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Sample records for common teal anas

  1. Spread of Avian Influenza Viruses by Common Teal (Anas crecca) in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lebarbenchon, Camille; Albespy, Frédéric; Brochet, Anne-Laure; Grandhomme, Viviane; Renaud, François; Fritz, Hervé; Green, Andy J.; Thomas, Frédéric; van der Werf, Sylvie; Aubry, Philippe; Guillemain, Matthieu; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Since the recent spread of highly pathogenic (HP) H5N1 subtypes, avian influenza virus (AIV) dispersal has become an increasing focus of research. As for any other bird-borne pathogen, dispersal of these viruses is related to local and migratory movements of their hosts. In this study, we investigated potential AIV spread by Common Teal (Anas crecca) from the Camargue area, in the South of France, across Europe. Based on bird-ring recoveries, local duck population sizes and prevalence of infection with these viruses, we built an individual-based spatially explicit model describing bird movements, both locally (between wintering areas) and at the flyway scale. We investigated the effects of viral excretion duration and inactivation rate in water by simulating AIV spread with varying values for these two parameters. The results indicate that an efficient AIV dispersal in space is possible only for excretion durations longer than 7 days. Virus inactivation rate in the environment appears as a key parameter in the model because it allows local persistence of AIV over several months, the interval between two migratory periods. Virus persistence in water thus represents an important component of contamination risk as ducks migrate along their flyway. Based on the present modelling exercise, we also argue that HP H5N1 AIV is unlikely to be efficiently spread by Common Teal dispersal only. PMID:19802387

  2. Experimental infection with low and high pathogenicity H7N3 Chilean avian influenza viruses in Chiloe wigeon (Anas sibilatrix) and cinnamon teal (Anas cyanoptera).

    PubMed

    Sá e Silva, Mariana; Mathieu-Benson, Christian; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Swayne, David E

    2011-09-01

    Two different wild duck species common in Chile and neighboring countries, Chiloe wigeon (Anas sibilatrix) and cinnamon teal (Anas cyanoptera), were intranasally inoculated with 10(6) mean embryo infective dose (EID50) of the H7N3 low pathogenicity (LP) avian influenza virus (AIV) (A/chicken/Chile/176822/02) or high pathogenicity (HP) AIV (A/chicken/Chile/ 184240-1/02), in order to study the infectivity and pathobiology of these viruses. None of the virus-inoculated ducks had clinical signs or died, but most seroconverted by 14 days postinoculation (DPI), indicating a productive virus infection. Both LPAIV and HPAIV were isolated from oral swabs from two of six Chiloe wigeons and from oral and/or cloacal swabs from all five of the cinnamon teal at 2 DPI. Both LPAIV and HPAIV were efficiently transmitted to cinnamon teal contacts but not to Chiloe wigeon contacts. This study demonstrates that the cinnamon teal and Chiloe wigeons were susceptible to infection with both Chilean H7N3 LPAIV and HPAIV, but only the cinnamon teal showed contact transmission of the virus between birds, suggesting that the cinnamon teal has the potential to be a reservoir for these viruses, especially the LPAIV, as was demonstrated in 2001 with isolation of a genetically related H7N3 LPAIV strain in a cinnamon teal in Bolivia. However, the definitive source of the H7N3 Chilean LPAIV still remains unknown. PMID:22017047

  3. Mortality in the endangered Laysan teal, Anas laysanensis: conservation implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.; Work, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Laysan Teal Anas laysanensis is an endangered anatid of the Hawaiian Islands, currently restricted to an emergent atoll, Laysan Island. Laysan Island lacks terrestrial mammalian predators, which permits the examination of mortality rates and causes without the anthropogenic effects of introduced predators. Mass and morophometrics were measured during the colour-marking of 297 Laysan Teal between 1998 and 2001. Intensive mark-resighting and recovery methods were used to estimate adult and juvenile mortality. One hundred and nineteen carcasses were collected on Laysan between 1998 and 2003, and systematic gross and microscopic examinations were undertaken on 63 of these. Causes of mortality were categorised as trauma, emaciation, miscellaneous or undetermined. Annual adult mortality rates were low, 0.05-0.10 (s.e. <0.01), but duckling mortality was much higher, varying from approximately 0.7-0.9 during 1998-2000 and 2003. Body condition of both sexes deteriorates during the breeding season, and most adult mortality (88%) occurred during or post-breeding (May-October). Cause of mortality was determined via necropsy in 22 ducks. Of three adults, one died from bacterial infections, one was egg bound, and one died from botulism concomitant with nematode infestation. Fourteen ducklings died from acute trauma, four from emaciation sometimes associated with nematode infection, and one from bacterial pneumonia Trauma is a significant factor in Laysan duckling mortalities, and elucidating the cause of and preventing such trauma may allow for management measures to enhance duckling survivability. High duckling mortality rates and emaciation also indicate that habitat on Laysan Island may have limited capacity to support broods.

  4. A tangled tale of two teal: Population history of the grey Anas gracilis and chestnut teal a. castanea of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joseph, L.; Adcock, G.J.; Linde, C.; Omland, K.E.; Heinsohn, R.; Terry, Chesser R.; Roshier, D.

    2009-01-01

    Two Australian species of teal (Anseriformes: Anatidae: Anas), the grey teal Anas gracilis and the chestnut teal A. castanea, are remarkable for the zero or near-zero divergence recorded between them in earlier surveys of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity. We confirmed this result through wider geographical and population sampling as well as nucleotide sampling in the more rapidly evolving mtDNA control region. Any data set where two species share polymorphism as is the case here can be explained by a model of gene flow through hybridization on one hand or by incomplete lineage sorting on the other hand. Ideally, analysis of such shared polymorphism would simultaneously estimate the likelihood of both phenomena. To do this, we used the underlying principle of the IMa package to explore ramifications to understanding population histories of A. gracilis and A. castanea. We cannot reject that hybridization occurs between the two species but an equally or more plausible finding for their nearly zero divergence is incomplete sorting following very recent divergence between the two, probably in the mid-late Pleistocene. Our data add to studies that explore intermediate stages in the evolution of reciprocal monophyly and paraphyletic or polyphyletic relationships in mtDNA diversity among widespread Australian birds. ?? 2009 J. Avian Biol.

  5. Laysan Teal Anas laysanensis nesting phenology and site characteristics on Laysan Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.; Crampton, L.H.; Vekasy, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Factors influencing breeding initiation of the endangered Laysan Teal Anas laysanensis were studied on Laysan Island in the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge between 1998 and 2006. Sixty-two radio-tagged adult females were tracked for 30-180 days to locate and describe their nest sites. In addition, the Laysan Teal were surveyed daily during the breeding season, and 331 individually colour-ringed females were marked to identify new broods and timing of incubation initiation. Temperature, rainfall, and abundance of Brine Flies (Scatella sexnotata, an important prey) were measured in all years. Females nested on average 213 m (s.e. ?? 37 m) from the lake basin primarily in Eragrostis variablis, a native bunch grass with > 75% cover. The first observation of nesting in marine debris by Laysan Teal was reported. The initiation of incubation, at the start of the breeding season each year, varied from December to July, and differed significantly between years. Brine Fly abundance, temperature, and rainfall also varied significantly between years. The earlier the Brine Fly abundance peaked, the longer the duration of the breeding season. The length of the breeding season, measured as the number of days between the first and last clutches, varied from 83-192 days (mean 116 ?? 14 days). Annual brood production was positively correlated with spring peak abundance of Brine Flies. There was some evidence that it was negatively correlated with the number of adult females in the population. Rainfall, temperature, prey abundance, and the density of other birds on Laysan Island are likely to interact in influencing Laysan Teal's variable nesting phenology and productivity. ?? Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust.

  6. Helminth Community Dynamics in Populations of Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Using Two Distinct Migratory Corridors.

    PubMed

    Garvon, Jason M; Fedynich, Alan M; Peterson, Markus J; Pence, Danny B

    2011-01-01

    The influence of spatially distinct host subpopulations on helminth community structure and pattern was examined in a migratory avian host species. Forty helminth species represented by 24,082 individuals were collected from 184 blue-winged teal (Anas discors; BWT) from 2 primary migratory corridors in Florida (eastern migratory corridor; EMC) and Louisiana and Texas (western migratory corridor; WMC). Mean species richness was greater in BWT from the WMC (x̅±SE = 10.2 ± 0.3 species) than the EMC (8.6 ± 0.2). The helminth community from the WMC had higher abundances of 6 common/intermediate species. Corridor helminth communities were similar in species composition but less similar when incorporating abundances of those species. Overlapping distributions of phylogenetically related host species that share generalist helminth species across ecologically similar habitats seem to mitigate the isolating mechanisms that are necessary for the distinct coevolutionary pathways to develop between adjacent corridors. PMID:21584230

  7. Evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of avian influenza virus subtypes in blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; González-Reiche, Ana S.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Walther, Patrick; Link, Paul; Carter, Deborah L.; Newsome, George M.; Müller, Maria L.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Perez, Daniel R.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal dynamics of influenza A viruses (IAVs) are driven by host density and population immunity. Through an analysis of subtypic data for IAVs isolated from Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors), we present evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of viral subtypes in spring and summer/autumn.

  8. Evidence for the exchange of blood parasites between North America and the Neotropics in blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reed, John; Walther, Patrick; Link, Paul; Schmutz, Joel A.; Douglas, David; Stallknecht, David E.; Soos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) are abundant, small-bodied dabbling ducks that breed throughout the prairies of the northcentral USA and central Canada and that winter in the southern USA and northern Neotropics. Given the migratory tendencies of this species, it is plausible that blue-winged teal may disperse avian pathogens, such as parasites causing avian malaria, between spatially distant areas. To test the hypothesis that blue-winged teal play a role in the exchange of blood parasites between North America and areas further south, we collected information on migratory tendencies of this species and sampled birds at spatially distant areas during breeding and non-breeding periods to diagnose and genetically characterize parasitic infections. Using a combination of band recovery data, satellite telemetry, molecular diagnostics, and genetic analyses, we found evidence for (1) migratory connectivity of blue-winged teal between our sampling locations in the Canadian prairies and along the US Gulf Coast with areas throughout the northern Neotropics, (2) parasite acquisition at both breeding and non-breeding areas, (3) infection of blue-winged teal sampled in Canada and the USA withPlasmodium parasite lineages associated with the Neotropics, and (4) infection of blue-winged teal with parasites that were genetically related to those previously reported in waterfowl in both North America and South America. Collectively, our results suggest that blue-winged teal likely play a role in the dispersal of blood parasites between the Neotropics and North America, and therefore, the targeting of this species in surveillance programs for the early detection of Neotropical-origin avian pathogens in the USA may be informative.

  9. Gastrointestinal helminthes of green-winged teal (Anas crecca) from North Iran

    PubMed Central

    Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Hossein; Tabarestani, Amir Hossein Alizadeh; Ardeshir, Hadi Alijani; Jafarzade, Farshid; Rahimi, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the helminth parasites of Anas crecca (A. crecca) in one of proper refuges of Iran, Fereydunkenar. Methods A total number of one hundred thirty-six gastrointestinal tracts of green-winged teal (A. crecca) were collected from Fereydunkenar, Mazandaran province during September and October 2011. The gastrointestinal tracts were examined for helminth infection. Results The total infection rate was 70.50% (96) that 68.96% (40) of males and 71.79% (56) of females shown helminthes infection. The examined A. crecca harbored one species of Nematoda, Cestoda and two species of Digenea which were as following: Contracaecum larvae (from stomach wall), Diorchis stefanskii (D. stefanskii) (from small intestine), Hypoderaeum conoideum (from small intestine) and Notocotylus attenuatus (N. attenuatus) (from caecum), respectively. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of infection between examined males and females ducks in Hypoderaeum conoideum, D. stefanskii and N. attenuatus (P>0.05) whereas a significant relationship was observed between males and females in Contracaecum larvae (P<0.05). Conclusions Based on the results of the present study, we conclude that A. crecca plays a prominent role in transmission of mentioned parasites. In addition, this is the first report of Contracaecum larvae, D. stefanskii and N. attenuatus from A. crecca in Iran. PMID:25183069

  10. Genome Sequence of a Novel H14N7 Subtype Influenza A Virus Isolated from a Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Harvested in Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Andrew B.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Carter, Deborah L.; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir. PMID:27284136

  11. Genome Sequence of a Novel H14N7 Subtype Influenza A Virus Isolated from a Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Harvested in Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Andrew M; Reeves, Andrew B; Poulson, Rebecca L; Carter, Deborah L; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir. PMID:27284136

  12. Blood Parasites of Blue-winged Teal ( Anas discors ) from Two Migratory Corridors, in the Southern USA.

    PubMed

    Garvon, Jason M; Mott, Joanna B; Jacobs, Sandy Serio; Fedynich, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    We collected 180 Blue-winged Teal ( Anas discors ) in September and October 2002 from Florida, US (n=100, representing the eastern migratory corridor) and the Louisiana-Texas, US, border (n=80, representing the western migratory corridor) and examined for blood parasites using thin heart-blood smears. Leucocytozoon simondi, Haemoproteus nettionis, and microfilariae were found in 16, 23, and 27 birds, respectively. Prevalence of L. simondi and H. nettionis did not vary by migratory corridor, but the prevalence of microfilariae was higher in the western corridor (23%) than the eastern corridor (9%). No differences in prevalence of L. simondi, H. nettionis, and microfilariae were observed by host age or sex. The mean density of L. simondi and H. nettionis averaged 1.5±0.3 and 2.3±0.4 (±SE per 3,000 erythrocytes), respectively. Ranked abundance models for main and interactive effects of corridor, age, and sex were not statistically significant for L. simondi or H. nettionis. Low prevalence and abundance of hematozoa in early autumn migrants reflects the likelihood of low exposure probabilities of Blue-winged Teal on the breeding grounds, compared to their congeners. PMID:27285417

  13. Isolation of avian infectious bronchitis coronavirus from domestic peafowl (Pavo cristatus) and teal (Anas).

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengwang; Chen, Jianfei; Chen, Jinding; Kong, Xiangang; Shao, Yuhao; Han, Zongxi; Feng, Li; Cai, Xuehui; Gu, Shoulin; Liu, Ming

    2005-03-01

    Coronavirus-like viruses, designated peafowl/China/LKQ3/2003 (pf/CH/LKQ3/03) and teal/China/LDT3/2003 (tl/CH/LDT3/03), were isolated from a peafowl and a teal during virological surveillance in Guangdong province, China. Partial genomic sequence analysis showed that these isolates had the S-3-M-5-N gene order that is typical of avian coronaviruses. The spike, membrane and nucleocapsid protein genes of pf/CH/LKQ3/03 had >99 % identity to those of the avian infectious bronchitis coronavirus H120 vaccine strain (Massachusetts serotype) and other Massachusetts serotype isolates. Furthermore, when pf/CH/LKQ3/03 was inoculated experimentally into chickens (specific-pathogen-free), no disease signs were apparent. tl/CH/LDT3/03 had a spike protein gene with 95 % identity to that of a Chinese infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) isolate, although more extensive sequencing revealed the possibility that this strain may have undergone recombination. When inoculated into chickens, tl/CH/LDT3/03 resulted in the death of birds from nephritis. Taken together, this information suggests that pf/CH/LKQ3/03 might be a revertant, attenuated vaccine IBV strain, whereas tl/CH/LDT3/03 is a nephropathogenic field IBV strain, generated through recombination. The replication and non-pathogenic nature of IBV in domestic peafowl and teal under field conditions raises questions as to the role of these hosts as carriers of IBV and the potential that they may have to transmit virus to susceptible chicken populations. PMID:15722532

  14. Genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Carter, Deborah L.; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir.                   

  15. Optimizing Surveillance for South American Origin Influenza A Viruses Along the United States Gulf Coast Through Genomic Characterization of Isolates from Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors).

    PubMed

    Ramey, A M; Walther, P; Link, P; Poulson, R L; Wilcox, B R; Newsome, G; Spackman, E; Brown, J D; Stallknecht, D E

    2016-04-01

    Relative to research focused on inter-continental viral exchange between Eurasia and North America, less attention has been directed towards understanding the redistribution of influenza A viruses (IAVs) by wild birds between North America and South America. In this study, we genomically characterized 45 viruses isolated from blue-winged teal (Anas discors) along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast during March of 2012 and 2013, coincident with northward migration of this species from Neotropical wintering areas to breeding grounds in the United States and Canada. No evidence of South American lineage genes was detected in IAVs isolated from blue-winged teal supporting restricted viral gene flow between the United States and southern South America. However, it is plausible that blue-winged teal redistribute IAVs between North American breeding grounds and wintering areas throughout the Neotropics, including northern South America, and that viral gene flow is limited by geographical barriers further south (e.g., the Amazon Basin). Surveillance for the introduction of IAVs from Central America and northern South America into the United States may be further optimized through genomic characterization of viruses resulting from coordinated, concurrent sampling efforts targeting blue-winged teal and sympatric species throughout the Neotropics and along the United States Gulf Coast. PMID:25056712

  16. Optimizing surveillance for South American origin influenza A viruses along the United States Gulf Coast through genomic characterization of isolates from blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Walther, Patrick; Link, Paul Karl; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Newsome, George M.; Spackman, Erica; Brown, J.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Relative to research focused on intercontinental viral exchange between Eurasia and North America, less attention has been directed towards understanding the redistribution of influenza A viruses (IAVs) by wild birds between North America and South America. In this study, we genomically characterized 45 viruses isolated from blue-winged teal (Anas discors) along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast during March of 2012 and 2013, coincident with northward migration of this species from Neotropical wintering areas to breeding grounds in the United States and Canada. No evidence of South American lineage genes were detected in IAVs isolated from blue-winged teal supporting restricted viral gene flow between the United States and southern South America. However, it is plausible that blue-winged teal redistribute IAVs between North American breeding grounds and wintering areas throughout the Neotropics, including northern South America, and that viral gene flow is limited by geographical barriers further south (e.g. the Amazon Basin). Surveillance for the introduction of IAVs from Central America and northern South America into the United States may be further optimized through genomic characterization of viruses resulting from coordinated, concurrent sampling efforts targeting blue-winged teal and sympatric species throughout the Neotropics and along the United States Gulf Coast.

  17. vidence of low genetic variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked endangered island endemic, the Lasan Teal (Anas laysanensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Peters Jeffrey L; Courtot, Karen; Seixas, Pedro P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity is assumed to reflect the evolutionary potential and adaptability of populations, and thus quantifying the genetic diversity of endangered species is useful for recovery programs. In particular, if conservation strategies include reintroductions, periodic genetic assessments are useful to evaluate whether management efforts have resulted in the maximization or loss of genetic variation within populations over generations. In this study, we collected blood, feather, and tissue samples during 1999–2009 and quantified genetic diversity for a critically endangered waterfowl species endemic to the Hawaiian archipelago, the Laysan teal or duck (Anas laysanensis; n = 239 individual birds sampled). The last extant population of this species at Laysan Island was sourced in 2004–2005 for a ‘wild to wild’ translocation of 42 individuals for an experimental reintroduction to Midway Atoll. To inform future management strategies, we compared genetic diversity sampled from the source population (n = 133 Laysan birds) including 23 of Midway’s founders and offspring of the translocated population 2–5 years post release (n = 96 Midway birds). We attempted to identify polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellite (N = 83) and intronic loci (N = 19), as well as the mitochondrial control region (mtDNA) for a subset of samples. Among 83 microsatellite loci screened, six were variable. We found low nuclear variation consistent with the species’ historical population bottlenecks and sequence variation was observed at a single intron locus. We detected no variation within the mtDNA. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within islands. Two rare alleles found in the Laysan Island source population were not present in the Midway translocated group, and a rare allele was discovered in an individual on Midway in 2008. We found similar genetic diversity and low, but statistically

  18. Weights of wild mallard Anas platyrhynchos, gadwall A. strepera, and blue-winged teal A. discors during the breeding season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lokemoen, J.T.; Johnson, D.H.; Sharp, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    During 1976-81 we weighed several thousands of wild Mallard, Gadwall, and Blue-winged Teal in central North Dakota to examine duckling growth patterns, adult weights, and the factors influencing them. One-day-old Mallard and Gadwall averaged 32.4 and 30.4 g, respectively, a reduction of 34% and 29% from fresh egg weights. In all three species, the logistic growth curve provided a good fit for duckling growth patterns. Except for the asymptote, there was no difference in growth curves between males and females of a species. Mallard and Gadwall ducklings were heavier in years when wetland area was extensive or had increased from the previous year. Weights of after-second-year females were greater than yearlings for Mallard but not for Gadwall or Blue-winged Teal. Adult Mallard females lost weight continuously from late March to early July. Gadwall and Blue-winged Teal females, which nest later than Mallard, gained weight after spring arrival, lost weight from the onset of nesting until early July, and then regained some weight. Females of all species captured on nests were lighter than those captured off nests at the same time. Male Mallard weights decreased from spring arrival until late May. Male Gadwall and Blue-winged Teal weights increased after spring arrival, then declined until early June. Males of all three species then gained weight until the end of June. Among adults, female Gadwall and male Mallard and Blue-winged Teal were heavier in years when wetland area had increased from the previous year; female Blue-winged Teal were heavier in years with more wetland area.

  19. Population estimates and monitoring guidelines for endangered Laysan Teal, Anas Laysanensis, at Midway Atoll: Pilot study results 2008-2010.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Brinck, Kevin W.; Laniawe, Leona

    2011-01-01

    To improve the Laysan Teal population estimates, we recommend changes to the monitoring protocol. Additional years of data are needed to quantify inter-annual seasonal detection probabilities, which may allow the use of standardized direct counts as an unbiased index of population size. Survey protocols should be enhanced through frequent resights, regular survey intervals, and determining reliable standards to detect catastrophic declines and annual changes in adult abundance. In late 2009 to early 2010, 68% of the population was marked with unique color band combinations. This allowed for potentially accurate adult population estimates and survival estimates without the need to mark new birds in 2010, 2011, and possibly 2012. However, efforts should be made to replace worn or illegible bands so birds can be identified in future surveys. It would be valuable to develop more sophisticated population size and survival models using Program MARK, a state-of-the-art software package which uses likelihood models to analyze mark-recapture data. This would allow for more reliable adult population and survival estimates to compare with the ―source‖ Laysan Teal population on Laysan Island. These models will require additional years of resight data (> 1 year) and, in some cases, an intensive annual effort of marking and recapture. Because data indicate standardized all-wetland counts are a poor index of abundance, monitoring efforts could be improved by expanding resight surveys to include all wetlands, discontinuing the all-wetland counts, and reallocating some of the wetland count effort to collect additional opportunistic resights. Approximately two years of additional bimonthly surveys are needed to validate the direct count as an appropriate index of population abundance. Additional years of individual resight data will allow estimates of adult population size, as specified in recovery criteria, and to track species population dynamics at Midway Atoll.

  20. ECOLOGICAL DETERMINANTS OF AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS, WEST NILE VIRUS, AND AVIAN PARAMYXOVIRUS INFECTION AND ANTIBODY STATUS IN BLUE-WINGED TEAL (ANAS DISCORS) IN THE CANADIAN PRAIRIES.

    PubMed

    Nallar, Rodolfo; Papp, Zsuzsanna; Leighton, Frederick A; Epp, Tasha; Pasick, John; Berhane, Yohannes; Lindsay, Robbin; Soos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian prairies are one of the most important breeding and staging areas for migratory waterfowl in North America. Hundreds of thousands of waterfowl of numerous species from multiple flyways converge in and disperse from this region annually; therefore this region may be a key area for potential intra- and interspecific spread of infectious pathogens among migratory waterfowl in the Americas. Using Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors, BWTE), which have the most extensive migratory range among waterfowl species, we investigated ecologic risk factors for infection and antibody status to avian influenza virus (AIV), West Nile virus (WNV), and avian paramyxovirus-1 (APMV-1) in the three prairie provinces (Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba) prior to fall migration. We used generalized linear models to examine infection or evidence of exposure in relation to host (age, sex, body condition, exposure to other infections), spatiotemporal (year, province), population-level (local population densities of BWTE, total waterfowl densities), and environmental (local pond densities) factors. The probability of AIV infection in BWTE was associated with host factors (e.g., age and antibody status), population-level factors (e.g., local BWTE population density), and year. An interaction between age and AIV antibody status showed that hatch year birds with antibodies to AIV were more likely to be infected, suggesting an antibody response to an active infection. Infection with AIV was positively associated with local BWTE density, supporting the hypothesis of density-dependent transmission. The presence of antibodies to WNV and APMV-1 was positively associated with age and varied among years. Furthermore, the probability of being WNV antibody positive was positively associated with pond density rather than host population density, likely because ponds provide suitable breeding habitat for mosquitoes, the primary vectors for transmission. Our findings highlight the importance of

  1. Eastward migration of blue-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, B.

    1972-01-01

    Of 3,789 recoveries of blue-winged teal (Anas discors) banded prior to the hunting season in the prairie pothole region, 183 (4.8 percent) were recovered, due east in New England, Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritime Provinces during the subsequent hunting season. Of 19 recoveries looked at in detail, all were banded as either hatching-year (flying young) or local (flightless young) birds. A blue-winged teal banded in Minnesota in September was retrapped in October in South Carolina, before being shot later that month in Colombia, South America.

  2. Identification and intraspecific genetic diversity of Sarcocystis rileyi from ducks, Anas spp., in Lithuania and Finland.

    PubMed

    Prakas, P; Oksanen, A; Butkauskas, D; Sruoga, A; Kutkienė, L; Švažas, S; Isomursu, M; Liaugaudaitė, S

    2014-10-01

    Macroscopic Sarcocystis cysts were detected in the muscles of 28 Mallards ( Anas platyrhynchos ), 1 Eurasian Wigeon ( Anas penelope ), and 1 Common Teal ( Anas crecca ) hunted in Lithuania and Finland. According to the sequences of the 18S rRNA gene, 28S rRNA gene, and ITS-1 region, the macrocysts examined from all 30 ducks belonged to Sarcocystis rileyi. This parasite was found in the Eurasian Wigeon and the Common Teal for the first time. All S. rileyi isolates examined were identical to each other and differed from 2 S. rileyi isolates previously reported from 2 Mallards from the United States only by 1 nucleotide substitution within the ITS-1 region. PMID:24766223

  3. Feeding ecology of northern pintails and green-winged teal wintering in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, N.H., Jr.; Harris, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    The feeding ecology of northern pintails (Anas acuta) and green-winged teal (A. crecca) was examined from October through February 1979-81 in 4 major seasonal marsh types in the Central Valley, California. The esophagi of 262 pintails contained 72.3% plant seeds and 27.7% animal matter. The esophagi of 173 green-winged teal contained 62.3% plant seeds and 37.6% animal matter. Swamp timothy (Heleochloa schoenoides) caryopses, chironomid midge larvae, and common barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crusgalli) caryopses formed >50% of the diet of both species. Both species were highly opportunistic and generally shifted their food habits seasonally to the most available foods. Animal matter increased seasonally in the diets of both and formed about 60% of the foods eaten during January and February compared to only about 8% in October and 17% in December. Both species used open water marsh habitats almost exclusively in daytime but they used densely vegetated marshes almost exclusively at night. Management recommendations based on the food habits and habitat use patterns of pintails and green-winged teal are offered.

  4. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Blue-Winged Teal (Breeding)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sousa, Patrick J.

    1985-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the blue-winged teal (Anas discors). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  5. Age determination of blue-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dane, C.W.

    1968-01-01

    Primary feather length, markings on the greater secondary coverts, and the degree of bill spotting were evaluated as characters for use in the spring to distinguish first-year, blue-winged teal (Anas discors) females from older ones. The length of the 10th primary feather did not prove suitable to separate different aged females. Extreme primary lengths might be used to determine the age of some males. In females that have been through a postnuptial molt the greater secondary coverts have a more symmetrical, and more acutely angled, white, inverted 'V'-marking. Any female with a 'V' subjectively classified as good has gone through at least one postnuptial molt, and a female with no sign of a 'V' on the coverts is a juvenile or yearling before her first postnuptial molt. By measuring the longest bill spot on the upper mandible of each known-age female, it was possible to determine the age of some female teal. Because the spots fade during the breeding season, no lower size limit could be set to delineate first-year females at that time of year, but any nest-trapped hen with a spot longer than 10 mm was considered to be older than 1 year. Upper and lower limits were also established to distinguish some yearlings and 2-year-olds in the fall.

  6. Peregrine falcon predation of endangered Laysan teal and Laysan Finches on remote Hawaiian atolls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Nash, Sarah A.B.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    We report the first records of Peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) predation on endangered Laysan teal (or duck; Anas laysanensis) and predation on endangered Laysan finches (Telespiza cantans). At Midway Atoll, vagrant Peregrine falcons killed ≥4% of a newly translocated Laysan teal population in 2006 and ≥2% in 2008. On Laysan Island during 2008–2009, remains of >76 Laysan finches (<1% of the population) were found at peregrine perches. On Midway Atoll, all depredated Laysan teal and other seabirds were recovered at kill sites on tarmac (runways). If the frequency or duration of vagrant raptors visitation increases at small atolls, this could pose a mortality risk to consider, especially during proposed translocations of endangered species. Vegetation restoration of abandoned runways near wetlands at Midway Atoll would provide cover and may help reduce mortality of endangered species due to vagrant raptors.

  7. Diet composition and terrestrial prey selection of the Laysan teal on Laysan Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.; Slotterback, J.W.; Walters, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Laysan teal (Anas laysanensis) is an endangered dabbling duck endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago but currently restricted to a single breeding population on Laysan Island. We studied its diet using fecal analysis and behavioral observations. Laysan teal fecal samples (N=118) contained prey items in 15 primary prey categories with a mean of 2.9 (range 0-7) taxa per sample. Sixty-two of these fecal samples were quantified with 2,270 prey items identified (mean items per sample 37; range 0-205). Based on fecal analysis and behavioral observations, we learned that the Laysan teal is not strictly a macroinsectivore as previously reported, but consumed seeds, succulent leaves, and algae, in addition to adult and larval diptera, ants, lepidoptera, coleoptera, and Artemia. We compared abundance of invertebrates from two terrestrial foraging substrates, soil and standing vegetation, to the abundance of invertebrate prey items counted in fecal samples collected from these habitats for the same period. In the soil substrate, Laysan teal selected two of the most abundant invertebrates, lepidoptera larvae and coleoptera. In the standing vegetation, Laysan teal selected the most abundant taxa: coleoptera. Amphipods were consumed in proportion to their abundance, and small gastropods (Tornatellides sp.), isopods, and arachnids were avoided or were identified in fecal matter in disproportion to their abundance in the foraging habitat. We compared fecal composition of samples collected in aquatic and terrestrial habitats and detected significant differences in samples' species compositions. The conservation implications of the adult Laysan teal's diet are positive, since results indicate that the Laysan teal are opportunistic insectivores, and exhibit dietary flexibility that includes seeds and other food. Dietary flexibility improves the possibility of successfully reestablishing populations on other predator-free islands.

  8. Banding reference areas and survival rates of green-winged teal, 1950-1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chu, D.S.; Nichols, J.D.; Hestbeck, J.B.; Hines, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The green-winged teal (Anas crecca carolinensis) is an important harvest species, yet we know relatively little about its population ecology. We investigated aspects of green-winged teal population ecology of potential importance to waterfowl managers. We used recoveries of green-winged teal banded during winter (1950-89) to establish banding reference areas and estimate survival and band recovery rates. We used cluster analysis based on similarities in recovery patterns to group banding degree blocks into 8 minor and 5 major reference areas describing the principal wintering range of green-winged teal in North America. We then estimated survival and recovery rates of green-winged teal banded in these areas. Mean annual survival rate estimates across years and reference areas were similar (P gt 0.05) for males (0.55, cxa SE = 0.022) and females (0.51, cxa SE = 0.057). Mean annual recovery rate estimates were larger for males (0.033, cxa SE = 0.0017) than for females (0.024, cxa SE = 0.0024) (P lt 0.01). There was little evidence of temporal variation in survival or recovery rates for most datasets. There was evidence of geographic variation in survival rates among major reference areas for males (P = 0.04) but not for females (P = 0.30). We recommend that analyses be conducted on greenwinged teal banded during preseason to further investigate possible sex specificity of survival rates and to address questions about the relationship between harvest rates and survival.

  9. Efficacy of a type C botulism vaccine in green-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Samuel, M.D.; Swift, P.K.; Yarris, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of a single dose of Botumink toxoid for protecting wild green-winged teal (Anas crecca) during botulism epizootics caused by Clostridium botulinum type C. We challenged control and immunized ducks with four different doses of type C botulinum toxin to determine the LD50 for this species and to evaluate vaccine protection. Fewer immunized ducks were affected with botulism than control ducks, indicating that a single dose of Botumink toxoid could increase the survival of ducks during epizootics. However, the frequency of immunized ducks with signs of botulism increased with the challenge dose of botulinum toxin. Even at doses of botulinum toxin approximately 2 to 4 green-winged teal LD50, about 50% of the immunized ducks were affected. We believe an improved vaccine or a better delivery system is required to justify immunization of wild birds for experimental survival studies.

  10. Influence of radio packs on captive mallards and blue-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, R.J.; Sargeant, A.B.

    1973-01-01

    Back-mounted radio packs of three weights were attached to 30 captive mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and 30 blue-winged teal (A. discors), and physical condition of the birds was evaluated for 12 weeks. All groups with radio packs lost more weight than did control groups. Feather wear often followed by skin irritation occurred in the axillary region of the wings on 90 percent of the treated birds within 1 week, and on the backs of 55 percent of the treated birds within 4 weeks after the radio packs were attached. The treated birds appeared preoccupied with the radio packs and exhibited a partial aversion to swimming.

  11. Ecological relationships of breeding blue-winged teal to prairie potholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewien, R.C.; Springer, P.F.

    1969-01-01

    Ecology of breeding blue-winged teal (Anas discors) was studied on the Waubay Study Area in Day County, South Dakota, in 1965 and 1966. Breeding pair use of the wetland habitat and importance of Type 1 ponds in the wetland complex were evaluated. Changes in breeding pair densities and wetland habitat conditions on the study area were compared for the 16-year period, 1950-66.Blue-winged teal pair densities of 30.7 and 33.0 per square mile in 1965 and 1966, respectively, were above the 16-year average from 1950 to 1966 and near the maximum for this period. Blue-winged teal comprised 46.7 per cent of the waterfowl breeding population in 1965 and 51.7 per cent in 1966. Number of water areas per square mile through mid-spring 1965 was comparable to the average for the 16-year period, whereas during late spring 1965 and throughout the 1966 spring breeding seasons the number of water areas increased to near optimum conditions.Annual breeding-pair densities from 1950 to 1966 appeared to be largely influenced by water conditions, and pair-density fluctuations resulted from changes in number of wet ponds from late April through mid-May. Variations in water conditions after this period did not appear to have as great an effect on numbers of breeding teal.Use of wetland habitat by pairs changed throughout the spring breeding seasons. During the post-arrival period, teal congregated on larger wetlands. With onset of egg-laying, pairs dispersed into ponds throughout the wetland complex to establish breeding home ranges. Other factors that influenced changes in habitat use included: 1) pond type and size, 2) breeding cycle phenology, 3) availability of wet ponds, and 4) land use. Number of blue-winged teal pairs per unit area of water was highest in 1965 and 1966 on Type 1B ponds, followed in decreasing order by Types 3, 1A, and 4 and 5. Greater use of Type 1B ponds was probably related to larger ratio of edge or shore line to unit area of water. Interspersion of many small

  12. Drivers of waterfowl population dynamics: from teal to swans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koons, David N.; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Schmutz, Joel A.; Rotella, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Waterfowl are among the best studied and most extensively monitored species in the world. Given their global importance for sport and subsistence hunting, viewing and ecosystem functioning, great effort has been devoted since the middle part of the 20th century to understanding both the environmental and demographic mechanisms that influence waterfowl population and community dynamics. Here we use comparative approaches to summarise and contrast our understanding ofwaterfowl population dynamics across species as short-lived as the teal Anas discors and A.crecca to those such as the swans Cygnus sp. which have long life-spans. Specifically, we focus on population responses to vital rate perturbations across life history strategies, discuss bottom-up and top-down responses of waterfowlpopulations to global change, and summarise our current understanding of density dependence across waterfowl species. We close by identifying research needs and highlight ways to overcome the challenges of sustainably managing waterfowl populations in the 21st century.

  13. Influence of space use on fitness and the reintroduction success of the Laysan teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.; Hatfield, J.S.; Laniawe, L.P.; Vekasy, M.S.; Klavitter, J.L.; Berkowitz, P.; Crampton, L.H.; Walters, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Translocation is an important tool for wildlife conservation and biodiversity restoration, but an inefficient one because of the unpredictability of success. Predictors of success such as habitat quality of the release site and number of individuals released have been identified, but the dynamics of successful translocations remain poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the relationship of individual post-release movements to population establishment. In 2004, Laysan teal Anas laysanensis were reintroduced by translocating 20 wild birds from Laysan Island to Midway Atoll. Twenty-two additional wild founders were brought the next year. We monitored the survival, reproductive success and movements of the 42 translocated individuals and their offspring for 4 years. Additionally, we monitored population size from 2004 to 2010. Unlike most translocations, we did not observe elevated post-release mortality despite flight-feather trimming to prevent immediate dispersal off-island: first year survival was > 90% and survival rates until 2009 were 0.65±0.08 for founding adults. Laysan teal flew between the two main islands of Midway Atoll, and offspring had significantly larger maximum movement distances than founders. We monitored 84 nests and observed a significant, negative relationship of home range size to productivity for founding females. Flightless founders did not show fidelity to their release sites, but had strong fidelity to annual home ranges after attaining flight. Although we observed a component Allee effect on mate-finding, this did not translate into a demographic Allee effect, and generally, the high fitness of founders contributed substantially to successful population establishment. Laysan teal abundance increased linearly until 2009, but showed evidence of population regulation afterwards. The population estimate was 473 (95% confidence interval 439–508) in 2010. On the much larger main Hawaiian Islands, we expect greater post

  14. Translocation and early post-release demography of endangered Laysan teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.; Seavy, N.E.; Vekasy, M.S.; Klavitter, J.L.; Laniawe, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce the high extinction risk inherent to small island populations, we translocated wild Laysan teal Anas laysanensis to a portion of its presumed prehistoric range. Most avian translocations lack the strategic post-release monitoring needed to assess early population establishment or failure. Therefore, we monitored the survival and reproduction of all founders, and their first-generation offspring using radio telemetry for 2 years after the first release. Forty-two Laysan teal were sourced directly from the only extant population on Laysan Island and transported 2 days by ship to Midway Atoll. All birds survived the translocation with nutritional and veterinary support, and spent between 4 and 14 days in captivity. Post-release survival of 42 founders was 0.857 (95% CI 0.86-0.99) during 2004-2006 or annualized 0.92 (95% CI 0.83-0.98). Seventeen of 18 founding hens attempted nesting in the first two breeding seasons. Fledgling success was 0.57 (95% CI 0.55-0.60) in 2005 and 0.63 (95% CI 0.62-0.64) in 2006. The effective founding female population (Ne) was 13. We applied these initial demographic rates to model population growth. The nascent population size increased to >100 after only 2 years post-release (?? = 1.73). If this growth rate continues, the size of the Midway population could surpass the source population before 2010. ?? 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2008 The Zoological Society of London.

  15. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs you take. ANA testing can produce a “false positive.” This typically signals the presence of antinuclear ... keep looking. In fact, you may have a “false positive” ANA, which means that the evidence is ...

  16. Teal Ruby - Design, manufacture and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepi, J. W.; Kahan, M. A.; Barnes, W. H.; Zielinski, R. J.

    The Teal Ruby infrared telescope, designed to passively operate in a cryogenic and orbital environment, and capable of maintaining integrity under a severe set of design criteria, is presented. The infrared telescope unit, a curved-field centered design, is described; a woven graphite epoxy composite structure encloses the lightweight fused silica mirrors. The completed telescope design satisfies the necessary criteria, including spacecraft payload capabilities, good stiffness characteristics, low heat loss, and low thermal expansion. To meet performance in terms of optical resolution, the overall design error is held to one-tenth of one wavelength or less of near infrared light. To ascertain the design validity, a detailed mathematical model was constructed using the NASTRAN digital routine. The instrument is scheduled for Space Shuttle orbital launch, one of its purposes being the verification of the capabilities of an infrared sensor and a mosaic focal plane.

  17. Teal Amber Visible Focal Plane Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Charles R.; Burczewski, Ron

    1981-12-01

    Deep-space surveillance missions have imposed severe demands on existing technology and simulated the search for new, advanced technology developments to provide higher performance. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored Teal Amber as a visible charge-coupled device (CCD) and associated focal plane signal processing technology development and demonstration program. This paper describes this large-scale, staring-array-sensor concept. The current state of art in the resulting visibled CCD imagers is specified, along with the focal plane signal processor implementation in low power-weight-volume large-scale integrated (LSI) circuitry. Performance requirements and analytic predictions are compared to demonstration system results from an electro-optical test site in White Sands, New Mexico.

  18. Homing and reproductive habits of mallards, gadwalls, and blue-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lokemoen, John T.; Duebbert, Harold F.; Sharp, David E.

    1990-01-01

    We studied mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), gadwall (A. strepera), and blue-winged teal (A. discors) populations on 2 study areas of 22.6-km2 each in central North Dakota during 1976-81. Data regarding rates of return of females to natal or previously used nesting areas, nest site selection, and productivity of hens of different ages were collected from 1,166 nasal-marked and 2,142 banded hens of the 3 species and from 740 web-tagged mallard and gadwall young. In spring, yearling mallard and gadwall hens arrived at the breeding site later than older hens. Yearling gadwall hens initiated nesting about 1 week later than 2-year-old hens, and 2-year-old hens began nesting about 1 week later than hens older than 2 years. Gadwall hens older than 2 years also had a longer nesting season. Mallard and gadwall nest densities were highest in those cover types with the highest visual obstruction ratings. Cover preference in descending order of use was seeded nesting cover, odd areas, roadside, dry wetland, and canal-side. Blue-winged teal nest densities were highest in dry wetland and roadside. Nesting success was different among years, but not among cover types. There was no population increase at any cover type due to homing hens. Overall nesting success was 11, 10, and 23% for mallards, gadwalls, and blue-winged teal, respectively. Recruitment of fledged young was similar for yearling and adult mallard females. Production from yearling gadwall hens was a meager 0.2 young fledged/female. Clutch size was not different between yearling and adult mallard and blue-winged teal hens, but clutch size for all 3 species declined as the nesting season advanced. More ≥1-year-mallard hens and ≥2-year-old gadwall hens that nested successfully 1 year returned to the study areas the following year than did unsuccessful hens. Gadwall hen return rates also increased with age. Blue-winged teal hen return rates averaged 4% and were not related to hen success or hen age. Mallard and gadwall

  19. Summer foods of American widgeon, mallards, and a green-winged teal near Great Slave Lake, N.W.T

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.

    1972-01-01

    Foods found in three species of dabbling ducks collected during summer from bog ponds, and sedge pools in taiga on the north side of Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories, are described. Animal material in the esophageal contents of 10 adult American Widgeons (Mareca americana) averaged 31 i?? 34 per cent (P<0.05) by volume. A significantly higher percentage of animal material was found in Class I and II widgeon ducklings (66 i?? 22 per cent) than in Class IIIa ducklings and flying juveniles (12 i?? 20 per cent) of this species. Animal material comprised 87 i?? 35 per cent of esophageal contents from five Class II and flying juvenile Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and 100 per cent of that from an adult female Green-winged Teal (A. carolinensis).

  20. Habitat use and home range of the Laysan Teal on Laysan Island, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    The 24-hour habitat use and home range of the Laysan Teal (Anas laysanensis), an endemic dabbling duck in Hawaii, was studied using radio telemetry during 1998-2000. Radios were retained for a mean of 40 days (0-123 d; 73 adult birds radio-tagged). Comparisons of daily habitat use were made for birds in the morning, day, evening, and night. Most birds showed strong evidence of selective habitat use. Adults preferred the terrestrial vegetation (88%), and avoided the lake and wetlands during the day. At night, 63% of the birds selected the lake and wetlands. Nocturnal habitat use differed significantly between the non-breeding and breeding seasons, while the lake and wetland habitats were used more frequently during the non-breeding season. Most individuals showed strong site fidelity during the study, but habitat selection varied between individuals. Mean home range size was 9.78 ha (SE ?? 2.6) using the fixed kernel estimator (95% kernel; 15 birds, each with >25 locations). The average minimum convex polygon size was 24 ha (SE ?? 5.6). The mean distance traveled between tracking locations was 178 m (SE ?? 30-5), with travel distances between points ranging up to 1,649 m. Tracking duration varied from 31-121 days per bird (mean tracking duration 75 days).

  1. Blue-winged teals swim in shallow water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A pair of blue-winged teals glide through the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Inhabiting marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, the teal winters as far south as South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  2. Blue-winged teals in the waters around KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The furious beating wings of a blue-winged teal launch it from the water as another swims calmly beneath it in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Inhabiting marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, the teal winters as far south as South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  3. 1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the northeast taken from the northeast extremity of the canyon, showing, in the middle distance, the confluence of Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, site of the future Prado Dam. File number written on negative: R & H 80 026. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  4. The Santa Ana Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cournoyer, David, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    One of the priority interests of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation is to connect the knowledge and resources of institutions with communities in order to improve the quality of life in community. Partnerships achieve uncommon results. In Santa Ana, California, an unusual partnership of public schools, community college, universities, community…

  5. The MIT TEAL Simulations and Visualizations in Electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, John

    2007-03-01

    The Technology Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) Project at MIT has developed a broad range of 3D visualizations and simulations to foster student intuition about electromagnetic fields and phenomena (see http://web.mit.edu/8.02t/www/802TEAL3D/). In this talk we discuss the software approaches we use to create these simulations, including Macromedia Shockwave and Java 3D applets for interactive visualization, passive animations created with 3ds max, and the Dynamic Line Integral Convolution (DLIC) method for constructing time dependent representations of the electromagnetic field at close to the resolution of the computer display (Sundquist, 2003). The DLIC method, in particular, is far superior in delineating the spatial and temporal structure of fields as compared to e.g. field line displays or vector field grids. We also report on the use of these visualizations in instruction at the freshmen level. Our strong opinion is that for effective student learning, such visualizations must be embedded in a software framework for their interactive delivery. This ``guided inquiry'' framework is essential to influence and optimize what students take away from the visualizations. In our current research, we are delivering our visualizations using a commercial package, Addison Wesley's MasteringPhysics (MP), although any guided inquiry delivery system such as MP will be able to interact with our simulation software. We have released our Java 3D simulation software as open source with a liberal open source license (see http://jlearn.mit.edu/tealsim/ ), with support from the Davis Educational Foundation.

  6. The Impact of Technology-Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) Implementation on Student Learning and Teachers' Teaching in a High School Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Ruey S.

    2012-01-01

    Technology-Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) is a pedagogical innovation established in a technology-enhanced multimedia studio, emphasizing constructivist-oriented teaching and learning. In Taiwan, an increasing number of schools are adopting the TEAL notion to deliver courses. This study examines the impact of TEAL on both student performance and…

  7. Lead poisoning in the globally threatened marbled teal and white-headed duck in Spain.

    PubMed

    Mateo, R; Green, A J; Jeske, C W; Urios, V; Gerique, C

    2001-12-01

    Marbled teal (Marmaronetta angustirostris) and white-headed duck (Oxyura leucocephala) are the two European ducks threatened with global extinction. We investigated lead (Pb) poisoning in stifftails (Oxyura spp., n = 83) and marbled teal (n = 80) shot or found dead or moribund in Spanish wetlands via gizzard examination and liver, bone, and blood Pb analysis. Ingested Pb shot was present in 32% of shot stifftails and 70 and 43% of dead or moribund stifftails and marbled teal, respectively. Lead-shot ingestion was more frequent in Valencia (eastern Spain), where Pb-shot densities were higher and grit scarcer. Selection of larger grit similar in size to Pb shot may explain the higher rate of Pb-shot ingestion observed in stifftails. Ingested shot was found more frequently in juvenile stifftails than in adults. Lead bone concentrations were higher in ducklings < 9 d old than in fully grown teal and were also higher in adult than in juvenile teal. Our results show the need for a ban of Pb shot for waterfowl hunting in Spain and the cleanup of spent shot at major wetlands. PMID:11764172

  8. Experimental infection with low and high pathogenicity H7N3 Chilean avian influenza viruses in Chiloe Wigeon (Anas sibilatrix) and Cinnamon Teal (Anas cyanoptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2002, H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have been associated with natural, lethal infections in wild aquatic birds which have been reproduced experimentally. Some aquatic bird species have been suggested as potential transporters of H5N1 HPAI virus via migration. However, ...

  9. Santa Ana Forecasting and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, T.; Eichhorn, D.; D'Agostino, B. J.; Vanderburg, S.; Means, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Southern California experiences wildfires every year, but under certain circumstances these fires grow into extremely large and destructive fires, such as the Cedar Fire of 2003 and the Witch Fire of 2007. The Cedar Fire burned over 1100 km2 , destroyed more than 2200 homes and killed 15 people; the Witch fire burned more than 800 km2, destroyed more than 1000 homes and killed 2 people. Fires can quickly become too large and dangerous to fight if they are accompanied by a very strong "Santa Ana" condition, which is a foehn-like wind that may bring strong winds and very low humidities. However there is an entire range of specific weather conditions that fall into the broad category of Santa Anas, from cold and blustery to hot with very little wind. All types are characterized by clear skies and low humidity. Since the potential for destructive fire is dependent on the characteristics of Santa Anas, as well as the level of fuel moisture, there exists a need for further classification, such as is done with tropical cyclones and after-the-fact with tornadoes. We use surface data and fuel moisture combined with reanalysis to diagnose those conditions that result in Santa Anas with the greatest potential for destructive fires. We use this data to produce a new classification system for Santa Anas. This classification system should be useful for informing the relevant agencies for mitigation and response planning. In the future this same classification may be made available to the general public.

  10. Technology Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) in Introductory Physics: Impact on Genders and Achievement Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Ruey S.; Chang, Wheijen; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the impact of "Technology Enabled Active Learning" (TEAL) on students learning general physics, focusing on differences between genders and among various achievement levels. A quasi-experimental investigation was conducted on two semesters of courses offered in 2008. Data sources consisted of pre-tests, post-tests, self-report…

  11. Purification and Characterization of Anacardium occidentale (Cashew) Allergens Ana o 1, Ana o 2, and Ana o 3.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, Marit; Bastiaan-Net, Shanna; Sforza, Stefano; van der Valk, Johanna P M; van Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Savelkoul, Huub F J; de Jong, Nicolette W; Wichers, Harry J

    2016-02-10

    In this study a fast and simple purification procedure for the three known allergens from cashew (7S globulin Ana o 1, 11S globulin Ana o 2, and 2S albumin Ana o 3) is described. The purified allergens are characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, glycoprotein stain, and protein identification. The purified proteins still bind IgE, and this IgE binding varied between different pools of patient serum. Ana o 1 was found to be a glycoprotein. Ana o 3 has been studied more in detail to identify both the small and large subunits, both displaying microheterogeneity, and epitope mapping of Ana o 3 has been performed. PMID:26769082

  12. A blue-winged teal swims in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This male blue-winged teal is one of 23 species of migratory waterfowl that winter in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male is usually identified with pale blue shoulder patches and a white crescent in front of its eye. The blue-winged teal's normal range is from Canada to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, preferring marshes, shallow ponds and lakes. It winters as far as northern South America. The refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  13. Blue-winged teals in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Two male blue-winged teals are joined by a female in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The teals inhabit marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, wintering as far south as South America. The 92,000- acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  14. 2. OBLIQUE VIEW TO NORTHEAST ALONG FRONT OF SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OBLIQUE VIEW TO NORTHEAST ALONG FRONT OF SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAM. NOTE CABLE CAR SUSPENSION CABLE AT GATE ATOP DAM. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Santa Ana River Diversion Dam, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Developing and Validating a Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, S. B.; Rolinski, T.; DAgostino, B.; Vanderburg, S.; Fovell, R. G.; Cao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Santa Ana winds, common to southern California during the fall through spring, are a type of katabatic wind that originates from a direction generally ranging from 360°/0° to 100° and is usually accompanied by very low humidity. Since fuel conditions tend to be driest from late September through the middle of November, Santa Ana winds occurring during this period have the greatest potential to produce large, devastating fires when an ignition occurs. Such catastrophic fires occurred in 1993, 2003, 2007, and 2008. Because of the destructive nature of these fires, there has been a growing desire to categorize Santa Ana wind events in much the same way that tropical cyclones have been categorized. The Santa Ana Wildfire Threat index (SAWT) is an attempt to categorize such events with respect to fire activity, based on surface wind velocity, dew point depression, and forecasted fuel conditions. The index, a USDA Forest Service product, was developed by the Forest Service in collaboration with San Diego Gas and Electric Utility (SDG&E), the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at UCLA, The Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Vertum Partners. The methodology behind the SAWT index, along with the index itself will be presented in detail. Also, there will be a discussion on the construction of a 30-year climatology of the index, which includes various meteorological and fuel parameters. We will demonstrate the usefulness of the index as another decision support tool for fire agencies and first responders, and how it could assist the general public and private industry in the preparation of critical Santa Ana wind events.

  16. Life history and ecological characteristics of the Santa Ana sucker, Catostomus santaanae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; Knowles, Glen W.; Tennant, Patrick W.

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to document the life history and ecological characteristics of the Santa Ana sucker, Catostomus santaanae, within its native range in southern California. Electrofishing surveys were conducted at 3-month intervals from December 1998 to December 1999 at one site on the San Gabriel River and two sites on the Santa Ana River. Suckers were captured in the San Gabriel River (average, 6.6 fish/10-minutes electrofishing) and at an upstream Santa Ana River site (average, 2.3 fish/10-minutes electrofishing) but not at a downstream Santa Ana River site. Length frequency distributions indicated that at least three year classes (modal groups) of suckers were present in the San Gabriel River, whereas one or two year classes were present in the Santa Ana River. Collection of 21-30 mm standard length (SL) juveniles in June in the Santa Ana River and in September in the San Gabriel River indicated that reproduction occurred over several months. In December, Age-0 suckers averaged 36-48 mm SL in the San Gabriel River and 63-65 mm SL in the Santa Ana River, whereas Age-1 suckers averaged 86 mm SL in the San Gabriel River and 115 mm SL in the Santa Ana River. On average, suckers were in better body condition in the San Gabriel River than in the Santa Ana River. Highest abundance of suckers was associated with relativelypristine environmental conditions (especially low specific conductance) where other native fishes were also common or abundant.

  17. Two Cyanobacterial Photoreceptors Regulate Photosynthetic Light Harvesting by Sensing Teal, Green, Yellow, and Red Light

    PubMed Central

    Wiltbank, Lisa B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomes of many photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria encode numerous phytochrome superfamily photoreceptors whose functions and interactions are largely unknown. Cyanobacterial genomes encode particularly large numbers of phytochrome superfamily members called cyanobacteriochromes. These have diverse light color-sensing abilities, and their functions and interactions are just beginning to be understood. One of the best characterized of these functions is the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna composition in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon by the cyanobacteriochrome RcaE in response to red and green light, a process known as chromatic acclimation. We have identified a new cyanobacteriochrome named DpxA that maximally senses teal (absorption maximum, 494 nm) and yellow (absorption maximum, 568 nm) light and represses the accumulation of a key light-harvesting protein called phycoerythrin, which is also regulated by RcaE during chromatic acclimation. Like RcaE, DpxA is a two-component system kinase, although these two photoreceptors can influence phycoerythrin expression through different signaling pathways. The peak responsiveness of DpxA to teal and yellow light provides highly refined color discrimination in the green spectral region, which provides important wavelengths for photosynthetic light harvesting in cyanobacteria. These results redefine chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria and demonstrate that cyanobacteriochromes can coordinately impart sophisticated light color sensing across the visible spectrum to regulate important photosynthetic acclimation processes. PMID:26861023

  18. Body lipids and pesticide burdens of migrant blue-winged teal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; King, K.A.; Mitchell, C.A.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Blue-winged Teal were collected before and after their migration to wintering grounds in Latin America. Pesticide burdens, body weights, and lipid levels of carcasses were determined. Only DDE and dieldrin were detected in a small proportion of the samples and then at concentrations far below known-effect levels. Residue loads, because of their infrequency, were not significantly correlated with overall body weight and percent lipid. Body weights among most age and sex classes did not differ in either fall or spring, nor did percent lipid in any instance. However, body weights and lipid levels were significantly correlated; as body weight increased so did percent lipid. Thus, the extreme variability in body weight appears to be a function of the amount of fat present and not overall body size, age, or sex.

  19. Optimizing surveillance for South American origin influenza A viruses along the United States Gulf Coast through genomic characterization of isolates from blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative to research focused on intercontinental viral exchange between Eurasia and North America, less attention has been directed towards understanding the redistribution of influenza A viruses (IAVs) by wild birds between North America and South America. In this study, we genomically characterize...

  20. 4. INTERIOR OF ABANDONED SANTA ANA CANAL TUNNEL, SHOWING CEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR OF ABANDONED SANTA ANA CANAL TUNNEL, SHOWING CEMENT TROUGH FLOOR AND UNFINISHED GRANITE ROOF. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Abandoned Tunnel, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. 53. SIPHON NO. 1, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. SIPHON NO. 1, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, EXHIBIT L, PROJECT 1933, MAY 1973. SCE drawing no. 5110869 (sheet no. 11; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. 42. FOUNDATIONS TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. FOUNDATIONS - TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, EDISON ELECTRIC CO., NOV. 3, 1904. SCE drawing no. 5393. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. 60. NEEDLE AND NOZZLE TIP, SANTA ANA NO. 1, SOUTHERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. NEEDLE AND NOZZLE TIP, SANTA ANA NO. 1, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON CO., APR. 28, 1910, REVISED MAY 12, 1910. SCE drawing no. 4500. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. 34. ELEVATION OF RELAY AND CONTROL SWITCHBOARD, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. ELEVATION OF RELAY AND CONTROL SWITCHBOARD, SANTA ANA RIVER P.H. #3, JUNE 23, 1943. SCE drawing no. 413187-1. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. 4. PENSTOCKS. EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PENSTOCKS. EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523197 (sheet no. 7; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Forebay & Penstock, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  6. 52. INDOOR SWITCHRACK, ELEVATION AND SECTIONS. SANTA ANA RIVER NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. INDOOR SWITCHRACK, ELEVATION AND SECTIONS. SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 11, 1951, AND MAR. 20, 1952. SCE drawing no. 534986-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 54. ALDER CREEK DIVERSION, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. ALDER CREEK DIVERSION, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 2 SCE drawing no. 5206858, no date (FERC no. 1933-48). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. 53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455670-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. 3. TAILRACE AND FOREBAY, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. TAILRACE AND FOREBAY, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 541475 (sheet 6; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Forebay & Penstock, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. 32. SHAW BOX 5 TON CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SHAW BOX 5 TON CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 3, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455678-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. 41. EXTERNAL ELEVATIONS, POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. EXTERNAL ELEVATIONS, POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, EDISON ELECTRIC CO., NOV. 3, 1904. SCE drawing no. 5392. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. 54. PLAN OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. PLAN OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 1. SCE drawing no. 5206855 (no date; FERC no. 1933-45). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. 51. SWITCHBOARD ELEVATIONS, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. SWITCHBOARD ELEVATIONS, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 14, 1951; REVISIONS, MAR. 20 AND SEPT. 19, 1952. SCE drawing no. 534984-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. 57. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PLOT PLAN, SANTA ANA NO. 1 HYDRO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PLOT PLAN, SANTA ANA NO. 1 HYDRO PLANT, OCTOBER 10, 1958. SCE drawing no. 428615-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. 49. BEAR CREEK AND SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAMS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. BEAR CREEK AND SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAMS AND CONCRETE CONDUIT NO. 1, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 1. SCE drawing no. 5206851, no date (FERC no. 1933-41). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 52. POWER HOUSE AREA, SANTA ANA NO. 2; DETAIL MAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. POWER HOUSE AREA, SANTA ANA NO. 2; DETAIL MAP OF SANTA ANA NO. 1 AND NO. 2 HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT, EXHIBIT K, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523691 (sheet no. 6; for filing with the Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. 2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the north, looking over the flooded fields between Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, just upstream of the Prado Dam site. File number written on negative: R & H 80 024. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  18. 51. INTAKE AND POWER HOUSE AREAS, SANTA ANA NO. 1; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. INTAKE AND POWER HOUSE AREAS, SANTA ANA NO. 1; DETAIL MAP OF SANTA ANA NO. 1 AND NO. 2 HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT, EXHIBIT K, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523690 (sheet no. 5; for filing with the Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. Automated tests of ANA immunofluorescence as throughput autoantibody detection technology: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Meroni, Pier Luigi; Bizzaro, Nicola; Cavazzana, Ilaria; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Tincani, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) assay is a screening test used for almost all autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and in a number of these cases, it is a diagnostic/classification parameter. In addition, ANA is also a useful test for additional autoimmune disorders. The indirect immunofluorescence technique on monolayers of cultured epithelial cells is the current recommended method because it has higher sensitivity than solid phase assays. However, the technique is time-consuming and requires skilled operators. Automated ANA reading systems have recently been developed, which offer the advantage of faster and much easier performance as well as better harmonization in the interpretation of the results. Preliminary validation studies of these systems have given promising results in terms of analytical specificity and reproducibility. However, these techniques require further validation in clinical studies and need improvement in their recognition of mixed or less common staining patterns. PMID:24589329

  20. Genetic and phenotypic divergence between low- and high-altitude populations of two recently diverged cinnamon teal subspecies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert E; Peters, Jeffrey L; McCracken, Kevin G

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in the environment can lead to divergent selection between populations occupying different parts of a species' range, and ultimately lead to population divergence. The colonization of new areas can thus facilitate divergence in beneficial traits, yet with little differentiation at neutral genetic markers. We investigated genetic and phenotypic patterns of divergence between low- and high-altitude populations of cinnamon teal inhabiting normoxic and hypoxic regions in the Andes and adjacent lowlands of South America. Cinnamon teal showed strong divergence in body size (PC1; P(ST) = 0.56) and exhibited significant frequency differences in a single nonsynonymous α-hemoglobin amino acid polymorphism (Asn/Ser-α9; F(ST) = 0.60) between environmental extremes, despite considerable admixture of mtDNA and intron loci (F(ST) = 0.004-0.168). Inferences of strong population segregation were further supported by the observation of few mismatched individuals in either environmental extreme. Coalescent analyses indicated that the highlands were most likely colonized from lowland regions but following divergence, gene flow has been asymmetric from the highlands into the lowlands. Multiple selection pressures associated with high-altitude habitats, including cold and hypoxia, have likely shaped morphological and genetic divergence within South American cinnamon teal populations. PMID:23289570

  1. Comparison of chaparral regrowth patterns between Santa Ana wind-driven and non-Santa Ana fire areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachels, Diane Helen

    Wildfires are a common occurrence in California shrublands and island forests. Fire has a fundamental role in maintaining the ecosystem functions in chaparral where fire intensity and severity play important roles in the regeneration of species. In San Diego, the Cedar Fire that occurred in the fall of 2003 was unique in that one side was burned with wildfire fueled by dry, strong easterly Santa Ana winds that later died down, burning the remainder of the area under a mild westerly wind, allowing fuel-fed conditions. The objective of this study was to understand the connection between vegetation type and structure and environmental response to extreme fire events by analyzing life form regrowth in chaparral communities from the Santa Ana wind driven, Santa Ana backing, and non-Santa Ana fire types. Environmental factors of slope angle, aspect, elevation and soils were investigated in an effort to isolate shrub regrowth patterns. Fire burn characteristics, anthropogenic disturbance, fire history, and moisture availability were also analyzed to identify additional factors that may have influenced shrub regrowth. Shrub extents before the fire and six year after the fire were examined per slope aspect, slope angle, elevation, and fire characteristic categories. The closed canopy and natural features of the chaparral environment make ground based mapping very difficult. Remote sensing data and methods can be very helpful to evaluate the health of the vegetation and condition of the watershed for flood, erosion, and fire control. This study used high spatial resolution aerial imagery and a machine learning algorithm with a spatial contextual classifier to map three different areas from within the Cedar Fire perimeter. Geographic information science (GIS), field mapping, and image interpretation methods were used to identify vegetation samples for the classification and accuracy assessment of the vegetation maps. Object-based image samples were selected for the classifier

  2. International consensus on ANA patterns (ICAP): the bumpy road towards a consensus on reporting ANA results.

    PubMed

    Damoiseaux, Jan; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; Andrade, Luis E C; Chan, Edward K L; Conrad, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) was initiated as a workshop aiming to thoroughly discuss and achieve consensus regarding the morphological patterns observed in the indirect immunofluorescence assay on HEp-2 cells. One of the topics discussed at the second ICAP workshop, and addressed in this paper, was the harmonization of reporting ANA test results. This discussion centered on the issue if cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns should be reported as positive or negative. This report outlines the issues that impact on two major different reporting methods. Although it was appreciated by all participants that cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns are clinically relevant, implications for existing diagnostic/classification criteria for ANA-associated diseases in particular hampered a final consensus on this topic. Evidently, a more concerted action of all relevant stakeholders is required. Future ICAP workshops may help to facilitate this action. PMID:26831867

  3. 241-AN-A pit leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-331 acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    VANDYKE, D.W.

    1999-08-25

    This document describes the method used to test design criteria for Safety Class, Intrinsically Safe leak detector system installed in 241-AN-A Valve Pit located at 200E Tank Farms. The purpose of this Procedure is to demonstrate that the pit leak detection relay cabinet and intrinsically safe probe circuit is fully operable.

  4. Free inside: The Music Class at Santa Ana Jail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fierro, Joe

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the workings of the music class at the Santa Ana Jail in Santa Ana, California. It gives us insight into a jail system and a music class focused on helping inmates position themselves to become productive members of society. In this article I examine how the facility encourages inmates' good behaviour and why the music class…

  5. 29. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. PLAN FOR POWER HOUSE, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. PLAN FOR POWER HOUSE, SANTA ANA RIVER P. H. NO. 3, JUNE 23, 1943; REVISIONS, MAR. 14, 1945 AND MAY 17, 1954. SCE drawing no. 523219-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  6. 2. SPILLWAYS AND ROCKDROP, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SPILLWAYS AND ROCK-DROP, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 541724 (sheet 5; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Forebay & Penstock, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 43. FLOOR PLAN OF POWER HOUSE, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. FLOOR PLAN OF POWER HOUSE, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523643 (sheet no. 14; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. 4. FOREBAY AND PENSTOCK, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FOREBAY AND PENSTOCK, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523642 (sheet no. 13; for filing with the Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Forebay & Penstock, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. 10. TYPICAL DETAILS OF LENNON FLUME, SANTA ANA NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. TYPICAL DETAILS OF LENNON FLUME, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 541722 (sheet 4; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Warm Springs Canyon-SAR-3 Flumes, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. 48. MAP OF SANTA ANA RIVER POWER PLANT NO. 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. MAP OF SANTA ANA RIVER POWER PLANT NO. 2 OF THE EDISON ELECTRIC CO. THROUGH UNSURVEYED LAND IN THE SAN BERNARDINO FOREST RESERVE, APPROVED MAY 26, 1904, F. C. FINKLE, CHIEF HYDRAULIC ENGINEER. SCE drawing no. 53988. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. 9. HIGH LENNON FLUME, SANTA ANA NO 3, EXHIBIT L, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. HIGH LENNON FLUME, SANTA ANA NO 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 541723 (sheet 3; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Warm Springs Canyon-SAR-3 Flumes, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. 5. SANDBOX BETWEEN TUNNELS 12. SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SANDBOX BETWEEN TUNNELS 1-2. SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 541727 (sheet 2; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Sandbox, SAR-3 Flowline, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. 28. PLANS AND SECTIONS OF POWERHOUSE. SANTA ANA NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. PLANS AND SECTIONS OF POWERHOUSE. SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956 (SHEET 8; FOR FILING WITH FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION). SCE drawing no. 541729. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. 11. INTAKE FLUME AND TUNNEL SECTIONS, SANTA ANA NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTAKE FLUME AND TUNNEL SECTIONS, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 541728 (sheet 1; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Warm Springs Canyon-SAR-3 Flumes, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. 55. CROSS SECTION OF POWER HOUSE, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. CROSS SECTION OF POWER HOUSE, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523199 (sheet no. 9, for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 44. SECTIONS OF POWER HOUSE, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. SECTIONS OF POWER HOUSE, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523644 (sheet no. 15; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. 46. GENERAL MAP OF SANTA ANA NO. 3 PROJECT MAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. GENERAL MAP OF SANTA ANA NO. 3 PROJECT MAP OF ALL THREE POWER HOUSE SYSTEMS, EXHIBIT J, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 535041 (sheet no. 1; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  18. Comparative toxicity of lead shot in black ducks (Anas rubripes) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Fleming, W.J.; Bunck, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    In winter, pen-reared and wild black ducks (Anas rubripes), and game farm and wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), maintained on pelleted feed, were sham-dosed or given one number 4 lead shot. After 14 days, dosed birds were redosed with two or four additional lead shot. This dosing regimen also was repeated in summer using pen-reared black ducks and game farm mallards. Based upon mortality, overt intoxication, weight change, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity and protoporphyrin concentration, black ducks and mallards were found to be equally tolerant to lead shot. However, captive wild ducks were more sensitive than their domesticated counterparts, as evidenced by greater mortality and weight loss following lead shot administration. This difference may be related to stress associated with captivity and unnatural diet.

  19. Comparative toxicity of lead shot in black ducks (Anas rubripes) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Rattner, B A; Fleming, W J; Bunck, C M

    1989-04-01

    In winter, pen-reared and wild black ducks (Anas rubripes), and game farm and wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), maintained on pelleted feed, were sham-dosed or given one number 4 lead shot. After 14 days, dosed birds were redosed with two or four additional lead shot. This dosing regimen also was repeated in summer using pen-reared black ducks and game farm mallards. Based upon mortality, overt intoxication, weight change, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity and protoporphyrin concentration, black ducks and mallards were found to be equally tolerant to lead shot. However, captive wild ducks were more sensitive than their domesticated counterparts, as evidenced by greater mortality and weight loss following lead shot administration. This difference may be related to stress associated with captivity and unnatural diet. PMID:2716097

  20. Lead isotopes and lead shot ingestion in the globally threatened marbled teal (Marmaronetta angustirostris) and white-headed duck (Oxyura leucocephala).

    PubMed

    Svanberg, Fredrik; Mateo, Rafael; Hillström, Lars; Green, Andy J; Taggart, Mark A; Raab, Andrea; Meharg, Andy A

    2006-11-01

    Lead isotope ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb) and concentrations in the livers and bones of marbled teal and white-headed duck found dead or moribund were determined in order to establish the main lead source in these waterfowl species. Lead concentrations in bone (dry weight) and liver (wet weight) were found to be very high in many of the white-headed ducks (bone: geometric mean=88.9 ppm, maximum=419 ppm; liver: geometric mean=16.8 ppm, maximum=57.0 ppm). Some of the marbled teal had high lead levels in the bones but liver lead levels were all low (bone: geometric mean=6.13 ppm, maximum=112 ppm; liver: geometric mean=0.581 ppm, maximum=4.77 ppm). Ingested lead shot were found in 71% of the white-headed duck and 20% of the marbled teal. The (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio in livers and bones of white-headed ducks and marbled teals showed no significant differences compared to the ratios obtained from lead shot. The (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio in bones of marbled teal ducklings with the highest lead concentrations tended to resemble the ratios of lead shot, which supports our hypothesis that the lead was derived from the hens. We also found that the lead ratios of lead shot and lead ratios described for soils in the area overlapped, but also that the isotopic ratio (206)Pb/(207)Pb in lead shot used in Spain has a narrow range compared with those used in North America. The principal source of lead in many of these birds was, however, most likely lead shot, as supported by the similar isotopic ratios, high lead concentrations in tissues and evidence of ingested shot. PMID:16914183

  1. Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nayyer

    One of the original ocean-bottom time-lapse seismic studies was performed at the Teal South oil field in the Gulf of Mexico during the late 1990's. This work reexamines some aspects of previous work using modern analysis techniques to provide improved quantitative interpretations. Using three-dimensional volume visualization of legacy data and the two phases of post-production time-lapse data, I provide additional insight into the fluid migration pathways and the pressure communication between different reservoirs, separated by faults. This work supports a conclusion from previous studies that production from one reservoir caused regional pressure decline that in turn resulted in liberation of gas from multiple surrounding unproduced reservoirs. I also provide an explanation for unusual time-lapse changes in amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) data related to the compaction of the producing reservoir which, in turn, changed an isotropic medium to an anisotropic medium. In the first part of this work, I examine regional changes in seismic response due to the production of oil and gas from one reservoir. The previous studies primarily used two post-production ocean-bottom surveys (Phase I and Phase II), and not the legacy streamer data, due to the unavailability of legacy prestack data and very different acquisition parameters. In order to incorporate the legacy data in the present study, all three post-stack data sets were cross-equalized and examined using instantaneous amplitude and energy volumes. This approach appears quite effective and helps to suppress changes unrelated to production while emphasizing those large-amplitude changes that are related to production in this noisy (by current standards) suite of data. I examine the multiple data sets first by using the instantaneous amplitude and energy attributes, and then also examine specific apparent time-lapse changes through direct comparisons of seismic traces. In so doing, I identify time-delays that, when

  2. Risk factors for ANA positivity in healthy persons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The finding of antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity in a healthy individual is usually of unknown significance and in most cases is benign. However, a subset of such individuals is at risk for development of autoimmune disease. We examined demographic and immunological features that are associated with ANA positivity in clinically healthy persons to develop insights into when this marker carries risk of progression to lupus. Methods Biological samples from healthy individuals and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were obtained from the Dallas Regional Autoimmune Disease Registry (DRADR). Measurements carried out on serum samples included ANA, extractable nuclear antibodies (ENA) and autoantibody profiling using an array with more than 100 specificities. Whole blood RNA samples from a subset of individuals were used to analyze gene expression on the Illumina platform. Data were analyzed for associations of high ANA levels with demographic features, the presence of other autoantibodies and with gene expression profiles. Results Overall, ANA levels are significantly higher in females than in males and this association holds in patients with the autoimmune diseases lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as in healthy controls (HC). Age was not significantly associated with ANA levels and the elevated ANA values could not be explained by higher IgG levels. Another autoantibody, anti- cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), did not show gender dimorphism in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or healthy individuals. The autoantigen array showed significant elevations of other autoantibodies in high ANA HCs. Some of these autoantibodies were directed to antigens in skin and others were related to autoimmune conditions of kidney, thyroid or joints. Gene expression analyses showed a greater prevalence of significantly upregulated genes in HCs with negative ANA values than in those with significant ANA positivity. Genes upregulated in high ANA HCs

  3. ANA testing in the presence of acute and chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Christine M; Binder, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibody testing is performed to help diagnose patients who have clinical symptoms suggestive of possible autoimmune diseases. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are present in many systemic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, a positive ANA test may also be seen with non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including both acute and chronic infections. When the ANA test is used as an initial screen in patients with non-specific clinical symptoms, such as fever, joint pain, myalgias, fatigue, rash, or anemia, the likelihood of a positive result due to infection will increase, especially in children. This article identifies acute and chronic infectious diseases that are likely to produce a positive ANA result and summarizes recent literature addressing both the causes and consequences of these findings. PMID:27050929

  4. Measurement of anti-DFS70 antibodies in patients with ANA-associated autoimmune rheumatic diseases suspicion is cost-effective.

    PubMed

    Gundín, Simón; Irure-Ventura, Juan; Asensio, Esther; Ramos, David; Mahler, Michael; Martínez-Taboada, Victor; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2016-12-01

    The presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is associated with a wide range of ANA-associated autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AARD). The most commonly method used for the detection of ANA is indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on HEp-2 cells. This method is very sensitive but unspecific. As a consequence, ANA testing on HEp-2 substrates outside a proper clinical specialist framework may lead to inappropriate referrals to tertiary care specialists and, worst case inappropriate and potentially toxic therapy for the patient. Among ANA, isolated anti-DFS70 antibodies represent a potentially important biomarker that can be clinically used to discriminate AARD from non-AARD patients in ANA IIF positive individuals. Therefore, their presence may avoid unnecessary follow-up testing and referrals. In our study, we investigated if the implementation of a new ANA workup algorithm allowing for the identification of anti-DFS70 antibodies is cost-effective through the reduction of both unnecessary follow-up testing and outpatient clinic visits generated by the clinical suspicion of a potential AARD. None of the 181 patients included with a positive monospecific anti-DFS70 antibody result developed SARD during the follow-up period of 10 years. The reduction in number of tests after ANA and anti-DFS70 positive results was significant for anti-ENA (230 vs. 114 tests; p < 0.001) and anti-dsDNA antibodies (448 vs. 114 tests; p < 0.001). In addition, the outpatient clinic visits decreased by 70 % (p < 0.001). In total, the adoption of the new algorithm including anti-DFS70 antibody testing resulted in a cost saving of 60869.53 € for this pilot study. In conclusion, the use of anti-DFS70 antibodies was clearly cost-efficient in our setting. PMID:27473142

  5. Novel H5 clade 2.3.4.4 reassortant (H5N1) virus from a green-winged teal in Washington, USA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torchetti, Mia Kim; Killian, Mary-Lea; Dusek, Robert J.; Pedersen, Janice C.; Hines, Nichole; Bodenstein, Barbara L.; White, C. LeAnn; Ip, Hon S.

    2015-01-01

    Eurasian (EA)-origin H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4 avian influenza viruses were first detected in North America during December 2014. Subsequent reassortment with North American (AM) low-pathogenic wild-bird-origin avian influenza has generated at least two reassortants, including an EA/AM H5N1 from an apparently healthy wild green-winged teal, suggesting continued ongoing reassortment.

  6. 31. CRANE RUNWAY FOR 5TON PUSH TYPE CRANE, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. CRANE RUNWAY FOR 5-TON PUSH TYPE CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 3, SEPT. 4, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523856-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 1. RUINED PORTION OF SANTA ANA CANAL INTAKE ALONGSIDE SAR3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. RUINED PORTION OF SANTA ANA CANAL INTAKE ALONGSIDE SAR-3 SYSTEM TUNNEL, JUST TO SOUTH OF SAR-2. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Abandoned Tunnel, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. Clinical-laboratory characteristics of ANA-positive chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Magen, Eli; Waitman, Dan-Andrei; Dickstein, Yoav; Davidovich, Valentina; Kahan, Natan R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the established association between chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU) and presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), the prevalence of autoimmune comorbidities in this population has not been analyzed. Here, we aim to identify clinical and laboratory manifestations associated with ANA-positive CIU. ANA-positive patients were identified via electronic data capture from the electronic patient record database of Leumit Health care Services (LHS) of Israel. Patient characteristics, medical histories, and details of diagnostic workup, medical treatment, and follow-up were retrieved by performing a chart review of electronic patient records (EPRs). The prevalence of target diseases among ANA(+) CIU(+), ANA(+) CIU(-), and ANA(-) CIU(+) patients was calculated. A total of 91 ANA(+) CIU(+), 3131 ANA(+) CIU(-), and 478 ANA(-) CIU(+) patients were identified. The ANA(+) CIU(+) group was characterized by higher prevalence of Sjögren's syndrome (SS)-A 52 antibodies (Ab) (7.7% versus 2.4%; p = 0.008), SS-A 60 Ab (11% versus 2.8%; p = < 0.001), and SS-B Ab (14.3% versus 3.2%; p < 0.001), compared with ANA(-) CIU(+) group. Additionally, ANA(+) CIU(+) patients were more likely to be diagnosed with thyroid autoimmune diseases, higher C-reactive protein (6.4 ± 10.3 versus 4.1 ± 8.8 mg/L; p = 0.027), and more profound basopenia (0.04 ± 0.09 versus 0.15 ± 0.11 cell/mm(3); p < 0.001) than ANA(-) CIU patients. More ANA(+) CIU(+) patients were resistant to four-fold standard licensed doses of antihistamines than ANA(-) CIU(+) patients [11 (12.1%) versus 29 (6.1%); p = 0.046]. ANA-positive CIU is characterized by higher prevalence of SS-A 52, SS-A 60, and SS-B antibodies and poorer clinical response to antihistamine medications. PMID:25715242

  9. 21. ORIGINAL COMPANY HOUSE AT CORNER OF SANTA ANA AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. ORIGINAL COMPANY HOUSE AT CORNER OF SANTA ANA AND ANAHEIM BLVDS. (BEHIND HOUSE IN CA-242-20), WHICH IS BEING PREPARED FOR DEMOLITION. - Gene Pump Plant, South of Gene Wash Reservoir, 2 miles west of Whitsett Pump Plant, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. Dona Ana Branch Community College Annual Report, 1990-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. Dona Ana Branch Community Coll.

    During 1990-91, New Mexico State University's (NMSU's) Dona Ana Branch Community College (DABCC) continued to feel the effects of its fourth year of rapidly increasing enrollments. The defeat of bond issues that would have funded facility expansions resulted in critical space shortages. The 27% increase in headcount enrollments between spring 1990…

  11. Sandia Text ANaLysis Extensible librarY Server

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-05-11

    This is a server wrapper for STANLEY (Sandia Text ANaLysis Extensible librarY). STANLEY provides capabilities for analyzing, indexing and searching through text. STANLEY Server exposes this capability through a TCP/IP interface allowing third party applications and remote clients to access it.

  12. The Impact of Santa Ana Winds on Wildland Fire Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billmire, M.; Loboda, T. V.; French, N. H.; Tyner, M.

    2011-12-01

    Santa Ana winds have been implicated as major drivers of extensive wildfires that occur annually in southern California. While numerous anecdotal reports dictate an obvious relationship, there is little quantitative analysis in current literature on how this loosely-defined weather phenomenon impacts fire progression regimes. A new satellite-derived fire progression dataset developed using MODIS and Landsat was linked to a network of 82 Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) to evaluate three differing a priori classifications of Santa Ana events defined using three weather parameters: wind speed, wind direction, and relative humidity. The fire progression dataset comprised 528 burn area polygons representing 151 distinct fire events from 2001-2009 in southern California. Each burn area polygon was assigned weather data from one of the RAWS units by shortest straight-line distance. These data and methods show quantitatively that burn area is dramatically larger under Santa Ana conditions than under non-Santa Ana conditions (see table). Outliers of both types (large burn areas under non-SA conditions; small burn areas under SA conditions) were identified and closely examined to identify potentially confounding variables. Time-lag effects (particularly with respect to cumulative precipitation preceding day of burn) and effects with regard to local vs. regional measurements were examined as well. We tested 17 variables (3 relative humidity variables, 5 wind speed variables, 3 temperature variables, 3 moisture variables, previous day burn area, census-derived population density, and the number of hours meeting one Santa Ana classification) individually and in combination for correlation with both burn area and burn area change from the previous day to test their predictive power. Mean daily relative humidity was found to have the strongest correlation (Pearson's r = -0.451) with burn area. All variables except moisture variables were more strongly correlated with the

  13. DOM in recharge waters of the Santa Ana River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Aiken, G.R.; Woodside, G.; O'Connor-Patel, K.

    2007-01-01

    The urban Santa Ana River in California is the primary source of recharge water for Orange County's groundwater basin, which provides water to more than two million residents. This study was undertaken to determine the unidentified portion of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in various natural surface and reclaimed waters of the Santa Ana River Basin and to assess the potential health risk of this material. The most abundant organic contaminants were anionic detergent degradation products (constituting about 12% of the DOM), which have no known adverse health effects. In addition, high percentages of dissolved colloids from bacterial cell walls were found during storm flows; these colloids foul membranes used in water treatment. Although no significant health risks were ascribed to the newly characterized DOM, the authors note that even the small amounts of humic substances deposited during storm flow periods were responsible for significant increases in disinfection by_product formation potential in these waters.

  14. Online Stigma Resistance in the Pro-Ana Community.

    PubMed

    Yeshua-Katz, Daphna

    2015-10-01

    Media scholars often use concepts from Goffman's dramaturgical approach to study online communities of stigmatized individuals as "backstages," spaces where members take refuge from social disapproval. In this study, I extend this view through an examination of in-depth interviews with bloggers from the "pro-ana" community, an online community for people with eating disorders. To explore how this community uses an online environment that is both anonymous and public, I fuse Goffman's ideas about identity performance and stigma with more recent theories about boundary maintenance. In-depth interviews with "pro-ana" bloggers reveal that to protect this virtual group and resist stigmas associated both with their illness and with their online presence, they construct their own norms and rules in the online realm, and discipline and eject members deemed to be out-group. PMID:25667161

  15. Evolutionary routes from a prebiotic ANA-world.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sebastian; Humphreys, Christine; Dale, Trevor C

    2012-03-01

    Recent experimental support has been generated for a model of prebiotic development that postulates a role for Amyloid-Nucleic Acid (ANA)-fibers as the earliest replicating entities capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution. Here, this new model is compared with existing RNA-world models with a particular focus on trajectories that lead to evolutionary-beneficial interactions between nucleic acid, protein and lipid components. This analysis suggests a number of new areas for fruitful experimental studies. PMID:22808333

  16. Contrasting controls on wildland fires in Southern California during periods with and without Santa Ana winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.; Faivre, Nicolas; Capps, Scott; Hall, Alex; Goulden, Michael L.

    2014-03-01

    Wildland fires in Southern California can be divided into two categories: fall fires, which are typically driven by strong offshore Santa Ana winds, and summer fires, which occur with comparatively weak onshore winds and hot and dry weather. Both types of fire contribute significantly to annual burned area and economic loss. An improved understanding of the relationship between Southern California's meteorology and fire is needed to improve predictions of how fire will change in the future and to anticipate management needs. We used output from a regional climate model constrained by reanalysis observations to identify Santa Ana events and partition fires into those occurring during periods with and without Santa Ana conditions during 1959-2009. We then developed separate empirical regression models for Santa Ana and non-Santa Ana fires to quantify the effects of meteorology on fire number and size. These models explained approximately 58% of the seasonal and interannual variation in the number of Santa Ana fires and 36% of the variation in non-Santa Ana fires. The number of Santa Ana fires increased during years when relative humidity during Santa Ana events and fall precipitation were below average, indicating that fuel moisture is a key controller of ignition. Relative humidity strongly affected Santa Ana fire size. Cumulative precipitation during the previous three winters was significantly correlated with the number of non-Santa Ana fires, presumably through increased fine fuel density and connectivity between infrastructure and nearby vegetation. Both relative humidity and the preceding wet season precipitation influenced non-Santa Ana fire size. Regression models driven by meteorology explained 57% of the temporal variation in Santa Ana burned area and 22% of the variation in non-Santa Ana burned area. The area burned by non-Santa Ana fires has increased steadily by 1.7% year-1 since 1959 (p < 0.006) the occurrence of extremely large Santa Ana fires has

  17. Drosophila Ana1 is required for centrosome assembly and centriole elongation.

    PubMed

    Saurya, Saroj; Roque, Hélio; Novak, Zsofia A; Wainman, Alan; Aydogan, Mustafa G; Volanakis, Adam; Sieber, Boris; Pinto, David Miguel Susano; Raff, Jordan W

    2016-07-01

    Centrioles organise centrosomes and cilia, and these organelles have an important role in many cell processes. In flies, the centriole protein Ana1 is required for the assembly of functional centrosomes and cilia. It has recently been shown that Cep135 (also known as Bld10) initially recruits Ana1 to newly formed centrioles, and that Ana1 then recruits Asl (known as Cep152 in mammals) to promote the conversion of these centrioles into centrosomes. Here, we show that ana1 mutants lack detectable centrosomes in vivo, that Ana1 is irreversibly incorporated into centrioles during their assembly and appears to play a more important role in maintaining Asl at centrioles than in initially recruiting Asl to centrioles. Unexpectedly, we also find that Ana1 promotes centriole elongation in a dose-dependent manner: centrioles are shorter when Ana1 dosage is reduced and are longer when Ana1 is overexpressed. This latter function of Ana1 appears to be distinct from its role in centrosome and cilium function, as a GFP-Ana1 fusion lacking the N-terminal 639 amino acids of the protein can support centrosome assembly and cilium function but cannot promote centriole over-elongation when overexpressed. PMID:27206860

  18. Drosophila Ana1 is required for centrosome assembly and centriole elongation

    PubMed Central

    Saurya, Saroj; Roque, Hélio; Novak, Zsofia A.; Wainman, Alan; Aydogan, Mustafa G.; Volanakis, Adam; Sieber, Boris; Pinto, David Miguel Susano

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Centrioles organise centrosomes and cilia, and these organelles have an important role in many cell processes. In flies, the centriole protein Ana1 is required for the assembly of functional centrosomes and cilia. It has recently been shown that Cep135 (also known as Bld10) initially recruits Ana1 to newly formed centrioles, and that Ana1 then recruits Asl (known as Cep152 in mammals) to promote the conversion of these centrioles into centrosomes. Here, we show that ana1 mutants lack detectable centrosomes in vivo, that Ana1 is irreversibly incorporated into centrioles during their assembly and appears to play a more important role in maintaining Asl at centrioles than in initially recruiting Asl to centrioles. Unexpectedly, we also find that Ana1 promotes centriole elongation in a dose-dependent manner: centrioles are shorter when Ana1 dosage is reduced and are longer when Ana1 is overexpressed. This latter function of Ana1 appears to be distinct from its role in centrosome and cilium function, as a GFP–Ana1 fusion lacking the N-terminal 639 amino acids of the protein can support centrosome assembly and cilium function but cannot promote centriole over-elongation when overexpressed. PMID:27206860

  19. Ground-water geology of the coastal zone, Long Beach-Santa Ana area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, J.F.; Piper, A.M.

    1956-01-01

    structural features that influence the watertightness of the so-called coastal barrier. The hills and mesas of the Newport-Inglewood belt are cut by six gaps through which tongues of the central lowland extend to the coast. The gaps are trenched in the deformed late Pleistocene surface and are floored with alluvium that is highly permeable in its lower part. The Long Beach-Santa Ana area, with which this report is concerned, encompasses the central and eastern segments of the coastal plain, and includes five of the gaps in succession from northwest to south- east: Dominguez, Alamitos, Sunset, Bolsa, and Santa Ana Gaps. In the Long Beach-Santa Ana area a thick sequence of Quaternary and Tertiary sedimentary rocks has been deposited on a basement of metamorphic and crystalline rocks of pre-Tertiary age. In the broad syncline underlying tl e central part of Downey Plain these sediments probably exceed 20,000 feet in thickness. This report pertains chiefly to the geology and water-bearing character of the rocks that underlie the coastal zone of the Long Beach-Santa Ana area. This area extends some 27 miles from Dominguez Hill on the northwest to Newport Beach on the southeast, has an average width of about 6 miles, includes some 180 square miles, and borders the Pacific Ocean. Of the Quaternary deposits the youngest are of Recent age and comprise silt, sand, gravel, and clay, chiefly of fluvial origin; they are the latest contributions to the alluvial cones of the Los Angeles, San Gabriel, and Santa Ana Rivers; their thickness is as much as 175 feet. The upper division of the Recent deposits, largely fine sand and silt of low permeability, commonly furnishes water only to a few wells of small yield; the lower division is coarse sand and gravel deposited chiefly in two tongues extending respectively, from Whittier Narrows through Dominguez Gap and from Santa Ana Canyon through Santa Ana Gap. These tongues, designated in this report the Gaspur a

  20. Gene flow and hybridization between numerically imbalanced populations of two duck species on the subantarctic island of South Georgia.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Kevin G; Wilson, Robert E; Martin, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization is common between species of animals, particularly in waterfowl (Anatidae). One factor shown to promote hybridization is restricted mate choice, which can occur when 2 species occur in sympatry but one is rare. According to the Hubbs principle, or "desperation hypothesis," the rarer species is more likely to mate with heterospecifics. We report the second of 2 independent examples of hybridization between 2 species of ducks inhabiting island ecosystems in the Subantarctic and South Atlantic Ocean. Yellow-billed pintails (Anas georgica) and speckled teal (Anas flavirostris) are abundant in continental South America, where they are sympatric and coexist in mixed flocks. But on South Georgia, an isolated island in the Subantarctic, the pintail population of approximately 6000 pairs outnumbers a small breeding population of speckled teal 300∶1. Using 6 genetic loci (mtDNA and 5 nuclear introns) and Bayesian assignment tests coupled with coalescent analyses, we identified hybrid-origin speckled teal alleles in 2 pintails on South Georgia. While it is unclear whether introgression has also occurred into the speckled teal population, our data suggest that this hybridization was not a recent event, but occurred some time ago. We also failed to identify unequivocal evidence of introgression in a much larger sample of pintails and speckled teal from Argentina using a 3-population "Isolation-with-Migration" coalescent analysis. Combined with parallel findings of hybridization between these same 2 duck species in the Falkland Islands, where population ratios are reversed and pintails are outnumbered by speckled teal 1:10, our results provide further support for the desperation hypothesis, which predicts that scarcity in one population and abundance of another will often lead to hybridization. While the South Georgia pintail population appears to be thriving, it's possible that low density of conspecific mates and inverse density dependence (Allee effect) may be

  1. Gene Flow and Hybridization between Numerically Imbalanced Populations of Two Duck Species on the Subantarctic Island of South Georgia

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kevin G.; Wilson, Robert E.; Martin, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization is common between species of animals, particularly in waterfowl (Anatidae). One factor shown to promote hybridization is restricted mate choice, which can occur when 2 species occur in sympatry but one is rare. According to the Hubbs principle, or "desperation hypothesis," the rarer species is more likely to mate with heterospecifics. We report the second of 2 independent examples of hybridization between 2 species of ducks inhabiting island ecosystems in the Subantarctic and South Atlantic Ocean. Yellow-billed pintails (Anas georgica) and speckled teal (Anas flavirostris) are abundant in continental South America, where they are sympatric and coexist in mixed flocks. But on South Georgia, an isolated island in the Subantarctic, the pintail population of approximately 6000 pairs outnumbers a small breeding population of speckled teal 300∶1. Using 6 genetic loci (mtDNA and 5 nuclear introns) and Bayesian assignment tests coupled with coalescent analyses, we identified hybrid-origin speckled teal alleles in 2 pintails on South Georgia. While it is unclear whether introgression has also occurred into the speckled teal population, our data suggest that this hybridization was not a recent event, but occurred some time ago. We also failed to identify unequivocal evidence of introgression in a much larger sample of pintails and speckled teal from Argentina using a 3-population "Isolation-with-Migration" coalescent analysis. Combined with parallel findings of hybridization between these same 2 duck species in the Falkland Islands, where population ratios are reversed and pintails are outnumbered by speckled teal 1:10, our results provide further support for the desperation hypothesis, which predicts that scarcity in one population and abundance of another will often lead to hybridization. While the South Georgia pintail population appears to be thriving, it's possible that low density of conspecific mates and inverse density dependence (Allee effect) may be

  2. Contribution of Doñana Wetlands to Carbon Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward P.; Flecha, Susana; Figuerola, Jordi; Costas, Eduardo; Navarro, Gabriel; Ruiz, Javier; Rodriguez, Pablo; Huertas, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Inland and transitional aquatic systems play an important role in global carbon (C) cycling. Yet, the C dynamics of wetlands and floodplains are poorly defined and field data is scarce. Air-water fluxes in the wetlands of Doñana Natural Area (SW Spain) were examined by measuring alkalinity, pH and other physiochemical parameters in a range of water bodies during 2010–2011. Areal fluxes were calculated and, using remote sensing, an estimate of the contribution of aquatic habitats to gaseous transport was derived. Semi-permanent ponds adjacent to the large Guadalquivir estuary acted as mild sinks, whilst temporal wetlands were strong sources of (−0.8 and 36.3 ). Fluxes in semi-permanent streams and ponds changed seasonally; acting as sources in spring-winter and mild sinks in autumn (16.7 and −1.2 ). Overall, Doñana's water bodies were a net annual source of (5.2 ). Up–scaling clarified the overwhelming contribution of seasonal flooding and allochthonous organic matter inputs in determining regional air-water gaseous transport (13.1 ). Nevertheless, this estimate is about 6 times < local marsh net primary production, suggesting the system acts as an annual net sink. Initial indications suggest longer hydroperiods may favour autochthonous C capture by phytoplankton. Direct anthropogenic impacts have reduced the hydroperiod in Doñana and this maybe exacerbated by climate change (less rainfall and more evaporation), suggesting potential for the modification of C sequestration. PMID:23977044

  3. Water Quality, Habitat, and Biological Conditions at Selected Sites in the Highly Urbanized Santa Ana River Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, C. A.; Brown, L. R.

    2001-12-01

    The Santa Ana River Basin of southern California is highly urbanized and is affected by habitat loss, habitat alteration, and changes in water quality of the river and tributary streams. Nineteen sites, selected to represent the range in water source (mountain runoff, ground-water discharge, urban runoff, treated waste water), were sampled during summer 2000, to assess macroinvertebrate community structure and various measures of water quality. Sites were characterized on the basis of water source because much of the water in Santa Ana Basin is imported and does not typically originate within the watershed boundaries. Artificial substrates were employed for biological samples to minimize the effect of channel environments--natural, channelized but unlined, and concrete-lined-- as a confounding variable. The number of benthic macroinvertebrate genera ranged from five to 20 taxa per site. Pesticides were detected at 16 of 19 sites; the number of detections per site ranged from two to nine. Diazinon was the most commonly detected pesticide and was found at 13 of the 16 sites. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected at 9 of 10 sites; the number of detections ranged from 1 to 10 per site. Chloroform and bromodichloromethane, the most commonly detected VOCs, were found at six sites each. Results from a Microtox toxicity test using extracts from semi-permeable membrane devices installed at 14 sites indicated potential toxicity at 10 of the sites. Results suggest that water source and channel modifications associated with urbanization have altered water quality and associated ecological communities in the streams of the Santa Ana Basin.

  4. Choosing wisely: Review and commentary on anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) testing.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, Marvin J

    2016-03-01

    Choosing Wisely®: Next Steps in Improving Healthcare Value is an initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation. The driving forces for the Choosing Wisely (CW) campaign include rising and unstainable health care expenditures and evidence that there is lack of fiscal stewardship of health care resources. The American College of Rheumatology and the Canadian Rheumatology Association published their top five Choosing Wisely recommendations, the first of which pertained to antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and ANA subserology testing. Concerns about the wasteful use of these tests prompted an analysis of the expenditures attributable to ANA testing as a proportion of total health care expenditures and based on a financial model was in the range of 0.00125%. It is suggested that if the sole use of ANA testing is to add evidence to support a diagnosis when the pre-test probability is high, then the ANA test has limited clinical value. Accordingly, the goal of ANA testing needs to be reconsidered and expanded beyond an approach to simply confirming a diagnosis with 'intention to treat' to a goal of case finding of 'pre- or early disease' with an 'intent to prevent' disease. This an area where more significant inroads can be made in preventing end organ disease and thereby reducing health care expenditures HCE. One CW recommendation that bears emphasizing is that, with a few possible exceptions, repeat ANA or ANA subserology testing has little clinical value in monitoring disease activity or predicting a flare. PMID:26687321

  5. Characterization of a cashew allergen, 11S globulin (Ana o 2), conformational epitope.

    PubMed

    Robotham, Jason M; Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    Both linear and conformational epitopes likely contribute to the allergenicity of tree nut allergens, yet, due largely to technical issues, few conformational epitopes have been characterized. Using the well studied recombinant cashew allergen, Ana o 2, an 11S globulin or legumin, we identified a murine monoclonal antibody which recognizes a conformational epitope and competes with patient IgE Ana o 2-reactive antibodies. This epitope is expressed on the large subunit of Ana o 2, but only when associated with an 11S globulin small subunit. Both Ana o 2 and the homologous soybean Gly m 6 small subunits can foster epitope expression, even when the natural N-terminal to C-terminal subunit order is reversed in chimeric molecules. The epitope, which is also expressed on native Ana o 2, is readily susceptible to destruction by physical and chemical denaturants. PMID:20362336

  6. The Mechanism of Dynein Light Chain LC8-mediated Oligomerization of the Ana2 Centriole Duplication Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Slevin, Lauren K.; Romes, Erin M.; Dandulakis, Mary G.; Slep, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Centrioles play a key role in nucleating polarized microtubule networks. In actively dividing cells, centrioles establish the bipolar mitotic spindle and are essential for genomic stability. Drosophila anastral spindle-2 (Ana2) is a conserved centriole duplication factor. Although recent work has demonstrated that an Ana2-dynein light chain (LC8) centriolar complex is critical for proper spindle positioning in neuroblasts, how Ana2 and LC8 interact is yet to be established. Here we examine the Ana2-LC8 interaction and map two LC8-binding sites within the central region of Ana2, Ana2M (residues 156–251). Ana2 LC8-binding site 1 contains a signature TQT motif and robustly binds LC8 (KD of 1.1 μm), whereas site 2 contains a TQC motif and binds LC8 with lower affinity (KD of 13 μm). Both LC8-binding sites flank a predicted ∼34-residue α-helix. We present two independent atomic structures of LC8 dimers in complex with Ana2 LC8-binding site 1 and site 2 peptides. The Ana2 peptides form β-strands that extend a central composite LC8 β-sandwich. LC8 recognizes the signature TQT motif in the first LC8 binding site of Ana2, forming extensive van der Waals contacts and hydrogen bonding with the peptide, whereas the Ana2 site 2 TQC motif forms a uniquely extended β-strand, not observed in other dynein light chain-target complexes. Size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle static light scattering demonstrates that LC8 dimers bind Ana2M sites and induce Ana2 tetramerization, yielding an Ana2M4-LC88 complex. LC8-mediated Ana2 oligomerization probably enhances Ana2 avidity for centriole-binding factors and may bridge multiple factors as required during spindle positioning and centriole biogenesis. PMID:24920673

  7. The mechanism of dynein light chain LC8-mediated oligomerization of the Ana2 centriole duplication factor.

    PubMed

    Slevin, Lauren K; Romes, Erin M; Dandulakis, Mary G; Slep, Kevin C

    2014-07-25

    Centrioles play a key role in nucleating polarized microtubule networks. In actively dividing cells, centrioles establish the bipolar mitotic spindle and are essential for genomic stability. Drosophila anastral spindle-2 (Ana2) is a conserved centriole duplication factor. Although recent work has demonstrated that an Ana2-dynein light chain (LC8) centriolar complex is critical for proper spindle positioning in neuroblasts, how Ana2 and LC8 interact is yet to be established. Here we examine the Ana2-LC8 interaction and map two LC8-binding sites within the central region of Ana2, Ana2M (residues 156-251). Ana2 LC8-binding site 1 contains a signature TQT motif and robustly binds LC8 (KD of 1.1 μm), whereas site 2 contains a TQC motif and binds LC8 with lower affinity (KD of 13 μm). Both LC8-binding sites flank a predicted ~34-residue α-helix. We present two independent atomic structures of LC8 dimers in complex with Ana2 LC8-binding site 1 and site 2 peptides. The Ana2 peptides form β-strands that extend a central composite LC8 β-sandwich. LC8 recognizes the signature TQT motif in the first LC8 binding site of Ana2, forming extensive van der Waals contacts and hydrogen bonding with the peptide, whereas the Ana2 site 2 TQC motif forms a uniquely extended β-strand, not observed in other dynein light chain-target complexes. Size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle static light scattering demonstrates that LC8 dimers bind Ana2M sites and induce Ana2 tetramerization, yielding an Ana2M4-LC88 complex. LC8-mediated Ana2 oligomerization probably enhances Ana2 avidity for centriole-binding factors and may bridge multiple factors as required during spindle positioning and centriole biogenesis. PMID:24920673

  8. Erythrodiplax ana sp. nov. (Odonata: Libellulidae) from Brazilian palm swamps.

    PubMed

    Guillermo-Ferreira, Rhainer; Vilela, Diogo S; Del-Claro, Kleber; Bispo, Pitágoras C

    2016-01-01

    Erythrodiplax ana sp. nov. (male holotype, six male and three female paratypes), collected in Vereda wetlands (a unique Neotropical savanna environment) in Uberlândia (Minas Gerais) and Chapada dos Guimarães (Mato Grosso), Brazil, is described and illustrated. The new species fits in Borror's Basalis Group, and can be distinguished from other species by the combination of the following traits: blue pruinosity dorsally on thorax and third to eighth abdominal segments; sides of the thorax olive-green; face ivory or olive-green; wings hyaline with a small apical brown spot on all four wings, well defined in females; male genitalia with sclerotized erectile posterior lobe and inflatable sac-like median process. Last instar larvae were reared in the laboratory, resulting in the description of the larva. We also followed this population for 13 months and present resulting biological notes and comments on ontogenetic color change in males, as well as longevity. PMID:27615887

  9. 75 FR 17202 - Proposed Establishment of Long Beach, CA, Class C Airspace Area and Revision of Santa Ana (John...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Revision of Santa Ana (John Wayne), CA, Class C Airspace Area; Public Meetings AGENCY: Federal Aviation... establish Class C airspace at Long Beach, CA, and revise the Santa Ana (John Wayne) Class C airspace area... Santa Ana (John Wayne), CA, Class C airspace area will be accepted. (b) The meetings will be open to...

  10. The ANA-reflex test as a model for improving clinical appropriateness in autoimmune diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tonutti, Elio; Bizzaro, Nicola; Morozzi, Gabriella; Radice, Antonella; Cinquanta, Luigi; Villalta, Danilo; Tozzoli, Renato; Tampoia, Marilina; Porcelli, Brunetta; Fabris, Martina; Brusca, Ignazio; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Barberio, Giuseppina; Sorrentino, Maria Concetta; Antico, Antonio; Bassetti, Danila; Fontana, Desré Ethel; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Visentini, Daniela; Pesce, Giampaola; Bagnasco, Marcello

    2016-12-01

    Reflex tests are widely used in clinical laboratories, for example, to diagnose thyroid disorders or in the follow-up of prostate cancer. Reflex tests for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have recently gained attention as a way to improve appropriateness in the immunological diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases and avoid waste of resources. However, the ANA-reflex test is not as simple as other consolidated reflex tests (the TSH-reflex tests or the PSA-reflex tests) because of the intrinsic complexity of the ANA test performed by the indirect immunofluorescence method on cellular substrates. The wide heterogeneity of the ANA patterns, which need correct interpretation, and the subsequent choice of the most appropriate confirmatory test (ANA subserology), which depend on the pattern feature and on clinical information, hinder any informatics automation, and require the pathologist's intervention. In this review, the Study Group on Autoimmune Diseases of the Italian Society of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine provides some indications on the configuration of the ANA-reflex test, using two different approaches depending on whether clinical information is available or not. We further give some suggestions on how to report results of the ANA-reflex test. PMID:27423928

  11. Updating movement estimates for American black ducks (Anas rubripes)

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Conor P.; Devers, Patrick K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding migratory connectivity for species of concern is of great importance if we are to implement management aimed at conserving them. New methods are improving our understanding of migration; however, banding (ringing) data is by far the most widely available and accessible movement data for researchers. Here, we use band recovery data for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) from 1951–2011 and analyze their movement among seven management regions using a hierarchical Bayesian framework. We showed that black ducks generally exhibit flyway fidelity, and that many black ducks, regardless of breeding region, stopover or overwinter on the Atlantic coast of the United States. We also show that a non-trivial portion of the continental black duck population either does not move at all or moves to the north during the fall migration (they typically move to the south). The results of this analysis will be used in a projection modeling context to evaluate how habitat or harvest management actions in one region would propagate throughout the continental population of black ducks. This analysis may provide a guide for future research and help inform management efforts for black ducks as well as other migratory species. PMID:26989624

  12. Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) linkage mapping by AFLP fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chang-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Shin; Rouvier, Roger; Yang, Kuo-Tai; Wu, Chean-Ping; Huang, Hsiu-Lin; Huang, Mu-Chiou

    2009-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) with multicolored fluorescent molecular markers was used to analyze duck (Anas platyrhynchos) genomic DNA and to construct the first AFLP genetic linkage map. These markers were developed and genotyped in 766 F2 individuals from six families from a cross between two different selected duck lines, brown Tsaiya and Pekin. Two hundred and ninety-six polymorphic bands (64% of all bands) were detected using 18 pairs of fluorescent TaqI/EcoRI primer combinations. Each primer set produced a range of 7 to 29 fragments in the reactions, and generated on average 16.4 polymorphic bands. The AFLP linkage map included 260 co-dominant markers distributed in 32 linkage groups. Twenty-one co-dominant markers were not linked with any other marker. Each linkage group contained three to 63 molecular markers and their size ranged between 19.0 cM and 171.9 cM. This AFLP linkage map provides important information for establishing a duck chromosome map, for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping) and for breeding applications. PMID:19291328

  13. Migration strategy affects avian influenza dynamics in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takekawa, John Y.; Hill, Nichola J.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herring, Garth; Hobson, Keith; Cardona, Carol J.; Runstadler, Jonathan; Boyce, Walter M.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of pathogen transmission typically overlook that wildlife hosts can include both migrant and resident populations when attempting to model circulation. Through the application of stable isotopes in flight feathers, we estimated the migration strategy of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) occurring on California wintering grounds. Our study demonstrates that mallards- a principal host of avian influenza virus (AIV) in nature, contribute differently to virus gene flow depending on migration strategy. No difference in AIV prevalence was detected between resident (9.6%), intermediate-distance (9.6%) and long-distance migrants (7.4%). Viral diversity among the three groups was also comparable, possibly owing to viral pool mixing when birds converge at wetlands during winter. However, migrants and residents contributed differently to the virus gene pool at wintering wetlands. Migrants introduced virus from northern breeding grounds (Alaska and the NW Pacific Rim) into the wintering population, facilitating gene flow at continental scales, but circulation of imported virus appeared to be limited. In contrast, resident mallards acted as AIV reservoirs facilitating year-round circulation of limited subtypes (i.e. H5N2) at lower latitudes. This study supports a model of virus exchange in temperate regions driven by the convergence of wild birds with separate geographic origins and exposure histories.

  14. Mycotic Keratitis in a Khaki Campbell Duck ( Anas platyrhynchos domesticus).

    PubMed

    Sadar, Miranda J; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Burton, Andrew G; Byrne, Barbara A; Wiggans, K Tomo; Hollingsworth, Steven R

    2014-12-01

    A 1.5-year-old, intact female khaki Campbell duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) was evaluated for lethargy and a swollen left eye (OS). Mucoid discharge, chemosis, and conjunctival hyperemia with trace aqueous flare, indicating anterior uveitis, in the anterior chamber were evident on ophthalmic examination. There was no fluorescein stain uptake by the cornea. Initial topical antibiotic therapy and systemic anti-inflammatory treatments were unsuccessful, and the lesion progressed to a diffuse, yellow-white plaque, which covered 90%-95% of the cornea 4 days later. There was moderate blepharospasm, mild blepharedema, and epiphora OS. The mobility of the nictitating membrane was impaired because of the presence of the plaque over the cornea. Cytologic examination of a corneal scraping revealed fungal hyphae, and aerobic culture confirmed Aspergillus species. Treatment with topical voriconazole (1 drop OS q4h-q6h) was initiated and was switched to oral voriconazole (20 mg/kg PO q12h) 6 days after initiating treatment. The ocular disease improved during the antifungal treatment period. Eighty-four days after initial presentation (9 days after discontinuation of treatment), there was no clinical evidence of mycotic keratitis on ophthalmic examination. PMID:25843471

  15. Migration strategy affects avian influenza dynamics in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Hill, Nichola J; Takekawa, John Y; Ackerman, Joshua T; Hobson, Keith A; Herring, Garth; Cardona, Carol J; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Boyce, Walter M

    2012-12-01

    Studies of pathogen transmission typically overlook that wildlife hosts can include both migrant and resident populations when attempting to model circulation. Through the application of stable isotopes in flight feathers, we estimated the migration strategy of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) occurring on California wintering grounds. Our study demonstrates that mallards- a principal host of avian influenza virus (AIV) in nature, contribute differently to virus gene flow depending on migration strategy. No difference in AIV prevalence was detected between resident (9.6%), intermediate-distance (9.6%) and long-distance migrants (7.4%). Viral diversity among the three groups was also comparable, possibly owing to viral pool mixing when birds converge at wetlands during winter. However, migrants and residents contributed differently to the virus gene pool at wintering wetlands. Migrants introduced virus from northern breeding grounds (Alaska and the NW Pacific Rim) into the wintering population, facilitating gene flow at continental scales, but circulation of imported virus appeared to be limited. In contrast, resident mallards acted as AIV reservoirs facilitating year-round circulation of limited subtypes (i.e. H5N2) at lower latitudes. This study supports a model of virus exchange in temperate regions driven by the convergence of wild birds with separate geographic origins and exposure histories. PMID:22971007

  16. Updating movement estimates for American black ducks (Anas rubripes).

    PubMed

    Robinson, Orin J; McGowan, Conor P; Devers, Patrick K

    2016-01-01

    Understanding migratory connectivity for species of concern is of great importance if we are to implement management aimed at conserving them. New methods are improving our understanding of migration; however, banding (ringing) data is by far the most widely available and accessible movement data for researchers. Here, we use band recovery data for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) from 1951-2011 and analyze their movement among seven management regions using a hierarchical Bayesian framework. We showed that black ducks generally exhibit flyway fidelity, and that many black ducks, regardless of breeding region, stopover or overwinter on the Atlantic coast of the United States. We also show that a non-trivial portion of the continental black duck population either does not move at all or moves to the north during the fall migration (they typically move to the south). The results of this analysis will be used in a projection modeling context to evaluate how habitat or harvest management actions in one region would propagate throughout the continental population of black ducks. This analysis may provide a guide for future research and help inform management efforts for black ducks as well as other migratory species. PMID:26989624

  17. Exposure of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to the hepatotoxic cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sipia, V.O.; Franson, J.C.; Sjovall, O.; Pflugmacher, S.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Rocke, T.E.; Meriluoto, J.A.O.

    2008-01-01

    Nodularin (NODLN) is a cyclic pentapeptide hepatotoxin produced by the cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena, which forms extensive blooms during the summer in the Baltic Sea. Nodularin was detected in liver, muscle and/or feather samples of several common eiders (Somateria mollissima) from the Gulf of Finland (northern Baltic Sea) in 2002-2005. Published information on the adverse effects of NODLN in marine birds is scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of NODLN, and determine the concentrations of NODLN in liver and muscle tissue in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) exposed to N. spumigena. Mallards received a single or multiple exposure via oral gavage with an aqueous slurry containing toxic N. spumigena. Dosages ranged from 200 to 600 ??g NODLN per kg body weight (bw). There were minimal histopathological changes in liver tissue, and brain cholinesterase activity did not differ among treatment groups. Concentrations of NODLN measured by LC-MS in liver varied between approximately 3-120 ??g kg-1 dry weight (dw) and ducks receiving multiple exposures had significantly greater liver toxin levels than ducks receiving the two lowest single exposures. In muscle, NODLN concentrations were approximately 2-6 ??g kg-1 dw, but did not differ significantly among exposure groups. This is the first in vivo lab study examining the effects and bioaccumulation of NODLN from N. spumigena in birds. The mallards in this study were resistant to adverse effects and did not bioaccumulate substantial levels of NODLN at the doses given. ?? 2008 Taylor & Francis.

  18. Report on the second International Consensus on ANA Pattern (ICAP) workshop in Dresden 2015.

    PubMed

    Chan, E K L; Damoiseaux, J; de Melo Cruvinel, W; Carballo, O G; Conrad, K; Francescantonio, P L C; Fritzler, M J; Garcia-De La Torre, I; Herold, M; Mimori, T; Satoh, M; von Mühlen, C A; Andrade, L E C

    2016-07-01

    The second meeting for the International Consensus on Antinuclear antibody (ANA) Pattern (ICAP) was held on 22 September 2015, one day prior to the opening of the 12th Dresden Symposium on Autoantibodies in Dresden, Germany. The ultimate goal of ICAP is to promote harmonization and understanding of autoantibody nomenclature, and thereby optimizing ANA usage in patient care. The newly developed ICAP website www.ANApatterns.org was introduced to the more than 50 participants. This was followed by several presentations and discussions focusing on key issues including the two-tier classification of ANA patterns into competent-level versus expert-level, the consideration of how to report composite versus mixed ANA patterns, and the necessity for developing a consensus on how ANA results should be reported. The need to establish on-line training modules to help users gain competency in identifying ANA patterns was discussed as a future addition to the website. To advance the ICAP goal of promoting wider international participation, it was agreed that there should be a consolidated plan to translate consensus documents into other languages by recruiting help from members of the respective communities. PMID:27252255

  19. Common Space, Common Time, Common Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Melody J.

    2005-01-01

    The most valued means of support and learning cited by new teachers at Poland Regional High School in rural Maine are the collegial interactions that common workspace, common planning time, and common tasks make possible. The school has used these everyday structures to enable new and veteran teachers to converse about curricular and pedagogical…

  20. Historical Climate and Streamflow Trends in Santa Ana River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, D.; Sultana, R.; Tang, V.

    2015-12-01

    Santa Ana River watershed, located in Southern California, is the home of more than 5 million people. Population is projected to double within the next 50 years in the 2,650 square miles watershed. With prolonged drought conditions, and projected climate change, a strong concern exists about sustainable water supply of the area. In this study, historic climate and streamflow trend from water year 1965 to 2014 is analyzed using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test. Climate trends are studied using annual rainfall, and annual average maximum and minimum temperature at 5 and 4 weather stations, respectively. Three of the precipitation stations show precipitation is decreasing in the watershed while minimum and maximum temperature has an increasing trend at three stations (p < 0.05). To assess whether streamflow and stream-channel characteristics are tended to increase or decrease monotonically with time, four variables - (1) annual maximum peak, (2) annual mean, (3) low to moderate and (4) moderate to high maximum peak streamflow were tested at 20 stream gauge sites. Only at 5 stream gage stations, significant streamflow trend is observed. At two stream gages, annual peak and annual average streamflow is increasing and at two stations, annual average streamflow has a decreasing trend. Low to moderate peak streamflow is increasing at two gage locations but there is no monotonic trend in moderate to high flows. As precipitation is decreasing in some part of the watershed, the effect of increasing urbanization in the area can be attributed for the localized increase in mean and peak streamflow. The trend analysis in weather and stream gage data will be presented in detail.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of zinc borophosphates with ANA-zeotype framework by the microwave method

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yu; Ding, Ling; An, Qingda; Zhai, Shangru; Song, Xiaowei

    2013-06-15

    Zinc borophosphate (NH{sub 4}){sub 16}[Zn{sub 16}B{sub 8}P{sub 24}O{sub 96}] (denoted as ZnBP-ANA) with ANA-zeotype structure has been synthesized by employing microwave-assisted solvothermal synthesis in the reaction system ZnCl{sub 2}∙6H{sub 2}O-(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}–H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} using ethylene glycol as a co-solvent. The influences of various experimental parameters, such as reaction temperature, solvent ratio, zinc precursors and reactive power, have been systematically investigated. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and so on. Small and homogeneous ZnBP-ANA single crystal with regular cube morphology are crystallized by using microwave solvothermal synthesis method within a shorter time, and its grain size decreases with power. - Graphical abstract: Tailor-made ANA zeolites with varied size can be prepared by simply changing the reaction power. - Highlights: • Zinc borophosphate zeolites with ANA-zeotype structures were prepared by microwave technique. • The size of crystals could be controlled by tuning power. • Synthesis period can be significantly reduced by raising reaction temperature.

  2. A software tool for material data analysis and property prediction: CASAC-ANA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Xie, Q.; Feng, J.; Li, S.; Xu, Z.; Chen, L.; Gui, Z.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a user-friendly software, CASAC-ANA, for material data analysis and property prediction is presented. In CASAC-ANA, there are seven methods: Nonlinear Mapping (NLM), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Stepwise Discriminant Analysis (SDA), Discriminant Analysis with Constellation Graph (DACG), Hierarchical Clustering Analysis (HCA), Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (SMLR), and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The software has some noteworthy features: (1) only one input file is needed and multipath output is produced; (2) both quantitative and qualitative data of dependent variables are accepted; and (3) it is easy to link with materials property databases. As a generalized modeling tool, CASAC-ANA can be used to treat material data concerning composition, technological processes, properties, and to predict properties of materials. The validity of the CASAC-ANA software has been tested successfully with three typical case studies concerning structural alloy steels, nickel-base superalloys, and continuously cast copper alloys. These CASAC-ANA methods have been compared and discussed.

  3. Sediment Dynamics Affecting the Threatened Santa Ana Sucker in the Highly-modified Santa Ana River and Inset Channel, Southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Wright, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the sediment dynamics of the low-flow channel of the Santa Ana River that is formed by wastewater discharges and contains some of the last remaining habitat of the Santa Ana Sucker (Catostomus santaanae). The Santa Ana River is a highly-modified river draining the San Bernardino Mountains and Inland Empire metropolitan area east of Los Angeles. Home to over 4 million people, the watershed provides habitat for the federally-threatened Santa Ana Sucker, which presently reside within the mainstem Santa Ana River in a reach supported by year-round constant discharges from water treatment plants. The nearly constant low-flow wastewater discharges and infrequent runoff events create a small, approximately 8 m wide, inset channel within the approximately 300 m wide mainstem channel that is typically dry except for large flood flows. The sediment dynamics within the inset channel are characterized by constantly evolving bed substrate and sediment transport rates, and occasional channel avulsions. The sediment dynamics have large influence on the Sucker, which rely on coarse-substrate (gravel and cobble) for their food production. In WY 2013 through the present, we investigated the sediment dynamics of the inset channel using repeat bathymetric and substrate surveys, bedload sampling, and discharge measurements. We found two distinct phases of the inset channel behavior: 1. 'Reset' flows, where sediment-laden mainstem discharges from upstream runoff events result in sand deposition in the inset channel or avulse the inset channel onto previously dry riverbed; and 2. 'Winnowing' flows, whereby the sand within the inset channel is removed by clear-water low flows from the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Thus, in contrast to many regulated rivers where high flows are required to flush fine sediments from the bed (for example, downstream from dams), in the Santa Ana River the low flows from wastewater treatment plants serve as the flushing

  4. Common Schools for Common Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Eamonn

    1995-01-01

    A vision of common education for citizens of a liberal democracy warrants faith in common schools as an instrument of social good. Some kinds of separate schooling are not inconsistent with common schooling and are even desirable. Equal respect, as defined by J. Rawls, is a basis for common education. (SLD)

  5. Project W-314 updated acceptance test report HNF-4649 for HNF-4648 241-AN-A pit leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-331 for project W-314

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERS, J.S.

    1999-09-30

    The purpose of the test was to verify that the AN Tank Farm AN-A Pit Leak Detector components are functionally integrated and operate in accordance with engineering design specifications. The Acceptance Test Procedure HNF-4648,24l-AN-A-Pit Leak Detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-331 was conducted between 23 June and 01 July 1999 at the 200E AN Tank Farm. The test has been completed with no open test exceptions. The test was conducted prior to final engineering ''as built'' activities being completed this had no impact on the procedure or test results. All components, identified in the procedure were found to be labeled and identified as written in the procedure.

  6. 241-AN-A valve pit manifold valves and position indication acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    VANDYKE, D.W.

    1999-08-25

    This document describes the method used to test design criteria for gear actuated ball valves installed in 241-AN-A Valve Pit located at 200E Tank Farms. The purpose of this procedure is to demonstrate the following: Equipment is properly installed, labeled, and documented on As-Built drawings; New Manifold Valves in the 241-AN-A Valve Pit are fully operable using the handwheel of the valve operators; New valve position indicators on the valve operators will show correct valve positions; New valve position switches will function properly; and New valve locking devices function properly.

  7. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  8. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds. You can get a cold by touching your ...

  9. A coordinated set of ecosystem research platforms open to international research in ecotoxicology, AnaEE-France.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Christian; Azam, Didier; Caquet, Thierry; Cheviron, Nathalie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Guillaume, Olivier; Houot, Sabine; Lacroix, Gérard; Lafolie, François; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Michniewicz, Radika; Pichot, Christian; Ranjard, Lionel; Roy, Jacques; Zeller, Bernd; Clobert, Jean; Chanzy, André

    2015-10-01

    The infrastructure for Analysis and Experimentation on Ecosystems (AnaEE-France) is an integrated network of the major French experimental, analytical, and modeling platforms dedicated to the biological study of continental ecosystems (aquatic and terrestrial). This infrastructure aims at understanding and predicting ecosystem dynamics under global change. AnaEE-France comprises complementary nodes offering access to the best experimental facilities and associated biological resources and data: Ecotrons, seminatural experimental platforms to manipulate terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, in natura sites equipped for large-scale and long-term experiments. AnaEE-France also provides shared instruments and analytical platforms dedicated to environmental (micro) biology. Finally, AnaEE-France provides users with data bases and modeling tools designed to represent ecosystem dynamics and to go further in coupling ecological, agronomical, and evolutionary approaches. In particular, AnaEE-France offers adequate services to tackle the new challenges of research in ecotoxicology, positioning its various types of platforms in an ecologically advanced ecotoxicology approach. AnaEE-France is a leading international infrastructure, and it is pioneering the construction of AnaEE (Europe) infrastructure in the field of ecosystem research. AnaEE-France infrastructure is already open to the international community of scientists in the field of continental ecotoxicology. PMID:26315587

  10. Gene flow and hybridization between numerically imbalanced populations of two duck species in the Falkland Islands.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Kevin G; Wilson, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization is common in plants and animals, particularly in waterfowl (Anatidae). One factor shown to contribute to hybridization is restricted mate choice, which can occur when two species occur in sympatry but one is rare. The Hubbs principle, or "desperation hypothesis," states that under such circumstances the rarer species is more likely to mate with heterospecifics. Here we report interspecific hybridization between two waterfowl species that coexist in broad sympatry and mixed flocks throughout southern South America. Speckled teal (Anas flavirostris) and yellow-billed pintails (Anas georgica) are abundant in continental South America, but in the Falkland Islands speckled teal outnumber yellow-billed pintails approximately ten to one. Using eight genetic loci (mtDNA and 7 nuclear introns) coupled with Bayesian assignment tests and relatedness analysis, we identified a speckled teal x yellow-billed pintail F(1) hybrid female and her duckling sired by a male speckled teal. Although our sample in the Falkland Islands was small, we failed to identify unequivocal evidence of hybridization or introgression in a much larger sample from Argentina using a three-population "isolation with migration" coalescent analysis. While additional data are needed to determine if this event in the Falkland Islands was a rare singular occurrence, our results provide further support for the "desperation hypothesis," which states that scarcity in one population and abundance of another will often lead to hybridization. PMID:21887236

  11. SN-268 encasement leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-335 acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    VANDYKE, D.W.

    1999-08-25

    This document describes the method used to test design criteria for encasement leak detector system installed in 241-AN-A Encasement Line SN-268, located at 200E Tank Farms. This procedure provides instructions for demonstrating that the pit leak detection relay cabinet and intrinsically safe probe circuit is fully operable.

  12. The Chicana Subject in Ana Castillo's Fiction and the Discursive Zone of Chicana/o Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Benjamin D.

    2007-01-01

    In the world of Chicana fiction, Ana Castillo has achieved the kind of status Maxine Hong Kingston has attained within Asian American discourse. Castillo's work is popular not only with the general reading public but in many academic circles as well. What sets Castillo apart from so many other Chicana fiction writers is that she is also a…

  13. 75 FR 38441 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for Santa Ana Sucker

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are reopening the comment period on our December 9, 2009, proposed revised designation of critical habitat for Santa Ana sucker (Catostomus santaanae) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). We are reopening the comment period for an additional 30 days to allow all interested parties an opportunity to comment simultaneously on the......

  14. Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing conditions on June 30, 1949. Drawing no. NA 91/A9-1(1) 1949 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  15. Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing conditions on June 30, 1949. Drawing no. NA 91/A9-1(1) 1949 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, East of Red Hill Avenue between Edinger Avenue & Barranca Parkway, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  16. Dona Ana Branch Community College Five-Year Plan: Adopted 1989, Revised 1990-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. Dona Ana Branch Community Coll.

    In 1990-91, responding to the rapid growth and change of both community and college, New Mexico State University's (NMSU's) Dona Ana Branch Community College (DABCC) revised its 5-year plan which was adopted in 1989 to establish goals that would shape the actions, policies, and plans of the college. These goals included: (1) increase instructional…

  17. Apigenin Induces the Apoptosis and Regulates MAPK Signaling Pathways in Mouse Macrophage ANA-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yuexia; Shen, Weigan; Kong, Guimei; Lv, Houning; Tao, Wenhua; Bo, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Apigenin is a naturally occurring plant flavonoid that possesses antioxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. However, there are few reports has been done on the ability of apigenin to induce apoptosis in macrophages. In this study, mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells were incubated with different concentrations of apigenin. The cell viability was determined by an MTT assay. The cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. Apoptosis were also analyzed using a TUNEL assay and a DNA ladder. The level of intracellular ROS was detected using a dichlorofluorescein -diacetate probe. The expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that apigenin decreased the viability of ANA-1 cells and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apigenin increased the level of intracellular ROS, downregulated the expression of Bcl-2 and upregulated the expression of caspase-3 and caspase-8 in ANA-1 cells. Furthermore, apigenin downregulated the expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-JNK, upregulated the expression of phospho-p38 and had no significant effect on the expression of Bax, ERK, JNK and p38. The results suggested that apigenin induced cell apoptosis in mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells may via increasing intracellular ROS, regulating the MAPK pathway, and then inhibiting Bcl-2 expression. PMID:24646936

  18. River Basin management: the optimal control of water quantity and quality. [Upper Santa Ana Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Opaluch, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find the optimal method of achieving water quantity and quality standards in a dynamic framework. The study proceeds in two steps. In the first step the supply of pollution-disposal services is derived by minimizing the cost of achieving the standards with various quantities of pollution generated. An empirical study is then done to illustrate the methodology and to examine various policy questions. The model is applied to the Upper Santa Ana Watershed, which is located in Southern California. The net benefits to the Upper Watershed are estimated for salinity control of the Colorado River and the availability of the Peripheral Canal at various dates. In addition, construction of the Santa Ana Regional Interceptor and the constraints imposed on water flow from the Upper to the Lower Santa Ana Watershed are evaluated. Monte Carlo methods are used in order to evaluate the net benefits derived from incorporating an effluent charge into the pollution-control policy. In addition, the benefit derived from incorporating learning into the taxation policy as well as incorporating the use of centralized treatment facilities into a pure taxation scheme are evaluated. Finally, the results from the Upper Santa Ana Watershed are extrapolated to other affected river basins in order to evaluate the total benefits derived from the Peripheral Canal in a speculatory manner. The benefits derived from the use of the Peripheral Canal are tentatively estimated at $7.5 billion.

  19. 75 FR 77961 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for Santa Ana Sucker

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Santa Ana sucker in this final rule. In the proposed rule (74 FR 65056; December 9, 2009) and the document that made available the draft economic analysis (DEA) (75 FR 38441; July 2, 2010), we stated that... River that we did not discuss in the 2005 final critical habitat designation for this species (70 FR...

  20. Do You Know Me? E Mohio Ana Koe Ki Ahau? A Resource for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Bill; Haslam, Vicky; Hitaua, Raewyn; Kent, Bruce; Tavui, Esther; Tu'ionetoa, Alison; Crosswell, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    The article shares some of the reflections of the project team who developed the "Do You Know Me? E Mohio Ana Koe Ki Ahau?" resource for educators, which aims to assist educators in both school and early childhood education services to clarify concerns about young children and take appropriate action. Issues discussed include the context and…

  1. Facilitating Hispanics' Expression of Ethical Values during Mock Oral Interviews with the Santa Ana Police Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Norma Landa

    To help Hispanic Americans wishing to enroll in the Santa Ana (California) Police Department, this paper presents an Advancement of Ethnic Representation Opportunities (AERO) Police Success Communication Skills Competency Based lesson that focuses on expressing ethical values during police oral interviews. After providing background information on…

  2. CHANGES IN THE MALLARD (ANAS PLATYRHYNCHOS) SERUM CHEMISTRY DUE TO AGE, SEX, AND REPRODUCTIVE CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selected serum constituents were analyzed from 50 adult mallards (Anas platyrhnynchos) of both sexes during several stages of reproduction: pre-egg laying, egg-laying, incubating, molting, and postreproductive. imilar assays were conducted on sera from duckling 5 to 58 days old. ...

  3. Synthesis and catalytic properties of metal clusters encapsulated within small-pore (SOD, GIS, ANA) zeolites.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sarika; Wu, Zhijie; Zones, Stacey I; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-10-24

    The synthesis protocols for encapsulation of metal clusters reported here expand the diversity in catalytic chemistries made possible by the ability of microporous solids to select reactants, transition states, and products on the basis of their molecular size. We report a synthesis strategy for the encapsulation of noble metals and their oxides within SOD (Sodalite, 0.28 nm × 0.28 nm), GIS (Gismondine, 0.45 nm × 0.31 nm), and ANA (Analcime, 0.42 nm × 0.16 nm) zeolites. Encapsulation was achieved via direct hydrothermal synthesis for SOD and GIS using metal precursors stabilized by ammonia or organic amine ligands, which prevent their decomposition or precipitation as colloidal hydroxides at the conditions of hydrothermal synthesis (<380 K) and favor interactions between metal precursors and incipient aluminosilicate nuclei during self-assembly of microporous frameworks. The synthesis of ANA requires higher crystallization temperatures (~415 K) and high pH (>12), thereby causing precipitation of even ligand-stabilized metal precursors as hydroxides. As a result, encapsulation was achieved by the recrystallization of metal clusters containing GIS into ANA, which retained these metal clusters within voids throughout the GIS-ANA transformation. PMID:23016946

  4. 77 FR 66578 - San Bernardino National Forest, Mountaintop Ranger District, CA, Santa Ana Watershed Hazardous...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ...The Mountaintop Ranger District, San Bernardino National Forest proposes to reduce fire risk and improve forest health within approximately 19,850 acres around the Barton Flats area of the upper Santa Ana Watershed under the authority of the Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA) of 2003. To meet the primary purposes of providing for firefighter safety and community protection, it is proposed......

  5. A Study of Non-Native English Speakers' Academic Performance at Santa Ana College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slark, Julie; Bateman, Harold

    A study was conducted in 1980-81 at Santa Ana College (SAC) to collect data on the English communication skills of non-native English speakers and to determine if a relationship existed between these skills and student's educational success. A sample of 22 classes, with an enrollment of at least 50% non-native English speakers and representing a…

  6. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  7. New dinosaur fossils from ANA locality, Arcillas de Morella Formation (Aptian, Lower Cretaceous, Cinctorres, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Cubedo, A.; de Santisteban, C.; Suñer, M.; Galobart, A.

    2009-04-01

    Ana is one of the several dinosaur bone sites located in the Arcillas de Morella Formation (Aptian, Lower Cretaceous; eastern Iberian Chain, Spain). This site was discovered in 1998, but it remained unexcavated until 2002, when a palaeontologist team formed by members of the Institut Paleontología Miquel Crusafont from Sabadell and the Grup Guix from Vila-real unearthed the first fossil from the locality. Nowadays there are five hundred fossils collected, including vertebrate and invertebrate species. Dinosaur bones (Theropoda and Ornithopoda) are abundant in this assemblage and in the last field season bones determined as Sauropoda were found. Taxonomically, Ana is dominated by disarticulated remains of Ornithopoda, which are usually fragmentary and abraded. Many of the elements may have been reworked (spatial averaging and/or time averaging), and the fossil concentration constitutes an autochthonous to parautochthonous association, in a spatial sense. The remains found in the Ana fossils site are placed in sandstones and limes containing marine autochthonous fauna. These deposits were formed during the transgressive infilling of an incised valley. Sedimentological features indicate that fossils were finally deposited in starved shallow estuarine environment. Mineralogically, the sediment including the fossils contains grains of quartz, illite/mica, kaolinite/clorite, K-feldspar and plagioclase, distributed in two mainly grain populations, a silty-clay and a coarse sand size grain, indicating that the sediments were bedded in a low-medium energy depositional environment. Nowadays we identified in Ana, teeth of Theropoda indet. and Baryonychinae indet., and bones of Iguanodon sp. Herein, we report new fossil findings from Ana site. These materials have been determined as Iguanodontia, Titanosauriformes and Theropoda. These new findings will help to understand the dinosaur fauna present in the Lower Cretaceous of Els Ports (Castellón, Spain). Acknowledgments This

  8. Student Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  9. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the most common reason that children miss school and parents miss work. Parents often get colds ... other children. A cold can spread quickly through schools or daycares. Colds can occur at any time ...

  10. Evaluation of the BioPlex 2200 ANA screen: analysis of 510 healthy subjects: incidence of natural/predictive autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Shovman, O; Gilburd, B; Barzilai, O; Shinar, E; Larida, B; Zandman-Goddard, G; Binder, S R; Shoenfeld, Y

    2005-06-01

    The BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen is a fully automated system that determines levels for 13 different autoimmune antibodies of established clinical significance. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of the BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen assay and to analyze the antibody profile samples collected from healthy subjects against comparative ELISA and IIF screening methods. A total of 510 specimens were randomly selected from a cohort of apparently healthy blood bank donors. Samples were distributed to five age brackets. All samples were tested using Bio-Rad's ANA Screen kit. Specificity was compared to IIF and ELISA results. Most of the samples were found negative in all ANA screening systems (84.5% by IIF, 92.5% by BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen kit, and 94.5% by ELISA). The frequency of positive results was highest (15.5%) using IIF, in comparison to almost similar results (5.5% vs. 7.5%) achieved by ANA ELISA and BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen kits. The positive rate of autoantibodies was significantly reduced when analyzed by different combinations of ANA screen assays (from 2.35% using IIF + BioPlex ANA Screen tests to 0.98% by using all three tests). Using the BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen system, we were able to identify samples with high levels of individual antibodies: anti-dsDNA at 20-63 IU/mL, antichromatin at 4-8 AI, anti-SmRNP at 2-6 AI, and anti-RNPA at 2-4.5 AI. Importantly, from 7 IIF and ELISA positive sera, 5 of these were also BioPlex 2200 positive, suggesting that the BioPlex is seeing the samples that are of the greatest interest, using the established techniques. The specificity of the BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen analysis of 13 different analytes (dsDNA, centromere B, chromatin, Jo1, ribosomal P, RNP 68, RNP A, Scl-70, Sm, SmPNP, SS-A52, SS-A60, SS-B) is comparable (P < 0.252) to the ELISA ANA screening test. Like the ELISA, the BioPlex 2200 has a lower (P < 0.001) positive rate than IIF for the autoantibody screening. PMID:16014555

  11. Climate change projected fire weather sensitivity: CaliforniaSanta Ana wind occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Norman L.; Schlegel, Nicole J.

    2006-01-01

    A new methodbased on global climate model pressuregradients was developed for identifying coastal high-wind fire weatherconditions, such as the Santa Ana Occurrence (SAO). Application of thismethod for determining southern California Santa Ana wind occurrenceresulted in a good correlation between derived large-scale SAOs andobserved offshore winds during periods of low humidity. The projectedchange in the number of SAOs was analyzed using two global climatemodels, one a low temperature sensitivity and the other amiddle-temperature sensitivity, both forced with low and high emissionscenarios, for three future time periods. This initial analysis showsconsistent shifts in SAO events from earlier (September-October) to later(November-December) in the season, suggesting that SAOs may significantlyincrease the extent of California coastal areas burned by wildfires, lossof life, and property.

  12. Project W-314 241-AN-A valve pit upgrade acceptance for beneficial use

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERS, J.S.

    1999-07-21

    This report identifies the responsibilities and requirements, applicable to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit Upgrades portion of Project W-314, for Acceptance for Beneficial Use in accordance with HNF-IP-0842, Vol IV, Sec 3.12. At project turnover, the end user accepts the affected Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for beneficial use. This checklist is used to help the end user ensure that all documentation, training, and testing requirements are met prior to turnover. This checklist specifically identifies those items related to the upgrading of the 241-AN-A valve pit. The upgrades include: the installation of jumper/valve manifolds with position sensors, replacement pit leak detection systems, construction of replacement cover blocks, and electrical upgrades to support the instrumentation upgrades.

  13. Ground-water quality in the upper Santa Ana River basin, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eccles, Lawrence A.

    1979-01-01

    The principal ground-water quality problems in the Santa Ana River basin, as determined from two samplings (1968-69 and 1977-78), are high concentrations of dissolved solids in general and nitrate-nitrogen in particular. The distribution of dissolved solids exceeding 800 milligrams per liter was smaller in area in 1977-78 than in 1968-69. Distribution of nitrate-nitrogen exceeding 10 milligrams per liter was larger in area in 1977-78 than in 1968-69. Concentrations of dissolved solids and nitrate-nitrogen decreased with depth. The network of wells used in the 1977-78 sampling program provides only a general appraisal of overall quality for most of the upper Santa Ana River basin. It is not adequate for detailed appraisals of specific problem areas because it lacks sufficient areal coverage and construction information for the wells sampled. (Kosco-USGS)

  14. Climate change projected fire weather sensitivity: California Santa Ana wind occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Norman L.; Schlegel, Nicole J.

    2006-08-01

    A new method based on global climate model pressure gradients was developed for identifying coastal high-wind fire weather conditions, such as the Santa Ana Occurrence (SAO). Application of this method for determining southern California Santa Ana wind occurrence resulted in a good correlation between derived large-scale SAOs and observed offshore winds during periods of low humidity. The projected change in the number of SAOs was analyzed using two global climate models, one a low temperature sensitivity and the other a middle-temperature sensitivity, both forced with low and high emission scenarios, for three future time periods. This initial analysis shows consistent shifts in SAO events from earlier (September-October) to later (November-December) in the season, suggesting that SAOs may significantly increase the extent of California coastal areas burned by wildfires, loss of life, and property.

  15. Campylobacter populations in wild and domesticated Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Colles, Frances M; Ali, Jan S; Sheppard, Samuel K; McCarthy, Noel D; Maiden, Martin C J

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the Campylobacter genotypes that colonize farmed and wild ducks will help to assess the proportion of human disease that is potentially attributable to the consumption of duck meat and environmental exposure to duck faeces. Comparison of temporally and geographically matched farmed and wild ducks showed that they had different Campylobacter populations in terms of: (i) prevalence, (ii) Campylobacter species and (iii) diversity of genotypes. Furthermore, 92.4% of Campylobacter isolates from farmed ducks were sequence types (STs) commonly associated with human disease, in contrast to just one isolate from the wild ducks. Only one ST, ST-45, was shared between the two sources, accounting for 0.9% of wild duck isolates and 5% of farmed duck isolates. These results indicate that domestic ‘niche’ as well as host type may affect the distribution of Campylobacter, and that husbandry practises associated with intensive agriculture may be involved in generating a reservoir of human disease associated lineages. PMID:22164198

  16. Phylogenetic studies of two Anas platyrhynchos (Anatini: Anatinae) in Hunan province of China based on complete mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Lin, Qian; Cao, Rong; Yuan, Ya-Ting; Pan, Di-Zi; Yun, Long; Zhang, Shi-Rui; Hou, De-Xing

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we cloned and sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNAs of Chinese duck, Anas platyrhynchos, population from two different areas of Hunan province in China. The Anas platyrhynchos breed Linwu duck (LW) sample was taken from the Linwu county of Chenzhou city, and the Anas platyrhynchos breed Youxian duck (YX) sample was taken from the Youxian county of Zhuzhou city. The lengths of their complete mitochondrial genome were 16,604 bp (LW) and 16,606 bp (YX), respectively. The organization of the two Anas platyrhynchos breed mitochondrial genomes was similar to those reported from other duck mitochondrial genomes. Phylogenetic analyses using N-J computational algorithms showed that the analyzed species are divided into four major clades: Anatinae, Anserinae, Dendrocygninae and Anseranatidae. Also, the Linwu duck and Youxian duck have highly similar phylogenetic relationship. PMID:26057008

  17. 78 FR 23769 - Notice of Final Issuance on the Adoption of Administration for Native Americans (ANA) Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ..., Language--EMI, and ERE. ANA published a NOPC in the Federal Register (78 FR 13062) on February 26, 2013... referred to as Language Preservation), Native Language Preservation and Maintenance--Esther...

  18. Project W-314 Specific Test and Evaluation Plan 241-AN-A Valve Pit

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERS, J.S.

    1999-08-25

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP).

  19. Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for 241-AN-A valve pit

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-06-25

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP).

  20. ANA Negative Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Leading to CTEPH, TTP-Like Thrombocytopenia, and Skin Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Sofi, Fayaz; Altaf, Sheikh Shoaib; Raina, Adnan; Raina, Ab. Hameed

    2016-01-01

    SLE affects almost every organ system, with differing degrees of severity. During its clinical course periods of flares may alternate with periods of remission culminating in disease and therapy related damage. We describe a case of ANA negative SLE with severe thrombocytopenia, cutaneous vasculitis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and pulmonary artery hypertension. As there is no definitive cure for SLE the treatment lies in caring for the individual organ systems involved and simultaneously taking care of the patient as a whole. PMID:27006850

  1. AnaSP: a software suite for automatic image analysis of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Today, more and more biological laboratories use 3D cell cultures and tissues grown in vitro as a 3D model of in vivo tumours and metastases. In the last decades, it has been extensively established that multicellular spheroids represent an efficient model to validate effects of drugs and treatments for human care applications. However, a lack of methods for quantitative analysis limits the usage of spheroids as models for routine experiments. Several methods have been proposed in literature to perform high throughput experiments employing spheroids by automatically computing different morphological parameters, such as diameter, volume and sphericity. Nevertheless, these systems are typically grounded on expensive automated technologies, that make the suggested solutions affordable only for a limited subset of laboratories, frequently performing high content screening analysis. In this work we propose AnaSP, an open source software suitable for automatically estimating several morphological parameters of spheroids, by simply analyzing brightfield images acquired with a standard widefield microscope, also not endowed with a motorized stage. The experiments performed proved sensitivity and precision of the segmentation method proposed, and excellent reliability of AnaSP to compute several morphological parameters of spheroids imaged in different conditions. AnaSP is distributed as an open source software tool. Its modular architecture and graphical user interface make it attractive also for researchers who do not work in areas of computer vision and suitable for both high content screenings and occasional spheroid-based experiments. PMID:25737369

  2. The Reliability of a Novel Automated System for ANA Immunofluorescence Analysis in Daily Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Alsuwaidi, Mohammed; Dollinger, Margit; Fleck, Martin; Ehrenstein, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Automated interpretation (AI) systems for antinuclear antibody (ANA) analysis have been introduced based on assessment of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) patterns. The diagnostic performance of a novel automated IIF reading system was compared with visual interpretation (VI) of IIF in daily clinical practice to evaluate the reduction of workload. ANA-IIF tests of consecutive serum samples from patients with suspected connective tissue disease were carried out using HEp-2 cells according to routine clinical care. AI was performed using a visual analyser (Zenit G-Sight, Menarini, Germany). Agreement rates between ANA results by AI and VI were calculated. Of the 336 samples investigated, VI yielded 205 (61%) negative, 42 (13%) ambiguous, and 89 (26%) positive results, whereas 82 (24%) were determined to be negative, 176 (52%) ambiguous, and 78 (24%) positive by AI. AI displayed a diagnostic accuracy of 175/336 samples (52%) with a kappa coefficient of 0.34 compared to VI being the gold standard. Solely relying on AI, with VI only performed for all ambiguous samples by AI, would have missed 1 of 89 (1%) positive results by VI and misclassified 2 of 205 (1%) negative results by VI as positive. The use of AI in daily clinical practice resulted only in a moderate reduction of the VI workload (82 of 336 samples: 24%). PMID:27247573

  3. The homo-oligomerisation of both Sas-6 and Ana2 is required for efficient centriole assembly in flies

    PubMed Central

    Cottee, Matthew A; Muschalik, Nadine; Johnson, Steven; Leveson, Joanna; Raff, Jordan W; Lea, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Sas-6 and Ana2/STIL proteins are required for centriole duplication and the homo-oligomerisation properties of Sas-6 help establish the ninefold symmetry of the central cartwheel that initiates centriole assembly. Ana2/STIL proteins are poorly conserved, but they all contain a predicted Central Coiled-Coil Domain (CCCD). Here we show that the Drosophila Ana2 CCCD forms a tetramer, and we solve its structure to 0.8 Å, revealing that it adopts an unusual parallel-coil topology. We also solve the structure of the Drosophila Sas-6 N-terminal domain to 2.9 Å revealing that it forms higher-order oligomers through canonical interactions. Point mutations that perturb Sas-6 or Ana2 homo-oligomerisation in vitro strongly perturb centriole assembly in vivo. Thus, efficient centriole duplication in flies requires the homo-oligomerisation of both Sas-6 and Ana2, and the Ana2 CCCD tetramer structure provides important information on how these proteins might cooperate to form a cartwheel structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07236.001 PMID:26002084

  4. Clinical Phenotypes of Patients with Anti-DFS70/LEDGF Antibodies in a Routine ANA Referral Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Miyara, Makoto; Albesa, Roger; Charuel, Jean-Luc; El Amri, Mohamed; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Ghillani-Dalbin, Pascale; Amoura, Zahir; Musset, Lucile; Mahler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the clinical value of anti-DFS70 antibodies in a cohort of patients undergoing routine antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) testing. Methods. Sera with a dense fine speckled (DFS) indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) pattern from 100 consecutive patients and 100 patients with other IIF patterns were tested for anti-DFS70 antibodies by a novel chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA) and for ANA by ANA Screen ELISA (both INOVA). Results. Among the 100 patients with a DFS IIF pattern, 91% were anti-DFS70 positive by CIA compared to 3% in the comparator group (P < 0.0001). The CIA and IIF titers of anti-DFS antibodies were highly correlated (rho = 0.89). ANA by ELISA was positive in 35% of patients with the DFS IIF pattern as compared to 67% of patients with other patterns (P < 0.0001). Only 12.0% of patients with DFS pattern and 13.4% with DFS pattern and anti-DFS70 antibodies detected by CIA had systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease (SARD). Only 5/91 (5.5%) patients with anti-DFS70 antibodies had SARD and their sera were negative on the ANA Screen ELISA. Conclusion. Although anti-DFS70 antibodies cannot exclude the presence of SARD, the likelihood is significantly lower than in patients with other IIF patterns and should be included in test algorithms for ANA testing. PMID:23476678

  5. Making the Common Good Common

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

  6. Oral Health Assessment in the San Blas and Santa Ana Populations of Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Gianopoulos, Vicki; Pizanis, Charles; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Gonzalez, Elmer; Aboytes, Diana; Gonzales, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the oral health of a population in rural Nicaragua. Methods A total of 241 individuals were recruited from areas around San Blas and Santa Ana, Nicaragua. A demographic questionnaire assessing income, access to oral healthcare, means of transportation, and presence of dental/health insurance was collected for each patient. Oral screenings were also conducted to assess for evidence of untreated decayed teeth, restorations, missing/extracted teeth, and presence/absence of periodontal disease. Results The majority of residents in San Blas and Santa Ana, Nicaragua have little income if any, no medical or dental insurance of any kind and no means of transportation. There was a very high prevalence of untreated decayed teeth among the population studied where 51.1% of our sample had three or more dental caries. Children aged fewer than 20 years had five times the prevalence of dental decay than those in the United States. No statistically significant difference was found in untreated decayed teeth by age or gender. A smaller percentage (25.2%) of all patients had restorations with a statistically significant difference found between genders (p<0.0001). There was also a relationship between gender and number of missing/extracted teeth (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in amount of untreated decayed teeth among those who reported having been seen by a dentist within the previous one-to-three, greater than three years or never at all. Conclusion Among a population of individuals from San Blas and Santa Ana, Nicaragua, there are major socioeconomic barriers present, and a significant burden of oral pathology is evident. PMID:23865892

  7. Titan2D Based Pyroclastic Flows Hazard Maps for Santa Ana Volcano, El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajo, J. V.; Martinez-Hackert, B.; Escobar, C. D.; Gutierrez, R. E.

    2009-05-01

    Santa Ana Volcano is located in the Apaneca Volcanic Field located to the west of El Salvador, Central America. It is one the six active volcanoes monitor by the Servicios Nacionales de Estudios Territoriales (SNET) in El Salvador, out of twenty that are considered active in this small country by Smithsonian definition. The Santa Ana Volcano is surrounded by rural communities in its proximal areas and in its close distal areas by the second largest city of the country. On October 1st 2005, after a few months of increased fumarolic and seismic activity, it erupted generating a 10 km high steam and ash plume, reportedly seen by some aircraft and estimated using photography by SNET members. Ash was deposited to the west, north-west part of the country, following typical wind pattern for the region, as well as small pyroclastic flows and major lahars in its eastern part. Coffee plantations were lost, as was some crop of coffee in the following season. However, to the west the ash fertilized the land and resulted in an enhanced harvest of coffee beans. Only 2 people were killed from the Blast, thanks to the auto evacuation of proximal communities. Whilst the last eruption had a relatively low human life toll, a stronger eruption spells havoc almost certainly for the region. At this moment no exhaustive study and understanding exists of the pyroclastic flows generated by the Santa Ana Volcano nor a map for this particular hazard. This study proposes the use of Titan2D for those two purposes, using a DEM generated by the SNET using topographic maps as well as DEMs generated using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Images (ASTER).

  8. Audiomagnetotelluric exploration across the Waíanae Range, Óahu, Hawaíi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdardottir, T. D.; Thomas, D. M.; Wallin, E.; Winchester, C.; Sinton, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) method is capable of providing direct evidence of a geothermal resource within the extinct Waíanae volcano, Óahu, Hawaíi. Geothermal systems are becoming an increasingly important energy source worldwide. With electric energy costs in Hawaíi the most expensive in the US (30.54 cents/kWh), it is important to investigate the potential of local geothermal resources. Slightly elevated temperature and chloride concentrations, measured in the 1970's at wells in the upper Lualualei Valley indicate the possibility of a geothermal resource. Previous geophysical investigations: self-potential, rotating quadripole resistivity, and shallow soil temperature surveys in the caldera measured low resistivity values. Resistivity is related to rock characteristics (e.g., porosity, saturation, salinity, temperature, chemistry, and the presence of weathered minerals). We are investigating the area further using the AMT method. We have collected profiles of AMT measurements across the Lualualei Valley and the Waíanae caldera boundary. Anthropogenic noise and access in this area is problematic. Electrical noise, originating from power lines along roads and very low frequency radio towers in the vicinity, add noise to the data. Limited access to sites on military lands inhibit data collection. However, preliminary results show that we have successfully imaged the expected higher resistivity values as our profiles cross the mountains bounding the caldera. As data continue to be collected across the Waíanae Caldera and Range and we begin modeling our data in two dimensions, we expect to be able to identify water table elevations, detect lateral variability between salt and fresh water saturation, estimate thickness of the freshwater lens and depth to the transition zone, image fault structures at the caldera boundary, and with enough sensitivity to conductivity, we can identify regions of elevated temperature.

  9. Aquatic assemblages of the highly urbanized Santa Ana River Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.; Burton, C.A.; Belitz, K.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the structure of periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblages and their associations with environmental variables at 17 sites on streams of the highly urbanized Santa Ana River basin in Southern California. All assemblages exhibited strong differences between highly urbanized sites in the valley and the least-impacted sites at the transition between the valley and undeveloped mountains. Results within the urbanized area differed among taxa. Periphyton assemblages were dominated by diatoms (>75% of total taxa). Periphyton assemblages within the urbanized area were not associated with any of the measured environmental variables, suggesting that structure of urban periphyton assemblages might be highly dependent on colonization dynamics. The number of Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Plecoptera (EPT) taxa included in macroinvertebrate assemblages ranged from 0 to 6 at urbanized sites. Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages had significant correlations with several environmental variables within the urban area, suggesting that stream size and permanence were important determinants of distribution among the species able to survive conditions in urban streams. Only 4 of 16 fish species collected were native to the drainage. Fish assemblages of urbanized sites included two native species, arroyo chub Gila orcuttii and Santa Ana sucker Catostomus santaanae, at sites that were intermediate in coefficient of variation of bank-full width, depth, bed substrate, and water temperature. Alien species dominated urbanized sites with lesser or greater values for these variables. These results suggest that urban streams can be structured to enhance populations of native fishes. Continued study of urban streams in the Santa Ana River basin and elsewhere will contribute to the basic understanding of ecological principles and help preserve the maximum ecological value of streams in highly urbanized areas.

  10. Thermal Monitoring of Santa Ana Volcano. El Salvador. C.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez, B.; Escobar, D.; López, D.; Olmos, R.; Barahona, F.; Hernández, A.; Funes, R.; Benítez, E.

    2006-12-01

    The thermal regime of Santa Ana volcano has been monitored measuring temperatures in the fumaroles and the crater lake from 2002 to 2005. SNET (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales) monitored five fumaroles and the crater lake, and researchers from UES(Universidad de El Salvador) monitored two fumaroles and the soils within the crater. Temperatures measured within the crater lake indicate a 3.4 °C increase in temperature from 2002 to 2004, suggesting an increase in heat flow to the lake during that period. This increase in heat flow could be produced by new magma input to the magmatic chamber beneath the lake or the opening of new permeable conduits for the transfer of gases and heat to the surface. A continuous monitoring station within the crater soils registered an increase of temperature from 84 to 95 °C three days after a landslide within the crater ejected ash that was dispersed around the volcano (explosion around June 16, 2005). After incandescence was first observed in the crater on August 26, 2005, discrete temperature measurements on August 29, 2005 in one of the fumaroles showed an increase in temperature of 1.8 °C with respect to previous measurements. In addition, the same day, a new fumarolica zone in the SE of the crater was identified presenting high CO2 fluxes and temperatures around 60 to 70 °C. These results show increments in temperature and changes in the thermal regime of Santa Ana volcano that can be summarized as follows: a) gradual increase in the annual temperature of the lake, b) significant increment in the temperatures of fumaroles within the crater, and c) appearance of new fumaroles in the crater border. These thermal observations could be considered as possible precursory signals of the October 1st, 2005 eruption of Santa Ana volcano.

  11. The Santa AnaWinds of Southern California in the context of Fire Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yang

    The Santa Ana winds represent a high-impact weather event owing to the intimate relationship between the extremely dry, fast winds and the wildfire threat. The winds can be locally gusty, particularly in the complex terrain of San Diego county, where the airflow has characteristics of downslope windstorms. These winds can cause and/or rapidly spread wildfires, the threat of which is particularly acute during the autumn season before the onset of winter rains. It remains a day-to-day challenge to accurately predict wind gust speed, especially in the mountainous regions. Our study employs large physics ensembles composed of high-resolution simulations of severe downslope windstorms that involve an exhaustive examination of available model physical parameterizations. Model results are calibrated and validated against the San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) mesonet observations, a dense, homogenous, and well-positioned network with uniform high quality. Results demonstrate model horizontal resolution, model physics, random perturbations and landuse database can have a material effect on the strength, location and timing of Santa Ana winds in real-data simulations. A large model physics ensemble reveals the land surface model to be most crucial in skillful wind predictions, which are particularly sensitive to the surface roughness length. A surprisingly simple gust parameterization is proposed for the San Diego network, based on the discovery that this homogeneous mesonet has a nearly invariant network-averaged gust factor. The gust forecast technique is of special interest in the context of routine weather combined with atmospheric humidity and fuel moisture information. A real-time wildfire threat warning system, the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTI), has been developed to effectively communicate the upcoming Santa Ana wind strength with respect to the anticipated fire danger to first responders and the public. In addition to the wind and gust forecast techniques

  12. NURSING EMERGING. ANA Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, (2015) 3rd Edition.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Carla

    2016-04-01

    AHNA Past-President Carla Mariano recently had the privilege of serving on the American Nurses Association's (ANA) Nursing Scope and Standards Revision Workgroup. Representing the specialty practice of holistic nursing, Carla's presence within this workgroup contributed greatly to the inclusion of holistic principles and values throughout the new 2015 Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, 3rd edition, the foundational document that informs and guides professional nursing practice within the United States. This is a significant step forward for holistic nursing and an indicator of our growing influence as specialty practice. PMID:27305802

  13. Mate preference in wild and domesticated (game-farm) mallards (Anas platyrhynchos): I. Initial preference

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, K.M.; Shoffner, R.N.; Phillips, R.E.; Lee, F.B.

    1978-01-01

    Wild and game-farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) raised in pure strain and mixed groups were tested for initial mate preference in a choice test. Female mallards showed no significant preference but males of either strain raised with females of their own strain significantly preferred female models of their own strain during the test. Males raised with females of the other strain merely showed attenuation of their preference for female models of their own strain and did not show preference for female models of the other strain. Game-farm mallards approached models significantly sooner than wild mallards and there was a significant sex X mate interaction.

  14. Early imprinting in wild and game-farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos): genotype and arousal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, K.M.; Shoffner, R.N.; Phillips, R.E.; Shapiro, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Early imprinting was studied under laboratory conditions in five lines of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) with different degrees of wildness obtained through pedigreed breeding. Data were analyzed by the least squares method. Wild ducklings imprinted better than game-farm (domesticated) ducklings, and heterosis was demonstrated to exist in imprinting traits. Nonadditive genetic variations and genotype-environmental interactions are discussed as possible causes for the heterosis observed. Differences in imprinting between genetic lines are attributed, at least partly, to differences in arousal level during the ducklings' first exposure to the imprinting stimulus.

  15. Dynamics of a thermo-Mediterranean coastal environment the Coto Doñana National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Geraldine; Finlayson, Clive; Espejo, J. M. Recio

    2008-11-01

    Using data collected from existing habitats found in the southwestern Iberian Peninsula, and including data collected in the Biological Reserve of the Parque Nacional de Doñana, Spain, this study considers the seasonal and inter-annual variability of a thermo-Mediterranean, subhumid, environment and the significance of the presence of surface water in the system. This extant environment is then used together with the fossil record from Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar, where Neanderthals lived, as a proxy for the ecology of the emerged landscape outside the cave.

  16. Acidobacteria in freshwater ponds at Doñana National Park, Spain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Johannes; Portillo, M Carmen; Serrano, Laura; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2012-05-01

    The Acidobacteria show a widespread distribution in natural ecosystems. In this study, we analyzed the presence of Acidobacteria in freshwater ponds at Doñana National Park (southwestern Spain). Nucleic acid sequence analysis, quantitative, real-time RT-PCR, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were carried out. Acidobacteria in these aquatic environments were investigated using their 16S and 23S rDNA sequences and acidobacterial specific primer pairs through phylogenetic approaches. The presence of up to five subdivisions of Acidobacteria was detected during this study. The analyzed ponds exhibited distinctive patterns of acidobacterial clades. In order to detect their role in ecosystem functions, metabolically active Acidobacteria were detected based upon rRNA analyses. Quantitative, real-time RT-PCR showed a low percentage of metabolically active Acidobacteria at suboxic zones within the water column covered by surface Fe-rich films. Oxygen-saturated areas showed around 4% of total bacterial RNA belonging to Acidobacteria both in the water column and the sediment surface. The morphology of the most abundant Acidobacteria was revealed by FISH as cocci generally in pairs or chains. Enrichment cultures were also obtained and indicated a putative metabolism based on aerobic and heterotrophic characteristics likely taking advantage of the abundant organic matter present at the investigated sites. These results represent a significant contribution toward understanding the distribution and ecological role of the phylum Acidobacteria in natural ecosystems, specifically at Doñana National Park freshwater ponds. PMID:22167078

  17. D-penicillamine-induced ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis in pediatric patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Sang Taek; Cho, Heeyeon

    2016-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are associated with systemic vasculitis. The pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has not been clearly proven, and drug-induced ANCA-associated vasculitis has been reported. Wilson's disease is an inborn error of copper metabolism caused by a mutation in the copper transporting gene ATP7B, and traditional treatment is based on copper chelation with agents such as D-penicillamine. There have been rare reports that prolonged D-penicillamine therapy might cause adverse renal events such as membranous nephropathy and minimal change disease, but it is questionable if D-penicillamine induces ANCA-associated vasculitis. We describe 2 patients with Wilson's disease treated with D-penicillamine who presented with ANCA (+) vasculitis and renal involvement. The 2 patients also showed positive results for antinuclear antibody (ANA). Their kidney biopsy findings were compatible with crescentic/necrotizing glomerulonephritis, pauci-immune type. After diagnosis of AAV, D-penicillamine was stopped. Patients were then treated with plasmapheresis and immunosuppressants, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and the other showed persistent proteinuria. These cases suggest that D-penicillamine may induce ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis with severe renal involvement in pediatric patients, and plasmapheresis combined with immunosuppressant should be considered. PMID:26784915

  18. Interpretation of ANA Indirect Immunofluorescence Test Outside the Darkroom Using NOVA View Compared to Manual Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Copple, Susan S.; Jaskowski, Troy D.; Giles, Rashelle; Hill, Harry R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate NOVA View with focus on reading archived images versus microscope based manual interpretation of ANA HEp-2 slides by an experienced, certified medical technologist. Methods. 369 well defined sera from: 44 rheumatoid arthritis, 50 systemic lupus erythematosus, 35 scleroderma, 19 Sjögren's syndrome, and 10 polymyositis patients as well as 99 healthy controls were examined. In addition, 12 defined sera from the Centers for Disease Control and 100 random patient sera sent to ARUP Laboratories for ANA HEp-2 IIF testing were included. Samples were read using the archived images on NOVA View and compared to results obtained from manual reading. Results. At a 1 : 40/1 : 80 dilution the resulting comparison demonstrated 94.8%/92.9% positive, 97.4%/97.4% negative, and 96.5%/96.2% total agreements between manual IIF and NOVA View archived images. Agreement of identifiable patterns between methods was 97%, with PCNA and mixed patterns undetermined. Conclusion. Excellent agreements were obtained between reading archived images on NOVA View and manually on a fluorescent microscope. In addition, workflow benefits were observed which need to be analyzed in future studies. PMID:24741573

  19. "Houses and Fields and Vineyards Shall Yet Again Be Bought in This Land": The Story of Ana, a Public Kindergarten Teacher in Portugal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasconcelos, Teresa Maria Sena

    This study examined the teaching style and methods of Ana, a kindergarten teacher in Portugal, chosen because she is considered a master teacher by colleagues and parents and because she grew up in Portugal before democracy. The study attempted to answer the questions: (1) What are the commitments and competencies that distinguish Ana as a master…

  20. Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blood samples from 105 northern pintails (Anas acuta) captured on Hokkaido, Japan were tested for antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) to assess possible involvement of this species in the transmission and spread of economically impor...

  1. Utilising a Blended Ethnographic Approach to Explore the Online and Offline Lives of Pro-Ana Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The article critically interrogates contemporary discourses and practices around "anorexia nervosa" through an ethnographic study that moves between two sites: an online pro-anorexia (pro-ana) community, and a Local Authority-funded eating disorder prevention project located in schools and youth centres in the north of England. The article…

  2. Individual Differences Associated with Exposure to "Ana-Mia" Websites: An Examination of Adolescents from 25 European Countries.

    PubMed

    Almenara, Carlos A; Machackova, Hana; Smahel, David

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the individual differences associated with adolescents' exposure to "ana-mia" websites (i.e., websites where people discuss ways to be very thin, such as being anorexic). Participants were adolescents from a large cross-national survey in 25 European countries (N = 18,709, aged 11-16, 50% girls). Sociodemographic and individual factors (i.e., variables related to Internet use and personality traits) were included in a logistic regression performed separately for girls and boys. The results showed that sensation seeking and online disinhibition were both associated with an increased risk of exposure to "ana-mia" websites in girls as well as in boys, although some gender differences were apparent. In girls, but not in boys, the older the child and higher the socioeconomic status, higher the chance of being exposed to "ana-mia" websites. Further research is recommended to understand the real impact of "ana-mia" website exposure on adolescent health. PMID:27448192

  3. SEQUENTIAL SAMPLING OF PLASMA CHOLINESTERASE IN MALLARDS (ANAS PLATYRHYNCHOS) AS AN INDICATOR OF EXPOSURE TO CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of sequential measurements of plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity for monitoring exposure to organophosphorus pesticides was investigated in the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). t the onset of incubation, birds were assigned to treated (400 ppm methyl parathion in the diet)...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bacteriocinogenic Strain Enterococcus faecalis DBH18, Isolated from Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Arbulu, Sara; Jimenez, Juan J.; Borrero, Juan; Sánchez, Jorge; Frantzen, Cyril; Herranz, Carmen; Nes, Ingolf F.; Cintas, Luis M.; Diep, Dzung B.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis DBH18, a bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacterium (LAB) isolated from mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). The assembly contains 2,836,724 bp, with a G+C content of 37.6%. The genome is predicted to contain 2,654 coding DNA sequences (CDSs) and 50 RNAs. PMID:27417838

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bacteriocinogenic Strain Enterococcus faecalis DBH18, Isolated from Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Arbulu, Sara; Jimenez, Juan J; Borrero, Juan; Sánchez, Jorge; Frantzen, Cyril; Herranz, Carmen; Nes, Ingolf F; Cintas, Luis M; Diep, Dzung B; Hernández, Pablo E

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis DBH18, a bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacterium (LAB) isolated from mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). The assembly contains 2,836,724 bp, with a G+C content of 37.6%. The genome is predicted to contain 2,654 coding DNA sequences (CDSs) and 50 RNAs. PMID:27417838

  6. 78 FR 53780 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Doña Ana County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Las Cruces District Office, proposes to sell two parcels of public land totaling 2.47 acres in Do[ntilde]a Ana County, New Mexico. The public land would be sold to the Union Pacific Railroad for $11,000 which is more than the appraised fair market...

  7. Conscientizacion of the Oppressed Language and the Politics of Humor in Ana Castillo's "So Far from God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thananopavarn, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores the relationship between Ana Castillo's novel "So Far from God" (1993) and her development of an activist poetics inspired by Paulo Freire's influential 1970 treatise "Pedagogy of the Oppressed." "So Far from God" may be understood as the practical application of Castillo's theory of "conscienticized poetics"; that is, the…

  8. 75 FR 36677 - Temporary Closure to All Public Use on Public Land in Doña Ana County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Temporary Closure to All Public Use on Public Land in Do a Ana County, NM... closure to all public use, including casual use, to protect person, property, and public land and... Mexico, totaling 67.5 acres. All public use, including casual use, is prohibited on this 67.5-...

  9. Biomimicry of multifunctional nanostructures in the neck feathers of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos L.) drakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudiyev, Tural; Dogan, Tamer; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-04-01

    Biological systems serve as fundamental sources of inspiration for the development of artificially colored devices, and their investigation provides a great number of photonic design opportunities. While several successful biomimetic designs have been detailed in the literature, conventional fabrication techniques nonetheless remain inferior to their natural counterparts in complexity, ease of production and material economy. Here, we investigate the iridescent neck feathers of Anas platyrhynchos drakes, show that they feature an unusual arrangement of two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals and further exhibit a superhydrophobic surface, and mimic this multifunctional structure using a nanostructure composite fabricated by a recently developed top-down iterative size reduction method, which avoids the above-mentioned fabrication challenges, provides macroscale control and enhances hydrophobicity through the surface structure. Our 2D solid core photonic crystal fibres strongly resemble drake neck plumage in structure and fully polymeric material composition, and can be produced in wide array of colors by minor alterations during the size reduction process.

  10. Outbreak of Avian Tuberculosis in Commercial Domestic Pekin Ducks ( Anas platyrhynchos domestica).

    PubMed

    Zhu, De-Kang; Song, Xiao-Heng; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Wang-Shu; Ou, Xu-Ming; Chen, Hong-Xi; Liu, Ma-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shu; Jia, Ren-Yong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Cheng, An-Chun

    2016-09-01

    Avian tuberculosis is a contagious disease affecting various domestic and wild bird species, and is caused by Mycobacterium avium . It is reported extremely rarely in commercial poultry flocks and has not been reported in commercial domestic ducks to date, with domestic ducks reported to be moderately resistant to M. avium infection. Here, we report the outbreak of avian tuberculosis in commercial Pekin duck ( Anas platyrhynchos domestica) flocks. Postmortem and histopathologic findings included nodules presenting in the visceral organs of ducks, and granulomas with central caseous necrosis surrounded by infiltrating lymphocytes. The M. avium pathogen was isolated and further identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and PCR based on insert sequence IS901 and the 16S rRNA gene. We highlight that avian tuberculosis not only has economic significance for the duck industry, but also presents a potential zoonotic hazard to humans. PMID:27610730

  11. Stratospheric intrusions, the Santa Ana winds, and wildland fires in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Pierce, R. B.; Schultz, P. J.

    2015-07-01

    The Santa Ana winds of Southern California have long been associated with wildland fires that can adversely affect air quality and lead to loss of life and property. These katabatic winds are driven primarily by thermal gradients but can be exacerbated by northerly flow associated with upper level troughs passing through the western U.S. In this paper, we show that the fire danger associated with the passage of upper level troughs can be further increased by the formation of deep tropopause folds that transport extremely dry ozone-rich air from the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere to the surface. Stratospheric intrusions can thus increase surface ozone both directly through transport and indirectly through their influence on wildland fires. We illustrate this situation with the example of the Springs Fire, which burned nearly 25,000 acres in Ventura County during May 2013.

  12. Lead shot ingestion in two raptor species from Doñana, Spain.

    PubMed

    Mateo, R; Cadenas, R; Máñez, M; Guitart, R

    2001-01-01

    Diurnal raptors inhabiting wetland areas where waterfowl shooting is conducted have many opportunities to ingest lead (Pb) shot pellets when feeding on their prey. Exposure to Pb shot was studied in the Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti), an endangered species with a world population of about 150 breeding pairs, and in the red kite (Milvus milvus) from Doñana (southwest Spain). Lead exposure was evaluated by the presence of Pb shot in the pellets of both species. Results obtained by this noninvasive method demonstrated Pb shot in 11.0% of Spanish imperial eagle and 5.5% of red kite pellets. When the data of both species were pooled, there was a significant relationship between Pb shot ingestion and consumption of waterfowl during the hunting season. Pb shot found in pellets exhibited signs of erosion, and their weight distribution had peaks at 70, 170, and 240 mg, which could correspond to ammunition used for duck and goose hunting. PMID:11161671

  13. Effects of ingested crude and dispersed crude oil on thermoregulation in ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, B.M.

    1989-02-01

    Thermoregulatory effects of ingested doses of Statfjord A crude oil and of this oil mixed with the dispersant Finasol OSR-5 were studied in adult domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) exposed to ambient temperatures of +16 degrees C and -17 degrees C. The data show that ingestion of both the crude and the oil-dispersant mixture resulted in an increased body temperature during exposure to the low ambient temperature (-17 degrees C). Neither contaminant had any effect on body temperature during exposure to +16 degrees C. Ingestion of the contaminants had no effect on metabolic heat production at either ambient temperature. The breast skin temperature of the ducks in both contaminated groups was significantly decreased when the ducks were exposed to the low ambient temperature. This indicates that the increase in body temperature observed in the contaminated ducks at the low ambient temperature is due to an increase in peripheral vasoconstriction.

  14. Meteorological Controls on Biomass Burning During Santa Ana Events in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veraverbeke, Sander; Capps, Scott; Hook, Simon J.; Randerson, James T.; Jin, Yufang; Hall, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Fires occurring during Santa Ana (SA) events in southern California are driven by extreme fire weather characterized by high temperatures, low humidities, and high wind speeds. We studied the controls on burned area and carbon emissions during two intensive SA burning periods in 2003 and 2007. We therefore used remote sensing data in parallel with fire weather simulations of the Weather and Regional Forecast model. Total carbon emissions were approximately 1800 gigagrams in 2003 and 900 gigagrams in 2007, based on a daily burned area and a fire emission model that accounted for spatial variability in fuel loads and combustion completeness. On a regional scale, relatively strong positive correlations were found between the daily Fosberg fire weather index and burned area/emissions (probability is less than 0.01). Our analysis provides a quantitative assessment of relationships between fire activity and weather during severe SA fires in southern California.

  15. The susceptibility of the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos) to Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jensen, W.I.; Duncan, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Most strains of Clostridium botulinum type C, after having lost their capacity to produce their dominant toxin (C1) as a result of being "cured" of their prophages, continue to produce C2, a trypsin-activable toxin reported by other investigators. While of relatively low toxicity when administered perorally to the adult mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), it was highly toxic when given parenterally. By the intravenous route, for example, it was more than 1,000 times as toxic as C1 toxin by the same route, when compared on the basis of mouse intraperitoneal toxicity. The cause of death in every instance was massive pulmonary edema and hemorrhage rather than the respiratory paralysis that occurs in C1 intoxication.

  16. Migration of Waterfowl in the East Asian Flyway and Spatial Relationship to HPAI H5N1 Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Takekawa, John Y.; Newman, Scott H.; Xiao, Xiangming; Prosser, Diann J.; Spragens, Kyle A.; Palm, Eric C.; Yan, Baoping; Li, Tianxian; Lei, Fumin; Zhao, Delong; Douglas, David C.; Muzaffar, Sabir Bin; Ji, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Poyang Lake is situated within the East Asian Flyway, a migratory corridor for waterfowl that also encompasses Guangdong Province, China, the epicenter of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1. The lake is the largest freshwater body in China and a significant congregation site for waterfowl; however, surrounding rice fields and poultry grazing have created an overlap with wild waterbirds, a situation conducive to avian influenza transmission. Reports of HPAI H5N1 in healthy wild ducks at Poyang Lake have raised concerns about the potential of resilient free-ranging birds to disseminate the virus. Yet the role wild ducks play in connecting regions of HPAI H5N1 outbreak in Asia is hindered by a lack of information about their migratory ecology. During 2007–08 we marked wild ducks at Poyang Lake with satellite transmitters to examine the location and timing of spring migration and identify any spatiotemporal relationship with HPAI H5N1 outbreaks. Species included the Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope), northern pintail (Anas acuta), common teal (Anas crecca), falcated teal (Anas falcata), Baikal teal (Anas formosa), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), garganey (Anas querquedula), and Chinese spotbill (Anas poecilohyncha). These wild ducks (excluding the resident mallard and Chinese spotbill ducks) followed the East Asian Flyway along the coast to breeding areas in northern China, eastern Mongolia, and eastern Russia. None migrated west toward Qinghai Lake (site of the largest wild bird epizootic), thus failing to demonstrate any migratory connection to the Central Asian Flyway. A newly developed Brownian bridge spatial analysis indicated that HPAI H5N1 outbreaks reported in the flyway were related to latitude and poultry density but not to the core migration corridor or to wetland habitats. Also, we found a temporal mismatch between timing of outbreaks and wild duck movements. These analyses depend on complete or representative reporting of outbreaks, but by

  17. Migration of waterfowl in the East Asian flyway and spatial relationship to HPAI H5N1 outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, John Y; Newman, Scott H; Xiao, Xiangming; Prosser, Diann J; Spragens, Kyle A; Palm, Eric C; Yan, Baoping; Li, Tianxian; Lei, Fumin; Zhao, Delong; Douglas, David C; Muzaffar, Sabir Bin; Ji, Weitao

    2010-03-01

    Poyang Lake is situated within the East Asian Flyway, a migratory corridor for waterfowl that also encompasses Guangdong Province, China, the epicenter of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1. The lake is the largest freshwater body in China and a significant congregation site for waterfowl; however, surrounding rice fields and poultry grazing have created an overlap with wild waterbirds, a situation conducive to avian influenza transmission. Reports of HPAI H5N1 in healthy wild ducks at Poyang Lake have raised concerns about the potential of resilient free-ranging birds to disseminate the virus. Yet the role wild ducks play in connecting regions of HPAI H5N1 outbreak in Asia is hindered by a lack of information about their migratory ecology. During 2007-08 we marked wild ducks at Poyang Lake with satellite transmitters to examine the location and timing of spring migration and identify any spatiotemporal relationship with HPAI H5N1 outbreaks. Species included the Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope), northern pintail (Anas acuta), common teal (Anas crecca), falcated teal (Anas falcata), Baikal teal (Anas formosa), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), garganey (Anas querquedula), and Chinese spotbill (Anas poecilohyncha). These wild ducks (excluding the resident mallard and Chinese spotbill ducks) followed the East Asian Flyway along the coast to breeding areas in northern China, eastern Mongolia, and eastern Russia. None migrated west toward Qinghai Lake (site of the largest wild bird epizootic), thus failing to demonstrate any migratory connection to the Central Asian Flyway. A newly developed Brownian bridge spatial analysis indicated that HPAI H5N1 outbreaks reported in the flyway were related to latitude and poultry density but not to the core migration corridor or to wetland habitats. Also, we found a temporal mismatch between timing of outbreaks and wild duck movements. These analyses depend on complete or representative reporting of outbreaks, but by

  18. Migration of waterfowl in the east asian flyway and spatial relationship to HPAI H5N1 outbreaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takekawa, J.Y.; Newman, S.H.; Xiao, X.; Prosser, D.J.; Spragens, K.A.; Palm, E.C.; Yan, B.; Li, T.; Lei, F.; Zhao, D.; Douglas, D.C.; Muzaffar, S.B.; Ji, W.

    2010-01-01

    Poyang Lake is situated within the East Asian Flyway, a migratory corridor for waterfowl that also encompasses Guangdong Province, China, the epicenter of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1. The lake is the largest freshwater body in China and a significant congregation site for waterfowl; however, surrounding rice fields and poultry grazing have created an overlap with wild waterbirds, a situation conducive to avian influenza transmission. Reports of HPAI H5N1 in healthy wild ducks at Poyang Lake have raised concerns about the potential of resilient free-ranging birds to disseminate the virus. Yet the role wild ducks play in connecting regions of HPAI H5N1 outbreak in Asia is hindered by a lack of information about their migratory ecology. During 2007-08 we marked wild ducks at Poyang Lake with satellite transmitters to examine the location and timing of spring migration and identify any spatiotemporal relationship with HPAI H5N1 outbreaks. Species included the Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope), northern pintail (Anas acuta), common teal (Anas crecca), falcated teal (Anas falcata), Baikal teal (Anas formosa), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), garganey (Anas querquedula), and Chinese spotbill (Anas poecilohyncha). These wild ducks (excluding the resident mallard and Chinese spotbill ducks) followed the East Asian Flyway along the coast to breeding areas in northern China, eastern Mongolia, and eastern Russia. None migrated west toward Qinghai Lake (site of the largest wild bird epizootic), thus failing to demonstrate any migratory connection to the Central Asian Flyway. A newly developed Brownian bridge spatial analysis indicated that HPAI H5N1 outbreaks reported in the flyway were related to latitude and poultry density but not to the core migration corridor or to wetland habitats. Also, we found a temporal mismatch between timing of outbreaks and wild duck movements. These analyses depend on complete or representative reporting of outbreaks, but by

  19. Prevalence of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and clinical significance of ANA profile: data from a tertiary hospital in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zaixing; Ren, Yingpeng; Liu, Donghong; Lin, Feng; Liang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary and useful to explore prevalence of various systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) in patients with suspicion of having SARDs and to characterize antinuclear antibodies (ANA) profile for identifying different populations (SARDs and non-SARDs). A total of 5024 consecutive patients with available medical records were investigated, whose sera had been tested for ANA profile, including ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibodies, between 31 January 2012 and 26 March 2014. Only 594 (11.8%) patients were diagnosed with SARDs of those suspected with SARDs. The prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was highest (3.2%), followed by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (2.5%), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) (1.7%), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (1.5%), etc. Of females, SLE also showed the highest prevalence (6%), while of males, AS showed the highest prevalence (1.9%). The prevalence of most SARDs was closely associated with age, except mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and the variation characteristics among different age groups were different among various SARDs. The prevalence of ANA was significantly increased in most SARD patients [especially in SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc) and MCTD]. For anti-ENA antibodies, in contrast to some autoantibodies associated with multiple SARDs (e.g. anti-SSA, SSB, nRNP), others were relatively specific for certain diseases, such as anti-dsDNA, Sm, histone, nucleosome and Rib-P for SLE, anti-SCL-70 for SSc and anti-Jo-1 for polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM). Of note, ANA profile appeared to be of little significance for AS, ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR), adult-onset Still's disease (ASD) and Behcet's disease (BD). The younger were more likely to have the presence of anti-dsDNA, Sm, histone or Rib-P for SLE, and anti-SSA for RA or MCTD. No significant differences for frequencies of ANA and anti-ENA autoantibodies were found between sexes in most SARDs

  20. Latvian Waste Management Modelling in View of Environmental Impact Reduction / Latvijas Atkritumu SAIMNIECĪBAS ATTĪSTĪBA un TĀS RADĪTĀS Ietekmes UZ Vidi SAMAZINĀŠANAS MODELĒŠANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teibe, I.; Bendere, R.; Arina, D.

    2013-12-01

    In the work, the life-cycle assessment approach is applied to the planning of waste management development in a seaside region (Piejūra) using the Waste Management Planning System (WAMPS) program. In Latvia, the measures to be taken for the climate change mitigation are of utmost importance - especially as related to the WM performance, since a disposal of biodegradable waste presents the primary source of GHG emissions. To reduce the amount of such waste is therefore one of the most significant goals in the State WM plan for 2013-2020, whose adoption is the greatest challenge for municipalities. The authors analyse seven models which involve widely employed biomass processing methods, are based on experimental data and intended for minimising the direct disposal of organic mass at the solid waste landfills. The numerical results obtained evidence that the thermal or biotechnological treatment of organic waste substantially reduces the negative environmental impact of WM practices - by up to 6% as compared with the currently existing. Klimata pārmaiņu samazināšanas pasākumi Latvijā atkritumu saimniecības sektorā ir īpaši svarīgi. jo bioloģiski sadalāmo atkritumu apglabāšana ir viens no būtiskākajiem SEG emisiju avotiem valstī. Pētījumā modelēti virkne sadzīves atkritumu apsaimniekošanas modeļi. kas ietver plašāk izmantotās biomasas pārstrādes metodes un samazina tiešu organiskās masas apglabāšanu cieto sadzīves atkritumu poligonos. Atkritumu apsaimniekošanas modeļu radītās vides ietekmes novērtēšanai izmantota WAMPS (Waste Management Planning System) programma, kas balstīta uz atkritumu apsaimniekošanas procesu dzīves cikla novērtējumu vienā no desmit Latvijas atkritumu apsaimniekošanas reģioniem - Piejūra. Iegūtie kvantitatīvie rezultāti norāda. ka organiskās atkritumu masas pārstrāde un stabilizēšana, izmantojot biotehnoloģijas vai termisko pārstrādi, būtiski samazina atkritumu apsaimniekošanas rad

  1. Precursory Activity of the 2005 Eruption of Santa Ana Volcano, El Salvador.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, A.; Patrick, M.; Rose, W. I.; Escobar, D.; Montalvo, F.; Gutierrez, E.; Olmos, R.

    2007-12-01

    After a period of unrest, Santa Ana (Illamatepec) volcano in El Salvador erupted suddenly on October 1st, 2005 at 1420 UTC (0820 local time), ejecting its acidic crater lake and generating a gas-and-ash plume ~10 km above the volcano. The short-lived eruption (~1 hr duration) deposited ballistics and ash up to 5m thick at the crater rim and depositing ash up to 40 km to the west. Underlying phreatomagmatic deposits exposed in the crater suggest that larger eruptions of this type are characteristic of recent historic activity. In this study, precursory activity to the 2005 eruption is investigated by analyzing physical and chemical parameters of the crater lake. Data has been compiled on water chemistry, temperature, and color of the lake from direct sampling and ground observations from 2004-2007. Lake water data suggests three phases of activity: (1) constant, well constrained activity from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2004 showing SO4 ~10,000 ppm, Cl ~6000 ppm, and SO4/Cl ~1.6; (2) potential precursory activity from Jan. 2005 to Oct. 2005 expressed as a ramping up of SO4 to 11,625 ppm in May with a sudden decrease to 8250 ppm one month later, increased variability in Cl, and color change from dark coffee color to green in mid-September; and (3) post- eruption activity to present showing increasing Cl to a maximum of 22340 ppm, low SO4/Cl=0.38-0.8, an increase in temperature to 65.6 degrees C, and color change to yellowish-green). Analysis of high resolution satellite imagery from the ASTER sensor (15-90m/pixel) from 2000 to 2007 provides further information on lake size, temperature, and color. ASTER images show that the lake re-established itself further to the west after the eruption, drowning the adjacent high temperature fumarole field (max. 875 degrees C) which potentially contributed to the observed post-eruption changes in the lake. The combination of synoptic satellite-based remote sensing data with ground measurements will enhance the capabilities to recognize and

  2. Biomimicry of multifunctional nanostructures in the neck feathers of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos L.) drakes.

    PubMed

    Khudiyev, Tural; Dogan, Tamer; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Biological systems serve as fundamental sources of inspiration for the development of artificially colored devices, and their investigation provides a great number of photonic design opportunities. While several successful biomimetic designs have been detailed in the literature, conventional fabrication techniques nonetheless remain inferior to their natural counterparts in complexity, ease of production and material economy. Here, we investigate the iridescent neck feathers of Anas platyrhynchos drakes, show that they feature an unusual arrangement of two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals and further exhibit a superhydrophobic surface, and mimic this multifunctional structure using a nanostructure composite fabricated by a recently developed top-down iterative size reduction method, which avoids the above-mentioned fabrication challenges, provides macroscale control and enhances hydrophobicity through the surface structure. Our 2D solid core photonic crystal fibres strongly resemble drake neck plumage in structure and fully polymeric material composition, and can be produced in wide array of colors by minor alterations during the size reduction process. PMID:24751587

  3. Embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of petroleum hydrocarbons in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Egg surface applications of microliter quantities of crude and refined oils of high aromatic content are embryotoxic to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and other avian species; applications of aliphatic hydrocarbons have virtually no effect. Mallard eggs at 72 h of development were exposed to a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons or to aromatic compounds representative to those present in crude oil to assess their toxicity. The class composition of the mixture was similar to that of South Louisiana crude oil, an American Petroleum Institute reference oil. Application of 20 microliter of the mixture reduced embryonic survival by nearly 70%. The temporal pattern of embryonic death was similar to that after exposure to South Louisiana crude oil. Embryonic growth was stunted, as reflected by weight, crown-rump length, and bill length, and there was a significant increase in the incidence of abnormal survivors. When individual classes of aromatic hydrocarbons were tested, tetracyclics caused some embryonic death at the concentrations in the mixture. When classes were tested in all possible combinations of two, no combination appeared to be as toxic as the entire mixture. Addition of the tetracyclic compound chrysene to the aromatic mixture considerably enhanced embryotoxicity, but could not completely account for the toxicity of the crude oil. The presence of additional unidentified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as methylated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic compounds such as chrysene may further account for the embryotoxicity of the crude oil.

  4. Embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of petroleum hydrocarbons in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D J

    1979-09-01

    Egg surface applications of microliter quantities of crude and refined oils of high aromatic content are embryotoxic to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and other avian species; applications of aliphatic hydrocarbons have virtually no effect. Mallard eggs at 72 h of development were exposed to a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons or to aromatic compounds representative to those present in crude oil to assess their toxicity. The class composition of the mixture was similar to that of South Louisiana crude oil, an American Petroleum Institute reference oil. Application of 20 microliter of the mixture reduced embryonic survival by nearly 70%. The temporal pattern of embryonic death was similar to that after exposure to South Louisiana crude oil. Embryonic growth was stunted, as reflected by weight, crown-rump length, and bill length, and there was a significant increase in the incidence of abnormal survivors. When individual classes of aromatic hydrocarbons were tested, tetracyclics caused some embryonic death at the concentrations in the mixture. When classes were tested in all possible combinations of two, no combination appeared to be as toxic as the entire mixture. Addition of the tetracyclic compound chrysene to the aromatic mixture considerably enhanced embryotoxicity, but could not completely account for the toxicity of the crude oil. The presence of additional unidentified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as methylated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic compounds such as chrysene may further account for the embryotoxicity of the crude oil. PMID:513150

  5. Suspended-sediment rating curve response to urbanization and wildfire, Santa Ana River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Rubin, David M.

    2007-06-01

    River suspended-sediment concentrations provide insights to the erosion and transport of materials from a landscape, and changes in concentrations with time may result from landscape processes or human disturbance. Here we show that suspended-sediment concentrations in the Santa Ana River, California, decreased 20-fold with respect to discharge during a 34-year period (1968-2001). These decreases cannot be attributed to changes in sampling technique or timing, nor to event or seasonal hysteresis. Annual peak and total discharge, however, reveal sixfold increases over the 34-year record, which largely explain the decreases in sediment concentration by a nonlinear dilution process. The hydrological changes were related to the widespread urbanization of the watershed, which resulted in increases in storm water discharge without detectable alteration of sediment discharge, thus reducing suspended-sediment concentrations. Periodic upland wildfire significantly increased water discharge, sediment discharge, and suspended-sediment concentrations and thus further altered the rating curve with time. Our results suggest that previous inventories of southern California sediment flux, which assume time-constant rating curves and extend these curves beyond the sampling history, may have substantially overestimated loads during the most recent decades.

  6. Breeding habitat selection and home range of radio-marked black ducks (Anas rubripes) in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringelman, J.K.; Longcore, J.R.; Owen, R.B., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Telemetry techniques were used to monitor the movements and habitat use of 13 female and 7 male black ducks (Anas rubripes) in an inland breeding region of south central Maine in 1977-1980. Black ducks preferred persistent emergent, broad-leaved deciduous forested, and broad-leaved deciduous scrub-shrub wetlands over unconsolidated organic bottom, needle-leaved evergreen forested, and broad-leaved evergreen scrub-shrub ponds. Birds also made frequent use of small ephemeral pools and streams throughout the breeding period. Nests were located in several habitats ranging from wetland sites to upland areas 1.5 km from the most frequently used pond. Home range size averaged 119 ha for females and 231 ha for males and did not differ by reproductive stage. Three pairs used only a single pond during the incubation period. Home ranges were linear (linearity index = 2.8), averaging 1956 m long for females and 2755 m for males. Wetlands used most by hens during incubation recesses were not always those located closest to the nest. Radio-marked ducks that returned in subsequent breeding seasons demonstrated fidelity to the previously used home range. Pair bonds of marked birds lasted until day 19 or 20 of incubation for initial nesting attempts.

  7. Isostatic Gravity Map with Geology of the Santa Ana 30' x 60' Quadrangle, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Lee, Tien-Chang; Biehler, Shawn; Jachens, R.C.; Morton, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an updated isostatic gravity map, with an accompanying discussion of the geologic significance of gravity anomalies in the Santa Ana 30 by 60 minute quadrangle, southern California. Comparison and analysis of the gravity field with mapped geology indicates the configuration of structures bounding the Los Angeles Basin, geometry of basins developed within the Elsinore and San Jacinto Fault zones, and a probable Pliocene drainage network carved into the bedrock of the Perris block. Total cumulative horizontal displacement on the Elsinore Fault derived from analysis of the length of strike-slip basins within the fault zone is about 5-12 km and is consistent with previously published estimates derived from other sources of information. This report also presents a map of density variations within pre-Cenozoic metamorphic and igneous basement rocks. Analysis of basement gravity patterns across the Elsinore Fault zone suggests 6-10 km of right-lateral displacement. A high-amplitude basement gravity high is present over the San Joaquin Hills and is most likely caused by Peninsular Ranges gabbro and/or Tertiary mafic intrusion. A major basement gravity gradient coincides with the San Jacinto Fault zone and marked magnetic, seismic-velocity, and isotopic gradients that reflect a discontinuity within the Peninsular Ranges batholith in the northeast corner of the quadrangle.

  8. [Friends of virtual Ana--the phenomenon of pro-anorexia in the Internet].

    PubMed

    Stochel, Martyna; Janas-Kozik, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is regarded as a serious mental disturbance, where denial of illness and strong resistance to treatment are symptomatic features. In many cases it leads to extreme devastation or even to death. Effective treatment of this disorder still remains a challenge for clinicians and researchers. Since the 90-ies of the previous century there has been a rise in the free access to the internet. At present over a billion people all over the world use it. What young people look for in the internet is not only information, but also friends, support or entertainment. For last a few years, a phenomenon of pro-anorexia has been present in the Internet, connecting people who claim that anorexia is a "lifestyle" rather than a deadly illness, which should be treat. They communicate with each other through the internet blogs, forums and popular social networking sites, creating a virtual community. The pro-ana community is made up of adolescent girls and young women who decide on dieting. Pro-anorexia is still a poorly known phenomenon, especially in Poland. It seems to be very important to take a note on this phenomenon in the face of an increasing prevalence of eating disorders in the last years. PMID:21452504

  9. Heat exposure and the toxicity of one number four lead shot in Mallards, Anas platyrhynchos

    SciTech Connect

    Srebocan, E.; Rattner, B.A.

    1988-02-01

    Lead poisoning from ingested shot is a major cause of mortality in waterfowl throughout the world. In North America, most waterfowl that die from lead poisoning succumb following the hunting season. Cold and harsh winter weather is generally thought to exacerbate lead toxicity in birds. Although largely undocumented, there is considerable opportunity for birds to ingest lead shot in the summer during periods of extreme heat. Substantial lead exposure in over 50% of the American black ducks (Anas rubripes) captured in late summer has been observed in areas of the Chesapeake Bay. Moreover, investigations with rodents, rabbits, and man have demonstrated that the toxicity of lead is increased by high environmental temperature, possibly caused by elevated metabolic rate, dehydration, and impaired lead excretion. A recent study in which black ducks were dosed with a single number 4 lead shot suggested that toxicity may be enhanced during periods of extreme hot weather. To further investigate this finding, the authors examined lead toxicity in mallards maintained at thermoneutral temperature (21/sup 0/C) and at an elevated temperature (35/sup 0/C) approaching the upper critical limit.

  10. Transfer of Maternal Antibodies against Avian Influenza Virus in Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Jacintha G. B.; Mateman, A. Christa; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Maternal antibodies protect chicks from infection with pathogens early in life and may impact pathogen dynamics due to the alteration of the proportion of susceptible individuals in a population. We investigated the transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus (AIV) in a key AIV host species, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Combining observations in both the field and in mallards kept in captivity, we connected maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs to (i) female body condition, (ii) female AIV antibody concentration, (iii) egg laying order, (iv) egg size and (v) embryo sex. We applied maternity analysis to the eggs collected in the field to account for intraspecific nest parasitism, which is reportedly high in Anseriformes, detecting parasitic eggs in one out of eight clutches. AIV antibody prevalence in free-living and captive females was respectively 48% and 56%, with 43% and 24% of the eggs receiving these antibodies maternally. In both field and captive study, maternal AIV antibody concentrations in egg yolk correlated positively with circulating AIV antibody concentrations in females. In the captive study, yolk AIV antibody concentrations correlated positively with egg laying order. Female body mass and egg size from the field and captive study, and embryos sex from the field study were not associated with maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs. Our study indicates that maternal AIV antibody transfer may potentially play an important role in shaping AIV infection dynamics in mallards. PMID:25386907

  11. Biomimicry of multifunctional nanostructures in the neck feathers of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos L.) drakes

    PubMed Central

    Khudiyev, Tural; Dogan, Tamer; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Biological systems serve as fundamental sources of inspiration for the development of artificially colored devices, and their investigation provides a great number of photonic design opportunities. While several successful biomimetic designs have been detailed in the literature, conventional fabrication techniques nonetheless remain inferior to their natural counterparts in complexity, ease of production and material economy. Here, we investigate the iridescent neck feathers of Anas platyrhynchos drakes, show that they feature an unusual arrangement of two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals and further exhibit a superhydrophobic surface, and mimic this multifunctional structure using a nanostructure composite fabricated by a recently developed top-down iterative size reduction method, which avoids the above-mentioned fabrication challenges, provides macroscale control and enhances hydrophobicity through the surface structure. Our 2D solid core photonic crystal fibres strongly resemble drake neck plumage in structure and fully polymeric material composition, and can be produced in wide array of colors by minor alterations during the size reduction process. PMID:24751587

  12. Anaïs Nin and the developmental use of the creative process.

    PubMed

    Kavaler-Adler, S

    1992-01-01

    Anaïs Nin had the capacity to work through the wound of self-injury through the combination of poetic and analytic exploration demonstrated in her writing. She recreated her father, and confronted the fallacies of her idealization, as well as the suppressed anger that kept her enslaved in wishes for his mirroring admiration. There was no escape from injury for Nin. After the father's departure, she scrutinized herself for flaws, trying to discover a reason for her father's betrayal. Yet, the humiliation was modified by some knowledge of the narcissistic bind that she was in, and by some evidence that her father was unworthy of the kind of worship that she clung to from childhood. Nin transcends retaliation. Her fictional abandonment of her father does not come from vindictiveness. Rather, it comes through growing insight into herself and into her own needs. There is a letting-go of past fantasies of idealization, and a mourning process that is based on both awareness and acceptance of the disappointments in these idealized fantasies. Separation and loss stem from surrendering the fusion with the idealized object and its counterpart grandiose self, a grandiose self seen here as a false self that exists through resonating with image projections and their reflections. PMID:1579617

  13. Tracking Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) with GPS Satellite Transmitters Along Their Migration Route Through Northeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Ki-Sup; Kim, Seol-Hee; Hwang, Jong-Kyung; Woo, Chanjin; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Suh, Jae-Hwa; Jeong, Jipseol; Wang, Seung-Jun; Chung, Hyen-Mi; Yu, Seung-do; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Mo, In-Pil

    2016-05-01

    In this study, Global Positioning System satellite transmitters were attached to three mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) wintering in South Korea to track their migration routes, stopover sites, breeding sites, and migration patterns. We successfully tracked only one mallard (no. 108917) from November 15, 2011, to November 29, 2013, and determined separate migration routes in two cases of spring migration and one case of fall migration. The mallard repeatedly migrated to the same final destination, even though the travel path varied. We identified six stopover sites: Hunhe River, Liaohe River, Yinma River, Yalu River, Songjeon Bay, and Dahuofang Reservoir in China and South Korea. The wintering sites of two migration cases were discovered to be identical (Gokgyo River in Asan, South Korea). The terminal sites, which were presumed to be breeding grounds, were the same in both cases (Hinggan League in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China). On the basis of the migration routes identified in this study, we suggest that future efforts to control highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) should not only include avian influenza surveillance but also implement flyway-based strategies, with regard to all countries affected by potential HPAI outbreaks. PMID:27309072

  14. Suspended-sediment rating curve response to urbanization and wildfire, Santa Ana River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Rubin, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    River suspended-sediment concentrations provide insights to the erosion and transport of materials from a landscape, and changes in concentrations with time may result from landscape processes or human disturbance. Here we show that suspended-sediment concentrations in the Santa Ana River, California, decreased 20-fold with respect to discharge during a 34-year period (1968−2001). These decreases cannot be attributed to changes in sampling technique or timing, nor to event or seasonal hysteresis. Annual peak and total discharge, however, reveal sixfold increases over the 34-year record, which largely explain the decreases in sediment concentration by a nonlinear dilution process. The hydrological changes were related to the widespread urbanization of the watershed, which resulted in increases in storm water discharge without detectable alteration of sediment discharge, thus reducing suspended-sediment concentrations. Periodic upland wildfire significantly increased water discharge, sediment discharge, and suspended-sediment concentrations and thus further altered the rating curve with time. Our results suggest that previous inventories of southern California sediment flux, which assume time-constant rating curves and extend these curves beyond the sampling history, may have substantially overestimated loads during the most recent decades.

  15. Biomonitoring recycled water in the Santa Ana River Basin in southern California.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Carney, Michael; Hinton, David E; Lyon, Stephen; Woodside, Greg; Duong, Cuong N; Kim, Sang-Don; Schlenk, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The Santa Ana River (SAR) is the primary source of groundwater recharge for the Orange County Groundwater Basin in coastal southern California. Approximately 85% base flow in the SAR originates from wastewater treatment plants operated by three dischargers. An on-line, flow-through bioassay using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a means of judging potential public health impacts was employed to evaluate the water quality of the surface water and shallow groundwater originating from the SAR. Three chronic (3-4.5 mo) exposures using orange-red (outbred, OR) and see-through (color mutant, ST-II) Japanese medaka as bioindicators were conducted to evaluate endocrinologic, reproductive, and morphologic endpoints. No statistically significant differences in gross morphological endpoints, mortality, gender ratios, and vitellogenin induction were observed in fish from SAR groundwater treatment compared to the group tested in solute reconstituted reverse osmosis-treated or granular activated carbon (GAC)-treated control waters. Significant differences were observed in egg reproduction and the time to hatch in SAR groundwater; however, total hatchability was not significantly lower. To evaluate the estrogenic activity of the surfacewater source of the groundwater, SAR surface water was evaluated for vitellogenin and gonadal histopathology in juvenile medaka with no effects observed. These results demonstrate that OR Japanese medaka may be a sensitive strain as an on-line monitor to predict potential impacts of water quality, but further studies are needed to elicit causative agents within the water mixture. PMID:18080901

  16. Occurrence and behavior of wastewater indicators in the Santa Ana River and the underlying aquifers.

    PubMed

    Ding, W H; Wu, J; Semadeni, M; Reinhard, M

    1999-11-01

    The occurrence and behavior of wastewater indicator compounds in the Santa Ana River (SAR) water and the underlying aquifer recharged by the SAR has been studied. The SAR contains a high proportion of tertiary treated wastewater effluents, up to 100% during summer and fall. The following water quality parameters were quantified: four specific wastewater indicator compounds, ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), a naphthalene dicarboxylate (NDC) isomer, alkylphenol polyethoxy carboxylates (APECs), and selected haloacetic acids (HAAs), nitrate, dissolved oxygen (DO), DOC, total carbohydrate, and phenolic substances. Statistical analysis indicated that normal distribution was adequate to describe the probability distribution of the constituents in most cases. In the river, the concentrations of wastewater indicator compounds decreased as the fraction of storm runoff increased. EDTA and NDC were detected in a monitoring well near the river and in two production wells 1.8 and 2.7 km down gradient with little apparent attenuation. By contrast, NTA, APECs, bromochloro- and dibromoacetic acids appeared to be attenuated significantly during infiltration of river water and groundwater transport. PMID:10533715

  17. Lead toxicity in captive and wild Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan José; Oliveira, Paula A; Fidalgo, Luis Eusebio; Ginja, Mário M D; Silvestre, António M; Ordoñez, Cesar; Serantes, Alicia Ester; Gonzalo-Orden, José Manuel; Orden, María Asunción

    2010-07-01

    Forty captive Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), of both sexes, were separated into five groups and dosed with lead shot via oral intubation; one group was used as a control. Lead dosage differed in terms of shot number and size, as well as administration time. One hundred and thirty-five wild mallards were trapped between 1998 and 2001 in the Boada and Nava lagoons near the Canal de Castilla, in the Spanish province of Palencia. Radiologic techniques (ventrodorsal and lateral views) were used to detect lead shot in the gizzard and to determine degradation in dosed birds over time. Heparinized blood samples were taken from wild and captive mallards and blood lead levels were determined using anodic stripping voltammetry with a dropping mercury electrode. Clinical signs, injuries, and body weight were recorded. In approximately 90% of the experimentally dosed mallards, administered shot stayed in their gizzard until it degraded; this took approximately 30 days. Peak lead levels in blood were observed between days 10 and 20, and 10 days following a repeat dosage; males were more sensitive than females to a repeat dosage. During the experimental phase, 34% of birds died, and those that survived had varying degrees of anorexia, lethargy, and a decreased response to external stimulus. Of 135 tested wild mallards, 41% had a blood lead concentration higher than 0.200 microg/g. Lead shot was found embedded in 3.6% of the wild birds and 1.2% had a lead shot pellet in their gizzard. PMID:20688691

  18. No Common Opinion on the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael B.; Peterson, Paul E.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    According to the three authors of this article, the 2014 "EdNext" poll yields four especially important new findings: (1) Opinion with respect to the Common Core has yet to coalesce. The idea of a common set of standards across the country has wide appeal, and the Common Core itself still commands the support of a majority of the public.…

  19. Fish composition and assemblage in the anthropogenic-modified tidally-restricted Doñana (Spain) marshlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Valcárcel, Raquel; Oliva-Paterna, Francisco J.; Arribas, Carmen; Fernández-Delgado, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    The Guadalquivir estuary is the largest estuarine area on the southern Atlantic coast of Europe; its anthropogenic tidally-restricted marshes are partly within the boundary of the Doñana National Park, southern Spain. Our two-year study describes the spatial and temporal patterns of the fish assemblages in the Doñana marshlands in terms of species richness, abundance and biomass. The main families were Mugilidae and Cyprinidae, which accounted for 40.9% of the total species richness. Unlike the fish assemblages found in other European estuaries, Doñana was dominated in both biomass and abundance by freshwater species, mainly invasive exotic species. The spatial analysis of the assemblage showed four significant fish groups corresponding to different habitats established a priori and related to the salinity gradient. Assemblages did not show a seasonal pattern and the temporal fish groups observed were mainly related to the hydrological cycle and the extreme drought that occurred during the study period.

  20. 349 Detection of Anti-nucclear Antibodies (ana) Used for Diagnostic Approach of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. Correlation with Double Stranded DNA (DSDNA) and Extractable Nuclear Antigen (ENA) Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiou, Ekarerini; Vakaloudi, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Mavridou, Styliani; Koteli, Asimoula

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the correlation between the titer of ANA and anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibodies and the contribution of ANA detection to the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases (CTD). Methods Our samples consisted of 516 specimens, from Rheumatology Department, collected during January 2010 – July 2010. The detection of ANA was performed using indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and the detection of anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA using ELISA. Results Of the 364 (70.54%) samples with negative ANA 4 (1%) had positive anti-ENA and 2 (0.5%) had positive anti-dsDNA while positive anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA were detected in the 44.73% (n = 68) and 21% (n = 32) of the specimens with positive ANA respectively. The probability of detecting positive anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA rises proportionately to the titer of ANA. Specifically, the correlation between the probability of detecting positive anti-ENA and the titer of ANA is 0.577 (P < 0.001) while the correlation between the probability of detecting positive anti-dsDNA and the titer of ANA is 0.18 (P = 0.003). Probability calculations on the basis of the ANA titer showed that samples with low titer ANAs (1:160 or less) had low probabilities for positive anti-ENA. The receiver operating (ROC) curves of the ANA titer for anti-ENA had a larger under the curve area compared to the ROC curve for anti-dsDNA, indicating that ANA titer is better for predicting anti-ENA than anti-dsDNA. The sensitivity of positive ANA in the prediction of the anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA was 94.40% and 94.10%, the specificity was 81% and 75.10%, the positive prognostic value was 44.70% and 21.10% and negative prognostic value was 98.90 and 99.50%. Conclusions The detection of ANA using indirect IFA has high sensitivity in predicting the presence of specialized antibodies and may be used as a screening method for the diagnosis of CTD. It is cost and time effective too. Our study also shows that the ANA titer is useful in predicting anti-ENA. Samples with

  1. Annual cycle of plasma luteinizing hormone and sex hormones in male and female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donham, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons between 'wild'and 'game farm' mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were made to assess the differences in the temporal changes of plasma hormones. Seasonal variation in the levels of immunoreactive luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, 5 -dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estrone, estradiol-17i?? and progesterone were measured in male and female mallards. In all birds there was a vernal increase in the concentrations of LH and testosterone in plasma which were correlated with the development of the testes and ovaries prior to and during the nesting season. The concentrations of estrogens in the plasma of the females were, in general, slightly higher during the nesting season but were much lower than the levels of testosterone. The highest levels of LH and testosterone in the females coincided precisely with the period of egg laying which occurred approximately one month earlier in game farm females than in wild females. The concentrations of LH and testosterone in the plasma of females decreased rapidly during incubation. In wild males, the decline in levels of these hormones temporally coincided with that of females. In contrast, plasma levels of LH and testosterone of males of the game farm stock remained elevated after the beginning of incubation in females to which they were paired. On the basis of these results and an examination of the literature, it appears that domestication results in: 1) increased reproductive potential through earlier initiation of nesting and by delay of the termination of reproduction until later in the summer; and 2) a decrease in the synchronization of the hormonal events supporting reproduction between the male and female of a pair. Testicular weights and plasma levels of testosterone become higher in game farm and domestic males than in the wild stock but levels of LH are similar.

  2. Seismic reflection study of the East Potrillo Fault, southwestern Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, Shane Alan

    The East Potrillo Mountains are located just north of the U.S.-Mexico border in southwestern Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Laramide and Rio Grande rift deformation has formed low-angle and high-angle Tertiary normal faults that are exposed in the area. Along the east flank of the range is the East Potrillo Fault identified on the surface as a north-striking scarp. Fault scarps associated with the East Potrillo Fault have been dated using slope degradation models and they range between 56 ka and 377 ka in age. Offset of geomorphic surfaces interpreted to be tectonic terraces records at least four earthquakes over that period of time, leading to an estimated recurrence interval of 33.5 kyr. Because of this paleoseismic history, the East Potrillo Fault potentially poses a significant seismic hazard to the over 2 million residents living in the border region. Our study presents two 2D seismic reflection profiles to give the first subsurface image of the East Potrillo Fault and potentially other subsidiary faults that have not broken the surface. Three faults are identified in the subsurface, two of which were previously unknown. The range bounding fault is identified 300 m west of observed fault scarps. The fault scarp is found to be formed from one of two secondary faults. It dips 75°s east and has a fault offset of 150 m. The other secondary fault is an antithetic fault dipping 75°s west and forms a graben within the EPF system. The vibroseis source data acquisition is found to be beneficial for characterizing unknown subsurface features.

  3. The Quaternary Deformational History of the East Potrillo Fault, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, S. N.; Hurtado, J. M.; Clague, J. W.; Andronicos, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    The East Potrillo Mountains are located immediately north of the U.S.-Mexico border in southwestern Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Along the east flank of the East Potrillo Mountains are north-striking piedmont scarps that indicate continuous, late Quaternary movement on the high-angle normal faults of the East Potrillo Fault system. This East Potrillo fault may pose a major seismic hazard to the 2.2 million people that live in the El Paso, Texas border region. We investigate the Quaternary deformational history in this area using GPS, field and remote sensing observations, traditional survey techniques, and new advances in desert varnish geochronology. We focus on estimating the average slip rate on the East Potrillo fault and the earthquake recurrence interval. The amount of Quaternary deformation is constrained by measuring displacements of geomorphic surfaces, including alluvial fans and fluvial deposits. A total of thirteen profiles perpendicular to the scarp have been surveyed to reproduce the fault scarp geometry. From these profiles, we estimate fault scarp age by using three types of slope degradation modeling: calibrated scarp-height-slope-angle relationships, a diffusion model, and a general morphologic dating method for transport-limited hillslopes. A total of 18 varnished rock samples were also collected from displaced alluvial fan surfaces and from cut terraces associated with slip events on the East Potrillo fault. These samples were analyzed using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to obtain concentrations of Mn and Fe present in the varnish. The accumulation of Fe and Mn reflects the amount of time that varnish has accumulated on a clast, and, thus, provides a constraint on the age of the surface from which the clast was obtained. The morphologic dating results will be compared with the desert varnish results to better understand landform evolution, fault mechanics, and determine the slip history in the study area. These measurements are vital for constraining

  4. Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in northern Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lohse, R.L.; Schoenmackers, R.

    1985-07-01

    Fifty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled along Interstate Highway 25 and the Rio Grande, from Las Cruces to Rincon, in northern Dona Ana County, New Mexico. This shallow temperature study (a joint exploration program performed with the cooperation and financial assistance of Trans-Pacific Geothermal, Inc. of Oakland, California) resulted in the discovery and confirmation of new and suspected major low-temperature geothermal resources. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest a thermal anomaly which can be generally described as being a nearly continuous linear feature which extends some 25 miles in length in a northwest-southeast direction with the only break being a 5-mile gap near the southern end of the study area. The width of the anomaly is only a few miles but tends to thicken around individual anomalies located within this larger anomaly. There are five main individual anomalies situated within the major anomaly and, listed from north to south, they are the: (1) Rincon Anomaly, (2) San Diego Mountain Anomaly, (3) Radium Springs KGRA, (4) Grande Dome Anomaly, and (5) Goat Mountain Anomaly. The main anomaly is well defined by a 4 HFU contour and the individual anomalies range from about 10 HFU to a high of near 30 HFU, estimated for the Rincon Anomaly. A bottom-hole temperature of 54/sup 0/C at 50 meters was also recorded at Rincon. Deeper drilling is certainly warranted and required in the Rincon Anomaly in order to discover and confirm the true commercially exploitable potential of this geothermal resource. 12 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Does increasing daylength control seasonal changes in clutch sizes of Northern Pintails (Anas acuta)?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.; Sargeant, G.A.; Perkins, A.E.H.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated spatiotemporal variation in clutch sizes of Northern Pintails (pintails; Anas acuta) nesting in California (1985 to 1996), North Dakota (1982 to 1985), Saskatchewan (1982 to 1985) and Alaska (1991 to 1993) to determine whether seasonal declines in clutch size varied in ways that were consistent with a controlling influence of increasing day length. Pintails began nesting in mid-March in California, mid-April in North Dakota and Saskatchewan, and mid-May in Alaska. Observed durations of nesting were 70 ?? 2.6 days (SE) in California, 60 ?? 6.3 days in North Dakota, 66 ?? 1.3 days in Saskatchewan, and 42 ?? 0.7 days in Alaska. Annual differences were the principal source of variation in mean clutch sizes (????Y2 = 0.15, SE = 0.049), which varied little among study locations (????A2 = 0.002, SE = 0.013). Predicted rates of seasonal decline in clutch sizes increased with latitude early in the nesting season, but declined as the nesting season progressed, except in California. Rates of decline in clutch sizes thus were not directly related to rates of increase in day length. Predicted declines in numbers of eggs per clutch over the nesting season were similar for all four locations (range, 3.05-3.12) despite wide variation in durations of nesting. Evidence suggests that reduced nutrient availability during nesting contributes to a higher rate of decline in clutch sizes in Alaska than in temperate regions. Pintails that nest early lay large initial clutches, but thereafter clutch sizes decline rapidly and breeding terminates early. This reproductive strategy is adaptive because young that hatch earliest exhibit the highest survival rates; however, the conversion of grassland to cropland on the primary prairie breeding grounds has reduced hatching rates of clutches laid early in the nesting season. Under these conditions, the limited capacity to renest in late spring on their prairie breeding grounds probably has contributed to Pintail population declines.

  6. Experimental reintroduction reveals novel life-history variation in Laysan Ducks (Anas laysanensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Jeffrey R.; Reynolds, Michelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Subfossil remains indicate that the Laysan Duck (Anas laysanensis) formerly occurred throughout the Hawaiian archipelago, but for more than 150 years it has been confined to a single, small atoll in the northwestern chain, Laysan Island. In 2004–2005, 42 ducks were reintroduced from Laysan to Midway Atoll, where they exhibited variation in life history never observed on Laysan. On Laysan, females have never been observed to breed successfully at age 1 year and few attempt it, whereas on Midway, females routinely raised young at <1 year of age. Mean (± SD) clutch size on Midway (7.0 ± 1.1, n = 41) was larger than the maximum clutch size of six eggs observed on Laysan. On Midway, renesting following nest failure (0.55 probability, n = 27) and double brooding (0.50, n = 54) were routine, and two instances of triple brooding were observed, whereas on Laysan, renesting and double brooding are rare (0.05 probability for both during our study; n = 21 and 19, respectively) and triple brooding has never been observed. Other novel life history on Midway included early cessation of parental care to renest. Altered life history on Midway is likely related to better feeding conditions and low population density compared with Laysan. An especially intriguing possibility is that the phenotypic plasticity observed represents exposure of hidden reaction norms evolved when the species inhabited a range of environments, but several alternative explanations exist. Future reintroductions of this species may provide opportunities to test hypotheses about mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity.

  7. Hunting influences the diel patterns in habitat selection by northern pintails Anas acuta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casazza, Michael L.; Coates, Peter S.; Miller, Michael R.; Overton, Cory T.; Yparraguirre, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Northern pintail Anas acuta (hereafter pintail) populations wintering within Suisun Marsh, a large estuarine managed wetland near San Francisco Bay, California,USA, have declined markedly over the last four decades. The reasons for this decline are unclear. Information on how hunting and other factors influence the selection of vegetation types and sanctuaries would be beneficial to manage pintail populations in SuisunMarsh. During 1991-1993, we radio-marked and relocated female pintails (individuals: N = 203, relocations: N = 7,688) within Suisun Marsh to investigate habitat selection during the non-breeding months (winter). We calculated selection ratios for different vegetation types and for sanctuaries, and examined differences in those ratios between hunting season (i.e. hunting and non-hunting), age (hatchyear and after-hatch-year), and time of day (daylight or night hours). We found that diel patterns in selection were influenced by hunting disturbance. For example, prior to the hunting season and during daylight hours, pintails selected areas dominated by brass buttons Cotula coronopifolia, a potentially important food source, usually outside of sanctuary boundaries. However, during the hunting season, pintails did not select brass buttons during daylight hours, but instead highly selected permanent pools, mostly within sanctuaries. Also, during the hunting season, pintails showed strong selection for brass buttons at night. Sanctuaries provided more area of permanent water pools than within hunting areas and appeared to function as important refugia during daylight hours of the hunting season. Wildlife managers should encourage large protected permanent pools adjacent to hunted wetlands to increase pintail numbers within wetland environments and responsibly benefit hunting opportunities while improving pintail conservation.

  8. Hydrodynamic characteristics of the western Doñana Region (area of El Abalario), Huelva, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trick, Thomas; Custodio, Emilio

    The Doñana region, in southwestern Spain, comprises a large and important nature reserve, the wetlands of which are affected by human activity. Planting of an extensive eucalyptus forest in the 1950s and, more recently, the use of aquifers for irrigation and water supply for some coastal tourist resorts, have altered the natural groundwater-flow system. The area of the study is the western sector of the region, called El Abalario, which is a gentle topographic elevation between the Atlantic coast and La Rocina Creek (Arroyo de la Rocina). Underneath a variable layer of eolian sands with high dunes near the coast, thick Plio-Quaternary detritic strata, mostly fine silica sands, overlie marls. Near the base there is a variable, deltaic-origin layer of coarse sands and gravels. The dome-shaped water table, inside the sands, is close to the surface everywhere except beneath the dune belt, and small, temporary, shallow lagoons are numerous. The coarse sand and gravel layer conditions groundwater flow and behaves as a semiconfined layer between sands. A cross section through the area was simulated with a model to check the validity of the conceptual groundwater-flow pattern and its sensitivity to the hydraulic parameters. The model was calibrated using parameter values obtained by pumping tests and multilevel piezometric data, and checked against the estimated groundwater discharge into La Rocina Creek. Groundwater flows peripherally to the sea coast, to La Rocina Creek, or directly east and southeastward into the Doñana marshlands, in the Guadalquivir River delta. The average net aquifer recharge rate was calculated to be between 100 and 200 mm year-1 for the area covered by brush, but is remarkably lower in the areas of eucalyptus trees. The transient-state model shows that recharge varies spatially and is not clearly proportional to annual precipitation. Phreatic evapotranspiration plays an important role in decreasing the net value of aquifer recharge to

  9. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches . Home > Migraine and Common Morbidities Print Email Migraine and Common Morbidities ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine and Common Morbidities For many patients, migraine is ...

  10. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.