Up-Regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 in Dendritic Cells in Response to HIV Type 1 and Coinfection with Opportunistic Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Arteaga, Jose; Paul, Stéphane; Kumar, Ajit; Latz, Eicke; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The ability to trigger an innate immune response against opportunistic pathogens associated with HIV-1 infection is an important aspect of AIDS pathogenesis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in innate immunity against pathogens, but in HIV-1 patients coinfected with opportunistic infections, the regulation of TLR expression has not been studied. In this context, we have evaluated the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in monocytes, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and myeloid dendritic cells of HIV-1 patients with or without opportunistic infections. Forty-nine HIV-1-infected individuals were classified according to viral load, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and the presence or absence of opportunistic infections, and 21 healthy subjects served as controls. Increased expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was observed in myeloid dendritic cells of HIV-1 patients coinfected with opportunistic infections (without HAART), while TLR4 increased in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, compared to both HIV-1 without opportunistic infections and healthy subjects. Moreover, TLR2 expression was higher in patients with opportunistic infections without HAART and up-regulation of TLR expression in HIV-1 patients coinfected with opportunistic infections was more pronounced in dendritic cells derived from individuals coinfected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results indicate that TLR expression in innate immune cells is up-regulated in patients with a high HIV-1 load and coinfected with opportunistic pathogens. We suggest that modulation of TLRs expression represents a mechanism that promotes HIV-1 replication and AIDS pathogenesis in patients coinfected with opportunistic pathogens. PMID:21406030

  4. On the Feasibility of Opportunistic Ad Hoc Music Sharing Barbara Keller, Philippe von Bergen, Roger Wattenhofer, Samuel Welten

    E-print Network

    called smartphones, people started to store their music on their phones. Although the way of stor- ing traces of the Lausanne data collection campaign to demonstrate the feasibility of opportunistic ad- hoc, and sharing with people with- out the need to meet physically. With the development of mobile phones to so

  5. Introduction of an opportunistic bacterial cotton pathogen into bolls by the southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, seed and boll rot associated with microorganism infections have had a significantly negative impact on cotton yield in southeastern Cotton Belt states. Based on Koch’s postulates, we previously established that an opportunistic strain of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans, originall...

  6. Position statement on opportunistic genomic screening from the Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors (UK and Ireland).

    PubMed

    Middleton, Anna; Patch, Chris; Wiggins, Jennifer; Barnes, Kathy; Crawford, Gill; Benjamin, Caroline; Bruce, Anita

    2014-08-01

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics released recommendations for reporting incidental findings (IFs) in clinical exome and genome sequencing. These suggest 'opportunistic genomic screening' should be available to both adults and children each time a sequence is done and would be undertaken without seeking preferences from the patient first. Should opportunistic genomic screening be implemented in the United Kingdom, the Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors (AGNC), which represents British and Irish genetic counsellors and nurses, feels strongly that the following must be considered (see article for complete list): (1) Following appropriate genetic counselling, patients should be allowed to consent to or opt out of opportunistic genomic screening. (2) If true IFs are discovered the AGNC are guided by the report from the Joint Committee on Medical Genetics about the sharing of genetic testing results. (3) Children should not be routinely tested for adult-onset conditions. (4) The formation of a list of variants should involve a representative from the AGNC as well as a patient support group. (5) The variants should be for serious or life-threatening conditions for which there are treatments or preventative strategies available. (6) There needs to be robust evidence that the benefits of opportunistic screening outweigh the potential harms. (7) The clinical validity and utility of variants should be known. (8) There must be a quality assurance framework that operates to International standards for laboratory testing. (9) Psychosocial research is urgently needed in this area to understand the impact on patients. PMID:24398792

  7. A novel fluorescence imaging technique combining deconvolution microscopy and spectral analysis for quantitative detection of opportunistic pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Le Puil, Michael; Biggerstaff, John P.; Weidow, B.; Price, Jeffery R; Naser, S.; White, D.C.; Alberte, R.

    2006-01-01

    A novel fluorescence imaging technique based on deconvolution microscopy and spectral analysis is presented here as an alternative to confocal laser scanning microscopy. It allowed rapid, specific and simultaneous identification of five major opportunistic pathogens, relevant for public health, in suspension and provided quantitative results.

  8. Animal-associated opportunistic infections among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Glaser, C A; Angulo, F J; Rooney, J A

    1994-01-01

    A number of animal-associated infections occur in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), including those due to Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptosporidium, Microsporida, Salmonella, Campylo-bacter, Giardia, Rhodococcus equi, Rochalimaea, and Listeria monocytogenes. Most of these infections, with the exception of those due to Rochalimaea, appear to be acquired by the immunosuppressed individual from sources other than exposure to animals. Drs. Glaser and colleagues review our current understanding of the role of exposure to animals, especially pets, in the natural history of these opportunistic infections. They suggest that the risk of zoonotic transmission is small and offer practical suggestions designed to reduce this low risk. They conclude that the benefits of animal companionship outweigh the risks to patients and that prohibition of pet ownership by individuals infected with HIV is not warranted. PMID:8054433

  9. Opportunistic Pathogens Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) and Legionella spp. Colonise Model Shower

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, Harriet; Giglio, Steven; Bentham, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Legionella spp. and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are opportunistic pathogens of public health concern. Hot water systems, including showers, have been identified as a potential source of infection. This paper describes the colonization of Legionella and MAC on the flexible tubing within a model potable shower system, utilizing thermostatic mixing and a flexible shower head. A MAC qPCR method of enumeration was also developed. MAC and Legionella spp. were detected within the biofilm at maximum concentrations of 7.0 × 104 and 2.0 × 103 copies/cm2 PVC tubing respectively. No significant changes were observed between sample of the flexible shower tubing that dried between uses and those that remained filled with water. This suggested the “unhooking” showerheads and allowing them to dry is not an effective method to reduce the risk of Legionella or MAC colonisation. PMID:26213977

  10. Discrete-time Queuing Analysis of Opportunistic Spectrum Access: Single User Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-long; Xu, Yu-hua; Gao, Zhan; Wu, Qi-hui

    2011-11-01

    This article studies the discrete-time queuing dynamics of opportunistic spectrum access (OSA) systems, in which the secondary user seeks spectrum vacancies between bursty transmissions of the primary user to communicate. Since spectrum sensing and data transmission can not be performed simultaneously, the secondary user employs a sensing-then-transmission strategy to detect the presence of the primary user before accessing the licensed channel. Consequently, the transmission of the secondary user is periodically suspended for spectrum sensing. To capture the discontinuous transmission nature of the secondary user, we introduce a discrete-time queuing subjected to bursty preemption to describe the behavior of the secondary user. Specifically, we derive some important metrics of the secondary user, including secondary spectrum utilization ratio, buffer length, packet delay and packet dropping ratio. Finally, simulation results validate the proposed theoretical model and reveal that the theoretical results fit the simulated results well.

  11. Expanding fungal pathogenesis: Cryptococcus species break out of the opportunistic box

    PubMed Central

    Kronstad, James W.; Attarian, Rodgoun; Cadieux, Brigitte; Choi, Jaehyuk; D’Souza, Cletus A.; Griffiths, Emma J.; Geddes, Jennifer M.H.; Hu, Guanggan; Jung, Won Hee; Kretschmer, Matthias; Saikia, Sanjay; Wang, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Preface Cryptococcus neoformans is generally considered an opportunistic fungal pathogen because of its tendency to infect immunocompromised individuals, particularly those infected with HIV. However, this view has been challenged by recent discoveries of specialized interactions between the fungus and its mammalian hosts, and by the emergence of the related species Cryptococcus gattii as a primary pathogen of immunocompetent populations. In this Review, we highlight features of cryptococcal pathogens that reveal their adaptation to the mammalian environment. These features include remarkably sophisticated interactions with phagocytic cells to promote intracellular survival, dissemination to the central nervous system and escape, as well as surprising morphological and genomic adaptations such as the formation of polyploid giant cells in the lung. PMID:21326274

  12. Opportunistic Pathogens Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) and Legionella spp. Colonise Model Shower.

    PubMed

    Whiley, Harriet; Giglio, Steven; Bentham, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Legionella spp. and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are opportunistic pathogens of public health concern. Hot water systems, including showers, have been identified as a potential source of infection. This paper describes the colonization of Legionella and MAC on the flexible tubing within a model potable shower system, utilizing thermostatic mixing and a flexible shower head. A MAC qPCR method of enumeration was also developed. MAC and Legionella spp. were detected within the biofilm at maximum concentrations of 7.0 × 104 and 2.0 × 103 copies/cm2 PVC tubing respectively. No significant changes were observed between sample of the flexible shower tubing that dried between uses and those that remained filled with water. This suggested the "unhooking" showerheads and allowing them to dry is not an effective method to reduce the risk of Legionella or MAC colonisation. PMID:26213977

  13. Eukaryotic opportunists dominate the deep-subsurface biosphere in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Borgonie, G; Linage-Alvarez, B; Ojo, A O; Mundle, S O C; Freese, L B; Van Rooyen, C; Kuloyo, O; Albertyn, J; Pohl, C; Cason, E D; Vermeulen, J; Pienaar, C; Litthauer, D; Van Niekerk, H; Van Eeden, J; Lollar, B Sherwood; Onstott, T C; Van Heerden, E

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the first Eukarya in the deep subsurface, intense interest has developed to understand the diversity of eukaryotes living in these extreme environments. We identified that Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida and Arthropoda are thriving at 1.4?km depths in palaeometeoric fissure water up to 12,300?yr old in South African mines. Protozoa and Fungi have also been identified; however, they are present in low numbers. Characterization of the different species reveals that many are opportunistic organisms with an origin due to recharge from surface waters rather than soil leaching. This is the first known study to demonstrate the in situ distribution of biofilms on fissure rock faces using video documentation. Calculations suggest that food, not dissolved oxygen is the limiting factor for eukaryal population growth. The discovery of a group of Eukarya underground has important implications for the search for life on other planets in our solar system. PMID:26597082

  14. Eukaryotic opportunists dominate the deep-subsurface biosphere in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Borgonie, G.; Linage-Alvarez, B.; Ojo, A. O.; Mundle, S.O.C.; Freese, L B.; Van Rooyen, C.; Kuloyo, O.; Albertyn, J.; Pohl, C.; Cason, E. D.; Vermeulen, J.; Pienaar, C.; Litthauer, D.; Van Niekerk, H.; Van Eeden, J.; Lollar, B. Sherwood.; Onstott, T. C.; Van Heerden, E.

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the first Eukarya in the deep subsurface, intense interest has developed to understand the diversity of eukaryotes living in these extreme environments. We identified that Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida and Arthropoda are thriving at 1.4?km depths in palaeometeoric fissure water up to 12,300?yr old in South African mines. Protozoa and Fungi have also been identified; however, they are present in low numbers. Characterization of the different species reveals that many are opportunistic organisms with an origin due to recharge from surface waters rather than soil leaching. This is the first known study to demonstrate the in situ distribution of biofilms on fissure rock faces using video documentation. Calculations suggest that food, not dissolved oxygen is the limiting factor for eukaryal population growth. The discovery of a group of Eukarya underground has important implications for the search for life on other planets in our solar system. PMID:26597082

  15. Vegetable microbiomes: is there a connection among opportunistic infections, human health and our ‘gut feeling'?

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Gabriele; Erlacher, Armin; Smalla, Kornelia; Krause, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The highly diverse microbiomes of vegetables are reservoirs for opportunistic and emerging pathogens. In recent years, an increased consumption, larger scale production and more efficient distribution of vegetables together with an increased number of immunocompromised individuals resulted in an enhanced number of documented outbreaks of human infections associated with the consumption of vegetables. Here we discuss the occurrence of potential pathogens in vegetable microbiomes, the impact of farming and processing practices, and plant and human health issues. Based on these results, we discuss the question if vegetables can serve as a source of infection for immunocompromised individuals as well as possible solutions to avoid outbreaks. Moreover, the potentially positive aspects of the vegetables microbiome for the gut microbiota and human health are presented. PMID:25186140

  16. Use of opportunistic sightings and expert knowledge to predict and compare Whooping Crane stopover habitat.

    PubMed

    Hefley, Trevor J; Baasch, David M; Tyre, Andrew J; Blankenship, Erin E

    2015-10-01

    Predicting a species' distribution can be helpful for evaluating management actions such as critical habitat designations under the U.S. Endangered Species Act or habitat acquisition and rehabilitation. Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) are one of the rarest birds in the world, and conservation and management of habitat is required to ensure their survival. We developed a species distribution model (SDM) that could be used to inform habitat management actions for Whooping Cranes within the state of Nebraska (U.S.A.). We collated 407 opportunistic Whooping Crane group records reported from 1988 to 2012. Most records of Whooping Cranes were contributed by the public; therefore, developing an SDM that accounted for sampling bias was essential because observations at some migration stopover locations may be under represented. An auxiliary data set, required to explore the influence of sampling bias, was derived with expert elicitation. Using our SDM, we compared an intensively managed area in the Central Platte River Valley with the Niobrara National Scenic River in northern Nebraska. Our results suggest, during the peak of migration, Whooping Crane abundance was 262.2 (90% CI 40.2-3144.2) times higher per unit area in the Central Platte River Valley relative to the Niobrara National Scenic River. Although we compared only 2 areas, our model could be used to evaluate any region within the state of Nebraska. Furthermore, our expert-informed modeling approach could be applied to opportunistic presence-only data when sampling bias is a concern and expert knowledge is available. PMID:25926004

  17. Structural diversity and biological significance of glycosphingolipids in pathogenic and opportunistic fungi.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luciana L; Toledo, Marcos S; Ferreira, Felipe A S; Straus, Anita H; Takahashi, Helio K

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are ubiquitous membrane components and have key roles in biological systems, acting as second messengers or modulators of signal transduction by affecting several events, ranging from cell adhesion, cell growth, cell motility, regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle. Over the last 20 years our laboratory and other research groups determined the glycan and ceramide structures of more than 20 GSLs from several pathogenic/opportunistic fungi, using a combination of gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance as well as other immunochemical and biochemical techniques. Fungal GSLs can be divided in two major classes: neutral GSLs, galactosyl- and glucosylceramide (GlcCer), and acidic GSLs, the glycosylinositol-phosphorylceramides (GIPCs). Glycosyl structures in fungal GIPCs exhibited significant structural diversity and distinct composition when compared to mammalian GSLs, e.g., the expression of inositol-mannose and inositol-glucosamine cores and the terminal residue of ?-D-galactofuranose which are absent in mammalian cells. Studies performed by our group demonstrated that GIPC (Galf? 6[Man?3]Man?2InsPCer) elicited in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis an immune response with production of antibodies directed to the terminal residue of ?-D-galactofuranose. Further studies also showed that inhibition of GlcCer biosynthetic pathways affects fungal colony formation, spore germination and hyphal growth, indicating that enzymes involved in GlcCer biosynthesis may represent promising targets for the therapy of fungal infections. Recently, it was shown that GlcCer and GIPCs are preferentially localized in membrane microdomains and monoclonal antibodies directed to these GSLs interfere in several fungal biological processes such as growth and morphological transition. This review focuses on glycan structures carried on sphingolipids of pathogenic/opportunistic fungi, and aspects of their biological significance are discussed. PMID:25309884

  18. The Genomic Aftermath of Hybridization in the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida metapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Németh, Tibor; Saus, Ester; Ksiezopolska, Ewa; Heged?sová, Eva; Nosek, Jozef; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Gacser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Candida metapsilosis is a rarely-isolated, opportunistic pathogen that belongs to a clade of pathogenic yeasts known as the C. parapsilosis sensu lato species complex. To gain insight into the recent evolution of C. metapsilosis and the genetic basis of its virulence, we sequenced the genome of 11 clinical isolates from various locations, which we compared to each other and to the available genomes of the two remaining members of the complex: C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis. Unexpectedly, we found compelling genomic evidence that C. metapsilosis is a highly heterozygous hybrid species, with all sequenced clinical strains resulting from the same past hybridization event involving two parental lineages that were approximately 4.5% divergent in sequence. This result indicates that the parental species are non-pathogenic, but that hybridization between them formed a new opportunistic pathogen, C. metapsilosis, that has achieved a worldwide distribution. We show that these hybrids are diploid and we identified strains carrying loci for both alternative mating types, which supports mating as the initial mechanism for hybrid formation. We trace the aftermath of this hybridization at the genomic level, and reconstruct the evolutionary relationships among the different strains. Recombination and introgression -resulting in loss of heterozygosis- between the two subgenomes have been rampant, and includes the partial overwriting of the MTLa mating locus in all strains. Collectively, our results shed light on the recent genomic evolution within the C. parapsilosis sensu lato complex, and argue for a re-definition of species within this clade, with at least five distinct homozygous lineages, some of which having the ability to form hybrids. PMID:26517373

  19. Common Career Technical Core: Common Standards, Common Vision for CTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium's (NASDCTEc) Common Career Technical Core (CCTC), a state-led initiative that was created to ensure that career and technical education (CTE) programs are consistent and high quality across the United States. Forty-two states,…

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P.; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S. aurantiacum strains. This study shows that P. aeruginosa has a substantial inhibitory effect on the growth of the recently described CF fungal pathogen S. aurantiacum. The findings also highlighted that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation is important but not crucial for inhibiting the growth of S. aurantiacum in a lung- mimicking environment. PMID:26379643

  1. Controversies in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Sam; Winsto, Alan; Letendre, Scott; Michael, Benedict D; McArthur, Justin C; Khoo, Saye; Solomon, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies show that around half of individuals infected with HIV-1 have some degree of cognitive impairment despite the use of antiretroviral drugs. However, prevalence estimates vary depending on the population and methods used to assess cognitive impairment. Whether asymptomatic patients would benefit from routine screening for cognitive difficulties is unclear and the appropriate screening method and subsequent management is the subject of debate. In some patients, HIV-1 RNA can be found at higher concentrations in CSF than in blood, which potentially results from the poor distribution of antiretroviral drugs into the CNS. However, the clinical relevance of so-called CSF viral escape is not well understood. The extent to which antiretroviral drug distribution and toxicity in the CNS affect clinical decision making is also debated. PMID:25316020

  2. HIV-Associated TB: Facts 2013

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HIV ACTIVITIES: RESPONSE & PROGRESS ? Between 2005 and 2011 implementation of the collaborative TB/HIV activities saved an ... echnical and practical “ how to” considerations for rapid implementation of the Xpert MTB/ RIF diagnostic test which ...

  3. Canonical Commonality Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leister, K. Dawn

    Commonality analysis is a method of partitioning variance that has advantages over more traditional "OVA" methods. Commonality analysis indicates the amount of explanatory power that is "unique" to a given predictor variable and the amount of explanatory power that is "common" to or shared with at least one predictor variable. This paper outlines…

  4. How Common Is the Common Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Amande; Edson, Alden J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) in 2010, stakeholders in adopting states have engaged in a variety of activities to understand CCSSM standards and transition from previous state standards. These efforts include research, professional development, assessment and modification of curriculum resources,…

  5. Microbial diversities (16S and 18S rDNA gene pyrosequencing) and environmental pathogens within drinking water biofilms grown on the common premise plumbing materials unplasticized polyvinylchloride and copper

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water (DW) biofilm communities influence the survival of opportunistic pathogens, e.g. Legionella pneumophila, via parasitization of free-living amoebae such as Acanthamoebae. Yet knowledge about the microbial composition of DW biofilms developed on common in-premise pl...

  6. USE OF THE GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM TO INVESTIGATE MERCURY LEVELS IN CORRELATION WITH POSTMORTEM FINDINGS OF ASPERGILLUS INDUCED LESIONS IN THE COMMON LOON (GAVIA IMMER) IN THE NORTHEASTERN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study employed the Geographic Information System (GIS) to correlate total mercury levels in liver tissue with post-mortem findings of aspergillosis in common loons (Gavia immer) in the northeast United States of America (USA). Aspergillosis is an opportunistic fungal infecti...

  7. Risk of Cataract among Subjects with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Free of Ocular Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, John H.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Varma, Rohit; Dunn, James P.; Heinemann, Murk-Hein; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lyon, Alice T.; Lewis, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk of cataract in the setting of AIDS. Design Prospective cohort study. Participants Subjects with AIDS free of ocular opportunistic infections throughout catamnesis. Methods During 1998–2008 inclusive, subjects ?13 years of age were enrolled. Demographic characteristics and clinical characteristics were documented at enrollment and semiannually. Main Outcome Measures Cataract was defined as high-grade lens opacity observed by biomicroscopy and judged to be the cause of a best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/40. Eyes that underwent cataract surgery during follow-up were considered to have developed cataract prior to the first visit when pseudophakia or aphakia was observed. Results Among 1,606 participants (3,212 eyes), at enrollment 1.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3%?2.7%) were observed to have cataract or prior cataract surgery. Among the 2,812 eyes initially free of cataract, and followed longitudinally (median follow-up=4.6 years), the incidence of cataract was 0.37%/eye-year (95% CI: 0.26%– 0.53%). In addition to age, significant cataract risk factors included prior cataract in the contralateral eye (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=21.6, 95% CI: 10.4–44.8), anterior segment inflammation (aHR=4.40, 95% CI: 1.64–11.9), prior retinal detachment (aHR=4.94, 95% CI: 2.21–11.0), and vitreous inflammation (aHR=7.12, 95% CI: 2.02– 25.0), each studied as a time-updated characteristic. Detectable HIV RNA in peripheral blood was associated with lower risk of cataract at enrollment (adjusted odds ratio=0.32, 95% CI: 0.12–0.80) but not of incident cataract (aHR=1.58, 95% CI: 0.90–2.76). After adjustment for other factors, neither the then current absolute CD4+ T cell count nor antiretroviral therapy status showed consistent association with cataract risk, nor did an additive diagnosis of other other co-morbidities. Compared to the available population-based studies that used similar definitions of cataract, the age-specific prevalence of cataract in our cohort was higher than in one of two such studies, and the age-specific incidence of cataract surgery was higher. Conclusions Our results suggest cataract may occur earlier among patients with AIDS free of ocular opportunistic infections than in the general population. Cataract risk was associated most strongly with age and with other ocular morbidity in this population. With improved survival, the burden of cataract likely will increase for persons with HIV/AIDS. PMID:25109932

  8. Complete genome and gene expression analyses of Asaia bogorensis reveal unique responses to culture with mammalian cells as a potential opportunistic human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Mikihiko; Higashiura, Norie; Hayasaki, Kimie; Okamoto, Naruhei; Takami, Akiko; Hirakawa, Hideki; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Azuma, Yoshinao

    2015-10-01

    Asaia bogorensis, a member of acetic acid bacteria (AAB), is an aerobic bacterium isolated from flowers and fruits, as well as an opportunistic pathogen that causes human peritonitis and bacteraemia. Here, we determined the complete genomic sequence of the As. bogorensis type strain NBRC 16594, and conducted comparative analyses of gene expression under different conditions of co-culture with mammalian cells and standard AAB culture. The genome of As. bogorensis contained 2,758 protein-coding genes within a circular chromosome of 3,198,265 bp. There were two complete operons encoding cytochrome bo3-type ubiquinol terminal oxidases: cyoABCD-1 and cyoABCD-2. The cyoABCD-1 operon was phylogenetically common to AAB genomes, whereas the cyoABCD-2 operon belonged to a lineage distinctive from the cyoABCD-1 operon. Interestingly, cyoABCD-1 was less expressed under co-culture conditions than under the AAB culture conditions, whereas the converse was true for cyoABCD-2. Asaia bogorensis shared pathogenesis-related genes with another pathogenic AAB, Granulibacter bethesdensis, including a gene coding pathogen-specific large bacterial adhesin and additional genes for the inhibition of oxidation and antibiotic resistance. Expression alteration of the respiratory chain and unique hypothetical genes may be key traits that enable the bacterium to survive under the co-culture conditions. PMID:26358298

  9. Complete genome and gene expression analyses of Asaia bogorensis reveal unique responses to culture with mammalian cells as a potential opportunistic human pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Mikihiko; Higashiura, Norie; Hayasaki, Kimie; Okamoto, Naruhei; Takami, Akiko; Hirakawa, Hideki; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Azuma, Yoshinao

    2015-01-01

    Asaia bogorensis, a member of acetic acid bacteria (AAB), is an aerobic bacterium isolated from flowers and fruits, as well as an opportunistic pathogen that causes human peritonitis and bacteraemia. Here, we determined the complete genomic sequence of the As. bogorensis type strain NBRC 16594, and conducted comparative analyses of gene expression under different conditions of co-culture with mammalian cells and standard AAB culture. The genome of As. bogorensis contained 2,758 protein-coding genes within a circular chromosome of 3,198,265 bp. There were two complete operons encoding cytochrome bo3-type ubiquinol terminal oxidases: cyoABCD-1 and cyoABCD-2. The cyoABCD-1 operon was phylogenetically common to AAB genomes, whereas the cyoABCD-2 operon belonged to a lineage distinctive from the cyoABCD-1 operon. Interestingly, cyoABCD-1 was less expressed under co-culture conditions than under the AAB culture conditions, whereas the converse was true for cyoABCD-2. Asaia bogorensis shared pathogenesis-related genes with another pathogenic AAB, Granulibacter bethesdensis, including a gene coding pathogen-specific large bacterial adhesin and additional genes for the inhibition of oxidation and antibiotic resistance. Expression alteration of the respiratory chain and unique hypothetical genes may be key traits that enable the bacterium to survive under the co-culture conditions. PMID:26358298

  10. Constraint satisfaction using a hybrid evolutionary hill-climbing algorithm that performs opportunistic arc and path revision

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, J.; Dozier, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper introduces a hybrid evolutionary hill-climbing algorithm that quickly solves (Constraint Satisfaction Problems (CSPs)). This hybrid uses opportunistic arc and path revision in an interleaved fashion to reduce the size of the search space and to realize when to quit if a CSP is based on an inconsistent constraint network. This hybrid outperforms a well known hill-climbing algorithm, the Iterative Descent Method, on a test suite of 750 randomly generated CSPs.

  11. Effective but Costly, Evolved Mechanisms of Defense against a Virulent Opportunistic Pathogen in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yixin H.; Chenoweth, Stephen F.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila harbor substantial genetic variation for antibacterial defense, and investment in immunity is thought to involve a costly trade-off with life history traits, including development, life span, and reproduction. To understand the way in which insects invest in fighting bacterial infection, we selected for survival following systemic infection with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster over 10 generations. We then examined genome-wide changes in expression in the selected flies relative to unselected controls, both of which had been infected with the pathogen. This powerful combination of techniques allowed us to specifically identify the genetic basis of the evolved immune response. In response to selection, population-level survivorship to infection increased from 15% to 70%. The evolved capacity for defense was costly, however, as evidenced by reduced longevity and larval viability and a rapid loss of the trait once selection pressure was removed. Counter to expectation, we observed more rapid developmental rates in the selected flies. Selection-associated changes in expression of genes with dual involvement in developmental and immune pathways suggest pleiotropy as a possible mechanism for the positive correlation. We also found that both the Toll and the Imd pathways work synergistically to limit infectivity and that cellular immunity plays a more critical role in overcoming P. aeruginosa infection than previously reported. This work reveals novel pathways by which Drosophila can survive infection with a virulent pathogen that may be rare in wild populations, however, due to their cost. PMID:19381251

  12. Genetic Identification of the Main Opportunistic Mucorales by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Machouart, M.; Larché, J.; Burton, K.; Collomb, J.; Maurer, P.; Cintrat, A.; Biava, M. F.; Greciano, S.; Kuijpers, A. F. A.; Contet-Audonneau, N.; de Hoog, G. S.; Gérard, A.; Fortier, B.

    2006-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare and opportunistic infection caused by fungi belonging to the order Mucorales. Recent reports have demonstrated an increasing incidence of mucormycosis, which is frequently lethal, especially in patients suffering from severe underlying conditions such as immunodeficiency. In addition, even though conventional mycology and histopathology assays allow for the identification of Mucorales, they often fail in offering a species-specific diagnosis. Due to the lack of other laboratory tests, a precise identification of these molds is thus notoriously difficult. In this study we aimed to develop a molecular biology tool to identify the main Mucorales involved in human pathology. A PCR strategy selectively amplifies genomic DNA from molds belonging to the genera Absidia, Mucor, Rhizopus, and Rhizomucor, excluding human DNA and DNA from other filamentous fungi and yeasts. A subsequent digestion step identified the Mucorales at genus and species level. This technique was validated using both fungal cultures and retrospective analyses of clinical samples. By enabling a rapid and precise identification of Mucorales strains in infected patients, this PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism-based method should help clinicians to decide on the appropriate treatment, consequently decreasing the mortality of mucormycosis. PMID:16517858

  13. [Microbiological results of bronchoalveolar lavage that was performed for opportunistic pulmonary infections].

    PubMed

    Gülcü, Aylin; Sevinç, Can; Esen, Nuran; Kilinç, O?uz; Uçan, Eyüp Sabri; Itil, Oya; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet; Kömüs, Nuray; Sener, Gülper; Akkoçlu, Atila; Gülay, Zeynep; Yücesoy, Mine

    2006-01-01

    Between 2001-2002; in 62 cases, 33 (53%) male, 29 (47%) female, mean age 51.4 +/- 18.1 years) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for diagnosis of opportunistic pulmonary infection and specimens were evaluated for results of microbiological examinations. There was hematological malignancy in 18 (29%) and solid organ malignancy in 13 (21%) cases. Thirty-one (50%) cases were immunocompromised for reasons other than malignancy. By endoscopic evaluation endobronchial lesion was seen in 2 (3%) cases, indirect tumor signs were seen in 2 (3%) cases and signs of infection were seen in 11 (18%) cases. Forty-even (76%) cases were endoscopically normal. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) direct examination was positive in 3 (5%) cases. In 4 (6%) cases mycobacterial culture was positive, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also positive in these four cases. Examination of gram-stained smears for bacteria was associated with infection in 14 (23%) cases. Bacteriologic cultures were positive for single potential pathogen in 10 (16%) cases, and for mixed pathogens in 7 (11%) cases for a total number of 17 (27%). Fungal cultures were positive in 3 (5%) cases all of which had hematological malignancy. As a result in 24 (39%) cases microbiological agent of infection is determined: in four mycobacteria, in 17 bacteria other than mycobacteria and in three fungi. PMID:17001542

  14. Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa interactions: more than an opportunistic criminal association?

    PubMed

    Méar, J-B; Kipnis, E; Faure, E; Dessein, R; Schurtz, G; Faure, K; Guery, B

    2013-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans are frequently coexisting opportunistic pathogens, responsible for colonization and infection in predisposed patients. They share a virulence specificity relying on auto-inducing, cell density-dependent molecules named quorum-sensing (QS). C. albicans virulence depends on its QS that influences morphological switch from yeast to filamentous form. Similarly, the production of P. aeruginosa virulence factors depends partly on QS molecules. Interactions have been investigated and demonstrated in vitro. P. aeruginosa may kill C. albicans either by producing toxins, such as pyocyanin, or by direct contact on its biofilm-dependent filamentous form. Cross-kingdom communication is a more subtle interaction: C. albicans can adapt its morphology in the presence of P. aeruginosa QS molecules, and inhibit P. aeruginosa QS-dependent virulence factor secretion, through farnesol, one of its QS molecule. But the in vivo relevance of these interactions is still controversial, as models of airway colonization/infection by C. albicans followed by subsequent P. aeruginosa pneumonia give contradictory results, suggesting the probable involvement of the immune system as a third party player. Finally, the authors of clinical studies performed in ventilated patients, indicate that C. albicans colonization could be a risk factor for P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The clinical outcome of C. albicans and P. aeruginosa interaction is uncertain, the virulence modulation demonstrated in these interactions opens new possibilities for future anti-infectious therapeutics. PMID:23622953

  15. The Opportunistic Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes: Pathogenicity and Interaction with the Mucosal Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen causing listeriosis, an often fatal infection leading to meningitis, sepsis, or infection of the fetus and abortion in susceptible individuals. It was recently found that the bacterium can also cause acute, self-limiting febrile gastroenteritis in healthy individuals. In the intestinal tract, L. monocytogenes penetrates the mucosa directly via enterocytes, or indirectly via invasion of Peyer's patches. Animal models for L. monocytogenes infection have provided many insights into the mechanisms of pathogenesis, and the development of new model systems has allowed the investigation of factors that influence adaptation to the gastrointestinal environment as well as adhesion to and invasion of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract are permanently exposed to an enormous antigenic load derived from the gastrointestinal microbiota present in the human bowel. The integrity of the important epithelial barrier is maintained by the mucosal immune system and its interaction with the commensal flora via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the interaction of L. monocytogenes with the host immune system that triggers the antibacterial immune responses on the mucosal surfaces of the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21188219

  16. A dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid improves consumer performance during challenge with an opportunistic bacterial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Schlotz, Nina; Pester, Michael; Freese, Heike M; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik

    2014-11-01

    A dietary deficiency in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and/or sterols can severely constrain growth and reproduction of invertebrate consumers. Single nutrients are potentially assigned to different physiological processes, for example to support defence mechanisms; therefore, lipid requirements of healthy and pathogen-challenged consumers might differ. In an oral exposure experiment, we explored the effects of dietary PUFAs and cholesterol on growth, reproduction and survival of an aquatic key herbivore (Daphnia magna) exposed to an opportunistic pathogen (Pseudomonas sp.). We show that healthy and pathogen-challenged D. magna are strongly albeit differentially affected by the biochemical composition of their food sources. Supplementation of a C20 PUFA-deficient diet with arachidonic acid (ARA) resulted in increased survival and reproduction of pathogen-challenged D. magna. We propose that the observed benefit of consuming an ARA-rich diet during pathogen challenge is conveyed partially via ARA-derived eicosanoids. This study is one of the first to consider the importance of dietary PUFAs in modifying fitness parameters of pathogen-challenged invertebrate hosts. Our results suggest that dietary PUFA supply should receive increased attention in host-microorganisms interactions and invertebrate disease models to better understand and predict disease dynamics in natural populations. PMID:25098920

  17. New Zealand juvenile oyster mortality associated with ostreid herpesvirus 1-an opportunistic longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Keeling, S E; Brosnahan, C L; Williams, R; Gias, E; Hannah, M; Bueno, R; McDonald, W L; Johnston, C

    2014-07-01

    During the 2010-11 summer outbreak of ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) in New Zealand, an opportunistic longitudinal field study was conducted. OsHV-1 PCR-negative oyster spat (Crassostrea gigas) were relocated to an OsHV-1 PCR-positive area of the North Island of New Zealand that was experiencing juvenile oyster mortalities. Over a period of 13 d, spat were monitored for mortality, sampled for histopathology, and tested for the presence of OsHV-1 using real time PCR and Vibrio culture. Histopathology showed some evidence of tissue pathology; however, no consistent progressive pathology was apparent. Field mortalities were evident from Day 6 on. After 5 and 7 d of exposure, 83 and 100% of spat, respectively, tested positive for the virus by real time PCR. Vibrio species recovered during the longitudinal study included V. splendidus and V. aestuarianus. This study offers insight into the rapidity of onset and virulence of the virus in naïve oyster spat in New Zealand waters. PMID:24991849

  18. Opportunistic out-crossing in Nicotiana attenuata (Solanaceae), a predominantly self-fertilizing native tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Sime, Karen R; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-01-01

    Background Although Nicotiana attenuata is entirely self-compatible, chemical and other floral traits suggest selection for the maintenance of advertisement for moth pollinators. Results Experimental exclusions of pollinators from plants with emasculated flowers in natural populations in southern Utah during an outbreak of the hawkmoth Hyles lineata revealed that 24% of the seed set could be attributed to insect pollination, and eliminated wind pollination and apomixis as contributing to seed set. Hence these moths can mediate gene flow when self-pollen is unavailable. To quantify gene flow when self-pollen is available, plants were transformed with two marker genes: hygromycin-B resistance and ?-glucuronidase. The utility of these genetic markers to measure gene flow between plants was examined by mixing pollen from plants homozygous for both genes with self-pollen in different ratios and hand-pollinating emasculated flowers of plants growing in a natural population. The proportion of transformed seeds was positively correlated with the amount of transformed pollen applied to stigmas. In glasshouse experiments with the hawkmoth Manduca sexta and experimental arrays of transformed and wild-type plants, pollination mediated by moths accounted for 2.5% of the seed set. Conclusions Even though moth pollination is rare and highly variable for this largely selfing plant, N. attenuata opportunistically employs a mixed-mating system. PMID:12866951

  19. Opportunistic feeding on various organic food sources by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, C. E.; Larsson, A. I.; Veuger, B.; Middelburg, J. J.; van Oevelen, D.

    2013-07-01

    The ability of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to exploit different food sources was investigated under standardized conditions in a flume. All tested food sources, dissolved organic matter (DOM, added as dissolved free amino acids), bacteria, algae, and zooplankton (Artemia) were deliberately enriched in 13C and 15N. The incorporation of 13C and 15N was traced into bulk tissue, fatty acids, hydrolysable amino acids, and the skeleton (13C only) of L. pertusa. Incorporation rates of carbon (ranging from 0.8-2.4 µg C g-1 DW d-1) and nitrogen (0.2-0.8 µg N g-1 DW d-1) into coral tissue did not differ significantly among food sources indicating an opportunistic feeding strategy. Although total food assimilation was comparable among sources, subsequent food processing was dependent on the type of food source ingested and recovery of assimilated C in tissue compounds ranged from 17% (algae) to 35% (Artemia). De novo synthesis of individual fatty acids by L. pertusa occurred in all treatments as indicated by the 13C enrichment of individual phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) in the coral that were absent in the added food sources. This indicates that the coral might be less dependent on its diet as a source of specific fatty acids than expected, with direct consequences for the interpretation of in situ observations on coral nutrition based on lipid profiles.

  20. Opportunistic feeding on various organic food sources by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, C. E.; Larsson, A. I.; Veuger, B.; Middelburg, J. J.; van Oevelen, D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to exploit different food sources was investigated under standardized conditions in a flume. The tested food sources, dissolved organic matter (DOM, added as dissolved free amino acids), bacteria, algae, and zooplankton (Artemia) were deliberately enriched in 13C and 15N. The incorporation of 13C and 15N was traced into bulk tissue, fatty acids, hydrolysable amino acids, and the skeleton (13C only) of L. pertusa. Incorporation rates of carbon (ranging from 0.8-2.4 ?g C g-1 DW d-1) and nitrogen (0.2-0.8 ?g N g-1 DW d-1) into coral tissue did not differ significantly among food sources indicating an opportunistic feeding strategy. Although total food assimilation was comparable among sources, subsequent food processing was dependent on the type of food source ingested and recovery of assimilated C in tissue compounds ranged from 17% (algae) to 35% (Artemia). De novo synthesis of individual fatty acids by L. pertusa occurred in all treatments as indicated by the 13C enrichment of individual phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) in the coral that were absent in the added food sources. This indicates that the coral might be less dependent on its diet as a source of specific fatty acids than expected, with direct consequences for the interpretation of in situ observations on coral nutrition based on lipid profiles.

  1. Development of a rapid detection system for opportunistic pathogenic Cronobacter spp. in powdered milk products.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Jennifer; Schmidt, Herbert; Loessner, Martin J; Weiss, Agnes

    2014-09-01

    Certain species of the genus Cronobacter are considered opportunistic pathogens, but their detection in milk products according to ISO/TS 22964 may take up to six days. The aim of this study was to develop a fast and sensitive PCR-based detection system for these species including enrichment, DNA-isolation and detection by real-time PCR, using the outer membrane protein gene ompA as a target. The assay was successfully validated using type strains of the genus Cronobacter, as well as 18 strains of closely related genera as controls. A total of 40 Cronobacter spp. food isolates yielded positive results, while the food matrix itself did not influence the PCR reaction. An equal detection limit as achieved with the ISO/TS 22964 method was established in this study, when 0.01 CFU Cronobacter sakazakii DSM 4485(T) per gram powdered infant formula were successfully detected after 28 days of storage at ambient temperature. In comparison to the ISO/TS 22964 method, the method described here has an equal detection limit, but offers a specific detection at the genus level in an analysis time of 24 h. PMID:24929712

  2. Single cell growth rate and morphological dynamics revealing an "opportunistic" persistence.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Qiu, Yong; Glidle, Andrew; Cooper, Jon; Shi, HanChang; Yin, HuaBing

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria persistence is a well-known phenomenon, where a small fraction of cells in an isogenic population are able to survive high doses of antibiotic treatment. Since the persistence is often associated with single cell behaviour, the ability to study the dynamic response of individual cells to antibiotics is critical. In this work, we developed a gradient microfluidic system that enables long-term tracking of single cell morphology under a wide range of inhibitor concentrations. From time-lapse images, we calculated bacterial growth rates based on the variations in cell mass and in cell number. Using E. coli and Comamonas denitrificans to amoxicillin inhibition as model systems, we found the IC50 determined via both methods are in a good agreement. Importantly, the growth rates together with morphological dynamics of individual cells has led to the discovery of a new form of persistence to amoxicillin. Normal cells that are sensitive to amoxicillin gain persistence or recover from the killing process, if they have had an opportunity to utilise the cytoplasm released from lysed cells close-by. We term this acquired persistence in normal growing cells "opportunistic persistence". This finding might shed new insights into biofilm resistance and the effect of antibiotics on environmental microbes. PMID:24733150

  3. Opioid Drug Abuse and Modulation of Immune Function: Consequences in the Susceptibility to Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sabita; Ninkovic, Jana; Banerjee, Santanu; Charboneau, Richard; Das, Subhas; Dutta, Raini; Kirchner, Varvara; Koodie, Lisa; Ma, Jing; Meng, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Infection rate among intravenous drug users (IDU) is higher than the general public, and is the major cause of morbidity and hospitalization in the IDU population. Epidemiologic studies provide data on increased prevalence of opportunistic bacterial infections such as TB and pneumonia, and viral infections such as HIV-1 and hepatitis in the IDU population. An important component in the intravenous drug abuse population and in patients receiving medically indicated chronic opioid treatment is opioid withdrawal. Data on bacterial virulence in the context of opioid withdrawal suggest that mice undergoing withdrawal had shortened survival and increased bacterial load in response to Salmonella infection. As the body of evidence in support of opioid dependency and its immunosuppressive effects is growing, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which opioids exert these effects and identify the populations at risk that would benefit the most from the interventions to counteract opioid immunosuppressive effects. Thus, it is important to refine the existing animal model to closely match human conditions and to cross-validate these findings through carefully controlled human studies. Better understanding of the mechanisms will facilitate the search for new therapeutic modalities to counteract adverse effects including increased infection rates. This review will summarize the effects of morphine on innate and adaptive immunity, identify the role of the mu opioid receptor in these functions and the signal transduction activated in the process. The role of opioid withdrawal in immunosuppression and the clinical relevance of these findings will also be discussed. PMID:21789507

  4. The Intraperitoneal Transcriptome of the Opportunistic Pathogen Enterococcus faecalis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Cécile; Cacaci, Margherita; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Rattei, Thomas; Eder, Thomas; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Kalinowski, Jörn; Hain, Torsten; Hartke, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive lactic acid intestinal opportunistic bacterium with virulence potential. For a better understanding of the adapation of this bacterium to the host conditions, we performed a transcriptome analysis of bacteria isolated from an infection site (mouse peritonitis) by RNA-sequencing. We identified a total of 211 genes with significantly higher transcript levels and 157 repressed genes. Our in vivo gene expression database reflects well the infection process since genes encoding important virulence factors like cytolysin, gelatinase or aggregation substance as well as stress response proteins, are significantly induced. Genes encoding metabolic activities are the second most abundant in vivo induced genes demonstrating that the bacteria are metabolically active and adapt to the special nutrient conditions of the host. ?- and ?- glucosides seem to be important substrates for E. faecalis inside the host. Compared to laboratory conditions, the flux through the upper part of glycolysis seems to be reduced and more carbon may enter the pentose phosphate pathway. This may reflect the need of the bacteria under infection conditions to produce more reducing power for biosynthesis. Another important substrate is certainly glycerol since both pathways of glycerol catabolism are strongly induced. Strongly in vivo induced genes should be important for the infection process. This assumption has been verified in a virulence test using well characterized mutants affected in glycerol metabolism. This showed indeed that mutants unable to metabolize this sugar alcohol are affected in organ colonisation in a mouse model. PMID:25978463

  5. Joint Network Coding and Opportunistic Transmission for Two-Way Relay Fading Channels

    E-print Network

    Liu, Jianquan; Xu, Youyun

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a two-way relay (TWR) fading channel where two source nodes wish to exchange information with the help of a relay node. The capacity of two-way relaying is known to be limited by the hop with weak channel condition due to immediate forwarding. In this paper, we introduce store-andforward (SF) relay protocol and present a joint network coding and opportunistic transmission (NCOT) for TWR channel. Through the use of NCOT method, a new upper bound on the ergodic sum-capacity for the TWR fading system is derived when delay tends to infinity. We further propose two alternative awaiting and broadcast (AAB) schemes: pure partial decoding (PPD) with SF-I and combinatorial decoding (CBD) with SF-II, which approach the new upper bound at high SNR with unbounded and bounded delay respectively. Numerical results show that the proposed AAB schemes significantly outperform the traditional physical layer network coding (PLNC) methods without delay. Compared to the traditional TWR schemes without delay, the pr...

  6. Bioengineering T cells to target carbohydrate to treat opportunistic fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresan, Pappanaicken R.; Manuri, Pallavi R.; Albert, Nathaniel D.; Maiti, Sourindra; Singh, Harjeet; Mi, Tiejuan; Roszik, Jason; Rabinovich, Brian; Olivares, Simon; Krishnamurthy, Janani; Zhang, Ling; Najjar, Amer M.; Huls, M. Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical-grade T cells are genetically modified ex vivo to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to redirect their specificity to target tumor-associated antigens in vivo. We now have developed this molecular strategy to render cytotoxic T cells specific for fungi. We adapted the pattern-recognition receptor Dectin-1 to activate T cells via chimeric CD28 and CD3-? (designated “D-CAR”) upon binding with carbohydrate in the cell wall of Aspergillus germlings. T cells genetically modified with the Sleeping Beauty system to express D-CAR stably were propagated selectively on artificial activating and propagating cells using an approach similar to that approved by the Food and Drug Administration for manufacturing CD19-specific CAR+ T cells for clinical trials. The D-CAR+ T cells exhibited specificity for ?-glucan which led to damage and inhibition of hyphal growth of Aspergillus in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of D-CAR+ T cells with steroids did not compromise antifungal activity significantly. These data support the targeting of carbohydrate antigens by CAR+ T cells and provide a clinically appealing strategy to enhance immunity for opportunistic fungal infections using T-cell gene therapy. PMID:25002471

  7. Propionibacterium acnes: from Commensal to Opportunistic Biofilm-Associated Implant Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Coenye, Tom

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Propionibacterium acnes is known primarily as a skin commensal. However, it can present as an opportunistic pathogen via bacterial seeding to cause invasive infections such as implant-associated infections. These infections have gained more attention due to improved diagnostic procedures, such as sonication of explanted foreign materials and prolonged cultivation time of up to 14 days for periprosthetic biopsy specimens, and improved molecular methods, such as broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR. Implantassociated infections caused by P. acnes are most often described for shoulder prosthetic joint infections as well as cerebrovascular shunt infections, fibrosis of breast implants, and infections of cardiovascular devices. P. acnes causes disease through a number of virulence factors, such as biofilm formation. P. acnes is highly susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics, including beta-lactams, quinolones, clindamycin, and rifampin, although resistance to clindamycin is increasing. Treatment requires a combination of surgery and a prolonged antibiotic treatment regimen to successfully eliminate the remaining bacteria. Most authors suggest a course of 3 to 6 months of antibiotic treatment, including 2 to 6 weeks of intravenous treatment with a beta-lactam. While recently reported data showed a good efficacy of rifampin against P. acnes biofilms, prospective, randomized, controlled studies are needed to confirm evidence for combination treatment with rifampin, as has been performed for staphylococcal implant-associated infections. PMID:24982315

  8. Propionibacterium acnes: from commensal to opportunistic biofilm-associated implant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Yvonne; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Coenye, Tom; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2014-07-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is known primarily as a skin commensal. However, it can present as an opportunistic pathogen via bacterial seeding to cause invasive infections such as implant-associated infections. These infections have gained more attention due to improved diagnostic procedures, such as sonication of explanted foreign materials and prolonged cultivation time of up to 14 days for periprosthetic biopsy specimens, and improved molecular methods, such as broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR. Implant-associated infections caused by P. acnes are most often described for shoulder prosthetic joint infections as well as cerebrovascular shunt infections, fibrosis of breast implants, and infections of cardiovascular devices. P. acnes causes disease through a number of virulence factors, such as biofilm formation. P. acnes is highly susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics, including beta-lactams, quinolones, clindamycin, and rifampin, although resistance to clindamycin is increasing. Treatment requires a combination of surgery and a prolonged antibiotic treatment regimen to successfully eliminate the remaining bacteria. Most authors suggest a course of 3 to 6 months of antibiotic treatment, including 2 to 6 weeks of intravenous treatment with a beta-lactam. While recently reported data showed a good efficacy of rifampin against P. acnes biofilms, prospective, randomized, controlled studies are needed to confirm evidence for combination treatment with rifampin, as has been performed for staphylococcal implant-associated infections. PMID:24982315

  9. Evaluation of zebrafish as a model to study the pathogenesis of the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter turicensis

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Alexander; Eshwar, Athmanya K; Neuhauss, Stephan CF; Ruetten, Maja; Lehner, Angelika; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter spp. have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections, primarily in premature, low-birth weight and/or immune-compromised neonates. Knowledge remains scarce regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms of disease development. In this study, we evaluated the use of a zebrafish model to study the pathogenesis of Cronobacter turicensis LMG 23827T, a clinical isolate responsible for two fatal sepsis cases in neonates. Here, the microinjection of approximately 50 colony forming units (CFUs) into the yolk sac resulted in the rapid multiplication of bacteria and dissemination into the blood stream at 24 h post infection (hpi), followed by the development of a severe bacteremia and larval death within 3 days. In contrast, the innate immune response of the embryos was sufficiently developed to control infection after the intravenous injection of up to 104 CFUs of bacteria. Infection studies using an isogenic mutant devoid of surviving and replicating in human macrophages (?fkpA) showed that this strain was highly attenuated in its ability to kill the larvae. In addition, the suitability of the zebrafish model system to study the effectiveness of antibiotics to treat Cronobacter infections in zebrafish embryos was examined. Our data indicate that the zebrafish model represents an excellent vertebrate model to study virulence-related aspects of this opportunistic pathogen in vivo. PMID:26060602

  10. The Opportunistic Human Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii Senses and Responds to Light? †

    PubMed Central

    Mussi, María A.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Cabruja, Matías; Arivett, Brock A.; Viale, Alejandro M.; Rasia, Rodolfo; Actis, Luis A.

    2010-01-01

    Light is a ubiquitous environmental signal that many organisms sense and respond to by modulating their physiological responses accordingly. While this is an expected response among phototrophic microorganisms, the ability of chemotrophic prokaryotes to sense and react to light has become a puzzling and novel issue in bacterial physiology, particularly among bacterial pathogens. In this work, we show that the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii senses and responds to blue light. Motility and formation of biofilms and pellicles were observed only when bacterial cells were incubated in darkness. In contrast, the killing of Candida albicans filaments was enhanced when they were cocultured with bacteria under light. These bacterial responses depend on the expression of the A. baumannii ATCC 17978 A1S_2225 gene, which codes for an 18.6-kDa protein that contains an N-terminal blue-light-sensing-using flavin (BLUF) domain and lacks a detectable output domain(s). Spectral analyses of the purified recombinant protein showed its ability to sense light by a red shift upon illumination. Therefore, the A1S_2225 gene, which is present in several members of the Acinetobacter genus, was named blue-light-sensing A (blsA). Interestingly, temperature plays a role in the ability of A. baumannii to sense and respond to light via the BlsA photoreceptor protein. PMID:20889755

  11. An ethnobotanical survey of plants used to manage HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Katima Mulilo, Caprivi region, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Katima Mulilo has the highest burden of HIV/AIDS in Namibia. Due to several constraints of the antiretroviral therapy programme, HIV-infected persons still use ethnomedicines to manage AIDS-related opportunistic infections. Despite the reliance on plants to manage HIV/AIDS in Katima Mulilo, there have been no empirical studies to document the specific plant species used by traditional healers to treat AIDS-related opportunistic infections. In this study, an ethnobotanical survey was conducted to record the various plant families, species, and plant parts used to manage different HIV/AIDS-related opportunistic infections in Katima Mulilo, Caprivi region, Namibia. The results showed that a total of 71 plant species from 28 families, mostly the Combretaceae (14%), Anacardiaceae (8%), Mimosaceae (8%), and Ebanaceae (7%), were used to treat conditions such as herpes zoster, diarrhoea, coughing, malaria, meningitis, and tuberculosis. The most plant parts used were leaves (33%), bark (32%), and roots (28%) while the least used plant parts were fruits/seeds (4%). Further research is needed to isolate the plants' active chemical compounds and understand their modes of action. PMID:20831821

  12. Common Dermatologic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shelley; Kampp, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Procedures are an essential component of dermatology practice. There is a wide variety of dermatologic procedures, including biopsies, excisions, curettage, cryosurgery, Mohs surgery, and more. This article reviews common dermatologic procedures, with a focus on the skin biopsy, a fundamental skill for all physicians who manage skin conditions. Common pitfalls, preoperative preparation, postoperative care, and select cosmetic procedures are also covered. PMID:26476254

  13. Radiomarked Common Loon

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A juvenile common loon wearing a satellite transmitter antenna follows an adult. USGS scientists and partners captured and radiomarked juvenile common loons on lakes scattered across Minnesota and Wisconsin during the last two weeks of August 2014 to track their movements and wintering ground...

  14. Scientist Releases Common Loon

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    As part of a cooperative project, scientists with the USGS and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources tagged common loons in north central Wisconsin to study the distribution and migration movements, as well as foraging patterns and depth profiles of common loons equipped with archiv...

  15. Multiplex touchdown PCR for rapid typing of the opportunistic pathogen Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Emma; Nagy, István; Hunyadkürti, Judit; Patrick, Sheila; McDowell, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Propionibacterium acnes is composed of a number of distinct phylogroups, designated types IA1, IA2, IB, IC, II, and III, which vary in their production of putative virulence factors, their inflammatory potential, and their biochemical, aggregative, and morphological characteristics. Although multilocus sequence typing (MLST) currently represents the gold standard for unambiguous phylogroup classification and individual strain identification, it is a labor-intensive and time-consuming technique. As a consequence, we developed a multiplex touchdown PCR assay that in a single reaction can confirm the species identity and phylogeny of an isolate based on its pattern of reaction with six primer sets that target the 16S rRNA gene (all isolates), ATPase (types IA1, IA2, and IC), sodA (types IA2 and IB), atpD (type II), and recA (type III) housekeeping genes, as well as a Fic family toxin gene (type IC). When applied to 312 P. acnes isolates previously characterized by MLST and representing types IA1 (n=145), IA2 (n=20), IB (n=65), IC (n=7), II (n=45), and III (n=30), the multiplex displayed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting isolates within each targeted phylogroup. No cross-reactivity with isolates from other bacterial species was observed. This multiplex assay will provide researchers with a rapid, high-throughput, and technically undemanding typing method for epidemiological and phylogenetic investigations. It will facilitate studies investigating the association of lineages with various infections and clinical conditions, and it will serve as a prescreening tool to maximize the number of genetically diverse isolates selected for downstream higher-resolution sequence-based analyses. PMID:25631794

  16. Symptoms of Fern Distortion Syndrome Resulting from Inoculation with Opportunistic Endophytic Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kloepper, Joseph W.; McInroy, John A.; Liu, Ke; Hu, Chia-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Background Fern Distortion Syndrome (FDS) is a serious disease of Leatherleaf fern (Rumohra adiantiformis). The main symptom of FDS is distortion of fronds, making them unmarketable. Additional symptoms include stunting, irregular sporulation, decreased rhizome diameter, and internal discoloration of rhizomes. We previously reported an association of symptoms with increased endophytic rhizome populations of fluorescent pseudomonads (FPs). The aim of the current study was to determine if FPs from ferns in Costa Rica with typical FDS symptoms would recreate symptoms of FDS. Methodology and Findings Greenhouse tests were conducted over a 29-month period. Micro-propagated ferns derived from tissue culture were first grown one year to produce rhizomes. Then, using an 8×9 randomized complete block experimental design, 8 replicate rhizomes were inoculated by dipping into 9 different treatments before planting. Treatments included water without bacteria (control), and four different groups of FPs, each at a two concentrations. The four groups of FPs included one group from healthy ferns without symptoms (another control treatment), two groups isolated from inside rhizomes of symptomatic ferns, and one group isolated from inside roots of symptomatic ferns. Symptoms were assessed 12 and 17 months later, and populations of FPs inside newly formed rhizomes were determined after 17 months. Results showed that inoculation with mixtures of FPs from ferns with FDS symptoms, but not from healthy ferns, recreated the primary symptom of frond deformities and also the secondary symptoms of irregular sporulation, decreased rhizome diameter, and internal discoloration of rhizomes. Conclusions These results suggest a model of causation of FDS in which symptoms result from latent infections by multiple species of opportunistic endophytic bacteria containing virulence genes that are expressed when populations inside the plant reach a minimum level. PMID:23516499

  17. Relationship between Organic Carbon and Opportunistic Pathogens in Simulated Glass Water Heaters

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Krista; Pruden, Amy; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Edwards, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Controlling organic carbon levels in municipal water has been hypothesized to limit downstream growth of bacteria and opportunistic pathogens in premise plumbing (OPPPs). Here, the relationships between influent organic carbon (0–15,000 µg ozonated fulvic acid /L) and the number of total bacteria [16S rRNA genes and heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs)] and a wide range of OPPPs (gene copy numbers of Acanthamoeba polyphaga, Vermamoeba vermiformis, Legionella pneumophila, and Mycobacterium avium) were examined in the bulk water of 120-mL simulated glass water heaters (SGWHs). The SGWHs were operated at 32–37 °C, which is representative of conditions encountered at the bottom of electric water heaters, with water changes of 80% three times per week to simulate low use. This design presented advantages of controlled and replicated (triplicate) conditions and avoided other potential limitations to OPPP growth in order to isolate the variable of organic carbon. Over seventeen months, strong correlations were observed between total organic carbon (TOC) and both 16S rRNA gene copy numbers and HPC counts (avg. R2 > 0.89). Although M. avium gene copies were occasionally correlated with TOC (avg. R2 = 0.82 to 0.97, for 2 out of 4 time points) and over a limited TOC range (0–1000 µg/L), no other correlations were identified between other OPPPs and added TOC. These results suggest that reducing organic carbon in distributed water is not adequate as a sole strategy for controlling OPPPs, although it may have promise in conjunction with other approaches. PMID:26066310

  18. Effectiveness of gastric cancer screening programs in South Korea: Organized vs opportunistic models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Jin; Heo, Chae; Kim, Byoung Kwon; Kim, Jae Yeol; Kim, Jae Gyu

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the outcome and effectiveness of two screening programs, National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) and opportunistic screening (OS), for the detection of gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 45??654 subjects underwent upper endoscopy as part of the NCSP or OS at the Chung-Ang University Healthcare System in Korea between January 2007 and December 2010. The study population was comprised of subjects over the age of 40 years. More specifically, subjects who took part in the NCSP were Medicaid recipients and beneficiaries of the National Health Insurance Corporation. Still photographs from the endoscopies diagnosed as gastric cancer were reviewed by two experienced endoscopists. RESULTS: The mean age of the screened subjects was 55 years for men and 54 years for women. A total of 126 cases (0.28%) of gastric cancer were detected from both screening programs; 100 cases (0.3%) from NCSP and in 26 cases (0.2%) from OS. The proportion of early gastric cancer (EGC) detected in NCSP was higher than that in OS (74.0% vs 53.8%, P = 0.046). Among the 34??416 screenees in NCSP, 6585 (19.1%) underwent upper endoscopy every other year as scheduled. Among the 11??238 screenees in OS, 3050 (27.1%) underwent upper endoscopy at least once every two years during the study period. The detection rate of gastric cancer was found to be significantly higher during irregular follow-up than during regular follow-up in both screening programs (0.3% vs 0.2%, P = 0.036). A higher incidence of EGC than advanced gastric cancer was observed during regular follow-up compared with irregular follow-up. CONCLUSION: Compliance to the screening program is more important than the type of screening system used. PMID:23430471

  19. Urine Stasis Predisposes to Urinary Tract Infection by an Opportunistic Uropathogen in the Megabladder (Mgb) Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Mohamed, Ahmad Z.; Li, Birong; Wilhide, Michael E.; Ingraham, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Urinary stasis is a risk factor for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Homozygous mutant Megabladder (Mgb-/-) mice exhibit incomplete bladder emptying as a consequence of congenital detrusor aplasia. We hypothesize that this predisposes Mgb-/- mice to spontaneous and experimental UTI. Methods Mgb-/-, Mgb+/-, and wild-type female mice underwent serial ultrasound and urine cultures at 4, 6, and 8 weeks to detect spontaneous UTI. Urine bacterial isolates were analyzed by Gram stain and speciated. Bladder stones were analyzed by x-ray diffractometry. Bladders and kidneys were subject to histologic analysis. The pathogenicity of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS) isolated from Mgb-/- urine was tested by transurethral administration to culture-negative Mgb-/- or wild-type animals. The contribution of urinary stasis to CONS susceptibility was evaluated by cutaneous vesicostomy in Mgb-/- mice. Results Mgb-/- mice develop spontaneous bacteriuria (42%) and struvite bladder stones (31%) by 8 weeks, findings absent in Mgb+/- and wild-type controls. CONS was cultured as a solitary isolate from Mgb-/- bladder stones. Bladders and kidneys from mice with struvite stones exhibit mucosal injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. These pathologic features of cystitis and pyelonephritis are replicated by transurethral inoculation of CONS in culture-negative Mgb-/- females, whereas wild-type animals are less susceptible to CONS colonization and organ injury. Cutaneous vesicostomy prior to CONS inoculation significantly reduces the quantity of CONS recovered from Mgb-/- urine, bladders, and kidneys. Conclusions CONS is an opportunistic uropathogen in the setting of urinary stasis, leading to enhanced UTI incidence and severity in Mgb-/- mice. PMID:26401845

  20. Multiplex Touchdown PCR for Rapid Typing of the Opportunistic Pathogen Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Emma; Nagy, István; Hunyadkürti, Judit; Patrick, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Propionibacterium acnes is composed of a number of distinct phylogroups, designated types IA1, IA2, IB, IC, II, and III, which vary in their production of putative virulence factors, their inflammatory potential, and their biochemical, aggregative, and morphological characteristics. Although multilocus sequence typing (MLST) currently represents the gold standard for unambiguous phylogroup classification and individual strain identification, it is a labor-intensive and time-consuming technique. As a consequence, we developed a multiplex touchdown PCR assay that in a single reaction can confirm the species identity and phylogeny of an isolate based on its pattern of reaction with six primer sets that target the 16S rRNA gene (all isolates), ATPase (types IA1, IA2, and IC), sodA (types IA2 and IB), atpD (type II), and recA (type III) housekeeping genes, as well as a Fic family toxin gene (type IC). When applied to 312 P. acnes isolates previously characterized by MLST and representing types IA1 (n = 145), IA2 (n = 20), IB (n = 65), IC (n = 7), II (n = 45), and III (n = 30), the multiplex displayed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting isolates within each targeted phylogroup. No cross-reactivity with isolates from other bacterial species was observed. This multiplex assay will provide researchers with a rapid, high-throughput, and technically undemanding typing method for epidemiological and phylogenetic investigations. It will facilitate studies investigating the association of lineages with various infections and clinical conditions, and it will serve as a prescreening tool to maximize the number of genetically diverse isolates selected for downstream higher-resolution sequence-based analyses. PMID:25631794

  1. Common Cancer Types

    Cancer.gov

    This list of common cancer types includes cancers that are diagnosed with the greatest frequency in the United States; provides most recent incidence and mortality statistics for these cancers. A brief description of page content that should include keywo

  2. Common Knowledge on Networks

    E-print Network

    Liddell, Torrin M

    2015-01-01

    Common knowledge of intentions is crucial to basic social tasks ranging from cooperative hunting to oligopoly collusion, riots, revolutions, and the evolution of social norms and human culture. Yet little is known about how common knowledge leaves a trace on the dynamics of a social network. Here we show how an individual's network properties---primarily local clustering and betweenness centrality---provide strong signals of the ability to successfully participate in common knowledge tasks. These signals are distinct from those expected when practices are contagious, or when people use less-sophisticated heuristics that do not yield true coordination. This makes it possible to infer decision rules from observation. We also find that tasks that require common knowledge can yield significant inequalities in success, in contrast to the relative equality that results when practices spread by contagion alone.

  3. Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol Updated:May 29,2014 Cholesterol can be both ... misconceptions about cholesterol. Click on each misconception about cholesterol to see the truth: My choices about diet ...

  4. Common Causes of Stillbirth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... following are some of the more common causes: Birth Defects Birth defects are involved in about 15 to 20 percent ... chromosomal abnormality, such as Down Syndrome. Others have birth defects resulting from genetic or environmental causes. Placental Problems ...

  5. Common Carrier Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This bulletin outlines the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibilities in regulating the interstate and foreign common carrier communication via electrical means. Also summarized are the history, technological development, and current capabilities and prospects of telegraph, wire telephone, radiotelephone, satellite communications,…

  6. Common skin conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, M.; Safranek, M.

    1992-01-01

    Four common conditions: acne, psoriasis, eczema and urticaria are considered. Guidance is given on appropriate topical and systematic treatment for the different types and degrees of these conditions, with notes on management in general and criteria for referral to hospital outpatient departments. Where there are different types of the condition, with varying aetiology, for example in urticaria and eczema, management of the common types is outlined. PMID:1345156

  7. Assessing the Groundwater Quality at a Saudi Arabian Agricultural Site and the Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens on Irrigated Food Produce.

    PubMed

    Alsalah, Dhafer; Al-Jassim, Nada; Timraz, Kenda; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the groundwater quality in wells situated near agricultural fields in Saudi Arabia. Fruits (e.g., tomato and green pepper) irrigated with groundwater were also assessed for the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens to determine if food safety was compromised by the groundwater. The amount of total nitrogen in most of the groundwater samples exceeded the 15 mg/L permissible limit for agricultural irrigation. Fecal coliforms in densities > 12 MPN/100 mL were detected in three of the groundwater wells that were in close proximity to a chicken farm. These findings, coupled with qPCR-based fecal source tracking, show that groundwater in wells D and E, which were nearest to the chicken farm, had compromised quality. Anthropogenic contamination resulted in a shift in the predominant bacterial phyla within the groundwater microbial communities. For example, there was an elevated presence of Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in wells D and E but a lower overall microbial richness in the groundwater perturbed by anthropogenic contamination. In the remaining wells, the genus Acinetobacter was detected at high relative abundance ranging from 1.5% to 48% of the total groundwater microbial community. However, culture-based analysis did not recover any antibiotic-resistant bacteria or opportunistic pathogens from these groundwater samples. In contrast, opportunistic pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the fruits irrigated with the groundwater from wells B and F. Although the groundwater was compromised, quantitative microbial risk assessment suggests that the annual risk incurred from accidental consumption of E. faecalis on these fruits was within the acceptable limit of 10(-4). However, the annual risk arising from P. aeruginosa was 9.55 × 10(-4), slightly above the acceptable limit. Our findings highlight that the groundwater quality at this agricultural site in western Saudi Arabia is not pristine and that better agricultural management practices are needed alongside groundwater treatment strategies to improve food safety. PMID:26445052

  8. The Impact of Opportunistic Infections on Clinical Outcome and Healthcare Resource Uses for Adult T Cell Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshiki; Babazono, Akira; Nishi, Takumi; Yasui, Midori; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Fujimori, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We examined the impact of opportunistic infections on in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay (LOS), and the total cost (TC) among adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) patients. In this retrospective cohort study, we identified 3712 patients with ATL using national hospital administrative data. Analysed opportunistic infections included Aspergillus spp., Candida spp., cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), tuberculosis, varicella zoster virus (VZV), Cryptococcus spp., nontuberculous mycobacteria, and Strongyloides spp. Multilevel logistic regression analysis for in-hospital mortality and a multilevel linear regression analysis for LOS and TC were employed to determine the impact of opportunistic infections on clinical outcomes and healthcare resources. We found ATL patients infected with CMV had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.29 [1.50–3.49] p < 0.001), longer LOS (coefficient (B): 0.13 [0.06–0.20] p < 0.001) and higher TC (B: 0.25 [0.17–0.32] p < 0.001) than those without CMV. Those with CAN and PCP were associated with a lower in-hospital mortality rate (AOR 0.72 [0.53–0.98] p = 0.035 and 0.54[0.41–0.73] p < 0.001, respectively) than their infections. VZV was associated with longer LOS (B: 0.13 [0.06–0.19] p < 0.001), while aspergillosis, HSV, or VZV infections were associated with higher TC (B: 0.16 [0.07–0.24] p < 0.001, 0.12 [0.02–0.23] p = 0.025, and 0.17 [0.10–0.24] p < 0.001, respectively). Our findings reveal that CMV infection is a major determinant of poor prognosis in patients affected by ATL. PMID:26274925

  9. Assessing the Groundwater Quality at a Saudi Arabian Agricultural Site and the Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens on Irrigated Food Produce

    PubMed Central

    Alsalah, Dhafer; Al-Jassim, Nada; Timraz, Kenda; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the groundwater quality in wells situated near agricultural fields in Saudi Arabia. Fruits (e.g., tomato and green pepper) irrigated with groundwater were also assessed for the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens to determine if food safety was compromised by the groundwater. The amount of total nitrogen in most of the groundwater samples exceeded the 15 mg/L permissible limit for agricultural irrigation. Fecal coliforms in densities > 12 MPN/100 mL were detected in three of the groundwater wells that were in close proximity to a chicken farm. These findings, coupled with qPCR-based fecal source tracking, show that groundwater in wells D and E, which were nearest to the chicken farm, had compromised quality. Anthropogenic contamination resulted in a shift in the predominant bacterial phyla within the groundwater microbial communities. For example, there was an elevated presence of Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in wells D and E but a lower overall microbial richness in the groundwater perturbed by anthropogenic contamination. In the remaining wells, the genus Acinetobacter was detected at high relative abundance ranging from 1.5% to 48% of the total groundwater microbial community. However, culture-based analysis did not recover any antibiotic-resistant bacteria or opportunistic pathogens from these groundwater samples. In contrast, opportunistic pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the fruits irrigated with the groundwater from wells B and F. Although the groundwater was compromised, quantitative microbial risk assessment suggests that the annual risk incurred from accidental consumption of E. faecalis on these fruits was within the acceptable limit of 10?4. However, the annual risk arising from P. aeruginosa was 9.55 × 10?4, slightly above the acceptable limit. Our findings highlight that the groundwater quality at this agricultural site in western Saudi Arabia is not pristine and that better agricultural management practices are needed alongside groundwater treatment strategies to improve food safety. PMID:26445052

  10. Members of native coral microbiota inhibit glycosidases and thwart colonization of coral mucus by an opportunistic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Alagely, Ali; Teplitski, Max

    2013-05-01

    The outcome of the interactions between native commensal microorganisms and opportunistic pathogens is crucial to the health of the coral holobiont. During the establishment within the coral surface mucus layer, opportunistic pathogens, including a white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100, compete with native bacteria for available nutrients. Both commensals and pathogens employ glycosidases and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase to utilize components of coral mucus. This study tested the hypothesis that specific glycosidases were critical for the growth of S. marcescens on mucus and that their inhibition by native coral microbiota reduces fitness of the pathogen. Consistent with this hypothesis, a S. marcescens transposon mutant with reduced glycosidase and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activities was unable to compete with the wild type on the mucus of the host coral Acropora palmata, although it was at least as competitive as the wild type on a minimal medium with glycerol and casamino acids. Virulence of the mutant was modestly reduced in the Aiptasia model. A survey revealed that ?8% of culturable coral commensal bacteria have the ability to inhibit glycosidases in the pathogen. A small molecular weight, ethanol-soluble substance(s) produced by the coral commensal Exiguobacterium sp. was capable of the inhibition of the induction of catabolic enzymes in S. marcescens. This inhibition was in part responsible for the 10-100-fold reduction in the ability of the pathogen to grow on coral mucus. These results provide insight into potential mechanisms of commensal interference with early colonization and infection behaviors in opportunistic pathogens and highlight an important function for the native microbiota in coral health. PMID:23254513

  11. Symbiotic mutualism with a community of opportunistic ants: protection, competition, and ant occupancy of the myrmecophyte Barteria nigritana (Passifloraceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djiéto-Lordon, Champlain; Dejean, Alain; Gibernau, Marc; Hossaert-McKey, Martine; McKey, Doyle

    2004-10-01

    Barteria nigritana is a myrmecophyte tree of Lower Guinea coastal vegetation. Unlike the more specialised B. fistulosa, which harbours a single host-specific mutualistic ant, B. nigritana is associated with several opportunistic ants. Such symbiotic, yet opportunistic, ant-plant associations have been little studied. On 113 clumps of B. nigritana, we censused ant associates and herbivores and compared herbivory on plants occupied by different ants. In addition to these correlative data, protection conferred by different ant species was compared by herbivore-placement experiments. Identity of ant associate changed predictably over plant ontogeny. Pheidole megacephala was restricted to very small plants; saplings were occupied by either Oecophylla longinoda or Crematogaster sp., and the latter species was the sole occupant of larger trees. Damage by caterpillars of the nymphalid butterfly Acraea zetes accounted for much of the herbivory to leaves. Ant species differed in the protection provided to hosts. While P. megacephala provided no significant protection, plants occupied by O. longinoda and Crematogaster sp. suffered less damage than did unoccupied plants or those occupied by P. megacephala. Furthermore, O. longinoda provided more effective protection than did Crematogaster sp. Herbivore-placement experiments confirmed these results. Workers of O. longinoda killed or removed all larval instars of A. zetes. Crematogaster preyed on only the two first larval instars, and P. megacephala preyed mainly on eggs, only rarely attacking the two first larval instars. Opportunistic ants provided significant protection to this relatively unspecialised myrmecophyte. The usual associate of mature trees was not the species that provided most protection.

  12. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  13. Quorum Sensing Is Accompanied by Global Metabolic Changes in the Opportunistic Human Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Peter W.; Griffin, Julian L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS) systems to control the expression of secreted effectors. These effectors can be crucial to the ecological fitness of the bacterium, playing roles in nutrient acquisition, microbial competition, and virulence. In this study, we investigated the metabolic consequences of AHL-dependent QS by monitoring the metabolic profile(s) of a lasI rhlI double mutant (unable to make QS signaling molecules) and its wild-type progenitor as they progressed through the growth curve. Analysis of culture supernatants by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy revealed that at the point where AHL concentrations peaked in the wild type, the metabolic footprints (i.e., extracellular metabolites) of the wild-type and lasI rhlI mutant diverged. Subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based analysis of the intracellular metabolome revealed QS-dependent perturbations in around one-third of all identified metabolites, including altered concentrations of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, amino acids, and fatty acids. Further targeted fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC-MS-based profiling of the cellular total fatty acid pools revealed that QS leads to changes associated with decreased membrane fluidity and higher chemical stability. However, not all of the changes we observed were necessarily a direct consequence of QS; liquid chromatography (LC)-MS analyses revealed that polyamine levels were elevated in the lasI rhlI mutant, perhaps a response to the absence of QS-dependent adaptations. Our data suggest that QS leads to a global readjustment in central metabolism and provide new insight into the metabolic changes associated with QS during stationary-phase adaptation. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing (QS) is a transcriptional regulatory mechanism that allows bacteria to coordinate their gene expression profile with the population cell density. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses QS to control the production of secreted virulence factors. In this study, we show that QS elicits a global “metabolic rewiring” in P. aeruginosa. This metabolic rerouting of fluxes is consistent with a variety of drivers, ranging from altered QS-dependent transcription of “metabolic genes” through to the effect(s) of global “metabolic readjustment” as a consequence of QS-dependent exoproduct synthesis, as well as a general stress response, among others. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind to assess the global impact of QS on the metabolome. PMID:25868647

  14. Scabies Mites Alter the Skin Microbiome and Promote Growth of Opportunistic Pathogens in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Swe, Pearl M.; Zakrzewski, Martha; Kelly, Andrew; Krause, Lutz; Fischer, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background The resident skin microbiota plays an important role in restricting pathogenic bacteria, thereby protecting the host. Scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei) are thought to promote bacterial infections by breaching the skin barrier and excreting molecules that inhibit host innate immune responses. Epidemiological studies in humans confirm increased incidence of impetigo, generally caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, secondary to the epidermal infestation with the parasitic mite. It is therefore possible that mite infestation could alter the healthy skin microbiota making way for the opportunistic pathogens. A longitudinal study to test this hypothesis in humans is near impossible due to ethical reasons. In a porcine model we generated scabies infestations closely resembling the disease manifestation in humans and investigated the scabies associated changes in the skin microbiota over the course of a mite infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings In a 21 week trial, skin scrapings were collected from pigs infected with S. scabies var. suis and scabies-free control animals. A total of 96 skin scrapings were collected before, during infection and after acaricide treatment, and analyzed by bacterial 16S rDNA tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. We found significant changes in the epidermal microbiota, in particular a dramatic increase in Staphylococcus correlating with the onset of mite infestation in animals challenged with scabies mites. This increase persisted beyond treatment from mite infection and healing of skin. Furthermore, the staphylococci population shifted from the commensal S. hominis on the healthy skin prior to scabies mite challenge to S. chromogenes, which is increasingly recognized as being pathogenic, coinciding with scabies infection in pigs. In contrast, all animals in the scabies-free cohort remained relatively free of Staphylococcus throughout the trial. Conclusions/Significance This is the first experimental in vivo evidence supporting previous assumptions that establishment of pathogens follow scabies infection. Our findings provide an explanation for a biologically important aspect of the disease pathogenesis. The methods developed from this pig trial will serve as a guide to analyze human clinical samples. Studies building on this will offer implications for development of novel intervention strategies against the mites and the secondary infections. PMID:24875186

  15. Common Standards for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2010

    2010-01-01

    About three-fourths of the states have already adopted the Common Core State Standards, which were designed to provide more clarity about and consistency in what is expected of student learning across the country. However, given the brief time since the standards' final release in June, questions persist among educators, who will have the…

  16. Prebreeding in Common Bean

    E-print Network

    Gepts, Paul

    Prebreeding in Common Bean and Use of Genetic Diversity from Wild Germplasm JORGE A. ACOSTA-GALLEGOS,* JAMES D. KELLY, AND PAUL GEPTS J.A. Acosta-Gallegos, Bean Program, CEBAJ-INIFAP, A.P. 310 Celaya, Gto S-45 ommon bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most widely consumed grain legume in the world

  17. Math, Literacy, & Common Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Nearly every state has signed on to use the Common Core State Standards as a framework for teaching English/language arts and mathematics to students. Translating them for the classroom, however, requires schools, teachers, and students to change the way they approach teaching and learning. This report examines the progress some states have made…

  18. Common Foot Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    newsletter | contact Share | Common Foot Problems A A A Trauma, infection, skin disease, and even simply bearing weight on the feet can cause changes on ... the sole of the front part of the foot and on the toes. Foot infections include warts; ...

  19. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  20. CISNET: Common Input Generators

    Cancer.gov

    For purposes of generating common parameters for the larger CISNET simulation models, a series of smaller, focused models was created in collaboration between the CISNET consortium members and NCI. These parameter generators are "mini models" in themselves in that they involve input data, processing guided by assumptions, and produce results.

  1. Finding the Common Ground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Dawn

    1980-01-01

    Describes an attempt to combine secondary English instruction emphasizing United States literature with science and history by finding "common ground" between these disciplines in (1) the separation of truth from falsehood and (2) logical thinking. Biographies combined history and literature, and science fiction combined science and English;…

  2. Space station commonality analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This study was conducted on the basis of a modification to Contract NAS8-36413, Space Station Commonality Analysis, which was initiated in December, 1987 and completed in July, 1988. The objective was to investigate the commonality aspects of subsystems and mission support hardware while technology experiments are accommodated on board the Space Station in the mid-to-late 1990s. Two types of mission are considered: (1) Advanced solar arrays and their storage; and (2) Satellite servicing. The point of departure for definition of the technology development missions was a set of missions described in the Space Station Mission Requirements Data Base. (MRDB): TDMX 2151 Solar Array/Energy Storage Technology; TDMX 2561 Satellite Servicing and Refurbishment; TDMX 2562 Satellite Maintenance and Repair; TDMX 2563 Materials Resupply (to a free-flyer materials processing platform); TDMX 2564 Coatings Maintenance Technology; and TDMX 2565 Thermal Interface Technology. Issues to be addressed according to the Statement of Work included modularity of programs, data base analysis interactions, user interfaces, and commonality. The study was to consider State-of-the-art advances through the 1990s and to select an appropriate scale for the technology experiments, considering hardware commonality, user interfaces, and mission support requirements. The study was to develop evolutionary plans for the technology advancement missions.

  3. Common Magnets, Unexpected Polarities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss a "misconception" in magnetism so simple and pervasive as to be typically unnoticed. That magnets have poles might be considered one of the more straightforward notions in introductory physics. However, the magnets common to students' experiences are likely different from those presented in educational…

  4. Common Carrier Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    After outlining the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibility for regulating interstate common carrier communication (non-broadcast communication whose carriers are required by law to furnish service at reasonable charges upon request), this information bulletin reviews the history, technological development, and current…

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Opportunistic Screening and Minimal Contact Psychotherapy to Prevent Depression in Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Matthijs; Smit, Filip; Vos, Theo; van Baal, Pieter H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression causes a large burden of disease worldwide. Effective prevention has the potential to reduce that burden considerably. This study aimed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of minimal contact psychotherapy, based on Lewinsohn's ‘Coping with depression’ course, targeted at opportunistically screened individuals with sub-threshold depression. Methods and Results Using a Markov model, future health effects and costs of an intervention scenario and a current practice scenario were estimated. The time horizon was five years. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were expressed in euro per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was employed to study the effect of uncertainty in the model parameters. From the health care perspective the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was € 1,400 per DALY, and from the societal perspective the intervention was cost-saving. Although the estimated incremental costs and effects were surrounded with large uncertainty, given a willingness to pay of € 20,000 per DALY, the probability that the intervention is cost-effective was around 80%. Conclusion This modelling study showed that opportunistic screening in primary care for sub-threshold depression in combination with minimal contact psychotherapy may be cost-effective in the prevention of major depression. PMID:21853053

  6. Candida and Fusarium species known as opportunistic human pathogens from customer-accessible parts of residential washing machines.

    PubMed

    Babi?, Monika Novak; Zalar, Polona; Ženko, Bernard; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Džeroski, Sašo; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2015-03-01

    Energy constraints have altered consumer practice regarding the use of household washing machines. Washing machines were developed that use lower washing temperatures, smaller amounts of water and biodegradable detergents. These conditions may favour the enrichment of opportunistic human pathogenic fungi. We focused on the isolation of fungi from two user-accessible parts of washing machines that often contain microbial biofilms: drawers for detergents and rubber door seals. Out of 70 residential washing machines sampled in Slovenia, 79% were positive for fungi. In total, 72 strains belonging to 12 genera and 26 species were isolated. Among these, members of the Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium solani species complexes, Candida parapsilosis and Exophiala phaeomuriformis represented 44% of fungi detected. These species are known as opportunistic human pathogens and can cause skin, nail or eye infections also in healthy humans. A machine learning analysis revealed that presence of detergents and softeners followed by washing temperature, represent most critical factors for fungal colonization. Three washing machines with persisting malodour that resulted in bad smelling laundry were analysed for the presence of fungi and bacteria. In these cases, fungi were isolated in low numbers (7.5 %), while bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Sphingomonas species prevailed. PMID:25749362

  7. Danish General Practitioners' Use of Prostate-Specific Antigen in Opportunistic Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Survey Comprising 174 GPs

    PubMed Central

    Søndergaard, Jens; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Thomsen, Janus Laust

    2013-01-01

    Background. The use of prostate-specific antigen test has markedly increased in Danish general practice in the last decade. Despite the national guidelines advice against PSA screening, opportunistic screening is supposed to be the primary reason for this increased number of PSA tests performed. Aims. Based on the increase in the amount of PSA conducted, we aimed to analyse how GPs in Denmark use the PSA test. Methods. A self-administrated questionnaire concerning symptomatic and asymptomatic patient cases was developed based on the national and international guidelines and the extensive literature review, and an in-depth interview conducted with a GP was performed. Results. None of the GPs would do a PSA measurement for an asymptomatic 76-year-old man. For asymptomatic 55- and 42-year-old men, respectively, 21.9% and 18.6% of GPs would measure PSA. Patient request and concern could be potential reasons for measuring PSA for asymptomatic patients. Almost all GPs stated that a PSA measurement is indicated for symptomatic 49- and 78-year-old men, respectively, 98.9% and 93.8%. Conclusion. Opportunistic PC screening is being performed in general practice to a high degree. Hence, current guidelines are not followed, and intense focus should be on more effective implementation strategies in order to avoid overuse of PSA. PMID:24349779

  8. Common medical pains

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Pain in infancy and childhood is extremely common. Sources of pain include illness, injury, and medical and dental procedures. Over the past two decades, tremendous progress has been made in the assessment, prevention and treatment of pain. It is important for the paediatric health care provider to be aware of the implications and consequences of pain in childhood. A multitude of interventions are available to reduce or alleviate pain in children of all ages, including neonates. These include behavioural and psychological methods, as well as a host of pharmacological preparations, which are safe and effective when used as indicated. Many complementary and alternative treatments appear to be promising in treating and relieving pain, although further research is required. The present article reviews the most common sources of pain in childhood and infancy, as well as current treatment strategies and options. PMID:19030348

  9. Common tester platform concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, Michael James

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a case study on the doctrine of a common tester platform, a concept of a standardized platform that can be applicable across the broad spectrum of testing requirements throughout the various stages of a weapons program, as well as across the various weapons programs. The common tester concept strives to define an affordable, next-generation design that will meet testing requirements with the flexibility to grow and expand; supporting the initial development stages of a weapons program through to the final production and surveillance stages. This report discusses a concept investing key leveraging technologies and operational concepts combined with prototype tester-development experiences and practical lessons learned gleaned from past weapons programs.

  10. Common Magnets, Unexpected Polarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mark

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, I discuss a "misconception" in magnetism so simple and pervasive as to be typically unnoticed. That magnets have poles might be considered one of the more straightforward notions in introductory physics. However, the magnets common to students' experiences are likely different from those presented in educational contexts. This leads students, in my experience, to frequently and erroneously attribute magnetic poles based on geometric associations rather than actual observed behavior. This polarity discrepancy can provide teachers the opportunity to engage students in authentic inquiry about objects in their daily experiences. I've found that investigation of the magnetic polarities of common magnets provides a productive context for students in which to develop valuable and authentic scientific inquiry practices.

  11. Common drive unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Moore, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Common Drive Unit (CDU) is a high reliability rotary actuator with many versatile applications in mechanism designs. The CDU incorporates a set of redundant motor-brake assemblies driving a single output shaft through differential. Tachometers provide speed information in the AC version. Operation of both motors, as compared to the operation of one motor, will yield the same output torque with twice the output speed.

  12. Common Anorectal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.; Umar, Sarah B.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Anorectal disorders result in many visits to healthcare specialists. These disorders include benign conditions such as hemorrhoids to more serious conditions such as malignancy; thus, it is important for the clinician to be familiar with these disorders as well as know how to conduct an appropriate history and physical examination. This article reviews the most common anorectal disorders, including hemorrhoids, anal fissures, fecal incontinence, proctalgia fugax, excessive perineal descent, and pruritus ani, and provides guidelines on comprehensive evaluation and management. PMID:24987313

  13. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  14. Common Geometry Module

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore »top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  15. 'Historicising common sense'.

    PubMed

    Millstone, Noah

    2012-12-01

    This essay is an expanded set of comments on the social psychology papers written for the special issue on History and Social Psychology. It considers what social psychology, and particularly the theory of social representations, might offer historians working on similar problems, and what historical methods might offer social psychology. The social history of thinking has been a major theme in twentieth and twenty-first century historical writing, represented most recently by the genre of 'cultural history'. Cultural history and the theory of social representations have common ancestors in early twentieth-century social science. Nevertheless, the two lines of research have developed in different ways and are better seen as complementary than similar. The theory of social representations usefully foregrounds issues, like social division and change over time, that cultural history relegates to the background. But for historians, the theory of social representations seems oddly fixated on comparing the thought styles associated with positivist science and 'common sense'. Using historical analysis, this essay tries to dissect the core opposition 'science : common sense' and argues for a more flexible approach to comparing modes of thought. PMID:23135802

  16. Identification of Patients with RAG Mutations Previously Diagnosed with Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Buchbinder, David; Baker, Rebecca; Lee, Yu Nee; Ravell, Juan; Zhang, Yu; McElwee, Joshua; Nugent, Diane; Coonrod, Emily M.; Durtschi, Jacob D.; Augustine, Nancy H.; Voelkerding, Karl V.; Csomos, Krisztian; Rosen, Lindsey; Browne, Sarah; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Hill, Harry R.; Kumánovics, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Combined immunodeficiency (CID) presents a unique challenge to clinicians. Two patients presented with the prior clinical diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) disorder marked by an early age of presentation, opportunistic infections, and persistent lymphopenia. Due to the presence of atypical clinical features, next generation sequencing was applied documenting RAG deficiency in both patients. Methods Two different genetic analysis techniques were applied in these patients including whole exome sequencing in one patient and the use of a gene panel designed to target genes known to cause primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDD) in a second patient. Sanger dideoxy sequencing was used to confirm RAG1 mutations in both patients. Results Two young adults with a history of recurrent bacterial sinopulmonary infections, viral infections, and autoimmune disease as well as progressive hypogammaglobulinemia, abnormal antibody responses, lymphopenia and a prior diagnosis of CVID disorder were evaluated. Compound heterozygous mutations in RAG1 (1) c256_257delAA, p86VfsX32 and (2) c1835A>G, pH612R were documented in one patient. Compound heterozygous mutations in RAG1 (1) c.1566G>T, p.W522C and (2) c.2689C>T, p. R897X) were documented in a second patient post-mortem following a fatal opportunistic infection. Conclusion Astute clinical judgment in the evaluation of patients with PIDD is necessary. Atypical clinical findings such as early onset, granulomatous disease, or opportunistic infections should support the consideration of atypical forms of late onset CID secondary to RAG deficiency. Next generation sequencing approaches provide powerful tools in the investigation of these patients and may expedite definitive treatments. PMID:25516070

  17. System Safety Common Cause Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-03-10

    The COMCAN fault tree analysis codes are designed to analyze complex systems such as nuclear plants for common causes of failure. A common cause event, or common mode failure, is a secondary cause that could contribute to the failure of more than one component and violates the assumption of independence. Analysis of such events is an integral part of system reliability and safety analysis. A significant common cause event is a secondary cause common tomore »all basic events in one or more minimal cut sets. Minimal cut sets containing events from components sharing a common location or a common link are called common cause candidates. Components share a common location if no barrier insulates any one of them from the secondary cause. A common link is a dependency among components which cannot be removed by a physical barrier (e.g.,a common energy source or common maintenance instructions).« less

  18. Mapping Common Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Carlos; Krueger, Robert F.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Liu, Shang-Min; Wang, Shuai; Kerridge, Bradley T.; Saha, Tulshi; Olfson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Context Clinical experience and factor analytic studies suggest that some psychiatric disorders may be more closely related to one another, as indicated by the frequency of their co-occurrence, which may have etiologic and treatment implications. Objective To construct a virtual space of common psychiatric disorders, spanned by factors reflecting major psychopathologic dimensions, and locate psychiatric disorders in that space, as well as to examine whether the location of disorders at baseline predicts the prevalence and incidence of disorders at 3-year follow-up. Design, Setting, and Patients A total of 34 653 individuals participated in waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Main Outcome Measures The distance between disorders at wave 1, calculated using the loadings of the factors spanning the space of disorders as coordinates. This distance was correlated with the adjusted odds ratios for age, sex, and race/ethnicity of the prevalence and incidence of Axis I disorders in wave 2, with the aim of determining whether smaller distances between disorders at wave 1 predicts higher disorder prevalence and incidence at wave 2. Results A model with 3 correlated factors provided an excellent fit (Comparative Fit Index = 0.99, Tucker-Lewis Index=0.98, root mean square error of approximation=0.008) for the structure of common psychiatric disorders and was used to span the space of disorders. Distances ranged from 0.070 (between drug abuse and dysthymia) to 1.032 (between drug abuse and avoidant personality disorder). The correlation of distance between disorders in wave 1 with adjusted odds ratios of prevalence in wave 2 was ?0.56. The correlation of distance in wave 1 with adjusted odds ratios of incidence in wave 2 was ?0.57. Conclusions Mapping psychiatric disorders can be used to quantify the distances among disorders. Proximity in turn can be used to predict prospectively the incidence and prevalence of Axis I disorders. PMID:23266570

  19. Enabling Opportunistic Navigation In Location-Based Notification Systems Scott Kelly, Ben Hood, Jason Chong Lee, Miten Sampat, Leigh Lally, D. Scott McCrickard

    E-print Network

    McCrickard, Scott

    Enabling Opportunistic Navigation In Location-Based Notification Systems Scott Kelly, Ben Hood, mccricks}@vt.edu Abstract Device-assisted navigation is rapidly becoming a major topic in computer science. PDAs and other small devices are enabling the introduction of navigational assistants to many different

  20. Relationship between two signaling systems: Calcium and Cyclic nucleotide Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen causing severe acute and chronic

    E-print Network

    levels in human body are imbalanced in response to infection or disease. Such Ca2+ imbalances mayRelationship between two signaling systems: Calcium and Cyclic nucleotide Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen causing severe acute and chronic infections, which are difficult to treat because

  1. Deep Trench Capacitor based Step-up and Step-down DC/DC Converters in 32nm SOI with Opportunistic

    E-print Network

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    Deep Trench Capacitor based Step-up and Step-down DC/DC Converters in 32nm SOI with Opportunistic University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA Abstract-A switched capacitor step-down converter domains. Using ultra-high density deep trench capacitors, we are able to achieve an output power density

  2. Thermophillic and thermotolerant fungi isolated from the thermal effluent of nuclear power generating reactors: dispersal of human opportunistic and veterinary pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Rippon, J W; Gerhold, R; Heath, M

    1980-03-31

    Over a period of a year, samples of water, foam, microbial mat, soil and air were obtained from areas associated with the cooling canal of a nuclear power station. The seventeen sample sites included water in the cooling canal that was thermally enriched and soil and water adjacent to, upstream, downstream and at a distance from the generator. Air samples were taken at the plant and at various distances from the plant. Fifty-two species of thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi were isolated. Of these, eleven species are grouped as opportunistic Mucorales or opportunistic Aspergillus sp. One veterinary pathogen was also isolated (Dactylaria gallopava). The opportunistic/pathogenic fungi were found primarily in the intake bay, the discharge bay and the cooling canal. Smaller numbers were obtained at both upstream and downstream locations. Soil samples near the cooling canal reflected an enrichment of thermophilous organisms, the previously mentioned opportunistic Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. Their numbers were found to be greater than that usually encountered in a mesophilic environment. However, air and soil samples taken at various distances from the power station indicated no greater abundance of these thermophilous fungi than would be expected from a thermal enriched environment. Our results indicate that there was no significant dissemination of thermophilous fungi from the thermal enriched effluents to the adjacent environment. These findings are consistent with the results of other investigators. PMID:7374746

  3. [Comparative analysis of the antibiotic sensitivity determination methods of conventionally pathogenic bacteria--agents of human opportunistic infections].

    PubMed

    Kulia, A F; Sabo, Iu; Koval', H M; Bo?ko, N V

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of biological properties of pathogenic bacteria and, first of all, their sensitivity to antibiotics is the key to successful treatment of human opportunistic infections and to selection of appropriate tactics of their prevention. This paper is devoted to the comparative characteristic of modem and classical approaches to determination of sensitivities to antibiotics of conventionally pathogenic bacteria: methods applied in Ukraine and recommendations proposed by European Committee aimed to unify all the methods of testing sensitivity to antimicrobial agents (EUCAST). The major differences of the above-mentioned methods of testing sensitivity of clinical and non-clinical isolates of potentially pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics have been examined in order to confirm the feasibility of usage and permanent updating the EUCAST database and to promote creation of the appropriate unifield national electronic resource. PMID:22164699

  4. House of Commons Innovation, Universities,

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    HC 215-I House of Commons Innovation, Universities, Science and Skills Committee Science Budget 2008 by authority of the House of Commons London: The Stationery Office Limited £0.00 House of Commons 2007­08 Volume I Report, together with formal minutes Ordered by The House of Commons to be printed 23

  5. Dual Roles of an Algal Farming Damselfish as a Cultivator and Opportunistic Browser of an Invasive Seaweed

    PubMed Central

    Peyton, Kimberly A.; Valentino, Lauren M.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Herbivory is a fundamental process determining reef resilience, and while algal farming damselfishes can help shape benthic assemblages, an understanding of their contribution to areas outside of defended territories is relatively unexplored. Here, we demonstrate how the farming damselfish Stegastes marginatus plays a dual role in benthic structuring by 1) contributing to persistence of the invasive macroalga Acanthophora spicifera within a Hawaiian marine protected area, where the macroalga occurred exclusively inside Stegastes territories, and 2) behaving as an opportunistic browser of the exotic alga outside their territorial borders. Greater than 50% of the biomass of tethered A. spicifera was consumed within one-hour when placed outside Stegastes territories, compared to <5% lost from tethers within territories or herbivore exclusion cages. In situ remote video revealed that tethered A. spicifera located outside territories was grazed primarily by the surgeonfish Acanthurus nigrofuscus (?68% of total bites) and, surprisingly, by S. marginatus (?27% of total bites) that left their territories to feed on this resource on 107 occasions during 400 min of filming. Further, for over half of those occurrences where S. marginatus grazed on the tethered macroalga outside of territories, they fed alongside conspecifics and other species, displaying little of the aggressiveness that characterizes this damselfish. These results show that S. marginatus plays a wider role in determining benthic assemblages than previously recognized, acting both as cultivators of a canopy-forming invasive macroalga within their territories, and as opportunistic browsers in neighboring sites. Consequently, S. marginatus can affect benthic species composition across their territory borders. These results provide a rare example of interspecific facilitation of an exotic alga by an indigenous marine fish. Accounting for fish behaviors more broadly is important to further our understanding of ecological processes that shape reef ecosystems to improve management of MPAs that often support extensive farming damselfish populations. PMID:25329385

  6. Opportunistic Screening for Hypertension and Selected Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Adults Attending a Primary Health Center in Puducherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Anindo; Chinnakali, Palanivel; Vinayagamoorthy, V; Daya, Praveena A; Shidam, Umakant G.; Roy, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Background: India is currently suffering from an epidemic of noncommunicable diseases; it is thus imperative to screen for cardiovascular risk factors in people visiting Primary Health Centers (PHCs). The objective of the study was to measure the amount of undiagnosed hypertension and selected cardiovascular risk factors present among the adult population through opportunistic screening at the PHC. Methods: A facility-based opportunistic screening program was carried out in a PHC in rural Puducherry. Patients and accompanying persons aged 30 years and above, who attended the daily outpatient department (OPD) were included. The OPD provides outpatient services and medical procedures or tests without requirement of an overnight stay, and functions for 4 h a day. Known hypertensive patients and pregnant women were excluded. Information on age, gender, diabetes status, and personal history of tobacco and alcohol use were collected using an interview schedule. Height, weight and waist circumference were measured, along with blood pressure and blood sugar using standard protocols. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) ?140 and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ?90 mm Hg was taken as hypertension. SBP of 120-139 mm Hg and/or DBP of 80-89 mm Hg were taken as prehypertension. Results: A total of 324 participants were screened; 56.8% were females. The mean standard deviation (SD) age of the participants was 47.7 (SD 12.6) years. Hypertension and prehypertension were present in 17.9% and 37.7% of the participants respectively. 17.3% participants had diabetes. 22.2% and 21.3% of all participants were current users of tobacco and alcohol respectively. Generalized obesity was present in 31.8% of the participants; 19.1% were overweight. 45.1% participants had central obesity. Conclusions: A relatively large proportion of adults were found to have prehypertension and obesity, thus showing the need for early intervention. PMID:25709799

  7. Common Control System Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Nelson

    2005-12-01

    The Control Systems Security Program and other programs within the Idaho National Laboratory have discovered a vulnerability common to control systems in all sectors that allows an attacker to penetrate most control systems, spoof the operator, and gain full control of targeted system elements. This vulnerability has been identified on several systems that have been evaluated at INL, and in each case a 100% success rate of completing the attack paths that lead to full system compromise was observed. Since these systems are employed in multiple critical infrastructure sectors, this vulnerability is deemed common to control systems in all sectors. Modern control systems architectures can be considered analogous to today's information networks, and as such are usually approached by attackers using a common attack methodology to penetrate deeper and deeper into the network. This approach often is composed of several phases, including gaining access to the control network, reconnaissance, profiling of vulnerabilities, launching attacks, escalating privilege, maintaining access, and obscuring or removing information that indicates that an intruder was on the system. With irrefutable proof that an external attack can lead to a compromise of a computing resource on the organization's business local area network (LAN), access to the control network is usually considered the first phase in the attack plan. Once the attacker gains access to the control network through direct connections and/or the business LAN, the second phase of reconnaissance begins with traffic analysis within the control domain. Thus, the communications between the workstations and the field device controllers can be monitored and evaluated, allowing an attacker to capture, analyze, and evaluate the commands sent among the control equipment. Through manipulation of the communication protocols of control systems (a process generally referred to as ''reverse engineering''), an attacker can then map out the control system processes and functions. With the detailed knowledge of how the control data functions, as well as what computers and devices communicate using this data, the attacker can use a well known Man-in-the-Middle attack to perform malicious operations virtually undetected. The control systems assessment teams have used this method to gather enough information about the system to craft an attack that intercepts and changes the information flow between the end devices (controllers) and the human machine interface (HMI and/or workstation). Using this attack, the cyber assessment team has been able to demonstrate complete manipulation of devices in control systems while simultaneously modifying the data flowing back to the operator's console to give false information of the state of the system (known as ''spoofing''). This is a very effective technique for a control system attack because it allows the attacker to manipulate the system and the operator's situational awareness of the perceived system status. The three main elements of this attack technique are: (1) network reconnaissance and data gathering, (2) reverse engineering, and (3) the Man-in-the-Middle attack. The details of this attack technique and the mitigation techniques are discussed.

  8. Cutaneous manifestations of opportunistic infections in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Tappero, J W; Perkins, B A; Wenger, J D; Berger, T G

    1995-01-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) presents most commonly as a cutaneous disease and is caused by two organisms. Bartonella (Rochalimaea) henselae and Bartonella (Rochalimaea) quintana. Biopsy confirmation of cutaneous BA is essential because lesions can mimic nodular Kaposi's sarcoma in appearance. Although the vast majority of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with BA have CD4 lymphocyte counts of less than 100 cells per mm3, the disease responds well to antimicrobial therapy. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial skin pathogen affecting HIV-infected patients. The prevalence of skin disease due to S. aureus may be explained by high nasal carriage rates for the organism ( > or = 50%) and altered immune function in conjunction with an impaired cutaneous barrier. Herpes simplex virus causes mucocutaneous disease early in the course HIV infection and ulcerative lesions at any site in advanced HIV infection. Herpes zoster is common early in the course of HIV infection; recurrent and disseminated herpes zoster infections are characteristic of patients with advanced HIV disease. Acyclovir resistance is usually seen in patients with large, untreated, ulcerative lesions of herpes simplex virus and in patients with chronic, verrucous lesions of varicella-zoster virus. Cutaneous cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, and coccidiomycosis are markers of disseminated disease and require biopsy confirmation. Scabies is easily diagnosed but may be atypical in presentation and difficult to eradicate in advanced HIV disease. PMID:7553576

  9. Common lung conditions: asthma.

    PubMed

    Delzell, John E

    2013-06-01

    Asthma is a common respiratory disease that leads to school and work absenteeism, office and emergency department visits, hospitalization, and mortality. Dyspnea and wheezing are caused by airway inflammation. Asthma severity scores are used to predict the risk of exacerbations. Severity assessment instruments include questions about daytime and nighttime symptoms, use of short-acting beta2-agonists, and the effect of symptoms on daily activities. The 4 components of effective asthma management are monitoring, education, control of environmental factors, and pharmacotherapy. Several national quality measures are used to measure asthma care. The National Healthcare Quality & Disparities reports measure use of drugs, routine examinations, smoking cessation, influenza vaccination, emergency department visits, and urgent ambulatory visits. Electronic health records can be used to create asthma registries to identify patients who are at higher risk of exacerbations. Interventions that have been shown to improve asthma outcomes include asthma self-management and education, risk stratification of asthma patients, and improvement of drug adherence. Providing asthma education for patients and family members has been shown to decrease hospitalizations and emergency department visits. PMID:23767417

  10. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  11. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  12. The Pharmaceutical Commons

    PubMed Central

    Lezaun, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the organization of pharmaceutical research on neglected tropical diseases has undergone transformative change. In a context of perceived “market failure,” the development of new medicines is increasingly handled by public-private partnerships. This shift toward hybrid organizational models depends on a particular form of exchange: the sharing of proprietary assets in general and of intellectual property rights in particular. This article explores the paradoxical role of private property in this new configuration of global health research and development. Rather than a tool to block potential competitors, proprietary assets function as a lever to attract others into risky collaborative ventures; instead of demarcating public and private domains, the sharing of property rights is used to increase the porosity of that boundary. This reimagination of the value of property is connected to the peculiar timescape of global health drug development, a promissory orientation to the future that takes its clearest form in the centrality of “virtual” business models and the proliferation of strategies of deferral. Drawing on the anthropological literature on inalienable possessions, we reconsider property’s traditional exclusionary role and discuss the possibility that the new pharmaceutical “commons” proclaimed by contemporary global health partnerships might be the precursor of future enclosures. PMID:25866425

  13. Common Waterfowl in the Southeast Common name1,2

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Common Waterfowl in the Southeast WFS 340 Common name1,2 Scientific name white-fronted goose Anser albifrons snow goose Chen caerulescens Canada goose Branta canadensis wood duck Aix sponsa mallard Anas

  14. Non-viral Opportunistic Infections in New Users of TNF Inhibitor Therapy: Results of the SAfety Assessment of Biologic ThERapy (SABER) Study

    PubMed Central

    Baddley, John W.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Chen, Lang; Liu, Liyan; Grijalva, Carlos G; Delzell, Elizabeth; Beukelman, Timothy; Patkar, Nivedita M.; Xie, Fenglong; Saag, Kenneth G.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Lewis, James D.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine among patients with autoimmune diseases in the United States whether the risk of non-viral opportunistic infections (OIs) was increased among new users of tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors (TNFI), when compared to users of non-biologic agents used for active disease. Methods We identified new users of TNFI among cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and psoriasis-psoriatic arthritis-ankylosing spondylitis (PsO-PsA-AS) patients during 1998–2007 using combined data from Kaiser Permanente Northern California, two pharmaceutical assistance programs for the elderly, Tennessee Medicaid, and US Medicaid/Medicare programs. We compared incidence of non-viral OIs among new TNFI users and patients initiating non-biologic disease modifying drugs (DMARDs) overall and within each disease cohort. Cox regression models were used to compare propensity-score and steroid- adjusted OI incidence between new TNFI and non-biologic DMARD users. Results Within a cohort of 33,324 new TNFI users we identified 80 non-viral OIs, the most common of which was pneumocystosis (n=16). In the combined cohort, crude rates of non-viral OIs among new users of TNFI as compared to those initiating non-biologic DMARDs was 2.7 verus 1.7 per 1000-person years[adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.6)]. Baseline corticosteroid use was associated with non-viral OIs (aHR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5, 4.0). In the RA cohort, rates of non-viral OIs among new users of infliximab were higher when compared to patients newly starting non-biologic DMARDs (aHR 2.6, 95% CI 1.2, 5.6) or new etanercept users (aHR 2.9, 95% CI: 1.5, 5.4). Conclusions In the US, the rate of non-viral OIs was higher among new users of TNFI with autoimmune diseases as compared to non-biologic DMARD users. PMID:23852763

  15. Cofunctional Subpathways Were Regulated by Transcription Factor with Common Motif, Common Family, or Common Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Shang, Desi; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Yang, Haixiu; Liu, Baoquan; Su, Shengyang; Chen, Lina; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting the characteristics of the transcription factor (TF) regulatory subpathway is helpful for understanding the TF underlying regulatory function in complex biological systems. To gain insight into the influence of TFs on their regulatory subpathways, we constructed a global TF-subpathways network (TSN) to analyze systematically the regulatory effect of common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs on subpathways. We performed cluster analysis to show that the common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs that regulated the same pathway classes tended to cluster together and contribute to the same biological function that led to disease initiation and progression. We analyzed the Jaccard coefficient to show that the functional consistency of subpathways regulated by the TF pairs with common motif, common family, or common tissue was significantly greater than the random TF pairs at the subpathway level, pathway level, and pathway class level. For example, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha) and NR1I3 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group I, member 3) were a pair of TFs with common motif, common family, and common tissue. They were involved in drug metabolism pathways and were liver-specific factors required for physiological transcription. In short, we inferred that the cofunctional subpathways were regulated by common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs. PMID:26688819

  16. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  17. House of Commons Defence Committee

    E-print Network

    Schrijver, Karel

    HC 1552 House of Commons Defence Committee Developing Threats: Electro-Magnetic Pulses (EMP) Tenth Report of Session 2010­12 #12;#12;HC 1552 Published on 22 February 2012 by authority of the House of Commons London: The Stationery Office Limited £14.50 House of Commons Defence Committee Developing Threats

  18. Common liability to addiction and “gateway hypothesis”: Theoretical, empirical and evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vanyukov, Michael M.; Tarter, Ralph E.; Kirillova, Galina P.; Kirisci, Levent; Reynolds, Maureen D.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Conway, Kevin P.; Maher, Brion S.; Iacono, William G.; Bierut, Laura; Neale, Michael C.; Clark, Duncan B.; Ridenour, Ty A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Two competing concepts address the development of involvement with psychoactive substances: the “gateway hypothesis” (GH) and common liability to addiction (CLA). Method The literature on theoretical foundations and empirical findings related to both concepts is reviewed. Results The data suggest that drug use initiation sequencing, the core GH element, is variable and opportunistic rather than uniform and developmentally deterministic. The association between risks for use of different substances, if any, can be more readily explained by common underpinnings than by specific staging. In contrast, the CLA concept is grounded in genetic theory and supported by data identifying common sources of variation in the risk for specific addictions. This commonality has identifiable neurobiological substrate and plausible evolutionary explanations. Conclusions Whereas the “gateway” hypothesis does not specify mechanistic connections between “stages”, and does not extend to the risks for addictions, the concept of common liability to addictions incorporates sequencing of drug use initiation as well as extends to related addictions and their severity, provides a parsimonious explanation of substance use and addiction co-occurrence, and establishes a theoretical and empirical foundation to research in etiology, quantitative risk and severity measurement, as well as targeted non-drug-specific prevention and early intervention. PMID:22261179

  19. How common are Earths? How common are Jupiters?

    E-print Network

    Charles H. Lineweaver; Daniel Grether; Marton Hidas

    2002-09-19

    Among the billions of planetary systems that fill the Universe, we would like to know how ours fits in. Exoplanet data can already be used to address the question: How common are Jupiters? Here we discuss a simple analysis of recent exoplanet data indicating that Jupiter is a typical massive planet rather than an outlier. A more difficult question to address is: How common are Earths? However, much indirect evidence suggests that wet rocky planets are common.

  20. The opportunistic nature of Trichinella--exploitation of new geographies and habitats.

    PubMed

    Pozio, Edoardo

    2013-05-20

    For more than 100 years, Trichinella spiralis (former Trichina spiralis) was considered a zoonotic parasite of the domestic habitat involving pigs, synanthropic rats and humans. In the last 70 years, there has been increasing evidence that the biomass of nematodes of the genus Trichinella is greater in wild animals than in domestic animals. Omnivores and carnivores (mammals, birds and some reptiles), mainly those with cannibalistic and scavenger behaviour, act primarily as reservoirs for the 12 Trichinella taxa recognized to date. The distribution areas of Trichinella spp. hosts can help to identify the environmental suitability where the different Trichinella taxa can be detected. Both the survival of larvae in decaying muscles of their hosts, which is favoured by high humidity and low temperatures, and human behaviour in the domestic and wild habitats play roles in the transmission patterns of these nematodes. Although Trichinella taxa develop in different host species circulating in different geographical regions, there is a common denominator among the hosts, namely their scavenging behaviour. PMID:23433987

  1. A Five-Year Survey of Dematiaceous Fungi in a Tropical Hospital Reveals Potential Opportunistic Species

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Su Mei; Chan, Chai Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Na, Shiang Ling; Tan, Ruixin; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2014-01-01

    Dematiaceous fungi (black fungi) are a heterogeneous group of fungi present in diverse environments worldwide. Many species in this group are known to cause allergic reactions and potentially fatal diseases in humans and animals, especially in tropical and subtropical climates. This study represents the first survey of dematiaceous fungi in Malaysia and provides observations on their diversity as well as in vitro response to antifungal drugs. Seventy-five strains isolated from various clinical specimens were identified by morphology as well as an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based phylogenetic analysis. The combined molecular and conventional approach enabled the identification of three classes of the Ascomycota phylum and 16 genera, the most common being Cladosporium, Cochliobolus and Neoscytalidium. Several of the species identified have not been associated before with human infections. Among 8 antifungal agents tested, the azoles posaconazole (96%), voriconazole (90.7%), ketoconazole (86.7%) and itraconazole (85.3%) showed in vitro activity (MIC ?1 µg/mL) to the largest number of strains, followed by anidulafungin (89.3%), caspofungin (74.7%) and amphotericin B (70.7%). Fluconazole appeared to be the least effective with only 10.7% of isolates showing in vitro susceptibility. Overall, almost half (45.3%) of the isolates showed reduced susceptibility (MIC >1 µg/mL) to at least one antifungal agent, and three strains (one Pyrenochaeta unguis-hominis and two Nigrospora oryzae) showed potential multidrug resistance. PMID:25098697

  2. Strategies for the Identification and Tracking of Cronobacter Species: An Opportunistic Pathogen of Concern to Neonatal Health

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiongqiong; Fanning, Séamus

    2015-01-01

    Cronobacter species are emerging opportunistic food-borne pathogens, which consists of seven species, including C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis, C. dublinensis, C. universalis, and C. condimenti. The organism can cause severe clinical infections, including necrotizing enterocolitis, septicemia, and meningitis, predominately among neonates <4?weeks of age. Cronobacter species can be isolated from various foods and their surrounding environments; however, powdered infant formula (PIF) is the most frequently implicated food source linked with Cronobacter infection. This review aims to provide a summary of laboratory-based strategies that can be used to identify and trace Cronobacter species. The identification of Cronobacter species using conventional culture method and immuno-based detection protocols were first presented. The molecular detection and identification at genus-, and species-level along with molecular-based serogroup approaches are also described, followed by the molecular sub-typing methods, in particular pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multi-locus sequence typing. Next generation sequence approaches, including whole genome sequencing, DNA microarray, and high-throughput whole-transcriptome sequencing, are also highlighted. Appropriate application of these strategies would contribute to reduce the risk of Cronobacter contamination in PIF and production environments, thereby improving food safety and protecting public health. PMID:26000266

  3. Effect of 2, 4-di-tert-butylphenol on growth and biofilm formation by an opportunistic fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, Alwar Ramanujam; Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, an opportunistic pathogen, has been known to form hypoxic biofilms on medical devices which in turn confers resistance towards antifungals, resulting in subsequent therapeutic failures. Inclusion of anti-biofilm agents in the control of infections is a topic of current interest in developing potential anti-infectives. The in vitro anti-fungal and anti-biofilm efficacy of 2,4-di-tert-butyl phenol [DTBP] was evaluated in this study, which revealed the potential fungicidal action of DTBP at higher concentrations where fluconazole failed to act completely. DTBP also inhibited the production of hemolysins, phospholipases and secreted aspartyl proteinase which are the crucial virulence factors required for the invasion of C. albicans. Various anti-biofilm assays and morphological observations revealed the efficacy of DTBP in both inhibiting and disrupting biofilms of C. albicans. Inhibition of hyphal development, a key process that aids in initial adhesion of C. albicans, was observed, and this could be a mechanism for the anti-biofilm activity of DTBP. PMID:26299260

  4. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K.; Veelken, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25784678

  5. A mixed strategy in the annual endemic Aster laurentianus (Asteraceae)--a stress-tolerant, yet opportunistic species.

    PubMed

    Houle, Gilles; Valéry, Sébastien

    2003-02-01

    Several environmental factors influence the distribution of plants in coastal salt marshes. Substrate salinity is among the major factors preventing several species from establishing near the water line. However, interspecific competition for light and nutrients is often significant in determining the upper limit of plants along the salt marsh gradient. In this study, we tested the effects of substrate salinity and light and nutrient availability on the performance of the annual Aster laurentianus (Asteraceae), an endangered species of eastern Canadian salt marshes. This species is typically found in a narrow band along the shores of shallow lagoons, cornered between the high water line and the dense, herbaceous community of the upper marsh. Low light availability was the most significant factor limiting plant performance. Salinity had little effect on A. laurentianus as, unexpectedly, did nutrient availability. Yet plants were able to absorb nutrients when these were made more available. Luxury consumption, the uptake of excess nutrients, may make sense for this annual plant because the habitat in which it grows is subject to frequent disturbances (e.g., sand accretion and salinity pulses) that may kill canopy species and release suppressed A. laurentianus individuals. These results suggest that interspecific competition for light may play a significant role in restraining A. laurentianus from the upper part of salt marshes. Luxury consumption may help the species to opportunistically take advantage of release from taller species, particularly towards the upper edge of the salt marsh gradient. PMID:21659119

  6. Opportunistic Gram-negative rods' capability of creating biofilm structures on polivynyl chloride and styrene-acronitrile copolymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zabielska, Julia; Kunicka-Styczy?ska, Alina; Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Tyfa, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly organized microbial communities displaying high resistance to disinfectants and other external environmental factors. Medical equipment, such as stents and catheters, can be colonized by a variety of bacteria including opportunistic pathogens circulating in the environment and dangerous to immunocompromised patients. Application of materials resistant to biofilm formation will minimize the risk of patients' infection. Hence, the aim of this research was to determine the biofilm growth of environmental bacteria isolates on polyvinyl chloride and styrene-acronitrile copolymer surfaces. Nine strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia and Serratia liquefacies) isolated from cosmetics, and a reference P. aeruginosa strain ATCC 15442, were tested. The ability and dynamics of biofilm formation on intubation catheters (30°C, up to 24 h) in bacterial growth cultures (10(7)-10(8) CFU/ml) was investigated, with subsequent sonication and quantification by agar plate count method. The results indicated that all the tested bacteria expressed a strong ability for the polymer surface adhesion, reaching 4.6 to 6.7 log CFU/cm(2) after 30 minutes. Moreover, for the majority of strains, the level of 24-hour biofilm production was from 6.67-7.61 log CFU/cm(2). This research indicates that the environmental strains circulating between the cosmetics and patients may pose a threat of biofilm formation on medical equipment surfaces, and presumably in the clinical surroundings as well. PMID:26619252

  7. The DSF type quorum sensing signalling system RpfF/R regulates diverse phenotypes in the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter.

    PubMed

    Suppiger, Angela; Eshwar, Athmanya Konegadde; Stephan, Roger; Kaever, Volkhard; Eberl, Leo; Lehner, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens produce diffusible signal factor (DSF)-type quorum sensing (QS) signals to control biofilm formation and virulence. Previous work showed that in Burkholderia cenocepacia the RpfFBc/RpfR system is involved in sensing and responding to DSF signals and that this signal/sensor gene pair is highly conserved in several bacterial species including Cronobacter spp. Here we show that C. turicensis LMG 23827(T) possesses a functional RpfF/R system that is involved in the regulation of various phenotypes, including colony morphology, biofilm formation and swarming motility. In vivo experiments using the zebrafish embryo model revealed a role of this regulatory system in virulence of this opportunistic pathogen. We provide evidence that the RpfF/R system modulates the intracellular c-di-GMP level of the organism, an effect that may underpin the alteration in phenotype and thus the regulated phenotypes may be a consequence thereof. This first report on an RpfF/R-type QS system of an organism outside the genus Burkholderia revealed that both the underlying molecular mechanisms as well as the regulated functions show a high degree of conservation. PMID:26725701

  8. Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) and Preliminary Mode of Action Studies of 3-Substituted Benzylthioquinolinium Iodide as Anti-opportunistic Infection Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bolden, Sidney; Zhu, Xue Y.; Etukala, Jagan R; Boateng, Comfort; Mazu, Tryphon; Flores-Rozas, Hernan; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I; Walker, Larry A.; Ablordeppey, Seth Y.

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic infections are devastating to immunocompromised patients. And in especially sub-Saharan Africa where the AIDS epidemic is still raging, the mortality rate was recently as high as 70%. The paucity of anti-opportunistic drugs, the decreasing efficacy and the development of resistance against the azoles and even amphotericin B have stimulated the search for new drugs with new mechanisms of action. In a previous work, we showed that a new chemotype derived from the natural product cryptolepine displayed selective toxicity against opportunistic pathogens with minimal cytotoxicity to normal cells. In this manuscript, we report the design and synthesis of substituted benzylthioquinolinium iodides, evaluated their anti-infective properties and formulated some initial structure-activity relationships around phenyl ring A from the original natural product. The sensitivity of the most potent analog 10l, to selected strains of C. cerevisiae was also evaluated leading to the observation that this scaffold may have a different mode of action from its predecessor, cryptolepine. PMID:24141203

  9. Propensity to high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice is associated with the indigenous opportunistic bacteria on the interior of Peyer’s patches

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi; Sun, Jin; Xie, Zhenxing; Shi, Yonghui; Le, Guowei

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous opportunistic bacteria on the interior of the Peyer’s patches play a key role in the development of the mucosal immune, but their population composition has been ignored. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the changes in the composition of indigenous opportunistic bacteria in the Peyer’s patches are associated with obesity. C57BL/6J-male mice had been fed either a control diet or a high-fat diet. After 25 weeks, mice in high-fat diet exhibit either an obesity-prone (OP) or an obesity-resistant (OR) phenotype. Control diet group (CT) and OR group had a significant larger bacteria diversity than that in the OP group. Allobaculum and Lactobacillus were significantly decreased in high-fat diet induced OP mice compared with CT and OR mice, whereas Rhizobium and Lactococcus was significantly increased. The result of quantitative real-time PCR was consistent with that of 454 pyrosequencing. Significant correlations between mRNA expression of inflammation marks and the top 5 abundance genera bacteria on the interior of Peyer’s patches were observed by Pearson’s correlation analysis. Taken together, the indigenous opportunistic bacteria on the interior of Peyer’s patches plays a major role in the development of inflammation for an occurrence of obesity. PMID:25320459

  10. Constructing the Commons: Practical Projects To Build the Information Commons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Daniel R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several projects aimed at building the Information Commons, including: Knowledge Conservancy plans to create a database of all freely available digitized content; the Universal Library, a project with the long-term goal of providing free, online access to all books; and several projects of the Creative Commons intended to build a robust…

  11. Competence across Europe: Highest Common Factor or Lowest Common Denominator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterton, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore diversity in competence models across Europe and consider the extent to which there is sufficient common ground for a common European approach to underpin the European Qualifications Framework. Design/methodology/approach: The paper uses a literature review and interviews with policy makers.…

  12. Breeding Common Bean for resistance to Common Blight: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common blight {caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli Smith (Dye) is a major bacterial disease causing >40% seed yield and quality losses in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. Use of resistant cultivars is crucial for its effective, economical, and environment friendly integarated...

  13. Multicenter Outbreak of Infections by Saprochaete clavata, an Unrecognized Opportunistic Fungal Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Vaux, Sophie; Criscuolo, Alexis; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Diancourt, Laure; Tarnaud, Chloé; Vandenbogaert, Matthias; Brisse, Sylvain; Coignard, Bruno; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Blanc, Catherine; Hoinard, Damien; Lortholary, Olivier; Bretagne, Stéphane; Thiolet, Jean-Michel; de Valk, Henriette; Courbil, Rémi; Chabanel, Anne; Simonet, Marion; Maire, Francoise; Jbilou, Saadia; Tiberghien, Pierre; Blanchard, Hervé; Venier, Anne-Gaëlle; Bernet, Claude; Simon, Loïc; Sénéchal, Hélène; Pouchol, Elodie; Angot, Christiane; Ribaud, Patricia; Socié, G.; Flèche, M.; Brieu, Nathalie; Lagier, Evelyne; Chartier, Vanessa; Allegre, Thierry; Maulin, Laurence; Lanic, Hélène; Tilly, Hervé; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Pihet, Marc; Schmidt, Aline; Kouatchet, Achille; Vandamme, Yves-Marie; Ifrah, Norbert; Mercat, Alain; Accoceberry, Isabelle; Albert, Olivier; Leguay, Thibaut; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Bonhomme, Julie; Reman, Oumédaly; Lesteven, Claire; Poirier, Philippe; Chabrot, Cécile Molucon; Calvet, Laure; Baud, Olivier; Cambon, Monique; Farkas, Jean Chistophe; Lafon, Bruno; Dalle, Frédéric; Caillot, Denis; Lazzarotti, Aline; Aho, Serge; Combret, Sandrine; Facon, Thierry; Sendid, Boualem; Loridant, Séverine; Louis, Terriou; Cazin, Bruno; Grandbastien, Bruno; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Lotthé, Anne; Cartron, Guillaume; Ravel, Christophe; Colson, Pascal; Gaudard, Philippe; Bonmati, Caroline; Simon, Loic; Rabaud, Christian; Machouart, Marie; Poisson, Didier; Carp, Diana; Meunier, Jérôme; Gaschet, Anne; Miquel, Chantal; Sanhes, Laurence; Ferreyra, Milagros; Leibinger, Franck; Geudet, Philippe; Toubas, Dominique; Himberlin, Chantal; Bureau-Chalot, Florence; Delmer, Alain; Favennec, Loïc; Gargala, Gilles; Michot, Jean-Baptiste; Girault, Christophe; David, Marion; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Jardin, Fabrice; Honderlick, Pierre; Caille, Vincent; Cerf, Charles; Cassaing, Sophie; Recher, Christian; Picard, Muriel; Protin, Caroline; Huguet, Françoise; Huynh, Anne; Ruiz, Jean; Riu-Poulenc, Béatrice; Letocart, Philippe; Marchou, Bruno; Verdeil, Xavier; Cavalié, Laurent; Chauvin, Pamela; Iriart, Xavier; Valentin, Alexis; Bouvet, Emmanuelle; Delmas-Marsalet, Béatrice; Jeblaoui, Asma; Kassis-Chikhani, Najiby; Mühlethaler, Konrad; Zimmerli, Stefan; Zalar, Polona; Sánchez-Reus, Ferran; Gurgui, Merce

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rapidly fatal cases of invasive fungal infections due to a fungus later identified as Saprochaete clavata were reported in France in May 2012. The objectives of this study were to determine the clonal relatedness of the isolates and to investigate possible sources of contamination. A nationwide alert was launched to collect cases. Molecular identification methods, whole-genome sequencing (WGS), and clone-specific genotyping were used to analyze recent and historical isolates, and a case-case study was performed. Isolates from thirty cases (26 fungemias, 22 associated deaths at day 30) were collected between September 2011 and October 2012. Eighteen cases occurred within 8 weeks (outbreak) in 10 health care facilities, suggesting a common source of contamination, with potential secondary cases. Phylogenetic analysis identified one clade (clade A), which accounted for 16/18 outbreak cases. Results of microbiological investigations of environmental, drug, or food sources were negative. Analysis of exposures pointed to a medical device used for storage and infusion of blood products, but no fungal contamination was detected in the unused devices. Molecular identification of isolates from previous studies demonstrated that S. clavata can be found in dairy products and has already been involved in monocentric outbreaks in hematology wards. The possibility that S. clavata may transmit through contaminated medical devices or can be associated with dairy products as seen in previous European outbreaks is highly relevant for the management of future outbreaks due to this newly recognized pathogen. This report also underlines further the potential of WGS for investigation of outbreaks due to uncommon fungal pathogens. PMID:25516620

  14. Lunar and Martian hardware commonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Hubert P.; Johnson, Robert E.; Phillips, Paul G.; Spear, Donald S.; Stump, William R.; Williams, Franklin U.

    1986-01-01

    A number of different hardware elements were examined for possible Moon/Mars program commonality. These include manned landers; cargo landers, a trans-Mars injection (TMI) stage, traverse vehicles, unmanned surface rovers, habitation modules, and power supplies. Preliminary analysis indicates that it is possible to build a common two-stage manned lander. A single-stage, reusable lander may be practical for the lunar cast, but much less so for the Martian case, and commonality may therefore exist only at the subsystem level. A modified orbit transfer vehicle was examined as a potential cargo lander. Potential cargoes to various destinations were calculated for a Shuttle external tank sized TMI stage. A nuclear powered, long range traverse vehicle was conceptually designed and commonality is considered feasible. Short range, unmanned rovers can be made common without great effort. A surface habitation module may be difficult to make common due to difficulties in landing certain shapes on the Martian surface with aerobraking landers. Common nuclear power sources appear feasible. High temperature radiators appear easy to make common. Low temperature radiators may be difficult to make common. In most of these cases, Martian requirements determine the design.

  15. How Common is Common Use Facilities at Airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbeau, Addison D.

    This study looked at common use airports across the country and at the implementation of common use facailities at airports. Common use consists of several elements that maybe installed at an airport. One of the elements is the self-service kiosks that allow passengers to have a faster check-in process, therefore moving them more quickly within the airport. Another element is signage and the incorporation of each airline's logo. Another aspect of common useis an airport regaining control of terminal gates by reducing the number of gates that are exclusively leased to a specific air carrier. This research focused on the current state of the common use facilities across the United States and examines the advantages and disadvantages of this approach. The research entailed interviews with personnel at a wide range of airports and found that each airport is in a different stage of implementation; some have fully implemented the common use concept while others are in the beginning stages of implementation. The questions were tailored to determine what the advantages and disadvantages are of a common use facility. The most common advantages reported included flexibility and cost. In the commom use system the airport reserves the right to move any airline to a different gate at any time for any reason. In turn, this helps reduce gates delays at that facility. For the airports that were interviewed no major disadvantages were reported. One down side of common use facilities for the airport involved is the major capital cost that is required to move to a common use system.

  16. Sporotrichosis: an emerging neglected opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Dayvison Francis Saraiva; Valle, Antonio Carlos Francesconi do; da Silva, Margarete Bernardo Tavares; Campos, Dayse Pereira; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; de Souza, Rogerio Valls; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Galhardo, Maria Clara Gutierrez

    2014-08-01

    Sporotrichosis associated with zoonotic transmission remains a relevant public health problem in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, affecting a large at-risk population, which includes HIV-infected individuals. We assessed patients co-infected by Sporothrix spp. and HIV over time in the context of an unabated sporotrichosis epidemic. A retrospective cohort retrieved information from a National reference institute for infectious diseases regarding 48 patients with sporotrichosis-HIV co-infection (group 1) as well as 3,570 patients with sporotrichosis (group 2), from 1987 through March 2013. Most patients from group 1 were male (68.8%), whereas women were predominant in group 2 (69.1%; p<0.0001). Patients from group 1 were younger than those from group 2 (??=?38.38±10.17 vs. 46.34±15.85; p<0.001) and differed from group 2 in terms of their race/ethnic background, with 70.8% non-white patients in group 1 vs. 38.6% from group 2 (p<0.0001). Close to half (?44%) of the patients from group 1 were hospitalized due to sporotrichosis over time, whereas hospitalization was very unlikely in group 2, among whom approximately 1% were hospitalized over time. Dissemination of sporotrichosis was the main cause of hospitalization in both groups, although it was more common among hospitalized patients from group 1 (19/21 [90.5%] vs. 16/37 [43.2%]; p<0.001). Over the period under analysis, eight patients died due to sporotrichosis (3/48 vs. 5/3,570). The diagnosis of sporotrichosis elicited HIV testing and subsequent diagnosis in 19/48 patients, whereas 23/48 patients were simultaneously diagnosed with the two infections. HIV infection aggravates sporotrichosis, with a higher incidence of severe disseminated cases and a higher number of hospitalizations and deaths. Underserved populations, among whom sporotrichosis has been propagated, have been affected by different transmissible (e.g., HIV) and non-transmissible diseases. These populations should be targeted by community development programs and entitled to integrated management and care of their superimposed burdens. PMID:25166475

  17. Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control. 

    E-print Network

    Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

    1964-01-01

    . The genus Potamogeton J commonly called pond weeds, includes many species common to Texas waters. Group characteristics include alternate leaves with flowers and fruits in spikes or heads. Many have two kinds of leaves: (1) floating and firm textured and (2...

  18. Longest Common Subsequence Andreas Klappenecker

    E-print Network

    Klappenecker, Andreas

    indices i1xia for all a in the range 1 Suppose that X and Y are two sequences over a set S. We say that Z is a common subsequence of X and Y if and only if · Z is a subsequence of X · Z is a subsequence of Y #12;The Longest Common Subsequence Problem

  19. Longest Common Subsequence Andreas Klappenecker

    E-print Network

    Klappenecker, Andreas

    indices i1xia for all a in the range 1 Suppose that X and Y are two sequences over a set S. We say that Z is a common subsequence of X and Y if and only if · Z is a subsequence of X · Z is a subsequence of Y 3 #12;The Longest Common Given two

  20. October 2007 THE COMMON VULNERABILITY

    E-print Network

    October 2007 THE COMMON VULNERABILITY SCORING SYSTEM (CVSS) THE COMMON VULNERABILITY SCORING SYSTEM technology (IT) systems, managers must continually identify and assess the vulnerabilities of their systems. These weaknesses, or vulnerabilities, make the systems attractive targets for attacks that can seriously change

  1. OSTA commonality analysis, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarik, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    The 13 OSTA disciplines are examined and the applications being performed under each discipline and the parameter requirements associated with the various applications are identified. It contains a variety of printouts from the commonality database built using DRS on the Vax. It also shows commonality of parameter requirements by discipline and by application.

  2. Common Protocols for Shared Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Bull, Gina; Sigmon, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Although it is becoming easier to share materials via the Internet, the process is still not transparent, especially when cross-platform transfers are involved. This article reviews common protocols and discusses several utilities and strategies for exchanging information online. Includes a table listing transfer and compression protocols, common

  3. In Situ Fixation of Metal(loid)s in Contaminated Soils: A Comparison of Conventional, Opportunistic, and Engineered Soil Amendments.

    PubMed

    Mele, Elena; Donner, Erica; Juhasz, Albert L; Brunetti, Gianluca; Smith, Euan; Betts, Aaron R; Castaldi, Paola; Deiana, Salvatore; Scheckel, Kirk G; Lombi, Enzo

    2015-11-17

    This study aimed to assess and compare the in vitro and in vivo bioaccessibility/bioavailability of As and Pb in a mining contaminated soil (As, 2267 mg kg(-1); Pb, 1126 mg kg(-1)), after the addition of conventional (phosphoric acid), opportunistic [water treatment residues (WTRs)], and engineered [nano- and microscale zero valent iron (ZVI)] amendments. Phosphoric acid was the only amendment that could significantly decrease Pb bioaccessibility with respect to untreated soil (41 and 47% in the gastric phase and 2.1 and 8.1% in the intestinal phases, respectively), giving treatment effect ratios (TERs, the bioaccessibility in the amended soil divided by the bioaccessibility in the untreated soil) of 0.25 and 0.87 in the gastric and intestinal phase, respectively. The in vivo bioavailability of Pb decreased in the phosphate treatment relative to the untreated soil (6 and 24%, respectively), and also in the Fe WTR 2% (12%) and nZVI-2 (13%) treatments. The ZVI amendments caused a decrease in As bioaccessibility, with the greatest decrease in the nZVI2-treated soil (TERs of 0.59 and 0.64 in the gastric and intestinal phases, respectively). Arsenic X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis indicated that most of the As in the untreated soil was present as As(V) associated with Fe mineral phases, whereas in the treated soil, the proportion of arsenosiderite increased. Arsenite was present only as a minor species (3-5%) in the treated soils, with the exception of an nZVI treatment [?14% of As(III)], suggesting a partial reduction of As(V) to As(III) caused by nZVI oxidation. PMID:26457447

  4. Banana infecting fungus, Fusarium musae, is also an opportunistic human pathogen: are bananas potential carriers and source of fusariosis?

    PubMed

    Triest, David; Stubbe, Dirk; De Cremer, Koen; Piérard, Denis; Detandt, Monique; Hendrickx, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    During re-identification of Fusarium strains in the BCCM™/IHEM fungal collection by multilocus sequence-analysis we observed that five strains, previously identified as Fusarium verticillioides, were Fusarium musae, a species described in 2011 from banana fruits. Four strains were isolated from blood samples or biopsies of immune-suppressed patients and one was isolated from the clinical environment, all originating from different hospitals in Belgium or France, 2001-2008. The F. musae identity of our isolates was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis using reference sequences of type material. Absence of the gene cluster necessary for fumonisin biosynthesis, characteristic to F. musae, was also the case for our isolates. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing revealed no important differences in their susceptibility compared to clinical F. verticillioides strains and terbinafine was the most effective drug. Additional clinical F. musae strains were searched by performing BLAST queries in GenBank. Eight strains were found, of which six were keratitis cases from the U.S. multistate contact lens-associated outbreak in 2005 and 2006. The two other strains were also from the U.S., causing either a skin infection or sinusitis. This report is the first to describe F. musae as causative agent of superficial and opportunistic, disseminated infections in humans. Imported bananas might act as carriers of F. musae spores and be a potential source of infection with F. musae in humans. An alternative hypothesis is that the natural distribution of F. musae is geographically a lot broader than originally suspected and F. musae is present on different plant hosts. PMID:25361833

  5. In Vitro Activities of Isavuconazole and Comparator Antifungal Agents Tested against a Global Collection of Opportunistic Yeasts and Molds

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Shawn A.; Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a new broad-spectrum triazole with a favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile. We report the MIC distributions for isavuconazole and 111 isolates of Candida (42 Candida albicans, 25 Candida glabrata, 22 Candida parapsilosis, 14 Candida tropicalis, and 8 Candida krusei isolates), as determined by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Also, the relative activities of isavuconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and the three echinocandins were assessed against a recent (2011) global collection of 1,358 isolates of Candida spp., 101 of Aspergillus spp., 54 of non-Candida yeasts, and 21 of non-Aspergillus molds using CLSI BMD methods. The overall essential agreement (EA) (±2 log2 dilutions) between the CLSI and EUCAST methods was 99.1% (EA at ±1 log2 dilution, 90.1% [range, 80.0 to 100.0%]). The activities of isavuconazole against the larger collection of Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. were comparable to those of posaconazole and voriconazole; the MIC90 values for isavuconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole against Candida spp. were 0.5, 1, and 0.25 ?g/ml and against Aspergillus spp. were 2, 1, and 1 ?g/ml, respectively. Isavuconazole showed good activities against Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC90, 0.12 ?g/ml) and other non-Candida yeasts (MIC90, 1 ?g/ml) but was less potent against non-Aspergillus molds (MIC90, >8 ?g/ml). Isavuconazole MIC values for three mucormycete isolates were 4, 1, and 2 ?g/ml, whereas all three were inhibited by 1 ?g/ml posaconazole. Isavuconazole demonstrates broad-spectrum activity against this global collection of opportunistic fungi, and the CLSI and EUCAST methods can be used to test this agent against Candida, with highly comparable results. PMID:23740727

  6. Tough decisions: Reproductive timing and output vary with individuals' physiology, behavior and past success in a social opportunistic breeder.

    PubMed

    Mariette, Mylene M; Buchanan, Katherine L; Buttemer, William A; Careau, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Photoperiod and the hormonal response it triggers are key determinants of reproductive timing in birds. However, other cues and physiological traits may permit flexibility in the timing of breeding and perhaps facilitate adaptation to global change. Opportunistic breeders are excellent models to study the adaptive significance of this flexibility, especially at the individual level. Here, we sought to quantify whether particular male physiological and behavioral traits were linked to reproductive timing and output in wild-derived zebra finches. We repeatedly assessed male stress-induced corticosterone levels (CORT), basal metabolic rate (BMR), and activity before releasing them into outdoor aviaries and quantifying each pair's breeding timing, investment, and output over a seven-month period. Despite unlimited access to food and water, the colony breeding activity occurred in waves, probably due to interpair social stimulations. Pairs adjusted their inter-clutch interval and clutch size to social and temperature cues, respectively, but only after successful breeding attempts, suggesting a facultative response to external cues. When these effects were controlled for statistically or experimentally, breeding intervals were repeatable within individuals across reproductive attempts. In addition, males' first laying date and total offspring production varied with complex interactions between pre-breeding CORT, BMR and activity levels. These results suggest that no one trait is under selection but that, instead, correlational selection acts on hormone levels, metabolism, and behavior. Together our results suggest that studying inter-individual variation in breeding strategy and their multiple physiological and behavioral underpinnings may greatly improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the evolution of breeding decisions. PMID:25917863

  7. Common Variants for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shutong; Tao, Lichan; Wang, Xiuzhi; Kong, Xiangqing; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common disease with high morbidity and mortality; however, none of the drugs available are now entirely optimal for the treatment of HF. In addition to various clinical diseases and environment influences, genetic factors also contribute to the development and progression of HF. Identifying the common variants for HF by genome-wide association studies will facilitate the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HF. This review summarizes the recently identified common variants for HF risk and outcome and discusses their implications for the clinic therapy. PMID:26085806

  8. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  11. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  12. Inherited risk for common disease

    E-print Network

    Banava, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium studies have discovered few gene-disease associations for common diseases. The explanation has been offered that complex modes of inheritance govern risk for cancers, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ...

  13. Oxley Creek Common Brisbane, Australia

    E-print Network

    Queensland, University of

    -lark are also easy to find. Striped Honeyeater have nested in the Hoop Pines around the BBQ. Brown Honeyeater, Brown Honeyeater and Bar-shouldered Doves are all common in the mangroves. While the Brown Honeyeater

  14. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disorders - Osteoporosis - Prevention - Calcium - Calcium content of common foods Printer friendly Email Share Tweet Like Below is ... Green/French beans 90 g cooked 50 Starchy foods Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Pasta (cooked) 180 ...

  15. Common Skin Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    Taradash, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Six common pediatric skin problems are discussed through the use of case histories. Problems of differential diagnosis are outlined, and the various steps and pitfalls in therapy itemized. PMID:21308018

  16. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    E-print Network

    Kirkup, Benjamin

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it ...

  17. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    E-print Network

    Kirkup, Benjamin

    Background: While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an ...

  18. Casuistry as common law morality.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Norbert

    2015-12-01

    This article elaborates on the relation between ethical casuistry and common law reasoning. Despite the frequent talk of casuistry as common law morality, remarks on this issue largely remain at the purely metaphorical level. The article outlines and scrutinizes Albert Jonsen and Stephen Toulmin's version of casuistry and its basic elements. Drawing lessons for casuistry from common law reasoning, it is argued that one generally has to be faithful to ethical paradigms. There are, however, limitations for the binding force of paradigms. The most important limitations-the possibilities of overruling and distinguishing paradigm norms-are similar in common law and in casuistry, or so it is argued. These limitations explain why casuistry is not necessarily overly conservative and conventional, which is one line of criticism to which casuists can now better respond. Another line of criticism has it that the very reasoning from case to case is extremely unclear in casuistry. I suggest a certain model of analogical reasoning to address this critique. All my suggestions to understand and to enhance casuistry make use of common law reasoning whilst remaining faithful to Jonsen and Toulmin's main ideas and commitments. Further developed along these lines, casuistry can appropriately be called "common law morality." PMID:26576963

  19. Diet composition of common ravens across the urban-wildland interface of the West Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kristan, W. B., III; Boarman, W.I.; Crayon, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Common ravens (Corvus corax) are human-subsidized scavengers and predators in the Mojave Desert. They have increased dramatically in number and have been implicated as contributors to the decline in desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) populations. Known patterns of increased fledging success near human developments suggested that food was the most likely resource subsidy received by ravens. Because ravens are opportunistic foragers with a generalist diet, we predicted that the types of resource subsidy provided by different kinds of human developments should be reflected in measures of diet composition of breeding ravens. We estimated diet composition from contents of raven pellets collected at nests and related diet composition to distance of the nests from roads and point sources of resource subsidies, such as towns or landfills. Ravens that nested close to point subsidies far from major roads had the greatest incidence of trash in their diets. Ravens that nested close to roads but far from point subsidies had a low incidence of trash and a higher incidence of presumably road-killed mammals and reptiles. Ravens far from both roads and point subsidies had more plant material and arthropods, and ravens close to both roads and point subsidies had more birds and amphibians. Diet diversity was not related to distance from roads or developments. Fledging success was correlated with diet composition, such that birds with diets consistent with trash or road-kill subsidies fledged the greatest number of chicks. Our results suggest that ravens forage opportunistically on foods available near their nests, and different kinds of human developments contribute different foods. Improved management of landfills and highway fencing to reduce road-kills may help slow the growth of raven populations in the Mojave.

  20. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value < 0.001), resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions There is insufficient clinical trial evidence regarding the effects of garlic in preventing or treating the common cold. A single trial suggested that garlic may prevent occurrences of the common cold but more studies are needed to validate this finding. Claims of effectiveness appear to rely largely on poor-quality evidence. PMID:25386977

  1. Surveying the Commons: Current Implementation of Information Commons Web sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeder, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the content of 72 academic library Information Commons (IC) Web sites using content analysis, quantitative assessment and qualitative surveys of site administrators to analyze current implementation by the academic library community. Results show that IC Web sites vary widely in content, design and functionality, with few…

  2. Common Ground: Finding Commonalities in Diverse Musical Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gault, Brent

    2006-01-01

    The article focuses on teaching commonalities in diverse musical genres. Teachers need to relate the musical activities performed in class to music that students experience in the world around them since they understand music in relation to history and culture. A key to selecting high-quality musical examples is to find music pieces that contain…

  3. Creative Commons and Why It Should Be More Commonly Understood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug

    2009-01-01

    Authors, videographers, musicians, photographers, and almost anyone who creates materials and makes them publicly available has an alternative to standard copyright licensing: Creative Commons (CC). It is a tool that helps the creator display a licensing mark. The creator can assign a variety of rights for others to use his work--rights that are…

  4. Using online adverts to increase the uptake of cervical screening amongst “real Eastenders”: an opportunistic controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical screening uptake has increased as a result of occurrences of cervical cancer in TV ‘soap operas’ and in real life celebrities such as Jade Goody. Media analysis at the time of Jade Goody’s death suggested the NHS did not take sufficient advantage of this opportunity to improve cervical screening rates. Google AdWords has been used to recruit and raise awareness of health but we were not aware of its use to supplement media events. Methods This was an opportunistic service evaluation to accompany a cervical cancer storyline in Eastenders (a TV ‘soap opera’). We ran an AdWords campaign based on keywords such as ‘Eastenders’, and ‘cervical cancer’ in a one mile radius in East London, linked to one webpage giving details of 10 practices and other links on cervical cancer. We recorded costs of adverts and setting up the webpage. We used routine statistics from Tower Hamlets, City and Hackney, and Newham Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) of the number of smears, eligible populations, and coverage by practice by month from September 2010 to January 2012 to compare the ten intervention practices with controls. Results Eight people per day in the target area viewed the project webpage. The cost of setting up the website and running Google AdWords was £1320 or £1.88 per person viewing the webpage. Unlike Jade Goody’s death, there was no major impact from the Eastenders’ storyline on Google searches for cervical cancer. There was considerable monthly variation in the number of smear tests in the 3 PCTs. The AdWords campaign may have had some effect on smear rates but this showed, at best, a marginal statistical difference. Assuming a ‘real’ effect, the intervention may have resulted in 110 ‘extra’ women being screened but there was no change in coverage. Conclusions Although the Eastenders storyline seemed to have no effect on interest in cervical cancer or screening, the AdWords campaign may have had some effect. Given the small scale exploratory nature of the study this was not statistically significant but the relatively modest cost of advertising suggests a larger study may be worthwhile. An outline of a possible study is described. PMID:23531167

  5. Evaluating the effectiveness of opportunistic eye screening model for people with Diabetes attending Diabetes clinic at Mnazi Mmoja hospital, Zanzibar

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes and its related microvascular complications like Diabetic retinopathy are showing an alarming rise in developing countries like Zanzibar. Objective of the present study is to evaluate the impact of integrating eye screening for all subjects attending the diabetes clinic at Mnazi Mmoja Hospital in Zanzibar and to estimate the prevalence of visual impairment and diabetic retinopathy among the subjects. Methods This is a cross sectional study involving 356 randomly selected patients who had attended the diabetes clinic between July and August 2012. All subjects underwent comprehensive eye examination including fundus evaluation after dilatation by a cataract surgeon and an ophthalmologist, independently. Data was collected using the designated questionnaire and analysed using the SPSS software. Blindness and visual impairment was defined as presenting VA <3/60 and <6/18 to 6/60 in the better eye respectively and DR was graded using the International classification of Diabetic Retinopathy severity grading scale. Results A total of 356/967 subjects were recruited in a duration of 2 months; 176 (49.4%) were male and the mean age was 52.21 (SD 15.3). Targeted eye screening of diabetics showed that 231/356 (65%) of the subjects had eye problems, including potentially blinding conditions that required immediate intervention in contrast to the existing self reported referral where only 10% of an average of 200 diabetics underwent eye checkup in a year. The prevalence of visual impairment was 20.2%; 95% CI: 16.4-24.7 and blindness in 9.3%; 95% CI: 6.7 -12.7. The prevalence of DR was 28.3% and sight-threatening DR was reported in 9%. Among the DR cases, 30% had sight threatening DR including 28% macular edema, 2% severe NPDR and PDR. Multivariate analysis showed a higher risk for any DR in older subjects >50 years (OR: 2.19; 95% CI: 1.14 – 4.25) and in females (OR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.07 – 3.44). Conclusion Opportunistic DR screening model achieved higher yield of identification of visual impairment and DR compared to the yield of 10% of existing self reported Diabetic eye screening model at Zanzibar. Integration of eye screening at diabetes clinics helps in early identification and provision of appropriate treatment for reducing blindness due to diabetes. PMID:24957576

  6. Governing for the Common Good.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2015-12-01

    The proper object of global health governance (GHG) should be the common good, ensuring that all people have the opportunity to flourish. A well-organized global society that promotes the common good is to everyone's advantage. Enabling people to flourish includes enabling their ability to be healthy. Thus, we must assess health governance by its effectiveness in enhancing health capabilities. Current GHG fails to support human flourishing, diminishes health capabilities and thus does not serve the common good. The provincial globalism theory of health governance proposes a Global Health Constitution and an accompanying Global Institute of Health and Medicine that together propose to transform health governance. Multiple lines of empirical research suggest that these institutions would be effective, offering the most promising path to a healthier, more just world. PMID:26122555

  7. The last common bilaterian ancestor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Douglas H.; Davidson, Eric H.

    2002-01-01

    Many regulatory genes appear to be utilized in at least superficially similar ways in the development of particular body parts in Drosophila and in chordates. These similarities have been widely interpreted as functional homologies, producing the conventional view of the last common protostome-deuterostome ancestor (PDA) as a complex organism that possessed some of the same body parts as modern bilaterians. Here we discuss an alternative view, in which the last common PDA had a less complex body plan than is frequently conceived. This reconstruction alters expectations for Neoproterozoic fossil remains that could illustrate the pathways of bilaterian evolution.

  8. Cognitive Neuropsychology of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    E-print Network

    Woods, Steven Paul; Moore, David J.; Weber, Erica; Grant, Igor

    2009-01-01

    s disease), HIV also affects the structure and function ofthe structure and function of subcortical regions among HIV-structure the diagnostic criteria for HAND, especially in light of the changing epidemiology of HIV

  9. HIV-Associated Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)Opens in a New Tab is a complex and devastating disease caused by infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)Opens in a New Tab. The advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has considerably slowed disease progression from HIV to full-blown AIDS, thereby increasing the number of people living with HIV. Despite this success in survivorship, certain types of cancers are becoming more prevalent in the expanding pool of HIV-infected individuals.

  10. Salicaceae (Willow family) Common cottonwood

    E-print Network

    Salicaceae (Willow family) Common cottonwood Populus deltoides Marshall Life cycle Fast trees and greenish yellow on young stems. Plants have the ability to form many vigorous, weedy sprouts. Flowers and fruit Male and female flowers are found on sepa- rate plants and are clustered in drooping, up

  11. Chemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core

    E-print Network

    Gilchrist, James F.

    301* 1 Undergraduate seminar CHM 307 3 Advanced inorganic chemistry Total = 25 credits CollateralChemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core CHM 40, 41 (or CHM 30, 31) 8 Introductory chemistry CHM 110,111,112,113 8 Organic chemistry CHM 332 3 Analytical chemistry CHM 201*** 2 Technical writing CHM

  12. NIH Common Fund Epigenomics Program

    E-print Network

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    NIH Common Fund Epigenomics Program John Satterlee Ph.D. Epigenomics Program Co Group Co-Chairs: Nora Volkow (NIDA), Linda Birnbaum (NIEHS), James Battey (NIDCD) Co Lehner NIMH Weiniu Gan NHLBI Bracie Watson NIDCD Roger Little NIMH Susan Old NHLBI Lillian Shum NIDCR

  13. Technology: Technology and Common Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    The absence of common sense in the world of technology continues to amaze the author. Things that seem so logical to just aren nott for many people. The installation of Voice-over IP (VoIP, with IP standing for Internet Protocol) in many school districts is a good example. Schools have always had trouble with telephones. Many districts don't even…

  14. Common Core: Solve Math Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Erich

    2012-01-01

    The new common core standards for mathematics demand that students (and teachers!) exhibit deeper conceptual understanding. That's music to the ears of education professor John Tapper, who says teachers have overemphasized teaching procedures--and getting right answers. In his new book, "Solving for Why," he makes a powerful case for moving beyond…

  15. The Common Core Math Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurman, Ze'ev; Wilson, W. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    More than 40 states have now signed onto the Common Core standards in English language arts and math, which have been both celebrated as a tremendous advance and criticized as misguided and for bearing the heavy thumbprint of the federal government. This article presents an interview with Ze'ev Wurman and W. Stephen Wilson. Wurman, who was a U.S.…

  16. COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS FOR

    E-print Network

    McGraw, Rebecca

    COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS FOR Mathematics (hyperlinked pdf of standards only) Note: This document the two documents. Please report any that you find to wmc@math.arizona.edu. P K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 NQ A F G describe varieties of expertise that mathe- matics educators at all levels should seek to develop

  17. Treatment of the common cold.

    PubMed

    Simasek, Madeline; Blandino, David A

    2007-02-15

    The common cold is a viral illness that affects persons of all ages, prompting frequent use of over-the-counter and prescription medications and alternative remedies. Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms (e.g., cough, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea). Dextromethorphan may be beneficial in adults with cough, but its effectiveness has not been demonstrated in children and adolescents. Codeine has not been shown to effectively treat cough caused by the common cold. Although hydrocodone is widely used and has been shown to effectively treat cough caused by other conditions, the drug has not been studied in patients with colds. Topical (intranasal) and oral nasal decongestants have been shown to relieve nasal symptoms and can be used in adolescents and adults for up to three days. Antihistamines and combination antihistamine/decongestant therapies can modestly improve symptoms in adults; however, the benefits must be weighed against potential side effects. Newer nonsedating antihistamines are ineffective against cough. Topical ipratropium, a prescription anticholinergic, relieves nasal symptoms in older children and adults. Antibiotics have not been shown to improve symptoms or shorten illness duration. Complementary and alternative therapies (i.e., Echinacea, vitamin C, and zinc) are not recommended for treating common cold symptoms; however, humidified air and fluid intake may be useful without adverse side effects. Vitamin C prophylaxis may modestly reduce the duration and severity of the common cold in the general population and may reduce the incidence of the illness in persons exposed to physical and environmental stresses. PMID:17323712

  18. Common Core: Fact vs. Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Despite students' interest in informational text, it has played second fiddle in literacy instruction for years. Now, though, nonfiction is getting its turn in the spotlight. The Common Core State Standards require that students become thoughtful consumers of complex, informative texts--taking them beyond the realm of dry textbooks and…

  19. Community Commons Program Development Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Kieta Osteen

    Community Commons (CC) is a collaborative partnership among Brevard Community College (BCC) (Florida) and over 40 social service organizations and agencies in Florida dedicated to providing education, job training, social services, recreation, and a drug free environment to communities of low income families. The project specifically seeks to…

  20. The Commons Posting Policy 1

    E-print Network

    Rathinam, Muruhan

    the discretion of The Commons Staff) to facilitate other postings. · Posters may be no larger 11 x 17 to accommodate advertisement for other events. · Posters and flyers must specifically state what the UMBC event-out by the Information Center (no stamp required). · Leaflets/handout materials will only be approved

  1. Identifying Common Sweet Corn Caterpillars

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Identifying Common Sweet Corn Caterpillars Education Center and Info Line practical solutions to everyday questions Toll free Info Line 1-877-398-4769 M-F · 9 AM - 2 PM Corn earworm, Fall armyworm, and European corn borer caterpillars can all infest the ears of sweet corn. The most reliable way to identify

  2. Objectification in Common Sense Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markova, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    In epistemologies of both scientific and common sense thinking "objectification" characterizes the formation of knowledge and concepts, yet in each case its meaning is different. In the former, objectification in acquiring knowledge refers to the individual's rationalistic reification of an object or of another person and to disengagement or…

  3. Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture

    E-print Network

    van der Hoek, André

    Software Canada References to architecture are everywhere: in every article, in every ad. And we takeCommon Misconceptions about Software Architecture by Philippe Kruchten Rational Fellow Rational definition of software architecture. Are we all understanding the same thing? We gladly accept that software

  4. Common sleep disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kevin A; Hathaway, Nathanael E; Lettieri, Christine F

    2014-03-01

    Up to 50% of children will experience a sleep problem. Early identification of sleep problems may prevent negative consequences, such as daytime sleepiness, irritability, behavioral problems, learning difficulties, motor vehicle crashes in teenagers, and poor academic performance. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs in 1% to 5% of children. Polysomnography is needed to diagnose the condition because it may not be detected through history and physical examination alone. Adenotonsillectomy is the primary treatment for most children with obstructive sleep apnea. Parasomnias are common in childhood; sleepwalking, sleep talking, confusional arousals, and sleep terrors tend to occur in the first half of the night, whereas nightmares are more common in the second half of the night. Only 4% of parasomnias will persist past adolescence; thus, the best management is parental reassurance and proper safety measures. Behavioral insomnia of childhood is common and is characterized by a learned inability to fall and/or stay asleep. Management begins with consistent implementation of good sleep hygiene practices, and, in some cases, use of extinction techniques may be appropriate. Delayed sleep phase disorder is most common in adolescence, presenting as difficulty falling asleep and awakening at socially acceptable times. Treatment involves good sleep hygiene and a consistent sleep-wake schedule, with nighttime melatonin and/or morning bright light therapy as needed. Diagnosing restless legs syndrome in children can be difficult; management focuses on trigger avoidance and treatment of iron deficiency, if present. PMID:24695508

  5. Environmental Niche Overlap between Common and Dusky Dolphins in North Patagonia, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Guillermo Martín; Romero, María Alejandra; Williams, Gabriela Noemí; Gagliardini, Domingo Antonio; Crespo, Enrique Alberto; Dans, Silvana Laura; González, Raúl Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Research on the ecology of sympatric dolphins has increased worldwide in recent decades. However, many dolphin associations such as that between common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) and dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) are poorly understood. The present study was conducted in the San Matías Gulf (SMG) ecosystem (North Patagonia, Argentina) where a high diet overlap among both species was found. The main objective of the present work was to explore the niche overlap of common and dusky dolphins in the habitat and temporal dimensions. The specific aims were (a) to evaluate the habitat use strategies of both species through a comparison of their group attributes (social composition, size and activity), and (b) to evaluate their habitat preferences and habitat overlap through Environmental Niche modeling considering two oceanographic seasons. To accomplish these aims, we used a historic database of opportunistic and systematic records collected from 1983 to 2011. Common and dusky dolphins exhibited similar patterns of group size (from less than 10 to more than 100 individuals), activity (both species use the area to feed, nurse, and copulate), and composition (adults, juveniles, and mothers with calves were observed for both species). Also, both species were observed travelling and feeding in mixed-species groups. Specific overlap indices were higher for common dolphins than for dusky dolphins, but all indices were low, suggesting that they are mainly segregated in the habitat dimension. In the case of common dolphins, the best habitats were located in the northwest of the gulf far from the coast. In the warm season they prefer areas with temperate sea surface and in the cold season they prefer areas with relatively high variability of sea surface temperature. Meanwhile, dusky dolphins prefer areas with steep slopes close to the coast in the southwestern sector of the gulf in both seasons. PMID:26091542

  6. Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligand (uPA) in brain tissues of human immunodeficiency virus patients with opportunistic cerebral diseases.

    PubMed

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Cinque, Paola; Sidenius, Nicolai; Ferri, Angelita; Lauri, Eleonora; Omodeo-Zorini, Elisabetta; Zerbi, Pietro; Vago, Luca

    2009-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligand (uPA) play an important role in cell migration and extracellular proteolysis. We previously described uPAR/uPA overexpression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related cerebral diseases. In this study, we examined uPAR/uPA expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in brains of HIV patients with opportunistic cerebral lesions and in HIV-positive/negative controls. uPAR was found in macrophages/microglia with the highest levels in cytomegalovirus (CMV) encephalitis, toxoplasmosis, and lymphomas; in cryptococcosis and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) cases, only a few positive cells were found and no positivity was observed in controls. uPA expression was demonstrated only in a few macrophages/microglia and lymphocytes in all the cases and HIV-positive controls without different pattern of distribution; no uPA immunostaining was found in cryptococcosis and HIV-negative controls. The higher expression of uPAR/uPA in most of the opportunistic cerebral lesions supports their role in these diseases, suggesting their contribution to tissue injury. PMID:19115132

  7. The Common Geometry Module (CGM).

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy James

    2004-12-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also includes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  8. Scientific Research: Commodities or Commons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeir, Koen

    2013-10-01

    Truth is for sale today, some critics claim. The increased commodification of science corrupts it, scientific fraud is rampant and the age-old trust in science is shattered. This cynical view, although gaining in prominence, does not explain very well the surprising motivation and integrity that is still central to the scientific life. Although scientific knowledge becomes more and more treated as a commodity or as a product that is for sale, a central part of academic scientific practice is still organized according to different principles. In this paper, I critically analyze alternative models for understanding the organization of knowledge, such as the idea of the scientific commons and the gift economy of science. After weighing the diverse positive and negative aspects of free market economies of science and gift economies of science, a commons structured as a gift economy seems best suited to preserve and take advantage of the specific character of scientific knowledge. Furthermore, commons and gift economies promote the rich social texture that is important for supporting central norms of science. Some of these basic norms might break down if the gift character of science is lost. To conclude, I consider the possibility and desirability of hybrid economies of academic science, which combine aspects of gift economies and free market economies. The aim of this paper is to gain a better understanding of these deeper structural challenges faced by science policy. Such theoretical reflections should eventually assist us in formulating new policy guidelines.

  9. Common Rail Injection System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Electro-Motive,

    2005-12-30

    The collaborative research program between the Department of energy and Electro-Motive Diesels, Inc. on the development of common rail fuel injection system for locomotive diesel engines that can meet US EPA Tier 2 exhaust emissions has been completed. This final report summarizes the objectives of the program, work scope, key accomplishments and research findings. The major objectives of this project encompassed identification of appropriate injection strategies by using advanced analytical tools, development of required prototype hardware/controls, investigations of fuel spray characteristics including cavitation phenomena, and validation of hareware using a single-cylinder research locomotive diesel engine. Major milestones included: (1) a detailed modeling study using advanced mathematical models - several various injection profiles that show simultaneous reduction of NOx and particulates on a four stroke-cycle locomotive diesel engine were identified; (2) development of new common rail fuel injection hardware capable of providing these injection profiles while meeting EMD engine and injection performance specifications. This hardware was developed together with EMD's current fuel injection component supplier. (3) Analysis of fuel spray characteristics. Fuel spray numerical studies and high speed photographic imaging analyses were performed. (4) Validation of new hardware and fuel injection profiles. EMD's single-cylinder research diesel engine located at Argonne National Laboratory was used to confirm emissions and performacne predictions. These analytical ane experimental investigations resulted in optimized fuel injection profiles and engine operating conditions that yield reductions in NOx emissions from 7.8 g/bhp-hr to 5.0 g/bhp-hr at full (rated) load. Additionally, hydrocarbon and particulate emissions were reduced considerably when compared to baseline Tier I levels. The most significant finding from the injection optimization process was a 2% to 3% improvement in fuel economy over EMD's traditional Tier I engine hardware configuration. the common rail fuel injection system enabled this added benefit by virtue of an inherent capability to provide multiple injections per power stroke at high fuel rail pressures. On the basis of the findings in this study, EMD concludes that the new electronically-controlled high-pressure common rail injection system has the potential to meet locomotive Tier 2 NOx and particulates emission standards without sacrificing the fuel economy. A number of areas to further improve the injection hardware and engine operating characteristics to further exploit the benefits of common rail injection system have also been identified.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Common variable immune deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Common variable immune deficiency On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... definitions Reviewed July 2014 What is common variable immune deficiency? Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is a ...

  11. 49 CFR 1242.02 - Common expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...RECORDS AND REPORTS SEPARATION OF COMMON OPERATING EXPENSES BETWEEN FREIGHT...RAILROADS 1 General § 1242.02 Common expenses. The Uniform System of Accounts also requires that carriers assign to common expense accounts the...

  12. 49 CFR 1242.02 - Common expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...RECORDS AND REPORTS SEPARATION OF COMMON OPERATING EXPENSES BETWEEN FREIGHT...RAILROADS 1 General § 1242.02 Common expenses. The Uniform System of Accounts also requires that carriers assign to common expense accounts the...

  13. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  14. Vibrios Commonly Possess Two Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazuhisa; Iida, Tetsuya; Kita-Tsukamoto, Kumiko; Honda, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of the two-chromosome configuration was investigated in 34 species of vibrios and closely related species. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of undigested genomic DNA suggested that vibrios commonly have two chromosomes. The size of the large chromosome is predominantly within a narrow range (3.0 to 3.3 Mb), whereas the size of the small chromosome varies considerably among the vibrios (0.8 to 2.4 Mb). This fact suggests that the structure of the small chromosome is more flexible than that of the large chromosome during the evolution of vibrios. PMID:15629946

  15. Evolution of a common controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, D.; Barbour, D.; Gilbreath, G.

    2012-06-01

    Precedent has shown common controllers must strike a balance between the desire for an integrated user interface design by human factors engineers and support of project-specific data requirements. A common user-interface requires the project-specific data to conform to an internal representation, but project-specific customization is impeded by the implicit rules introduced by the internal data representation. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) developed the latest version of the Multi-robot Operator Control Unit (MOCU) to address interoperability, standardization, and customization issues by using a modular, extensible, and flexible architecture built upon a sharedworld model. MOCU version 3 provides an open and extensible operator-control interface that allows additional functionality to be seamlessly added with software modules while providing the means to fully integrate the information into a layered game-like user interface. MOCU's design allows it to completely decouple the human interface from the core management modules, while still enabling modules to render overlapping regions of the screen without interference or a priori knowledge of other display elements, thus allowing more flexibility in project-specific customization.

  16. Common Skin Rashes in Children.

    PubMed

    Allmon, Amanda; Deane, Kristen; Martin, Kari L

    2015-08-01

    Because childhood rashes may be difficult to differentiate by appearance alone, it is important to consider the entire clinical presentation to help make the appropriate diagnosis. Considerations include the appearance and location of the rash; the clinical course; and associated symptoms, such as pruritus or fever. A fever is likely to occur with roseola, erythema infectiosum (fifth disease), and scarlet fever. Pruritus sometimes occurs with atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, erythema infectiosum, molluscum contagiosum, and tinea infection. The key feature of roseola is a rash presenting after resolution of a high fever, whereas the distinguishing features in pityriasis rosea are a herald patch and a bilateral and symmetric rash in a Christmas tree pattern. The rash associated with scarlet fever usually develops on the upper trunk, then spreads throughout the body, sparing the palms and soles. Impetigo is a superficial bacterial infection that most commonly affects the face and extremities of children. Erythema infectiosum is characterized by a viral prodrome followed by the "slapped cheek" facial rash. Flesh-colored or pearly white papules with central umbilication occur with molluscum contagiosum, a highly contagious viral infection that usually resolves without intervention. Tinea is a common fungal skin infection in children that affects the scalp, body, groin, feet, hands, or nails. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin condition that may present with a variety of skin changes. PMID:26280141

  17. ALMA Common Software - UTFSM Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, M.; Avarias, J.; Mora, M.; Tobar, R.

    The ACS-UTFSM Group was created as a distributed systems research team on astronomical and non-astronomical applications on the year 2004. The choice of the ALMA Common Software framework (ACS) as the development platform came from the experience gained during summerjobs at ESO observatories. After three years of informal contributions to ACS development, the team presented a technology exchange initiative to the ALMA-CONICYT Fund 2006, which was granted in 2007. Through the past years, the UTFSM helped the ACS team with "nice-to-have" applications and testing. Currently the ACS-UTFSM is involved in several contributions to ACS, and the development of a flexible telescope control system (gTCS) framework which aims to encapsulate common requirements and will provide a uniform software. In preparation for this challenging objective, several small projects are currently being developed. The other interesting edge of the team work is the technology transfer initiatives. Several inter-universities collaborations are flourishing (PUC, UCN, UV) after the first ACS Workshop held at the UTFSM this year. Today three former team members are working at NRAO's ALMA Test Facility in Socorro, New Mexico. Two other students will have a summer job next year to work in ALMA related development.

  18. Common contact sensitizers in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Singhal, V; Reddy, B S

    2000-07-01

    Seventy-five patients of both sexes with clinically suspected contact dermatitis were patch tested with the Indian Standard Series and indigenous antigens. The results were compared with the data from other centers. Most of these patients were young adults between 20 and 39 yrs old with the mean age of 36.63 +/- 5.6 yrs. Their occupational profiles included household workers (17.33%), masons (10.66%), farmers (6.66%), factory workers (4%), medical personnel (4%), lab workers (2.66%), and miscellaneous (17.33%). Itching and burning were two of the most common complaints, and chronic dermatitis was the predominant morphologic pattern of the lesions observed. Frequent sites involved included the hands (40.83%), airborne type (22.44%), hands and feet (12.24%), feet (12.24%), face (10.2%), and neck (2.04%). Patch test analysis of these patients revealed that, out of 75 subjects tested, 49 (65.3%) reacted to one or more allergens. Parthenium (20%) is the most common contact sensitizer followed by potassium dichromate (16%), xanthium (13.33%), nickel sulphate (12%), chrysanthemum (8%), mercaptobenzothiazole, and garlic (6.66% each). These findings are in broad conformity with those in other reports. We concluded that the Indian Standard Series of antigens with the addition of a few more (such as garlic, onion and chlorheximide of local relevance) is suitable for detecting the allergens responsible for the contact dermatitis prevailing in this region. PMID:10935340

  19. Common basis for cellular motility

    E-print Network

    Henry G. Zot; Javier E. Hasbun; Nguyen Van Minh

    2015-10-31

    Motility is characteristic of life, but a common basis for movement has remained to be identified. Diverse systems in motion shift between two states depending on interactions that turnover at the rate of an applied cycle of force. Although one phase of the force cycle terminates the decay of the most recent state, continuation of the cycle of force regenerates the original decay process in a recursive cycle. By completing a cycle, kinetic energy is transformed into probability of sustaining the most recent state and the system gains a frame of reference for discrete transitions having static rather than time-dependent probability. The probability of completing a recursive cycle is computed with a Markov chain comprised of two equilibrium states and a kinetic intermediate. Given rate constants for the reactions, a random walk reproduces bias and recurrence times of walking motor molecules and bacterial flagellar switching with unrivaled fidelity.

  20. Common questions in veterinary toxicology.

    PubMed

    Bates, N; Rawson-Harris, P; Edwards, N

    2015-05-01

    Toxicology is a vast subject. Animals are exposed to numerous drugs, household products, plants, chemicals, pesticides and venomous animals. In addition to the individual toxicity of the various potential poisons, there is also the question of individual response and, more importantly, of species differences in toxicity. This review serves to address some of the common questions asked when dealing with animals with possible poisoning, providing evidence where available. The role of emetics, activated charcoal and lipid infusion in the management of poisoning in animals, the toxic dose of chocolate, grapes and dried fruit in dogs, the use of antidotes in paracetamol poisoning, timing of antidotal therapy in ethylene glycol toxicosis and whether lilies are toxic to dogs are discussed. PMID:25728477

  1. The Common Patterns of Nature

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    We typically observe large-scale outcomes that arise from the interactions of many hidden, small-scale processes. Examples include age of disease onset, rates of amino acid substitutions, and composition of ecological communities. The macroscopic patterns in each problem often vary around a characteristic shape that can be generated by neutral processes. A neutral generative model assumes that each microscopic process follows unbiased or random stochastic fluctuations: random connections of network nodes; amino acid substitutions with no effect on fitness; species that arise or disappear from communities randomly. These neutral generative models often match common patterns of nature. In this paper, I present the theoretical background by which we can understand why these neutral generative models are so successful. I show where the classic patterns come from, such as the Poisson pattern, the normal or Gaussian pattern, and many others. Each classic pattern was often discovered by a simple neutral generative model. The neutral patterns share a special characteristic: they describe the patterns of nature that follow from simple constraints on information. For example, any aggregation of processes that preserves information only about the mean and variance attracts to the Gaussian pattern; any aggregation that preserves information only about the mean attracts to the exponential pattern; any aggregation that preserves information only about the geometric mean attracts to the power law pattern. I present a simple and consistent informational framework of the common patterns of nature based on the method of maximum entropy. This framework shows that each neutral generative model is a special case that helps to discover a particular set of informational constraints; those informational constraints define a much wider domain of non-neutral generative processes that attract to the same neutral pattern. PMID:19538344

  2. Work and common psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Henderson, M; Harvey, S B; Overland, S; Mykletun, A; Hotopf, M

    2011-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders are now the most common reason for long-term sickness absence. The associated loss in productivity and the payment of disability benefits places a substantial burden on the economies of many developed countries. The occupational dysfunction associated with psychiatric disorders can also lead to poverty and social isolation. As a result the area of work and psychiatric disorders is a high priority for policymakers. There are two main agendas: for many researchers and clinicians the focus is on the need to overcome stigma and ensure people with severe psychiatric disorders have meaningful work; however the public health agenda predominantly relates to the more common disorders such as depression and anxiety, which contribute a greater burden of disability benefits and pensions. In this review we attempt to address this second agenda. The relatively sparse evidence available reveals a complex field with significant interplay between medical, psychological social and cultural factors. Sick leave can be a 'process' as well as an 'event'. In this review we propose a staged model where different risk and protective factors contribute to the onset of psychiatric disorders in the working population, the onset of short-term sickness absence, and the transition from short- to long-term absence. We also examine strategies to manage psychiatric disorder in the workforce with a view towards returning the employee to work. Our aim in this review is to highlight the complexity of the area, to stimulate debate and to identify important gaps in knowledge where further research might benefit both patients and wider society. PMID:21558098

  3. The effects of indoor and outdoor dust exposure on the growth, sensitivity to oxidative-stress, and biofilm production of three opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Suraju, Mohammed O; Lalinde-Barnes, Sloan; Sanamvenkata, Sachindra; Esmaeili, Mahsa; Shishodia, Shishir; Rosenzweig, Jason A

    2015-12-15

    Within the last decade, many studies have highlighted the radical changes in the components of indoor and outdoor dust. For example, agents like automobile emitted platinum group elements and different kinds of organic phthalates and esters have been reported to be accumulating in the biosphere. Humans consistently face dermal, respiratory, and dietary exposures to these particles while indoors and outdoors. In fact, dust particulate matter has been associated with close to 500,000 deaths per year in Europe and about 200,000 deaths per year in the United States. To date, there has been limited examination of the physiological impact of indoor and outdoor dust exposure on normal flora microbes. In this study, the effect of indoor- and outdoor-dust exposure on three opportunistic bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was assessed. Specifically, bacterial growth, oxidative stress resistance, and biofilm production were measured following indoor- and outdoor-dust exposures. Studies were conducted in nutritionally-rich and -poor environments typically encountered by bacteria. Surprisingly, indoor-dust (200?g/mL), enhanced the growth of all three bacterial species in nutrient-poor conditions, but slowed growth in nutrient-rich conditions. In nutrient-rich medium, 100?g/mL exposure of either indoor- or outdoor-dust resulted in significantly reduced oxidative stress resistance in E. coli. Most interestingly, dust (indoor and outdoor), either in nutrient-rich or -poor conditions, significantly increased biofilm production in all three bacterial species. These data suggest that indoor and outdoor dust, can modify opportunistic bacteria through altering growth, sensitivity to oxidative stress, and their virulence potential through enhanced biofilm formation. PMID:26363607

  4. Lack of seasonal and moult-related stress modulation in an opportunistically breeding bird: The white-plumed honeyeater (Lichenostomus penicillatus).

    PubMed

    Buttemer, William A; Addison, BriAnne A; Astheimer, Lee B

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". In most vertebrate species, glucocorticoid levels and stress sensitivity vary in relation to season and life-history stage. In birds, baseline corticosterone (CORT) and stress sensitivity are typically highest while breeding and decrease substantially during moult. Because elevated CORT adversely affects protein synthesis, moult-related CORT suppression is thought to be necessary for forming high-quality feathers. Surprisingly, some passerine species lack moult-related CORT suppression, but these are distinguished by having slow rates of moult and being opportunistic breeders. We examined baseline and stress-induced CORT levels in an opportunistically breeding Australian passerine, the white-plumed honeyeater (Lichenostomus penicillatus). Although this species has a slower moult rate than high-latitude breeders, it differs little from north-temperate passerines. Neither baseline nor stress-induced CORT levels varied with season (winter, spring or summer), sex or moult status in adult birds. While breeding tended to be highest in early spring through late summer, laparotomies revealed only limited reduction in testicular size in males the year round. In all but one sampling period, at least some females displayed follicular hierarchy. Breeding usually coincides with outbreaks of phytophagous insects, which can happen at any time of the year. This results in moult/breeding overlap when infestations occur in late spring or summer. The ability of this species to moult and breed at the same time while having breeding-levels of CORT demonstrates that CORT suppression is not a prerequisite for synthesis of high-quality feathers. An experimental design incorporating moulting and non-moulting phenotypes is suggested to test the functional significance of CORT suppression in other species. PMID:25701624

  5. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  6. On the common envelope efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zhao-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we try to use the apparent luminosity versus displacement (i.e. LX versus R) correlation of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) to constrain the common envelope (CE) efficiency ?CE, which is a key parameter affecting the evolution of the binary orbit during the CE phase. The major updates that are crucial for the CE evolution include a variable ? parameter and a new CE criterion for Hertzsprung gap donor stars, both of which are recently developed. We find that, within the framework of the standard energy formula for CE and core definition at mass X = 10 per cent, a high value of ?CE, i.e. around 0.8-1.0, is more preferable, while ?CE < ˜0.4 likely can not reconstruct the observed LX versus R distribution. However, due to an ambiguous definition for the core boundary in the literature, the used ? here still carries almost two order of magnitude uncertainty, which may translate directly to the expected value of ?CE. We present the detailed components of current HMXBs and their spatial offsets from star clusters, which may be further testified by future observations of HMXB populations in nearby star-forming galaxies.

  7. Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imtiaz, Kauser

    2011-01-01

    Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool (comBAT) is an Excel/VB-based bolted joint analysis/optimization program that lays out a systematic foundation for an inexperienced or seasoned analyst to determine fastener size, material, and assembly torque for a given design. Analysts are able to perform numerous what-if scenarios within minutes to arrive at an optimal solution. The program evaluates input design parameters, performs joint assembly checks, and steps through numerous calculations to arrive at several key margins of safety for each member in a joint. It also checks for joint gapping, provides fatigue calculations, and generates joint diagrams for a visual reference. Optimum fastener size and material, as well as correct torque, can then be provided. Analysis methodology, equations, and guidelines are provided throughout the solution sequence so that this program does not become a "black box:" for the analyst. There are built-in databases that reduce the legwork required by the analyst. Each step is clearly identified and results are provided in number format, as well as color-coded spelled-out words to draw user attention. The three key features of the software are robust technical content, innovative and user friendly I/O, and a large database. The program addresses every aspect of bolted joint analysis and proves to be an instructional tool at the same time. It saves analysis time, has intelligent messaging features, and catches operator errors in real time.

  8. Common themes in microbial pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, B B; Falkow, S

    1989-01-01

    A bacterial pathogen is a highly adapted microorganism which has the capacity to cause disease. The mechanisms used by pathogenic bacteria to cause infection and disease usually include an interactive group of virulence determinants, sometimes coregulated, which are suited for the interaction of a particular microorganism with a specific host. Because pathogens must overcome similar host barriers, common themes in microbial pathogenesis have evolved. However, these mechanisms are diverse between species and not necessarily conserved; instead, convergent evolution has developed several different mechanisms to overcome host barriers. The success of a bacterial pathogen can be measured by the degree with which it replicates after entering the host and reaching its specific niche. Successful microbial infection reflects persistence within a host and avoidance or neutralization of the specific and nonspecific defense mechanisms of the host. The degree of success of a pathogen is dependent upon the status of the host. As pathogens pass through a host, they are exposed to new environments. Highly adapted pathogenic organisms have developed biochemical sensors exquisitely designed to measure and respond to such environmental stimuli and accordingly to regulate a cascade of virulence determinants essential for life within the host. The pathogenic state is the product of dynamic selective pressures on microbial populations. PMID:2569162

  9. Space station utilization and commonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, John

    1986-01-01

    Several potential ways of utilizing the space station, including utilization of learning experiences (such as operations), utilization of specific elements of hardware which can be largely common between the SS and Mars programs, and utilization of the on-orbit SS for transportation node functions were identified and discussed. The probability of using the SS in all of these areas seems very good. Three different ways are discussed of utilizing the then existing Low Earth Orbit (LEO) SS for operational support during assembly and checkout of the Mars Space Vehicle (SV): attaching the SV to the SS; allowing the SV to co-orbit near the SS; and a hybrid of the first 2 ways. Discussion of each of these approaches is provided, and the conclusion is reached that either the co-orbiting or hybrid approach might be preferable. Artists' conception of the modes are provided, and sketches of an assembly system concept (truss structure and subsystems derivable from the SS) which could be used for co-orbiting on-orbit assembly support are provided.

  10. Managing the wildlife tourism commons.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Lusseau, David

    2015-04-01

    The nonlethal effects of wildlife tourism can threaten the conservation status of targeted animal populations. In turn, such resource depletion can compromise the economic viability of the industry. Therefore, wildlife tourism exploits resources that can become common pool and that should be managed accordingly. We used a simulation approach to test whether different management regimes (tax, tax and subsidy, cap, cap and trade) could provide socioecologically sustainable solutions. Such schemes are sensitive to errors in estimated management targets. We determined the sensitivity of each scenario to various realistic uncertainties in management implementation and in our knowledge of the population. Scenarios where time quotas were enforced using a tax and subsidy approach, or they were traded between operators were more likely to be sustainable. Importantly, sustainability could be achieved even when operators were assumed to make simple rational economic decisions. We suggest that a combination of the two regimes might offer a robust solution, especially on a small spatial scale and under the control of a self-organized, operator-level institution. Our simulation platform could be parameterized to mimic local conditions and provide a test bed for experimenting different governance solutions in specific case studies. PMID:26214918

  11. Common Syndromes of Orthostatic Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system, adequate blood volume, and intact skeletal and respiratory muscle pumps are essential components for rapid cardiovascular adjustments to upright posture (orthostasis). Patients lacking sufficient blood volume or having defective sympathetic adrenergic vasoconstriction develop orthostatic hypotension (OH), prohibiting effective upright activities. OH is one form of orthostatic intolerance (OI) defined by signs, such as hypotension, and symptoms, such as lightheadedness, that occur when upright and are relieved by recumbence. Mild OI is commonly experienced during intercurrent illnesses and when standing up rapidly. The latter is denoted “initial OH” and represents a normal cardiovascular adjustment to the blood volume shifts during standing. Some people experience episodic acute OI, such as postural vasovagal syncope (fainting), or chronic OI, such as postural tachycardia syndrome, which can significantly reduce quality of life. The lifetime incidence of ?1 fainting episodes is ?40%. For the most part, these episodes are benign and self-limited, although frequent syncope episodes can be debilitating, and injury may occur from sudden falls. In this article, mechanisms for OI having components of adrenergic hypofunction, adrenergic hyperfunction, hyperpnea, and regional blood volume redistribution are discussed. Therapeutic strategies to cope with OI are proposed. PMID:23569093

  12. Asymmetric gait nail unit syndrome: the most common worldwide toenail abnormality and onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Zaias, Nardo; Rebell, Gerbert; Escovar, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric gait nail unit syndrome (AGNUS) is the result of asymmetric shoe pressure on the toes and foot caused by ubiquitous uneven flat feet that affect the gait. The pressure produces clinical changes in the toenails, which are identical to all clinical types of dermatophyte and opportunistic onychomycosis, yet they are dermatophytes-free. AGNUS produces additional signs that make it easy to identify. Its coexistence with fungal disease has resulted in reports describing new clinical types of onychomycosis, identifying signs of drug resistance, assessing severity index, and defining complete clinical cure when taking a systemic or topical antifungal, as well as "retronychia." These signs are typically seen in the toenails of patients with AGNUS. AGNUS has a mechanical etiology and can coexist with dermatophytosis, which is a hereditary disease. AGNUS can coexist with any other disease affecting the toenails and results in greater clinical severity than each condition individually. AGNUS is and has been the most common worldwide toenail abnormality in shoe-wearing societies. PMID:25335350

  13. Coordinating towards a Common Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Francisco C.; Pacheco, Jorge M.

    2010-09-01

    Throughout their life, humans often engage in collective endeavors ranging from family related issues to global warming. In all cases, the tragedy of the commons threatens the possibility of reaching the optimal solution associated with global cooperation, a scenario predicted by theory and demonstrated by many experiments. Using the toolbox of evolutionary game theory, I will address two important aspects of evolutionary dynamics that have been neglected so far in the context of public goods games and evolution of cooperation. On one hand, the fact that often there is a threshold above which a public good is reached [1, 2]. On the other hand, the fact that individuals often participate in several games, related to the their social context and pattern of social ties, defined by a social network [3, 4, 5]. In the first case, the existence of a threshold above which collective action is materialized dictates a rich pattern of evolutionary dynamics where the direction of natural selection can be inverted compared to standard expectations. Scenarios of defector dominance, pure coordination or coexistence may arise simultaneously. Both finite and infinite population models are analyzed. In networked games, cooperation blooms whenever the act of contributing is more important than the effort contributed. In particular, the heterogeneous nature of social networks naturally induces a symmetry breaking of the dilemmas of cooperation, as contributions made by cooperators may become contingent on the social context in which the individual is embedded. This diversity in context provides an advantage to cooperators, which is particularly strong when both wealth and social ties follow a power-law distribution, providing clues on the self-organization of social communities. Finally, in both situations, it can be shown that individuals no longer play a defection dominance dilemma, but effectively engage in a general N-person coordination game. Even if locally defection may seem inescapable, globally there is an emergent new dilemma in which cooperation often prevails, illustrating how collective cooperative action may emerge from myopic individual selfishness.

  14. Designing the Microbial Research Commons

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, Paul F

    2011-10-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an ever-increasing range and volume of digital data. All elements of the pillars of science--whether observation, experiment, or theory and modeling--are being transformed by the continuous cycle of generation, dissemination, and use of factual information. This is even more so in terms of the re-using and re-purposing of digital scientific data beyond the original intent of the data collectors, often with dramatic results. We all know about the potential benefits and impacts of digital data, but we are also aware of the barriers, the challenges in maximizing the access, and use of such data. There is thus a need to think about how a data infrastructure can enhance capabilities for finding, using, and integrating information to accelerate discovery and innovation. How can we best implement an accessible, interoperable digital environment so that the data can be repeatedly used by a wide variety of users in different settings and with different applications? With this objective: to use the microbial communities and microbial data, literature, and the research materials themselves as a test case, the Board on Research Data and Information held an International Symposium on Designing the Microbial Research Commons at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on 8-9 October 2009. The symposium addressed topics such as models to lower the transaction costs and support access to and use of microbiological materials and digital resources from the perspective of publicly funded research, public-private interactions, and developing country concerns. The overall goal of the symposium was to stimulate more research and implementation of improved legal and institutional models for publicly funded research in microbiology.

  15. Necropsy findings in 62 opportunistically collected free-ranging moose (Alces alces) from Minnesota, USA (2003-13).

    PubMed

    Wünschmann, Arno; Armien, Anibal G; Butler, Erika; Schrage, Mike; Stromberg, Bert; Bender, Jeff B; Firshman, Anna M; Carstensen, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The Minnesota, US moose population has declined dramatically since the 1990s. All 54 carcasses of moose that died of unknown cause or were euthanized by gun shot by tribal or Department of Natural Resources personnel because of perceived signs of illness between 2003 and 2013 and eight carcasses of moose that died from vehicular accidents between 2009 and 2013 were submitted to the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and included in our study. The majority of the animals were underweight or cachectic (n?=?53; 85%). Neural migration presumably by Parelaphostrongylus tenuis was a common finding (n?=?28; 45%). Moderate to marked Dermacentor albipictus ("winter tick") ectoparasitism with widespread alopecia was the cause or a contributing cause of death in 14 (23%) cases in which grossly apparent anemia was associated with exhaustion of hepatic iron stores. Hepatic lesions associated with Fascioloides magna were common (n?=?37; 60%) but were unlikely to be the cause of death. Environmental factors favoring winter tick survival, habitat expansion of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and the survival of terrestrial and aquatic snails (serving as intermediate hosts for P. tenuis and F. magna), might contribute to the seemingly severe parasitic burden in Minnesota's moose population. PMID:25390764

  16. Returning common sense to regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.

    1995-10-01

    While these sessions of the November 1995 meeting of the American Nuclear Society are being devoted to the Linear Theory of harm from radiation, it must be realized that the low-level radiation issue, as important as it may be, is but a subset of an entire body of environmental issues running afoul of common sense. Cellular phones, electromagnetic fields, asbestos, dioxin, acid rain, and others especially in their public portrayals, some in their regulatory treatment, are based upon exaggerated or misunderstood risks. One must recognize that what lies ahead is an immense effort to revisit the underlying science of the existing regulations of radiation exposures. New evidence has been published, and most importantly, it is now recognized that many of these regulations--promulgated with the best of intentions--have been extraordinarily harmful to the public. In many cases, the harm has been exaggerated, and has created in the public policy arena the notion that the public is at great risk from the smallest sources of radiation. The national cost of compliance with these regulations has been enormous. To the extent that existing environmental regulations are not being moderated, they pose major economic threats to present and future industries involving nuclear materials and technology. These would include the pharmaceutical industries as well as those seeking U.S. isotope markets in separations, purification, labeling, and manufacturing of new radiopharmaceuticals for cancer therapy, diagnosis, pain mitigation, treatment of arthritis, and other new applications. For those who are not aware of the results of recent advances in radiopharmaceuticals, clinical trials have demonstrated an 80% remission rate in the treatment of b-cell lymphoma and leukemia. New isotopes and new isotope technology promise greater effectiveness in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. The regulatory problems and their enormous costs exist at all stages in nuclear medicine, from the manufacture of the radiopharmaceuticals to the disposal of low-level wastes in Ward Valley, California, for example. Access to these promising new technologies will be severely limited under the existing regulatory environment.

  17. Common Disorders of the Achilles Tendon

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Common Disorders of the Achilles Tendon What Is the Achilles Tendon? A tendon is a band of tissue ... helping to raise the heel off the ground. Achilles Tendonitis and Achilles Tendonosis Two common disorders that ...

  18. How Are Pelvic Floor Disorders Commonly Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are pelvic floor disorders commonly treated? Skip sharing on social media ... Treatment Nonsurgical treatments commonly used for PFDs include: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Also called Kegel (pronounced KEY- ...

  19. Health Conditions Common in African American Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Minority Women's Health > African-Americans Minority Women's Health African-Americans Health conditions common in African-American women Of ... health. Return to top Health conditions common in African-American women Asthma Breast cancer Cancer Cervical cancer Diabetes ...

  20. What Are Some Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... some of the commonly abused prescription drugs? Prescription Drug Abuse Email Facebook Twitter What are some of the commonly abused prescription drugs? Although many medications can be abused, the following ...

  1. Commonality of ground systems in launch operations

    E-print Network

    Quinn, Shawn M

    2008-01-01

    NASA is examining the utility of requiring a certain degree of commonality in both flight and ground systems in the Constellation Program. While the benefits of commonality seem obvious in terms of minimizing upfront ...

  2. Towards a commons-based information society Information: Droge, Ware oder Commons?

    E-print Network

    Kuhlen, Rainer

    keine res nullius #12;Towards a commons-based information society Tragedy of the Commons? #12;Towards Hardin´schen These der Tragedy of the Commons #12;Towards a commons-based information society Tragedy ,,Ultimately, as population grows and greed runs rampant, the commons collapses and ends in "the tragedy

  3. 29 CFR 779.219 - Unified operation may be achieved without common control or common ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unified operation may be achieved without common control or... be achieved without common control or common ownership. The performance of related activities through “unified operation” to serve a common business purpose may be achieved without common control and...

  4. 29 CFR 779.219 - Unified operation may be achieved without common control or common ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unified operation may be achieved without common control or... be achieved without common control or common ownership. The performance of related activities through “unified operation” to serve a common business purpose may be achieved without common control and...

  5. Boat electrofishing survey of common smelt and common bullies in the Ohau Channel

    E-print Network

    Waikato, University of

    Boat electrofishing survey of common smelt and common bullies in the Ohau Channel CBER Contract Table 3. Numbers and densities of common smelt and common bullies at sites in the Ohau Channel that were bully and common smelt in the Ohau Channel on 13 December 2007

  6. Common Badging and Access Control System (CBACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischinger, Portia

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation presents NASA's Common Badging and Access Control System. NASA began a Smart Card implementation in January 2004. Following site surveys, it was determined that NASA's badging and access control systems required upgrades to common infrastructure in order to provide flexibly, usability, and return on investment prior to a smart card implantation. Common Badging and Access Control System (CBACS) provides the common infrastructure from which FIPS-201 compliant processes, systems, and credentials can be developed and used.

  7. Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    E-print Network

    Androulakis, George

    /programs- services/45/PASSMath Tests.cfm #12;21st Century Math Smarter Balanced Released Sample Item #12;Common CoreCommon Core State Standards for Mathematics and South Carolina: Where Are We and Where Are We Going among groups providing feedback #12;Common Core Standards · Different from most current state standards

  8. NIST Interagency Report 7435 The Common Vulnerability

    E-print Network

    NIST Interagency Report 7435 The Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) and Its Applicability to Federal Agency Systems PeterMell KarenScarfone SashaRomanosky #12;The Common Vulnerability Scoring NIST Jeffrey, Director #12;THE COMMON VULNERABILITY SCORING SYSTEM (CVSS) AND ITS APPLICABILITY TO FEDERAL

  9. Emergence Prediction of Common Groundsel (Senecio vulgaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common groundsel is an important weed of strawberry and other horticultural crops. There are few herbicides registered for common groundsel control in such crops, and understanding and predicting the timing and extent of common groundsel emergence may facilitate its management. We developed simple e...

  10. Academic Engagement in the Library Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Charlie; Bodnar, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written about library commons in recent years. For the most part, that literature has dealt with designing information and learning commons that support student learning by giving them the tools and resources they need for their academic work. However, few authors have discussed how a library commons might facilitate collaboration…

  11. Simplifying the ELA Common Core; Demystifying Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmoker, Mike; Jago, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The English Language Arts (ELA) Common Core State Standards ([CCSS], 2010) could have a transformational effect on American education. Though the process seems daunting, one can begin immediately integrating the essence of the ELA Common Core in every subject area. This article shows how one could implement the Common Core and create coherent,…

  12. Merging Multiple Data Streams on Common Keys

    E-print Network

    Grossman, Robert

    Merging Multiple Data Streams on Common Keys over High Performance Networks Marco Mazzucco, Asvin distributed streams is to merge them using a common key. In this paper, we present two algorithms for merging is with the problem of merging two data streams using a common key. This is one of the fundamental operations required

  13. Plant nutrition: from common sense to

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    Plant nutrition: from common sense to scientific views Science teaching unit #12;Disclaimer-2008DVD-EN Plant nutrition: from common sense to scientific views #12;#12;© Crown copyright 2008 1The National Strategies | Secondary Plant nutrition: from common sense to scientific views 00094-2008DVD

  14. Common Core: Teaching Optimum Topic Exploration (TOTE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karge, Belinda Dunnick; Moore, Roxane Kushner

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core has become a household term and yet many educators do not understand what it means. This article explains the historical perspectives of the Common Core and gives guidance to teachers in application of Teaching Optimum Topic Exploration (TOTE) necessary for full implementation of the Common Core State Standards. An effective…

  15. Identification of Opportunistic Pathogenic Bacteria in Drinking Water Samples of Different Rural Health Centers and Their Clinical Impacts on Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pindi, Pavan Kumar; Raghuveer Yadav, P.; Shiva Shanker, A.

    2013-01-01

    International drinking water quality monitoring programs have been established in order to prevent or to reduce the risk of contracting water-related infections. A survey was performed on groundwater-derived drinking water from 13 different hospitals in the Mahabubnagar District. A total of 55 bacterial strains were isolated which belonged to both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. All the taxa were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based on which they are phylogenetically close to 27 different taxa. Many of the strains are closely related to their phylogenetic neighbors and exhibit from 98.4 to 100% sequence similarity at the 16S rRNA gene sequence level. The most common group was similar to Acinetobacter junii (21.8%) and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (10.9%) which were shared by 7 and 5 water samples, respectively. Out of 55 isolates, only 3 isolates belonged to coliform group which are Citrobacter freundii and Pantoea anthophila. More than half (52.7%, 29 strains) of the phylogenetic neighbors which belonged to 12 groups were reported to be pathogenic and isolated from clinical specimens. Out of 27 representative taxa are affiliated have eight representative genera in drinking water except for those affiliated with the genera Exiguobacterium, Delftia, Kocuria, and Lysinibacillus. PMID:23862144

  16. Opportunistic infections and biologic therapies in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: consensus recommendations for infection reporting during clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance.

    PubMed

    Winthrop, K L; Novosad, S A; Baddley, J W; Calabrese, L; Chiller, T; Polgreen, P; Bartalesi, F; Lipman, M; Mariette, X; Lortholary, O; Weinblatt, M E; Saag, M; Smolen, J

    2015-12-01

    No consensus has previously been formed regarding the types and presentations of infectious pathogens to be considered as 'opportunistic infections' (OIs) within the setting of biologic therapy. We systematically reviewed published literature reporting OIs in the setting of biologic therapy for inflammatory diseases. The review sought to describe the OI definitions used within these studies and the types of OIs reported. These findings informed a consensus committee (infectious diseases and rheumatology specialists) in deliberations regarding the development of a candidate list of infections that should be considered as OIs in the setting of biologic therapy. We reviewed 368 clinical trials (randomised controlled/long-term extension), 195 observational studies and numerous case reports/series. Only 11 observational studies defined OIs within their methods; no consistent OI definition was identified across studies. Across all study formats, the most numerous OIs reported were granulomatous infections. The consensus group developed a working definition for OIs as 'indicator' infections, defined as specific pathogens or presentations of pathogens that 'indicate' the likelihood of an alteration in host immunity in the setting of biologic therapy. Using this framework, consensus was reached upon a list of OIs and case-definitions for their reporting during clinical trials and other studies. Prior studies of OIs in the setting of biologic therapy have used inconsistent definitions. The consensus committee reached agreement upon an OI definition, developed case definitions for reporting of each pathogen, and recommended these be used in future studies to facilitate comparison of infection risk between biologic therapies. PMID:26395500

  17. The relevance, biases, and importance of digitising opportunistic non-standardised collections: A case study in Iberian harvestmen fauna with BOS Arthropod Collection datasets (Arachnida, Opiliones).

    PubMed

    Merino-Sáinz, Izaskun; Torralba-Burrial, Antonio; Anadón, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyse the relevance of harvestmen distribution data derived from opportunistic, unplanned, and non-standardised collection events in an area in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Using specimens deposited in the BOS Arthropod Collection at the University of Oviedo, we compared these data with data from planned, standardised, and periodic collections with pitfall traps in several locations in the same area. The Arthropod Collection, begun in 1977, includes specimens derived from both sampling types, and its recent digitisation allows for this type of comparative analysis. Therefore, this is the first data-paper employing a hybrid approach, wherein subset metadata are described alongside a comparative analysis. The full dataset can be accessed through Spanish GBIF IPT at http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt/archive.do?r=Bos-Opi, and the metadata of the unplanned collection events at http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt/resource.do?r=bos-opi_unplanned_collection_events. We have mapped the data on the 18 harvestmen species included in the unplanned collections and provided records for some species in six provinces for the first time. We have also provided the locations of Phalangium opilio in eight provinces without published records. These results highlight the importance of digitising data from unplanned biodiversity collections, as well as those derived from planned collections, especially in scarcely studied groups and areas. PMID:24843271

  18. The relevance, biases, and importance of digitising opportunistic non-standardised collections: A case study in Iberian harvestmen fauna with BOS Arthropod Collection datasets (Arachnida, Opiliones)

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Sáinz, Izaskun; Torralba-Burrial, Antonio; Anadón, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we analyse the relevance of harvestmen distribution data derived from opportunistic, unplanned, and non-standardised collection events in an area in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Using specimens deposited in the BOS Arthropod Collection at the University of Oviedo, we compared these data with data from planned, standardised, and periodic collections with pitfall traps in several locations in the same area. The Arthropod Collection, begun in 1977, includes specimens derived from both sampling types, and its recent digitisation allows for this type of comparative analysis. Therefore, this is the first data-paper employing a hybrid approach, wherein subset metadata are described alongside a comparative analysis. The full dataset can be accessed through Spanish GBIF IPT at http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt/archive.do?r=Bos-Opi, and the metadata of the unplanned collection events at http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt/resource.do?r=bos-opi_unplanned_collection_events. We have mapped the data on the 18 harvestmen species included in the unplanned collections and provided records for some species in six provinces for the first time. We have also provided the locations of Phalangium opilio in eight provinces without published records. These results highlight the importance of digitising data from unplanned biodiversity collections, as well as those derived from planned collections, especially in scarcely studied groups and areas. PMID:24843271

  19. Genome-wide analyses reveal the extent of opportunistic STAT5 binding that does not yield transcriptional activation of neighboring genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bing-Mei; Kang, Keunsoo; Yu, Ji Hoon; Chen, Weiping; Smith, Harold E.; Lee, Daeyoup; Sun, Hong-Wei; Wei, Lai; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) 5A/B regulate cytokine-inducible genes upon binding to GAS motifs. It is not known what percentage of genes with GAS motifs bind to and are regulated by STAT5. Moreover, it is not clear whether genome-wide STAT5 binding is modulated by its concentration. To clarify these issues we established genome-wide STAT5 binding upon growth hormone (GH) stimulation of wild-type (WT) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and MEFs overexpressing STAT5A more than 20-fold. Upon GH stimulation, 23?827 and 111?939 STAT5A binding sites were detected in WT and STAT5A overexpressing MEFs, respectively. 13?278 and 71?561 peaks contained at least one GAS motif. 1586 and 8613 binding sites were located within 2.5?kb of promoter sequences, respectively. Stringent filtering revealed 78 genes in which the promoter/upstream region (?10?kb to +0.5?kb) was recognized by STAT5 both in WT and STAT5 overexpressing MEFs and 347 genes that bound STAT5 only in overexpressing cells. Genome-wide expression analyses identified that the majority of STAT5-bound genes was not under GH control. Up to 40% of STAT5-bound genes were not expressed. For the first time we demonstrate the magnitude of opportunistic genomic STAT5 binding that does not translate into transcriptional activation of neighboring genes. PMID:22319210

  20. Structural characterizations of metal ion binding transcriptional regulator CueR from opportunistic pathogen pseudomonas aeruginosa to identify its possible involvements in virulence.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Angshuman

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen present in the environment. It is responsible behind a variety of diseases specifically the multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections and chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. One of the vital genes of the organism responsible for its multidrug-resistant behavior is the gene PA3523 which codes for the multidrug efflux transporter. The expression of PA3523 is regulated by the dimeric transcription factor CueR having helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. So far, there have been no previous reports that depict the characterization of CueR protein from P. aeruginosa from a structural point of view. In the present work, an attempt has been made to characterize CueR protein by structural bioinformatics approach. The dimeric structure of CueR was built by comparative modeling technique. The dimeric model of CueR was then docked onto the corresponding promoter region of the PA3523 gene encoding the multidrug efflux transporter. The docked complex of promoter DNA with CueR protein was subjected to molecular dynamics simulations to identify the mode of DNA-protein interactions. So far, this is the first report that depicts the mechanistic details of gene regulation by CueR protein. This work may therefore be useful to illuminate the still obscure molecular mechanism behind disease propagation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:25342258

  1. A paradoxical mismatch of fecundity and recruitment in deep-sea opportunists: Cocculinid and pseudococculinid limpets colonizing vascular plant remains on the Bahamian Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Craig M.; Emson, Roland H.; Rice, Mary E.; Tyler, Paul A.

    2013-08-01

    Between 1992 and 1994, palm fronds and bundles of fibrous material (rolled door mats of Chinese dragon grass) were deployed by submersible every 3 months at 520 m depth in the Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas. Substrata were recovered after 3-month and 6-month exposure periods and searched intensively for invertebrate colonists. Recruitment surfaces were colonized during every exposure period by three species of cocculiniform limpets, Cocculina rathbuni, Cocculina emsoni, and Notocrater youngi. At least two species appeared in each season, but the relative numbers varied in a way that may indicate seasonal differences in reproduction. Gonad development could be observed through the transparent shell of C. rathbuni, which attained sexual maturity in less than 3 months and had a maximum instantaneous fecundity of 40 eggs. Growth rates (0.025-0.044 mm/day) were high when scaled to adult body size. We used current-meter data from the deployment site to calculate the fluxes of larvae that would be required to produce the measured levels of recruitment. Observed recruitment would require larval densities of hundreds of thousands to millions of larvae per km3. Nevertheless, it is remarkable that these snails are able to succeed with an opportunistic strategy given their low fecundity and lecithotrophic development.

  2. Determination of potentially toxic heavy metals in traditionally used medicinal plants for HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Ngamiland District in Northern Botswana.

    PubMed

    Okatch, Harriet; Ngwenya, Barbara; Raletamo, Keleabetswe M; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin

    2012-06-12

    The determination of four potentially toxic heavy metals, arsenic, chromium, lead and nickel in twelve plant species used for the treatment of perceived HIV and AIDS-associated opportunistic infections by traditional healers in Ngamiland District in Northern Botswana, a metal mining area, was carried out using atomic absorption spectrometry. The medicinal plants; Dichrostachys cinerea, Maerua angolensis, Mimusops zeyheri, Albizia anthelmintica, Plumbago zeylanica, Combretum imberbe, Indigofera flavicans, Clerodendrum ternatum, Solanum panduriforme, Capparis tomentosa, Terminalia sericea and Maytenus senegalensis contained heavy metals in varying quantities: arsenic 0.19-0.54 ?g g(-1), chromium 0.15-1.27 ?g g(-1), lead 0.12-0.23 ?g g(-1) and nickel 0.09-0.21 ?g g(-1) of dry weight. Chromium was found to be the most abundant followed by arsenic and lead. Nickel was undetectable in nine plant species. M. senegalensis contained the largest amounts of arsenic, chromium and lead. All metals determined were below the WHO permissive maximum levels. The possible maximum weekly intakes of the heavy metals following treatment regimes were insignificant compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake levels recommended by WHO and the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. This suggests that heavy metal exposure to patients originating from consumption of traditional medicinal plant preparations is within non health-compromising limits. PMID:22632043

  3. A Common CriteriaA Common Criteria Authoring EnvironmentAuthoring Environment

    E-print Network

    1 1 A Common CriteriaA Common Criteria Authoring EnvironmentAuthoring Environment for MILSfor MILS activities: ­­ a MILS Integration Protection Profile, anda MILS Integration Protection Profile, and ­­ A Common Criteria Authoring Environment (CCAE) toA Common Criteria Authoring Environment (CCAE) to support

  4. CURLYLEAF PONDWEED COMMON NAMES: Curlyleaf Pondweed

    E-print Network

    Serianni, Anthony S.

    CURLYLEAF PONDWEED COMMON NAMES: Curlyleaf Pondweed SCIENTIFIC NAME: Potamogeton crispus L. This plant can tolerate extreme conditions including low light and cold water temperatures and has even been

  5. Common Lunar Lander (CLL) trajectory analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Lynn A., Jr.; Wilks, Nancy A.

    1991-01-01

    Common Lunar Lander trajectory analysis is presented in viewgraph format. Trajectory requirements, trajectory characteristics, trajectory timeline, and alternate trajectory advantages and disadvantages are given.

  6. Common Lunar Lander (CLL) trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lynn A., Jr.; Wilks, Nancy A.

    1991-09-01

    Common Lunar Lander trajectory analysis is presented in viewgraph format. Trajectory requirements, trajectory characteristics, trajectory timeline, and alternate trajectory advantages and disadvantages are given.

  7. Host Genetic Background Influences the Response to the Opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Altering Cell-Mediated Immunity and Bacterial Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P. aeruginosa infection. These results now provide a basis for mapping genomic regions underlying host susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:25268734

  8. Student Voice and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonezawa, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Common Core proponents and detractors debate its merits, but students have voiced their opinion for years. Using a decade's worth of data gathered through design-research on youth voice, this article discusses what high school students have long described as more ideal learning environments for themselves--and how remarkably similar the Common

  9. Insights into The Commons on Flickr

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Commons on Flickr, comprised of an international community of select libraries, museums, and archives, was a project initially launched in 2008 by the Library of Congress and Flickr. Primary goals of The Commons are to broaden exposure to rich cultural heritage photographs and to observe and participate in the communities of engagement and…

  10. Designing Professional Development around the Common Core

    E-print Network

    Belding, Juliana

    Designing Professional Development around the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice Preparation of Teachers: The Impact of the Common Core State Standards Initiative January 7, 2012 #12;The It Up Report, 2001 National Math Advisory Panel Report, 2008 #12;What do these Mathematical Practices

  11. Go Figure: Math and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    In this article about the Common Core State Standards and mathematics, the author wanted to point out what's familiar in these standards and to give teachers clear access to what's different about them. She wanted to emphasize what has made her passionate about the Common Core standards--which is their two-part structure: Standards for…

  12. Confronting Common Folklore: Catching a Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2012-01-01

    Almost every child has experienced the sniffly, stuffy, and achy congestion of the common cold. In addition, many have encountered the "old wives tales" that forge a link between personal actions and coming down with this common respiratory infection. Much of this health folklore has been passed down from generation to generation (e.g., getting a…

  13. Looking Forward from "A Common Faith"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    2009-01-01

    "A Common Faith," according to this author, is arguably one of John Dewey's least effective books. In it, he tries to persuade readers that the best of two epistemologically different worlds can be reconciled in a common faith--one that employs the methods of science with a generously religious attitude. Possibly most people today believe this…

  14. Common Standards for Career Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Office of College and Career Readiness has developed the "Common Standards for Career Education Programs." The six common standards are: (1) Program Management and Planning; (2) Curriculum; (3) Instruction; (4) Professional Development; (5) Career and Technical Student Organizations; and (6) Instructional Facilities and Equipment. These…

  15. Hyperpigmentation: an overview of the common afflictions.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Kimberly A; McMichael, Amy J; Feldman, Steven R

    2004-10-01

    Hyperpigmentation disorders of the skin are common. Three of the more common forms include melasma, lentigines, and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Significant negative psychological consequences can result. Many therapeutic options exist, though treatment is often difficult, requiring lengthy therapy. PMID:15624705

  16. Common Core in the Real World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.; McShane, Michael Q.

    2013-01-01

    There are at least four key places where the Common Core intersects with current efforts to improve education in the United States--testing, professional development, expectations, and accountability. Understanding them can help educators, parents, and policymakers maximize the chance that the Common Core is helpful to these efforts and, perhaps…

  17. 47 CFR 1.9080 - Private commons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Spectrum Leasing General Policies and Procedures § 1.9080 Private commons. (a) Overview. A “private commons” arrangement is an arrangement, distinct from a spectrum leasing arrangement but permitted in the same services for which spectrum leasing arrangements are allowed, in which a licensee or spectrum lessee...

  18. 47 CFR 1.9080 - Private commons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Spectrum Leasing General Policies and Procedures § 1.9080 Private commons. (a) Overview. A “private commons” arrangement is an arrangement, distinct from a spectrum leasing arrangement but permitted in the same services for which spectrum leasing arrangements are allowed, in which a licensee or spectrum lessee...

  19. 47 CFR 1.9080 - Private commons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Spectrum Leasing General Policies and Procedures § 1.9080 Private commons. (a) Overview. A “private commons” arrangement is an arrangement, distinct from a spectrum leasing arrangement but permitted in the same services for which spectrum leasing arrangements are allowed, in which a licensee or spectrum lessee...

  20. A Learning Commons on a Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailin, Deb; Bouchey, Heather; Nelson, Garet; Sherriff, Graham

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the creation of a Lyndon Learning Commons at Lyndon State College. The Commons model emphasizes the integration of a variety of academic support services, increasing both their proximity to one another and cross-unit collaboration, in order to make these services more visible, more accessible, and easier for students to…