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Sample records for common tlr4 variants

  1. Irinotecan-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Pain Are Mediated by Common TLR4-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J; Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Secombe, Kate R; Coller, Janet K; White, Imogen A; Manavis, Jim; Hutchinson, Mark R; Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Logan, Richard M; Bowen, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    Strong epidemiological data indicate that chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain occur in parallel, indicating common underlying mechanisms. We have recently outlined evidence suggesting that TLR4 signaling may contribute to both side effects. We therefore aimed to determine if genetic deletion of TLR4 improves chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain. Forty-two female wild-type (WT) and 42 Tlr4 null (-/-) BALB/c mice weighing between 18 and 25 g (10-13 weeks) received a single 270 mg/kg (i.p.) dose of irinotecan hydrochloride or vehicle control and were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. Bacterial sequencing was conducted on cecal samples of control animals to determine the gut microbiome profile. Gut toxicity was assessed using validated clinical and histopathologic markers, permeability assays, and inflammatory markers. Chemotherapy-induced pain was assessed using the validated rodent facial grimace criteria, as well as immunologic markers of glial activation in the lumbar spinal cord. TLR4 deletion attenuated irinotecan-induced gut toxicity, with improvements in weight loss (P = 0.0003) and diarrhea (P < 0.0001). Crypt apoptosis was significantly decreased in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P < 0.0001), correlating with lower mucosal injury scores (P < 0.005). Intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran (4 kDa) and LPS translocation was greater in WT mice than in BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) (P = 0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively). GFAP staining in the lumbar spinal cord, indicative of astrocytic activation, was increased at 6 and 72 hours in WT mice compared with BALB/c-Tlr4(-/-billy) mice (P = 0.008, P = 0.01). These data indicate that TLR4 is uniquely positioned to mediate irinotecan-induced gut toxicity and pain, highlighting the possibility of a targetable gut/CNS axis for improved toxicity outcomes. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1376-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197307

  2. Should a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) agonist or antagonist be designed to treat cancer? TLR-4: its expression and effects in the ten most common cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Chun Wai; Kang, Yew Beng; Pichika, Mallikarjuna Rao

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) is well known for its host innate immunity. Despite the fact that TLR-4 activation confers antitumor responses; emerging evidence suggests that TLR-4 is associated with tumor development and progression. It is now clear that overactivation of TLR-4, through various immune mediators, may cause immune response dysfunction, resulting in tumorigenesis. Different cancers could have different extents of TLR-4 involvement during tumorigenesis or tumor progression. In this review, we focus on infection- and inflammation-related TLR-4 activation in noncancer and cancer cells, as well as on the current evidence about the role of TLR-4 in ten of the most common cancers, viz, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, liver cancer, pancreatic cancer, skin cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, and prostate cancer. PMID:24235843

  3. Prothymosin-α Variants Elicit Anti-HIV-1 Response via TLR4 Dependent and Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gusella, G. Luca; Teixeira, Avelino; Aberg, Judith; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Mosoian, Arevik

    2016-01-01

    Background Prothymosin α (ProTα) (isoform 2: iso2) is a widely distributed, small acidic protein with intracellular and extracellular-associated functions. Recently, we identified two new ProTα variants with potent anti-HIV activity from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal lavage. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene known as isoB and the second is the product of ProTα pseudogene 7 (p7). Similarly to iso2, the anti-HIV activity of both variants is mediated by type I IFN. Here we tested whether the immunomodulatory activity of isoB and p7 are also TLR4 dependent and determined their kinetic of release in response to HIV-1 infection. Methods Type I, type III, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA inducing activity was determined in macrophages from wild type and TLR4 knockout mice treated with recombinant ProTα variants. Supernatants from mock and HIV infected cells were analyzed by mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes for the presence of ProTα variants. In silico structural and functional analysis of ProTα variants were performed. Results We show that both isoB and p7 upregulate IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IL-6, TNF-α and RANTES mRNAs in primary human macrophages. The potent stimulation of IFN-β by the recombinant ProTα variants in human macrophages is dependent on the TLR4 pathway, whereas the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 may also occur independently of TLR4, suggesting the interaction of ProTα variants with other signaling molecules/receptors. In silico analyses confirmed that the novel isoB and p7 variants are intrinsically disordered proteins, which lack the NLS and mass spectrometry showed release of ProTα variants within minutes post HIV-1 infection. These features are consistent with the function of ProTα variants as damage associate molecular patterns (DAMPs). Conclusions Our findings indicate that ProTα variants strongly inhibit viral replication mainly, but not exclusively, through TLR4 signaling and that they are released within minutes of viral

  4. The common food additive carrageenan is not a ligand for Toll-Like- Receptor 4 (TLR4) in an HEK293-TLR4 reporter cell-line model.

    PubMed

    McKim, James M; Wilga, Paul C; Pregenzer, Jeffrey F; Blakemore, William R

    2015-04-01

    Carrageenan (CGN) is widely used in the food manufacturing industry as an additive that stabilizes and thickens food products. Standard animal safety studies in which CGN was administered in diet showed no adverse effects. However, several in vitro studies have reported that intestinal inflammation is caused by CGN and that this effect is mediated through Toll-Like-Receptor 4 (TLR4). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of different types of CGN to bind and activate TLR4 signaling. To accomplish this a TLR4/MD-2/CD14/NFκB/SEAP reporter construct in a HEK293 cell line was used. The reporter molecule, secretable alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), was measured as an indicator of TLR4 activation. The test compounds were exposed to this system at concentrations of 0.1, 1, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 ng/mL for 24 h. Cytotoxicity was evaluated following the 24 h exposure period by LDH leakage and ATP. CGN binding to serum proteins was characterized by Toluidine Blue. The results show that CGN does not bind to TLR4 and is not cytotoxic to the HEK293 cells at the concentrations and experimental conditions tested and that CGN binds tightly to serum proteins. PMID:25640528

  5. [Incidence of odontogenic phlegmon associated with polymorphic variant 896A/G of gene TLR4, but not with 2258G/A of gene TLR2].

    PubMed

    Kuong, Vu V'et; Avetikov, D S; Shlykova, O A; Izmaĭlova, O V; Kaĭdashev, I P

    2014-10-01

    The problem actuality is caused by significant enhancement of the incidence rate for inflammatory diseases of the head and neck tissues, first of all of the oral cavity floor abscesses and phlegmons, which causes severe forms of mediastinitis while inadequate treatment. The authors have had established, that Toll-like receptors (TLR) initiate a cascade of anti-inflammatory reactions of the inborn immunity, followed by synthesis of a certain cytokines, and their genetic polymorphism changes the immune reactivity of the organism. Trustworthy correlation of the gene TLR4 (rs4986790) polymorphism 896A/G was proved with high risk of the odontogenic phlegmon of the oral cavity floor occurrence, what would permit to prognosticate the disease course in early terms, to optimize the schemes of its prophylaxis and treatment. PMID:25675790

  6. Targeting TLR4 Signaling by TLR4 TIR-derived Decoy Peptides: Identification of the TLR4 TIR Dimerization Interface

    PubMed Central

    Toshchakov, Vladimir Y.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Couture, Leah A.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2011-01-01

    Agonist-induced dimerization of TLR4 TIR domains initiates intracellular signaling. Therefore, identification of the TLR4 TIR dimerization interface is one key to the rational design of therapeutics that block TLR4 signaling. A library of cell-permeating “decoy peptides,” each of which represents a non-fragmented patch of the TLR4 TIR surface, was designed such that the peptides entirely encompass the TLR4 TIR surface. Each peptide was synthesized in tandem with a cell-permeating Antennapedia homeodomain sequence and tested for the ability to inhibit early cytokine mRNA expression and MAPK activation in LPS-stimulated primary murine macrophages. Five peptides, 4R1, 4R3, 4BB, 4R9, and 4αE, potently inhibited all manifestations of TLR4, but not TLR2 signaling. When tested for their ability to bind directly to TLR4 TIR by FRET using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, Bodipy-TMR-X (BTX)-labeled 4R1, 4BB, and 4αE quenched fluorescence of TLR4-Cerulean (Cer) expressed in HeLa or HEK293T cells, while 4R3 was partially active and 4R9 was least active. These findings suggest that the area between BB loop of TLR4 and its fifth helical region mediates TLR4 TIR dimerization. Moreover, our data provide direct evidence for the utility of the “decoy peptide approach,” in which peptides representing various surface-exposed segments of a protein are initially probed for the ability to inhibit protein function and then their specific targets are identified by FRET, to define recognition sites in signaling proteins that may be targeted therapeutically to disrupt functional transient protein interactions. PMID:21402890

  7. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid. PMID:26617709

  8. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid. PMID:26617709

  9. Epistatic interaction between TLR4 and NOD2 in patients with Crohn's Disease: relation with risk and phenotype in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Chamorro, Alba; Moreno, Antonia; Gómez-García, María; Cabello, María José; Martin, Javier; Lopez-Nevot, Miguel Ángel

    2016-09-01

    Crohn's Disease is one of the two major forms of the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and, although the etiology is not completely understood, the confluence of environmental and genetic factors has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TLR4 variants in a Spanish cohort of Crohn's Disease patients and their relation with phenotype and common NOD2 variants. A total of 371 Crohn's Disease (CD) patients and 636 healthy controls (HC) were included. Single Nucleotide Polimorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 (D299G and T399I) and NOD2 (R702W and G908R) detection was performed by a Taqman(®) Allelic Discrimination Assay. 1007insC NOD2 variant was analyzed using a PCR combined with fluorescent technology and the different alleles were determined depending on the PCR products size. D299G and T399I were related to CD only in patients carrying NOD2 variants (NOD2+/TLR4+ haplotype) (p=0.036; OR=1.924), increasing the risk to develop CD when 1007insC and TLR4 variants were both present (OR=4.886). We also described a strong association between mutant NOD2 and CD risk (p<0.001, OR=3.214). R702W, G908R and 1007insC were associated when they were considered separately (p<0.001; p=0.002; p<0.001, respectively). Moreover, the patients carrying any mutant D299G or T399I polymorphisms were predisposed to develop a stricturing disease (p=0.013; OR=2.391), especially in the presence of NOD2 mutation (p=0.002; OR=4.989). In this study, ileal disease was also associated with the presence of at least one NOD2 susceptibility allele (p=0.001; OR=3.838) and, the risk of ileal CD was increased if TLR4 variants were presents (p<0.050; OR=4.160). TLR4 variants were related to bowel perforation, independently of NOD2. PMID:27290609

  10. A Protective Hsp70-TLR4 Pathway in Lethal Oxidant Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Xuchen; Shan, Peiying; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.; Lee, Patty J.

    2013-01-01

    Administering high levels of inspired oxygen, or hyperoxia, is commonly used as a life-sustaining measure in critically ill patients. However, prolonged exposures can exacerbate respiratory failure. Our previous study showed that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) confers protection against hyperoxia-induced lung injury and mortality. Hsp70 has potent cytoprotective properties and has been described as a TLR4 ligand in cell lines. We sought to elucidate the relationship between TLR4 and Hsp70 in hyperoxia-induced lung injury in vitro and in vivo and to define the signaling mechanisms involved. Wild type, TLR4−/− and Trif−/− (a TLR4 adapter protein) murine lung endothelial cells (MLEC) were exposed to hyperoxia. We found markedly elevated levels of intracellular and secreted Hsp70 from mice lung and MLEC after hyperoxia. We confirmed that Hsp70 and TLR4 co-immunoprecipitate in lung tissue and MLEC. Hsp70-mediated NFκB activation appears to depend upon TLR4. In the absence of TLR4, Hsp70 loses its protective effects in endothelial cells. Furthermore, these protective properties of Hsp70 are TLR4 adapter Trif-dependent, MyD88-independent. Hsp70-deficient mice have increased mortality during hyperoxia and lung-targeted adenoviral delivery of Hsp70 effectively rescues both Hsp70-deficient and wild type mice. Our studies are the first to define an Hsp70-TLR4-Trif cytoprotective axis in the lung and endothelial cells. This pathway is a potential therapeutic target against a range of oxidant-induced lung injuries. PMID:23817427

  11. Hepatic TLR4 signaling is activated by LPS from digestive tract during SARA, and epigenetic mechanisms contribute to enforced TLR4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Guangjun; Zhuang, Su; Seyfert, Hans-Martin; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Tianle; Jin, Di; Guo, Junfei; Shen, Xiangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is known to trigger a systemic inflammatory response that is possibly caused by the translocationof lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream. The aim of this study is to investigate this causal relationship between the increases of circulating LPS and liver inflammation. Here we found that SARA goats exhibited significantly increased LPS concentrations in both the rumen and portal vein. The livers of these goats exhibited increased mRNA concentrations of pro-inflammatory genes that indicated inflammation. Meanwhile, the occurrence of liver inflammation was further validated by the enhanced protein expression of those cytokines in the livers of SARA goats. These increased expressions of detected pro-inflammatory genes were likely mediated by enforced TLR4 signaling because SARA increased the concentrations of TLR4 mRNA and protein in the liver and the abundance of both the NF-kB-p65 factor and its active phosphorylated variant. We also verified that the enhanced TLR4 expression was accompanied by chromatin decompaction and demethylation of the proximal TLR4 promoter. Hence, epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the enforced expression of immune genes during SARA, and these findings open innovative routes for interventions via the modulation of these epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26498350

  12. Association between TLR2 and TLR4 Gene Polymorphisms and the Susceptibility to Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiuping; Zhang, Wei; Han, Zelong; Liu, Side

    2015-01-01

    Background The associations between toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and toll-like receptor 4(TLR4) polymorphisms and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility remain controversial. A meta-analysis was performed to assess these associations. Methods A systematic search was performed to identify all relevant studies relating TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms and IBD susceptibility. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed by ethnicity and publication quality. Results Thirty-eight eligible studies, assessing 10970 cases and 7061 controls were included. No TLR2 Arg677Trp polymorphism was found. No significant association was observed between TLR2 Arg753Gln polymorphism and Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) in all genetic models. Interestingly, TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk of CD and UC in all genetic models, except for the additive one in CD. In addition, a statistically significant association between TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism and IBD was observed among high quality studies evaluating Caucasians, but not Asians. Associations between TLR4 Thr399Ile polymorphisms and CD risk were found only in the allele and dominant models. The TLR4 Thr399Ile polymorphism was associated with UC risk in pooled results as well as subgroup analysis of high quality publications assessing Caucasians, in allele and dominant models. Conclusions The meta-analysis provides evidence that TLR2 Arg753Gln is not associated with CD and UC susceptibility in Asians; TLR4 Asp299Gly is associated with CD and UC susceptibility in Caucasians, but not Asians. TLR4 Thr399Ile may be associated with IBD susceptibility in Caucasians only. Additional well-powered studies of Asp299Gly and other TLR4 variants are warranted. PMID:26023918

  13. Gangliosides trigger inflammatory responses via TLR4 in brain glia.

    PubMed

    Jou, Ilo; Lee, Jee Hoon; Park, Soo Young; Yoon, Hee Jung; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Eun Jung

    2006-05-01

    Gangliosides participate in various cellular events of the central nervous system and have been closely implicated in many neuronal diseases. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the pathological activity of gangliosides are poorly understood. Here we report that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) may mediate the ganglioside-triggered inflammation in glia, brain resident immune cells. Gangliosides rapidly altered the cell surface expression of TLR4 in microglia and astrocytes within 3 hours. Using TLR4-specific siRNA and a dominant-negative TLR4 gene, we clearly demonstrate the functional importance of TLR4 in ganglioside-triggered activation of glia. Inhibition of TLR4 expression by TLR4-siRNA suppressed nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB-binding activity, NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase activity, and transcription of inflammatory cytokines after exposure to gangliosides. Transient transfection of dominant-negative TLR4 also attenuated NF-kappaB-binding activity and interleukin-6 promoter activity. In contrast, these activities were slightly elevated in cells with wild-type TLR4. In addition, CD14 was required for ganglioside-triggered activation of glia, and lipid raft formation may be associated with ganglioside-stimulated signal propagation. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR4 may provide an explanation for the pathological ability of gangliosides to cause inflammatory conditions in the brain. PMID:16651628

  14. Targeted resequencing implicates the familial Mediterranean fever gene MEFV and the toll-like receptor 4 gene TLR4 in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Yohei; Zhou, Qing; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Seyahi, Emire; Özyazgan, Yilmaz; Ugurlu, Serdal; Erer, Burak; Abaci, Neslihan; Ustek, Duran; Meguro, Akira; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Takeno, Mitsuhiro; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Ombrello, Michael J; Satorius, Colleen L; Maskeri, Baishali; Mullikin, James C; Sun, Hong-Wei; Gutierrez-Cruz, Gustavo; Kim, Yoonhee; Wilson, Alexander F; Kastner, Daniel L; Gül, Ahmet; Remmers, Elaine F

    2013-05-14

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful means of identifying genes with disease-associated common variants, but they are not well-suited to detecting genes with disease-associated rare and low-frequency variants. In the current study of Behçet disease (BD), nonsynonymous variants (NSVs) identified by deep exonic resequencing of 10 genes found by GWAS (IL10, IL23R, CCR1, STAT4, KLRK1, KLRC1, KLRC2, KLRC3, KLRC4, and ERAP1) and 11 genes selected for their role in innate immunity (IL1B, IL1R1, IL1RN, NLRP3, MEFV, TNFRSF1A, PSTPIP1, CASP1, PYCARD, NOD2, and TLR4) were evaluated for BD association. A differential distribution of the rare and low-frequency NSVs of a gene in 2,461 BD cases compared with 2,458 controls indicated their collective association with disease. By stringent criteria requiring at least a single burden test with study-wide significance and a corroborating test with at least nominal significance, rare and low-frequency NSVs in one GWAS-identified gene, IL23R (P = 6.9 × 10(-5)), and one gene involved in innate immunity, TLR4 (P = 8.0 × 10(-4)), were associated with BD. In addition, damaging or rare damaging NOD2 variants were nominally significant across all three burden tests applied (P = 0.0063-0.045). Furthermore, carriage of the familial Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV) mutation Met694Val, which is known to cause recessively inherited familial Mediterranean fever, conferred BD risk in the Turkish population (OR, 2.65; P = 1.8 × 10(-12)). The disease-associated NSVs in MEFV and TLR4 implicate innate immune and bacterial sensing mechanisms in BD pathogenesis. PMID:23633568

  15. Molecular characterization and expression profile of partial TLR4 gene in association to mastitis in crossbred cattle.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Manjit; Sharma, Arjava; Bhushan, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Crossbred cattle are more prone to mastitis in comparison to indigenous cattle. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) recognizes pathogen ligands, for example, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin from Escherichia coli and mediates signaling to initiate innate and adaptive immune responses. Mutations in TLR4 can compromise the host immune response to certain pathogens, so it may be a potential candidate for marker assisted selection to enhance mastitis resistance in dairy cattle. Hence, in this study role of bovine TLR4 gene in mastitis resistance was investigated by association as well as expression profiling analysis in crossbred cattle. The animals were divided into mastitis affected and unaffected groups on the basis of history of animals and California Mastitis Test (CMT). PCR-SSCP and Sequence analysis revealed three genotypes of coreceptor binding region 1 (CRBR1) fragment of TLR4 gene namely AA, AB, and BB in both groups of cattle. The logistic regression model did not show any significant effect of these genotypes on the occurrence of clinical mastitis. Moreover, in vitro challenge of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with LPS failed to show any association of the genotypes with TLR4 gene expression. In a nutshell, in the present study enough evidence was not found for association of the SNP variants of CRBR1 fragment of TLR4 gene with mastitis susceptibility in crossbred cattle. PMID:24669869

  16. Association between TLR4 and PTEN Involved in LPS-TLR4 Signaling Response.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huahua; Tan, Yan; Wu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong; Liu, Feng; Yao, Yuanzhang; Jiang, Jianxin; Wan, Qi; Li, Lei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explored the potential mechanisms of how PTEN regulating LPS induced TLR4 signaling pathway. The initial findings from ELISA demonstrate that PTEN influences TNF-α secretion by its lipid phosphatase activity. Subsequently, western blot, immunoprecipitation assay, and immunofluorescence were performed to explore the activation process of PTEN by stimulation with LPS. As early as 20 minutes after LPS stimulation, reduced phosphorylation of PTEN was found obviously. Accordingly, the whole cell-scattered PTEN translocated towards the cell membrane 20 minutes after stimulating with LPS. Moreover, the weak physical association between PTEN and TLR4 in resting RAW264.7 cells increased gradually after the stimulation of LPS. Furthermore, our study showed PTEN decreased LPS-induced Akt activity and upregulated NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, identifying indirectly that the PTEN could regulate the activation of NF-κB by its downstream Akt kinase. In summary, our study illustrates the potential signal transduction process of PTEN while stimulated by LPS: by increasing the association of TLR4, PTEN recruits to its phosphoinositide substrate PI(3,4,5)P3 located on the cell membrane and exerts its dephosphorylated function and subsequently depresses the activity of downstream molecule Akt and results in activation of NF-κB, followed by the secretion of inflammatory mediators TNF-α. PMID:27563672

  17. Association between TLR4 and PTEN Involved in LPS-TLR4 Signaling Response

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Huahua; Tan, Yan; Wu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong; Liu, Feng; Yao, Yuanzhang; Jiang, Jianxin; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explored the potential mechanisms of how PTEN regulating LPS induced TLR4 signaling pathway. The initial findings from ELISA demonstrate that PTEN influences TNF-α secretion by its lipid phosphatase activity. Subsequently, western blot, immunoprecipitation assay, and immunofluorescence were performed to explore the activation process of PTEN by stimulation with LPS. As early as 20 minutes after LPS stimulation, reduced phosphorylation of PTEN was found obviously. Accordingly, the whole cell-scattered PTEN translocated towards the cell membrane 20 minutes after stimulating with LPS. Moreover, the weak physical association between PTEN and TLR4 in resting RAW264.7 cells increased gradually after the stimulation of LPS. Furthermore, our study showed PTEN decreased LPS-induced Akt activity and upregulated NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, identifying indirectly that the PTEN could regulate the activation of NF-κB by its downstream Akt kinase. In summary, our study illustrates the potential signal transduction process of PTEN while stimulated by LPS: by increasing the association of TLR4, PTEN recruits to its phosphoinositide substrate PI(3,4,5)P3 located on the cell membrane and exerts its dephosphorylated function and subsequently depresses the activity of downstream molecule Akt and results in activation of NF-κB, followed by the secretion of inflammatory mediators TNF-α. PMID:27563672

  18. Different dimerisation mode for TLR4 upon endosomal acidification?

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, Monique

    2012-01-01

    TLR4 is unique among pathogen-recognition receptors in that it initiates different pathways in different cellular locations. Binding of a bridging factor, Mal, allows recruitment of an adapter protein, MyD88, at the plasma membrane, which leads to the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Upon internalization, TLR4 uses a different bridging factor, TRAM, to activate a MyD88-independent pathway that results in type I interferon expression. Interestingly, both Mal and TRAM are localised initially at the plasma membrane. In this Opinion, I suggest a possible mechanism by which endosomal acidification triggers the differential adaptor usage of TLR4. I discuss the evidence of the pH sensitivity of TLR4 and propose a new dimerisation mode for TLR4 based on the crystal structure of the related receptor TLR3 bound to its ligand, double-stranded RNA. PMID:22196451

  19. Different dimerisation mode for TLR4 upon endosomal acidification?

    PubMed

    Gangloff, Monique

    2012-03-01

    TLR4 is unique among pathogen-recognition receptors in that it initiates different pathways in different cellular locations. Binding of a bridging factor, Mal, allows recruitment of an adapter protein, MyD88, at the plasma membrane, which leads to the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Upon internalization, TLR4 uses a different bridging factor, TRAM, to activate a MyD88-independent pathway that results in type I interferon expression. Interestingly, both Mal and TRAM are localised initially at the plasma membrane. In this Opinion, I suggest a possible mechanism by which endosomal acidification triggers the differential adaptor usage of TLR4. I discuss the evidence of the pH sensitivity of TLR4 and propose a new dimerisation mode for TLR4 based on the crystal structure of the related receptor TLR3 bound to its ligand, double-stranded RNA. PMID:22196451

  20. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:26687466

  1. Effects of Differences in Lipid A Structure on TLR4 Pro-Inflammatory Signaling and Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Paula M.; Embry, Chelsea A.; Mitchell, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate immune system exists in equilibrium with the microbial world. The innate immune system recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns via a family of Toll-like receptors (TLR) that activate cells upon detection of potential pathogens. Because some microbes benefit their hosts, mobilizing the appropriate response, and then controlling that response is critical in the maintenance of health. TLR4 recognizes the various forms of lipid A produced by Gram-negative bacteria. Depending on the structural form of the eliciting lipid A molecule, TLR4 responses range from a highly inflammatory endotoxic response involving inflammasome and other pro-inflammatory mediators, to an inhibitory, protective response. Mounting the correct response against an offending microbe is key to maintaining health when exposed to various bacterial species. Further study of lipid A variants may pave the way to understanding how TLR4 responses are generally able to avoid chronic inflammatory damage. PMID:22707952

  2. TLR4 Deficiency Protects against Hepatic Fibrosis and Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Pre-Carcinogenic Liver Injury in Fibrotic Liver

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Susanne Nicole; Bohner, Annika; Dapito, Dianne H.; Schwabe, Robert F.; Lammert, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common consequence of advanced liver fibrosis but the interactions between fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis are still poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that HCC promotion depends on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Pre-cancerogenous events can be modelled in mice by the administration of a single dose of diethylnitrosamine (DEN), with HCC formation depending amongst others on interleukin (IL) 6 production. Mice lacking the hepatocanalicular phosphatidylcholine transporter ABCB4 develop liver fibrosis spontaneously, resemble patients with sclerosing cholangitis due to mutations of the orthologous human gene, and represent a valid model to study tumour formation in pre-injured cholestatic liver. The aim of this study was to investigate DEN-induced liver injury in TLR4-deficient mice with biliary fibrosis. Methods ABCB4-deficient mice on the FVB/NJ genetic background were crossed to two distinct genetic backgrounds (TLR4-sufficient C3H/HeN and TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ) for more than 10 generations. The two congenic knockout and the two corresponding wild-type mouse lines were treated with a single dose of DEN for 48 hours. Phenotypic differences were assessed by measuring hepatic collagen contents, inflammatory markers (ALT, CRP, IL6) as well as hepatic apoptosis (TUNEL) and proliferation (Ki67) rates. Results Hepatic collagen accumulation is significantly reduced in ABCB4-/-:TLR4-/-double-deficient mice. After DEN challenge, apoptosis, proliferation and inflammatory markers are decreased in TLR4-deficient in comparison to TLR4-sufficient mice. When combining ABCB4 and TLR4 deficiency with DEN treatment, hepatic IL6 expression and proliferation rates are lowest in fibrotic livers from the double-deficient line. Consistent with these effects, selective digestive tract decontamination in ABCB4-/- mice also led to reduced tumor size and number after DEN. Conclusion This study demonstrates that liver

  3. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment ... ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other ( ...

  4. Tlr4 Deficiency Protects against Cardiac Pressure Overload Induced Hyperinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Olaf; El Aissati, Sakina; Foltz, Fabian; Goelz, Lina; Goertz, David; Kebir, Sied; Weisheit, Christina; Wolf, Michael; Meyer, Rainer; Baumgarten, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Transverse aortic constriction provokes a pro-inflammatory reaction and results in cardiac hypertrophy. Endogenous ligands contribute to cardiac hypertrophy via toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 binding. A lack of TLR4 signaling diminishes hypertrophy and inflammation. Wild type mice undergoing aortic constriction respond to a lipopolysaccharide second-hit stimulus with hyperinflammation. The objective of this study was to assess whether other second-hit challenges utilizing TLR ligands provoke a comparable inflammatory reaction, and to find out whether this response is absent in TLR4 deficient mice. Assuming that cardiac stress alters the expression of pattern recognition receptors we analyzed the effects of transverse aortic constriction and second-hit virulence factor treatment on TLR expression, as well as cytokine regulation. Wild type and Tlr4-/- mice were subjected to three days of TAC and subsequently confronted with gram-positive TLR2 ligand lipoteichoic acid (LTA, 15mg/g bodyweight) or synthetic CpG-oligodesoxynucleotide 1668 thioate (20 nmol/kg bodyweight, 30 min after D-galactosamin desensitization) signaling via TLR9. Hemodynamic measurements and organ preservation were performed 6 h after stimulation. Indeed, the study revealed a robust enhancement of LTA induced pattern recognition receptor and cytokine mRNA expression and a LTA-dependent reduction of hemodynamic pressure in TAC wild type mice. Second-Hit treatment with CpG-ODNs led to similar results. However, second-hit effects were abolished in Tlr4-/- mice. In total, these data indicate for the first time that cardiac stress increases the inflammatory response towards both, gram-negative and gram-positive, TLR ligands as well as bacterial DNA. The decrease of the inflammatory response upon TLR2 and -9 ligand challenge in TAC Tlr4-/- mice demonstrates that a lack of TLR4 signaling does not only prevent left ventricular hypertrophy but also protects the mice from a cardiac stress induced hyperinflammatory

  5. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p < 0.01) and TNF-α (r = 0.7547, p < 0.01) in CKD rats. These findings indicated ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the

  6. Common mechanisms activate plant guard receptors and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    In metazoans, the innate immune system uses Pattern Recognition Receptors to detect conserved microbial products, whereas in plants Guard Receptors detect virulence factors or activities encoded by pathogens. In a recent study, Williams and colleagues report that plant Guard receptors can be activated by a mechanism remarkably similar to that of mammalian Toll-like Receptor 4. PMID:25224694

  7. PECAM-1 ligation negatively regulates TLR4 signaling in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rui, Yuxiang; Liu, Xingguang; Li, Nan; Jiang, Yingming; Chen, Guoyou; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Jianli

    2007-12-01

    Uncontrolled TLR4 signaling may induce excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and lead to harmful inflammation; therefore, negative regulation of TLR4 signaling attracts much attention now. PECAM-1, a member of Ig-ITIM family, can mediate inhibitory signals in T cells and B cells. However, the role and the mechanisms of PECAM-1 in the regulation of TLR4-mediated LPS response in macrophages remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that PECAM-1 ligation with CD38-Fc fusion protein negatively regulates LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IFN-beta production by inhibiting JNK, NF-kappaB, and IFN regulatory factor 3 activation in macrophages. In addition, PECAM-1 ligation-recruited Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) may be involved in the inhibitory effect of PECAM-1 on TLR4 signaling. Consistently, silencing of PECAM-1 enhances the macrophage response to LPS stimulation. Taken together with the data that PECAM-1 is constitutively expressed in macrophages and its expression is up-regulated by LPS stimulation, PECAM-1 might function as a feedback negative regulator of LPS inflammatory response in macrophages. This study may provide a potential target for intervention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:18025177

  8. The evolutionary history of TLR4 polymorphisms in Europe.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Theo S; Ioana, Mihai; Alonso, Santos; Izagirre, Neskuts; Hervella, Montserrat; Joosten, Leo A B; van der Meer, Jos W M; de la Rúa, Concepcion; Netea, Mihai G

    2012-01-01

    Infections exert important evolutionary pressures shaping the human genome, especially on genes involved in host defense. A crucial step for host defense is recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors on innate immune cells, among which Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of the best known. Genetic variation in TLR4 (Asp299Gly, Thr399Ile) has been recently described. Haplotype frequencies of these polymorphisms differ among African, Asian and European populations, suggesting evolutionary pressures exerted by local infections. The TLR4 299Gly/399Ile haplotype, characteristic mainly of European populations, has relatively high frequency in the Iberian peninsula. This region is also described as refuge area during the last glacial maximum 20,000 years ago, from which repopulation of Europe took place. We speculate that a genetic bottleneck in the Iberian peninsula could have promoted the increased frequency of this haplotype by genetic drift. This hypothesis is supported by three arguments: (1) the West-East gradient of prevalence in the haplotype among European populations; (2) ancient DNA from Neolithic burials in the Iberian peninsula, dated 6,600-4,500 years before present, confirmed the relatively high frequency of this haplotype in the region, and (3) no functional differences between this haplotype and wild-type TLR4 have been found. In contrast, the disappearance of the 299Gly/399Thr haplotype in Europe is most likely due to negative selection due to sepsis. In conclusion, differences in distribution of TLR4 polymorphisms Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile in European populations are most likely due to a combination of population migration events combined with selection due to sepsis. PMID:21968286

  9. Differential regulation of TLR4 expression in human B cells and monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ganley-Leal, Lisa M.; Liang, YanMei; Jagannathan-Bogdan, Madhumita; Farraye, Francis A.; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S.

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an innate immune receptor that is constitutively and inducibly activated in monocytes. Although TLR4 is expressed at very low levels on human B cells from healthy individuals, recent reports showed that TLR4 expression and function is elevated in B cells from inflammatory disease patients. New data showed that TLR4 expression on B cell is increased upon stimulation through surface Igμ and CD40 in combination with IL-4. In contrast, monocyte stimulation through CD40 and IL-4 receptors decreased TLR4 surface expression. Analysis of molecular signatures of TLR4 activation in stimulated B cells suggested that TLR4 is regulated by different mechanisms in B cells compared to monocytes. PU.1 and interferon regulatory factor association with the TLR4 promoter are sufficient for TLR4 transcription, but are not sufficient for surface TLR4 expression on B cells. In contrast, the PU.1/IRF combination is sufficient for surface TLR4 expression on monocytes. These data identify mechanisms that can activate B cell TLR4 expression in inflammatory disease patients, and demonstrate that B cells have additional layers of TLR4 regulation absent in monocytes. PMID:20956019

  10. Combined Analyses of 20 Common Obesity Susceptibility Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Sparsø, Thomas; Grarup, Niels; Albrechtsen, Anders; Almind, Katrine; Hansen, Lars; Toft, Ulla; Jørgensen, Torben; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Genome-wide association studies and linkage studies have identified 20 validated genetic variants associated with obesity and/or related phenotypes. The variants are common, and they individually exhibit small-to-modest effect sizes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this study we investigate the combined effect of these variants and their ability to discriminate between normal weight and overweight/obese individuals. We applied receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves, and estimated the area under the ROC curve (AUC) as a measure of the discriminatory ability. The analyses were performed cross-sectionally in the population-based Inter99 cohort where 1,725 normal weight, 1,519 overweight, and 681 obese individuals were successfully genotyped for all 20 variants. RESULTS When combining all variants, the 10% of the study participants who carried more than 22 risk-alleles showed a significant increase in probability of being both overweight with an odds ratio of 2.00 (1.47–2.72), P = 4.0 × 10−5, and obese with an OR of 2.62 (1.76–3.92), P = 6.4 × 10−7, compared with the 10% of the study participants who carried less than 14 risk-alleles. Discrimination ability for overweight and obesity, using the 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), was determined to AUCs of 0.53 and 0.58, respectively. When combining SNP data with conventional nongenetic risk factors of obesity, the discrimination ability increased to 0.64 for overweight and 0.69 for obesity. The latter is significantly higher (P < 0.001) than for the nongenetic factors alone (AUC = 0.67). CONCLUSIONS The discriminative value of the 20 validated common obesity variants is at present time sparse and too weak for clinical utility, however, they add to increase the discrimination ability of conventional nongenetic risk factors. PMID:20110568

  11. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  12. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  13. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Salmonella shedding in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key factor in the innate immune recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies from our group identified differences in the expression profile of TLR4 and genes affected by the TLR4 signaling pathway among pigs that shed varying...

  14. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  15. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Jiao, Shuo; Bien, Stephanie A; Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V; Curtis, Keith R; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hayes, Richard B; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jenkins, Mark A; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M; Newcomb, Polly A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Potter, John D; Schoen, Robert E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  16. Common and Rare Gene Variants Affecting Plasma LDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, John R; Hooper, Amanda J

    2008-01-01

    The plasma level of LDL cholesterol is clinically important and genetically complex. LDL cholesterol levels are in large part determined by the activity of LDL receptors (LDLR) in the liver. Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) – with its high LDL cholesterol levels, xanthomas, and premature atherosclerosis – is caused by mutations in either the LDLR or in APOB – the protein in LDL recognised by the LDLR. A third, rare form – autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia – arises from mutations in the gene encoding an adaptor protein involved in the internalisation of the LDLR. A fourth variant of inherited hypercholesterolaemia was recently found to be associated with missense mutations in PCSK9, which encodes a serine protease that degrades LDLR. Whereas the gain-of-function mutations in PCSK9 are rare, a spectrum of more frequent loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 associated with low LDL cholesterol levels has been identified in selected populations and could protect against coronary heart disease. Heterozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia (FHBL) – with its low LDL cholesterol levels and resistance to atherosclerosis – is caused by mutations in APOB. In contrast to other inherited forms of severe hypocholesterolaemia such as abetalipoproteinaemia - caused by mutations in MTP - and homozygous FHBL, a deficiency of PCSK9 appears to be benign. Rare variants of NPC1L1, the gene encoding the putative intestinal cholesterol receptor, have shown more modest effects on plasma LDL cholesterol than PCSK9 variants, similar in magnitude to the effect of common APOE variants. Taken together, these findings indicate that heritable variation in plasma LDL cholesterol is conferred by sequence variation in various loci, with a small number of common and multiple rare gene variants contributing to the phenotype. PMID:18566665

  17. TLR4 enhances histamine-mediated pruritus by potentiating TRPV1 activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have indicated that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a pathogen-recognition receptor that triggers inflammatory signals in innate immune cells, is also expressed on sensory neurons, implicating its putative role in sensory signal transmission. However, the possible function of sensory neuron TLR4 has not yet been formally addressed. In this regard, we investigated the role of TLR4 in itch signal transmission. Results TLR4 was expressed on a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons that express TRPV1. In TLR4-knockout mice, histamine-induced itch responses were compromised while TLR4 activation by LPS did not directly elicit an itch response. Histamine-induced intracellular calcium signals and inward currents were comparably reduced in TLR4-deficient sensory neurons. Reduced histamine sensitivity in the TLR4-deficient neurons was accompanied by a decrease in TRPV1 activity. Heterologous expression experiments in HEK293T cells indicated that TLR4 expression enhanced capsaicin-induced intracellular calcium signals and inward currents. Conclusions Our data show that TLR4 on sensory neurons enhances histamine-induced itch signal transduction by potentiating TRPV1 activity. The results suggest that TLR4 could be a novel target for the treatment of enhanced itch sensation. PMID:25139109

  18. Lipopolysaccharide promotes lipid accumulation in human adventitial fibroblasts via TLR4-NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic degenerative disease of the arteries and is thought to be one of the most common causes of death globally. In recent years, the functions of adventitial fibroblasts in the development of atherosclerosis and tissue repair have gained increased interests. LPS can increase the morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis-associated cardiovascular disease. Although LPS increases neointimal via TLR4 activation has been reported, how LPS augments atherogenesis through acting on adventitial fibroblasts is still unknown. Here we explored lipid deposition within adventitial fibroblasts mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to imitate inflammatory conditions. Results In our study, LPS enhanced lipid deposition by the up-regulated expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) as the silencing of ADRP abrogated lipid deposition in LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts. In addition, pre-treatment with anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antibody diminished the LPS-induced lipid deposition and ADRP expression. Moreover, LPS induced translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which could markedly up-regulate lipid deposition as pre-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC, significantly reduced lipid droplets. In addition, the lowering lipid accumulation was accompanied with the decreased ADRP expression. Furthermore, LPS-induced adventitial fibroblasts secreted more monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), compared with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that LPS promotes lipid accumulation via the up-regulation of ADRP expression through TLR4 activated downstream of NF-κB in adventitial fibroblasts. Increased levels of MCP-1 released from LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts and lipid accumulation may accelerate monocytes recruitment and lipid-laden macrophage foam cells formation. Here, our study provides a new explanation as to how bacterial infection contributes to

  19. Complement regulates TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses during intestinal ischemia reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Michael R.; Hoffman, Sara M.; Tomlinson, Stephen; Fleming, Sherry D.

    2010-01-01

    Innate immune responses including TLR4 and complement activation are required for mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion (IR)-induced tissue damage. We examined the regulation of TLR4 and complement activation in a mouse model of intestinal IR. Intestinal IR induced C3 deposition in a TLR4 dependent manner. In addition, in wild-type but not TLR4 deficient mice, IR significantly increased C3 and Factor B (FB) mRNA expression within the intestine. To further examine the role of TLR4 and complement, we administered the complement inhibitor, CR2-Crry, to target local complement activation in wild-type C57Bl/10, and TLR4 deficient B10/ScN mice. TLR4 deficient mice sustained less damage and inflammation after IR than wild-type mice, but administration of CR2-Crry did not further reduce tissue damage. In contrast, CR2-Crry treatment of wild-type mice was accompanied by a reduction in complement activation and in C3 and FB transcription in response to IR. CR2-Crry also significantly decreased intestinal IL-6 and IL-12p40 production in both the wild-type and TLR4 deficient mice. These data indicate that TLR4 regulates extrahepatic complement production while complement regulates TLR4-mediated cytokine production during intestinal IR. PMID:20800895

  20. GMPPB-Associated Dystroglycanopathy: Emerging Common Variants with Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Braden S; Willer, Tobias; Saade, Dimah N; Cox, Mary O; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Scavina, Mena; Stefans, Vikki A; Winder, Thomas L; Campbell, Kevin P; Moore, Steven A; Mathews, Katherine D

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase B (GMPPB), a catalyst for the formation of the sugar donor GDP-mannose, were recently identified as a cause of muscular dystrophy resulting from abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. In this series, we report nine unrelated individuals with GMPPB-associated dystroglycanopathy. The most mildly affected subject has normal strength at 25 years, whereas three severely affected children presented in infancy with intellectual disability and epilepsy. Muscle biopsies of all subjects are dystrophic with abnormal immunostaining for glycosylated α-dystroglycan. This cohort, together with previously published cases, allows preliminary genotype-phenotype correlations to be made for the emerging GMPPB common variants c.79G>C (p.D27H) and c.860G>A (p.R287Q). We observe that c.79G>C (p.D27H) is associated with a mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype, whereas c.860G>A (p.R287Q) is associated with a relatively severe congenital muscular dystrophy typically involving brain development. Sixty-six percent of GMPPB families to date have one of these common variants. PMID:26310427

  1. Andrographolide suppress tumor growth by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation in insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma. PMID:24719558

  2. Distinct microenvironmental cues stimulate divergent TLR4-mediated signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Anna M; Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Lim, Jenny M P; Midwood, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit a phenotypic plasticity that enables them to orchestrate specific immune responses to distinct threats. The microbial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C are released during bacterial infection and tissue injury, respectively, and both activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We found that these two TLR4 ligands stimulated distinct signaling pathways in macrophages, resulting in cells with divergent phenotypes. Although macrophages activated by LPS or tenascin-C displayed some common features, including activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cytokine synthesis, each ligand stimulated the production of different subsets of cytokines and generated different phosphoproteomic signatures. Moreover, tenascin-C promoted the generation of macrophages that exhibited increased synthesis and phosphorylation of extracellular matrix components, whereas LPS stimulated the production of macrophages that exhibited an enhanced capacity to degrade the matrix. These data reveal how the activation of one pattern recognition receptor by different microenvironmental cues generates macrophage with distinct phenotypes. PMID:27577261

  3. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C.; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette L.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Rowley, Anne H.; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5′ untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 × 10−8 in the Japanese and P = 3.7 × 10−3 in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD. PMID:20423928

  4. TLR4 mutant mice are protected from renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana C P; Tsuji, Takayuki; Baranova, Irina N; Bocharov, Alexander V; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Hu, Xuzhen; Eggerman, Thomas; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with persistent low-grade inflammation and immunosuppression. In this study we tested the role of Toll-like receptor 4, the main receptor for endotoxin (LPS), in a mouse model of renal fibrosis and in a model of progressive CKD that better resembles the human disease. C3HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice have a missense point mutation in the TLR4 gene, rendering the receptor nonfunctional. In a model of renal fibrosis after folic acid injection, TLR4 mutant mice developed less interstititial fibrosis in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy with continuous low-dose angiotensin II infusion, C3HeOuJ (TLR4 WT) mice developed progressive CKD with albuminuria, increased serum levels of BUN and creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis, whereas TLR4 mutant mice were significantly protected from CKD progression. TLR4 WT mice also developed low-grade systemic inflammation, splenocyte apoptosis and increased expression of the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 in the spleen, which were not observed in TLR4 mutant mice. In vitro, endotoxin (LPS) directly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome expression in renal epithelial cells via TLR4. In summary, TLR4 contributes to renal fibrosis and CKD progression, at least in part, via inflammasome activation in renal epithelial cells, and may also participate in the dysregulated immune response that is associated with CKD. PMID:26416975

  5. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.

  6. Association of Common Variants in MMPs with Periodontitis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyang; Zhu, Ying; Singh, Pradeep; Ajmera, Deepal Haresh; Song, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered to play an important role during tissue remodeling and extracellular matrix degradation. And functional polymorphisms in MMPs genes have been reported to be associated with the increased risk of periodontitis. Recently, many studies have investigated the association between MMPs polymorphisms and periodontitis risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. In order to quantify the influence of MMPs polymorphisms on the susceptibility to periodontitis, we performed a meta-analysis and systematic review. Results. Overall, this comprehensive meta-analysis included a total of 17 related studies, including 2399 cases and 2002 healthy control subjects. Our results revealed that although studies of the association between MMP-8 −799 C/T variant and the susceptibility to periodontitis have not yielded consistent results, MMP-1 (−1607 1G/2G, −519 A/G, and −422 A/T), MMP-2 (−1575 G/A, −1306 C/T, −790 T/G, and −735 C/T), MMP-3 (−1171 5A/6A), MMP-8 (−381 A/G and +17 C/G), MMP-9 (−1562 C/T and +279 R/Q), and MMP-12 (−357 Asn/Ser), as well as MMP-13 (−77 A/G, 11A/12A) SNPs are not related to periodontitis risk. Conclusions. No association of these common MMPs variants with the susceptibility to periodontitis was found; however, further larger-scale and multiethnic genetic studies on this topic are expected to be conducted to validate our results. PMID:27194818

  7. Cellular uptake of exogenous calcineurin B is dependent on TLR4/MD2/CD14 complexes, and CnB is an endogenous ligand of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinju; Qin, Nannan; Zhang, Hongwei; Yang, Rui; Xiang, Benqiong; Wei, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Our previous research showed that recombinant calcineurin B (rhCnB) stimulates cytokine secretion by immune cells, probably through TLR4. Exogenous CnB can be incorporated into many different tumour cells in vitro, but the mode of uptake and receptors required remain unknown. Here, we report that exogenous CnB is taken up by cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner via clathrin-dependent receptor-mediated internalization. Our findings further confirm that uptake is mediated by the TLR4/MD2 complex together with the co-receptor CD14. The MST results revealed a high affinity between CnB and the TLR4 receptor complex. No binding was detected between CnB and LPS. CnB inhibited the uptake of LPS, and LPS also inhibited the uptake of CnB. These results indicate that the uptake of exogenous CnB did not occur through LPS and that CnB was not a chaperone of LPS. Thus, we conclude that TLR4 receptor complexes were required for the recognition and internalization of exogenous CnB. CnB could be a potential endogenous ligand of TLR4 and function as an agonist of TLR4. These properties of CnB support its potential for development as an anti-cancer drug. PMID:27090571

  8. Role of the Toll Like receptor (TLR) radical cycle in chronic inflammation: possible treatments targeting the TLR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Kurt; Maes, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) complex, a receptor of the innate immune system, may underpin the pathophysiology of many human diseases, including asthma, cardiovascular disorder, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, autoimmune disorders, neuroinflammatory disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, clinical depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, alcohol abuse, and toluene inhalation. TLRs are pattern recognition receptors that recognize damage-associated molecular patterns and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria. Here we focus on the environmental factors, which are known to trigger TLR4, e.g., ozone, atmosphere particulate matter, long-lived reactive oxygen intermediate, pentachlorophenol, ionizing radiation, and toluene. Activation of the TLR4 pathways may cause chronic inflammation and increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and oxidative and nitrosative stress and therefore TLR-related diseases. This implies that drugs or substances that modify these pathways may prevent or improve the abovementioned diseases. Here we review some of the most promising drugs and agents that have the potential to attenuate TLR-mediated inflammation, e.g., anti-LPS strategies that aim to neutralize LPS (synthetic anti-LPS peptides and recombinant factor C) and TLR4/MyD88 antagonists, including eritoran, CyP, EM-163, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, 6-shogaol, cinnamon extract, N-acetylcysteine, melatonin, and molecular hydrogen. The authors posit that activation of the TLR radical (ROS/RNS) cycle is a common pathway underpinning many "civilization" disorders and that targeting the TLR radical cycle may be an effective method to treat many inflammatory disorders. PMID:23436141

  9. TLR4 signaling augments B lymphocyte migration and overcomes the restriction that limits access to germinal center dark zones

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Il-Young; Park, Chung; Harrison, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    B lymphocyte–intrinsic Toll-like receptor (TLR) signals amplify humoral immunity and can exacerbate autoimmune diseases. We identify a new mechanism by which TLR signals may contribute to autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. We show that TLR4 signaling enhances B lymphocyte trafficking into lymph nodes (LNs), induces B lymphocyte clustering and interactions within LN follicles, leads to sustained in vivo B cell proliferation, overcomes the restriction that limits the access of nonantigen-activated B cells to germinal center dark zones, and enhances the generation of memory and plasma cells. Intravital microscopy and in vivo tracking studies of B cells transferred to recipient mice revealed that TLR4-activated, but not nonstimulated, B cells accumulated within the dark zones of preexisting germinal centers even when transferred with antigen-specific B cells. The TLR4-activated cells persist much better than nonstimulated cells, expanding both within the memory and plasma cell compartments. TLR-mediated activation of B cells may help to feed and stabilize the spontaneous and ectopic germinal centers that are so commonly found in autoimmune individuals and that accompany chronic inflammation. PMID:19917774

  10. Genetic polymorphisms of IL-17A, IL-17F, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Lü, Lingshuang; Xu, Kun; Chen, Yongzhong; Pan, Hongqiu; Burstrom, Bo; Burstrom, Kristina; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors affect host susceptibility to pathogens. In this population-based case control study, we explored the genetic polymorphisms of IL-17, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with pulmonary tuberculosis in a Chinese Han population. We recruited 1601 pulmonary tuberculosis patients matched with 1526 healthy controls and genotyped twelve functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After the correction for multiple comparisons, two SNPs (rs10759932 and rs2737190) in the TLR4 gene remained significant. Individuals carrying the rs2737190-AG genotype (vs. AA) had a significantly increased risk of either clinical tuberculosis (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11–1.53) or sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13–1.61). Stratification analysis revealed that the effects of genetic variations on tuberculosis were more evident among non-smokers. People with haplotype TLR4 rs10983755G–rs10759932C had a significantly increased risk of tuberculosis (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 2.34–5.05). Moreover, we found that SNPs of rs3819024 in IL-17A and rs763780 in IL-17F were weakly related to a prognosis of tuberculosis. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of IL-17 and TLR4 may play a role in host susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population. More work is necessary to identify specific causative variants of tuberculosis underlying the observed associations. PMID:27339100

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of IL-17A, IL-17F, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Lü, Lingshuang; Xu, Kun; Chen, Yongzhong; Pan, Hongqiu; Burstrom, Bo; Burstrom, Kristina; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors affect host susceptibility to pathogens. In this population-based case control study, we explored the genetic polymorphisms of IL-17, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with pulmonary tuberculosis in a Chinese Han population. We recruited 1601 pulmonary tuberculosis patients matched with 1526 healthy controls and genotyped twelve functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After the correction for multiple comparisons, two SNPs (rs10759932 and rs2737190) in the TLR4 gene remained significant. Individuals carrying the rs2737190-AG genotype (vs. AA) had a significantly increased risk of either clinical tuberculosis (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11-1.53) or sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13-1.61). Stratification analysis revealed that the effects of genetic variations on tuberculosis were more evident among non-smokers. People with haplotype TLR4 rs10983755G-rs10759932C had a significantly increased risk of tuberculosis (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 2.34-5.05). Moreover, we found that SNPs of rs3819024 in IL-17A and rs763780 in IL-17F were weakly related to a prognosis of tuberculosis. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of IL-17 and TLR4 may play a role in host susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population. More work is necessary to identify specific causative variants of tuberculosis underlying the observed associations. PMID:27339100

  12. TLR4 regulates pulmonary vascular homeostasis and remodeling via redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Hui; Sun, Yong; Jhala, Nirag; Bradley, Wayne E.; Dell’Italia, Louis J.; Michalek, Sue; Wu, Hui; Steele, Chad; Benza, Raymond L; Chen, Yabing

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) contributes to morbidity and mortality of patients with lung and heart diseases. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced PAH and increased pulmonary arterial wall thickness in wild-type mice. Mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4−/−) spontaneously developed PAH, which was not further enhanced by hypoxia. Echocardiography determined right ventricular hypertrophy and decreased pulmonary arterial acceleration time were associated with the development of PAH in TLR4−/− mice. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), hypoxia decreased TLR4 expression and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nox1/Nox4. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase decreased hypoxia-induced proliferation of wild-type PASMC. PASMC derived from TLR4−/− mice exhibited increased ROS and Nox4/Nox1 expression. Our studies demonstrate an important role of TLR4 in maintaining normal pulmonary vasculature and in hypoxia-induced PAH. Inhibition of TLR4, by genetic ablation or hypoxia, increases the expression of Nox1/Nox4 and induces PASMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. These results support a novel function of TLR4 in regulating the development of PAH and reveal a new regulatory axis contributing to TLR4 deficiency-induced vascular hypertrophy and remodeling. PMID:26709781

  13. Hyperinsulinemia Down-Regulates TLR4 Expression in the Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    de Laat, Melody A.; Gruntmeir, Kaylynn J.; Pollitt, Christopher C.; McGowan, Catherine M.; Sillence, Martin N.; Lacombe, Véronique A.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are key regulators of innate immune and inflammatory responses and their activation is linked to impaired glucose metabolism during metabolic disease. Determination of whether TLR4 signaling can be activated in the heart by insulin may shed light on the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy, a process that is often complicated by obesity and insulin resistance. The aim of the current study was to determine if supraphysiological insulin concentrations alter the expression of TLR4, markers of TLR4 signaling and glucose transporters (GLUTs) in the heart. Firstly, the effect of insulin on TLR4 protein expression was investigated in vitro in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Secondly, protein expression of TLR4, the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) and GLUTs (1, 4, 8, 12) were examined in the equine ventricular myocardium following a prolonged, euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp. Down-regulation of TLR4 protein content in rat cardiac myocytes was observed after incubation with a supraphysiologic concentration of insulin as well as in the equine myocardium after prolonged insulin infusion. Further, cardiac TLR4 expression was negatively correlated with serum insulin concentration. Markers of cardiac TLR4 signaling and GLUT expression were not affected by hyperinsulinemia and concomitant TLR4 down-regulation. Since TLRs are major determinants of the inflammatory response, our findings suggest that insulin infusion exerts an anti-inflammatory effect in the hearts of non-obese individuals. Understanding the regulation of cardiac TLR4 signaling during metabolic dysfunction will facilitate improved management of cardiac sequela to metabolic syndrome and diabetes. PMID:25101057

  14. An in silico approach towards the identification of novel inhibitors of the TLR-4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mahita, Jarjapu; Harini, K; Rao Pichika, Mallikarjuna; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-06-01

    Precise functioning and fine-tuning of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is a critical requirement for the smooth functioning of the innate immune system, since aberrant TLR4 activation causes excessive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and interferons. This can result in life threatening conditions such as septic shock and other inflammatory disorders. The TRIF-related adaptor molecule (TRAM) adaptor protein is unique to the TLR4 signaling pathway and abrogation of TRAM-mediated TLR4 signaling is a promising strategy for developing therapeutics aimed at disrupting TRAM interactions with other components of the TLR4 signaling complex. The VIPER motif from the vaccinia virus-producing protein, A46 has been reported to disrupt TRAM-TLR4 interactions. We have exploited this information, in combination with homology modeling and docking approaches, to identify a potential binding site on TRAM lined by the BB loop and αC helix. Virtual screening of commercially available small molecules targeting the binding site enabled to short-list 12 small molecules to abrogate TRAM-mediated TLR4 signaling. Molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics calculations have been performed for the analysis of these receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:26264972

  15. Distinct Tlr4-expressing cell compartments control neutrophilic and eosinophilic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    McAlees, J W; Whitehead, G S; Harley, I T W; Cappelletti, M; Rewerts, C L; Holdcroft, A M; Divanovic, S; Wills-Karp, M; Finkelman, F D; Karp, C L; Cook, D N

    2015-07-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic, inflammatory lung disease. Some forms of allergic asthma are characterized by T helper type 2 (Th2)-driven eosinophilia, whereas others are distinguished by Th17-driven neutrophilia. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells (AECs) contributes to the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and allergens, but the specific contribution of TLR4 in these cell compartments to airway inflammatory responses remains poorly understood. We used novel, conditionally mutant Tlr4(fl/fl) mice to define the relative contributions of AEC and hematopoietic cell Tlr4 expression to LPS- and allergen-induced airway inflammation. We found that Tlr4 expression by hematopoietic cells is critical for neutrophilic airway inflammation following LPS exposure and for Th17-driven neutrophilic responses to the house dust mite (HDM) lysates and ovalbumin (OVA). Conversely, Tlr4 expression by AECs was found to be important for robust eosinophilic airway inflammation following sensitization and challenge with these same allergens. Thus, Tlr4 expression by hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells controls distinct arms of the immune response to inhaled allergens. PMID:25465099

  16. LPS INHIBITION OF GLUCOSE PRODUCTION THROUGH THE TLR4, MYD88, NFκB PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Raetzsch, Carl F.; Brooks, Natasha L.; Alderman, J. McKee; Moore, Kelli S.; Hosick, Peter A.; Klebanov, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Bear, James E.; Baldwin, Albert S.; Mackman, Nigel; Combs, Terry P.

    2010-01-01

    Acute exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can cause hypoglycemia and insulin resistance; the underlying mechanisms however, are unclear. We set out to determine whether insulin resistance is linked to hypoglycemia through TLR4, MyD88 and NFκB, a cell signaling pathway that mediates LPS induction of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. LPS induction of hypoglycemia was blocked in TLR4−/− and MyD88−/− mice but not in TNFα−/− mice. Both glucose production and glucose utilization were decreased during hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia was associated with the activation of NFκB in the liver. LPS inhibition of glucose production was blocked in hepatocytes isolated from TLR4−/− and MyD88−/− mice and hepatoma cells expressing an IκB mutant that interferes with NFκB activation. Thus, LPS-induced hypoglycemia was mediated by the inhibition of glucose production from the liver through the TLR4, MyD88, NFκB pathway, independent of LPS induced TNFα. LPS inhibition of glucose production was not blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of the insulin signaling intermediate PI3K in hepatoma cells. Insulin injection caused a similar reduction of circulating glucose in TLR4−/− and TLR4+/+ mice. These two results suggest that LPS and insulin inhibit glucose production by separate pathways. Recovery from LPS induced hypoglycemia was linked to glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia in TLR4+/+ mice, but not in TLR4−/− mice. Conclusion Insulin resistance is linked to the inhibition of glucose production by the TLR4, MyD88 and NFκB pathway. PMID:19492426

  17. Pulmonary Epithelial TLR4 Activation Leads to Lung Injury in Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongpeng; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Martin, Laura Y; Good, Misty; Zhou, Qinjie; Sung, Jungeun; Fulton, William B; Nino, Diego F; Prindle, Thomas; Ozolek, John A; Hackam, David J

    2016-08-01

    We seek to define the mechanisms leading to the development of lung disease in the setting of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a life-threatening gastrointestinal disease of premature infants characterized by the sudden onset of intestinal necrosis. NEC development in mice requires activation of the LPS receptor TLR4 on the intestinal epithelium, through its effects on modulating epithelial injury and repair. Although NEC-associated lung injury is more severe than the lung injury that occurs in premature infants without NEC, the mechanisms leading to its development remain unknown. In this study, we now show that TLR4 expression in the lung gradually increases during postnatal development, and that mice and humans with NEC-associated lung inflammation express higher levels of pulmonary TLR4 than do age-matched controls. NEC in wild-type newborn mice resulted in significant pulmonary injury that was prevented by deletion of TLR4 from the pulmonary epithelium, indicating a role for pulmonary TLR4 in lung injury development. Mechanistically, intestinal epithelial TLR4 activation induced high-mobility group box 1 release from the intestine, which activated pulmonary epithelial TLR4, leading to the induction of the neutrophil recruiting CXCL5 and the influx of proinflammatory neutrophils to the lung. Strikingly, the aerosolized administration of a novel carbohydrate TLR4 inhibitor prevented CXCL5 upregulation and blocked NEC-induced lung injury in mice. These findings illustrate the critical role of pulmonary TLR4 in the development of NEC-associated lung injury, and they suggest that inhibition of this innate immune receptor in the neonatal lung may prevent this devastating complication of NEC. PMID:27307558

  18. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  19. Identification of key residues that confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS activity at horse TLR4/MD-2.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katherine L; Gangloff, Monique; Walsh, Catherine M; Spring, David R; Gay, Nicholas J; Bryant, Clare E

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS) antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA) within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly important in TLR

  20. Identification of Key Residues That Confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS Activity at Horse TLR4/MD-2

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Catherine M.; Spring, David R.; Gay, Nicholas J.; Bryant, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS) antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA) within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly important in TLR

  1. A novel approach for the simultaneous analysis of common and rare variants in complex traits.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ao; Chen, Guanjie; Zhou, Yanxun; Bentley, Amy; Rotimi, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in detecting common genetic variants underlying common traits and diseases. Despite the GWAS success stories, the percent trait variance explained by GWAS signals, the so called "missing heritability" has been, at best, modest. Also, the predictive power of common variants identified by GWAS has not been encouraging. Given these observations along with the fact that the effects of rare variants are often, by design, unaccounted for by GWAS and the availability of sequence data, there is a growing need for robust analytic approaches to evaluate the contribution of rare variants to common complex diseases. Here we propose a new method that enables the simultaneous analysis of the association between rare and common variants in disease etiology. We refer to this method as SCARVA (simultaneous common and rare variants analysis). SCARVA is simple to use and is efficient. We used SCARVA to analyze two independent real datasets to identify rare and common variants underlying variation in obesity among participants in the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study and plasma triglyceride levels in the Dallas Heart Study (DHS). We found common and rare variants associated with both traits, consistent with published results. PMID:22346348

  2. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Soriano, Virtudes; Juberias, Pablo; Saez, Berta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Grasa, Matilde; Höiom, Veronica; Lindblom, Annika; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Aben, Katja K H; de Vries, Esther; Santinami, Mario; Di Mauro, Maria G; Maurichi, Andrea; Wendt, Judith; Hochleitner, Pia; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gudmundsson, Julius; Magnusdottir, Droplaug N; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Holm, Hilma; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Frigge, Michael L; Blondal, Thorarinn; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Bjarnason, Hjördis; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Okamoto, Ichiro; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hansson, Johan; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-08-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 x 10(-9)), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of rs157935[T] is dependent on the parental origin of the risk allele. None of these variants were found to be associated with melanoma or fair-pigmentation traits. A melanoma- and pigmentation-associated variant in the SLC45A2 gene, L374F, is associated with risk of both BCC and squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we report conclusive evidence that rs401681[C] in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus confers susceptibility to BCC but protects against melanoma. PMID:19578363

  3. House dust mite allergen induces asthma via TLR4 triggering of airway structural cells

    PubMed Central

    HAMMAD, Hamida; CHIEPPA, Marcello; PERROS, Frederic; WILLART, Monique A.; GERMAIN, Ronald N.; LAMBRECHT, Bart N.

    2009-01-01

    Barrier epithelial cells and airway dendritic cells (DC) make up the first line of defence against inhaled substances like house dust mite (HDM) allergen and endotoxin. We hypothesized that these cells need to communicate to cause allergic disease. Using irradiated chimeric mice, we demonstrate that TLR4 expression on radioresistant lung structural cells is required and sufficient for DC activation in the lung and for priming of effector T helper responses to HDM. TLR4 triggering on structural cells caused production of the innate proallergic cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin-25 and IL-33. The absence of TLR4 on structural cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, abolished HDM driven allergic airway inflammation. Finally, inhalation of a TLR4 antagonist to target exposed epithelial cells suppressed the salient features of asthma including bronchial hyperreactivity. Our data identify an innate immune function of airway epithelial cells that drives allergic inflammation via activation of mucosal DCs. PMID:19330007

  4. Kupffer cells and activation of endothelial TLR4 coordinate neutrophil adhesion within liver sinusoids during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Jenne, Craig N; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Kubes, Paul

    2013-12-01

    A key pathological feature of the systemic inflammatory response of sepsis/endotoxemia is the accumulation of neutrophils within the microvasculature of organs such as the liver, where they cause tissue damage and vascular dysfunction. There is emerging evidence that the vascular endothelium is critical to the orchestration of inflammatory responses to blood-borne microbes and microbial products in sepsis/endotoxemia. In this study, we aimed to understand the role of endothelium, and specifically endothelial TLR4 activation, in the regulation of neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Intravital microscopy of bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that TLR4 expression by non-bone marrow-derived cells was required for neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Furthermore, LPS-induced neutrophil adhesion in liver sinusoids was equivalent between wild-type mice and transgenic mice that express TLR4 only on endothelium (tlr4(-/-)Tie2(tlr4)), revealing that activation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to initiate neutrophil adhesion. Neutrophil arrest within sinusoids of endotoxemic mice requires adhesive interactions between neutrophil CD44 and endothelial hyaluronan. Intravital immunofluorescence imaging demonstrated that stimulation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to induce the deposition of serum-derived hyaluronan-associated protein (SHAP) within sinusoids, which was required for CD44/hyaluronan-dependent neutrophil adhesion. In addition to endothelial TLR4 activation, Kupffer cells contribute to neutrophil recruitment via a distinct CD44/HA/SHAP-independent mechanism. This study sheds new light on the control of innate immune activation within the liver vasculature during endotoxemia, revealing a key role for endothelial cells as sentinels in the detection of intravascular infections and coordination of neutrophil recruitment to the liver. PMID:24113769

  5. Paclitaxel therapy promotes breast cancer metastasis in a TLR4-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Volk-Draper, Lisa; Hall, Kelly; Griggs, Caitlin; Rajput, Sandeep; Kohio, Pascaline; DeNardo, David; Ran, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cytotoxic therapy may actually promote drug resistance and metastasis while inhibiting the growth of primary tumors. Work in preclinical models of breast cancer have shown that acquired chemoresistance to the widely used drug paclitaxel (PXL) can be mediated by activation of the Toll-like receptor TLR4 in cancer cells. In this study, we determined the pro-metastatic effects of tumor-expressed TLR4 and PXL therapy and we investigated the mechanisms mediating these effects. While PXL treatment was largely efficacious in inhibiting TLR4-negative tumors, it significantly increased the incidence and burden of pulmonary and lymphatic metastasis by TLR4-positive tumors. TLR4 activation by PXL strongly increased the expression of inflammatory mediators, not only locally in the primary tumor microenvironment but also systemically in the blood, lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and lungs. These pro-inflammatory changes promoted the outgrowth of Ly6C+ and Ly6G+ myeloid progenitor cells and their mobilization to tumors, where they increased blood vessel formation but not invasion of these vessels. In contrast, PXL-mediated activation of TLR4-positive tumors induced de novo generation of deep intratumoral lymphatic vessels that were highly permissive to invasion by malignant cells. These results suggest that PXL therapy of patients with TLR4-expressing tumors may activate systemic inflammatory circuits that promote angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and metastasis, both at local sites and premetastatic niches where invasion occurs in distal organs. Taken together, our findings suggest that efforts to target TLR4 on tumor cells may simultaneously quell local and systemic inflammatory pathways that promote malignant progression, with implications for how to prevent tumor recurrence and the establishment of metastatic lesions, either during chemotherapy or after it is completed. PMID:25274031

  6. Helicobacter pylori regulates TLR4 and TLR9 during gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian Rong; Peng, Jiang Chen; Qiao, Yu Qi; Zhu, Ming Ming; Zhao, Di; Shen, Jun; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigated the influence of H. pylori on TLR4 and TLR9 in gastric mucosa during gastric carcinogenesis. Methods: Gastric biopsy specimens were taken from 148 patients and divided into five groups, including normal group (n = 10), chronic superficial gastritis group (n = 35), atrophy/intestinal metaplasia group (n = 35), dysplasia group (n = 34) and gastric carcinoma group (n = 34). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of TLR4 and TLR9. Geimsa staining and rapid urea test were used for determine H. pylori infection. Results: TLR4 was detected in gastric epithelium and monocytes/macrophages in superficial gastritis, atrophy/intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or carcinoma. TLR9 was mainly accentuated in monocytes/macrophages. TLR4 positive cells in epithelium and in monocytes/macrophages with H. pylori infection were much more than those without H. pylori infection. Similar results were also found in TLR9. When gastric epithelium was accompanied with H. pylori infection, TLR4 was significant higher in superficial gastritis and atrophy/intestinal metaplasia groups compared with dysplasia and carcinoma groups. When gastric epithelium was infected by H. pylori, TLR9 was significant higher in carcinoma group compared with superficial gastritis, atrophy/intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. TLR4 and TLR9 show significant correlation with the severity of inflammation. Conclusions: H. pylori infection was associated with increased expression of TLR4 and TLR9 in gastric mucosa. In superficial gastritis and atrophy/intestinal metaplasia the inflammation was predominately mediated by TLR4, while in gastric cancer the inflammation was mainly mediated by TLR9. PMID:25400780

  7. Common and Rare Variants in SCN10A Modulate the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Javad; Olesen, Morten S.; Yuan, Lei; Nielsen, Jonas B.; Liang, Bo; Macri, Vincenzo; Christophersen, Ingrid E.; Nielsen, Nikolaj; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Grunnet, Morten; Haunsø, Stig; Holst, Anders G.; Svendsen, Jesper H.; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown that the common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6800541 located in SCN10A, encoding the voltage-gated Nav1.8 sodium channel, is associated with PR–interval prolongation and atrial fibrillation (AF). SNP rs6800541 is in high linkage disequilibrium with the non-synonymous variant in SCN10A, rs6795970 (V1073A, r2=0.933). We therefore sought to determine whether common and rare SCN10A variants are associated with early onset AF. Methods and Results SCN10A was sequenced in 225 AF patients in whom there was no evidence of other cardiovascular disease or dysfunction (lone AF). In an association study of the rs6795970 SNP variant, we included 515 AF patients, and two control cohorts of 730 individuals free of AF and 6,161 randomly sampled individuals. Functional characterization of SCN10A variants was performed by whole-cell patch-clamping. In the lone AF cohort, nine rare missense variants and one splice site donor variant were detected. Interestingly, AF patients were found to have higher G allele frequency of rs6795970 which encodes the alanine variant at position 1073 (described from here on as A1073, odds ratio = 1.35 [1.16–1.54]; p=2.3×10−05). Both of the common variants, A1073 andP1092, induced a gain-of-channel function, while the rare missense variants, V94G and R1588Q, resulted in a loss-of-channel function. Conclusions The common variant A1073 is associated with increased susceptibility to AF. Both rare and common variants have impact on the function of the channel, indicating that these variants influence susceptibility to AF. Hence, our study suggests that SCN10A variations are involved in the genesis of AF. PMID:25691686

  8. Tlr-4 deficiency selectively protects against obesity induced by diets high in saturated fat.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeremy E; Gabler, Nicholas K; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Spurlock, Michael E

    2008-06-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (Tlr-4), a key pattern recognition receptor involved in innate immune response, is activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs). To investigate the involvement of this receptor in obesity caused by consumption of diets high in fat, we utilized male Tlr-4-deficient 10ScN mice and 10J controls. Mice were fed either low fat (low-fat control (LFC)), high unsaturated fat (high-fat control (HFC)), or high saturated fat + palmitate (HFP) diets ad libitum for 16 weeks. Relative to the LFC diet, the HFC diet resulted in greater epididymal fat pad weights and adipocyte hypertrophy in both Tlr-4-deficient and normal mice. However, the 10ScN mice were completely protected against the obesigenic effects of the HFP diet. Moreover, macrophage infiltration and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) transcript abundance were lower in adipose tissue of 10ScN mice fed the HFP diet, and the hyperinsulinemic response was negated. Tlr-4-deficient mice also had markedly lower circulating concentrations of MCP-1 and much less nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB) protein in nuclear extracts prepared from adipose tissue, irrespective of diet. In contrast, Tlr-4 deficiency did not attenuate the induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in adipose tissue. These data indicate that Tlr-4 deficiency selectively protects against the obesigenic effects of SFA and alters obesity-related inflammatory responses in adipose tissue. PMID:18421279

  9. Elevated muscle TLR4 expression and metabolic endotoxemia in human aging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sangeeta; Lertwattanarak, Raweewan; Garduño, Jose de Jesus; Galeana, Joaquin Joya; Li, Jinqi; Zamarripa, Frank; Lancaster, Jack L; Mohan, Sumathy; Hussey, Sophie; Musi, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in glucose metabolism and sarcopenia that jointly contribute to a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Because aging is considered as a state of low-grade inflammation, in this study we examined whether older, healthy (lean, community-dwelling) participants have altered signaling flux through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a key mediator of innate and adaptive immune responses. We also examined whether a 4-month aerobic exercise program would have an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing TLR4 expression and signaling. At baseline, muscle TLR4, nuclear factor κB p50 and nuclear factor κB p65 protein content, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation were significantly elevated in older versus young participants. The plasma concentration of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide and its binding protein also were significantly elevated in older participants, indicative of metabolic endotoxemia, which is a recently described phenomenon of increased plasma endotoxin level in metabolic disease. These alterations in older participants were accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity, quadriceps muscle volume, and muscle strength. The exercise training program increased insulin sensitivity, without affecting quadriceps muscle volume or strength. Muscle TLR4, nuclear factor κB, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and plasma lipopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide binding protein were not changed by exercise. In conclusion, insulin resistance and sarcopenia of aging are associated with increased TLR4 expression/signaling, which may be secondary to metabolic endotoxemia. PMID:24846769

  10. Elevated Muscle TLR4 Expression and Metabolic Endotoxemia in Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangeeta; Lertwattanarak, Raweewan; Garduño, Jose de Jesus; Galeana, Joaquin Joya; Li, Jinqi; Zamarripa, Frank; Lancaster, Jack L.; Mohan, Sumathy; Hussey, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in glucose metabolism and sarcopenia that jointly contribute to a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Because aging is considered as a state of low-grade inflammation, in this study we examined whether older, healthy (lean, community-dwelling) participants have altered signaling flux through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a key mediator of innate and adaptive immune responses. We also examined whether a 4-month aerobic exercise program would have an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing TLR4 expression and signaling. At baseline, muscle TLR4, nuclear factor κB p50 and nuclear factor κB p65 protein content, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation were significantly elevated in older versus young participants. The plasma concentration of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide and its binding protein also were significantly elevated in older participants, indicative of metabolic endotoxemia, which is a recently described phenomenon of increased plasma endotoxin level in metabolic disease. These alterations in older participants were accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity, quadriceps muscle volume, and muscle strength. The exercise training program increased insulin sensitivity, without affecting quadriceps muscle volume or strength. Muscle TLR4, nuclear factor κB, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and plasma lipopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide binding protein were not changed by exercise. In conclusion, insulin resistance and sarcopenia of aging are associated with increased TLR4 expression/signaling, which may be secondary to metabolic endotoxemia. PMID:24846769

  11. Genetic Polymorphisms of TLR4 and MICA are Associated with Severity of Trachoma Disease in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Muneer; Berka, Noureddine; Khraiwesh, Mozna; Ramadan, Ali; Apprey, Victor; Furbert-Harris, Paulette; Quinn, Thomas; Brim, Hassan; Dunston, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Aim To examine the association of TLR4 Asp299Gly and MICA exon 5 microsatellites polymorphisms with severity of trachoma in a sub-Saharan East Africa population of Tanzanian villagers. Methods The samples were genotyped for MICA exon 5 microsatellites and the TLR4 299 A/G polymorphism by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), and GeneScan®, respectively. The association of TLR4 Asp299Gly and MICA exon 5 microsatellites with inflammatory trachoma (TI) and trichiasis (TI) were examined. Results The results showed an association between TLR4 and MICA polymorphisms and trachoma disease severity, as well as with protection. TLR4 an allele was significantly associated with inflammatory trachoma (p=0.0410), while the G allele (p=0.0410) was associated with protection. Conclusion TLR4 and MICA may modulate the risk of severity to trachoma disease by modulating the immune response to Ct. In addition; the increased frequency of MICA-A9 heterozygote in controls may suggest a positive selection of these alleles in adaptation to environments where Ct is endemic.

  12. TLR4 drives the pathogenesis of acquired cholesteatoma by promoting local inflammation and bone destruction

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yu; Chen, Yu Bin; Chen, Sui Jun; Zheng, Yi Qing; Liu, Xiang; Liu, Yi; Jiang, Huai Li; Xu, Guo; Li, Zhuo Hao; Huang, Qiu Hong; Xiong, Hao; Zhang, Zhi Gang

    2015-01-01

    Acquired cholesteatoma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by both hyperkeratinized squamous epithelial overgrowth and bone destruction. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation and subsequent inflammatory cytokine production are closely associated with inflammatory bone disease. However, the expression and function of TLRs in cholesteatoma remain unclear.We observed inflammatory cell infiltration of the matrix and prematrix of human acquired cholesteatoma, as well as dramatically increased expression of TLR4 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. TLR2 exhibited an up-regulation that was not statistically significant. TLR4 expression in human acquired cholesteatoma correlated with disease severity; the number of TLR4-positive cells increased with an increased degree of cholesteatoma, invasion, bone destruction, and hearing loss. Moreover, TLR4 deficiency was protective against experimental acquired cholesteatoma-driven bone destruction and hearing loss, as it reduced local TNF-α and IL-1β expression and impaired osteoclast formation by decreasing expression of the osteoclast effectors receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). TLR2 deficiency did not relieve disease severity, inflammatory responses, or osteoclast formation. Moreover, neither TLR2 nor TLR4 deficiency had an effect on antimicrobial peptides, inducible iNOS,BD-2 expression or bacterial clearance. Therefore, TLR4 may promote cholesteatoma-induced bone destruction and deafness by enhancing inflammatory responses and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26639190

  13. TLR4 Signaling Is Involved in Brain Vascular Toxicity of PCB153 Bound to Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Choi, Jeong June; Eum, Sung Yong; Daunert, Sylvia; Toborek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    PCBs bind to environmental particles; however, potential toxicity exhibited by such complexes is not well understood. The aim of the present study is to study the hypothesis that assembling onto nanoparticles can influence the PCB153-induced brain endothelial toxicity via interaction with the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To address this hypothesis, TLR4-deficient and wild type control mice (males, 10 week old) were exposed to PCB153 (5 ng/g body weight) bound to chemically inert silica nanoparticles (PCB153-NPs), PCB153 alone, silica nanoparticles (NPs; diameter, 20 nm), or vehicle. Selected animals were also subjected to 40 min ischemia, followed by a 24 h reperfusion. As compared to exposure to PCB153 alone, treatment with PCB153-NP potentiated the brain infarct volume in control mice. Importantly, this effect was attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice. Similarly, PCB153-NP-induced proinflammatory responses and disruption of tight junction integrity were less pronounced in TLR4-deficient mice as compared to control animals. Additional in vitro experiments revealed that TLR4 mediates toxicity of PCB153-NP via recruitment of tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). The results of current study indicate that binding to seemingly inert nanoparticles increase cerebrovascular toxicity of PCBs and suggest that targeting the TLR4/TRAF6 signaling may protect against these effects. PMID:23690990

  14. Sex Differences in monocytes and TLR4 associated immune responses; implications for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Gilkeson, Gary

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that TLR7 and TLR9 signaling play a role in SLE pathogenesis. Our recent study revealed that estrogen receptor α knockout mice have impaired inflammatory responses to TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 ligand stimulation in DCs, B cells and whole spleen cells. These findings indicate that estrogen receptor mediated signaling may impact universal TLR responsiveness. Whether estrogen has a direct or indirect effect on TLR responsiveness by immune cells is not clear. There is evidence of a role of TLR4 in SLE disease pathogenesis, such as the kidney damage, the induction of CD40 and autoantibodies, the suppression of regulatory T cells, and the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α) in SLE pathogenesis that can be induced by TLR4-mediated monocyte activation, suggesting that TLR4 and TLR4 responsiveness are also important for SLE disease. This review will focus on TLR4 responses and monocytes, which are understudied in systemic autoimmune diseases such as SLE. PMID:25309746

  15. Relationship between TLR4 and MCP2 expression levels and habitual abortion.

    PubMed

    Li, X P; Song, L N; Tian, L P; Zhang, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Habitual abortion is associated with the altered expression of multiple genes. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP2 or CCL8) and habitual abortion. This was done by detecting and comparing their relative expression in peripheral blood and placental villi of patients and healthy fertile women. Based on our previous research, 85 subjects with habitual abortion (study group) and 40 healthy fertile women (control group), who were admitted to our hospital between June 2013 and December 2014, were enrolled in this study. After these subjects signed written informed consent, peripheral blood samples and villous tissues were collected, from which the total RNA was extracted. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 was detected with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, using GAPDH as a reference control. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood and villous tissues of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the changes in expression levels of TLR4 and MCP2. In conclusion, TLR4 and MCP2 expression correlated with the occurrence of habitual abortion. Detecting expression changes in TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood is a feasible method for predicting the occurrence of abortion in women of child-bearing age. PMID:27173235

  16. Altered Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 on Peripheral CD14+ Blood Monocytes in Children with Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karananou, Panagiota; Fleva, Alexandra; Tramma, Despoina; Alataki, Anastasia; Pavlitou-Tsiontsi, Aikaterini; Emporiadou-Peticopoulou, Maria; Papadopoulou-Alataki, Efimia

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the second most common bacterial infection, after otitis media, in infants and children. The mechanisms of disease susceptibility and the role of immunity in the pathogenesis of UTI in children have been evaluated. In recent years, Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) have been recognized as specific components of the innate immune system constituting important mediators in host immune recognition. The aim of the present study was to determine ΤLR2 and TLR4 expression during the acute phase of UTI in infants and children by measuring the CD14/TLR2 and CD14/TLR4 expression on monocytes. We also attempted to compare the TLRs expression with the immunological status of the patients to healthy children. The study group consisted of 60 children (36 females and 24 males) and the control group included 60 age-matched pediatric subjects (27 females and 33 males). In our study, no antibody deficiency was found either in the children with UTI or in healthy subjects. There might be a connection between low IgA, IgG, and IgG subclasses serum levels and UTI as there was a statistically significant difference between patients and healthy children. A higher expression of CD14/TLR2 was revealed in patients (90,07%) compared to controls (85,48%) as well as CD14/TLR4 in patients (90,53%) compared to controls (87,25%) (statistically significant difference, p < 0,05). The results of this study could provide new understanding of UTIs' pathogenesis in children. PMID:27252945

  17. Utilizing mutual information for detecting rare and common variants associated with a categorical trait

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Leiming; Wang, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Genome-wide association studies have succeeded in detecting novel common variants which associate with complex diseases. As a result of the fast changes in next generation sequencing technology, a large number of sequencing data are generated, which offers great opportunities to identify rare variants that could explain a larger proportion of missing heritability. Many effective and powerful methods are proposed, although they are usually limited to continuous, dichotomous or ordinal traits. Notice that traits having nominal categorical features are commonly observed in complex diseases, especially in mental disorders, which motivates the incorporation of the characteristics of the categorical trait into association studies with rare and common variants. Methods. We construct two simple and intuitive nonparametric tests, MIT and aMIT, based on mutual information for detecting association between genetic variants in a gene or region and a categorical trait. MIT and aMIT can gauge the difference among the distributions of rare and common variants across a region given every categorical trait value. If there is little association between variants and a categorical trait, MIT or aMIT approximately equals zero. The larger the difference in distributions, the greater values MIT and aMIT have. Therefore, MIT and aMIT have the potential for detecting functional variants. Results.We checked the validity of proposed statistics and compared them to the existing ones through extensive simulation studies with varied combinations of the numbers of variants of rare causal, rare non-causal, common causal, and common non-causal, deleterious and protective, various minor allele frequencies and different levels of linkage disequilibrium. The results show our methods have higher statistical power than conventional ones, including the likelihood based score test, in most cases: (1) there are multiple genetic variants in a gene or region; (2) both protective and deleterious

  18. Glial TLR4 signaling does not contribute to opioid-induced depression of respiration

    PubMed Central

    Zwicker, Jennifer D.; Zhang, Yong; Ren, Jun; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Rice, Kenner C.; Watkins, Linda R.; Greer, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids activate glia in the central nervous system in part by activating the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation 2 (MD2) complex. TLR4/MD2-mediated activation of glia by opioids compromises their analgesic actions. Glial activation is also hypothesized as pivotal in opioid-mediated reward and tolerance and as a contributor to opioid-mediated respiratory depression. We tested the contribution of TLR4 to opioid-induced respiratory depression using rhythmically active medullary slices that contain the pre-Bötzinger Complex (preBötC, an important site of respiratory rhythm generation) and adult rats in vivo. Injection with DAMGO (μ-opioid receptor agonist; 50 μM) or bath application of DAMGO (500 nM) or fentanyl (1 μM) slowed frequency recorded from XII nerves to 40%, 40%, or 50% of control, respectively. This DAMGO-mediated frequency inhibition was unaffected by preapplication of lipopolysaccharides from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (a TLR4 antagonist, 2,000 ng/ml) or (+)naloxone (1–10 μM, a TLR4-antagonist). Bath application of (−)naloxone (500 nM; a TLR4 and μ-opioid antagonist), however, rapidly reversed the opioid-mediated frequency decrease. We also compared the opioid-induced respiratory depression in slices in vitro in the absence and presence of bath-applied minocycline (an inhibitor of microglial activation) and in slices prepared from mice injected (ip) 18 h earlier with minocycline or saline. Minocycline had no effect on respiratory depression in vitro. Finally, the respiratory depression evoked in anesthetized rats by tail vein infusion of fentanyl was unaffected by subsequent injection of (+)naloxone, but completely reversed by (−)naloxone. These data indicate that neither activation of microglia in preBötC nor TLR4/MD2-activation contribute to opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:25103966

  19. The roles of bacteria and TLR4 in rat and murine models of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Jilling, Tamas; Simon, Dyan; Lu, Jing; Meng, Fan Jing; Li, Dan; Schy, Robert; Thomson, Richard B; Soliman, Antoine; Arditi, Moshe; Caplan, Michael S

    2006-09-01

    Bacteria are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), but it is unknown whether their interaction with the epithelium can participate in the initiation of mucosal injury or they can act only following translocation across a damaged intestinal barrier. Our aims were to determine whether bacteria and intestinal epithelial TLR4 play roles in a well-established neonatal rat model and a novel neonatal murine model of NEC. Neonatal rats, C57BL/6J, C3HeB/FeJ (TLR4 wild type), and C3H/HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice were delivered by Cesarean section and were subjected to formula feeding and cold asphyxia stress or were delivered naturally and were mother-fed. NEC incidence was evaluated by histological scoring, and gene expression was quantified using quantitative real-time PCR from cDNA generated from intestinal total RNA or from RNA obtained by laser capture microdissection. Spontaneous feeding catheter colonization or supplementation of cultured bacterial isolates to formula increased the incidence of experimental NEC. During the first 72 h of life, i.e., the time frame of NEC development in this model, intestinal TLR4 mRNA gradually decreases in mother-fed but increases in formula feeding and cold asphyxia stress, correlating with induced inducible NO synthase. TLR4, inducible NO synthase, and inflammatory cytokine induction occurred in the intestinal epithelium but not in the submucosa. NEC incidence was diminished in C3H/HeJ mice, compared with C3HeB/FeJ mice. In summary, bacteria and TLR4 play significant roles in experimental NEC, likely via an interaction of intraluminal bacteria and aberrantly overexpressed TLR4 in enterocytes. PMID:16920968

  20. Mice that exclusively express TLR4 on endothelial cells can efficiently clear a lethal systemic Gram-negative bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Andonegui, Graciela; Zhou, Hong; Bullard, Daniel; Kelly, Margaret M.; Mullaly, Sarah C.; McDonald, Braedon; Long, Elizabeth M.; Robbins, Stephen M.; Kubes, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of LPS by TLR4 on immune sentinel cells such as macrophages is thought to be key to the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection with Gram-negative bacteria. To explore whether endothelial TLR4 plays a role in this process, we engineered and imaged mice that expressed TLR4 exclusively on endothelium (known herein as EndotheliumTLR4 mice). Local administration of LPS into tissue induced comparable neutrophil recruitment in EndotheliumTLR4 and wild-type mice. Following systemic LPS or intraperitoneal E. coli administration, most neutrophils were sequestered in the lungs of wild-type mice and did not accumulate at primary sites of infection. In contrast, EndotheliumTLR4 mice showed reduced pulmonary capillary neutrophil sequestration over the first 24 hours; as a result, they mobilized neutrophils to primary sites of infection, cleared bacteria, and resisted a dose of E. coli that killed 50% of wild-type mice in the first 48 hours. In fact, the only defect we detected in EndotheliumTLR4 mice was a failure to accumulate neutrophils in the lungs following intratracheal administration of LPS; this response required TLR4 on bone marrow–derived immune cells. Therefore, endothelial TLR4 functions as the primary intravascular sentinel system for detection of bacteria, whereas bone marrow–derived immune cells are critical for pathogen detection at barrier sites. Nonendothelial TLR4 contributes to failure to accumulate neutrophils at primary infection sites in a disseminated systemic infection. PMID:19603547

  1. Detecting association of rare and common variants by testing an optimally weighted combination of variants with longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuaicheng; Fang, Shurong; Sha, Qiuying; Zhang, Shuanglin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that complex diseases are caused by both common and rare variants. Recently, several statistical methods for detecting associations of rare variants have been developed, including the test for testing the effect of an optimally weighted combination of variants (TOW) developed by our group in 2012. These methodologies consider phenotype measurement at only one time point. Because many sequence data have been developed on population cohorts that contain phenotype measurements at multiple time points, such as the data set provided in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 (GAW18), we extend TOW from phenotype measurement at one time point to phenotype measurements at multiple time points. We then apply the newly proposed method to the GAW18 data set and compare the power of the new method with TOW using only one phenotype measurement. The application results show that the newly proposed method jointly modeling phenotype measurements at all time points has increased power over TOW. PMID:25519418

  2. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Heung; Kim, Young Seob; Kim, Seokho; Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T-C; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-09-29

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  3. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T.-C.; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  4. TLR2 and TLR4 mediate the TNFα response to Vibrio vulnificus biotype 1.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Lola V; Drapp, Rebecca L

    2014-08-01

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) is a pathogenic bacterium that can cause life-threatening infections in humans. Most fatal cases are due to septic shock that results from dysregulation of cytokines, particularly TNFα, which plays a critical role in the outcome of Vv infection. The goal of this study was to investigate the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated TNFα response to four Vv biotype 1 strains using mice deficient for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR2/TLR4. Ex vivo assays were performed with blood, splenocytes, and Kupffer cells (KC) from wild-type (WT) and TLR-knockout (KO) mice using formalin-inactivated Vv (f-Vv) as stimulant. All f-Vv biotype 1 strains elicited strong TNFα production by WT mouse blood and cells, which was TLR2 and TLR4 dependent. OxPAPC, an inhibitor of TLR2 and TLR4 signaling, effectively blunted the TLR-mediated TNFα response to f-Vv. Furthermore, TLR2 KO and TLR2/TLR4 KO mice were more resistant to lethal infection with Vv ATCC 27562 than WT mice, perhaps due to attenuation of the TNFα response. These data suggest that it may be possible to devise strategies to specifically target the harmful TLR-mediated TNFα response as an adjunct to antibiotic treatment of severe Vv infection. PMID:24532589

  5. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4(-/-) mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2(-)/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  6. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  7. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Previtera, Michelle L; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrow-derived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffness-regulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, p-NF-κB p65, MyD88, and p-IκBα expression as well as p-NF-κB p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  8. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Previtera, Michelle L.; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrow–derived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffness–regulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, p–NF–κB p65, MyD88, and p–IκBα expression as well as p–NF–κB p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  9. Platycodon grandiflorum polysaccharide induces dendritic cell maturation via TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Jeong; Ryu, Hwa Sun; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kang, Jong Soon; Yun, Jieun; Kim, Sung Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation is critical for initiation of the adoptive immune response. DC maturation is often attenuated in several pathological conditions including cancer. In this study, we report the effect of Platycodon grandiflorum polysaccharide (PG) on DC maturation. PG induced phenotypic maturation of DCs, as proved by the increase in the expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I/II on the cell surface. PG also induced functional maturation of DCs, as proved by elevated production of interleukin (IL)-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and interferon-β, and by enhanced allogeneic T cell stimulation ability of PG-treated DCs. PG efficiently induced maturation of DCs from C3H/HeN mice, which have normal Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), but not that of DCs from C3H/HeJ mice, which have mutated TLR4, suggesting that TLR4 might be one of the PG receptors in DCs. In line with TLR4 activation, PG increased the phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK, and the nuclear translocation of p-c-Jun, p-CREB, and c-Fos. PG also activated NF-κB signaling, as evidenced by degradation of IκBα/β and nuclear translocation of p65 and p50. In summary, our data suggest that PG induces DC maturation by activating MAPK and NF-κB signaling downstream of TLR4. PMID:25019244

  10. MD-2 is required for disulfide HMGB1–dependent TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Ju, Zhongliang; Ragab, Ahmed A.; Lundbäck, Peter; Long, Wei; Valdes-Ferrer, Sergio I.; He, Mingzhu; Pribis, John P.; Li, Jianhua; Lu, Ben; Gero, Domokos; Szabo, Csaba; Antoine, Daniel J.; Harris, Helena E.; Golenbock, Doug T.; Meng, Jianmin; Roth, Jesse; Chavan, Sangeeta S.; Andersson, Ulf; Billiar, Timothy R.; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune receptors for pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and DAMPs) orchestrate inflammatory responses to infection and injury. Secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by damaged cells, HMGB1 is subjected to redox modification that distinctly influences its extracellular functions. Previously, it was unknown how the TLR4 signalosome distinguished between HMGB1 isoforms. Here we demonstrate that the extracellular TLR4 adaptor, myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2), binds specifically to the cytokine-inducing disulfide isoform of HMGB1, to the exclusion of other isoforms. Using MD-2–deficient mice, as well as MD-2 silencing in macrophages, we show a requirement for HMGB1-dependent TLR4 signaling. By screening HMGB1 peptide libraries, we identified a tetramer (FSSE, designated P5779) as a specific MD-2 antagonist preventing MD-2–HMGB1 interaction and TLR4 signaling. P5779 does not interfere with lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine/chemokine production, thus preserving PAMP-mediated TLR4–MD-2 responses. Furthermore, P5779 can protect mice against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury, chemical toxicity, and sepsis. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which innate systems selectively recognize specific HMGB1 isoforms. The results may direct toward strategies aimed at attenuating DAMP-mediated inflammation while preserving antimicrobial immune responsiveness. PMID:25559892

  11. Andrographolide inhibits multiple myeloma cells by inhibiting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Jianrong

    2016-02-01

    Andrographolide is an active component from the extract of Andrographis paniculata [(Burm.f) Nees], a medicinal plant from the Acanthaceae family. Pharmacological studies have revealed that andrographolide possesses anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, immune regulatory and hepatoprotective properties, and is efficacious in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, while exhibiting low toxicity and low cost. The present study aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of andrographolide on the growth of multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its possible impact on the Toll-like receptor (TLR)4/nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. Cell proliferation was detected using an MTT assay, cellular apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry, and caspase-9/3 activation were assessed using colorimetric assay kits. Furthermore, TLR4 and NF-κB protein expression was determined by western blot analysis. The results revealed that andrographolide reduced the proliferation, while increasing cellular apoptosis and caspase-9/3 activation of MM cells, in addition to downregulating the expression of TLR4 and NF-κB protein. Of note, TLR4- or NF-κB-targeting small-interfering (si)RNA enhanced the andrographolide-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis of MM cells. The results of the present study therefore suggested that andrographolide inhibited multiple myeloma cells via the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26707811

  12. Soluble alpha-enolase activates monocytes by CD14-dependent TLR4 signalling pathway and exhibits a dual function

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Clément; Fréret, Manuel; Fondard, Emeline; Derambure, Céline; Avenel, Gilles; Golinski, Marie-Laure; Verdet, Mathieu; Boyer, Olivier; Caillot, Frédérique; Musette, Philippe; Lequerré, Thierry; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common form of chronic inflammatory rheumatism. Identifying auto-antigens targeted by RA auto-antibodies is of major interest. Alpha-enolase (ENO1) is considered to be a pivotal auto-antigen in early RA but its pathophysiologic role remains unknown. The main objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of soluble ENO1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and RA patients in order to determine the potential pathogenic role of ENO1. ELISA, transcriptomic analysis, experiments of receptor inhibition and flow cytometry analysis were performed to determine the effect, the target cell population and the receptor of ENO1. We showed that ENO1 has the ability to induce early production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines with delayed production of IL-10 and to activate the innate immune system. We demonstrated that ENO1 binds mainly to monocytes and activates the CD14-dependent TLR4 pathway both in healthy subjects and in RA patients. Our results establish for the first time that ENO1 is able to activate in vitro the CD14-dependent TLR4 pathway on monocytes involving a dual mechanism firstly pro-inflammatory and secondly anti-inflammatory. These results contribute to elucidating the role of this auto-antigen in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of RA. PMID:27025255

  13. Unilateral nevoid acanthosis nigricans: Uncommon variant of a common disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Kumar, Piyush; Gayen, Tirthankar; Roy, Kunal; Das, Nilay K.; Gharami, Ramesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a fairly common dermatosis characterized by hyperpigmented velvety plaques, having a predilection for the intertriginous areas. We herein present a case of unilateral nevoid acanthosis nigricans over the left lateral chest, in an adult male. The rarity of documentation of this entity in the world literature prompted us to report the case. PMID:25506563

  14. Pigmented Pheochromocytoma: an Unusual Variant of a Common Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Kaur, Kavneet; Kumar, Tarun; Cherian, Libin Babu; Kaushal, Rohit; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Dhar, Anita; Seth, Amlesh; Jain, Deepali

    2016-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a neuroendocrine tumor arising from the adrenal medulla. A number of variants of pheochromocytoma are known; however, pigmented pheochromocytoma is extremely rare, with only few cases reported in literature. We report the cases of two patients with pigmented pheochromocytoma. Case 1 was a 28-year-old female who presented with complaints of breathlessness, palpitations, and anxiety for 5 years, which had worsened over the last 8 months. Computed tomography (CT) abdomen showed a right suprarenal mass. Case 2 was that of an 18-year-old girl who presented with similar complaints and was diagnosed with hypertension. CT abdomen showed bilateral adrenal masses. Urinary vanillyl mandelic acid was raised in both patients. Sections examined from all three tumors showed cells arranged in Zellballen pattern, separated by thin fibrovascular septae. Tumor cells showed moderate to marked nuclear pleomorphism in case 1. Mitoses were, however, not seen. There was no evidence of capsular or vascular invasion. Many of the tumor cells showed intracytoplasmic black pigment, which was positive for Fontana-Masson and was bleach-labile, confirming it as melanin. Hemosiderin deposition was also identified. Large areas of hemorrhagic necrosis were seen in case 1. Tumor cells were immunopositive for chromogranin and synaptophysin, while they were negative for HMB-45. Electron microscopy was performed. A final diagnosis of pigmented pheochromocytoma was rendered in both cases. Pigmented pheochromocytoma is a very rare tumor, which needs to be differentiated from other pigmented tumors like malignant melanoma of adrenal gland and pigmented adrenal adenoma. Histochemistry and immunohistochemistry help in making this distinction. PMID:26578456

  15. Resistin Induces Hypertension and Insulin Resistance in Mice via a TLR4-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Linfang; Hu, Youtao; Li, Qiang; An, Chaoqiang; Yu, Xiaolan; Shu, Le; Chen, Ao; Niu, Congcong; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, an adipokine involved in insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes, has recently been reported to play a role in cardiovascular events. However, its effect on blood pressure (BP) and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we showed that resistin induces hypertension and IR in wild type (WT) mice, but not in tlr4(-/-) mice. Resistin upregulated angiotensinogen (Agt) expression in WT mice, whereas it had no effect on tlr4(-/-) mice, or in mice treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril. Real-time PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation further confirmed that resistin activates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) via the TLR4/P65/Agt pathway. This finding suggested an essential role of resistin in linking IR and hypertension, which may offer a novel target in clinic on the study of the association between diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26917360

  16. Resistin Induces Hypertension and Insulin Resistance in Mice via a TLR4-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Linfang; Hu, Youtao; Li, Qiang; An, Chaoqiang; Yu, Xiaolan; Shu, Le; Chen, Ao; Niu, Congcong; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, an adipokine involved in insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes, has recently been reported to play a role in cardiovascular events. However, its effect on blood pressure (BP) and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we showed that resistin induces hypertension and IR in wild type (WT) mice, but not in tlr4−/− mice. Resistin upregulated angiotensinogen (Agt) expression in WT mice, whereas it had no effect on tlr4−/− mice, or in mice treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril. Real-time PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation further confirmed that resistin activates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) via the TLR4/P65/Agt pathway. This finding suggested an essential role of resistin in linking IR and hypertension, which may offer a novel target in clinic on the study of the association between diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26917360

  17. β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Compound 49b, inhibits TLR4 signaling pathway in diabetic retina

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Elizabeth A.; Carion, Thomas W.; Jiang, Youde; Liu, Li; Chahine, Adam; Walker, Robert Jason; Steinle, Jena J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy has recently become associated with complications similar to chronic inflammatory diseases. While it is clear that tumor necrosis factor- alpha (TNF-α) is increased in diabetes, the role of innate immunity is only recently being investigated. As such, we hypothesized that diabetes would increase toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, which could be inhibited by a β-adrenergic receptor agonist (Compound 49b) previously shown to have anti-inflammatory actions. In order to investigate β-adrenergic receptor signaling and TLR4 in the diabetic retina, streptozotocin-injected diabetic mice, as well as human primary retinal endothelial cells (REC) and rat retinal Müller cells (rMC-1) exposed to high glucose (25mM), were treated with a novel β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Compound 49b (50nM), or PBS (control). TLR4 and its downstream signaling partners (MyD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, total and phosphorylated NF-κB) were examined. In addition, we assessed high mobility box group 1 (HMGB1) protein levels. Our data showed that diabetes or high glucose culture conditions significantly increased TLR4 and downstream signaling partners. Compound 49b was able to significantly reduce TLR4 and related molecules in the diabetic animal and retinal cells. HMGB1 was significantly increased in REC and Müller cells grown in high glucose, which was subsequently reduced with Compound 49b treatment. Our findings suggest that high glucose may increase HMGB1 levels that lead to increased TLR4 signaling. Compound 49b significantly inhibited this pathway providing a potential mechanism for its protective actions. PMID:26888251

  18. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  19. Discovery and Validation of a New Class of Small Molecule Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Eyer, Benjamin; Good, Misty; Guerriero, Christopher J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Afrazi, Amin; Prindle, Thomas; Ma, Congrong; Branca, Maria; Ozolek, John; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Wipf, Peter; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases may be linked to pathologically elevated signaling via the receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). There has thus been great interest in the discovery of TLR4 inhibitors as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Recently, the structure of TLR4 bound to the inhibitor E5564 was solved, raising the possibility that novel TLR4 inhibitors that target the E5564-binding domain could be designed. We utilized a similarity search algorithm in conjunction with a limited screening approach of small molecule libraries to identify compounds that bind to the E5564 site and inhibit TLR4. Our lead compound, C34, is a 2-acetamidopyranoside (MW 389) with the formula C17H27NO9, which inhibited TLR4 in enterocytes and macrophages in vitro, and reduced systemic inflammation in mouse models of endotoxemia and necrotizing enterocolitis. Molecular docking of C34 to the hydrophobic internal pocket of the TLR4 co-receptor MD-2 demonstrated a tight fit, embedding the pyran ring deep inside the pocket. Strikingly, C34 inhibited LPS signaling ex-vivo in human ileum that was resected from infants with necrotizing enterocolitis. These findings identify C34 and the β-anomeric cyclohexyl analog C35 as novel leads for small molecule TLR4 inhibitors that have potential therapeutic benefit for TLR4-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23776545

  20. Inhibition of TLR4 Signalling-Induced Inflammation Attenuates Secondary Injury after Diffuse Axonal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonglin; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Junjie; Ma, Xudong; Huang, Tingqin; Pang, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that secondary injury after diffuse axonal injury (DAI) damages more axons than the initial insult, but the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are not fully understood. Recent studies show that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a critical role in promoting adaptive immune responses and have been shown to be associated with brain damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the TLR4 signalling pathway in secondary axonal injury in the cortices of DAI rats. TLR4 was mainly localized in microglial cells and neurons, and the levels of TLR4 downstream signalling molecules, including TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, toll/IR-1-(TIR-) domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-beta, interferon regulatory factor 3, interferon β, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65, and phospho-NF-κB p65, significantly increased and peaked at 1 d after DAI. Inhibition of TLR4 by TAK-242 attenuated apoptosis, neuronal and axonal injury, and glial responses. The neuroprotective effects of TLR4 inhibition were associated with decreases in the levels of TLR4 downstream signalling molecules and inflammatory factors, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumour necrosis factor-α. These results suggest that the TLR4 signalling pathway plays an important role in secondary injury and may be an important therapeutic target following DAI. PMID:27478307

  1. Gene-based analysis of rare and common variants to determine association with blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Beyene, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure are known risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and understanding their genetic basis will have important public health implications. For rare variants, it is extremely challenging to make statistical inference for single-maker tests. Therefore, joint analysis of a set of variants has been proposed. In this paper, we applied recently proposed methods "test for testing the effect of an optimally weighted combination of variants" and "variable weight-TOW" to determine genetic regions that are associated with blood pressure. Then least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, as well as sparse partial least square methods, were used to identify significant markers within a gene or in intergenic regions. We investigated the effect of rare variants and common variants, and their combined effect. PMID:25519387

  2. The Contribution of Rare and Common Variants in 30 Genes to Risk Nicotine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiekun; Wang, Shaolin; Yang, Zhongli; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Iarikova, Polina; Ma, Jennie Z.; Payne, Thomas J.; Goldman, David; Li, Ming D.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and functional studies have revealed that both common and rare variants of several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits are associated with nicotine dependence (ND). In this study, we identified variants in 30 candidate genes including nicotinic receptors in 200 sib pairs selected from the Mid-South Tobacco Family (MSTF) population with equal numbers of African Americans (AAs) and European Americans (EAs). We selected 135 of the rare and common variants and genotyped them in the Mid-South Tobacco Case-Control (MSTCC) population, which consists of 3088 AAs and 1430 EAs. None of the genotyped common variants showed significant association with smoking status (smokers vs. non-smokers), Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) scores, or indexed cigarettes per day (CPD) after Bonferroni correction. Rare variants in NRXN1, CHRNA9, CHRNA2, NTRK2, GABBR2, GRIN3A, DNM1, NRXN2, NRXN3, and ARRB2 were significantly associated with smoking status in the MSTCC AA sample, with Weighted Sum Statistic (WSS) P values ranging from 2.42 × 10−3 to 1.31 × 10−4 after 106 phenotype rearrangements. We also observed a significant excess of rare nonsynonymous variants exclusive to EA smokers in NRXN1, CHRNA9, TAS2R38, GRIN3A, DBH, ANKK1/DRD2, NRXN3, and CDH13 with WSS P values between 3.5 × 10−5 and 1 × 10−6. Variants rs142807401 (A432T) and rs139982841 (A452V) in CHRNA9 and variants V132L, V389L, rs34755188 (R480H), and rs75981117 (N549S) in GRIN3A are of particular interest because they are found in both the AA and EA samples. A significant aggregate contribution of rare and common coding variants in CHRNA9 to the risk for ND (SKAT-C: P= 0.0012) was detected by applying the combined sum test in MSTCC EAs. Together, our results indicate that rare variants alone or combined with common variants in a subset of 30 biological candidate genes contribute substantially to the risk of ND. PMID:25450229

  3. The contribution of rare and common variants in 30 genes to risk nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Wang, S; Yang, Z; Hodgkinson, C A; Iarikova, P; Ma, J Z; Payne, T J; Goldman, D; Li, M D

    2015-11-01

    Genetic and functional studies have revealed that both common and rare variants of several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits are associated with nicotine dependence (ND). In this study, we identified variants in 30 candidate genes including nicotinic receptors in 200 sib pairs selected from the Mid-South Tobacco Family population with equal numbers of African Americans (AAs) and European Americans (EAs). We selected 135 of the rare and common variants and genotyped them in the Mid-South Tobacco Case-Control (MSTCC) population, which consists of 3088 AAs and 1430 EAs. None of the genotyped common variants showed significant association with smoking status (smokers vs non-smokers), Fagerström Test for ND scores or indexed cigarettes per day after Bonferroni correction. Rare variants in NRXN1, CHRNA9, CHRNA2, NTRK2, GABBR2, GRIN3A, DNM1, NRXN2, NRXN3 and ARRB2 were significantly associated with smoking status in the MSTCC AA sample, with weighted sum statistic (WSS) P-values ranging from 2.42 × 10(-3) to 1.31 × 10(-4) after 10(6) phenotype rearrangements. We also observed a significant excess of rare nonsynonymous variants exclusive to EA smokers in NRXN1, CHRNA9, TAS2R38, GRIN3A, DBH, ANKK1/DRD2, NRXN3 and CDH13 with WSS P-values between 3.5 × 10(-5) and 1 × 10(-6). Variants rs142807401 (A432T) and rs139982841 (A452V) in CHRNA9 and variants V132L, V389L, rs34755188 (R480H) and rs75981117 (N549S) in GRIN3A are of particular interest because they are found in both the AA and EA samples. A significant aggregate contribution of rare and common coding variants in CHRNA9 to the risk for ND (SKAT-C: P=0.0012) was detected by applying the combined sum test in MSTCC EAs. Together, our results indicate that rare variants alone or combined with common variants in a subset of 30 biological candidate genes contribute substantially to the risk of ND. PMID:25450229

  4. Common Genetic Variants and Response to Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Bollmann, Andreas; Lubitz, Steven A.; Ueberham, Laura; Saini, Harsimran; Montgomery, Jay; Edwards, Todd; Yoneda, Zachary; Sinner, Moritz F.; Arya, Arash; Sommer, Philipp; Delaney, Jessica; Goyal, Sandeep K.; Saavedra, Pablo; Kanagasundram, Arvindh; Whalen, S. Patrick; Roden, Dan M.; Hindricks, Gerhard; Ellis, Christopher R.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Darbar, Dawood; Husser, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Background Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosomes 4q25 (rs2200733, rs10033464 near PITX2), 1q21 (rs13376333 in KCNN3), and 16q22 (rs7193343 in ZFHX3) have consistently been associated with the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). Single-center studies have shown that 4q25 risk alleles predict recurrence of AF after catheter ablation of AF. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to test the hypothesis that these 4 AF susceptibility SNPs modulate response to AF ablation. Methods and Results Patients underwent de novo AF ablation between 2008 and 2012 at Vanderbilt University, the Heart Center Leipzig, and Massachusetts General Hospital. The primary outcome was 12-month recurrence, defined as an episode of AF, atrial flutter, or atrial tachycardia lasting >30 seconds after a 3-month blanking period. Multivariable analysis of the individual cohorts using a Cox proportional hazards model was performed. Summary statistics from the 3 centers were analyzed using fixed effects meta-analysis. A total of 991 patients were included (Vanderbilt University, 245; Heart Center Leipzig, 659; and Massachusetts General Hospital, 87). The overall single procedure 12-month recurrence rate was 42%. The overall risk allele frequency for these SNPs ranged from 12% to 35%. Using a dominant genetic model, the 4q25 SNP, rs2200733, predicted a 1.4-fold increased risk of recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.3 [95% confidence intervals, 1.1–1.6]; P=0.011). The remaining SNPs, rs10033464 (4q25), rs13376333 (1q21), and rs7193343 (16q22) were not significantly associated with recurrence. Conclusions Among the 3 genetic loci most strongly associated with AF, the chromosome 4q25 SNP rs2200733 is significantly associated with recurrence of atrial arrhythmias after catheter ablation for AF. PMID:25684755

  5. TLR4 Activation Promotes Bone Marrow MSC Proliferation and Osteogenic Differentiation via Wnt3a and Wnt5a Signaling

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoqing; Wang, Hai; Jin, Tao; Xu, Yongqing; Mei, Liangbin; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow maintain their self-renewal ability and the ability to differentiate into osteoblast. Thus, adult bone marrow MSCs play a key role in the regeneration of bone tissue. Previous studies indicated that TLR4 is expressed in MSCs and is critical in regulating the fate decision of MSCs. However, the exact functional role and underlying mechanisms of how TLR4 regulate bone marrow MSC proliferation and differentiation are unclear. Here, we found that activated TLR4 by its ligand LPS promoted the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. TLR4 activation by LPS also increased cytokine IL-6 and IL-1β production in MSCs. In addition, LPS treatment has no effect on inducing cell death of MSCs. Deletion of TLR4 expression in MSCs completely eliminated the effects of LPS on MSC proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and cytokine production. We also found that the mRNA and protein expression of Wnt3a and Wnt5a, two important factors in regulating MSC fate decision, was upregulated in a TLR4-dependent manner. Silencing Wnt3a with specific siRNA remarkably inhibited TLR4-induced MSC proliferation, while Wnt5a specific siRNA treatment significantly antagonized TLR4-induced MSC osteogenic differentiation. These results together suggested that TLR4 regulates bone marrow MSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation through Wnt3a and Wnt5a signaling. These finding provide new data to understand the role and the molecular mechanisms of TLR4 in regulating bone marrow MSC functions. These data also provide new insight in developing new therapy in bone regeneration using MSCs by modulating TLR4 and Wnt signaling activity. PMID:26930594

  6. TLR4 signaling promotes a COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 positive feedback loop in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ang; Wang, Guan; Zhao, Huajun; Zhang, Yuyi; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can be expressed by tumor cells, and each TLR exhibits different biological functions. Evidences showed the activation of some certain TLRs could promote tumor progression. One of which TLR4 has been found to promote hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells proliferation, but the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we verified that TLR4 was functionally expressed on HCC cells, and TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could stimulate the proliferation and clone formation of HCC cells. Most importantly, we found a COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 positive feedback loop exists in HCC cells, which could be provoked by TLR4 activation. Consistently, the expression of TLR4, COX-2 and p-STAT3Y705 was positively correlated with each other in liver tumor tissues from patients with primary HCC. Further investigation demonstrated this loop played a dominant role in TLR4-induced HCC cell proliferation and multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy. Inhibition of TLR4 or COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 loop would attenuate LPS-induced inflammation and proliferation of HCC cells, and enhance the sensitivity of HCC cells to chemotherapeutics in vitro. By using a primary HCC model, we observed COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 loop was significantly blocked in TLR4−/− mice compared to wild type mice, and there was no obvious tumorgenesis sign in TLR4−/− mice. Therefore, these findings provided the precise molecular mechanism of TLR4 signaling pathway involved in HCC progress, and suggested that TLR4 may be a promising target for HCC treatment. PMID:27057441

  7. Epigenetic modification of TLR4 promotes activation of NF-κB by regulating methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 and Sp1 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Seon-Jin; Oh, Byung Moo; Lee, Heesoo; Uhm, Tae Gi; Min, Jeong-Ki; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Jong Wan; Choe, Yong-Kyung; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-26

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important in promoting the immune response in various cancers. Recently, TLR4 is highly expressed in a stage-dependent manner in gastric cancer, but the regulatory mechanism of TLR4 expression has been not elucidated it. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying regulation of TLR4 expression through promoter methylation and histone modification between transcriptional regulation and silencing of the TLR4 gene in gastric cancer cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was carried out to screen for factors related to TLR4 methylation such as MeCP2, HDAC1, and Sp1 on the TLR4 promoter. Moreover, DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induced demethylation of the TLR4 promoter and increased H3K4 trimethylation and Sp1 binding to reactivate silenced TLR4. In contrast, although the silence of TLR4 activated H3K9 trimethylation and MeCP2 complex, combined treatment with TLR4 agonist and 5-aza-dC upregulated H3K4 trimethylation and activated with transcription factors as Sp1 and NF-κB. This study demonstrates that recruitment of the MeCP2/HDAC1 repressor complex increases the low levels of TLR4 expression through epigenetic modification of DNA and histones on the TLR4 promoter, but Sp1 activates TLR4 high expression by hypomethylation and NF-κB signaling in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26675260

  8. Epigenetic modification of TLR4 promotes activation of NF-κB by regulating methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 and Sp1 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byung Moo; Lee, Heesoo; Uhm, Tae Gi; Min, Jeong-Ki; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Jong Wan; Choe, Yong-Kyung; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important in promoting the immune response in various cancers. Recently, TLR4 is highly expressed in a stage-dependent manner in gastric cancer, but the regulatory mechanism of TLR4 expression has been not elucidated it. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying regulation of TLR4 expression through promoter methylation and histone modification between transcriptional regulation and silencing of the TLR4 gene in gastric cancer cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was carried out to screen for factors related to TLR4 methylation such as MeCP2, HDAC1, and Sp1 on the TLR4 promoter. Moreover, DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induced demethylation of the TLR4 promoter and increased H3K4 trimethylation and Sp1 binding to reactivate silenced TLR4. In contrast, although the silence of TLR4 activated H3K9 trimethylation and MeCP2 complex, combined treatment with TLR4 agonist and 5-aza-dC upregulated H3K4 trimethylation and activated with transcription factors as Sp1 and NF-κB. This study demonstrates that recruitment of the MeCP2/HDAC1 repressor complex increases the low levels of TLR4 expression through epigenetic modification of DNA and histones on the TLR4 promoter, but Sp1 activates TLR4 high expression by hypomethylation and NF-κB signaling in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26675260

  9. Multifaceted contribution of the TLR4-activated IRF5 transcription factor in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Saigusa, Ryosuke; Asano, Yoshihide; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yamashita, Takashi; Ichimura, Yohei; Takahashi, Takehiro; Toyama, Tetsuo; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Sugawara, Koji; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Sato, Shinichi

    2015-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder with clinical manifestations resulting from tissue fibrosis and extensive vasculopathy. A potential disease susceptibility gene for SSc is IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), whose SNP is associated with milder clinical manifestations; however, the underlying mechanisms of this association remain elusive. In this study we examined IRF5-deficient (Irf5(-/-)) mice in the bleomycin-treated SSc murine model. We show that dermal and pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin is attenuated in Irf5(-/-) mice. Interestingly, we find that multiple SSc-associated events, such as fibroblast activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, vascular destabilization, Th2/Th17 skewed immune polarization, and B-cell activation, are suppressed in these mice. We further provide evidence that IRF5, activated by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), binds to the promoters of various key genes involved in SSc disease pathology. These observations are congruent with the high level of expression of IRF5, TLR4, and potential endogenous TLR4 ligands in SSc skin lesions. Our study sheds light on the TLR4-IRF5 pathway in the pathology of SSc with clinical implications of targeting the IRF5 pathways in the suppression of disease development. PMID:26598674

  10. Regulation of TLR4-associated MD-2 in intestinal epithelial cells: a comprehensive analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vamadevan, Arunan S.; Fukata, Masayuki; Arnold, Elizabeth T.; Thomas, Lisa S.; Hsu, David; Abreu, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium maintains a state of controlled inflammation despite continuous contact with Gram-negative commensal bacteria and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on its luminal surface. Recognition of LPS by the TLR4/MD-2 complex results in proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). We have shown that IEC express low levels of MD-2 and TLR4 and are poorly responsive to LPS. In this study, we did a comprehensive analysis to understand the immune-mediated and epigenetic mechanisms by which IEC down-regulate MD-2 expression. Expression of MD-2 and TLR4 mRNA was examined in human inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal epithelial cell lines (T84, HT-29, Caco-2). Nuclear factor-κB transcriptional activation was used as a measure of LPS responsiveness. Intestinal epithelial cellsin patients with IBD exhibited increased expression of MD-2 and TLR4 mRNA. Lipopolysaccharide responsiveness in IEC was polarized to the basolateral membrane. Bisulfite sequencing of the MD-2 promoter demonstrated methylation of CpG dinucleotides. Inhibition of methylation by 5-azacytidine and histone deactylation by trichostatin A, two forms of epigenetic silencing, resulted in increased mRNA expression of MD-2 in IEC. These results demonstrate various molecular mechanisms by which IEC down-regulate MD-2 and thereby protect against dysregulated inflammation to commensal bacteria in the intestinal lumen. PMID:19710105

  11. An unusual dimeric structure and assembly for TLR4 regulator RP105-MD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-16

    RP105-MD-1 modulates the TLR4-MD-2-mediated, innate immune response against bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The crystal structure of the bovine 1:1 RP105-MD-1 complex bound to a putative endogenous lipid at 2.9 Å resolution shares a similar overall architecture to its homolog TLR4-MD-2 but assembles into an unusual 2:2 homodimer that differs from any other known TLR-ligand assembly. The homodimer is assembled in a head-to-head orientation that juxtaposes the N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of the two RP105 chains, rather than the usual tail-to-tail configuration of C-terminal LRRs in ligand-activated TLR dimers, such as TLR1-TRL2, TLR2-TLR6, TLR3-TLR3 and TLR4-TLR4. Another unusual interaction is mediated by an RP105-specific asparagine-linked glycan, which wedges MD-1 into the co-receptor binding concavity on RP105. This unique mode of assembly represents a new paradigm for TLR complexes and suggests a molecular mechanism for regulating LPS responses.

  12. WISP1 mediates hepatic warm ischemia reperfusion injury via TLR4 signaling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yao; Ding, Xi-Bing; Chen, Zhi-Xia; Jin, Shu-Qing; Zhao, Xiang; Wang, Xin; Mei, Shu-Ya; Jiang, Xi; Wang, Lingyu; Li, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP1) is an extracellular matrix protein that has been reported in cancer researches. Our previous studies on WISP1 implied it could be a harmful mediator in septic mice. However, its role in liver ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury is unknown. This study investigated the effects of WISP1 on liver I/R damage. Male C57BL/6 wild-type mice were used to undergo 60 min segmental (70%) ischemia. WISP1 expression was measured after indicated time points of reperfusion. Anti-WISP1 antibody was injected intraperitoneally to mice. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockout mice and TIR-domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF) knockout mice were adopted in this study. WISP1 was significantly enhanced after 6 h of reperfusion when compared with sham treated mice and significantly decreased either by TLR4 knockout mice or TRIF knockout mice. Anti-WISP1 antibody significantly decreased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), pathological changes and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the mice following I/R. Furthermore, significantly increased serum transaminase levels were found in C57 wild-type mice treated with recombinant WISP1 protein, but not found in TLR4 knockout or TRIF knockout mice subjected to liver I/R. Taken together, WISP1 might contribute to hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury in mice and possibly depends on TLR4/TRIF signaling. PMID:26821752

  13. Release of Luminal Exosomes Contributes to TLR4-Mediated Epithelial Antimicrobial Defense

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoku; Gong, Ai-Yu; Roth, Amanda L.; Huang, Bing Q.; Ward, Honorine D.; Zhu, Guan; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Hanson, Nancy D.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles released by most cell types from multi-vesicular endosomes. They are speculated to transfer molecules to neighboring or distant cells and modulate many physiological and pathological procedures. Exosomes released from the gastrointestinal epithelium to the basolateral side have been implicated in antigen presentation. Here, we report that luminal release of exosomes from the biliary and intestinal epithelium is increased following infection by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. Release of exosomes involves activation of TLR4/IKK2 signaling through promoting the SNAP23-associated vesicular exocytotic process. Downregulation of let-7 family miRNAs by activation of TLR4 signaling increases SNAP23 expression, coordinating exosome release in response to C. parvum infection. Intriguingly, exosomes carry antimicrobial peptides of epithelial cell origin, including cathelicidin-37 and beta-defensin 2. Activation of TLR4 signaling enhances exosomal shuttle of epithelial antimicrobial peptides. Exposure of C. parvum sporozoites to released exosomes decreases their viability and infectivity both in vitro and ex vivo. Direct binding to the C. parvum sporozoite surface is required for the anti-C. parvum activity of released exosomes. Biliary epithelial cells also increase exosomal release and display exosome-associated anti-C. parvum activity following LPS stimulation. Our data indicate that TLR4 signaling regulates luminal exosome release and shuttling of antimicrobial peptides from the gastrointestinal epithelium, revealing a new arm of mucosal immunity relevant to antimicrobial defense. PMID:23592986

  14. Altered Th17 Cytokine Expression in Helicobacter pylori Patients with TLR4 (D299G) Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nader; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Kheiri, Soleyman; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with gastric ulcer and gastric adenocarcinoma. Polymorphisms in the host genes coding for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may influence the innate and adaptive immune response to the infection, affecting the susceptibility to H. pylori or the disease outcomes. However, the details and association with different polymorphism and clinical expression of infection remain unclear. A case-control study consisting of 58 patients with H. pylori infection and 44 H. pylori uninfection was conducted. Genomic DNA was extracted and genotypes of TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism were assessed through polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Mucosal cytokines expression in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsies was determined by real-time PCR. The expression of IL-6, IL-17, IL-21, IL-23 and TGF-β1 was significantly higher in patients with D299G polymorphism in TLR4. But the expression of IL-18 between patients with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and patients with the wild-type allele was not significant. In H. pylori-infected patients with gastritis, SNPs in TLR4 may alter cytokine expression toward Th17 immune response in the gastric mucosa and may have increased risk for the development of peptic ulcer. PMID:26853914

  15. Euodenine A: a small-molecule agonist of human TLR4.

    PubMed

    Neve, Juliette E; Wijesekera, Hasanthi P; Duffy, Sandra; Jenkins, Ian D; Ripper, Justin A; Teague, Simon J; Campitelli, Marc; Garavelas, Agatha; Nikolakopoulos, George; Le, Phuc V; de A Leone, Priscila; Pham, Ngoc B; Shelton, Philip; Fraser, Neil; Carroll, Anthony R; Avery, Vicky M; McCrae, Christopher; Williams, Nicola; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-02-27

    A small-molecule natural product, euodenine A (1), was identified as an agonist of the human TLR4 receptor. Euodenine A was isolated from the leaves of Euodia asteridula (Rutaceae) found in Papua New Guinea and has an unusual U-shaped structure. It was synthesized along with a series of analogues that exhibit potent and selective agonism of the TLR4 receptor. SAR development around the cyclobutane ring resulted in a 10-fold increase in potency. The natural product demonstrated an extracellular site of action, which requires the extracellular domain of TLR4 to stimulate a NF-κB reporter response. 1 is a human-selective agonist that is CD14-independent, and it requires both TLR4 and MD-2 for full efficacy. Testing for immunomodulation in PBMC cells shows the induction of the cytokines IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p40 as well as suppression of IL-5 from activated PBMCs, indicating that compounds like 1 could modulate the Th2 immune response without causing lung damage. PMID:24471857

  16. TRAP-positive osteoclast precursors mediate ROS/NO-dependent bactericidal activity via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazuaki; Shindo, Satoru; Movila, Alexandru; Kayal, Rayyan; Abdullah, Albassam; Savitri, Irma Josefina; Ikeda, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Tsuguno; Howait, Mohammed; Al-Dharrab, Ayman; Mira, Abdulghani; Han, Xiaozhe; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2016-08-01

    Osteoclastogenesis was induced by RANKL stimulation in mouse monocytes to examine the possible bactericidal function of osteoclast precursors (OCp) and mature osteoclasts (OCm) relative to their production of NO and ROS. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive OCp, but few or no OCm, phagocytized and killed Escherichia coli in association with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Phagocytosis of E. coli and production of ROS and NO were significantly lower in TRAP+ OCp derived from Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 KO mice than that derived from wild-type (WT) or TLR2-KO mice. Interestingly, after phagocytosis, TRAP+ OCp derived from wild-type and TLR2-KO mice did not differentiate into OCm, even with continuous exposure to RANKL. In contrast, E. coli-phagocytized TRAP+ OCp from TLR4-KO mice could differentiate into OCm. Importantly, neither NO nor ROS produced by TRAP+ OCp appeared to be engaged in phagocytosis-induced suppression of osteoclastogenesis. These results suggested that TLR4 signaling not only induces ROS and NO production to kill phagocytized bacteria, but also interrupts OCm differentiation. Thus, it can be concluded that TRAP+ OCp, but not OCm, can mediate bactericidal activity via phagocytosis accompanied by the production of ROS and NO via TLR4-associated reprograming toward phagocytic cell type. PMID:27343691

  17. Electrochemical endotoxin sensors based on TLR4/MD-2 complexes immobilized on gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tae Yun; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Byung Kook; Kim, Beob Soo; Yoon, Hwa In; Lee, Hyeong Yun; Cho, Yong Woo

    2011-10-15

    Even low concentrations of endotoxins can be life-threatening. As such, continuous effort has been directed toward the development of sensitive and specific endotoxin detection systems. In this paper, we report the design and fabrication of a new electrochemical endotoxin sensor based on a human recombinant toll-like receptor 4 (rhTLR4) and myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2) complex. The rhTLR4/MD-2 complex, which specifically binds to endotoxin, was immobilized on gold electrodes through a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) technique involving the use of dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU). The surface topography of the electrodes at each fabrication stage was characterized with a nanosurface profiler and atomic force microscope (AFM). The electrochemical signals generated from interactions between the rhTLR4/MD-2 complex and the endotoxin were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A linear relationship between the peak current and endotoxin concentration was obtained in the range of 0.0005 to 5 EU/mL with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.978. The estimated limit of detection (LOD) was fairly low, 0.0002 EU/mL. The rhTLR4/MD-2 based sensors exhibited no current responses to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bearing two lipid chains, which is structurally similar to endotoxin, indicating the high specificity of the sensors to endotoxin. PMID:21816600

  18. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Salmonella shedding in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key receptor in the innate immune recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria; genetic variation in this specific gene has been linked with the host’s response to bacterial infections and disease resistance. Since colonization and ...

  19. Multifaceted contribution of the TLR4-activated IRF5 transcription factor in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Saigusa, Ryosuke; Asano, Yoshihide; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yamashita, Takashi; Ichimura, Yohei; Takahashi, Takehiro; Toyama, Tetsuo; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Sugawara, Koji; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Sato, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder with clinical manifestations resulting from tissue fibrosis and extensive vasculopathy. A potential disease susceptibility gene for SSc is IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), whose SNP is associated with milder clinical manifestations; however, the underlying mechanisms of this association remain elusive. In this study we examined IRF5-deficient (Irf5−/−) mice in the bleomycin-treated SSc murine model. We show that dermal and pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin is attenuated in Irf5−/− mice. Interestingly, we find that multiple SSc-associated events, such as fibroblast activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, vascular destabilization, Th2/Th17 skewed immune polarization, and B-cell activation, are suppressed in these mice. We further provide evidence that IRF5, activated by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), binds to the promoters of various key genes involved in SSc disease pathology. These observations are congruent with the high level of expression of IRF5, TLR4, and potential endogenous TLR4 ligands in SSc skin lesions. Our study sheds light on the TLR4-IRF5 pathway in the pathology of SSc with clinical implications of targeting the IRF5 pathways in the suppression of disease development. PMID:26598674

  20. TLR4 genotype and environmental LPS mediate RSV bronchiolitis through Th2 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Mauricio T.; Serra, M. Elina; Acosta, Patricio L.; Marzec, Jacqui; Gibbons, Luz; Salim, Maximiliano; Rodriguez, Andrea; Reynaldi, Andrea; Garcia, Alejandro; Bado, Daniela; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Hijano, Diego R.; Coviello, Silvina; Newcomb, Dawn; Bellabarba, Miguel; Ferolla, Fausto M.; Libster, Romina; Berenstein, Ada; Siniawaski, Susana; Blumetti, Valeria; Echavarria, Marcela; Pinto, Leonardo; Lawrence, Andrea; Ossorio, M. Fabiana; Grosman, Arnoldo; Mateu, Cecilia G.; Bayle, Carola; Dericco, Alejandra; Pellegrini, Mariana; Igarza, Ignacio; Repetto, Horacio A.; Grimaldi, Luciano Alva; Gudapati, Prathyusha; Polack, Norberto R.; Althabe, Fernando; Shi, Min; Ferrero, Fernando; Bergel, Eduardo; Stein, Renato T.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Boothby, Mark; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Polack, Fernando P.

    2015-01-01

    While 30%–70% of RSV-infected infants develop bronchiolitis, 2% require hospitalization. It is not clear why disease severity differs among healthy, full-term infants; however, virus titers, inflammation, and Th2 bias are proposed explanations. While TLR4 is associated with these disease phenotypes, the role of this receptor in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pathogenesis is controversial. Here, we evaluated the interaction between TLR4 and environmental factors in RSV disease and defined the immune mediators associated with severe illness. Two independent populations of infants with RSV bronchiolitis revealed that the severity of RSV infection is determined by the TLR4 genotype of the individual and by environmental exposure to LPS. RSV-infected infants with severe disease exhibited a high GATA3/T-bet ratio, which manifested as a high IL-4/IFN-γ ratio in respiratory secretions. The IL-4/IFN-γ ratio present in infants with severe RSV is indicative of Th2 polarization. Murine models of RSV infection confirmed that LPS exposure, Tlr4 genotype, and Th2 polarization influence disease phenotypes. Together, the results of this study identify environmental and genetic factors that influence RSV pathogenesis and reveal that a high IL-4/IFN-γ ratio is associated with severe disease. Moreover, these molecules should be explored as potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25555213

  1. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    PubMed Central

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  2. Suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory response by macrophage class A scavenger receptor (CD204)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Takemura, Kenichi; Lei, XiaoFeng; Nakagawa, Takenobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} We focused on the interaction between SR-A and TLR4 signaling in this study. {yields} SR-A deletion promoted NF{kappa}B activation in macrophages in septic model mouse. {yields} SR-A suppresses both MyD88-dependent and -independent TLR4 signaling in vitro. {yields} SR-A clears LPS binding to TLR4 which resulting in the suppression of TLR4 signals. -- Abstract: The class A scavenger receptor (SR-A, CD204), one of the principal receptors expressed on macrophages, has been found to regulate inflammatory response and attenuate septic endotoxemia. However, the detailed mechanism of this process has not yet been well characterized. To clarify the regulative mechanisms of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage activation by SR-A, we evaluated the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling molecules in SR-A-deficient (SR-A{sup -/-}) macrophages. In a septic shock model, the blood levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-{beta} were significantly increased in SR-A{sup -/-} mice compared to wild-type mice, and elevated nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation was detected in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. SR-A deletion increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF{kappa}B in vitro. SR-A deletion also promoted the nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B and IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-3. In addition, a competitive binding assay with acetylated low-density lipoprotein, an SR-A-specific ligand, and anti-SR-A antibody induced significant activation of TLR4-mediated signaling molecules in wild-type macrophages but not in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. These results suggest that SR-A suppresses the macrophage activation by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 in a competitive manner and it plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  3. TLR4 activates NF-{kappa}B in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Dori C.; Johnson, A.L.

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} TLR4 is expressed in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} Acting through TLR4, LPS and HSP60 induce a NF{kappa}B signaling cascade in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation or inhibition did not alter chemosensitivity to TRAIL or cisplatin. -- Abstract: Previous studies have demonstrated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the surface epithelium of normal ovaries (OSE) and in epithelial ovarian tumors. Most notably, OSE-derived cancers express TLR4, which activates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling cascade as a mediator of inflammatory response. Currently, there is considerable interest in elucidating the role of TLR-mediated signaling in cancers. Nevertheless, the expression of TLRs in granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary, and the extent to which GCT expression of TLRs may influence cell-signaling pathways and/or modulate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, has yet to be determined. In the present study, human GCT lines (COV434 and KGN) were utilized to evaluate expression of functional TLR4. TLR4 is expressed in GCT cell lines and ligation of TLR4 with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to I{kappa}B degradation and activation of NF-{kappa}B. NF-{kappa}B activation was confirmed by nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65 following treatment with LPS and the naturally occurring ligand, HSP60. Notably, immunoneutralization of TLR4 blocked nuclear localization, and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling attenuated LPS-induced TNF{alpha} plus increased doubling time in both cell lines. Contradictory to reports using human OSE cell lines, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling failed to sensitize GCT lines to TRAIL or cisplatin. In summary, findings herein are the first to demonstrate a functional TLR-signaling pathway specifically in GCTs, and indicate that in contrast to OSE-derived cancers, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B does not sensitize GCTs to TRAIL or cisplatin.

  4. Detection of Abnormal Hemoglobin Variants by HPLC Method: Common Problems with Suggested Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Leela; Kalita, Dipti; Singh, Sompal; Kudesia, Madhur; Mendiratta, Sumanlata; Mittal, Meenakshi; Mathur, Alka

    2014-01-01

    Thalassemia and thalassemic hemoglobinopathies pose serious health problem leading to severe morbidity and mortality in Indian population. Plethora of hemoglobin variants is prevalent in multiethnic Indian population. The aim of the present study was to analyze laboratory aspects, namely, hematological profile and HPLC findings of the hemoglobin variants detected, and to discuss problems that we faced in diagnosis in a routine clinical laboratory. We screened a total of 4800 cases in a hospital based population of North India in a 2-years period of by automated HPLC method using the Variant Hemoglobin Testing System (Variant II Beta Thalassemia Short Program, Bio-Rad Laboratories) under the experimental conditions specified by the manufacturer. Whole blood in EDTA was used and red cell indices were determined using automated hematology analyzer. We detected 290 cases with abnormal variants in which beta thalassemia was the most common followed by hemoglobin E. Here, we discuss the laboratory aspects of various hemoglobin disorders and diagnostic difficulties in cases like borderline HbA2 values, presence of silent mutation, alpha thalassemia gene, and few rare variants which at times require correlation with genetic study. Special attention was given to HbA2 level even in presence of a structural variant to rule out coinheritance of beta thalassemia gene. PMID:27351019

  5. TLR4 down-regulation identifies high risk HPV infection and integration in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pannone, Giuseppe; Bufo, Pantaleo; Pace, Mirella; Lepore, Silvia; Russo, Giuseppe M; Rubini, Corrado; Franco, Renato; Aquino, Gabriella; Santoro, Angela; Campisi, Giuseppina; Rodolico, Vito; Bucci, Eduardo; Ilardi, Gennaro; Mascolo, Massimo; Merolla, Francesco; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Natalicchio, Iole; Colella, Giuseppe; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Trino, Stefania; Leonardi, Rosalia; Bucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    TLRs are main actors of the innate immune response against HPV. There are very few studies on the role of TLRs mediated HPV clearance in Head and Neck oncology. Our aim was to evaluate whether TLR4 expression identifies HPV infection and/or HR-HPV integration status in oral and oropharyngeal cancers. By immunohistochemistry we assessed TLR4 levels in OSCC/OPSCC. To detect viral integration or episomic status In situ hybridization for HPV-DNA and Pyro-sequencing techniques have been performed. The relationship between TLR4 expression with HPV infection status has been investigated. ISH HPV positive samples have reported lower levels of TLR4 intensity than negative samples (p = .002). There was no statistical correlation between TLR4 intensity and PCR HPV results (p more than 0.0.5). Point-biserial correlation coefficient revealed significant association between TLR4 expression and HR-HPV integration status (p = .0001) and between TLR4 expression index and HR-HPV infection (p = .001). These data have shown that TLR4 down-regulation is strongly associated to both HPV-16 infection and its integration into the host DNA. PMID:26709642

  6. Inducible Lentivirus-Mediated siRNA against TLR4 Reduces Nociception in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ruirui; Di, Huiting; Zhang, Jinming; Huang, Zhangxiang; Sun, Yuming; Yu, Weifeng; Wu, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Although bone cancer pain is still not fully understood by scientists and clinicians alike, studies suggest that toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in the initiation and/or maintenance of pathological pain state in bone cancer pain. A promising treatment for bone cancer pain is the downregulation of TLR4 by RNA interference; however, naked siRNA (small interference RNA) is not effective in long-term treatments. In order to concoct a viable prolonged treatment for bone cancer pain, an inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 (tetracycline inducible lentivirus carrying siRNA targeting TLR4) was prepared and the antinociception effects were observed in bone cancer pain rats induced by Walker 256 cells injection in left leg. Results showed that LvOn-siTLR4 intrathecal injection with doxycycline (Dox) oral administration effectively reduced the nociception induced by Walker 256 cells while inhibiting the mRNA and protein expression of TLR4. Proinflammatory cytokines as TNF-α and IL-1β in spinal cord were also decreased. These findings suggest that TLR4 could be a target for bone cancer pain treatment and tetracycline inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 represents a new potential option for long-term treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:26556957

  7. Inducible Lentivirus-Mediated siRNA against TLR4 Reduces Nociception in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ruirui; Di, Huiting; Zhang, Jinming; Huang, Zhangxiang; Sun, Yuming; Yu, Weifeng; Wu, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Although bone cancer pain is still not fully understood by scientists and clinicians alike, studies suggest that toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in the initiation and/or maintenance of pathological pain state in bone cancer pain. A promising treatment for bone cancer pain is the downregulation of TLR4 by RNA interference; however, naked siRNA (small interference RNA) is not effective in long-term treatments. In order to concoct a viable prolonged treatment for bone cancer pain, an inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 (tetracycline inducible lentivirus carrying siRNA targeting TLR4) was prepared and the antinociception effects were observed in bone cancer pain rats induced by Walker 256 cells injection in left leg. Results showed that LvOn-siTLR4 intrathecal injection with doxycycline (Dox) oral administration effectively reduced the nociception induced by Walker 256 cells while inhibiting the mRNA and protein expression of TLR4. Proinflammatory cytokines as TNF-α and IL-1β in spinal cord were also decreased. These findings suggest that TLR4 could be a target for bone cancer pain treatment and tetracycline inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 represents a new potential option for long-term treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:26556957

  8. Isoflurane preconditioning provides neuroprotection against stroke by regulating the expression of the TLR4 signalling pathway to alleviate microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Gao, Changjun; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Daihua; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Lixian; Chen, Lei; Sun, Xude

    2015-01-01

    Excessive microglial activation often contributes to inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity in the ischemic penumbra during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to induce microglial activation via the NF-κB pathway. Isoflurane preconditioning (IP) can provide neuroprotection and inhibit microglial activation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the TLR4 signalling pathway in IP to exert neuroprotection following ischemic stroke in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that 2% IP alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume, attenuated apoptosis and weakened microglial activation in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, IP down-regulated the expression of HSP 60, TLR4 and MyD88 and up-regulated inhibitor of IκB-α expression compared with I/R group in vivo. In vitro, 2% IP and a specific inhibitor of TLR4, CLI-095, down-regulated the expression of TLR4, MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α and Bax, and up-regulated IκB-α and Bcl-2 expression compared with OGD group. Moreover, IP and CLI-095 attenuated microglial activation-induced neuronal apoptosis, and overexpression of the TLR4 gene reversed the neuroprotective effects of IP. In conclusion, IP provided neuroprotection by regulating TLR4 expression directly, alleviating microglial activation and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the activation of microglial activation via TLR4 may be a new avenue for stroke treatment. PMID:26086415

  9. TLR4 PROMOTES CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM CLEARANCE IN A MOUSE MODEL OF BILIARY CRYPTOSPORIDIOSIS

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Steven P.; Tietz Bogert, Pamela S.; Chen, Xianming; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining intrahepatic bile ducts, express multiple toll-like receptors (TLRs) and thus have the capacity to recognize and respond to microbial pathogens. In previous work we demonstrated that TLR4, which is activated by gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is upregulated in cholangiocytes in response to infection with Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro and contributes to NFkB activation. Here, using an in vivo model of biliary cryptosporidiosis we addressed the functional role of TLR4 in C. parvum infection dynamics and hepatobiliary pathophysiology. We observed that C57BL mice clear the infection by three weeks post-infection. In contrast, parasites were detected in bile and stool in TLR4 deficient mice at four weeks post-infection. The liver enzymes, alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST), and the proinflammatory cytokines Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α, Interferon (IFN)-γ, and Interleukin (IL)-6 peaked at one to two weeks postinfection and normalized by four weeks in infected C57BL mice. C57BL mice also demonstrated increased cholangiocyte proliferation (PCNA staining) at one-week post-infection, which was resolved by two weeks post-infection. In contrast, TLR4 deficient mice showed persistently elevated serum ALT and AST, elevated hepatic IL-6 levels, and histological evidence of hepatocyte necrosis, increased inflammatory cell infiltration, and cholangiocyte proliferation through four weeks post-infection. These data suggest that a TLR4-mediated response is required for efficient eradication of biliary C. parvum infection in vivo, and lack of this pattern recognition receptor contributes to an altered inflammatory response and an increase in hepatobiliary pathology. PMID:21506806

  10. TLR4 activates NFkB in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Dori C.; White, Yvonne A. R.; Dau, Caroline; Johnson, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the surface epithelium of normal ovaries (OSE) and in epithelial ovarian tumors. Most notably, OSE-derived cancers express TLR4, which activates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling cascade as a mediator of inflammatory response. Currently, there is considerable interest in elucidating the role of TLR-mediated signaling in cancers. Nevertheless, the expression of TLRs in granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary, and the extent to which GCT expression of TLRs may influence cell-signaling pathways and/or modulate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, has yet to be determined. In the present study, human GCT lines (COV434 and KGN) were utilized to evaluate expression of functional TLR4. TLR4 is expressed in GCT cell lines and ligation of TLR4 with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to IκB degradation and activation of NF-κB. NF-κB activation was confirmed by nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 following treatment with LPS and the naturally occurring ligand, HSP60. Notably, immunoneutralization of TLR4 blocked nuclear localization, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling attenuated LPS-induced TNFαplus increased doubling time in both cell lines. Contradictory to reports using human OSE cell lines, inhibition of NF-κB signaling failed to sensitize GCT lines to TRAIL or cisplatin. In summary, findings herein are the first to demonstrate a functional TLR-signaling pathway specifically in GCTs, and indicate that in contrast to OSE-derived cancers, inhibition of NF-κB does not sensitize GCTs to TRAIL or cisplatin. PMID:21616060

  11. LPS/TLR4 Signaling Enhances TGF-β Response Through Downregulating BAMBI During Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    He, Yao; Ou, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiang; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Li, Yuan; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Minfeng; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Hequn; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development involves accumulation of mesenchymal-like cells derived from the prostatic epithelium by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces EMT phenotypes with low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression in prostatic epithelial cells. Here we report that LPS/TLR4 signalling induces down-regulation of the bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), which enhances TGF-β signalling in the EMT process during prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we found that the mean TLR4 staining score was significantly higher in BPH tissues with inflammation compared with BPH tissues without inflammation (5.13 ± 1.21 and 2.96 ± 0.73, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with inflammatory infiltrate were more likely to have a higher age (P = 0.020), BMI (P = 0.026), prostate volume (P = 0.024), total IPSS score (P = 0.009) and IPSS-S (P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly positively associated with age, BMI, serum PSA levels, urgency and nocturia subscores of IPSS in the inflammatory group. These findings provide new insights into the TLR4-amplified EMT process and the association between TLR4 levels and storage LUTS, suggesting chronic inflammation as vital to the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27243216

  12. LPS/TLR4 Signaling Enhances TGF-β Response Through Downregulating BAMBI During Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao; Ou, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiang; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Li, Yuan; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Minfeng; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Hequn; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development involves accumulation of mesenchymal-like cells derived from the prostatic epithelium by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces EMT phenotypes with low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression in prostatic epithelial cells. Here we report that LPS/TLR4 signalling induces down-regulation of the bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), which enhances TGF-β signalling in the EMT process during prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we found that the mean TLR4 staining score was significantly higher in BPH tissues with inflammation compared with BPH tissues without inflammation (5.13 ± 1.21 and 2.96 ± 0.73, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with inflammatory infiltrate were more likely to have a higher age (P = 0.020), BMI (P = 0.026), prostate volume (P = 0.024), total IPSS score (P = 0.009) and IPSS-S (P < 0.001). Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly positively associated with age, BMI, serum PSA levels, urgency and nocturia subscores of IPSS in the inflammatory group. These findings provide new insights into the TLR4-amplified EMT process and the association between TLR4 levels and storage LUTS, suggesting chronic inflammation as vital to the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27243216

  13. [The role of TLR-2, TLR-3, TLR-4 genes polymorphism of grippe].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Distribution and prognostic value of Arg753Gln TLR-2, Leu412Рhe TLR-3, Asp299Gly TLR-4 genes polymorphism in case of grippe have been studied in the present article. The examination has comprised 112 patients with grippe including 63 cases with uncomplicated course and 49 cases with grippe-associated pneumonia. The population control group has included 90 scarcely healthy persons to study Arg753Gln TLR-2 gene polymorphism and 80 ones to study Leu412Phe TLR-3 gene polymorphism. The conducted researches results have shown reliably higher frequency of heterozygous genotype Asp/Gly TLR-4 in patients with grippe (12,69%) and grippe-associated pneumonia (14,28%) compared with population control (3,33%). The frequency of homozygous genotype Phe/Phe TLR-3 in patients with grippe-associated pneumonia (18,37%) has exceeded the indices of patients with uncomplicated grippe (4,76%, р=0,02) and healthy persons (5,00%, р=0,03). Mutant genotypes combinations TLR-2, TLR-3, TLR-4 have been determined barely in patients with grippe and grippe-associated pneumonia with the frequency 11,11%-14,28%. It has been established that there is the increased risk of grippe development for persons with Asp/Gly TLR-4 genotype and TLR-2, TLR-3, TLR-4 mutant genotypes combinations; there is the increased risk of grippe-associated pneumonia for patients with mutant homozygous genotype Phe/Phe TLR-3. PMID:25214272

  14. Paeoniflorin abrogates DSS-induced colitis via a TLR4-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingjing; Zhang, Eryun; Sun, Aning; Ding, Lili; Wei, Xiaohui; Chou, Guixin; Mani, Sridhar; Wang, Zhengtao

    2013-01-01

    Paeonia lactiflora Pall is one of the most well-known herbs in China, Korea, and Japan for more than 1,200 years. Paeoniflorin, the major bioactive component of peony root, has recently been reported to have anticolitic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. The present study was to explore the possible mechanism of paeoniflorin in attenuating dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Pre- and coadministration of paeoniflorin significantly reduced the severity of colitis and resulted in downregulation of several inflammatory parameters in the colon, including the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, and the mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators (MCP-1, Cox2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17). The decline in the activation of NF-κB p65, ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK correlated with a decrease in mucosal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) but not TLR2 or TLR5 expression. In accordance with the in vivo results, paeoniflorin downregulated TLR4 expression, blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, and reduced the production of IL-6 in LPS-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Transient transfection assay performed in LPS-stimulated human colon cancer HT-29 cells indicated that paeoniflorin inhibits NF-κB transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 knockdown and overexpression experiments demonstrated a requirement for TLR4 in paeoniflorin-mediated downregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, for the first time, the present study indicates that paeoniflorin abrogates DSS-induced colitis via decreasing the expression of TLR4 and suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways. PMID:24232001

  15. Sequencing rare and common APOL1 coding variants to determine kidney disease risk.

    PubMed

    Limou, Sophie; Nelson, George W; Lecordier, Laurence; An, Ping; O'hUigin, Colm S; David, Victor A; Binns-Roemer, Elizabeth A; Guiblet, Wilfried M; Oleksyk, Taras K; Pays, Etienne; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2015-10-01

    A third of African Americans with sporadic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) or HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) do not carry APOL1 renal risk genotypes. This raises the possibility that other APOL1 variants may contribute to kidney disease. To address this question, we sequenced all APOL1 exons in 1437 Americans of African and European descent, including 464 patients with biopsy-proven FSGS/HIVAN. Testing for association with 33 common and rare variants with FSGS/HIVAN revealed no association independent of strong recessive G1 and G2 effects. Seeking additional variants that might have been under selection by pathogens and could represent candidates for kidney disease risk, we also sequenced an additional 1112 individuals representing 53 global populations. Except for G1 and G2, none of the 7 common codon-altering variants showed evidence of selection or could restore lysis against trypanosomes causing human African trypanosomiasis. Thus, only APOL1 G1 and G2 confer renal risk, and other common and rare APOL1 missense variants, including the archaic G3 haplotype, do not contribute to sporadic FSGS and HIVAN in the US population. Hence, in most potential clinical or screening applications, our study suggests that sequencing APOL1 exons is unlikely to bring additional information compared to genotyping only APOL1 G1 and G2 risk alleles. PMID:25993319

  16. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  17. Minigene analysis of intronic variants in common SPINK1 haplotypes associated with chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kereszturi, Éva; Király, Orsolya; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Two common haplotypes of the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) gene have been shown to increase the risk for chronic pancreatitis. A haplotype comprising the c.101A>G (p.N34S) missense variant and four intronic alterations has been found worldwide, whereas a second haplotype consisting of the c. −215G>A promoter variant and the c.194+2T>C intronic alteration has been observed frequently in Japan. METHODS In the present study we examined the functional significance of the intronic variants in the pathogenic SPINK1 haplotypes by utilizing minigenes, which harbor individual introns placed in the appropriate context of the full-length SPINK1 cDNA. Cells transfected with the SPINK1 minigenes secrete active trypsin inhibitor, thereby allowing evaluation of mutational effects simultaneously on transcription, splicing, translation and secretion. RESULTS We found that the c.194+2T>C intronic alteration abolished SPINK1 expression at the mRNA level, with consequent loss of inhibitor secretion, whereas the p.N34S associated intronic variants had no detectable functional effect. CONCLUSIONS Taken together with previous studies, the results indicate that all known variants within the p.N34S associated haplotype are functionally innocuous, suggesting that a yet unidentified variant within this haplotype is responsible for the pathogenic effect. The marked negative impact of the c.194+2T>C variant on SPINK1 expression supports the notion that SPINK1 variants increase the risk of chronic pancreatitis by diminishing protective trypsin inhibitor levels. PMID:18978175

  18. Sleep duration does not mediate or modify association of common genetic variants with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tare, Archana; Lane, Jacqueline M.; Cade, Brian E.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Chen, Ting-hsu; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Gharib, Sina A.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Redline, Susan; Saxena, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Short and long sleep duration are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to investigate whether genetic variants for fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes associate with short or long sleep duration and whether sleep duration modifies the association of genetic variants with these traits. Methods We examined the cross-sectional relationship between self-reported habitual sleep duration and prevalence of type 2 diabetes in individuals of European descent participating in five studies included in the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe), totalling 1,474 cases and 8,323 controls. We tested for association of 16 fasting glucose-associated variants, 27 type 2 diabetes-associated variants and aggregate genetic risk scores with continuous and dichotomised (≤5 h or ≥9 h) sleep duration using regression models adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Finally, we tested whether a gene × behaviour interaction of variants with sleep duration had an impact on fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes risk. Results Short sleep duration was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes in CARe (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.08, 1.61; p = 0.008). Variants previously associated with fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes and genetic risk scores were not associated with sleep duration. Furthermore, no study-wide significant interaction was observed between sleep duration and these variants on glycaemic traits. Nominal interactions were observed for sleep duration and PPARG rs1801282, CRY2 rs7943320 and HNF1B rs4430796 in influencing risk of type 2 diabetes (p < 0.05). Conclusions/interpretation Our findings suggest that differences in habitual sleep duration do not mediate or modify the relationship between common variants underlying glycaemic traits (including in circadian rhythm genes) and diabetes. PMID:24280871

  19. Common variants in UMOD associate with urinary uromodulin levels: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Olden, Matthias; Corre, Tanguy; Hayward, Caroline; Toniolo, Daniela; Ulivi, Sheila; Gasparini, Paolo; Pistis, Giorgio; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Bergmann, Sven; Campbell, Harry; Cocca, Massimiliano; Gandin, Ilaria; Girotto, Giorgia; Glaudemans, Bob; Hastie, Nicholas D; Loffing, Johannes; Polasek, Ozren; Rampoldi, Luca; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Traglia, Michela; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuckovic, Dragana; Youhanna, Sonia; Weber, Julien; Wright, Alan F; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bochud, Murielle; Fox, Caroline S; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    Uromodulin is expressed exclusively in the thick ascending limb and is the most abundant protein excreted in normal urine. Variants in UMOD, which encodes uromodulin, are associated with renal function, and urinary uromodulin levels may be a biomarker for kidney disease. However, the genetic factors regulating uromodulin excretion are unknown. We conducted a meta-analysis of urinary uromodulin levels to identify associated common genetic variants in the general population. We included 10,884 individuals of European descent from three genetic isolates and three urban cohorts. Each study measured uromodulin indexed to creatinine and conducted linear regression analysis of approximately 2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms using an additive model. We also tested whether variants in genes expressed in the thick ascending limb associate with uromodulin levels. rs12917707, located near UMOD and previously associated with renal function and CKD, had the strongest association with urinary uromodulin levels (P<0.001). In all cohorts, carriers of a G allele of this variant had higher uromodulin levels than noncarriers did (geometric means 10.24, 14.05, and 17.67 μg/g creatinine for zero, one, or two copies of the G allele). rs12446492 in the adjacent gene PDILT (protein disulfide isomerase-like, testis expressed) also reached genome-wide significance (P<0.001). Regarding genes expressed in the thick ascending limb, variants in KCNJ1, SORL1, and CAB39 associated with urinary uromodulin levels. These data indicate that common variants in the UMOD promoter region may influence urinary uromodulin levels. They also provide insights into uromodulin biology and the association of UMOD variants with renal function. PMID:24578125

  20. Common Variants in UMOD Associate with Urinary Uromodulin Levels: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Olden, Matthias; Corre, Tanguy; Hayward, Caroline; Toniolo, Daniela; Ulivi, Sheila; Gasparini, Paolo; Pistis, Giorgio; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Bergmann, Sven; Campbell, Harry; Cocca, Massimiliano; Gandin, Ilaria; Girotto, Giorgia; Glaudemans, Bob; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Loffing, Johannes; Polasek, Ozren; Rampoldi, Luca; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Traglia, Michela; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuckovic, Dragana; Youhanna, Sonia; Weber, Julien; Wright, Alan F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bochud, Murielle; Fox, Caroline S.

    2014-01-01

    Uromodulin is expressed exclusively in the thick ascending limb and is the most abundant protein excreted in normal urine. Variants in UMOD, which encodes uromodulin, are associated with renal function, and urinary uromodulin levels may be a biomarker for kidney disease. However, the genetic factors regulating uromodulin excretion are unknown. We conducted a meta-analysis of urinary uromodulin levels to identify associated common genetic variants in the general population. We included 10,884 individuals of European descent from three genetic isolates and three urban cohorts. Each study measured uromodulin indexed to creatinine and conducted linear regression analysis of approximately 2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms using an additive model. We also tested whether variants in genes expressed in the thick ascending limb associate with uromodulin levels. rs12917707, located near UMOD and previously associated with renal function and CKD, had the strongest association with urinary uromodulin levels (P<0.001). In all cohorts, carriers of a G allele of this variant had higher uromodulin levels than noncarriers did (geometric means 10.24, 14.05, and 17.67 μg/g creatinine for zero, one, or two copies of the G allele). rs12446492 in the adjacent gene PDILT (protein disulfide isomerase-like, testis expressed) also reached genome-wide significance (P<0.001). Regarding genes expressed in the thick ascending limb, variants in KCNJ1, SORL1, and CAB39 associated with urinary uromodulin levels. These data indicate that common variants in the UMOD promoter region may influence urinary uromodulin levels. They also provide insights into uromodulin biology and the association of UMOD variants with renal function. PMID:24578125

  1. Sequencing of SCN5A identifies rare and common variants associated with cardiac conduction

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Prins, Bram P.; Arking, Dan E.; Lin, Honghuang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Morrison, Alanna C.; Zhang, Feng; Spector, Tim D.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Lubitz, Steven A.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Pulit, Sara L.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Santibanez, Jireh; Taylor, Herman A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Lange, Leslie A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jackson, Rebecca; Rich, Stephen S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Jamshidi, Yalda; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Background The cardiac sodium channel SCN5A regulates atrioventricular and ventricular conduction. Genetic variants in this gene are associated with PR and QRS intervals. We sought to further characterize the contribution of rare and common coding variation in SCN5A to cardiac conduction. Methods and Results In the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Targeted Sequencing Study (CHARGE), we performed targeted exonic sequencing of SCN5A (n=3699, European-ancestry individuals) and identified 4 common (minor allele frequency >1%) and 157 rare variants. Common and rare SCN5A coding variants were examined for association with PR and QRS intervals through meta-analysis of European ancestry participants from CHARGE, NHLBI’s Exome Sequencing Project (ESP, n=607) and the UK10K (n=1275) and by examining ESP African-ancestry participants (N=972). Rare coding SCN5A variants in aggregate were associated with PR interval in European and African-ancestry participants (P=1.3×10−3). Three common variants were associated with PR and/or QRS interval duration among European-ancestry participants and one among African-ancestry participants. These included two well-known missense variants; rs1805124 (H558R) was associated with PR and QRS shortening in European-ancestry participants (P=6.25×10−4 and P=5.2×10−3 respectively) and rs7626962 (S1102Y) was associated with PR shortening in those of African ancestry (P=2.82×10−3). Among European-ancestry participants, two novel synonymous variants, rs1805126 and rs6599230, were associated with cardiac conduction. Our top signal, rs1805126 was associated with PR and QRS lengthening (P=3.35×10−7 and P=2.69×10−4 respectively), and rs6599230 was associated with PR shortening (P=2.67×10−5). Conclusions By sequencing SCN5A, we identified novel common and rare coding variants associated with cardiac conduction. PMID:24951663

  2. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Human Gait Suggest Contribution of Common Variants.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hieab H H; Verlinden, Vincentius J A; Callisaya, Michele L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hofman, Albert; Thomson, Russell; Uitterlinden, André G; Vernooij, Meike W; van der Geest, Jos N; Srikanth, Velandai; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-06-01

    Human gait is a complex neurological and musculoskeletal function, of which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. To determine the influence of common genetic variants on gait parameters, we studied 2,946 participants of the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort of unrelated elderly individuals. We assessed 30 gait parameters using an electronic walkway, which yielded seven independent gait domains after principal component analysis. Genotypes of participants were imputed to the 1,000 Genomes reference panel for generating genetic relationship matrices to estimate heritability of gait parameters, and for subsequent genome-wide association scans (GWASs) to identify specific variants. Gait domains with the highest age- and sex-adjusted heritability were Variability (h (2) = 61%), Rhythm (37%), and Tandem (32%). For other gait domains, heritability estimates attenuated after adjustment for height and weight. Genome-wide association scans identified a variant on 1p22.3 that was significantly associated with single support time, a variable from the Rhythm domain (rs72953990; N = 2,946; β [SE] = 0.0069 (0.0012), p = 2.30×10(-8)). This variant did not replicate in an independent sample (N = 362; p = .78). In conclusion, human gait has highly heritable components that are explained by common genetic variation, which are partly attributed to height and weight. Collaborative efforts are needed to identify robust single variant associations for the heritable parameters. PMID:26219847

  3. CLAMMS: a scalable algorithm for calling common and rare copy number variants from exome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Jonathan S.; Maxwell, Evan K.; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Lopez, Alexander E.; Dewey, Frederick E.; Chernomorsky, Rostislav; Baras, Aris; Overton, John D.; Habegger, Lukas; Reid, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Several algorithms exist for detecting copy number variants (CNVs) from human exome sequencing read depth, but previous tools have not been well suited for large population studies on the order of tens or hundreds of thousands of exomes. Their limitations include being difficult to integrate into automated variant-calling pipelines and being ill-suited for detecting common variants. To address these issues, we developed a new algorithm—Copy number estimation using Lattice-Aligned Mixture Models (CLAMMS)—which is highly scalable and suitable for detecting CNVs across the whole allele frequency spectrum. Results: In this note, we summarize the methods and intended use-case of CLAMMS, compare it to previous algorithms and briefly describe results of validation experiments. We evaluate the adherence of CNV calls from CLAMMS and four other algorithms to Mendelian inheritance patterns on a pedigree; we compare calls from CLAMMS and other algorithms to calls from SNP genotyping arrays for a set of 3164 samples; and we use TaqMan quantitative polymerase chain reaction to validate CNVs predicted by CLAMMS at 39 loci (95% of rare variants validate; across 19 common variant loci, the mean precision and recall are 99% and 94%, respectively). In the Supplementary Materials (available at the CLAMMS Github repository), we present our methods and validation results in greater detail. Availability and implementation: https://github.com/rgcgithub/clamms (implemented in C). Contact: jeffrey.reid@regeneron.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26382196

  4. Common and Rare Variant Association Study for Plasma Lipids and Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Konno, Tetsuo; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-03-01

    Blood lipid levels are highly heritable and modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), and are the leading cause of death worldwide. These facts have motivated human genetic association studies that have the substantial potential to define the risk factors that are causal and to identify pathways and therapeutic targets for lipids and CAD.The success of the HapMap project that provided an extensive catalog of human genetic variations and the development of microarray based genotyping chips (typically containing variations with allele frequencies >5%) facilitated common variant association study (CVAS; formerly termed genome-wide association study, GWAS) identifying disease-associated variants in a genome-wide manner. To date, 157 loci associated with blood lipids and 46 loci with CAD have been successfully identified, accounting for approximately 12%-14% of heritability for lipids and 10% of heritability for CAD. However, there is yet a major challenge termed "missing heritability problem," namely the observation that loci detected by CVAS explain only a small fraction of the inferred genetic variations. To explain such missing portions, focuses in genetic association studies have shifted from common to rare variants. However, it is challenging to apply rare variant association study (RVAS) in an unbiased manner because such variants typically lack the sufficient number to be identified statistically.In this review, we provide a current understanding of the genetic architecture mostly derived from CVAS, and several updates on the progress and limitations of RVAS for lipids and CAD. PMID:26347050

  5. Sophocarpine displays anti-inflammatory effect via inhibiting TLR4 and TLR4 downstream pathways on LPS-induced mastitis in the mammary gland of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehai; Xu, Niannian; Zhang, Zhenbiao; Yang, Shijin; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen; Guo, Mengyao

    2016-06-01

    Mastitis is defined as the inflammation of the mammary gland. LPS, which is widely used to induce mastitis models for the study of this disease, triggers similar inflammation as Escherichia coli. Sophocarpine, isolated from Sophora alopecuroides L., exhibits multiple biological properties. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of sophocarpine on mastitis within an LPS-induced mouse model. ELISA and western blotting were performed to detect protein levels. The qPCR was performed to detect mRNA levels. The ELISA and qRT-PCR results showed that sophocarpine inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. However, sophocarpine suppressed TLR4 expression. Further study showed that sophocarpine could suppress the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65 and p38. These results confirm that sophocarpine played an anti-inflammatory role in LPS-induced mastitis by regulating TLR4 and the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in mammary gland tissues. Therefore, sophocarpine may be a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of mastitis. PMID:27039209

  6. The NRAMP1, VDR, TNF-α, ICAM1, TLR2 and TLR4 gene polymorphisms in Iranian patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza; Sanaei, Roozbeh; Anoosheh, Saber; Farnia, Parisa; Sepanjnia, Adel; Tajik, Nader

    2016-04-01

    The innate immune response drives early events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Since human genetic variation is an important determinant in the outcome of infection with M. tuberculosis, we typed polymorphisms in the innate immune molecules, such as natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), Vitamin D receptor (VDR), Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), intercellular adhesion molecule1 (ICAM-1), Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in a case-control study of pulmonary tuberculosis in Iranian population. We conducted an association study and included 96 patients and 122 matched healthy individuals. We used single ARMS-PCR technique to simultaneously genotype fourteen polymorphisms in this survey. Among all fourteen polymorphisms that were examined, three polymorphisms were significantly different between case and control groups. The TNF -308A polymorphism showed significant increase in allele and genotype frequencies among patients compared to control individuals [-308A allele: 19.3 vs. 9.4%, GA genotype: 28.1 vs. 17.2%, AA genotype: 5.2 vs. 0.8%; Corrected P (Pc)<0.05], and the TLR4 variant allele and genotypes prevalence (D299G and T399I) were significantly higher among patients compared to controls [DG genotype: 14.6 vs. 5.7%, Pc<0.05 and I399 allele: 4.2 vs. 0.8%, TI genotype: 8.3 vs. 1.6%; Pc<0.05], respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that TLR4 (D299G and T399I) and TNF (-308G/A) genetic polymorphisms may influence the risk of developing tuberculosis after exposure to Mycobacterium. PMID:26774366

  7. Common variants of the vitamin D binding protein gene and adverse health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suneil; Fu, Lei; Juras, David James; Karmali, Mohamed; Wong, Betty Y. L.; Gozdzik, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is the major plasma carrier for vitamin D and its metabolites, but it is also an actin scavenger, and is the precursor to the immunomodulatory protein, Gc-MAF. Two missense variants of the DBP gene – rs7041 encoding Asp432Glu and rs4588 encoding Thr436Lys – change the amino acid sequence and alter the protein function. They are common enough to generate population-wide constitutive differences in vitamin D status, based on assay of the serum metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD). Whether these variants also influence the role of vitamin D in an immunologic milieu is not known. However, the issue is relevant, given the immunomodulatory effects of DBP and the role of protracted innate immune-related inflammation in response to tissue injury or repeated infection. Indeed, DBP and vitamin D may jointly or independently contribute to a variety of adverse health outcomes unrelated to classical notions of their function in bone and mineral metabolism. This review summarizes the reports to date of associations between DBP variants, and various chronic and infectious diseases. The available information leads us to conclude that DBP variants are a significant and common genetic factor in some common disorders, and therefore, are worthy of closer attention. In view of the heightened interest in vitamin D as a public health target, well-designed studies that look simultaneously at vitamin D and its carrier in relation to genotypes and adverse health outcome should be encouraged. PMID:23427793

  8. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kathryn L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Michaelson, Jacob J; Christiansen, Morten H; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population. PMID:27064276

  9. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Christiansen, Morten H.; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population. PMID:27064276

  10. LPS/TLR4-mediated stromal cells acquire an invasive phenotype and are implicated in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Li, Caixia; Chen, Rong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Kang, Le; Cheng, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested whether the LPS/TLR4 signal pathway in endometrial stromal cells is essential for the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. We tested the expression of TLR4, MD2 in the endometrium without adenomyosis (CE), the eutopic endometrium with adenomyosis (EuE) and the ectopic endometrium with adenomyosis (EE). We isolated the stromal cells from CE, EuE and EE (CESC, EuESC, EESC), treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TLR4 antagonist and detected the cell viability. And we also measured the key protein of the TLR4 signal pathway and inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth of experimental cells. We found that the viability of experimental cells treated with LPS was significantly greater than that of the non-treated cells, blocked by the TLR4 antagonist VIPER. TLR4 signal pathway and inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth of experimental cells stimulated by LPS, and it was inhibited by VIPER. This study suggested that stromal cells were activated by the TLR4 signalling pathway, which processed the cellular inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth involved in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. PMID:26898650

  11. LPS/TLR4-mediated stromal cells acquire an invasive phenotype and are implicated in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Li, Caixia; Chen, Rong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Kang, Le; Cheng, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested whether the LPS/TLR4 signal pathway in endometrial stromal cells is essential for the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. We tested the expression of TLR4, MD2 in the endometrium without adenomyosis (CE), the eutopic endometrium with adenomyosis (EuE) and the ectopic endometrium with adenomyosis (EE). We isolated the stromal cells from CE, EuE and EE (CESC, EuESC, EESC), treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TLR4 antagonist and detected the cell viability. And we also measured the key protein of the TLR4 signal pathway and inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth of experimental cells. We found that the viability of experimental cells treated with LPS was significantly greater than that of the non-treated cells, blocked by the TLR4 antagonist VIPER. TLR4 signal pathway and inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth of experimental cells stimulated by LPS, and it was inhibited by VIPER. This study suggested that stromal cells were activated by the TLR4 signalling pathway, which processed the cellular inflammatory proliferation and invasive growth involved in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. PMID:26898650

  12. A TLR4/MD2 fusion protein inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling in hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schnabl, Bernd Brandl, Katharina; Fink, Marina; Gross, Philipp; Taura, Kojiro; Gaebele, Erwin; Hellerbrand, Claus; Falk, Werner

    2008-10-17

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in hepatic fibrogenesis. In injured liver they are the main extracellular matrix protein producing cell type and further perpetuate hepatic injury by secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators. Since LPS-mediated signaling through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been identified as key fibrogenic signal in HSCs we aimed to test TLR4 as potential target of therapy via ligand-binding soluble receptors. Incubation of human HSCs with a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of TLR4 and MD2 which binds LPS inhibited LPS-induced NF{kappa}B and JNK activation. TLR4/MD2 abolished LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8, MCP1, and RANTES in HSCs. In addition, TLR4/MD2 fused to human IgG-Fc neutralized LPS activity. Since TLR4 mutant mice are resistant to liver fibrosis, the TLR4/MD2 soluble receptor might represent a new therapeutic molecule for liver fibrogenesis in vivo.

  13. Hyaluronan Inhibits Tlr-4-Dependent RANKL Expression in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hirabara, Shinya; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is activated in synovial fibroblast cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL, are key molecules involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts and joint destruction in RA. Hyaluronan (HA) is a major extracellular component and an important immune regulator. In this study, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation significantly increases RANKL expression via a TLR-4 signaling pathway. We also demonstrate that HA suppresses LPS-induced RANKL expression, which is dependent on CD44, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Our study provides evidence for HA-mediated suppression of TLR-4-dependent RANKL expression. This could present an alternative target for the treatment of destructed joint bones and cartilages in RA. PMID:27054952

  14. Statistical Colocalization of Genetic Risk Variants for Related Autoimmune Diseases in the Context of Common Controls

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Mary D.; Guo, Hui; Burren, Oliver; Schofield, Ellen; Walker, Neil M.; Ban, Maria; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Ann; Eyre, Steve; Todd, John A.; Wallace, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying whether potential causal variants for related diseases are shared can identify overlapping etiologies of multifactorial disorders. Colocalization methods disentangle shared and distinct causal variants. However, existing approaches require independent datasets. Here we extend two colocalization methods to allow for the shared control design commonly used in comparison of genome-wide association study results across diseases. Our analysis of four autoimmune diseases, type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease and multiple sclerosis, revealed 90 regions that were associated with at least one disease, 33 (37%) of which with two or more disorders. Nevertheless, for 14 of these 33 shared regions there was evidence that causal variants differed. We identified novel disease associations in 11 regions previously associated with one or more of the other three disorders. Four of eight T1D-specific regions contained known type 2 diabetes candidate genes: COBL, GLIS3, RNLS and BCAR1, suggesting a shared cellular etiology. PMID:26053495

  15. A TLR4-interacting peptide inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inflammatory responses, migration and invasion of colon cancer SW480 cells

    PubMed Central

    Rakhesh, Madhusoodhanan; Cate, Moriasi; Vijay, Ramani; Shrikant, Anant; Shanjana, Awasthi

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a major risk factor for carcinogenesis in patients affected by chronic colitis, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression from chronic inflammation to cancer are not completely understood. Activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-NFκB signaling axis is associated with inflammation. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of TLR4-NFκB signaling might help in limiting inflammatory responses and inflammation-induced oncogenesis. In this work, we studied the effects of a TLR4-interacting surfactant protein A-derived (SPA4) peptide on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TLR4-NFκB signaling and cancer progression. We first characterized this peptide for its ability to bind the TLR4 ligand-LPS and for physico-chemical characteristics. Inflammation was induced by challenging the colon cancer SW480 cells with Escherichia coli LPS. Cells were then treated with varying amounts of the SPA4 peptide. Changes in the expression of TLR4, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, in intracellular NFκB-related signal transducers (IKBα, p65, phosphorylated IKBα, phosphorylated p65, RelB, COX-2) as well as in the transcriptional activity of NFκB were studied by immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting and NFκB reporter assay, respectively. Simultaneously, the effects on LPS-induced cell migration and invasion were determined. We found that the SPA4 peptide does not bind to LPS. Rather, its binding to TLR4 inhibits the LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, production of IL-1β and IL-6, activity of NFκB, migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the inhibition of TLR4-NFκB signaling by a TLR4-binding peptide may help for the treatment of chronic inflammation and prevention of inflammation-induced cancer in patients with colitis. PMID:23264896

  16. Cereblon negatively regulates TLR4 signaling through the attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae Mi; Kang, Jung-Ah; Yang, Taewoo; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Chung, Sungkwon; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor protein for the CRL4A E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. In this study, we report on a new regulatory role of CRBN in TLR4 signaling. CRBN overexpression leads to suppression of NF-κB activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and IL-1β in response to TLR4 stimulation. Biochemical studies revealed interactions between CRBN and TAK1, and TRAF6 proteins. The interaction between CRBN and TAK1 did not affect the association of the TAB1 and TAB2 proteins, which have pivotal roles in the activation of TAK1, whereas the CRBN-TRAF6 interaction critically affected ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Binding mapping results revealed that CRBN interacts with the Zinc finger domain of TRAF6, which contains the ubiquitination site of TRAF6, leading to attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Functional studies revealed that CRBN-knockdown THP-1 cells show enhanced NF-κB activation and p65- or p50-DNA binding activities, leading to up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent gene expression and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in response to TLR4 stimulation. Furthermore, Crbn−/− mice exhibit decreased survival in response to LPS challenge, accompanied with marked enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CRBN negatively regulates TLR4 signaling via attenuation of TRAF6 and TAB2 ubiquitination. PMID:27468689

  17. TLR4 Signaling in MPP+-Induced Activation of BV-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Weng, Ruihui; Chen, Zhaoyu; Wang, Rui; Zou, Jing; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Wang, Yanping; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This work was conducted to establish an in vitro Parkinson's disease (PD) model by exposing BV-2 cells to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) and exploring the roles of TLR2/TLR4/TLR9 in inflammatory responses to MPP+. Methods/Results. MTT assay showed that cell viability of BV-2 cells was 84.78 ± 0.86% and 81.18 ± 0.99% of the control after incubation with 0.1 mM MPP+ for 12 hours and 24 hours, respectively. Viability was not significantly different from the control group. With immunofluorescence technique, we found that MPP+ incubation at 0.1 mM for 12 hours was the best condition to activate BV-2 cells. In this condition, the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and iNOS protein were statistically increased compared to the control according to ELISA tests. Real time RT-PCR and western blot measurements showed that TLR4 was statistically increased after 0.1 mM MPP+ incubation for 12 hours. Furthermore, after siRNA interference of TLR4 mRNA, NF-κB activation and the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and iNOS were all statistically decreased in this cell model. Conclusion. MPP+ incubation at the concentration of 0.1 mM for 12 hours is the best condition to activate BV-2 cells for mimicking PD inflammation in BV-2 cells. TLR4 signalling plays a critical role in the activation of BV-2 cells and the induction of inflammation in this cell model. PMID:26881113

  18. Bovine TLR2 and TLR4 mediate Cryptosporidium parvum recognition in bovine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengtao; Fu, Yunhe; Gong, Pengtao; Zheng, Jingtong; Liu, Li; Yu, Yuqiang; Li, Jianhua; Li, He; Yang, Ju; Zhang, Xichen

    2015-08-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) is an intestinal parasite that causes diarrhea in neonatal calves. It results in significant morbidity of neonatal calves and economic losses for producers worldwide. Innate resistance against C. parvum is thought to depend on engagement of pattern recognition receptors. However, the role of innate responses to C. parvum has not been elucidated in bovine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of TLRs in host-cell responses during C. parvum infection of cultured bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The expressions of TLRs in bovine intestinal epithelial cells were detected by qRT-PCR. To determine which, if any, TLRs may play a role in the response of bovine intestinal epithelial cells to C. parvum, the cells were stimulated with C. parvum and the expression of TLRs were tested by qRT-PCR. The expression of NF-κB was detected by western blotting. Further analyses were carried out in bovine TLRs transfected HEK293 cells and by TLRs-DN transfected bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed that bovine intestinal epithelial cells expressed all known TLRs. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 were up-regulated when bovine intestinal epithelial cells were treated with C. parvum. Meanwhile, C. parvum induced IL-8 production in TLR2 or TLR4/MD-2 transfected HEK293 cells. Moreover, C. parvum induced NF-κB activation and cytokine expression in bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The induction of NF-κB activation and cytokine expression by C. parvum were reduced in TLR2-DN and TLR4-DN transfected cells. The results showed that bovine intestinal epithelial cells expressed all known TLRs, and bovine intestinal epithelial cells recognized and responded to C. parvum via TLR2 and TLR4. PMID:26048276

  19. Combined Tlr2 and Tlr4 Deficiency Increases Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paun, Alexandra; Fox, Jessica; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Qureshi, Salman T.; Haston, Christina K.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether Toll-like receptor 2 or 4 genotype alters the lung response to irradiation in C57BL/6 mice using a model developing a phenotype that resembles radiotherapy-induced fibrosis in both histological characteristics and onset post-treatment. Methods and Materials: The pulmonary phenotype of C57BL/6 mice deficient in each or both of these genes was assessed after an 18-Gy single dose to the thoracic cavity by survival time postirradiation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential, histological evidence of alveolitis and fibrosis, and gene expression levels, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Results: The lung phenotype of Tlr4-deficient and Tlr2-deficient mice did not differ from that of wild-type mice in terms of survival time postirradiation, or by histological evidence of alveolitis or fibrosis. In contrast, mice deficient in both receptors developed respiratory distress at an earlier time than did wild-type mice and presented an enhanced fibrotic response (13.5% vs. 5.8% of the lung by image analysis of histological sections, p < 0.001). No differences in bronchoalveolar cell differential counts, nor in numbers of apoptotic cells in the lung as detected through active caspase-3 staining, were evident among the irradiated mice grouped by Tlr genotype. Gene expression analysis of lung tissue revealed that Tlr2,4-deficient mice have increased levels of hyaluronidase 2 compared with both wild-type mice and mice lacking either Tlr2 or Tlr4. Conclusion: We conclude that a combined deficiency in both Tlr2 and Tlr4, but not Tlr2 or Tlr4 alone, leads to enhanced radiation-induced fibrosis in the C57BL/6 mouse model.

  20. Effective antibody therapy induces host protective antitumor immunity that is augmented by TLR4 agonist treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shangzi; Astsaturov, Igor A.; Bingham, Catherine A.; McCarthy, Kenneth M.; von Mehren, Margaret; Xu, Wei; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Tang, Yong; Littlefield, Bruce A.; Hawkins, Lynn D.; Ishizaka, Sally T.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors are potent activators of the innate immune system and generate signals leading to the initiation of the adaptive immune response that can be utilized for therapeutic purposes. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment with a toll-like receptor agonist and an anti-tumor monoclonal antibody is effective and induces host-protective anti-tumor immunity. C57BL/6 human mutated HER2 (hmHER2) transgenic mice that constitutively express kinase-deficient human HER2 under control of the CMV promoter were established. These mice demonstrate immunological tolerance to D5-HER2, a syngeneic human HER2-expressing melanoma cell line. This human HER2 tolerant model offers the potential to serve as a preclinical model to test both antibody therapy and the immunization potential of human HER2 targeted therapeutics. Here we show that E6020, a toll like receptor-4 (TLR4) agonist effectively boosted the antitumor efficacy of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in immunodeficient C57BL/6 SCID mice as well as in C57BL/6 hmHER2 transgenic mice. E6020 and trastuzumab co-treatment resulted in significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than was observed with either agent individually. Furthermore, mice treated with the combination of trastuzumab and the TLR4 agonist were protected against re-challenge with human HER2 transfected tumor cells in hmHER2 transgenic mouse strains. These findings suggest that combined treatment with trastuzumab and a TLR4 agonist not only promotes direct anti-tumor effects but also induces a host-protective human HER2-directed adaptive immune response indicative of a memory response. These data provide an immunological rationale for testing TLR4 agonists in combination with antibody therapy in patients with cancer. PMID:21842208

  1. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  2. Novel Associations between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants and Risk-Predicting Mammographic Density Measures.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jennifer; Thompson, Deborah J; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Scott, Christopher; Tamimi, Rulla M; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hazra, Aditi; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Jensen, Matt; Cunningham, Julie; Olson, Janet E; Purrington, Kristen; Couch, Fergus J; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth M L; Luben, Robert N; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Smith, Paula; Wareham, Nicholas J; Jud, Sebastian M; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W; Douglas, Julie A; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Ursin, Giske; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela N; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gram, Inger Torhild; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Fasching, Peter A; Pankratz, V Shane; Hopper, John L; Vachon, Celine M

    2015-06-15

    Mammographic density measures adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) are heritable predictors of breast cancer risk, but few mammographic density-associated genetic variants have been identified. Using data for 10,727 women from two international consortia, we estimated associations between 77 common breast cancer susceptibility variants and absolute dense area, percent dense area and absolute nondense area adjusted for study, age, and BMI using mixed linear modeling. We found strong support for established associations between rs10995190 (in the region of ZNF365), rs2046210 (ESR1), and rs3817198 (LSP1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas (all P < 10(-5)). Of 41 recently discovered breast cancer susceptibility variants, associations were found between rs1432679 (EBF1), rs17817449 (MIR1972-2: FTO), rs12710696 (2p24.1), and rs3757318 (ESR1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas, respectively. There were associations between rs6001930 (MKL1) and both adjusted absolute dense and nondense areas, and between rs17356907 (NTN4) and adjusted absolute nondense area. Trends in all but two associations were consistent with those for breast cancer risk. Results suggested that 18% of breast cancer susceptibility variants were associated with at least one mammographic density measure. Genetic variants at multiple loci were associated with both breast cancer risk and the mammographic density measures. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms at these loci could help identify etiologic pathways implicated in how mammographic density predicts breast cancer risk. PMID:25862352

  3. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person’s genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  4. Characterization and comparison of arcelin seed protein variants from common bean.

    PubMed

    Hartweck, L M; Vogelzang, R D; Osborn, T C

    1991-09-01

    Four variants of arcelin, an insecticidal seed storage protein of bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., were investigated. Each variant (arcelin-1, -2, -3, and -4) was purified, and solubilities and M(r)s were determined. For arcelins-1, -2, and -4, the isoelectric points, hemagglutinating activities, immunological cross-reactivities, and N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined. On the basis of native and denatured M(r)s, the variants were classified as being composed of dimer protein (arcelin-2), tetramer protein (arcelins-3 and -4), or both dimer and tetramer proteins (arcelin-1). Although the dimer proteins (arcelins-1d and -2) could be distinguished by M(r)s and isoelectric points, they were identical for their first 37 N-terminal amino acids and had similar immunological cross-reactions, and bean lines containing these variants had a DNA restriction fragment in common. The tetramer proteins arcelin-1t and arcelin-4 also could be distinguished from each other based on M(r)s and isoelectric points; however, they had similar immunological cross-reactions and they were 77 to 93% identical for N-terminal amino acid composition. The similarities among arcelin variants, phytohemagglutinin, and a bean alpha-amylase inhibitor suggest that they are all encoded by related members of a lectin gene family. PMID:16668372

  5. Characterization and Comparison of Arcelin Seed Protein Variants from Common Bean 1

    PubMed Central

    Hartweck, Lynn M.; Vogelzang, Robert D.; Osborn, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Four variants of arcelin, an insecticidal seed storage protein of bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., were investigated. Each variant (arcelin-1, -2, -3, and -4) was purified, and solubilities and Mrs were determined. For arcelins-1, -2, and -4, the isoelectric points, hemagglutinating activities, immunological cross-reactivities, and N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined. On the basis of native and denatured Mrs, the variants were classified as being composed of dimer protein (arcelin-2), tetramer protein (arcelins-3 and -4), or both dimer and tetramer proteins (arcelin-1). Although the dimer proteins (arcelins-1d and -2) could be distinguished by Mrs and isoelectric points, they were identical for their first 37 N-terminal amino acids and had similar immunological cross-reactions, and bean lines containing these variants had a DNA restriction fragment in common. The tetramer proteins arcelin-1t and arcelin-4 also could be distinguished from each other based on Mrs and isoelectric points; however, they had similar immunological cross-reactions and they were 77 to 93% identical for N-terminal amino acid composition. The similarities among arcelin variants, phytohemagglutinin, and a bean α-amylase inhibitor suggest that they are all encoded by related members of a lectin gene family. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 6 PMID:16668372

  6. Intracellular RIG-I Signaling Regulates TLR4-Independent Endothelial Inflammatory Responses to Endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Moser, Jill; Heeringa, Peter; Jongman, Rianne M; Zwiers, Peter J; Niemarkt, Anita E; Yan, Rui; de Graaf, Inge A; Li, Ranran; Ravasz Regan, Erzsébet; Kümpers, Philipp; Aird, William C; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Zijlstra, Jan G; Molema, Grietje; van Meurs, Matijs

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infections associated with organ failure that is the most frequent cause of death in hospitalized patients. Exaggerated endothelial activation, altered blood flow, vascular leakage, and other disturbances synergistically contribute to sepsis-induced organ failure. The underlying signaling events associated with endothelial proinflammatory activation are not well understood, yet they likely consist of molecular pathways that act in an endothelium-specific manner. We found that LPS, a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis, is internalized by endothelial cells, leading to intracellular signaling without the need for priming as found recently in immune cells. By identifying a novel role for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) as a central regulator of endothelial activation functioning independent of TLR4, we provide evidence that the current paradigm of TLR4 solely being responsible for LPS-mediated endothelial responses is incomplete. RIG-I, as well as the adaptor protein mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein, regulates NF-κB-mediated induction of adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to LPS. Our findings provide essential new insights into the proinflammatory signaling pathways in endothelial cells and suggest that combined endothelial-specific inhibition of RIG-I and TLR4 will provide protection from aberrant endothelial responses associated with sepsis. PMID:27183587

  7. Effect of rottlerin, a PKC-{delta} inhibitor, on TLR-4-dependent activation of murine microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Kim, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Min-Woo; Baek, Nam-in; Kim, Kyong-Tai . E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr

    2005-11-11

    In microglia, Toll-like receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and initiate innate immune responses upon interaction with infectious agents. The effect of rottlerin, a PKC-{delta} specific inhibitor, on TLR-4-mediated signaling was investigated in murine microglia stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and taxol. Pretreatment of microglia cells with rottlerin decreased LPS- and taxol-induced nitric oxide production in a concentration-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 99.1 {+-} 1.5 nM). Through MTT and FACS analysis, we found that the inhibition effect of rottlerin was not due to microglial cell death. Rottlerin pretreatment also attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and expression of type II nitric oxide synthase. In addition, microglial phagocytosis in response to TLR-4 activation was diminished in which rottlerin was pretreated. Together, these data raise the possibility that certain PKC-{delta} specific inhibitors can modulate TLR-4-derived signaling and inflammatory target gene expression, and can alter susceptibility to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases in central nervous system.

  8. Administration of a synthetic TLR4 agonist protects mice from pneumonic tularemia.

    PubMed

    Lembo, Annalisa; Pelletier, Mark; Iyer, Ravi; Timko, Michele; Dudda, Jan C; West, T Eoin; Wilson, Christopher B; Hajjar, Adeline M; Skerrett, Shawn J

    2008-06-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that causes the zoonosis tularemia. Because F. tularensis LPS causes weak TLR4 activation, we hypothesized that administration of a synthetic TLR4 agonist, aminoalkyl glucosaminide phosphate (AGP), would boost the innate immune system and compensate for reduced TLR4 stimulation. Intranasal administration of AGPs induced intrapulmonary production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Mice treated with AGPs before and after inhalation of Francisella novicida exhibited augmented cytokine and inflammatory responses to infection; reduced bacterial replication in lung, liver, and spleen; and increased survival, whereas all PBS-treated control mice died within 4 days of infection, all AGP-treated mice showed prolonged time-to-death, and 30-60% of AGP-treated mice survived. The protective effect of AGP was lost in mice lacking IFN-gamma. Long-term survivors developed specific Th1 splenocyte responses and specific Abs dominated by IgG2 isotypes. Survivors were fully protected from rechallenge with aerosolized F. novicida. Thus, preventive administration of AGP successfully modulated innate immune responses to aerosolized F. novicida, leading to protective immunity to pneumonic tularemia. This is the first report of the protective effect of a TLR ligand on resistance to F. novicida-induced pneumonic tularemia. PMID:18490759

  9. Pharmacological TLR4 Inhibition Protects against Acute and Chronic Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Liang, Hanyu; Farese, Robert V.; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate whether pharmacological TLR4 inhibition protects against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in rats. Materials and Methods For the acute experiment, rats received a TLR4 inhibitor [TAK-242 or E5564 (2x5 mg/kg i.v. bolus)] or vehicle, and an 8-h Intralipid (20%, 8.5 mg/kg/min) or saline infusion, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. For the chronic experiment, rats were subcutaneously implanted with a slow-release pellet of TAK-242 (1.5 mg/d) or placebo. Rats then received a high fat diet (HFD) or a low fat control diet (LFD) for 10 weeks, followed by a two-step insulin clamp. Results Acute experiment; the lipid-induced reduction (18%) in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) was attenuated by TAK-242 and E5564 (the effect of E5564 was more robust), suggesting improved peripheral insulin action. Insulin was able to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) in saline- but not lipid-treated rats. TAK-242, but not E5564, partially restored this effect, suggesting improved HGP. Chronic experiment; insulin-stimulated Rd was reduced ~30% by the HFD, but completely restored by TAK-242. Insulin could not suppress HGP in rats fed a HFD and TAK-242 had no effect on HGP. Conclusions Pharmacological TLR4 inhibition provides partial protection against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in vivo. PMID:26196892

  10. Histones from Dying Renal Cells Aggravate Kidney Injury via TLR2 and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Hägele, Holger; Lichtnekert, Julia; Hagemann, Jan Henrik; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Ryu, Mi; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph A.; Krombach, Fritz; Monestier, Marc; Liapis, Helen; Moreth, Kristin; Schaefer, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    In AKI, dying renal cells release intracellular molecules that stimulate immune cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger leukocyte recruitment and renal inflammation. Whether the release of histones, specifically, from dying cells contributes to the inflammation of AKI is unknown. In this study, we found that dying tubular epithelial cells released histones into the extracellular space, which directly interacted with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 (TLR2) and TLR4 to induce MyD88, NF-κB, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Extracellular histones also had directly toxic effects on renal endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, direct injection of histones into the renal arteries of mice demonstrated that histones induce leukocyte recruitment, microvascular vascular leakage, renal inflammation, and structural features of AKI in a TLR2/TLR4-dependent manner. Antihistone IgG, which neutralizes the immunostimulatory effects of histones, suppressed intrarenal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and tubular cell necrosis and improved excretory renal function. In summary, the release of histones from dying cells aggravates AKI via both its direct toxicity to renal cells and its proinflammatory effects. Because the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells requires TLR2 and TLR4, these results support the concept that renal damage triggers an innate immune response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of AKI. PMID:22677551

  11. Interleukin-18 Increases TLR4 and Mannose Receptor Expression and Modulates Cytokine Production in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão; Fernandes, Reginaldo Keller; Rodrigues, Daniela Ramos; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Soares, Angela Maria Victoriano Campos

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine belonging to the interleukin-1 family of cytokines. This cytokine exerts many unique biological and immunological effects. To explore the role of IL-18 in inflammatory innate immune responses, we investigated its impact on expression of two toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4) and mannose receptor (MR) by human peripheral blood monocytes and its effect on TNF-α, IL-12, IL-15, and IL-10 production. Monocytes from healthy donors were stimulated or not with IL-18 for 18 h, and then the TLR2, TLR4, and MR expression and intracellular TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-10 production were assessed by flow cytometry and the levels of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-15, and IL-10 in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. IL-18 treatment was able to increase TLR4 and MR expression by monocytes. The production of TNF-α and IL-10 was also increased by cytokine treatment. However, IL-18 was unable to induce neither IL-12 nor IL-15 production by these cells. Taken together, these results show an important role of IL-18 on the early phase of inflammatory response by promoting the expression of some pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that are important during the microbe recognition phase and by inducing some important cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-10. PMID:25873755

  12. TLR4/TIRAP polymorphisms are associated with progression and survival of patients with symptomatic myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bagratuni, Tina; Terpos, Evangelos; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, Evangelos; Kalapanida, Despoina; Gavriatopoulou, Maria; Migkou, Magdalini; Liacos, Christine-Ivy; Tasidou, Anna; Matsouka, Charis; Mparmparousi, Despoina; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Kastritis, Efstathios

    2016-01-01

    Myeloma cells thrive in an environment of sustained inflammation, which impacts the development and evolution of the disease, as well as drug resistance. We evaluated the impact of genetic polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway, which have been implicated in different inflammatory responses in the outcomes of patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) who have received contemporary therapies. We found that the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both the TLR4 and toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-associated protein (TIRAP) genes was associated with lower response to primary therapy mainly for patients who received immunomodulatory drugs but not in patients treated with bortezomib-based therapies. Furthermore, TIRAP SNP was associated with a significantly shorter progression-free survival and overall survival, independently of other prognostic factors, such as age, transplant, International Staging System stage, lactate dehydrogenase and cytogenetics. This is the first study to demonstrate the effect of SNPs in TLR4/TIRAP in MM. Our data indicate that genetic variability in the immune system may be associated with different responses to antimyeloma therapies and may be a critical component affecting the natural history of the disease, providing the basis for further investigation of the role of these pathways in myeloma. PMID:26564000

  13. TLR2 and TLR4 mediated host immune responses in major infectious diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Suprabhat; Karmakar, Subhajit; Babu, Santi Prasad Sinha

    2016-01-01

    During the course of evolution, multicellular organisms have been orchestrated with an efficient and versatile immune system to counteract diverse group of pathogenic organisms. Pathogen recognition is considered as the most critical step behind eliciting adequate immune response during an infection. Hitherto Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially the surface ones viz. TLR2 and TLR4 have gained immense importance due to their extreme ability of identifying distinct molecular patterns from invading pathogens. These pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) not only act as innate sensor but also shape and bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, they also play a pivotal role in regulating the balance between Th1 and Th2 type of response essential for the survivability of the host. In this work, major achievements rather findings made on the typical signalling and immunopathological attributes of TLR2 and TLR4 mediated host response against the major infectious diseases have been reviewed. Infectious diseases like tuberculosis, trypanosomiasis, malaria, and filariasis are still posing myriad threat to mankind. Furthermore, increasing resistance of the causative organisms against available therapeutics is also an emerging problem. Thus, stimulation of host immune response with TLR2 and TLR4 agonist can be the option of choice to treat such diseases in future. PMID:26775799

  14. Macrophages activation by heparanase is mediated by TLR-2 and TLR-4 and associates with plaque progression

    PubMed Central

    Blich, Miry; Golan, Amnon; Arvatz, Gil; Sebbag, Anat; Shafat, Itay; Sabo, Edmond; Cohen-Kaplan, Victoria; Petcherski, Sirouch; Avniel-Polak, Shani; Eitan, Amnon; Hammerman, Haim; Aronson, Doron; Axelman, Elena; Ilan, Neta; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2012-01-01

    Objective Factors and mechanisms that activate macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques are incompletely understood. We examined the capacity of heparanase to activate macrophages. Results/Methods Highly purified heparanase was added to mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) and macrophage-like J774 cells and the levels of TNFα, MMP-9, IL-1, and MCP-1 were evaluated by ELISA. Gene expression was determined by RT-PCR. Cells collected from Toll like receptor (TLR)-2 and -4 knockout mice (KO) were evaluated similarly. Heparanase levels in the plasma of patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), stable angina (SA), and healthy subjects were determined by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect the expression of heparanase in control specimens and specimens of patients with SA or acute MI. Addition or over expression of heparanase variants resulted in marked increase in TNFα, MMP-9, IL-1 and MCP-1 levels. MPM harvested from TLR-2 or TLR-4 knockout mice were not activated by heparanase. Plasma heparanase level was higher in patients with acute MI, compared to patients with SA and healthy subjects. Pathologic coronary specimens obtained from vulnerable plaques showed increased heparanase staining compared to specimens of stable plaque and controls. Conclusion Heparanase activates macrophages, resulting in marked induction of cytokine expression associated with plaque progression towards vulnerability. PMID:23162016

  15. Common Variants of IL6, LEPR, and PBEF1 Are Associated With Obesity in Indian Children

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Rubina; Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Chauhan, Ganesh; Ghosh, Saurabh; Marwaha, Raman K.; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity in urban Indian children is indicative of an impending crisis of metabolic disorders. Although perturbations in the secretion of adipokines and inflammatory molecules in childhood obesity are well documented, the contribution of common variants of genes encoding them is not well investigated. We assessed the association of 125 common variants from 21 genes, encoding adipocytokines and inflammatory markers in 1,325 urban Indian children (862 normal weight [NW group] and 463 overweight/obese [OW/OB group]) and replicated top loci in 1,843 Indian children (1,399 NW children and 444 OW/OB children). Variants of four genes (PBEF1 [rs3801266] [P = 4.5 × 10−4], IL6 [rs2069845] [P = 8.7 × 10−4], LEPR [rs1137100] [P = 1.8 × 10−3], and IL6R [rs7514452] [P = 2.1 × 10−3]) were top signals in the discovery sample. Associations of rs2069845, rs1137100, and rs3801266 were replicated (P = 7.9 × 10−4, 8.3 × 10−3, and 0.036, respectively) and corroborated in meta-analysis (P = 2.3 × 10−6, 3.9 × 10−5, and 4.3 × 10−4, respectively) that remained significant after multiple testing corrections. These variants also were associated with quantitative measures of adiposity (weight, BMI, and waist and hip circumferences). Allele dosage analysis of rs2069845, rs1137100, and rs3801266 revealed that children with five to six risk alleles had an approximately four times increased risk of obesity than children with less than two risk alleles (P = 1.2 × 10−7). In conclusion, our results demonstrate the association of the common variants of IL6, LEPR, and PBEF1 with obesity in Indian children. PMID:22228719

  16. Common variants near MC4R are associated with fat mass, weight and risk of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Ruth J F; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Li, Shengxu; Wheeler, Eleanor; Zhao, Jing Hua; Prokopenko, Inga; Inouye, Michael; Freathy, Rachel M; Attwood, Antony P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Berndt, Sonja I; Bergmann, Sven; Bennett, Amanda J; Bingham, Sheila A; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris; Cauchi, Stéphane; Connell, John M; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian; Dina, Christian; De, Subhajyoti; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Froguel, Philippe; Ghori, Jilur; Groves, Christopher J; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hadley, David; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hebebrand, Johannes; Heid, Iris M; Herrera, Blanca; Hinney, Anke; Hunt, Sarah E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Toby; Jolley, Jennifer D M; Karpe, Fredrik; Keniry, Andrew; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert N; Mangino, Massimo; Marchini, Jonathan; McArdle, Wendy L; McGinnis, Ralph; Meyre, David; Munroe, Patricia B; Morris, Andrew D; Ness, Andrew R; Neville, Matthew J; Nica, Alexandra C; Ong, Ken K; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Papadakis, Konstantinos; Potter, Simon; Pouta, Anneli; Qi, Lu; Randall, Joshua C; Rayner, Nigel W; Ring, Susan M; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Scherag, André; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Soranzo, Nicole; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Syddall, Holly E; Teichmann, Sarah A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tobias, Jonathan H; Uda, Manuela; Vogel, Carla I Ganz; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Wraight, Vicki L; Yuan, Xin; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Strachan, David P; Ouwehand, Willem H; Caulfield, Mark J; Samani, Nilesh J; Frayling, Timothy M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Mooser, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hayes, Richard B; Lamina, Claudia; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Hunter, David J; Hu, Frank B; Lyon, Helen N; Voight, Benjamin F; Ridderstrale, Martin; Groop, Leif; Scheet, Paul; Sanna, Serena; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Albai, Giuseppe; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Schlessinger, David; Jackson, Anne U; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Collins, Francis S; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L

    2009-01-01

    To identify common variants influencing body mass index (BMI), we analyzed genome-wide association data from 16,876 individuals of European descent. After previously reported variants in FTO, the strongest association signal (rs17782313, P = 2.9 × 10−6) mapped 188 kb downstream of MC4R (melanocortin-4 receptor), mutations of which are the leading cause of monogenic severe childhood-onset obesity. We confirmed the BMI association in 60,352 adults (per-allele effect = 0.05 Z-score units; P = 2.8 × 10−15) and 5,988 children aged 7–11 (0.13 Z-score units; P = 1.5 × 10−8). In case-control analyses (n = 10,583), the odds for severe childhood obesity reached 1.30 (P = 8.0 × 10−11). Furthermore, we observed overtransmission of the risk allele to obese offspring in 660 families (P (pedigree disequilibrium test average; PDT-avg) = 2.4 × 10−4). The SNP location and patterns of phenotypic associations are consistent with effects mediated through altered MC4R function. Our findings establish that common variants near MC4R influence fat mass, weight and obesity risk at the population level and reinforce the need for large-scale data integration to identify variants influencing continuous biomedical traits. PMID:18454148

  17. Common variants near MC4R are associated with fat mass, weight and risk of obesity.

    PubMed

    Loos, Ruth J F; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Li, Shengxu; Wheeler, Eleanor; Zhao, Jing Hua; Prokopenko, Inga; Inouye, Michael; Freathy, Rachel M; Attwood, Antony P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Berndt, Sonja I; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hayes, Richard B; Bergmann, Sven; Bennett, Amanda J; Bingham, Sheila A; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris; Cauchi, Stéphane; Connell, John M; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian; Dina, Christian; De, Subhajyoti; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Paul; Evans, David M; Sadaf Farooqi, I; Froguel, Philippe; Ghori, Jilur; Groves, Christopher J; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hadley, David; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hebebrand, Johannes; Heid, Iris M; Lamina, Claudia; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Herrera, Blanca; Hinney, Anke; Hunt, Sarah E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Toby; Jolley, Jennifer D M; Karpe, Fredrik; Keniry, Andrew; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert N; Mangino, Massimo; Marchini, Jonathan; McArdle, Wendy L; McGinnis, Ralph; Meyre, David; Munroe, Patricia B; Morris, Andrew D; Ness, Andrew R; Neville, Matthew J; Nica, Alexandra C; Ong, Ken K; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Papadakis, Konstantinos; Potter, Simon; Pouta, Anneli; Qi, Lu; Randall, Joshua C; Rayner, Nigel W; Ring, Susan M; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Scherag, André; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Soranzo, Nicole; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Syddall, Holly E; Teichmann, Sarah A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tobias, Jonathan H; Uda, Manuela; Vogel, Carla I Ganz; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Wraight; Yuan, Xin; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Strachan, David P; Ouwehand, Willem H; Caulfield, Mark J; Samani, Nilesh J; Frayling, Timothy M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Mooser, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hayes, Richard B; Lamina, Claudia; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Hunter, David J; Hu, Frank B; Lyon, Helen N; Voight, Benjamin F; Ridderstrale, Martin; Groop, Leif; Scheet, Paul; Sanna, Serena; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Albai, Giuseppe; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Schlessinger, David; Jackson, Anne U; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Collins, Francis S; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L

    2008-06-01

    To identify common variants influencing body mass index (BMI), we analyzed genome-wide association data from 16,876 individuals of European descent. After previously reported variants in FTO, the strongest association signal (rs17782313, P = 2.9 x 10(-6)) mapped 188 kb downstream of MC4R (melanocortin-4 receptor), mutations of which are the leading cause of monogenic severe childhood-onset obesity. We confirmed the BMI association in 60,352 adults (per-allele effect = 0.05 Z-score units; P = 2.8 x 10(-15)) and 5,988 children aged 7-11 (0.13 Z-score units; P = 1.5 x 10(-8)). In case-control analyses (n = 10,583), the odds for severe childhood obesity reached 1.30 (P = 8.0 x 10(-11)). Furthermore, we observed overtransmission of the risk allele to obese offspring in 660 families (P (pedigree disequilibrium test average; PDT-avg) = 2.4 x 10(-4)). The SNP location and patterns of phenotypic associations are consistent with effects mediated through altered MC4R function. Our findings establish that common variants near MC4R influence fat mass, weight and obesity risk at the population level and reinforce the need for large-scale data integration to identify variants influencing continuous biomedical traits. PMID:18454148

  18. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; Jeanbart, Laura; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with itsmore » neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.« less

  19. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; Jeanbart, Laura; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with its neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.

  20. Common Variants in PLD3 and Correlation to Amyloid-Related Phenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Tan, Lan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Yu, Wan-Jiang; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Meng-Shan; Hao, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Dao-Qiang; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipase D3 (PLD3) gene has shown association with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of PLD3 common variants in amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology remains unclear. We examined the association of thirteen common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ(1- 42) levels and florbetapir retention on florbetapir 18F amyloid positron emission tomography (AV45-PET) in a large population. We found that one SNP (rs11667768) was significantly associated with CSF Aβ(1- 42) levels in the normal cognition group. We did not observe an association of any SNP with florbetapir retention. Our study predicted the potential role of PLD3 variants in Aβ pathology. PMID:26402410

  1. The Cancer Chemotherapeutic Paclitaxel Increases Human and Rodent Sensory Neuron Responses to TRPV1 by Activation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Adamek, Pavel; Zhang, Haijun; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D.; Mrozkova, Petra; Li, Qin; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Cassidy, Ryan M.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Cata, Juan P.; Sapire, Kenneth; Zhang, Hongmei; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M.; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Ghetti, Andre; Yan, Jiusheng; Palecek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is dose limiting in paclitaxel cancer chemotherapy and can result in both acute pain during treatment and chronic persistent pain in cancer survivors. The hypothesis tested was that paclitaxel produces these adverse effects at least in part by sensitizing transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. The data show that paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity is prevented and reversed by spinal administration of a TRPV1 antagonist. The number of TRPV1+ neurons is increased in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in paclitaxel-treated rats and is colocalized with TLR4 in rat and human DRG neurons. Cotreatment of rats with lipopolysaccharide from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS), a TLR4 inhibitor, prevents the increase in numbers of TRPV1+ neurons by paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of paclitaxel or the archetypal TLR4 agonist LPS activated both rat DRG and spinal neurons directly and produced acute sensitization of TRPV1 in both groups of cells via a TLR4-mediated mechanism. Paclitaxel and LPS sensitize TRPV1 in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TLR4 and transiently expressing human TRPV1. These physiological effects also are prevented by LPS-RS. Finally, paclitaxel activates and sensitizes TRPV1 responses directly in dissociated human DRG neurons. In summary, TLR4 was activated by paclitaxel and led to sensitization of TRPV1. This mechanism could contribute to paclitaxel-induced acute pain and chronic painful neuropathy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this original work, it is shown for the first time that paclitaxel activates peripheral sensory and spinal neurons directly and sensitizes these cells to transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-mediated capsaicin responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in multiple species. A direct functional interaction between TLR4 and TRPV1 is shown in rat and human dorsal root ganglion neurons, TLR4/TRPV1

  2. Combinatorial effects of multiple enhancer variants in linkage disequilibrium dictate levels of gene expression to confer susceptibility to common traits.

    PubMed

    Corradin, Olivia; Saiakhova, Alina; Akhtar-Zaidi, Batool; Myeroff, Lois; Willis, Joseph; Cowper-Sal lari, Richard; Lupien, Mathieu; Markowitz, Sanford; Scacheri, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    DNA variants (SNPs) that predispose to common traits often localize within noncoding regulatory elements such as enhancers. Moreover, loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) often contain multiple SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD), any of which may be causal. Thus, determining the effect of these multiple variant SNPs on target transcript levels has been a major challenge. Here, we provide evidence that for six common autoimmune disorders (rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and ulcerative colitis), the GWAS association arises from multiple polymorphisms in LD that map to clusters of enhancer elements active in the same cell type. This finding suggests a "multiple enhancer variant" hypothesis for common traits, where several variants in LD impact multiple enhancers and cooperatively affect gene expression. Using a novel method to delineate enhancer-gene interactions, we show that multiple enhancer variants within a given locus typically target the same gene. Using available data from HapMap and B lymphoblasts as a model system, we provide evidence at numerous loci that multiple enhancer variants cooperatively contribute to altered expression of their gene targets. The effects on target transcript levels tend to be modest and can be either gain- or loss-of-function. Additionally, the genes associated with multiple enhancer variants encode proteins that are often functionally related and enriched in common pathways. Overall, the multiple enhancer variant hypothesis offers a new paradigm by which noncoding variants can confer susceptibility to common traits. PMID:24196873

  3. Expression of TLR4 protein is reduced in chronic renal failure: evidence from an experimental model of nephron reduction.

    PubMed

    Kacsó, Ina Maria; Borza, Gabriel Mircea; Ciuce, Cătălin C; Bîrsan, Andrei; Apostu, Raluca Cristina; Dindelegan, George Călin; Bondor, Cosmina Ioana; Potra, Alina Ramona; Netea, Mihai G; Cătoi, Cornel

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is involved in various acute and chronic renal lesions and contributes to inflammation and fibrosis in several organs; the latter are important determinants to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to assess TLR4 expression in progressive CKD and relate it to severity of kidney damage, using an experimental nephron reduction model. Male Wistar rats were subjected to subtotal nephrectomy using the ligation technique, after 12 weeks of observation, serum creatinine and proteinuria were determined, animals were sacrificed, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial scarring were quantified histologically, and TLR4 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Sham-operated rats served as controls. Case animals had significantly higher creatinine, proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial involvement. TLR4 expression was prominent in proximal tubes, less staining was observed on infiltrating inflammatory cells. Percentage of TLR4-positive tubes was reduced in the subtotal nephrectomy animals, when compared to controls (0.67±0.09 versus 0.79±0.07, p=0.003). Percentage of TLR4-positive tubes correlated inversely to markers of kidney damage: to proteinuria (r=-0.55, p=0.02), serum creatinine (r=-0.53, p=0.01); percentage of glomeruli with glomerulosclerosis (r=-0.54, p=0.01) and tubulointerstitial score (r=-0.36, p=0.01). As TLR4 staining appears in tubular casts only in nephrectomy animals, shedding from damaged tubular cells is a very likely explanation for the reduced TLR4 expression in the kidneys of subjects with experimental nephron reduction. PMID:25826492

  4. CD14 dependence of TLR4 endocytosis and TRIF signaling displays ligand specificity and is dissociable in endotoxin tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Rajaiah, Rajesh; Perkins, Darren J.; Ireland, Derek D. C.; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2015-01-01

    Dimerization of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD2) heterodimers is critical for both MyD88- and TIR-domain–containing adapter-inducing IFN-β (TRIF)-mediated signaling pathways. Recently, Zanoni et al. [(2011) Cell 147(4):868–880] reported that cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) is required for LPS-/Escherichia coli- induced TLR4 internalization into endosomes and activation of TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophages. We confirmed their findings with LPS but report here that CD14 is not required for receptor endocytosis and downstream signaling mediated by TLR4/MD2 agonistic antibody (UT12) and synthetic small-molecule TLR4 ligands (1Z105) in murine macrophages. CD14 deficiency completely ablated the LPS-induced TBK1/IRF3 signaling axis that mediates production of IFN-β in murine macrophages without affecting MyD88-mediated signaling, including NF-κB, MAPK activation, and TNF-α and IL-6 production. However, neither the MyD88- nor TRIF-signaling pathways and their associated cytokine profiles were altered in the absence of CD14 in UT12- or 1Z105-treated murine macrophages. Eritoran (E5564), a lipid A antagonist that binds the MD2 “pocket,” completely blocked LPS- and 1Z105-driven, but not UT12-induced, TLR4 dimerization and endocytosis. Furthermore, TLR4 endocytosis is induced in macrophages tolerized by exposure to either LPS or UT12 and is independent of CD14. These data indicate that TLR4 receptor endocytosis and the TRIF-signaling pathway are dissociable and that TLR4 internalization in macrophages can be induced by UT12, 1Z105, and during endotoxin tolerance in the absence of CD14. PMID:26106158

  5. An MD2 Hot-Spot Mimicking Peptide that Suppresses TLR4-Mediated Inflammatory Response In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liping; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Slivka, Peter F.; Fiorini, Zeno; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2012-01-01

    A truncated peptide was shown to retain the structure of the TLR4-binding hot-spot region of MD2, disrupting with the TLR4/MD2 interactions. The peptide not only demonstrated strong binding affinity in the fluorescence polarization assay, but also showed high specificity in macrophage cells. Furthermore, MD2-I was able to suppress neuropathic pain in animal models. PMID:21678541

  6. Toll like receptor (TLR)-4 as a regulator of peripheral endogenous opioid-mediated analgesia in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leukocytes containing opioid peptides locally control inflammatory pain. In the early phase of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced hind paw inflammation, formyl peptides (derived e.g. from Mycobacterium butyricum) trigger the release of opioid peptides from neutrophils contributing to tonic basal antinociception. In the later phase we hypothesized that toll-like-receptor-(TLR)-4 activation of monocytes/macrophages triggers opioid peptide release and thereby stimulates peripheral opioid-dependent antinociception. Results In Wistar rats with CFA hind paw inflammation in the later inflammatory phase (48–96 h) systemic leukocyte depletion by cyclophosphamide (CTX) or locally injected naloxone (NLX) further decreased mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. In vitro β-endorphin (β-END) content increased during human monocyte differentiation as well as in anti-inflammatory CD14+CD16- or non-classical M2 macrophages. Monocytes expressing TLR4 dose-dependently released β-END after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dependent on intracellular calcium. Despite TLR4 expression proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages only secreted opioid peptides in response to ionomycin, a calcium ionophore. Intraplantar injection of LPS as a TLR4 agonist into the inflamed paw elicited an immediate opioid- and dose-dependent antinociception, which was blocked by TAK-242, a small-molecule inhibitor of TLR4, or by peripheral applied NLX. In the later phase LPS lowered mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Furthermore, local peripheral TLR4 blockade worsened thermal and mechanical nociceptive pain thresholds in CFA inflammation. Conclusion Endogenous opioids from monocytes/macrophages mediate endogenous antinociception in the late phase of inflammation. Peripheral TLR4 stimulation acts as a transient counter-regulatory mechanism for inflammatory pain in vivo, and increases the release of opioid peptides from monocytes in vitro. TLR4

  7. KALRN Rare and Common Variants and Susceptibility to Ischemic Stroke in Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Dang, Meizheng; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Ruyou; Li, Xiaoying; Peng, Yanqing; Han, Xuesong; Sun, Litao; Tian, Jiawei

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of mortality worldwide, and it is a major cause of physical disability. Several genome-wide association studies have yielded numerous common variants which increase the risk of ischemic stroke, including the Kalirin-coding gene, KALRN. KALRN strongly associates with early-onset coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis and plays an important role in stroke in the European population. In this study, we analyzed four KALRN gene SNPs in 503 ischemic stroke patients and 493 control subjects, separating the patients into separate research groups based on comorbidity with hypertension or diabetes and stroke type (atherosis or lacunar and combination type). We found a rare variant of KALRN, rs11712619, that associated with lacunar stroke in the northern Chinese Han population with an average-risk allele frequency 0.009 (OR 2.95, 95 % CI 1.08-8.01, p = 0.028). However, after adjusting for relevant factors, including sex, age, body mass index, dyslipidemia, alcohol consumption, and smoking, this association was not evident. Additionally, the KALRN variant rs6438833 was associated with ischemic stroke, ischemic stroke comorbid with diabetes, and lacunar stroke after adjusting for the relevant factors (p = 0.046, p = 0.019 and p = 0.046, respectively), which remained significant after 10,000 permutation procedure test (p' = 0.047, p' = 0.018 and p' = 0.048, respectively). The association of these rare and common variants of KALRN with ischemic stroke in northern Chinese Han population offers insight for potential therapeutic research. PMID:25917671

  8. The role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in cardiac ischaemic-reperfusion injury, cardioprotection and preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sam Man; Hutchinson, Mark; Saint, David A

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac ischaemic-reperfusion injury (IRI) remains the primary cause of mortality throughout the developed world. Molecular mechanisms underlying IRI are complex and are often interlinked with each other driving a synergistic response. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an immunosurveillance receptor, is known to enhance tissue injury during IRI by enhancing the inflammatory response. The release of endogenous components during IRI bind onto TLR4 leading to the activation of multiple signalling kinases. Once this event occurs these proteins are defined as danger associated molecular patterns molecules (DAMPs) or alarmins. Examples include heat shock proteins, high mobility group box one (HMGB1) and extracellular matrix proteins, all of which are involved in IRI. However, literature in the last two decades suggests that transient stimulation of TLR4 may suppress IRI and thus improve cardiac recovery. Furthermore, it remains to be seen what role TLR4 plays during ischaemic-preconditioning where acute bouts of ischaemia, preceding a harmful bout of ischaemic-reperfusion, is cardioprotective. The other question which also needs to be considered is that if transient TLR4 signalling drives a preconditioning response then what are the ligands which drive this? Hence the second part of this review explores the possible TLR4 ligands which may promote cardioprotection against IRI. PMID:27249055

  9. Association between TLR4 and TLR9 Gene Polymorphisms with Development of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Zahedan, Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jahantigh, Danial; Salimi, Saeedeh; Alavi-Naini, Roya; Emamdadi, Abolfazl; Owaysee Osquee, Hamid; Farajian Mashhadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that a variety of genetic factors contribute to development of the tuberculosis (TB). TLR4 and TLR9 have been proposed as susceptibility genes for TB. This study was performed in 124 newly diagnosed TB cases and 149 healthy controls in a TB-endemic region of Iran. The TLR4 genes Asp299Gly, Thr399Ile, and TLR9 gene T-1486C polymorphisms were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then detected by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The frequencies of the mutant alleles of TLR4 Arg299Gly, Thr399Ile, and TLR9 T-1486C polymorphisms were 0.8 versus 0.1, 5.6 versus 3, and 28.6 versus 25.2 in patients and controls, respectively, that were not significant. The synergic effect of TI,II/CC genotypes for TLR4 Thr399Ile and TLR9 T-1486C polymorphisms showed increased risk of PTB susceptibility. In conclusion, no significant relation was found between TLR4 and TLR9 polymorphisms alone and PTB. However, synergic effects of TLR4 Thr399Ile and TLR9-1486T/C polymorphisms might increase risk of PTB. PMID:23766695

  10. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is required for protective immunity to larval Strongyloides stercoralis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Laura A; Hess, Jessica A; Leon, Ofra; Nolan, Thomas J; Schad, Gerhard A; Abraham, David

    2007-01-01

    TLR4 is important for immunity to various unicellular organisms and has been implicated in the immune responses to helminth parasites. The immune response against helminths is generally Th2-mediated and studies have shown that TLR4 is required for the development of a Th2 response against allergens and helminth antigens in mice. C3H/HeJ mice, which have a point mutation in the Tlr4 gene, were used in this study to determine the role of TLR4 in protective immunity to the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. It was demonstrated that TLR4 was not required for killing larval S. stercoralis during the innate immune response, but was required for killing the parasites during the adaptive immune response. No differences were seen in the IL-5 and IFN-gamma responses, antibody responses or cell recruitment between wild type and C3H/HeJ mice after immunization. Protective immunity was restored in immunized C3H/HeJ mice by the addition of wild type peritoneal exudate cells in the environment of the larvae. It was therefore concluded that the inability of TLR4-mutant mice to kill larval S. stercoralis during the adaptive immune response is due to a defect in the effector cells recruited to the microenvironment of the larvae. PMID:17196865

  11. Reversal of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes With an Agonistic TLR4/MD-2 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Kyle J; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Kachapati, Kritika; Ohta, Shoichiro; Wu, Yuehong; Katz, Jonathan D; Ascherman, Dana P; Ridgway, William M

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is currently an incurable disease, characterized by a silent prodromal phase followed by an acute clinical phase, reflecting progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Autoreactive T cells play a major role in β-cell destruction, but innate immune cell cytokines and costimulatory molecules critically affect T-cell functional status. We show that an agonistic monoclonal antibody to TLR4/MD-2 (TLR4-Ab) reverses new-onset diabetes in a high percentage of NOD mice. TLR4-Ab induces antigen-presenting cell (APC) tolerance in vitro and in vivo, resulting in an altered cytokine profile, decreased costimulatory molecule expression, and decreased T-cell proliferation in APC:T-cell assays. TLR4-Ab treatment increases T-regulatory cell (Treg) numbers in both the periphery and the pancreatic islet, predominantly expanding the Helios(+)Nrp-1(+)Foxp3(+) Treg subset. TLR4-Ab treatment in the absence of B cells in NOD.scid mice prevents subsequent T cell-mediated disease, further suggesting a major role for APC tolerization in disease protection. Specific stimulation of the innate immune system through TLR4/MD-2, therefore, can restore tolerance in the aberrant adaptive immune system and reverse new-onset T1D, suggesting a novel immunological approach to treatment of T1D in humans. PMID:26130764

  12. Genome-wide meta-analysis of common variant differences between men and women

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Jerončić, Ana; Colonna, Vincenza; Southam, Lorraine; Nyholt, Dale R.; William Rayner, Nigel; Perry, John R.B.; Toniolo, Daniela; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Barroso, Inês; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Biffar, Reiner; Boomsma, Dorret; Campbell, Harry; Corre, Tanguy; Erdmann, Jeanette; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Franceschini, Nora; Frayling, Timothy M.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heid, Iris M.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hua Zhao, Jing; Jackson, Anne U.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Klopp, Norman; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lagou, Vasiliki; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lemire, Mathieu; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Loley, Christina; Luan, Jian'an; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Navis, Gerjan; Newnham, John; Nieminen, Markku S.; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Peters, Annette; Pirastu, Nicola; Polašek, Ozren; Rehnström, Karola; Ripatti, Samuli; Ritchie, Graham R.S.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Samani, Nilesh J.; Shin, So-Youn; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Johannes H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Stolk, Lisette; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Tönjes, Anke; Traglia, Michela; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valsesia, Armand; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Viikari, Jorma; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Waeber, Gerard; Warrington, Nicole M.; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wright, Alan F.; Zanke, Brent W.; Zgaga, Lina; Boehnke, Michael; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; de Geus, Eco; Demerath, Ellen W.; den Heijer, Martin; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hayward, Caroline; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hudson, Thomas J.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kogevinas, Manolis; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Spector, Tim D.; Stumvoll, Michael; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulivi, Sheila; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Xue, Yali; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2012-01-01

    The male-to-female sex ratio at birth is constant across world populations with an average of 1.06 (106 male to 100 female live births) for populations of European descent. The sex ratio is considered to be affected by numerous biological and environmental factors and to have a heritable component. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of common allele modest effects at autosomal and chromosome X variants that could explain the observed sex ratio at birth. We conducted a large-scale genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis across 51 studies, comprising overall 114 863 individuals (61 094 women and 53 769 men) of European ancestry and 2 623 828 common (minor allele frequency >0.05) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Allele frequencies were compared between men and women for directly-typed and imputed variants within each study. Forward-time simulations for unlinked, neutral, autosomal, common loci were performed under the demographic model for European populations with a fixed sex ratio and a random mating scheme to assess the probability of detecting significant allele frequency differences. We do not detect any genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10−8) common SNP differences between men and women in this well-powered meta-analysis. The simulated data provided results entirely consistent with these findings. This large-scale investigation across ∼115 000 individuals shows no detectable contribution from common genetic variants to the observed skew in the sex ratio. The absence of sex-specific differences is useful in guiding genetic association study design, for example when using mixed controls for sex-biased traits. PMID:22843499

  13. Partitioning heritability of regulatory and cell-type-specific variants across 11 common diseases.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Kähler, Anna K; Hultman, Christina M; Purcell, Shaun M; McCarroll, Steven A; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F; Neale, Benjamin M; Wray, Naomi R; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L

    2014-11-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg(2)) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg(2) from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10(-17)) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg(2) from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10(-4)). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg(2) despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

  14. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S. Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H.M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Brglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St. Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Ripke, Stephan; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L.; Kähler, Anna K.; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Scolnick, Edward; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina M.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Kähler, Anna K.; Hultman, Christina M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg2) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg2 from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10−17) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg2 from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10−4). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg2 despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

  15. Novel Associations between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants and Risk-Predicting Mammographic Density Measures

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer; Thompson, Deborah J.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Scott, Christopher; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hazra, Aditi; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Jensen, Matt; Cunningham, Julie; Olson, Janet E.; Purrington, Kristen; Couch, Fergus J.; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth M. L.; Luben, Robert N.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Smith, Paula; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Douglas, Julie A.; Shah, Kaanan P.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Ursin, Giske; Grenaker Alnaes, Grethe I.; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gram, Inger Torhild; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Simard, Jacques; Paroah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Fasching, Peter A.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Hopper, John; Vachon, Celine M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density measures adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) are heritable predictors of breast cancer risk but few mammographic density-associated genetic variants have been identified. Using data for 10,727 women from two international consortia, we estimated associations between 77 common breast cancer susceptibility variants and absolute dense area, percent dense area and absolute non-dense area adjusted for study, age and BMI using mixed linear modeling. We found strong support for established associations between rs10995190 (in the region of ZNF365), rs2046210 (ESR1) and rs3817198 (LSP1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas (all p <10−5). Of 41 recently discovered breast cancer susceptibility variants, associations were found between rs1432679 (EBF1), rs17817449 (MIR1972-2: FTO), rs12710696 (2p24.1), and rs3757318 (ESR1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas, respectively. There were associations between rs6001930 (MKL1) and both adjusted absolute dense and non-dense areas, and between rs17356907 (NTN4) and adjusted absolute non-dense area. Trends in all but two associations were consistent with those for breast cancer risk. Results suggested that 18% of breast cancer susceptibility variants were associated with at least one mammographic density measure. Genetic variants at multiple loci were associated with both breast cancer risk and the mammographic density measures. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms at these loci could help identify etiological pathways implicated in how mammographic density predicts breast cancer risk. PMID:25862352

  16. Folate Receptor Targeted Delivery of siRNA and Paclitaxel to Ovarian Cancer Cells via Folate Conjugated Triblock Copolymer to Overcome TLR4 Driven Chemotherapy Resistance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Steven K; Lizzio, Vincent; Merkel, Olivia M

    2016-01-11

    This paper focuses on the ability of a folate-decorated triblock copolymer to deliver a targeted dose of siRNA in order to overcome chemotherapy resistance which can commonly cause complications in ovarian cancer patients. The micelleplexes that are formed upon electrostatic interaction with siRNA are used to deliver siRNA in a targeted manner to SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that overexpress folate receptor-α (FRα). The triblock copolymer consists of polyethylenimine-graft-polycaprolactone-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-g-PCL-b-PEG-Fol). In this work, polymers of different molecular weights of PEG, as well as different grafting degrees of the (g-PCL-b-PEG-Fol) chains to PEI, were analyzed to optimize targeted siRNA delivery. The polymers, their micelleplexes, and the in vitro performance of the latter were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, flow cytrometry, western blot, confocal microscopy, and in luciferase assays. The different PEI-g-PCL-b-PEG-Fol conjugates showed suitable sizes below 260 nm, especially at N/P 5, which also allowed for full siRNA condensation. Furthermore, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis demonstrated that our best polymer was able to effectively deliver siRNA and that siRNA delivery resulted in efficient protein knockdown of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Consequently, TLR4 knock down within SKOV-3 cells resensitized them toward paclitaxel (PTX) treatment, and apoptotic events increased. This study demonstrates that PEI-g-PCL-b-PEG-Fol conjugates are a reliable delivery system for siRNA and are able to mediate therapeutic protein knockdown within ovarian cancer cells. Additionally, this study provides further evidence to link TLR4 levels to chemotherapy resistance. PMID:26636884

  17. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    May, Patrick; Thiele, Holger; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Schwarz, Günter; Riesch, Erik; Ikram, M. Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Steinböck, Hannelore; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Neophytou, Birgit; Zara, Federico; Hahn, Andreas; Gormley, Padhraig; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne G.; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Krause, Roland; Zimprich, Fritz; Lemke, Johannes R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Lerche, Holger; Neubauer, Bernd A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. Methods We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. Results and Interpretation We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10−4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions. PMID:26990884

  18. Sex-dependent association of common variants of microcephaly genes with brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rimol, Lars M; Agartz, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Brown, Andrew A; Roddey, J Cooper; Kähler, Anna K; Mattingsdal, Morten; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Joyner, Alexander H; Schork, Nicholas J; Halgren, Eric; Sundet, Kjetil; Melle, Ingrid; Dale, Anders M; Andreassen, Ole A

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the genes associated with primary microcephaly (MCPH) reduce human brain size by about two-thirds, without producing gross abnormalities in brain organization or physiology and leaving other organs largely unaffected [Woods CG, et al. (2005) Am J Hum Genet 76:717-728]. There is also evidence suggesting that MCPH genes have evolved rapidly in primates and humans and have been subjected to selection in recent human evolution [Vallender EJ, et al. (2008) Trends Neurosci 31:637-644]. Here, we show that common variants of MCPH genes account for some of the common variation in brain structure in humans, independently of disease status. We investigated the correlations of SNPs from four MCPH genes with brain morphometry phenotypes obtained with MRI. We found significant, sex-specific associations between common, nonexonic, SNPs of the genes CDK5RAP2, MCPH1, and ASPM, with brain volume or cortical surface area in an ethnically homogenous Norwegian discovery sample (n = 287), including patients with mental illness. The most strongly associated SNP findings were replicated in an independent North American sample (n = 656), which included patients with dementia. These results are consistent with the view that common variation in brain structure is associated with genetic variants located in nonexonic, presumably regulatory, regions. PMID:20080800

  19. Initiation of the TLR4 signal transduction network : deeper understanding for better therapeutics.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael Y.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Sale, Kenneth L.; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2010-09-01

    The innate immune system represents our first line of defense against microbial pathogens, and in many cases is activated by recognition of pathogen cellular components (dsRNA, flagella, LPS, etc.) by cell surface membrane proteins known as toll-like receptors (TLRs). As the initial trigger for innate immune response activation, TLRs also represent a means by which we can effectively control or modulate inflammatory responses. This proposal focused on TLR4, which is the cell-surface receptor primarily responsible for initiating the innate immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of the outer membrane envelope of gram-negative bacteria. The goal was to better understand TLR4 activation and associated membrane proximal events, in order to enhance the design of small molecule therapeutics to modulate immune activation. Our approach was to reconstitute the receptor in biomimetic systems in-vitro to allow study of the structure and dynamics with biophysical methods. Structural studies were initiated in the first year but were halted after the crystal structure of the dimerized receptor was published early in the second year of the program. Methods were developed to determine the association constant for oligomerization of the soluble receptor. LPS-induced oligomerization was observed to be a strong function of buffer conditions. In 20 mM Tris pH 8.0 with 200 mM NaCl, the onset of receptor oligomerization occurred at 0.2 uM TLR4/MD2 with E coli LPS Ra mutant in excess. However, in the presence of 0.5 uM CD14 and 0.5 uM LBP, the onset of receptor oligomerization was observed to be less than 10 nM TLR4/MD2. Several methods were pursued to study LPS-induced oligomerization of the membrane-bound receptor, including CryoEM, FRET, colocalization and codiffusion followed by TIRF, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. However, there approaches met with only limited success.

  20. Common genetic risk variants are associated with positive symptoms and decision-making ability in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew K; Robinson, G; Reutens, D; Mowry, B

    2015-09-30

    Schizophrenia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder associated with broad deficits across cognitive domains. As large genomewide association studies uncover the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, the relationship between common genetic variants and clinical and cognitive characteristics will form part of an integrative approach to understanding genetic effects on the clinical phenotype. In the current study, association between common genetic risk variants and clinical and cognitive variables was investigated. Common risk variants were associated with positive symptoms and decision-making ability from the Cambridge Gambling Task with trends in other domains. PMID:26070766

  1. Mining the LIPG allelic spectrum reveals the contribution of rare and common regulatory variants to HDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Edmondson, Andrew C; Raghavan, Avanthi; Neeli, Hemanth; Jin, Weijun; Badellino, Karen O; Demissie, Serkalem; Manning, Alisa K; DerOhannessian, Stephanie L; Wolfe, Megan L; Cupples, L Adrienne; Li, Mingyao; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J

    2011-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified loci associated with quantitative traits, such as blood lipids. Deep resequencing studies are being utilized to catalogue the allelic spectrum at GWAS loci. The goal of these studies is to identify causative variants and missing heritability, including heritability due to low frequency and rare alleles with large phenotypic impact. Whereas rare variant efforts have primarily focused on nonsynonymous coding variants, we hypothesized that noncoding variants in these loci are also functionally important. Using the HDL-C gene LIPG as an example, we explored the effect of regulatory variants identified through resequencing of subjects at HDL-C extremes on gene expression, protein levels, and phenotype. Resequencing a portion of the LIPG promoter and 5' UTR in human subjects with extreme HDL-C, we identified several rare variants in individuals from both extremes. Luciferase reporter assays were used to measure the effect of these rare variants on LIPG expression. Variants conferring opposing effects on gene expression were enriched in opposite extremes of the phenotypic distribution. Minor alleles of a common regulatory haplotype and noncoding GWAS SNPs were associated with reduced plasma levels of the LIPG gene product endothelial lipase (EL), consistent with its role in HDL-C catabolism. Additionally, we found that a common nonfunctional coding variant associated with HDL-C (rs2000813) is in linkage disequilibrium with a 5' UTR variant (rs34474737) that decreases LIPG promoter activity. We attribute the gene regulatory role of rs34474737 to the observed association of the coding variant with plasma EL levels and HDL-C. Taken together, the findings show that both rare and common noncoding regulatory variants are important contributors to the allelic spectrum in complex trait loci. PMID:22174694

  2. Mining the LIPG Allelic Spectrum Reveals the Contribution of Rare and Common Regulatory Variants to HDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Avanthi; Neeli, Hemanth; Jin, Weijun; Badellino, Karen O.; Demissie, Serkalem; Manning, Alisa K.; DerOhannessian, Stephanie L.; Wolfe, Megan L.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Li, Mingyao; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified loci associated with quantitative traits, such as blood lipids. Deep resequencing studies are being utilized to catalogue the allelic spectrum at GWAS loci. The goal of these studies is to identify causative variants and missing heritability, including heritability due to low frequency and rare alleles with large phenotypic impact. Whereas rare variant efforts have primarily focused on nonsynonymous coding variants, we hypothesized that noncoding variants in these loci are also functionally important. Using the HDL-C gene LIPG as an example, we explored the effect of regulatory variants identified through resequencing of subjects at HDL-C extremes on gene expression, protein levels, and phenotype. Resequencing a portion of the LIPG promoter and 5′ UTR in human subjects with extreme HDL-C, we identified several rare variants in individuals from both extremes. Luciferase reporter assays were used to measure the effect of these rare variants on LIPG expression. Variants conferring opposing effects on gene expression were enriched in opposite extremes of the phenotypic distribution. Minor alleles of a common regulatory haplotype and noncoding GWAS SNPs were associated with reduced plasma levels of the LIPG gene product endothelial lipase (EL), consistent with its role in HDL-C catabolism. Additionally, we found that a common nonfunctional coding variant associated with HDL-C (rs2000813) is in linkage disequilibrium with a 5′ UTR variant (rs34474737) that decreases LIPG promoter activity. We attribute the gene regulatory role of rs34474737 to the observed association of the coding variant with plasma EL levels and HDL-C. Taken together, the findings show that both rare and common noncoding regulatory variants are important contributors to the allelic spectrum in complex trait loci. PMID:22174694

  3. Investigating the Contribution of Common Genetic Variants to the Risk and Pathogenesis of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hamshere, Marian; Holmans, Peter; Langley, Kate; Zaharieva, Irina; Hawi, Ziarah; Kent, Lindsey; Gill, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael J.; O'Donovan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A major motivation for seeking disease-associated genetic variation is to identify novel risk processes. Although rare copy number variants (CNVs) appear to contribute to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), common risk variants (single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) have not yet been detected using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This raises the concern as to whether future larger-scale, adequately powered GWAS will be worthwhile. The authors undertook a GWAS of ADHD and examined whether associated SNPs, including those below conventional levels of significance, influenced the same biological pathways affected by CNVs. Method: The authors analyzed genome-wide SNP frequencies in 727 children with ADHD and 5,081 comparison subjects. The gene sets that were enriched in a pathway analysis of the GWAS data (the top 5% of SNPs) were tested for an excess of genes spanned by large, rare CNVs in the children with ADHD. Results: No SNP achieved genome-wide significance levels. As previously reported in a subsample of the present study, large, rare CNVs were significantly more common in case subjects than comparison subjects. Thirteen biological pathways enriched for SNP association significantly overlapped with those enriched for rare CNVs. These included cholesterol-related and CNS development pathways. At the level of individual genes, CHRNA7, which encodes a nicotinic receptor subunit previously implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, was affected by six large duplications in case subjects (none in comparison subjects), and SNPs in the gene had a gene-wide p value of 0.0002 for association in the GWAS. Conclusions: Both common and rare genetic variants appear to be relevant to ADHD and index-shared biological pathways. PMID:22420046

  4. Endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal microcirculatory perfusion in necrotizing enterocolitis via eNOS–NO–nitrite signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yazji, Ibrahim; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Lee, Elizabeth K.; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte E.; Afrazi, Amin; Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Lin, Joyce; Branca, Maria F.; Prindle, Thomas; Richardson, Ward M.; Ozolek, John; Billiar, Timothy R.; Binion, David G.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants characterized by severe intestinal necrosis and for which breast milk represents the most effective protective strategy. Previous studies have revealed a critical role for the lipopolysaccharide receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in NEC development through its induction of mucosal injury, yet the reasons for which intestinal ischemia in NEC occurs in the first place remain unknown. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling within the endothelium plays an essential role in NEC development by regulating perfusion to the small intestine via the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Using a unique mouse system in which we selectively deleted TLR4 from the endothelium, we now show that endothelial TLR4 activation is required for NEC development and that endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal perfusion without effects on other organs and reduces eNOS expression via activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88. NEC severity was significantly increased in eNOS−/− mice and decreased upon administration of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, which augments eNOS function. Strikingly, compared with formula, human and mouse breast milk were enriched in sodium nitrate—a precursor for enteral generation of nitrite and nitric oxide—and repletion of formula with sodium nitrate/nitrite restored intestinal perfusion, reversed the deleterious effects of endothelial TLR4 signaling, and reduced NEC severity. These data identify that endothelial TLR4 critically regulates intestinal perfusion leading to NEC and reveal that the protective properties of breast milk involve enhanced intestinal microcirculatory integrity via augmentation of nitrate–nitrite–NO signaling. PMID:23650378

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of toll-like receptor 4 (tlr4) in the blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Lai, Ruifang; Liu, Han; Jakovlić, Ivan; Zhan, Fanbin; Wei, Jin; Yang, Pinhong; Wang, Weimin

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in teleost innate immune system. In this study, Megalobrama amblycephala (ma) tlr4 gene was cloned, its putative polypeptide product characterized, and expression analysed. Matlr4 cDNA is 2862 bp long, with an open reading frame of 2364 bp encoding 787 amino acids. MaTlr4 is a typical TLR protein, including the extracellular part with nine leucine-rich repeat motifs, a transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain. MaTlr4 has the highest level of identity (94%) and similarity (97%) with the grass carp Tlr4.2 homolog. This was also corroborated by the phylogenetic analysis, which placed MaTlr4 in a cluster with other cyprinid homologs. Matlr4 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues and during all sampled developmental stages. The observed peak in matlr4 mRNA expression during gastrula and somite stages is in good agreement with its proposed role in the development of the neural system. Temporal expression patterns of matlr4 and maMyD88 mRNAs and proteins were analyzed in liver, spleen, head kidney, trunk kidney and intestine after Aeromonas hydrophila infection. And mRNA expression varied between different time-points. Both MaTlr4 and MaMyD88 protein expressions at 12 hpi were significantly enhanced in head kidney and intestine. These results indicate that matlr4 is involved in the immune response in M. amblycephala, and that it is indeed a functional homologue of tlr4s described in other animal species. PMID:26802439

  6. HMGB1-Driven Inflammation and Intimal Hyperplasia After Arterial Injury Involves Cell-Specific Actions Mediated by TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jingjing; Yuan, Hong; Wang, Qingde; Yang, Huan; Al-Abed, Yousef; Hua, Zhong; Wang, Jiemei; Chen, Dandan; Wu, Jinze; Lu, Ben; Pribis, John P.; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Kan; Hackam, David J.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Chen, Alex F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endoluminal vascular interventions such as angioplasty initiate a sterile inflammatory response resulting from local tissue damage. This response drives the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) that, in turn, can lead to arterial occlusion. We hypothesized that the ubiquitous nuclear protein and damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is one of the endogenous mediators that activates processes leading to IH after endoluminal injury to the arterial wall. The aim of this study is to investigate whether approaches that reduce the levels of HMGB1 or inhibit its activity suppresses IH after arterial injury. Approach and Results Here, we show that HMGB1 regulates IH in a mouse carotid wire injury model. Induced genetic deletion or neutralization of HMGB1 prevents IH, monocyte recruitment, and smooth muscle cell growth factor production after endoluminal carotid artery injury. A specific inhibitor of HMGB1 myeloid differentiation factor 2–toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) interaction, P5779, also significantly inhibits IH. HMGB1 deletion is mimicked in this model by global deletion of TLR4 and partially replicated by myeloid-specific deletion of TLR4 but not TLR2 or receptor for advanced glycation endproducts deletion. The specific HMGB1 isoform known to activate TLR4 signaling (disulfide HMGB1) stimulates smooth muscle cell to migrate and produce monocyte chemotactic protein 1/CCL2) via TLR4. Macrophages produce smooth muscle cell mitogens in response to disulfide HMGB1 also in a TLR4/myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88)/Trif-dependent manner. Conclusions These findings place HMGB1 and its receptor, TLR4 as critical regulators of the events that drive the inflammation leading to IH after endoluminal arterial injury and identify this pathway as a possible therapeutic target to limit IH to attenuate damage-associated molecular pattern molecule–mediated vascular inflammatory responses. PMID:26515416

  7. Common UCP2 variants contribute to serum urate concentrations and the risk of hyperuricemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Luyu; Dong, Zheng; zhou, Jingru; Ma, Yanyun; Pu, Weilin; Zhao, Dongbao; He, Hongjun; Ji, Hengdong; Yang, Yajun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Xia; Pang, Yafei; Zou, Hejian; Jin, Li; Yang, Chengde; Wang, Jiucun

    2016-01-01

    Elevated serum urate, which is regulated at multiple levels including genetic variants, is a risk factor for gout and other metabolic diseases. This study aimed to investigate the association between UCP2 variants and serum urate as well as hyperuricemia in a Chinese population. In total, 4332 individuals were genotyped for two common UCP2 variants, −866G/A and Ala55Val. These loci were not associated either serum urate level or with a risk of hyperuricemia in the total group of subjects. However, in females, −866G/A and Ala55Val were associated with a lower serum urate (P = 0.006 and 0.014, seperately) and played a protective role against hyperuricemia (OR = 0.80, P = 0.018; OR = 0.79, P = 0.016). These associations were not observed in the males. After further stratification, the two loci were associated with serum urate in overweight, but not underweight females. The haplotype A-T (−866G/A-Ala55Val) was a protective factor for hyperuricemia in the female subgroup (OR = 0.80, P = 0.017). This present study identified a novel gene, UCP2, that influences the serum urate concentration and the risk of hyperuricemia, and the degree of association varies with gender and BMI levels. PMID:27273589

  8. Common UCP2 variants contribute to serum urate concentrations and the risk of hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Luyu; Dong, Zheng; Zhou, Jingru; Ma, Yanyun; Pu, Weilin; Zhao, Dongbao; He, Hongjun; Ji, Hengdong; Yang, Yajun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Xia; Pang, Yafei; Zou, Hejian; Jin, Li; Yang, Chengde; Wang, Jiucun

    2016-01-01

    Elevated serum urate, which is regulated at multiple levels including genetic variants, is a risk factor for gout and other metabolic diseases. This study aimed to investigate the association between UCP2 variants and serum urate as well as hyperuricemia in a Chinese population. In total, 4332 individuals were genotyped for two common UCP2 variants, -866G/A and Ala55Val. These loci were not associated either serum urate level or with a risk of hyperuricemia in the total group of subjects. However, in females, -866G/A and Ala55Val were associated with a lower serum urate (P = 0.006 and 0.014, seperately) and played a protective role against hyperuricemia (OR = 0.80, P = 0.018; OR = 0.79, P = 0.016). These associations were not observed in the males. After further stratification, the two loci were associated with serum urate in overweight, but not underweight females. The haplotype A-T (-866G/A-Ala55Val) was a protective factor for hyperuricemia in the female subgroup (OR = 0.80, P = 0.017). This present study identified a novel gene, UCP2, that influences the serum urate concentration and the risk of hyperuricemia, and the degree of association varies with gender and BMI levels. PMID:27273589

  9. A new Streptococcus group A M-29 variant isolated during a suspected common-source epidemic.

    PubMed

    Gillis, D; Cohen, D; Beck, A; Rouach, T; Katzenelson, E; Green, M

    1992-06-01

    In the summer of 1988, a large epidemic of acute pharyngitis occurred in an Israeli military base. The clinical features were those of acute pharyngitis. The epidemic curve was characteristic of a common-source outbreak, possibly food-borne. Throat swabs from a sample of cases were positive for group A streptococci. Nine isolates from the epidemic were further evaluated at the local reference laboratory and serotyping showed that all were of the same strain with a distinct M protein that is a hitherto undescribed variant of M-29. We discuss the significance of unusual strains of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus appearing in food-borne outbreaks. PMID:1620392

  10. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  11. Association of primary open-angle glaucoma with mitochondrial variants and haplogroups common in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gudiseva, Harini V.; Trachtman, Benjamin; Bowman, Anita S.; Sagaser, Anna; Sankar, Prithvi; Miller-Ellis, Eydie; Lehman, Amanda; Addis, Victoria; O'Brien, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the population frequencies of all common mitochondrial variants and ancestral haplogroups among 1,999 subjects recruited for the Primary Open-Angle African American Glaucoma Genetics (POAAGG) Study, including 1,217 primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) cases and 782 controls, and to identify ancestral subpopulations and mitochondrial mutations as potential risk factors for POAG susceptibility. Methods Subject classification by characteristic glaucomatous optic nerve findings and corresponding visual field defects, as defined by enrolling glaucoma specialists, stereo disc photography, phlebotomy, extraction of total DNA from peripheral blood or saliva, DNA quantification and normalization, PCR amplification of whole mitochondrial genomes, Ion Torrent deep semiconductor DNA sequencing on DNA pools (“Pool-seq”), Sanger sequencing of 3,479 individual mitochondrial DNAs, and bioinformatic analysis. Results The distribution of common African haplogroups within the POAAGG study population was broadly similar to prior surveys of African Americans. However, the POAG case population was found to be enriched in L1c2 haplogroups, which are defined in part by missense mutations m.6150G>A (Val83Ile, odds ratio [OR] 1.8, p=0.01), m.6253C>T (Met117Thr, rs200165736, OR 1.6, p=0.04), and m.6480G>A (Val193Ile, rs199476128, OR 4.6, p=0.04) in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (MT-CO1) gene and by a variant, m.2220A>G (OR 2.0, p=0.01), in MT-RNR2, which encodes the mitochondrial ribosomal 16s RNA gene. L2 haplogroups were predicted to be overrepresented in the POAG case population by Pool-seq, and the difference was confirmed to be significant with Sanger sequencing, that targeted the L2-associated variants m.2416T>C (rs28358580, OR 1.2, p=0.02) and m.2332C>T (OR 1.2, p=.02) in MT-RNR2. Another variant within MT-RNR2, m.3010G>A (rs3928306), previously implicated in sensitivity to the optic neuropathy-associated antibiotic linezolid, and arising on D4 and J1

  12. Transcriptome sequencing wide functional analysis of human mesenchymal stem cells in response to TLR4 ligand

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Hwa; Das, Amitabh; Chai, Jin Choul; Binas, Bert; Choi, Mi Ran; Park, Kyoung Sun; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Due to their multipotentiality and immunomodulation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are widely studied for the treatment of degenerative and inflammatory diseases. Transplantation of hMSCs to damaged tissue is a promising approach for tissue regeneration. However, the physiological mechanisms and regulatory processes of MSC trafficking to injured tissue are largely unexplored. Here, we evaluated the gene expression profile and migratory potential of hMSCs upon stimulation with the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using RNA sequencing, we identified unique induction patterns of interferon stimulated genes, cytokines and chemokines involved in chemotaxis and homing. The −950 to +50 bp regions of many of these LPS-responsive genes were enriched with putative binding motifs for the transcription factors (TFs) interferon regulatory factor (IRF1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB1, REL), which were also induced by LPS along with other TFs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that IRF1 bound within their target genes promoter region. In addition, IRF1 attenuation significantly down-regulated interferon stimulated genes as well as key cytokines. Furthermore, using pharmacological inhibitors, we showed that the NF-κB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways regulate the migratory and cytokines/chemokines response to LPS. These unprecedented data suggest that IRF1 and NF-κB orchestrate the TLR4-primed immunomodulatory response of hMSCs and that this response also involves the PI3K pathway. PMID:27444640

  13. Lipopolysaccharides with Acylation Defects Potentiate TLR4 Signaling and Shape T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anna; Ohne, Yoichiro; Degos, Clara; Gorvel, Laurent; Moriyón, Ignacio; Oh, Sangkon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are components of Gram-negative enterobacteria that cause septic shock in mammals. However, a LPS carrying hexa-acyl lipid A moieties is highly endotoxic compared to a tetra-acyl LPS and the latter has been considered as an antagonist of hexa-acyl LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. We investigated the relationship between the structure and the function of bacterial LPS in the context of human and mouse dendritic cell activation. Strikingly, LPS with acylation defects were capable of triggering a strong and early TLR4-dependent DC activation, which in turn led to the activation of the proteasome machinery dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Upon activation with tetra-acyl LPS both mouse and human dendritic cells triggered CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses and, importantly, human myeloid dendritic cells favored the induction of regulatory T cells. Altogether, our data suggest that LPS acylation controlled by pathogenic bacteria might be an important strategy to subvert adaptive immunity. PMID:23390517

  14. Pycnogenol attenuates atherosclerosis by regulating lipid metabolism through the TLR4-NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Wang, Jing; Qiao, Chenhui; Ma, Ning; Liu, Donghai; Zhang, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death worldwide and is characterized by lipid-laden foam cell formation. Recently, pycnogenol (PYC) has drawn much attention because of its prominent effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, its protective effect against atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Here PYC treatment reduced areas of plaque and lipid deposition in atherosclerotic mice, concomitant with decreases in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels and increases in HDL cholesterol levels, indicating a potential antiatherosclerotic effect of PYC through the regulation of lipid levels. Additionally, PYC preconditioning markedly decreased foam cell formation and lipid accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 monocytes. A mechanistic analysis indicated that PYC decreased the lipid-related protein expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) and adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP/aP2) in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis confirmed that PYC attenuated LPS-induced lipid droplet formation via ADRP and ALBP expression through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, because pretreatment with anti-TLR4 antibody or a specific inhibitor of NF-κB (PDTC) strikingly mitigated the LPS-induced increase in ADRP and ALBP. Together, our results provide insight into the ability of PYC to attenuate bacterial infection-triggered pathological processes associated with atherosclerosis. Thus PYC may be a potential lead compound for the future development of antiatherosclerotic CVD therapy. PMID:26492950

  15. CETP Lowers TLR4 Expression Which Attenuates the Inflammatory Response Induced by LPS and Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Castoldi, Angela; Amano, Mariane Tami; Nunes, Valeria Sutti; Quintao, Eder Carlos Rocha; Cazita, Patrícia Miralda

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection eliciting high mortality rate which is a serious health problem. Despite numerous studies seeking for therapeutic alternatives, the mechanisms involved in this disease remain elusive. In this study we evaluated the influence of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), a glycoprotein that promotes the transfer of lipids between lipoproteins, on the inflammatory response in mice. Human CETP transgenic mice were compared to control mice (wild type, WT) after polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), aiming at investigating their survival rate and inflammatory profiles. Macrophages from the peritoneal cavity were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of recombinant CETP for phenotypic and functional studies. In comparison to WT mice, CETP mice showed higher survival rate, lower IL-6 plasma concentration, and decreased liver toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and acyloxyacyl hydrolase (AOAH) protein. Moreover, macrophages from WT mice to which recombinant human CETP was added decreased LPS uptake, TLR4 expression, NF-κB activation and IL-6 secretion. This raises the possibility for new therapeutic tools in sepsis while suggesting that lowering CETP by pharmacological inhibitors should be inconvenient in the context of sepsis and infectious diseases. PMID:27293313

  16. Lipopolysaccharides with acylation defects potentiate TLR4 signaling and shape T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anna; Ohne, Yoichiro; Degos, Clara; Gorvel, Laurent; Moriyón, Ignacio; Oh, Sangkon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are components of Gram-negative enterobacteria that cause septic shock in mammals. However, a LPS carrying hexa-acyl lipid A moieties is highly endotoxic compared to a tetra-acyl LPS and the latter has been considered as an antagonist of hexa-acyl LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. We investigated the relationship between the structure and the function of bacterial LPS in the context of human and mouse dendritic cell activation. Strikingly, LPS with acylation defects were capable of triggering a strong and early TLR4-dependent DC activation, which in turn led to the activation of the proteasome machinery dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Upon activation with tetra-acyl LPS both mouse and human dendritic cells triggered CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses and, importantly, human myeloid dendritic cells favored the induction of regulatory T cells. Altogether, our data suggest that LPS acylation controlled by pathogenic bacteria might be an important strategy to subvert adaptive immunity. PMID:23390517

  17. TLR4-mediated immunomodulatory properties of the bacterial metalloprotease arazyme in preclinical tumor models.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe V; Melo, Amanda C L; de Melo, Filipe M; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Silva, Priscila; Berzaghi, Rodrigo; Herbozo, Carolina C A; Coelho-Dos-Reis, Jordana; Scutti, Jorge A; Origassa, Clarice S T; Pereira, Rosana M; Juliano, Luis; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Carmona, Adriana K; Câmara, Niels O S; Tsuji, Moriya; Travassos, Luiz R; Rodrigues, Elaine G

    2016-07-01

    Despite the recent approval of new agents for metastatic melanoma, its treatment remains challenging. Moreover, few available immunotherapies induce a strong cellular immune response, and selection of the correct immunoadjuvant is crucial for overcoming this obstacle. Here, we studied the immunomodulatory properties of arazyme, a bacterial metalloprotease, which was previously shown to control metastasis in a murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 model. The antitumor activity of arazyme was independent of its proteolytic activity, since heat-inactivated protease showed comparable properties to the active enzyme; however, the effect was dependent on an intact immune system, as antitumor properties were lost in immunodeficient mice. The protective response was IFNγ-dependent, and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were the main effector antitumor population, although B and CD4(+) T lymphocytes were also induced. Macrophages and dendritic cells were involved in the induction of the antitumor response, as arazyme activation of these cells increased both the expression of surface activation markers and proinflammatory cytokine secretion through TLR4-MyD88-TRIF-dependent, but also MAPK-dependent pathways. Arazyme was also effective in the murine breast adenocarcinoma 4T1 model, reducing primary and metastatic tumor development, and prolonging survival. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a bacterial metalloprotease interaction with TLR4 and subsequent receptor activation that promotes a proinflammatory and tumor protective response. Our results show that arazyme has immunomodulatory properties, and could be a promising novel alternative for metastatic melanoma treatment. PMID:27622031

  18. Association of TLR4 polymorphisms with subclinical mastitis in Brazilian holsteins

    PubMed Central

    de Mesquita, Adriano Queiroz; e Rezende, Cintia Silva Minafra; de Mesquita, Albenones José; Jardim, Eurione Antonio Garcia da Veiga; Kipnis, Ana Paula Junqueira

    2012-01-01

    The identification of dairy cows with greater or lower potential to develop mastits has been pursued for many years among different segments of the milk industry, including governmental organizations. Genomic studies have suggested that Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) within the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) could lead to different responses to pathogens, and consequently result in mastitis resistance or susceptibility. To investigate whether toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene is associated with subclinical mastitis in Holstein cows from a property in the state of Goiás, Brazil, TaqMan allelic discrimination and somatic cell count were performed. One hundred and fifty milk samples were analyzed for SCC and centesimal composition. Twenty percent of those samples with SCC above 200,000 (n=13) were screened for real-time PCR identification of microorganisms and blood samples were genotyped for TLR4 SNPs. There was a higher prevalence of Gram-positive bacteria in the analyzed samples (88.9%) and animals that had the combined genotypes AACCCC, GGTCGG and GACCGC presented the lowest somatic cell scores, and consequently those genotypes have the potential to be applied as molecular markers for assisted animal selection to improve milk quality. PMID:24031881

  19. Transcriptome sequencing wide functional analysis of human mesenchymal stem cells in response to TLR4 ligand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hwa; Das, Amitabh; Chai, Jin Choul; Binas, Bert; Choi, Mi Ran; Park, Kyoung Sun; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Due to their multipotentiality and immunomodulation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are widely studied for the treatment of degenerative and inflammatory diseases. Transplantation of hMSCs to damaged tissue is a promising approach for tissue regeneration. However, the physiological mechanisms and regulatory processes of MSC trafficking to injured tissue are largely unexplored. Here, we evaluated the gene expression profile and migratory potential of hMSCs upon stimulation with the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using RNA sequencing, we identified unique induction patterns of interferon stimulated genes, cytokines and chemokines involved in chemotaxis and homing. The -950 to +50 bp regions of many of these LPS-responsive genes were enriched with putative binding motifs for the transcription factors (TFs) interferon regulatory factor (IRF1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB1, REL), which were also induced by LPS along with other TFs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that IRF1 bound within their target genes promoter region. In addition, IRF1 attenuation significantly down-regulated interferon stimulated genes as well as key cytokines. Furthermore, using pharmacological inhibitors, we showed that the NF-κB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways regulate the migratory and cytokines/chemokines response to LPS. These unprecedented data suggest that IRF1 and NF-κB orchestrate the TLR4-primed immunomodulatory response of hMSCs and that this response also involves the PI3K pathway. PMID:27444640

  20. The H3K9 methyltransferase Setdb1 regulates TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hachiya, Rumi; Shiihashi, Takuya; Shirakawa, Ibuki; Iwasaki, Yorihiro; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Oishi, Yumiko; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Manabe, Ichiro; Ochi, Kozue; Tanaka, Miyako; Goda, Nobuhito; Sakai, Juro; Suganami, Takayoshi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages involves multiple regulatory mechanisms, which are affected by environmental and intrinsic stress. In particular, accumulating evidence has suggested epigenetic control of macrophage differentiation and function mainly in vitro. SET domain, bifurcated 1 (Setdb1, also known as Eset) is a histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9)-specific methyltransferase and is essential for early development of embryos. Here we demonstrate that Setdb1 in macrophages potently suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated expression of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 through its methyltransferase activity. As a molecular mechanism, Setdb1-deficiency decreases the basal H3K9 methylation levels and augments TLR4-mediated NF-κB recruitment on the proximal promoter region of interleukin-6, thereby accelerating interleukin-6 promoter activity. Moreover, macrophage-specific Setdb1-knockout mice exhibit higher serum interleukin-6 concentrations in response to lipopolysaccharide challenge and are more susceptible to endotoxin shock than wildtype mice. This study provides evidence that the H3K9 methyltransferase Setdb1 is a novel epigenetic regulator of proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Our data will shed insight into the better understanding of how the immune system reacts to a variety of conditions. PMID:27349785

  1. The effects of Ostertagia occidentalis somatic antigens on ovine TLR2 and TLR4 expression

    PubMed Central

    BORJI, Hassan; HAGHPARAST, Alireza; SOLEIMANI, Nooshinmehr; AZIZZADEH, Mohammad; NAZEMSHIRAZI, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recognition of helminth-derived pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including toll like receptors (TLRs) is the first step towards initiating anti–helminth immune responses. Methods : Using somatic antigens of Ostertagia occidentalis, an important abomasal parasite of ruminants, the expression of ovine TLR2 and TLR4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed by real-time quatitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis were prepared to stimulate ovine PBMCs in a time and dose dependent manner. Results : A high expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was observed in PBMCs cultured with somatic antigens of the parasites specially when PBMCs were cultured with 100 µg/ml of somatic antigens and incubated for 2h. Up-regulation of TLR2 expression was more pronounced and evident in our study. Conclsusion : Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis have immunostimulatory and dominant role on peripheral immune cells. This study provide for the first time evidence of induction of TLRs in ovine PBMCs by somatic antigen of O. occidentalis PMID:26622306

  2. Imidacloprid induced histomorphological changes and expression of TLR-4 and TNFα in lung.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Arif Ahmad; Choudhary, Shanti; Ramneek; Singh, Baljit; Sethi, R S

    2016-07-01

    The imidacloprid is used worldwide as a pesticide and has been linked with endocrine disturbances and reduced pulmonary function. However, effects of imidacloprid alone or in combination with microbial molecules on lungs are not fully understood. Because the pulmonary effects of interactions of endotoxins with imidacloprid are unknown, we designed a study to investigate that in a mouse model. Mice (N=14) were given imidacloprid orally @ 1/20(th) of LD50 dissolved in corn oil for 30days. After the treatments, six animals from each group were challenged with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) @ 80μg/animal via intranasal route and remaining animals were challenged with normal saline solution @ 80μl/animal via same route. Imidacloprid in combination with LPS led to significant increase in total cell and neutrophil counts in BAL and peripheral blood. Semi-quantitative histopathology revealed lung injury in imidacloprid treatment group and injury was more marked in animal receiving both imidacloprid and LPS. There was no change (p<0.05) in the expression of TLR-4 and TNF-α both at mRNA and protein levels following exposure to imidacloprid alone or in combination with LPS. The data show that imidacloprid alone or in combination with LPS resulted changes in lung morphology without altering the expression of TLR-4 and TNF-α. Furthermore, pre-treatment with imidacloprid didn't affect response to LPS. PMID:27265821

  3. TLR4 induces CCR7-dependent monocytes transmigration through the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Alexandre; Bernier, Stéphane; Dumais, Nancy

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we examined whether bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns recognized by toll-like receptors (TLRs) can modify the CCR7-dependent migration of human monocytes. MonoMac-1 (MM-1) cells and freshly isolated human monocytes were cultivated in the presence of agonists for TLR4 (which senses lipopolysaccharides from gram-negative bacteria), TLR1/2 (which senses peptidoglycan from gram-positive bacteria), and TLR9 (which recognizes bacterial DNA rich in unmethylated CpG DNA). CCR7 mRNA transcription was measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and protein expression was examined using flow cytometry. CCR7 function was monitored using migration and transmigration assays in response to CCL19/CCL21, which are natural ligands for CCR7. Our results show that TLR4 strongly increases monocyte migratory capacity in response to CCL19 in chemotaxis and transmigration assays in a model that mimics the human blood-brain barrier, whereas TLR1/2 and 9 have no effect. Examination of monocyte migration in response to TLRs that are activated by bacterial components would contribute to understanding the excessive monocyte migration that characterizes the pathogenesis of bacterial infections and/or neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27235343

  4. Quercetin negatively regulates TLR4 signaling induced by lipopolysaccharide through Tollip expression.

    PubMed

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Yang, Mi-So; Choi, Han-Gyu; Sung, Nak-Yun; Song, Du-Sup; Sin, Sung-Jae; Byun, Eui-Hong

    2013-02-22

    Polyphenolic compounds have been regarded as one of the most promising dietary agents for the prevention and treatment of inflammation-related chronic diseases; however, the anti-inflammatory activities of flavonoids, such as quercetin, are not completely characterized, and many features remain to be elucidated. In this study, we showed the molecular basis for the downregulation of TLR4 signal transduction by quercetin. Quercetin markedly elevated the expression of the Toll-interacting protein, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. Lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of cell surface molecules (CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II) and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70) were inhibited by quercetin, and this action was prevented by Toll-interacting protein silencing. In addition, quercetin-treated macrophages inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and the translocation of nuclear factor-κB and p65 through Toll-interacting protein. Treatment with quercetin resulted in a significant decrease in prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide production induced by lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, these findings represent new insights into the understanding of negative regulatory mechanisms of the TLR4 signaling pathway and effective therapeutic intervention for the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:23353651

  5. Modulating potency: Physicochemical characteristics are a determining factor of TLR4-agonist nanosuspension activity.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Quinton M; Sivananthan, Sandra J; Guderian, Jeff A; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Chesko, James D; Fox, Christopher B; Vedvick, Thomas S; Kramer, Ryan M

    2014-03-01

    Activity of adjuvanted vaccines is difficult to predict in vitro and in vivo. The wide compositional and conformational range of formulated adjuvants, from aluminum salts to oil-in-water emulsions, makes comparisons between physicochemical and immunological properties difficult. Even within a formulated adjuvant class, excipient selection and concentration can alter potency and physicochemical properties of the mixture. Complete characterization of physicochemical properties of adjuvanted vaccine formulations and relationship to biological response is necessary to move beyond a guess-and-check paradigm toward directed development. Here we present a careful physicochemical characterization of a two-component nanosuspension containing synthetic TLR-4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) at various molar ratios. Physicochemical properties were compared with potency, as measured by stimulation of cytokine production in human whole blood. We found a surprising, nonlinear relationship between physicochemical properties and GLA-DPPC ratios that corresponded well with changes in biological activity. We discuss these data in light of the current understanding of TLR4 activation and the conformation-potency relationship in development of adjuvanted vaccines. PMID:24464844

  6. The H3K9 methyltransferase Setdb1 regulates TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Rumi; Shiihashi, Takuya; Shirakawa, Ibuki; Iwasaki, Yorihiro; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Oishi, Yumiko; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Manabe, Ichiro; Ochi, Kozue; Tanaka, Miyako; Goda, Nobuhito; Sakai, Juro; Suganami, Takayoshi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages involves multiple regulatory mechanisms, which are affected by environmental and intrinsic stress. In particular, accumulating evidence has suggested epigenetic control of macrophage differentiation and function mainly in vitro. SET domain, bifurcated 1 (Setdb1, also known as Eset) is a histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9)-specific methyltransferase and is essential for early development of embryos. Here we demonstrate that Setdb1 in macrophages potently suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated expression of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 through its methyltransferase activity. As a molecular mechanism, Setdb1-deficiency decreases the basal H3K9 methylation levels and augments TLR4-mediated NF-κB recruitment on the proximal promoter region of interleukin-6, thereby accelerating interleukin-6 promoter activity. Moreover, macrophage-specific Setdb1-knockout mice exhibit higher serum interleukin-6 concentrations in response to lipopolysaccharide challenge and are more susceptible to endotoxin shock than wildtype mice. This study provides evidence that the H3K9 methyltransferase Setdb1 is a novel epigenetic regulator of proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Our data will shed insight into the better understanding of how the immune system reacts to a variety of conditions. PMID:27349785

  7. Cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways in the arachidonic acid-induced inflammatory response in pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Mateu, A; Ramudo, L; Manso, M A; De Dios, I

    2015-12-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is generally associated with inflammation in different settings. We assess the molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response exerted by AA on pancreatic acini as an approach to acute pancreatitis (AP). Celecoxib (COX-2 inhibitor), TAK-242 (TLR4 inhibitor) and 15d-PGJ2 (PPARγ agonist) were used to ascertain the signaling pathways. In addition, we examine the effects of TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 on AP induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO). To carry out in vitro studies, acini were isolated from pancreas of control rats. Generation of PGE2 and TXB2, activation of pro-inflammatory pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, and JAK/STAT3) and overexpression of CCL2 and P-selectin was found in AA-treated acini. In addition, AA up-regulated TLR4 and down-regulated PPARγ expression. Celecoxib prevented the up-regulation of CCL2 and P-selectin but did not show any effect on the AA-mediated changes in TLR4 and PPARγ expression. TAK-242, reduced the generation of AA metabolites and repressed both the cascade of pro-inflammatory events which led to CCL2 and P-selectin overexpression as well as the AA-induced PPARγ down-regulation. Thus, TLR4 acts as upstream activating pro-inflammatory and inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways. 15d-PGJ2 down-regulated TLR4 expression and hence prevented the synthesis of AA metabolites and the inflammatory response mediated by them. Reciprocal negative cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways is evidenced. In vivo experiments showed that TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 treatments reduced the inflammatory response in BPDO-induced AP. We conclude that through TLR4-dependent mechanisms, AA up-regulated CCL2 and P-selectin in pancreatic acini, partly mediated by the generation of PGE2 and TXB2, which activated pro-inflammatory pathways, but also directly by down-regulating PPARγ expression with anti-inflammatory activity. In vitro and in vivo studies support the role of TLR4 in AP and the use of TLR4 inhibitors and

  8. Impacts of common variants in ALDH2 on coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinzhao; You, Ling; Wang, Dao Wen; Cui, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) as a susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease (CAD) previously. However, the impacts of common variants in this gene on CAD and its outcomes have not been extensively studied. This study explored the association between the Tagging SNPs in ALDH2 and CAD as well as its main outcomes. Six common variants in ALDH2 were selected as tagging SNPs and two cohorts containing 7296 individuals were genotyped to investigate the impacts of ALDH2 on CAD and its main outcomes. The results show that the variant rs671 in ALDH2 is associated with an increased risk of CAD in southern Chinese (OR=1.26, 95%CI: 1.07-1.48, p=0.004), while not in northern Chinese (OR=1.00, 95%CI: 0.86-1.50, p=0.94). Meanwhile, we find that rs671 genotypes may not influence the outcomes of CAD (HR=1.11, 95%CI: 0.892-1.38, p=0.346). Additionally, we also tested the effect of rs671 genotype on CAD severity, while no significant association was found between them. In the subgroup analysis, the results revealed that rs671 were significantly associated with CAD (OR=1.24, 95%CI: 1.11-1.38, p<0.001) in non-alcoholic subjects. Overall, our findings indicate that the associations between rs671 in ALDH2 and CAD are regional disparity, and rs671 genotypes may not influence the main outcomes of CAD. PMID:26995653

  9. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J.; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R.; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H. Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin αM (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS.

  10. Insights into the species-specific TLR4 signaling mechanism in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A detection

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    TLR4 in complex with MD2 senses the presence of lipid A (LA) and initiates a signaling cascade that curb the infection. This complex is evolutionarily conserved and can initiate the immune system in response to a variety of LAs. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation (25 ns) was performed to elucidate the differential behavior of TLR4/MD2 complex in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RsLA). Penta-acyl chain-containing RsLA is at the verge of agonist (6 acyl-chains) and antagonist (4 acyl-chains) structure, and activates the TLR4 pathway in horses and hamsters, while inhibiting in humans and murine. In the time-evolved coordinates, the promising factors that dictated the differential response included the local and global mobility pattern of complexes, solvent-accessible surface area of ligand, and surface charge distributions of TLR4 and MD2. We showed that the GlcN1-GlcN2 backbone acquires agonist (3FXI)-like configurations in horses and hamsters, while acquiring antagonist (2E59)-like configurations in humans and murine systems. Moreover, analysis of F126 behavior in the MD2 F126 loop (amino acids 123–129) and loop EF (81–89) suggested that certain sequence variations also contribute to species-specific response. This study underlines the TLR4 signaling mechanism and provides new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25563849

  11. Osmotin attenuates LPS-induced neuroinflammation and memory impairments via the TLR4/NFκB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Badshah, Haroon; Ali, Tahir; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in the brain mediates autoimmune responses and induces neuroinflammation that results in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The plant hormone osmotin inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TLR4 downstream signaling, including activation of TLR4, CD14, IKKα/β, and NFκB, and the release of inflammatory mediators, such as COX-2, TNF-α, iNOS, and IL-1β. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated colocalization of TLR4 and AdipoR1 receptors in BV2 microglial cells, which suggests that osmotin binds to AdipoR1 and inhibits downstream TLR4 signaling. Furthermore, osmotin treatment reversed LPS-induced behavioral and memory disturbances and attenuated LPS-induced increases in the expression of AD markers, such as Aβ, APP, BACE-1, and p-Tau. Osmotin improved synaptic functionality via enhancing the activity of pre- and post-synaptic markers, like PSD-95, SNAP-25, and syntaxin-1. Osmotin also prevented LPS-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration via inhibition of PARP-1 and caspase-3. Overall, our studies demonstrated that osmotin prevented neuroinflammation-associated memory impairment and neurodegeneration and suggest AdipoR1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurological disorders, such as AD. PMID:27093924

  12. IL-27 enhances innate immunity of human pulmonary fibroblasts and epithelial cells through upregulation of TLR4 expression.

    PubMed

    Su, Yufeng; Yao, Hua; Wang, Hong; Xu, Fang; Li, Dagen; Li, Dairong; Zhang, Xuemei; Yin, Yibing; Cao, Ju

    2016-01-15

    Lung tissue cells play an active role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary inflammatory diseases by releasing a variety of cytokines and chemokines. However, how lung tissue cells respond to microbial stimuli during pulmonary infections remains unclear. In this study, we found that patients with community-acquired pneumonia displayed increased IL-27 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum. We subsequently examined the immunopathological mechanisms for the activation of primary human lung fibroblasts and bronchial epithelial cells by IL-27. We demonstrated that IL-27 priming enhanced LPS-induced production of IL-6 and IL-8 from lung fibroblasts and bronchial epithelia cells via upregulating Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) expression. IL-27 upregulated TLR4 expression in lung fibroblasts through activation of Janus-activated kinase (JAK) and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways, and inhibition of the JAK pathway could partially decrease IL-27-induced TLR4 expression, while inhibition of JNK pathway could completely suppress IL-27-induced TLR4 expression. Our data suggest that IL-27 modulates innate immunity of lung tissue cells through upregulating TLR4 expression during pulmonary infections. PMID:26608531

  13. The TLR signaling adaptor TRAM interacts with TRAF6 to mediate activation of the inflammatory response by TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Verstak, Brett; Stack, Julianne; Ve, Thomas; Mangan, Matthew; Hjerrild, Kathryn; Jeon, Jannah; Stahl, Rainer; Latz, Eicke; Gay, Nick; Kobe, Bostjan; Bowie, Andrew G.; Mansell, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    TLRs act as sentinels in professional immune cells to detect and initiate the innate immune response to pathogen challenge. TLR4 is a widely expressed TLR, responsible for initiating potent immune responses to LPS. TRAM acts to bridge TLR4 with TRIF, orchestrating the inflammatory response to pathogen challenge. We have identified a putative TRAF6-binding motif in TRAM that could mediate a novel signaling function for TRAM in TLR4 signaling. TRAM and TRAF6 association was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of endogenous, ectopically expressed and recombinant proteins, which was ablated upon mutation of a key Glu residue in TRAM (TRAM E183A). TRAF6 and TRAM were observed colocalizing using confocal microscopy following ectopic expression in cells and the ability of TRAM and TRAM E183A to activate luciferase-linked reporter assays was determined in HEK293 and TRAF6-deficient cells. Importantly, TRAM-deficient macrophages reconstituted with TRAM E183A display significantly reduced inflammatory TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES protein production compared with WT TRAM. These results demonstrate a novel role for TRAM in TLR4-mediated signaling in regulating inflammatory responses via its interaction with TRAF6, distinct from its role as a bridging adaptor between TLR4 and TRIF. PMID:24812060

  14. Osmotin attenuates LPS-induced neuroinflammation and memory impairments via the TLR4/NFκB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Haroon; Ali, Tahir; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in the brain mediates autoimmune responses and induces neuroinflammation that results in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The plant hormone osmotin inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TLR4 downstream signaling, including activation of TLR4, CD14, IKKα/β, and NFκB, and the release of inflammatory mediators, such as COX-2, TNF-α, iNOS, and IL-1β. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated colocalization of TLR4 and AdipoR1 receptors in BV2 microglial cells, which suggests that osmotin binds to AdipoR1 and inhibits downstream TLR4 signaling. Furthermore, osmotin treatment reversed LPS-induced behavioral and memory disturbances and attenuated LPS-induced increases in the expression of AD markers, such as Aβ, APP, BACE-1, and p-Tau. Osmotin improved synaptic functionality via enhancing the activity of pre- and post-synaptic markers, like PSD-95, SNAP-25, and syntaxin-1. Osmotin also prevented LPS-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration via inhibition of PARP-1 and caspase-3. Overall, our studies demonstrated that osmotin prevented neuroinflammation-associated memory impairment and neurodegeneration and suggest AdipoR1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurological disorders, such as AD. PMID:27093924

  15. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin α(M) (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS. PMID:24423728

  16. Insights into the species-specific TLR4 signaling mechanism in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    TLR4 in complex with MD2 senses the presence of lipid A (LA) and initiates a signaling cascade that curb the infection. This complex is evolutionarily conserved and can initiate the immune system in response to a variety of LAs. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation (25 ns) was performed to elucidate the differential behavior of TLR4/MD2 complex in response to Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RsLA). Penta-acyl chain-containing RsLA is at the verge of agonist (6 acyl-chains) and antagonist (4 acyl-chains) structure, and activates the TLR4 pathway in horses and hamsters, while inhibiting in humans and murine. In the time-evolved coordinates, the promising factors that dictated the differential response included the local and global mobility pattern of complexes, solvent-accessible surface area of ligand, and surface charge distributions of TLR4 and MD2. We showed that the GlcN1-GlcN2 backbone acquires agonist (3FXI)-like configurations in horses and hamsters, while acquiring antagonist (2E59)-like configurations in humans and murine systems. Moreover, analysis of F126 behavior in the MD2 F126 loop (amino acids 123-129) and loop EF (81-89) suggested that certain sequence variations also contribute to species-specific response. This study underlines the TLR4 signaling mechanism and provides new therapeutic opportunities.

  17. No evidence for shared genetic basis of common variants in multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Goris, An; van Setten, Jessica; Diekstra, Frank; Ripke, Stephan; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; van Es, Michael; Andersen, Peter M.; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Hardiman, Orla; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Shatunov, Aleksey; Leigh, Nigel; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Mora, Gabriele; Ophoff, Roel A.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Van Damme, Philip; Compston, Alastair; Robberecht, Wim; Dubois, Bénédicte; van den Berg, Leonard H.; De Jager, Philip L.; Veldink, Jan H.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying common variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. From these studies, it has emerged that there is substantial overlap in susceptibility loci between diseases. In line with those findings, we hypothesized that shared genetic pathways may exist between multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While both diseases may have inflammatory and neurodegenerative features, epidemiological studies have indicated an increased co-occurrence within individuals and families. To this purpose, we combined genome-wide data from 4088 MS patients, 3762 ALS patients and 12 030 healthy control individuals in whom 5 440 446 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were successfully genotyped or imputed. We tested these SNPs for the excess association shared between MS and ALS and also explored whether polygenic models of SNPs below genome-wide significance could explain some of the observed trait variance between diseases. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of SNPs as well as polygenic analyses fails to provide evidence in favor of an overlap in genetic susceptibility between MS and ALS. Hence, our findings do not support a shared genetic background of common risk variants in MS and ALS. PMID:24234648

  18. Curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-stimulated mesencephalic astrocytes by interference with TLR4 and downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Song; Wang, Xu; He, Xingliang; Wang, Yue; Gao, Sujie; Ren, Lu; Shi, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Neuroinflammation is closely associated with the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent evidence indicates that astrocytes also play pro-inflammatory roles in the central nervous system (CNS) by activation with toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Therefore, targeting anti-inflammation may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for PD. Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound isolated from Curcuma longa root, has been commonly used for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the details of how curcumin exerts neuroprotection remain uncertain. Here, we investigated the protective effect of curcumin on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-(MPP(+)-) stimulated primary astrocytes. Our results showed that MPP(+) stimulation resulted in significant production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL-6), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in primary mesencephalic astrocytes. Curcumin pretreatment decreased the levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines while increased IL-10 expression in MPP(+)-stimulated astrocytes. In addition, curcumin increased the levels of antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and reduced ROS production. Our results further showed that curcumin decreased the levels of TLR4 and its downstream effectors including NF-κB, IRF3, MyD88, and TIRF that are induced by MPP(+) as well as inhibited the immunoreactivity of TLR4 and morphological activation in MPP(+)-stimulated astrocytes. Together, data suggest that curcumin might exert a beneficial effect on neuroinflammation in the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:27164829

  19. A Natural Genetic Variant of Granzyme B Confers Lethality to a Common Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Andoniou, Christopher E.; Sutton, Vivien R.; Wikstrom, Matthew E.; Fleming, Peter; Thia, Kevin Y. T.; Matthews, Antony Y.; Kaiserman, Dion; Schuster, Iona S.; Coudert, Jerome D.; Eldi, Preethi; Chaudhri, Geeta; Karupiah, Gunasegaran; Bird, Phillip I.

    2014-01-01

    Many immune response genes are highly polymorphic, consistent with the selective pressure imposed by pathogens over evolutionary time, and the need to balance infection control with the risk of auto-immunity. Epidemiological and genomic studies have identified many genetic variants that confer susceptibility or resistance to pathogenic micro-organisms. While extensive polymorphism has been reported for the granzyme B (GzmB) gene, its relevance to pathogen immunity is unexplored. Here, we describe the biochemical and cytotoxic functions of a common allele of GzmB (GzmBW) common in wild mouse. While retaining ‘Asp-ase’ activity, GzmBW has substrate preferences that differ considerably from GzmBP, which is common to all inbred strains. In vitro, GzmBW preferentially cleaves recombinant Bid, whereas GzmBP activates pro-caspases directly. Recombinant GzmBW and GzmBP induced equivalent apoptosis of uninfected targets cells when delivered with perforin in vitro. Nonetheless, mice homozygous for GzmBW were unable to control murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, and succumbed as a result of excessive liver damage. Although similar numbers of anti-viral CD8 T cells were generated in both mouse strains, GzmBW-expressing CD8 T cells isolated from infected mice were unable to kill MCMV-infected targets in vitro. Our results suggest that known virally-encoded inhibitors of the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway account for the increased susceptibility of GzmBW mice to MCMV. We conclude that different natural variants of GzmB have a profound impact on the immune response to a common and authentic viral pathogen. PMID:25502180

  20. Individual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorderspi

    PubMed Central

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Baird, Gillian; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Casey, Jillian; Conroy, Judith; Correia, Catarina; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Green, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Jacob, Suma; Kenny, Graham P.; Kim, Cecilia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Law-Smith, Miriam; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lombard, Frances; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Mantoulan, Carine; McDougle, Christopher J.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Noakes, Carolyn; Nygren, Gudrun; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Posey, David J.; Poustka, Fritz; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Regan, Regina; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Schlitt, Sabine; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Sykes, Nuala; Tancredi, Raffaella; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Vorstman, JAS; Wallace, Simon; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bailey, Anthony J.; Battaglia, Agatino; Cantor, Rita M.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Dawson, Geraldine; Ennis, Sean; Freitag, Christine M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Klauck, Sabine M.; McMahon, William M.; Maestrini, Elena; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nurnberger, John I.; Oliveira, Guiomar; Parr, Jeremy R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Piven, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Vicente, Astrid M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; Hallmayer, Joachim; Paterson, Andrew D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vieland, Veronica J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devlin, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Project genome-wide association study, adding 1301 ASD families and bringing the total to 2705 families analysed (Stages 1 and 2). In addition to evaluating the association of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we also sought evidence that common variants, en masse, might affect the risk. Despite genotyping over a million SNPs covering the genome, no single SNP shows significant association with ASD or selected phenotypes at a genome-wide level. The SNP that achieves the smallest P-value from secondary analyses is rs1718101. It falls in CNTNAP2, a gene previously implicated in susceptibility for ASD. This SNP also shows modest association with age of word/phrase acquisition in ASD subjects, of interest because features of language development are also associated with other variation in CNTNAP2. In contrast, allele scores derived from the transmission of common alleles to Stage 1 cases significantly predict case status in the independent Stage 2 sample. Despite being significant, the variance explained by these allele scores was small (Vm< 1%). Based on results from individual SNPs and their en masse effect on risk, as inferred from the allele score results, it is reasonable to conclude that common variants affect the risk for ASD but their individual effects are modest. PMID:22843504

  1. Association of Common Susceptibility Variants of Pancreatic Cancer in Higher-Risk Patients: A PACGENE Study.

    PubMed

    Childs, Erica J; Chaffee, Kari G; Gallinger, Steven; Syngal, Sapna; Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L; Bondy, Melissa L; Hruban, Ralph H; Chanock, Stephen J; Hoover, Robert N; Fuchs, Charles S; Rider, David N; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Wolpin, Brian M; Risch, Harvey A; Goggins, Michael G; Petersen, Gloria M; Klein, Alison P

    2016-07-01

    Individuals from pancreatic cancer families are at increased risk, not only of pancreatic cancer, but also of melanoma, breast, ovarian, and colon cancers. While some of the increased risk may be due to mutations in high-penetrance genes (i.e., BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, p16/CDKN2A or DNA mismatch repair genes), common genetic variants may also be involved. In a high-risk population of cases with either a family history of pancreatic cancer or early-onset pancreatic cancer (diagnosis before the age of 50 years), we examined the role of genetic variants previously associated with risk of pancreatic, breast, ovarian, or prostate cancer. We genotyped 985 cases (79 early-onset cases, 906 cases with a family history of pancreatic cancer) and 877 controls for 215,389 SNPs using the iSelect Collaborative Oncological Gene-Environment Study (iCOGS) array with custom content. Logistic regression was performed using a log-linear additive model. We replicated several previously reported pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci, including recently identified variants on 2p13.3 and 7p13 (2p13.3, rs1486134: OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63; P = 9.29 × 10(-4); 7p13, rs17688601: OR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.63-0.93; P = 6.59 × 10(-3)). For the replicated loci, the magnitude of association observed in these high-risk patients was similar to that observed in studies of unselected patients. In addition to the established pancreatic cancer loci, we also found suggestive evidence of association (P < 5 × 10(-5)) to pancreatic cancer for SNPs at HDAC9 (7p21.1) and COL6A2 (21q22.3). Even in high-risk populations, common variants influence pancreatic cancer susceptibility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1185-91. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197284

  2. A pilot study on commonality and specificity of copy number variants in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Calhoun, V D; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I; Pearlson, G D; Sui, J; Du, Y; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are known to share genetic risks. In this work, we conducted whole-genome scanning to identify cross-disorder and disorder-specific copy number variants (CNVs) for these two disorders. The Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) data were used for discovery, deriving from 2416 SZ patients, 592 BD patients and 2393 controls of European Ancestry, as well as 998 SZ patients, 121 BD patients and 822 controls of African Ancestry. PennCNV and Birdsuite detected high-confidence CNVs that were aggregated into CNV regions (CNVRs) and compared with the database of genomic variants for confirmation. Then, large (size⩾500 kb) and small common CNVRs (size <500 kb, frequency⩾1%) were examined for their associations with SZ and BD. Particularly for the European Ancestry samples, the dbGaP findings were further evaluated in the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) data set for replication. Previously implicated variants (1q21.1, 15q13.3, 16p11.2 and 22q11.21) were replicated. Some cross-disorder variants were noted to differentially affect SZ and BD, including CNVRs in chromosomal regions encoding immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors that were associated more with SZ, and the 10q11.21 small CNVR (GPRIN2) associated more with BD. Disorder-specific CNVRs were also found. The 22q11.21 CNVR (COMT) and small CNVRs in 11p15.4 (TRIM5) and 15q13.2 (ARHGAP11B and FAN1) appeared to be SZ-specific. CNVRs in 17q21.2, 9p21.3 and 9q21.13 might be BD-specific. Overall, our primary findings in individual disorders largely echo previous reports. In addition, the comparison between SZ and BD reveals both specific and common risk CNVs. Particularly for the latter, differential involvement is noted, motivating further comparative studies and quantitative models. PMID:27244233

  3. Common breast cancer risk variants in the post-COGS era: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer has a strong heritable component, with approximately 15% of cases exhibiting a family history of the disease. Mutations in genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 lead to autosomal dominant inherited cancer susceptibility and confer a high lifetime risk of breast cancers. Identification of mutations in these genes through clinical genetic testing enables patients to undergo screening and prevention strategies, some of which provide overall survival benefit. In addition, a number of mutant alleles have been identified in genes such as CHEK2, PALB2, ATM and BRIP1, which often display incomplete penetrance and confer moderate lifetime risks of breast cancer. Studies are underway to determine how to use the identification of mutations in these genes to guide clinical practice. Altogether, however, mutations in high and moderate penetrance genes probably account for approximately 25% of familial breast cancer risk; the remainder may be due to mutations in as yet unidentified genes or lower penetrance variants. Common low penetrance alleles, which have been mainly identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), are generally present at 10 to 50% population frequencies and confer less than 1.5-fold increases in breast cancer risk. A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified and risk associations extensively replicated in populations of European ancestry, the number of which has substantially increased as a result of GWAS performed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene–environment Study consortium. It is now estimated that 28% of familial breast cancer risk is explained by common breast cancer susceptibility loci. In some cases, SNP associations may be specific to different subsets of women with breast cancer, as defined by ethnicity or estrogen receptor status. Although not yet clinically established, it is hoped that identification of common risk variants may eventually allow identification of women at higher risk of

  4. Genome-wide analysis identifies a role for common copy number variants in specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Nuala H; Ceroni, Fabiola; Reader, Rose H; Covill, Laura E; Knight, Julian C; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Bolton, Patrick F; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; O'Hare, Anne; Baird, Gillian; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F

    2015-10-01

    An exploratory genome-wide copy number variant (CNV) study was performed in 127 independent cases with specific language impairment (SLI), their first-degree relatives (385 individuals) and 269 population controls. Language-impaired cases showed an increased CNV burden in terms of the average number of events (11.28 vs 10.01, empirical P=0.003), the total length of CNVs (717 vs 513 Kb, empirical P=0.0001), the average CNV size (63.75 vs 51.6 Kb, empirical P=0.0005) and the number of genes spanned (14.29 vs 10.34, empirical P=0.0007) when compared with population controls, suggesting that CNVs may contribute to SLI risk. A similar trend was observed in first-degree relatives regardless of affection status. The increased burden found in our study was not driven by large or de novo events, which have been described as causative in other neurodevelopmental disorders. Nevertheless, de novo CNVs might be important on a case-by-case basis, as indicated by identification of events affecting relevant genes, such as ACTR2 and CSNK1A1, and small events within known micro-deletion/-duplication syndrome regions, such as chr8p23.1. Pathway analysis of the genes present within the CNVs of the independent cases identified significant overrepresentation of acetylcholine binding, cyclic-nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity and MHC proteins as compared with controls. Taken together, our data suggest that the majority of the risk conferred by CNVs in SLI is via common, inherited events within a 'common disorder-common variant' model. Therefore the risk conferred by CNVs will depend upon the combination of events inherited (both CNVs and SNPs), the genetic background of the individual and the environmental factors. PMID:25585696

  5. Rare variants at 16p11.2 are associated with common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maggadottir, S. Melkorka; Li, Jin; Glessner, Joseph T.; Li, Yun Rose; Wei, Zhi; Chang, Xiao; Mentch, Frank D; Thomas, Kelly A; Kim, Cecilia E.; Zhao, Yan; Hou, Cuiping; Wang, Fengxiang; Jørgensen, Silje F.; Perez, Elena E.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Orange, Jordan Scott; Karlsen, Tom H.; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2015-01-01

    Background Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized clinically by inadequate quantity and quality of serum immunoglobulins with increased susceptibility to infections resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Only a few genes have been uncovered and the genetic background of CVID remains elusive to date for the majority of patients. Objective To seek novel associations of genes and genetic variants with CVID. Methods We performed association analyses in a discovery cohort of 164 CVID cases and 19,542 healthy control subjects genotyped on the Immuno BeadChip from Illumina (iCHIP); replication of findings were examined in an independent cohort of 135 CVID cases and 2,066 healthy control subjects, followed by meta-analysis. Results We identified 11 SNPs at the 16p11.2 locus associated with CVID at genome-wide significant level in the discovery cohort. The most significant SNP, rs929867 (p = 6.21×10−9) is in the gene FUS (fused-in-sarcoma) with four other SNPs mapping to ITGAM (integrin CD11b). Results were confirmed in our replication cohort. Conditional association analysis suggests a single association signal at the 16p11.2 locus. A strong trend of association was also seen by 38 SNPs (p < 5×10−5) in the MHC region, supporting that this is a genuine CVID locus. Interestingly we found that 80% of patients with the rare ITGAM variants have reduced counts of switched-memory B-cells. Conclusion We report a novel association of CVID with rare variants at the FUS/ITGAM (CD11b) locus on 16p11.2. The association signal is enriched for promoter/enhancer markers in the ITGAM gene. ITGAM encodes the integrin CD11b, a part of complement receptor 3 (CR3/Mac-1), a novel candidate gene implicated here for the first time in the pathogenesis of CVID. PMID:25678086

  6. Valsartan preconditioning protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury through TLR4/NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Jun; Ding, Jia-Wang; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Song; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2009-10-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The activated TLR4 is capable of activating a variety of proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Valsartan as a kind of Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers is gradually used for the treatment of ischemic heart disease depending on its anti-inflammation function. Therefore, we hypothesized that valsartan protects against myocardial I/R injury by suppressing TLR4 activation. We constructed the rat model of myocardial I/R injury. The rats were pretreated with valsartan for 2 weeks, and then subjected to 30 min ischemia and 2 h reperfusion. TLR4 and Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) levels were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. In order to evaluate myocardial damage, the myocardial infarct size, histopathologic changes, and the release of myocardial enzymes, proinflammation cytokines and Angiotensin II were analyzed by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, light microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Valsartan preconditioning inhibited TLR4 and NF-kappaB expressions concomitant with an improvement in myocardial injury, such as smaller infarct size, fewer release of myocardial enzymes, and proinflammation mediators. These findings suggest that valsartan plays a pivotal role in the protective effects on myocardial I/R injury. This protection mechanism is possibly due to its anti-inflammation function via TLR4/NF-kappaB signaling pathway. PMID:19370315

  7. Albumin stimulates renal tubular inflammation through an HSP70-TLR4 axis in mice with early diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jheng, Huei-Fen; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Yi-Lun; Shen, Yi-Ting; Tai, Ting-An; Chen, Wen-Chung; Chou, Chuan-Kai; Ho, Li-Chun; Tang, Ming-Jer; Lai, Kuei-Tai A.; Sung, Junne-Ming; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increased urinary albumin excretion is not simply an aftermath of glomerular injury, but is also involved in the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Whereas Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are incriminated in the renal inflammation of DN, whether and how albumin is involved in the TLR-related renal inflammatory response remains to be clarified. Here, we showed that both TLR2 and TLR4, one of their putative endogenous ligands [heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)] and nuclear factor-κB promoter activity were markedly elevated in the kidneys of diabetic mice. A deficiency of TLR4 but not of TLR2 alleviated albuminuria, tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation induced by diabetes. The protection against renal injury in diabetic Tlr4−/− mice was associated with reduced tubular injuries and preserved cubilin levels, rather than amelioration of glomerular lesions. In vitro studies revealed that albumin, a stronger inducer than high glucose (HG), induced the release of HSP70 from proximal tubular cells. HSP70 blockade ameliorated albumin-induced inflammatory mediators. HSP70 triggered the production of inflammatory mediators in a TLR4-dependent manner. Moreover, HSP70 inhibition in vivo ameliorated diabetes-induced albuminuria, inflammatory response and tubular injury. Finally, we found that individuals with DN had higher levels of TLR4 and HSP70 in the dilated tubules than non-diabetic controls. Thus, activation of the HSP70-TLR4 axis, stimulated at least in part by albumin, in the tubular cell is a newly identified mechanism associated with induction of tubulointerstitial inflammation and aggravation of pre-existing microalbuminuria in the progression of DN. PMID:26398934

  8. Involvement of TLR2 and TLR4 in inflammatory immune responses induced by fine and coarse ambient air particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfelt, Joanna; Mitkus, Robert J.; Zeisler, Rolf; Spatz, Rabia O.; Powell, Jan; Fenton, Matthew J.; Squibb, Katherine A.; Medvedev, Andrei E.

    2009-01-01

    Induction of proinflammatory mediators by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient air particulate matter has been suggested to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and allergic diseases in the lungs. However, receptors and mechanisms underlying these responses have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether TLR2, TLR4, and the key adaptor protein, MyD88, mediate the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to fine and coarse PM. TLR2 deficiency blunted macrophage TNF-α and IL-6 expression in response to fine (PM2.5), while not affecting cytokine-inducing ability of coarse NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM 1648) particles. In contrast, TLR4−/− macrophages showed inhibited cytokine expression upon stimulation with NIST SRM 1648 but exhibited normal responses to PM2.5. Preincubation with polymyxin B markedly suppressed the capacity of NIST SRM 1648 to elicit TNF-α and IL-6, indicating endotoxin as a principal inducer of cytokine responses. Overexpression of TLR2 in TLR2/4-deficient human embryonic kidney 293 cells imparted PM2.5 sensitivity, as judged by IL-8 gene expression, whereas NIST SRM 1648, but not PM2.5 elicited IL-8 expression in 293/TLR4/MD-2 transfectants. Engagement of TLR4 by NIST SRM 1648 induced MyD88-independent expression of the chemokine RANTES, while TLR2-reactive NIST IRM PM2.5 failed to up-regulate this response. Consistent with the shared use of MyD88 by TLR2 and TLR4, cytokine responses of MyD88−/− macrophages to both types of air PM were significantly reduced. These data indicate differential utilization of TLR2 and TLR4 but shared use of MyD88 by fine and coarse air pollution particles. PMID:19406832

  9. A Common Variant in the Telomerase RNA Component Is Associated with Short Telomere Length

    PubMed Central

    Njajou, Omer T.; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Mangino, Massimo; Damcott, Coleen M.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Spector, Timothy D.; Newman, Anne B.; Harris, Tamara B.; Cummings, Steven R.; Cawthon, Richard M.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Valdes, Ana M.; Hsueh, Wen-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Background Telomeres shorten as cells divide. This shortening is compensated by the enzyme telomerase. We evaluated the effect of common variants in the telomerase RNA component (TERC) gene on telomere length (TL) in the population-based Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study and in two replication samples (the TwinsUK Study and the Amish Family Osteoporosis Study, AFOS). Methodology Five variants were identified in the TERC region by sequence analysis and only one SNP was common (rs2293607, G/A). The frequency of the G allele was 0.26 and 0.07 in white and black, respectively. Testing for association between TL and rs2293607 was performed using linear regression models or variance component analysis conditioning on relatedness among subjects. Results The adjusted mean TL was significantly shorter in 665 white carriers of the G allele compared to 887 non-carriers from the Health ABC Study (4.69±0.05 kbp vs. 4.86±0.04 kbp, measured by quantitative PCR, p = 0.005). This association was replicated in another white sample from the TwinsUK Study (6.90±0.03 kbp in 301 carriers compared to 7.06±0.03 kbp in 395 non-carriers, measured by Southern blots, p = 0.009). A similar pattern of association was observed in whites from the family-based AFOS and blacks from the Health ABC cohort, although not statistically significant, possibly due to the lower allele frequency in these populations. Combined analysis using 2,953 white subjects from 3 studies showed a significant association between TL and rs2293607 (β = −0.19±0.04 kbp, p = 0.001). Conclusion Our study shows a significant association between a common variant in TERC and TL in humans, suggesting that TERC may play a role in telomere homeostasis. PMID:20885959

  10. A common variant in MTHFR influences response to chemoradiotherapy and recurrence of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nikas, Jason B; Lee, Janet T; Maring, Elizabeth D; Washechek-Aletto, Jill; Felmlee-Devine, Donna; Johnson, Ruth A; Smyrk, Thomas C; Tawadros, Patrick S; Boardman, Lisa A; Steer, Clifford J

    2015-01-01

    An important determinant of the pathogenesis and prognosis of various diseases is inherited genetic variation. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variations at a single base position, have been identified in both protein-coding and noncoding DNA sequences, but the vast majority of millions of those variants are far from being functionally understood. Here we show that a common variant in the gene MTHFR [rs1801133 (C>T)] not only influences response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer, but it also influences recurrence of the disease itself. More specifically, patients with the homozygous ancestral (wild type) genotype (C/C) were 2.91 times more likely (291% increased benefit) to respond to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy {95% CI: [1.23, 6.89]; P=0.0150} and 3.25 times more likely (325% increased benefit) not to experience recurrence of the disease {95% CI: [1.37, 7.72]; P=0.0079} than patients with either the heterozygous (C/T) or the homozygous mutation (T/T) genotype. These results identify MTHFR as an important genetic marker and open up new, pharmacogenomic strategies in the treatment and management of rectal cancer. PMID:26693073

  11. A common missense variant in NUDT15 confers susceptibility to thiopurine-induced leukopenia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Suk-Kyun; Hong, Myunghee; Baek, Jiwon; Choi, Hyunchul; Zhao, Wanting; Jung, Yusun; Haritunians, Talin; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Park, Sang Hyoung; Park, Soo-Kyung; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Dubinsky, Marla; Lee, Inchul; McGovern, Dermot P B; Liu, Jianjun; Song, Kyuyoung

    2016-01-01

    Thiopurine therapy, commonly used in autoimmune conditions, can be complicated by life-threatening leukopenia. This leukopenia is associated with genetic variation in TPMT (encoding thiopurine S-methyltransferase). Despite a lower frequency of TPMT mutations in Asians, the incidence of thiopurine-induced leukopenia is higher in Asians than in individuals of European descent. Here we performed an Immunochip-based 2-stage association study in 978 Korean subjects with Crohn’s disease treated with thiopurines. We identified a nonsynonymous SNP in NUDT15 (encoding p.Arg139Cys) that was strongly associated with thiopurine-induced early leukopenia (odds ratio (OR) = 35.6; Pcombined = 4.88 × 10−94). In Koreans, this variant demonstrated sensitivity and specificity of 89.4% and 93.2%, respectively, for thiopurine-induced early leukopenia (in comparison to 12.1% and 97.6% for TPMT variants). Although rare, this SNP was also strongly associated with thiopurine-induced leukopenia in subjects with inflammatory bowel disease of European descent (OR = 9.50; P = 4.64 × 10−4). Thus, NUDT15 is a pharmacogenetic determinant for thiopurine-induced leukopenia in diverse populations. PMID:25108385

  12. Association of Common Variants in the Glucocerebrosidase Gene with High Susceptibility to Parkinson's Disease among Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Bao, Qiong-Qiong; Zhuang, Xiao-Sai; Gan, Shi-Rui; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Yun; Hu, Qiao; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Feiyan; Wang, Lian; Wang, Ning

    2012-12-31

    The genetic variants in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene have been previously examined as potential susceptibility factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). Although of great interest, possible role of GBA gene in PD has not been well investigated in eastern Chinese population. To explore this association, we conducted a genetic screen of three common GBA variants (p.L444P, p.N370S, and p.R120W) in a casecontrol cohort comprised of 638 subjects of Chinese ethnicity. In order to provide a more precise estimate of this association, a meta-analysis was performed. We found that the GBA p.L444P allele was significantly more frequent (P = 0.001) in the PD patients (6/195 = 3.08%) than in the controls (0/443). The p.L444P mutation, but not p.N370S and p.R120W, was found to be associated with PD. Combined analysis including all previously published ancestral Chinese data yielded a highly significant association between the GBA gene and an increased risk for PD (OR = 8.13, 95% CI, 4.43-14.92, P < 0.00001). Our study suggests that the GBA gene may be a susceptibility gene for PD in the Chinese population. Efforts to elucidate in detail this interesting and biologically plausible genetic association are warranted. PMID:23286447

  13. Common variants at 7p21 are associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions

    PubMed Central

    Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Wang, Li-San; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F.; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E.; Mann, David M.A.; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M.; Seelaar, Harro; Heutink, Peter; van Swieten, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Grafman, Jordan; Hodges, John; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Gilman, Sid'; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Woltjer, Randall L.; Bigio, Eileen H; Mesulam, Marsel; al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; Rosenberg, Roger N.; White, Charles L.; Ferrer, Isidro; Lladó, Albert; Neumann, Manuela; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Hulette, Christine Marie; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Miller, Bruce L; Alzualde, Ainhoa; de Munain, Adolfo Lopez; McKee, Ann C.; Gearing, Marla; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Hardy, John; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Lashley, Tammaryn; Mackenzie, Ian R.A.; Feldman, Howard H.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Dekosky, Steven T.; van der Zee, Julie; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Mayeux, Richard; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Kril, Jillian J; Kwok, John B.J.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Bird, Thomas D.; Ince, Paul G.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Morris, John C.; McLean, Catriona Ann; DeCarli, Charles; Ellis, William G.; Freeman, Stefanie H.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Growdon, John H.; Perl, Daniel P.; Sano, Mary; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.; Beach, Thomas G.; Reiman, Eric M.; Woodruff, Bryan K.; Cummings, Jeffrey; Vinters, Harry V.; Miller, Carol A.; Chui, Helena C.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Hartikainen, Päivi; Seilhean, Danielle; Galasko, Douglas; Masliah, Eliezer; Cotman, Carl W.; Tuñón, M. Teresa; Martínez, M. Cristina Caballero; Munoz, David G.; Carroll, Steven L.; Marson, Daniel; Riederer, Peter F.; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the second most common cause of presenile dementia. The predominant neuropathology is FTLD with TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) inclusions (FTLD-TDP)1. FTLD-TDP is frequently familial resulting from progranulin (GRN) mutations. We assembled an international collaboration to identify susceptibility loci for FTLD-TDP, using genome-wide association (GWA). We found that FTLD-TDP associates with multiple SNPs mapping to a single linkage disequilibrium (LD) block on 7p21 that contains TMEM106B in a GWA study (GWAS) on 515 FTLD-TDP cases. Three SNPs retained genome-wide significance following Bonferroni correction; top SNP rs1990622 (P=1.08×10−11; odds ratio (OR) minor allele (C) 0.61, 95% CI 0.53-0.71). The association replicated in 89 FTLD-TDP cases (rs1990622; P=2×10−4). TMEM106B variants may confer risk by increasing TMEM106B expression. TMEM106B variants also contribute to genetic risk for FTLD-TDP in patients with GRN mutations. Our data implicate TMEM106B as a strong risk factor for FTLD-TDP suggesting an underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:20154673

  14. IL-12 family members: differential kinetics of their TLR4-mediated induction by Salmonella enteritidis and the impact of IL-10 in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schuetze, Nicole; Schoeneberger, Sabine; Mueller, Uwe; Freudenberg, Marina A; Alber, Gottfried; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2005-05-01

    The members of the IL-12 family of heterodimeric cytokines play a pivotal role in initiation and regulation of cell-mediated immunity. Best known is IL-12p70, which promotes an immune response towards T(h)1 bias. Other members of this family (IL-23, IL-27) are less well characterized in terms of induction and function. Using either heat-killed or viable Salmonella Enteritidis or LPS as a stimulus, the kinetics of mRNA production of each member of the IL-12 family (p19, p28, p35, p40, Ebstein-Barr-Virus-induced gene 3 (EBI-3)) were determined in BMDMPhi originating from wild-type, Toll-like receptor (TLR)2- and/or TLR4-deficient mice. It was found that following either type of stimulation, a characteristic mRNA expression pattern was observed for each cytokine subunit. Whereas p19 was induced early and transiently, p40 and p35 were up-regulated later and then continuously, but the secretion of IL-23 and IL-12p70 was significantly reduced by IL-10. The up-regulation of p28 mRNA occurred also delayed and declined afterwards, whereas the initial high-level expression of EBI-3 remained almost unchanged in BMDMPhi. Furthermore, a splice variant of the EBI-3 mRNA was discovered. In this context, the cytokine mRNA up-regulation by whole Salmonella Enteritidis is mediated chiefly by TLR4, but depends on additional pattern recognition receptors other than TLR2 expressed by macrophages. PMID:15837713

  15. Sesquiterpenoids from the Rhizomes of Curcuma phaeocaulis and Their Inhibitory Effects on LPS-Induced TLR4 Activation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Jin-Han; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Kim, Min-Suk; Jo, Jin Ha; Jung, Kyungsook; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Young-Ho; Lee, Woo Song; Lee, Seung Woong; Rho, Mun-Chual

    2016-01-01

    Two new guaiane-type (2, 6) and one new furanogermacrane-type (11) sesquiterpenoids have been isolated along with twelve known compounds from an EtOAc-soluble extract of Curcuma phaeocaulis rhizomes. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated using a combination of NMR, MS, and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. The inhibitory effects of each compound on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in THP-1-Blue cells were assessed, and compound 4 showed more potent inhibitory activity against LPS-stimulated TLR4 activation. PMID:27373668

  16. Heme triggers TLR4 signaling leading to endothelial cell activation and vaso-occlusion in murine sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Belcher, John D; Chen, Chunsheng; Nguyen, Julia; Milbauer, Liming; Abdulla, Fuad; Alayash, Abdu I; Smith, Ann; Nath, Karl A; Hebbel, Robert P; Vercellotti, Gregory M

    2014-01-16

    Treatment of sickle cell disease (SCD) is hampered by incomplete understanding of pathways linking hemolysis to vaso-occlusion. We investigated these pathways in transgenic sickle mice. Infusion of hemoglobin or heme triggered vaso-occlusion in sickle, but not normal, mice. Methemoglobin, but not heme-stabilized cyanomethemoglobin, induced vaso-occlusion, indicating heme liberation is necessary. In corroboration, hemoglobin-induced vaso-occlusion was blocked by the methemoglobin reducing agent methylene blue, haptoglobin, or the heme-binding protein hemopexin. Untreated HbSS mice, but not HbAA mice, exhibited ∼10% vaso-occlusion in steady state that was inhibited by haptoglobin or hemopexin infusion. Antibody blockade of adhesion molecules P-selectin, von Willebrand factor (VWF), E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, platelet endothelial cell (EC) adhesion molecule 1, α4β1, or αVβ3 integrin prevented vaso-occlusion. Heme rapidly (5 minutes) mobilized Weibel-Palade body (WPB) P-selectin and VWF onto EC and vessel wall surfaces and activated EC nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). This was mediated by TLR4 as TAK-242 blocked WPB degranulation, NF-κB activation, vaso-occlusion, leukocyte rolling/adhesion, and heme lethality. TLR4(-/-) mice transplanted with TLR4(+/+) sickle bone marrow exhibited no heme-induced vaso-occlusion. The TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated ECs and triggered vaso-occlusion that was inhibited by TAK-242, linking hemolysis- and infection-induced vaso-occlusive crises to TLR4 signaling. Heme and LPS failed to activate VWF and NF-κB in TLR4(-/-) ECs. Anti-LPS immunoglobulin G blocked LPS-induced, but not heme-induced, vaso-occlusion, illustrating LPS-independent TLR4 signaling by heme. Inhibition of protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase, or antioxidant treatment blocked heme-mediated stasis, WPB degranulation, and oxidant production. We conclude that intravascular hemolysis in SCD releases heme

  17. TLR4-dependent activation of inflammatory cytokine response in macrophages by Francisella elongation factor Tu1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jyotika; Mishra, Bibhuti B.; Li, Qun; Teale, Judy M.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial determinants of pulmonary Francisella induced inflammatory responses and their interaction with host components are not clearly defined. In this study, proteomic and immunoblot analyses showed presence of a cytoplasmic protein elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) in the membrane fractions of virulent F. novicida, LVS and SchuS4, but not in an attenuated F. novicida mutant. EF-Tu was immunodominant in mice vaccinated and protected from virulent F. novicida. Moreover, recombinant EF-Tu induced macrophages to produce inflammatory cytokines in a TLR4 dependent manner. This study shows immune stimulatory properties of a cytoplasmic protein EF-Tu expressed on the membrane of virulent Francisella strains. PMID:21497800

  18. Association of TLR4 and Treg in Helicobacter pylori Colonization and Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lei; Liu, Dongsheng; Hu, Sijun; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Nanjin; Xie, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The host immune response plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to clarify the immune pathogenic mechanism of Helicobacter pylori infection via TLR signaling and gastric mucosal Treg cells in mice. To discover the underlying mechanism, we selectively blocked the TLR signaling pathway and subpopulations of regulatory T cells in the gastric mucosa of mice, and examined the consequences on H. pylori infection and inflammatory response as measured by MyD88, NF-κB p65, and Foxp3 protein expression levels and the levels of Th1, Th17 and Th2 cytokines in the gastric mucosa. We determined that blocking TLR4 signaling in H. pylori infected mice decreased the numbers of Th1 and Th17 Treg cells compared to controls (P < 0.001–0.05), depressed the immune response as measured by inflammatory grade (P < 0.05), and enhanced H. pylori colonization (P < 0.05). In contrast, blocking CD25 had the opposite effects, wherein the Th1 and Th17 cell numbers were increased (P < 0.001–0.05), immune response was enhanced (P < 0.05), and H. pylori colonization was inhibited (P < 0.05) compared to the non-blocked group. In both blocked groups, the Th2 cytokine IL-4 remained unchanged, although IL-10 in the CD25 blocked group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MyD88, NF-κB p65, and Foxp3 in the non-blocked group were significantly lower than those in the TLR4 blocked group (P < 0.05), but significantly higher than those of the CD25 blocked group (P < 0.05). Together, these results suggest that there might be an interaction between TLR signaling and Treg cells that is important for limiting H. pylori colonization and suppressing the inflammatory response of infected mice. PMID:26901645

  19. TLR4, NOD1 and NOD2 mediate immune recognition of putative newly identified periodontal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, J; Jiao, Y Z; Schaff, R A; Hao, J; Morelli, T; Kinney, J S; Gerow, E; Sheridan, R; Rodrigues, V; Paster, B J; Inohara, N; Giannobile, W V

    2016-06-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that results from the interaction between the oral microbiota and the host immunity. Although the innate immune response is important for disease initiation and progression, the innate immune receptors that recognize both classical and putative periodontal pathogens that elicit an immune response have not been elucidated. By using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM), we identified multiple predominant oral bacterial species in human plaque biofilm that strongly associate with severe periodontitis. Ten of the identified species were evaluated in greater depth, six being classical pathogens and four putative novel pathogens. Using human peripheral blood monocytes (HPBM) and murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from wild-type (WT) and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific and MyD88 knockouts (KOs), we demonstrated that heat-killed Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, Selenomonas infelix, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia mediate high immunostimulatory activity. Campylobacter concisus, C. rectus, and S. infelix exhibited robust TLR4 stimulatory activity. Studies using mesothelial cells from WT and NOD1-specific KOs and NOD2-expressing human embryonic kidney cells demonstrated that Eubacterium saphenum, Eubacterium nodatum and Filifactor alocis exhibit robust NOD1 stimulatory activity, and that Porphyromonas endodontalis and Parvimonas micra have the highest NOD2 stimulatory activity. These studies allowed us to provide important evidence on newly identified putative pathogens in periodontal disease pathogenesis showing that these bacteria exhibit different immunostimulatory activity via TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01154855). PMID:26177212

  20. Procyanidin dimer B2-mediated IRAK-M induction negatively regulates TLR4 signaling in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sub; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Byun, Eui-Hong

    2013-08-16

    Polyphenolic compounds have been found to possess a wide range of physiological activities that may contribute to their beneficial effects against inflammation-related diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this anti-inflammatory activity are not completely characterized, and many features remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for the down-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal transduction by procyanidin dimer B2 (Pro B2) in macrophages. Pro B2 markedly elevated the expression of the interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-M protein, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of cell surface molecules (CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II) and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70) were inhibited by Pro B2, and this action was prevented by IRAK-M silencing. In addition, Pro B2-treated macrophages inhibited LPS-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and the translocation of nuclear factor κB and p65 through IRAK-M. We also found that Pro B2-treated macrophages inactivated naïve T cells by inhibiting LPS-induced interferon-γ and IL-2 secretion through IRAK-M. These novel findings provide new insights into the understanding of negative regulatory mechanisms of the TLR4 signaling pathway and the immune-pharmacological role of Pro B2 in the immune response against the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:23872113

  1. Group X secretory phospholipase A2 enhances TLR4 signaling in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M; Talbott, Kayla R; Oslund, Rob C; Gelb, Michael H; Webb, Nancy R

    2011-07-01

    Secretory phospholipase A(2)s (sPLA(2)) hydrolyze glycerophospholipids to liberate lysophospholipids and free fatty acids. Although group X (GX) sPLA(2) is recognized as the most potent mammalian sPLA(2) in vitro, its precise physiological function(s) remains unclear. We recently reported that GX sPLA(2) suppresses activation of the liver X receptor in macrophages, resulting in reduced expression of liver X receptor-responsive genes including ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1), and a consequent decrease in cellular cholesterol efflux and increase in cellular cholesterol content (Shridas et al. 2010. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 30: 2014-2021). In this study, we provide evidence that GX sPLA(2) modulates macrophage inflammatory responses by altering cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Transgenic expression or exogenous addition of GX sPLA(2) resulted in a significantly higher induction of TNF-α, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 in J774 macrophage-like cells in response to LPS. This effect required GX sPLA(2) catalytic activity, and was abolished in macrophages that lack either TLR4 or MyD88. The hypersensitivity to LPS in cells overexpressing GX sPLA(2) was reversed when cellular free cholesterol was normalized using cyclodextrin. Consistent with results from gain-of-function studies, peritoneal macrophages from GX sPLA(2)-deficient mice exhibited a significantly dampened response to LPS. Plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines were significantly lower in GX sPLA(2)-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice after LPS administration. Thus, GX sPLA(2) amplifies signaling through TLR4 by a mechanism that is dependent on its catalytic activity. Our data indicate this effect is mediated through alterations in plasma membrane free cholesterol and lipid raft content. PMID:21622863

  2. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  3. TBX6 Null Variants and a Common Hypomorphic Allele in Congenital Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N.; Ming, X.; Xiao, J.; Wu, Z.; Chen, X.; Shinawi, M.; Shen, Y.; Yu, G.; Liu, J.; Xie, H.; Gucev, Z.S.; Liu, S.; Yang, N.; Al-Kateb, H.; Chen, J.; Zhang, Jian; Hauser, N.; Zhang, T.; Tasic, V.; Liu, P.; Su, X.; Pan, X.; Liu, C.; Wang, L.; Shen, Joseph; Shen, Jianxiong; Chen, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Jianguo; Choy, K.W.; Wang, Jun; Wang, Q.; Li, S.; Zhou, W.; Guo, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, H.; An, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, Jiucun; Liu, Z.; Zuo, Y.; Tian, Y.; Weng, X.; Sutton, V.R.; Wang, H.; Ming, Y.; Kulkarni, S.; Zhong, T.P.; Giampietro, P.F.; Dunwoodie, S.L.; Cheung, S.W.; Zhang, X.; Jin, L.; Lupski, J.R.; Qiu, G.; Zhang, F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital scoliosis is a common type of vertebral malformation. Genetic susceptibility has been implicated in congenital scoliosis. METHODS We evaluated 161 Han Chinese persons with sporadic congenital scoliosis, 166 Han Chinese controls, and 2 pedigrees, family members of which had a 16p11.2 deletion, using comparative genomic hybridization, quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction analysis, and DNA sequencing. We carried out tests of replication using an additional series of 76 Han Chinese persons with congenital scoliosis and a multi-center series of 42 persons with 16p11.2 deletions. RESULTS We identified a total of 17 heterozygous TBX6 null mutations in the 161 persons with sporadic congenital scoliosis (11%); we did not observe any null mutations in TBX6 in 166 controls (P<3.8×10−6). These null alleles include copy-number variants (12 instances of a 16p11.2 deletion affecting TBX6) and single-nucleotide variants (1 nonsense and 4 frame-shift mutations). However, the discordant intrafamilial phenotypes of 16p11.2 deletion carriers suggest that heterozygous TBX6 null mutation is insufficient to cause congenital scoliosis. We went on to identify a common TBX6 haplotype as the second risk allele in all 17 carriers of TBX6 null mutations (P<1.1×10−6). Replication studies involving additional persons with congenital scoliosis who carried a deletion affecting TBX6 confirmed this compound inheritance model. In vitro functional assays suggested that the risk haplotype is a hypomorphic allele. Hemivertebrae are characteristic of TBX6-associated congenital scoliosis. CONCLUSIONS Compound inheritance of a rare null mutation and a hypomorphic allele of TBX6 accounted for up to 11% of congenital scoliosis cases in the series that we analyzed. PMID:25564734

  4. Inactivation of a common OGG1 variant by TNF-alpha in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Morreall, Jordan; Limpose, Kristin; Sheppard, Clayton; Kow, Yoke Wah; Werner, Erica; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species threaten genomic integrity by inducing oxidative DNA damage. One common form of oxidative DNA damage is the mutagenic lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG). One driver of oxidative stress that can induce 8-oxodG is inflammation, which can be initiated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Oxidative DNA damage is primarily repaired by the base excision repair pathway, initiated by glycosylases targeting specific DNA lesions. 8-oxodG is excised by 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1). A common Ogg1 allelic variant is S326C-Ogg1, prevalent in Asian and Caucasian populations. S326C-Ogg1 is associated with various forms of cancer, and S326C-OGG1 is inactivated by oxidation. However, whether oxidative stress caused by inflammatory cytokines compromises OGG1 variant repair activity remains unknown. We addressed whether TNF-α causes oxidative stress that both induces DNA damage and inactivates S326C-OGG1 via cysteine 326 oxidation. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that S326C-OGG1 was inactivated only after exposure to H2O2 or TNF-α. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prior to oxidative stress rescued S326C-OGG1 activity, demonstrated by in vitro and cellular repair assays. In contrast, S326C-OGG1 activity was unaffected by potassium bromate, which induces oxidative DNA damage without causing oxidative stress, and presumably cysteine oxidation. This study reveals that Cys326 is vulnerable to oxidation that inactivates S326C-OGG1. Physiologically relevant levels of TNF-α simultaneously induce 8-oxodG and inactivate S326C-OGG1. These results suggest a mechanism that could contribute to increased risk of cancer among S326C-Ogg1 homozygous individuals. PMID:25534136

  5. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    -wide association studies, demonstrate that a myriad of common variants of very small effect impacts ASD liability. PMID:23067556

  6. Impaired Innate Immunity in Tlr4−/− Mice but Preserved CD8+ T Cell Responses against Trypanosoma cruzi in Tlr4-, Tlr2-, Tlr9- or Myd88-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Klezewsky, Weberton; da Silva, Raquel N.; Neves, Fabieni S.; Cavalcanti, Gisele S.; Boscardin, Silvia; Nunes, Marise P.; Santiago, Marcelo F.; Nóbrega, Alberto; Rodrigues, Maurício M.; Bellio, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The murine model of T. cruzi infection has provided compelling evidence that development of host resistance against intracellular protozoans critically depends on the activation of members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family via the MyD88 adaptor molecule. However, the possibility that TLR/MyD88 signaling pathways also control the induction of immunoprotective CD8+ T cell-mediated effector functions has not been investigated to date. We addressed this question by measuring the frequencies of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells specific for H-2Kb-restricted immunodominant peptides as well as the in vivo Ag-specific cytotoxic response in infected animals that are deficient either in TLR2, TLR4, TLR9 or MyD88 signaling pathways. Strikingly, we found that T. cruzi-infected Tlr2−/−, Tlr4−/−, Tlr9−/− or Myd88−/− mice generated both specific cytotoxic responses and IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells at levels comparable to WT mice, although the frequency of IFN-γ+CD4+ cells was diminished in infected Myd88−/− mice. We also analyzed the efficiency of TLR4-driven immune responses against T. cruzi using TLR4-deficient mice on the C57BL genetic background (B6 and B10). Our studies demonstrated that TLR4 signaling is required for optimal production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) in the spleen of infected animals and, as a consequence, Tlr4−/− mice display higher parasitemia levels. Collectively, our results indicate that TLR4, as well as previously shown for TLR2, TLR9 and MyD88, contributes to the innate immune response and, consequently, resistance in the acute phase of infection, although each of these pathways is not individually essential for the generation of class I-restricted responses against T. cruzi. PMID:20442858

  7. Genetic association of TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR4 Thr399Ile, and CD14 C-159T polymorphisms with the risk of severe RSV infection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiahui; Zhang, Xiangning; Liu, Shuming; Wang, Ziyou; Chen, Qicong; Wu, Yongfu; He, Zhiwei; Huang, Zunnan

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of hospitalization in infants worldwide. It is recognized by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR 4) and cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) in the innate immune response. Previous case-control studies reported the influence of TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR4 Thr399Ile, and CD14 C-159T polymorphisms on the risk of severe RSV infection. However, a decisive conclusion has not been achieved. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to examine the association between these three polymorphisms and the development of RSV bronchiolitis. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, EMbase, Google Scholar Search, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biological Medicine, and Wanfang Databases. The data were extracted and pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated under six genetic models. A total of six studies with 1009 cases and 1348 controls, three studies with 473 cases and 481 controls, or four studies with 325 cases and 650 controls relating to each of the three polymorphisms were included in this meta-analysis. The analyzed data indicated that all of these polymorphisms were not associated with the risk of severe RSV infection. This is the first meta-analysis to investigate the relationship of TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR4 Thr399Ile, and CD14 C-159T polymorphisms with the risk of severe RSV infection. Although the results of this retrospective analysis indicated a lack of the association, more extensive multicentric studies with large sample sizes are necessary to provide a more reliable estimation of the association between these three polymorphisms and RSV bronchiolitis susceptibility. PMID:26901241

  8. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect.

    PubMed

    Romanelli Tavares, Vanessa L; Gordon, Christopher T; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy Mizue; Voisin, Norine; Tan, Tiong Y; Heggie, Andrew A; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Propst, Evan J; Papsin, Blake C; Torres, Tatiana T; Buermans, Henk; Capelo, Luciane Portas; den Dunnen, Johan T; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-04-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1-EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-q23.3 and two de novo variants in simplex cases. Two variants occur in known functional motifs, the G1 and G4 boxes, and the third variant is one amino acid outside of the G1 box. Structural modeling shows that all five altered GNAI3 residues identified to date cluster in a region involved in GDP/GTP binding. We hypothesize that all GNAI3 variants lead to dominant negative effects. PMID:25026904

  9. Novel variants in GNAI3 associated with auriculocondylar syndrome strengthen a common dominant negative effect

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli Tavares, Vanessa L; Gordon, Christopher T; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy Mizue; Voisin, Norine; Tan, Tiong Y; Heggie, Andrew A; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Propst, Evan J; Papsin, Blake C; Torres, Tatiana T; Buermans, Henk; Capelo, Luciane Portas; den Dunnen, Johan T; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-01-01

    Auriculocondylar syndrome is a rare craniofacial disorder comprising core features of micrognathia, condyle dysplasia and question mark ear. Causative variants have been identified in PLCB4, GNAI3 and EDN1, which are predicted to function within the EDN1–EDNRA pathway during early pharyngeal arch patterning. To date, two GNAI3 variants in three families have been reported. Here we report three novel GNAI3 variants, one segregating with affected members in a family previously linked to 1p21.1-q23.3 and two de novo variants in simplex cases. Two variants occur in known functional motifs, the G1 and G4 boxes, and the third variant is one amino acid outside of the G1 box. Structural modeling shows that all five altered GNAI3 residues identified to date cluster in a region involved in GDP/GTP binding. We hypothesize that all GNAI3 variants lead to dominant negative effects. PMID:25026904

  10. Fragmented sleep accelerates tumor growth and progression through recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fahed; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley XL; Zheng, Jiamao; Yolcu, Esma S.; Carreras, Alba; Khlayfa, Abdelnaby; Shirwan, Haval; Almendros, Isaac; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Fragmented sleep (SF) is a highly prevalent condition and a hallmark of sleep apnea, a condition that has been associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that SF promotes tumor growth and progression through pro-inflammatory TLR4 signaling. In the design, we compared mice that were exposed to SF one week before engraftment of syngeneic TC1 or LL3 tumor cells and tumor analysis three weeks later. We also compared host contributions through the use of mice genetically deficient in TLR4 or its effector molecules MYD88 or TRIF. We found that SF enhanced tumor size and weight compared to control mice. Increased invasiveness was apparent in SF tumors, which penetrated the tumor capsule into surrounding tissues including adjacent muscle. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were more numerous in SF tumors where they were distributed in a relatively closer proximity to the tumor capsule, compared to control mice. Although tumors were generally smaller in both MYD88−/− and TRIF−/− hosts, the more aggressive features produced by SF persisted. In contrast, these more aggressive features produced by SF were abolished completely in TLR4−/− mice. Our findings offer mechanistic insights into how sleep perturbations can accelerate tumor growth and invasiveness through TAM recruitment and TLR4 signaling pathways. PMID:24448240

  11. HELIGMOSOMOIDES POLYGYRUS INDUCES TLR4 ON MURINE MUCOSAL T CELLS THAT PRODUCE TGF-BETA AFTER LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE STIMULATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helminths are immune modulators that down-regulate colitis in inflammatory bowel disease. In animal models, intestinal bacteria drive colitis and in humans certain alleles of the LPS receptor protein TLR4 increase inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility. To understand helminthic immune modulation ...

  12. Acanthamoeba infection in lungs of mice expressed by toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4).

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Hadaś, Edward; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Wandurska-Nowak, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the innate immune responses to a variety of pathogens including parasites. TLRs are among the most highly conserved in the evolution of the receptor family, localized mainly on cells of the immune system and on other cells such as lung cells. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the lung of Acanthamoeba spp. infected mice using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. The Acanthamoeba spp. were isolated from a patient with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) (strain Ac 55) and from environmental samples of water from Malta Lake (Poznań, Poland - strain Ac 43). We observed a significantly increased level of expression of TLR2 as well as TLR4 mRNA from 2 to 30 days post Acanthamoeba infection (dpi) in the lungs of mice infected with Ac55 (KP120880) and Ac43 (KP120879) strains. According to our observations, increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the pneumocytes, interstitial cells and epithelial cells of the bronchial tree may suggest an important role of these receptors in protective immunity against Acanthamoeba infection in the lung. Moreover, increased levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in infected Acanthamoeba mice may suggest the involvement of these TLRs in the recognition of this amoeba pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). PMID:26940205

  13. Therapeutic Effects of Treatment with Anti-TLR2 and Anti-TLR4 Monoclonal Antibodies in Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Cristiano Xavier; Souza, Danielle Gloria; Amaral, Flavio Almeida; Fagundes, Caio Tavares; Rodrigues, Irla Paula Stopa; Alves-Filho, Jose Carlos; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Ferlin, Walter; Shang, Limin; Elson, Greg; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the recognition of microbial products and in host defense against infection. However, the massive release of inflammatory mediators into the bloodstream following TLR activation following sepsis is thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods Here, we evaluated the effects of preventive or therapeutic administration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting either TLR2 or TLR4 in a model of severe polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture in mice. Results Pre-treatment with anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 mAb alone showed significant protection from sepsis-associated death. Protective effects were observed even when the administration of either anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 alone was delayed (i.e., 3 h after sepsis induction). Delayed administration of either mAb in combination with antibiotics resulted in additive protection. Conclusion Although attempts to translate preclinical findings to clinical sepsis have failed so far, our preclinical experiments strongly suggest that there is a sufficient therapeutic window within which patients with ongoing sepsis could benefit from combined antibiotic plus anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 mAb treatment. PMID:26147469

  14. TLR4-mediated induction of TLR2 signaling is critical in the pathogenesis and resolution of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Leichtle, Anke; Hernandez, Michelle; Pak, Kwang; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Cheng, Chun-Fang; Webster, Nicholas J; Ryan, Allen F; Wasserman, Stephen I

    2009-08-01

    Otitis media is the most prevalent childhood disease in developed countries. The involvement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in otitis media pathophysiology has been implicated by studies in cell lines and association studies of TLR gene polymorphisms. However, precise functions of TLRs in the etiology of otitis media in vivo have not been examined. We investigated the inflammatory response to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae using a model of otitis media in wild-type, TLR2(- /-) and TLR4(-/ -) mice by gene microarray, qPCR, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis and histopathology. Toll-like receptor-2(- /-) and TLR4(- /-) mice exhibited a more profound, persistent inflammation with impaired bacterial clearance compared to controls. While wild-type mice induced tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF) after non-typeable H. influenzae challenge, TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice lack TNF induction in the early phase of otitis media. Moreover, lack of TLR2 resulted in a late increase in IL-10 expression and prolonged failure to clear bacteria. Toll-like receptor-4(-/- ) mice showed impaired early bacterial clearance and loss of TLR2 induction in early otitis media. Our results demonstrate that both TLR2 and TLR4 signalling are critical to the regulation of infection in non-typeable H. influenzae-induced otitis media. Toll-like receptor-4 signalling appears to induce TLR2 expression, and TLR2 activation is critical for bacterial clearance and timely resolution of otitis media. PMID:19586996

  15. A novel crosstalk between TLR4- and NOD2-mediated signaling in the regulation of intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hajeong; Zhao, Quanju; Zheng, Hua; Li, Xin; Zhang, Tuo; Ma, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Although Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2)-mediated signaling mechanisms have been extensively studied individually, the crosstalk between them in the regulation of intestinal mucosal defense and tissue homeostasis has been underappreciated. Here, we uncover some novel activities of NOD2 by gene expression profiling revealing the global nature of the cross-regulation between TLR4- and NOD2-mediated signaling. Specifically, NOD2 is able to sense the intensity of TLR4-mediated signaling, resulting in either synergistic stimulation of Interluekin-12 (IL-12) production when the TLR signaling intensity is low; or in the inhibition of IL-12 synthesis and maintenance of intestinal mucosal homeostasis when the TLR signaling intensifies. This balancing act is mediated through receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2, and the transcriptional regulator CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) via its serine 248 phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C. Mice deficient in C/EBPα in the hematopoietic compartment are highly susceptible to chemically induced experimental colitis in an IL-12-dependent manner. Additionally, in contrast to the dogma, we find that the major Crohn's disease-associated NOD2 mutations could cause a primarily immunodeficient phenotype by selectively impairing TLR4-mediated IL-12 production and host defense. To restore the impaired homeostasis would be a way forward to developing novel therapeutic strategies for inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26153766

  16. Dioscin ameliorates cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through the downregulation of TLR4 signaling via HMGB-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xufeng; Sun, Xiance; Yin, Lianhong; Han, Xu; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Li, Hua; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported the promising effect of dioscin against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, but its effect on cerebral I/R injury remains unknown. In this work, an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model and an in vivo middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model were used. The results indicated that dioscin clearly protected PC12 cells and primary cortical neurons against OGD/R insult and significantly prevented cerebral I/R injury. Further research demonstrated that dioscin-induced neuroprotection was accompanied by a significant inhibition in the expression and the nuclear to cytosolic translocation of HMGB-1, reflected by decreased TLR4 expression. Blockade of the TLR4/MyD88/TRAF6 signaling pathway by dioscin inhibited NF-κB and AP-1 transcriptional activities, MAPK and STAT3 phosphorylation, and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses, and upregulated the levels of anti-inflammatory factors. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) and overexpressed genes of HMGB-1 and TLR4 were applied in in vitro experiments, respectively, and the results further confirmed that dioscin showed an efficient neuroprotection because of its inhibiting effects on HMGB-1/TLR4 signaling and subsequent suppressing inflammation. These findings provide new insights that will aid in elucidating the effect of dioscin against cerebral I/R injury and support the development of dioscin as a potential treatment for ischemic stroke. PMID:25772012

  17. Annexin A2 binds to endosomes and negatively regulates TLR4-triggered inflammatory responses via the TRAM-TRIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Yu, Min; Guo, Qiang; Li, Rongpeng; Li, Guobo; Tan, Shirui; Li, Xuefeng; Wei, Yuquan; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from Gram-negative bacteria activates plasma membrane signaling via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on host cells and triggers innate inflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here we reveal a role for annexin A2 (AnxA2) in host defense against infection as anxa2−/− mice were highly susceptible to Gram-negative bacteria-induced sepsis with enhanced inflammatory responses. Computing analysis and biochemical experiments identified that constitutive AnxA2 expression facilitated TLR4 internalization and its subsequent translocation into early endosomal membranes. It activated the TRAM-dependent endosomal signaling, leading to the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, AnxA2 deficiency prolonged TLR4-mediated signaling from the plasma membrane, which was attributable to pro-inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, TNFα and IL-1β). Thus, AnxA2 directly exerted negative regulation of inflammatory responses through TLR4-initiated TRAM-TRIF pathway occurring on endosomes. This study reveals AnxA2 as a critical regulator in infection-initiated inflammation, which protects the host from excessive inflammatory damage. PMID:26527544

  18. A novel crosstalk between TLR4- and NOD2-mediated signaling in the regulation of intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajeong; Zhao, Quanju; Zheng, Hua; Li, Xin; Zhang, Tuo; Ma, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Although Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2)-mediated signaling mechanisms have been extensively studied individually, the crosstalk between them in the regulation of intestinal mucosal defense and tissue homeostasis has been underappreciated. Here, we uncover some novel activities of NOD2 by gene expression profiling revealing the global nature of the cross-regulation between TLR4- and NOD2-mediated signaling. Specifically, NOD2 is able to sense the intensity of TLR4-mediated signaling, resulting in either synergistic stimulation of Interluekin-12 (IL-12) production when the TLR signaling intensity is low; or in the inhibition of IL-12 synthesis and maintenance of intestinal mucosal homeostasis when the TLR signaling intensifies. This balancing act is mediated through receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2, and the transcriptional regulator CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) via its serine 248 phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C. Mice deficient in C/EBPα in the hematopoietic compartment are highly susceptible to chemically induced experimental colitis in an IL-12-dependent manner. Additionally, in contrast to the dogma, we find that the major Crohn’s disease-associated NOD2 mutations could cause a primarily immunodeficient phenotype by selectively impairing TLR4-mediated IL-12 production and host defense. To restore the impaired homeostasis would be a way forward to developing novel therapeutic strategies for inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26153766

  19. Mesenteric artery responsiveness to acetylcholine and phenylephrine in cirrhotic rats challenged with endotoxin: the role of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Tavangar, Seyed-Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Eftekhari, Golnar; Abdollahi, Alireza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2015-06-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with vascular dysfunction and endotoxemia. These experiments were designed to investigate the hypothesis that the administration of a low-dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) worsens vascular dysfunction in rats subjected to bile-duct ligation (BDL), and to determine whether LPS initiates changes in vascular Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression. Four weeks after BDL, the animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or LPS (1.0 mg/kg body mass). Three hours later, the superior mesenteric artery was isolated, perfused, and then subjected to the vasoconstriction and vasodilatation effects of phenylephrine and acetylcholine, respectively. Our results show that phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction decreased in the cirrhotic vascular bed (BDL rats) compared with the vascular bed of the sham-operated animals, and that the LPS injections in the cirrhotic (BDL) rats worsened this response. LPS injection administered to the sham-operated animals had no such effect. On the other hand, both the BDL procedure and the LPS injection increased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation, but LPS administration to the BDL rats had no effect on this response. The mRNA levels of TLR4 did not change, but immunohistochemical studies showed that TLR4 localization switched from the endothelium to vascular smooth muscle cells following chronic BDL. In conclusion, acute endotoxemia in cirrhotic rats is associated with hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine and tolerance to the effects of acetylcholine. Altered localization of TLR4 may be responsible for these effects. PMID:25978623

  20. Stimulation of TLR2 and TLR4 differentially skews the balance of T cells in a mouse model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Koenders, Marije I.; Devesa, Isabel; Roelofs, Mieke F.; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Heuvelmans-Jacobs, Marleen; Akira, Shizuo; Nicklin, Martin J.H.; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima; van den Berg, Wim B.

    2007-01-01

    TLRs may contribute to the progression of rheumatoid arthritis through recognition of microbial or host-derived ligands found in arthritic joints. Here, we show that TLR2 and TLR4, but not TLR9, are involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and play distinct roles in the regulation of T cells and cytokines. We investigated the involvement of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 in the progression of arthritis using IL-1 receptor antagonist–knockout (IL1rn–/–) mice, which spontaneously develop an autoimmune T cell–mediated arthritis. Spontaneous onset of arthritis was dependent on TLR activation by microbial flora, as germ-free mice did not develop arthritis. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of IL1rn–/–Tlr2–/– mice revealed more severe arthritis, characterized by reduced suppressive function of Tregs and substantially increased IFN-γ production by T cells. IL1rn–/–Tlr4–/– mice were, in contrast, protected against severe arthritis and had markedly lower numbers of Th17 cells and a reduced capacity to produce IL-17. A lack of Tlr9 did not affect the progression of arthritis. While any therapeutic intervention targeting TLR2 still seems complicated, the strict position of TLR4 upstream of a number of pathogenic cytokines including IL-17 provides an interesting potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:18060042

  1. Impact of Common Diabetes Risk Variant in MTNR1B on Sleep, Circadian, and Melatonin Physiology.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jacqueline M; Chang, Anne-Marie; Bjonnes, Andrew C; Aeschbach, Daniel; Anderson, Clare; Cade, Brian E; Cain, Sean W; Czeisler, Charles A; Gharib, Sina A; Gooley, Joshua J; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Grant, Struan F A; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Lauderdale, Diane S; Lockley, Steven W; Munch, Miriam; Patel, Sanjay; Punjabi, Naresh M; Rajaratnam, Shanthakumar M W; Rueger, Melanie; St Hilaire, Melissa A; Santhi, Nayantara; Scheuermaier, Karin; Van Reen, Eliza; Zee, Phyllis C; Shea, Steven A; Duffy, Jeanne F; Buxton, Orfeu M; Redline, Susan; Scheer, Frank A J L; Saxena, Richa

    2016-06-01

    The risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increased by abnormalities in sleep quantity and quality, circadian alignment, and melatonin regulation. A common genetic variant in a receptor for the circadian-regulated hormone melatonin (MTNR1B) is associated with increased fasting blood glucose and risk of T2D, but whether sleep or circadian disruption mediates this risk is unknown. We aimed to test if MTNR1B diabetes risk variant rs10830963 associates with measures of sleep or circadian physiology in intensive in-laboratory protocols (n = 58-96) or cross-sectional studies with sleep quantity and quality and timing measures from self-report (n = 4,307-10,332), actigraphy (n = 1,513), or polysomnography (n = 3,021). In the in-laboratory studies, we found a significant association with a substantially longer duration of elevated melatonin levels (41 min) and delayed circadian phase of dim-light melatonin offset (1.37 h), partially mediated through delayed offset of melatonin synthesis. Furthermore, increased T2D risk in MTNR1B risk allele carriers was more pronounced in early risers versus late risers as determined by 7 days of actigraphy. Our results provide the surprising insight that the MTNR1B risk allele influences dynamics of melatonin secretion, generating a novel hypothesis that the MTNR1B risk allele may extend the duration of endogenous melatonin production later into the morning and that early waking may magnify the diabetes risk conferred by the risk allele. PMID:26868293

  2. Rare Syndromes and Common Variants of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Han, J C

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders that cause BDNF haploinsufficiency, such as WAGR syndrome, 11p deletion, and 11p inversion, serve as models for understanding the role of BDNF in human energy balance and neurocognition. Patients with BDNF haploinsufficiency or inactivating mutations of the BDNF receptor exhibit hyperphagia, childhood-onset obesity, intellectual disability, and impaired nociception. Prader-Willi, Smith-Magenis, and ROHHAD syndromes are separate genetic disorders that do not directly affect the BDNF locus but share many similar clinical features with BDNF haploinsufficiency, and BDNF insufficiency is believed to possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of each of these conditions. In the general population, common variants of BDNF that affect BDNF gene expression or BDNF protein processing have also been associated with modest alterations in energy balance and cognitive functioning. Thus, variable degrees of BDNF insufficiency appear to contribute to a spectrum of excess weight gain and cognitive impairment that ranges in phenotypic severity. In this modern era of precision medicine, genotype-specific therapies aimed at increasing BDNF signaling in patients with rare and common disorders associated with BDNF insufficiency could serve as useful approaches for treating obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27288826

  3. Common genetic variants on 5p14.1 associate with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Ma, Deqiong; Bucan, Maja; Glessner, Joseph T.; Abrahams, Brett S.; Salyakina, Daria; Imielinski, Marcin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Takahashi, Nagahide; Sakurai, Takeshi; Rappaport, Eric; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Munson, Jeffrey; Estes, Annette; Korvatska, Olena; Piven, Joseph; Sonnenblick, Lisa I.; Retuerto, Ana I. Alvarez; Herman, Edward I.; Dong, Hongmei; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian; Ozonoff, Sally; Klin, Ami; Owley, Thomas; Sweeney, John A.; Brune, Camille W.; Cantor, Rita M.; Bernier, Raphael; Gilbert, John R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; McMahon, William M.; Miller, Judith; State, Matthew W.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Coon, Hilary; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Nurnberger, John I.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Cook, Edwin H.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Dawson, Geraldine; Grant, Struan F. A.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of childhood neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impairment of social interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of interests and behaviour. To identify common genetic risk factors underlying ASDs, here we present the results of genome-wide association studies on a cohort of 780 families (3,101 subjects) with affected children, and a second cohort of 1,204 affected subjects and 6,491 control subjects, all of whom were of European ancestry. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms between cadherin 10 (CDH10) and cadherin 9 (CDH9)—two genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules—revealed strong association signals, with the most significant SNP being rs4307059 (P = 3.4 × 10−8, odds ratio = 1.19). These signals were replicated in two independent cohorts, with combined P values ranging from 7.4 × 10−8 to 2.1 × 10−10. Our results implicate neuronal cell-adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of ASDs, and represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of genome-wide significant association of common variants with susceptibility to ASDs. PMID:19404256

  4. Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Günter U.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Wang, Li-San; Klei, Lambertus; Rademakers, Rosa; de Silva, Rohan; Litvan, Irene; Riley, David E.; van Swieten, John C.; Heutink, Peter; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Maetzler, Walter; Goldwurm, Stefano; Tolosa, Eduardo; Borroni, Barbara; Pastor, Pau; Cantwell, Laura B.; Han, Mi Ryung; Dillman, Allissa; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Cookson, Mark R.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Farrer, Matthew J.; Yu, Chang-En; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Revesz, Tamas; Hardy, John; Lees, Andrew J.; Devlin, Bernie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Müller, Ulrich; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2011-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common being Alzheimer’s disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated with some sports. To identify common genetic variation contributing to risk for tauopathies, we carried out a genome-wide association study of 1,114 PSP cases and 3,247 controls (Stage 1) followed up by a second stage where 1,051 cases and 3,560 controls were genotyped for Stage 1 SNPs that yielded P ≤ 10−3. We found significant novel signals (P < 5 × 10−8) associated with PSP risk at STX6, EIF2AK3, and MOBP. We confirmed two independent variants in MAPT affecting risk for PSP, one of which influences MAPT brain expression. The genes implicated encode proteins for vesicle-membrane fusion at the Golgi-endosomal interface, for the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, and for a myelin structural component. PMID:21685912

  5. TLR4 and TLR2 expression in biopsy specimens from antral and corporal stomach zones in Helicobacter pylori infections

    PubMed Central

    Khakzad, Mohammad Reza; Saffari, Ahmad; Mohamadpour, Niloofar; Sankian, Mojtaba; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Salari, Farhad; Meshkat, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is not yet known which types of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are most effective in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) recognition. It is also not known which gastric zones have the most prominent roles in TLR-mediated bacterial recognition. The aim of this work was to analyze the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in biopsy specimens from H. pylori-infected patients. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with gastrointestinal disorders were divided into four groups in this study. The groups were: (A) H. pylori infection and peptic ulcer (n=15), (B) peptic ulcer only (n=5), (C) H. pylori infection only (n=10) and (D) control, with neither H. pylori infection nor peptic ulcer (n=8). Biopsy specimens from sites of redness or atrophic mucosa from gastric antrum and body in patients with gastritis were collected. RNAs from the antrum and body specimens were isolated. TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression was assessed by RT-PCR and quantified as densitometric ratios of TLR2 and TLR4/β-actin mRNA. Results: In the antral zones of H. pylori-infected patients (Groups A and C) TLR2 and TLR4 expression was significantly greater than in uninfected patients (Groups B and D) regardless of peptic ulcers (p < 0.05). In the gastric body samples TLR2 expression was significantly greater in Group C (H. pylori infection only) than in Group B (peptic ulcer only) and TLR4 expression was significantly greater in group A (H. pylori infection and peptic ulcer) than in Group B (peptic ulcer only) (p < 0.05). No significant differences in expression of TLR4 and TLR2 were observed between samples from the antrum and body in same groups. Conclusions: We conclude that H. pylori infection leads to significant increase in TLR2 and TLR4 molecules expression in antral region related to the control group. Considering the stimulatory effect of H. pylori on TLRs expression in the gastric tissue, we assume that colonization of H. pylori infection might occurs more in the gastric antral region than in the gastric

  6. Cross-talk between toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is involved in vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, M; Vellecco, V; Harrington, L; Brancaleone, V; Roviezzo, F; Mattace Raso, G; Ianaro, A; Lungarella, G; De Palma, R; Meli, R; Cirino, G

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in innate immune responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible cross-talk between PAR2 and TLR4 in vessels in physiological condition and how it varies following stimulation of TLR4 by using in vivo and ex vivo models. Experimental Approach Thoracic aortas were harvested from both naïve and endotoxaemic rats for in vitro studies. Arterial blood pressure was monitored in anaesthetized rats in vivo. LPS was used as a TLR4 agonist while PAR2 activating peptide (AP) was used as a PAR2 agonist. Aortas harvested from TLR4–/– mice were also used to characterize the PAR2 response. Key Results PAR2, but not TLR4, expression was enhanced in aortas of endotoxaemic rats. PAR2AP-induced vasorelaxation was increased in aortic rings of LPS-treated rats. TLR4 inhibitors, curcumine and resveratrol, reduced PAR2AP-induced vasorelaxation and PAR2AP-induced hypotension in both naïve and endotoxaemic rats. Finally, in aortic rings from TLR4–/– mice, the expression of PAR2 was reduced and the PAR2AP-induced vasodilatation impaired compared with those from wild-type mice and both resveratrol and curcumine were ineffective. Conclusions and Implications Cross-talk between PAR2 and TLR4 contributes to vascular homeostasis. PMID:22957757

  7. Common Variants Associated with Type 2 Diabetes in a Black South African Population of Setswana Descent: African Populations Diverge.

    PubMed

    Chikowore, Tinashe; Conradie, Karin R; Towers, Gordon W; van Zyl, Tertia

    2015-10-01

    The increasing worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a serious global health concern. Although T2D has a strong genetic etiology, limited knowledge exists about the common variants associated with it in the black South African population. This study set out to evaluate the association of previously reported common variants in other world populations with T2D susceptibility in a black South African population of Setswana descent. A case-control study design of 178 cases and 178 controls nested in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study was conducted wherein we genotyped for 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). PLINK software was used to evaluate the standard genetic models of disease penetrance for the association of the common variants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) while adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index. Only rs1436955 significantly associated with an increase in T2D risk; three other variants, rs831571, rs8050136, and rs7542900, significantly associated with decreased risk of T2D. However, none of the four SNPs had significant associations after correcting for multiple testing (p<0.05). Although further studies are required to confirm these observations, the common variants associated with T2D risk among the Black South Africans of Setswana descent might likely be different than those in the Asian and European populations. This study supports the broader thesis that the genetic background of Africans is diverse and cannot be directly extrapolated using genetic variants from other ethnicities. Therefore there is a need to identify the population-specific variants linked with T2D in Africa. PMID:26382014

  8. TLR4 antagonist attenuates atherogenesis in LDL receptor-deficient mice with diet-induced type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongyang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Yanchun; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Huang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Although a large number of studies have well documented a key role of toll-like receptor (TLR)4 in atherosclerosis, it remains undetermined if TLR4 antagonist attenuates atherogenesis in mouse model for type 2 diabetes. In this study, we induced type 2 diabetes in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice by high-fat diet (HFD). At 8 weeks old, 20 mice were fed HFD and 20 mice fed regular chow (RC) for 24 weeks. In the last 10 weeks, half HFD-fed mice and half RC-fed mice were treated with Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipopolysaccharide (Rs-LPS), an established TLR4 antagonist. After the treatment, atherosclerotic lesions in aortas were analyzed. Results showed that the HFD significantly increased bodyweight, glucose, lipids including total cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids, and insulin resistance, indicating that the HFD induced type 2 diabetes in LDLR(-/-) mice. Results also showed that Rs-LPS had no effect on HFD-increased metabolic parameters in both nondiabetic and diabetic mice. Lipid staining of aortas and histological analysis of cross-sections of aortic roots showed that diabetes increased atherosclerotic lesions, but Rs-LPS attenuated atherogenesis in diabetic mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemical studies showed that Rs-LPS reduced infiltration of monocytes/macrophages and expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in atherosclerotic lesions of diabetic mice. Finally, the antagonistic effect of Rs-LPS on TLR4 was demonstrated by our in vitro studies showing that Rs-LPS inhibited IL-6 secretion from macrophages and endothelial cells stimulated by LPS or LPS plus saturated fatty acid palmitate. Taken together, our study demonstrated that TLR4 antagonist was capable of attenuating vascular inflammation and atherogenesis in mice with HFD-induced type 2 diabetes. PMID:26162692

  9. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  10. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  11. Short-term bed rest increases TLR4 and IL-6 expression in skeletal muscle of older adults.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Micah J; Timmerman, Kyle L; Markofski, Melissa M; Walker, Dillon K; Dickinson, Jared M; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R; Rasmussen, Blake B; Volpi, Elena

    2013-08-01

    Bed rest induces significant loss of leg lean mass in older adults. Systemic and tissue inflammation also accelerates skeletal muscle loss, but it is unknown whether inflammation is associated to inactivity-induced muscle atrophy in healthy older adults. We determined if short-term bed rest increases toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and pro-inflammatory markers in older adult skeletal muscle biopsy samples. Six healthy, older adults underwent seven consecutive days of bed rest. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken after an overnight fast before and at the end of bed rest. Serum cytokine expression was measured before and during bed rest. TLR4 signaling and cytokine mRNAs associated with pro- and anti-inflammation and anabolism were measured in muscle biopsy samples using Western blot analysis and qPCR. Participants lost ∼4% leg lean mass with bed rest. We found that after bed rest, muscle levels of TLR4 protein expression and interleukin-6 (IL-6), nuclear factor-κB1, interleukin-10, and 15 mRNA expression were increased after bed rest (P < 0.05). Additionally, the cytokines interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, were elevated in serum samples following bed rest (P < 0.05). We conclude that short-term bed rest in older adults modestly increased some pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in muscle samples while systemic changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines were mostly absent. Upregulation of TLR4 protein content suggests that bed rest in older adults increases the capacity to mount an exaggerated, and perhaps unnecessary, inflammatory response in the presence of specific TLR4 ligands, e.g., during acute illness. PMID:23761639

  12. Short-term bed rest increases TLR4 and IL-6 expression in skeletal muscle of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Kyle L.; Markofski, Melissa M.; Walker, Dillon K.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Volpi, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Bed rest induces significant loss of leg lean mass in older adults. Systemic and tissue inflammation also accelerates skeletal muscle loss, but it is unknown whether inflammation is associated to inactivity-induced muscle atrophy in healthy older adults. We determined if short-term bed rest increases toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and pro-inflammatory markers in older adult skeletal muscle biopsy samples. Six healthy, older adults underwent seven consecutive days of bed rest. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken after an overnight fast before and at the end of bed rest. Serum cytokine expression was measured before and during bed rest. TLR4 signaling and cytokine mRNAs associated with pro- and anti-inflammation and anabolism were measured in muscle biopsy samples using Western blot analysis and qPCR. Participants lost ∼4% leg lean mass with bed rest. We found that after bed rest, muscle levels of TLR4 protein expression and interleukin-6 (IL-6), nuclear factor-κB1, interleukin-10, and 15 mRNA expression were increased after bed rest (P < 0.05). Additionally, the cytokines interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, were elevated in serum samples following bed rest (P < 0.05). We conclude that short-term bed rest in older adults modestly increased some pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in muscle samples while systemic changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines were mostly absent. Upregulation of TLR4 protein content suggests that bed rest in older adults increases the capacity to mount an exaggerated, and perhaps unnecessary, inflammatory response in the presence of specific TLR4 ligands, e.g., during acute illness. PMID:23761639

  13. The TLR2 and TLR4 gene polymorphisms in Moroccan visceral leishmaniasis patients.

    PubMed

    Ejghal, Rajaâ; Hida, Moustapha; Bennani, Mounya Lahkim; Meziane, Mariame; Aurag, Rabia; Lemrani, Meryem

    2016-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is endemic in the Mediterranean basin and leads to the most severe form of Leishmania infection, lethal if left untreated. However, most infections are sub-clinical or asymptomatic, reflecting the influence of host genetic background on disease outcome. This study aimed to investigate possible association of TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR4 Thr399Ile and TLR2 Arg753Gln polymorphisms with VL in Moroccan children. We enrolled 119 children with VL caused by Leishmania infantum as well as 138 unrelated children, 95 asymptomatic subjects and 43 healthy individuals who had no evidence of present or past infection. Polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and amplification refractory mutation system assay (ARMS-PCR). Results showed significant differences in genotype Thr399Ile and recessive model frequencies between VL and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH+) groups (p=0.018, OR=0.414CI 0.195-0.880; p=0.029, OR=0.448CI 0.214-0.938], respectively) by having the amino-acid threonine polymorphism as a reference in the VL group. Concerning the Asp299Gly there were a significant associations when comparing VL vs DTH+ (Asp299Gly genotype p=0.002, OR=0.326CI 0.158-0.671, allele frequencies p=0.033, OR=0.396CI 0.164-0.959, recessive model p=0.002, OR=0.343CI 0.172-0.681) and DTH+ vs DTH- groups (Asp299Gly genotype p=2.160E-4, OR=3.065CI 1.672-5.618, Gly299Gly genotype p=0.047, OR=0.368CI 0.299-0.452, allele frequencies p=1.406E-7, OR=29.571CI 3.907-223.8, recessive model p=4.370E-14, OR=36.965CI 8.629-158.3), by having the aspartic acid polymorphism as a reference these results suggest that the allele A (savage) confer protection against the clinical manifestations but not against the infection. Furthermore, there was a significant association regarding the Arg753Gln genotype (p=0.002, OR=0.326CI 0.158-0.671), allele frequencies (p=0.033, OR=0.396CI 0.164-0.959) and when applying a recessive

  14. Procyanidin dimer B2-mediated IRAK-M induction negatively regulates TLR4 signaling in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sub; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Byun, Eui-Hong

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Pro B2 elevated the expression of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. •LPS-induced expression of cell surface molecules was inhibited by Pro B2. •LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was inhibited by Pro B2. •Pro B2 inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPKs and NF-κB through IRAK-M. •Pro B2 inactivated naïve T cells by inhibiting LPS-induced cytokines via IRAK-M. -- Abstract: Polyphenolic compounds have been found to possess a wide range of physiological activities that may contribute to their beneficial effects against inflammation-related diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this anti-inflammatory activity are not completely characterized, and many features remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for the down-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal transduction by procyanidin dimer B2 (Pro B2) in macrophages. Pro B2 markedly elevated the expression of the interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-M protein, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of cell surface molecules (CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II) and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70) were inhibited by Pro B2, and this action was prevented by IRAK-M silencing. In addition, Pro B2-treated macrophages inhibited LPS-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and the translocation of nuclear factor κB and p65 through IRAK-M. We also found that Pro B2-treated macrophages inactivated naïve T cells by inhibiting LPS-induced interferon-γ and IL-2 secretion through IRAK-M. These novel findings provide new insights into the understanding of negative regulatory mechanisms of the TLR4 signaling pathway and the immune-pharmacological role of Pro B2 in the immune response against the development

  15. Impaired fasting tolerance among Alaska Native Children with a common Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1A sequence variant

    PubMed Central

    Gillingham, Melanie B.; Hirschfeld, Matthew; Lowe, Sarah; Matern, Dietrich; Shoemaker, James; Lambert, William E.; Koeller, David M.

    2011-01-01

    A high prevalence of the sequence variant c.1436C>T in the CPT1A gene has been identified among Alaska Native newborns but the clinical implications of this variant are unknown. We conducted medically supervised fasts in 5 children homozygous for the c.1436C>T variant. Plasma free fatty acids increased normally in these children but their long-chain acylcarnitine and ketone production was significantly blunted. The fast was terminated early in two subjects due to symptoms of hypoglycemia. Homozygosity for the c.1436C>T sequence variant of CPT1A impairs fasting ketogenesis, and can cause hypoketotic hypoglycemia in young children. PMID:21763168

  16. Large numbers of genetic variants considered to be pathogenic are common in asymptomatic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cassa, Christopher A.; Tong, Mark Y.; Jordan, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    It is now affordable to order clinically interpreted whole genome sequence reports from clinical laboratories. One major component of these reports is derived from the knowledge base of previously identified pathogenic variants, including research articles, locus specific and other databases. While over 150,000 such pathogenic variants have been identified, many of these were originally discovered in small cohort studies of affected individuals, so their applicability to asymptomatic populations is unclear. We analyzed the prevalence of a large set of pathogenic variants from the medical and scientific literature in a large set of asymptomatic individuals (N=1,092) and found 8.5% of these pathogenic variants in at least one individual. In the average individual in the 1000 Genomes Project, previously identified pathogenic variants occur on average 294 times (σ= 25.5) in homozygous form and 942 times (σ = 68.2) in heterozygous form. We also find that many of these pathogenic variants are frequently occurring: there are 3,744 variants with MAF >= 0.01 (4.6%) and 2,837 variants with MAF >= 0.05 (3.5%). This indicates that many of these variants may be erroneous findings or have lower penetrance than previously expected. PMID:23818451

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of transcription of tlr4 in vitro is reversed by dexamethasone and correlates with presence of conserved NFκB binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bonin, Camila P.; Baccarin, Raquel Y.A.; Nostell, Katarina; Nahum, Laila A.; Fossum, Caroline; Camargo, Maristela M. de

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Chimpanzees, horses and humans have regions of similarity on TLR4 and MD2 promoters. ► Rodents have few regions of similarity on TLR4 promoter when compared to primates. ► Conserved NFkB binding sites were found in the promoters of TLR4 and MD2. ► LPS-induced inhibition of TLR4 transcription is reversed by dexamethasone. ► LPS-induced transcription of MD2 is inhibited by dexamethasone. -- Abstract: Engagement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a master trigger of the deleterious effects of septic shock. Horses and humans are considered the most sensitive species to septic shock, but the mechanisms explaining these phenomena remain elusive. Analysis of tlr4 promoters revealed high similarity among LPS-sensitive species (human, chimpanzee, and horse) and low similarity with LPS-resistant species (mouse and rat). Four conserved nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) binding sites were found in the tlr4 promoter and two in the md2 promoter sequences that are likely to be targets for dexamethasone regulation. In vitro treatment of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) with LPS decreased transcripts of tlr4 and increased transcription of md2 (myeloid differentiation factor 2) and cd14 (cluster of differentiation 14). Treatment with dexamethasone rescued transcription of tlr4 after LPS inhibition. LPS-induced transcription of md2 was inhibited in the presence of dexamethasone. Dexamethasone alone did not affect transcription of tlr4 and md2.

  18. Common Variants in Psychiatric Risk Genes Predict Brain Structure at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.; Wang, Jiaping; Zhu, Hongtu; Geng, Xiujuan; Woolson, Sandra; Hamer, Robert M.; Konneker, Thomas; Lin, Weili; Styner, Martin; Gilmore, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in adolescents and adults have demonstrated that polymorphisms in putative psychiatric risk genes are associated with differences in brain structure, but cannot address when in development these relationships arise. To determine if common genetic variants in disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1; rs821616 and rs6675281), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT; rs4680), neuregulin 1 (NRG1; rs35753505 and rs6994992), apolipoprotein E (APOE; ɛ3ɛ4 vs. ɛ3ɛ3), estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1; rs9340799 and rs2234693), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; rs6265), and glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1; rs2270335) are associated with individual differences in brain tissue volumes in neonates, we applied both automated region-of-interest volumetry and tensor-based morphometry to a sample of 272 neonates who had received high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans. ESR1 (rs9340799) predicted intracranial volume. Local variation in gray matter (GM) volume was significantly associated with polymorphisms in DISC1 (rs821616), COMT, NRG1, APOE, ESR1 (rs9340799), and BDNF. No associations were identified for DISC1 (rs6675281), ESR1 (rs2234693), or GAD1. Of note, neonates homozygous for the DISC1 (rs821616) serine allele exhibited numerous large clusters of reduced GM in the frontal lobes, and neonates homozygous for the COMT valine allele exhibited reduced GM in the temporal cortex and hippocampus, mirroring findings in adults. The results highlight the importance of prenatal brain development in mediating psychiatric risk. PMID:23283688

  19. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-11-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P < 5 × 10(-8) for each) to examine the role of triglycerides in risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride levels, and we show that the direction and magnitude of the associations with both traits are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, the strength of a polymorphism's effect on triglyceride levels is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD. PMID:24097064

  20. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D; Lee, James J; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Michael B; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L; Hansell, Narelle K; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H; Starr, John M; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G; Verhulst, Frank C; Ward, Mary E; Wright, Margaret J; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D

    2014-09-23

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated SNPs. Second, using independent samples (n = 24,189), we measure the association of these education-associated SNPs with cognitive performance. Three SNPs (rs1487441, rs7923609, and rs2721173) are significantly associated with cognitive performance after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. In an independent sample of older Americans (n = 8,652), we also show that a polygenic score derived from the education-associated SNPs is associated with memory and absence of dementia. Convergent evidence from a set of bioinformatics analyses implicates four specific genes (KNCMA1, NRXN1, POU2F3, and SCRT). All of these genes are associated with a particular neurotransmitter pathway involved in synaptic plasticity, the main cellular mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:25201988

  1. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiologic studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P<5×10−8 for each) to examine the role of triglycerides on risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides, and show that the direction and magnitude of both are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong magnitude of association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, a polymorphism's strength of effect on triglycerides is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD. PMID:24097064

  2. A Common Variant in the PTPN11 Gene Contributes to the Risk of Tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Goodship, Judith A.; Hall, Darroch; Topf, Ana; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Griffin, Helen; Rahman, Thahira J.; Glen, Elise; Tan, Huay; Doza, Julian Palomino; Relton, Caroline L.; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Cosgrove, Catherine; Brook, David; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Bu’Lock, Frances A.; O’Sullivan, John; Stuart, A. Graham; Parsons, Jonathan; Cordell, Heather J.; Keavney, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the commonest cyanotic form of congenital heart disease. In 80% of cases, TOF behaves as a complex genetic condition exhibiting significant heritability. As yet, no common genetic variants influencing TOF risk have been robustly identified. Methods and Results Two hundred and seven haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms in 22 candidate genes were genotyped in a test cohort comprising 362 nonsyndromic British white patients with TOF together with 717 unaffected parents of patients and 183 unrelated healthy controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with suggestive evidence of association in the test cohort (P<0.01) were taken forward for genotyping in an independent replication cohort comprising 392 cases of TOF, 218 unaffected parents of patients, and 1319 controls. Significant association was observed for 1 single nucleotide polymorphism, rs11066320 in the PTPN11 gene, in both the test and the replication cohort. Genotype at rs11066320 was associated with a per-allele odds ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 1.52; P=2.9×10−6) in the total cohort of TOF cases and controls; this remained highly significant after Bonferroni correction for 207 analyses (corrected P=0.00061). Genotype at rs11066320 was responsible for a population-attributable risk of TOF of approximately 10%. Conclusions Common variation in the linkage disequilibrium block including the PTPN11 gene contributes to the risk of nonsyndromic TOF. Rare mutations in PTPN11 are known to cause the autosomal dominant condition Noonan syndrome, which includes congenital heart disease, by upregulating Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Our results suggest a role for milder perturbations in PTPN11 function in sporadic, nonsyndromic congenital heart disease. PMID:22503907

  3. Streptococcus mutans wall-associated protein A promotes TLR4-induced dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, D

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses, which are central to establishing efficient responses to vaccination. Wall-associated protein A (WapA) of Streptococcus mutans was previously used as a vaccine in animal studies for immunization against dental caries. However, as a cell surface protein, whether WapA activates innate immune responses and the effects of WapA on DCs remain unclear. In this study, WapA was cloned into the GST fusion vector pEBG, which can be expressed efficiently in mammalian cells. We found that when added before stimulation with LPS, purified WapA-GST protein increased TLR4-induced NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathway activation. Pretreatment with WapA-GST also increased LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production by DCs, including IL-12, IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, expression of the DC maturation markers CD80/86, CD40 and MHC II was also increased by WapA pretreatment. These data indicate that WapA is recognized by DCs and promotes DC maturation. PMID:24846569

  4. A regulatory role for macrophage class A scavenger receptors in TLR4-mediated LPS responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunying; Wermeling, Fredrik; Sundqvist, Johanna; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Tryggvason, Karl; Pikkarainen, Timo; Karlsson, Mikael C I

    2010-05-01

    Recognition of microbial components by TLR, key sensors of infection, leads to induction of inflammatory responses. We found that, in vivo, TLR4 engagement by LPS induces up-regulation of the class A scavenger receptors (SR) macrophage receptor with a collagenous structure (MARCO) and SR-A, which occurs, at least in the case of MARCO, via both MyD88-dependent and -independent pathways. When challenging mice with a low dose of LPS followed by a high dose, class A SR-deficient mice showed a higher survival rate than WT mice. This was paired with increased production of IL-10 and anti-LPS Ab, as well as increased activation status of marginal zone B cells. However, the receptors were not crucial for survival when challenging mice i.p. with Neisseria meningitidis or Listeria monocytogenes, but they were found to contribute to microbial capture and clearance. This indicates physiological significance for the up-regulation of class A SR during early stages of bacterial infection. Thus, we believe that we have revealed a mechanism where SR regulate the activation status of the immune system and are involved in balancing a proper immune response to infection. This regulation could also be important in maintaining tolerance since these receptors have been shown to be involved in regulation of self-reactivity. PMID:20162551

  5. Common Variants in the TBX5 Gene Associated with Atrial Fibrillation in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huihua; Yin, Xiaomeng; Dong, Yingxue; Yang, Yanzong; Xia, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Background PR interval variations have recently been associated with an increased risk of long-term atrial fibrillation (AF), heart block and all-cause mortality. Genome-wide association studies have linked the PR interval with several common variants in the TBX5 gene. Several variants in the TBX5 gene, including rs7312625 and rs883079, have been associated with AF. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TBX5 gene, rs7312625 and rs883079, with AF in Chinese Han patients. Methodology/Principal Findings In this case-control association study, large cohorts of AF patients (n = 1132) and controls (n = 1206) were recruited from different hospitals. The genotyping was performed using a Rotor-Gene TM 6000 high-resolution melt system. Rs7312625, rs3825214 and rs883079 were analyzed. We found that SNP 3825214 was significantly associated with AF (P-obs = 0.002, odds ratio [OR] = 0.82), and lone AF (P-obs = 6.77x10-5, odds ratio [OR] = 0.71). SNP rs7312625 was significantly associated with lone AF (P-obs = 0.015, odds ratio [OR] = 1.27), although its association with AF was not significant. No significant association of SNP rs883079 with AF or lone AF was observed. Thus, we analyzed the interaction among these three loci. We demonstrated significant interaction among rs3825214, rs7312625 and rs883079. Four-locus risk alleles showed the highest odds ratio in combined rs3825214 and rs7312625 (P-obs<0.0001, odds ratio [OR] = 2.21). Six-locus risk alleles showed the highest odds ratio in combined rs3825214, rs7312625 and rs 883079(P-obs<0.0001, odds ratio [OR] = 2.35). Significance was established with the trend test (P<0.0001). Conclusions For the first time, we report the strong association of SNP rs3825214 in the TBX5 gene with AF and lone AF in a Chinese Han population. Rs7312625 was significantly associated with lone AF, and snp-snp interaction increased the risk of atrial fibrillation. Our data might

  6. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Lars G.; Igl, Wilmar; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Grassmann, Felix; Sengupta, Sebanti; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Wen, Cindy; Gorski, Mathias; Kim, Ivana K.; Cho, David; Zack, Donald; Souied, Eric; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.; Bala, Elisa; Lee, Kristine E.; Hunter, David J.; Sardell, Rebecca J.; Mitchell, Paul; Merriam, Joanna E.; Cipriani, Valentina; Hoffman, Joshua D.; Schick, Tina; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Jiang, Yingda; Stanton, Chloe M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Zhan, Xiaowei; Kwong, Alan M.; Boleda, Alexis; Brooks, Matthew; Gieser, Linn; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Branham, Kari E.; Foerster, Johanna R.; Heckenlively, John R.; Othman, Mohammad I.; Vote, Brendan J.; Liang, Helena Hai; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L.; Isaacs, Timothy; Hall, Janette; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A.; Constable, Ian J.; Craig, Jamie E.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; Yang, Zhenglin; Su, Zhiguang; Luo, Hongrong; Chen, Daniel; Ouyang, Hong; Flagg, Ken; Lin, Danni; Mao, Guanping; Ferreyra, Henry; Stark, Klaus; von Strachwitz, Claudia N.; Wolf, Armin; Brandl, Caroline; Rudolph, Guenther; Olden, Matthias; Morrison, Margaux A.; Morgan, Denise J.; Schu, Matthew; Ahn, Jeeyun; Silvestri, Giuliana; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Park, Kyu Hyung; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Orlin, Anton; Brucker, Alexander; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Cree, Angela J.; Rennie, Christina A.; Goverdhan, Srinivas V.; Grunin, Michelle; Hagbi-Levi, Shira; Campochiaro, Peter; Katsanis, Nicholas; Holz, Frank G.; Blond, Frédéric; Blanché, Hélène; Deleuze, Jean-François; Igo, Robert P.; Truitt, Barbara; Peachey, Neal S.; Meuer, Stacy M.; Myers, Chelsea E.; Moore, Emily L.; Klein, Ronald; Hauser, Michael A.; Postel, Eric A.; Courtenay, Monique D.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Kovach, Jaclyn L.; Scott, William K.; Liew, Gerald; Tƒan, Ava G.; Gopinath, Bamini; Merriam, John C.; Smith, R. Theodore; Khan, Jane C.; Shahid, Humma; Moore, Anthony T.; McGrath, J. Allie; Laux, Reneé; Brantley, Milam A.; Agarwal, Anita; Ersoy, Lebriz; Caramoy, Albert; Langmann, Thomas; Saksens, Nicole T. M.; de Jong, Eiko K.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cain, Melinda S.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Martin, Tammy M.; Blangero, John; Weeks, Daniel E.; Dhillon, Bal; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Romm, Jane; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Hayward, Caroline; Gorin, Michael B.; Klein, Michael L.; Baird, Paul N.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Fauser, Sascha; Yates, John R. W.; Allikmets, Rando; Wang, Jie Jin; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Chowers, Itay; Lotery, Andrew J.; Léveillard, Thierry; Zhang, Kang; Brilliant, Murray H.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; DeAngelis, Margaret; Stambolian, Dwight; Haines, Jonathan L.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Heid, Iris M.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly with limited therapeutic options. Here, we report on a study of >12 million variants including 163,714 directly genotyped, most rare, protein-altering variant. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832 controls, we identify 52 independently associated common and rare variants (P < 5×10–8) distributed across 34 loci. While wet and dry AMD subtypes exhibit predominantly shared genetics, we identify the first signal specific to wet AMD, near MMP9 (difference-P = 4.1×10–10). Very rare coding variants (frequency < 0.1%) in CFH, CFI, and TIMP3 suggest causal roles for these genes, as does a splice variant in SLC16A8. Our results support the hypothesis that rare coding variants can pinpoint causal genes within known genetic loci and illustrate that applying the approach systematically to detect new loci requires extremely large sample sizes. PMID:26691988

  7. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Lars G; Igl, Wilmar; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Grassmann, Felix; Sengupta, Sebanti; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Burdon, Kathryn P; Hebbring, Scott J; Wen, Cindy; Gorski, Mathias; Kim, Ivana K; Cho, David; Zack, Donald; Souied, Eric; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Bala, Elisa; Lee, Kristine E; Hunter, David J; Sardell, Rebecca J; Mitchell, Paul; Merriam, Joanna E; Cipriani, Valentina; Hoffman, Joshua D; Schick, Tina; Lechanteur, Yara T E; Guymer, Robyn H; Johnson, Matthew P; Jiang, Yingda; Stanton, Chloe M; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Zhan, Xiaowei; Kwong, Alan M; Boleda, Alexis; Brooks, Matthew; Gieser, Linn; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Branham, Kari E; Foerster, Johanna R; Heckenlively, John R; Othman, Mohammad I; Vote, Brendan J; Liang, Helena Hai; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L; Isaacs, Timothy; Hall, Janette; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A; Constable, Ian J; Craig, Jamie E; Kitchner, Terrie E; Yang, Zhenglin; Su, Zhiguang; Luo, Hongrong; Chen, Daniel; Ouyang, Hong; Flagg, Ken; Lin, Danni; Mao, Guanping; Ferreyra, Henry; Stark, Klaus; von Strachwitz, Claudia N; Wolf, Armin; Brandl, Caroline; Rudolph, Guenther; Olden, Matthias; Morrison, Margaux A; Morgan, Denise J; Schu, Matthew; Ahn, Jeeyun; Silvestri, Giuliana; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Park, Kyu Hyung; Farrer, Lindsay A; Orlin, Anton; Brucker, Alexander; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine A; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Cree, Angela J; Rennie, Christina A; Goverdhan, Srinivas V; Grunin, Michelle; Hagbi-Levi, Shira; Campochiaro, Peter; Katsanis, Nicholas; Holz, Frank G; Blond, Frédéric; Blanché, Hélène; Deleuze, Jean-François; Igo, Robert P; Truitt, Barbara; Peachey, Neal S; Meuer, Stacy M; Myers, Chelsea E; Moore, Emily L; Klein, Ronald; Hauser, Michael A; Postel, Eric A; Courtenay, Monique D; Schwartz, Stephen G; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Scott, William K; Liew, Gerald; Tan, Ava G; Gopinath, Bamini; Merriam, John C; Smith, R Theodore; Khan, Jane C; Shahid, Humma; Moore, Anthony T; McGrath, J Allie; Laux, Reneé; Brantley, Milam A; Agarwal, Anita; Ersoy, Lebriz; Caramoy, Albert; Langmann, Thomas; Saksens, Nicole T M; de Jong, Eiko K; Hoyng, Carel B; Cain, Melinda S; Richardson, Andrea J; Martin, Tammy M; Blangero, John; Weeks, Daniel E; Dhillon, Bal; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Doheny, Kimberly F; Romm, Jane; Klaver, Caroline C W; Hayward, Caroline; Gorin, Michael B; Klein, Michael L; Baird, Paul N; den Hollander, Anneke I; Fauser, Sascha; Yates, John R W; Allikmets, Rando; Wang, Jie Jin; Schaumberg, Debra A; Klein, Barbara E K; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Chowers, Itay; Lotery, Andrew J; Léveillard, Thierry; Zhang, Kang; Brilliant, Murray H; Hewitt, Alex W; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; DeAngelis, Margaret; Stambolian, Dwight; Haines, Jonathan L; Iyengar, Sudha K; Weber, Bernhard H F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Heid, Iris M

    2016-02-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832 controls, we identify 52 independently associated common and rare variants (P < 5 × 10(-8)) distributed across 34 loci. Although wet and dry AMD subtypes exhibit predominantly shared genetics, we identify the first genetic association signal specific to wet AMD, near MMP9 (difference P value = 4.1 × 10(-10)). Very rare coding variants (frequency <0.1%) in CFH, CFI and TIMP3 suggest causal roles for these genes, as does a splice variant in SLC16A8. Our results support the hypothesis that rare coding variants can pinpoint causal genes within known genetic loci and illustrate that applying the approach systematically to detect new loci requires extremely large sample sizes. PMID:26691988

  8. The D299G/T399I Toll-Like Receptor 4 Variant Associates with Body and Liver Fat: Results from the TULIP and METSIM Studies

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, Peter; Staiger, Harald; Stančáková, Alena; Machicao, Fausto; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Stefan, Norbert; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Schäfer, Silke; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Background Toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR) is discussed to provide a molecular link between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Genetic studies with replications in non-diabetic individuals in regard to their fat distribution or insulin resistance according to their carrier status of a common toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) variant (TLR4D299G/T399I) are still lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional analysis in individuals phenotyped for prediabetic traits as body fat composition (including magnetic resonance imaging), blood glucose levels and insulin resistance (oral glucose tolerance testing, euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp), according to TLR4 genotype determined by candidate SNP analyses (rs4986790). We analyzed N = 1482 non-diabetic individuals from the TÜF/TULIP cohort (South Germany, aged 39±13 y, BMI 28.5±7.9, mean±SD) and N = 5327 non-diabetic participants of the METSIM study (Finland, males aged 58±6 y, BMI 26.8±3.8) for replication purposes. German TLR4D299G/T399I carriers had a significantly increased body fat (XG in rs4986790: +6.98%, p = 0.03, dominant model, adjusted for age, gender) and decreased insulin sensitivity (XG: −15.3%, Matsuda model, p = 0.04; XG: −20.6%, p = 0.016, clamp; both dominant models adjusted for age, gender, body fat). In addition, both liver fat (AG: +49.7%; p = 0.002) and visceral adipose tissue (AG: +8.2%; p = 0.047, both adjusted for age, gender, body fat) were significantly increased in rs4986790 minor allele carriers, and the effect on liver fat remained significant also after additional adjustment for visceral fat (p = 0.014). The analysis in METSIM confirmed increased body fat content in association with the rare G allele in rs4986790 (AG: +1.26%, GG: +11.0%; p = 0.010, additive model, adjusted for age) and showed a non-significant trend towards decreased insulin sensitivity (AG: −0.99%, GG: −10.62%). Conclusions/Significance TLR4D299G/T399

  9. Activation of adult rat CNS endothelial cells by opioid-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling induces proinflammatory, biochemical, morphological, and behavioral sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Peter M.; Ramos, Khara M.; Rodgers, Krista M.; Wang, Xiaohui; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Lewis, Makenzie T.; Morgan, Kelly N.; Kroll, Juliet L.; Taylor, Frederick R.; Strand, Keith A.; Zhang, Yingning; Berkelhammer, Debra; Huey, Madeline G.; Greene, Lisa I.; Cochran, Thomas A.; Yin, Hang; Barth, Daniel S.; Johnson, Kirk W.; Rice, Kenner; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    CNS immune signaling contributes to deleterious opioid effects including hyperalgesia, tolerance, reward, and dependence/withdrawal. Such effects are mediated by opioid signaling at TLR4, presumptively of glial origin. Whether CNS endothelial cells express TLR4 is controversial. If so, they would be well positioned for activation by blood-borne opioids, contributing to opioid-induced pro-inflammatory responses. These studies examined adult primary rat CNS endothelial cell responses to (-)-morphine or its mu-opioid receptor (MOR) inactive metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), both known TLR4 agonists. We demonstrate that adult rat CNS endothelial cells express functional TLR4. M3G activated NFκB, increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) mRNAs, and released prostaglandin E2 from these cells. (-)-Morphine-induced upregulation of TNFα mRNA and prostaglandin E2 release were unmasked by pre-treatment with nalmefene, a MOR antagonist without TLR4 activity (unlike CTAP, shown to have both MOR- and TLR4-activity), suggestive of an interplay between MOR and TLR4 co-activation by (-)-morphine. In support, MOR-dependent Protein Kinase A (PKA) opposed TLR4 signaling, as PKA inhibition (H-89) also unmasked (-)-morphine-induced TNFα and COX2 mRNA upregulation. Intrathecal injection of CNS endothelial cells, stimulated in vitro with M3G, produced TLR4-dependent tactile allodynia. Further, cortical suffusion with M3G in vivo induced TLR4-dependent vasodilation. Finally, endothelial cell TLR4 activation by lipopolysaccharide and/or M3G was blocked by the glial inhibitors AV1013 and propentofylline, demonstrating endothelial cells as a new target of such drugs. These data indicate that (-)-morphine and M3G can activate CNS endothelial cells via TLR4, inducing proinflammatory, biochemical, morphological, and behavioral sequalae. CNS endothelial cells may have previously unanticipated roles in opioid-induced effects, in phenomena blocked by

  10. The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and the potential importance of common regulatory genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Saffen, David

    2015-10-01

    Currently, there is great interest in identifying genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), due in part to recent increases in the frequency of diagnosis of these disorders worldwide. While there is nearly universal agreement that ASDs are complex diseases, with multiple genetic and environmental contributing factors, there is less agreement concerning the relative importance of common vs rare genetic variants in ASD liability. Recent observations that rare mutations and copy number variants (CNVs) are frequently associated with ASDs, combined with reduced fecundity of individuals with these disorders, has led to the hypothesis that ASDs are caused primarily by de novo or rare genetic mutations. Based on this model, large-scale whole-genome DNA sequencing has been proposed as the most appropriate method for discovering ASD liability genes. While this approach will undoubtedly identify many novel candidate genes and produce important new insights concerning the genetic causes of these disorders, a full accounting of the genetics of ASDs will be incomplete absent an understanding of the contributions of common regulatory variants, which are likely to influence ASD liability by modifying the effects of rare variants or, by assuming unfavorable combinations, directly produce these disorders. Because it is not yet possible to identify regulatory genetic variants by examination of DNA sequences alone, their identification will require experimentation. In this essay, I discuss these issues and describe the advantages of measurements of allelic expression imbalance (AEI) of mRNA expression for identifying cis-acting regulatory variants that contribute to ASDs. PMID:26335735

  11. Common interleukin-6 promoter variants associate with the more severe forms of distal interphalangeal osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kämäräinen, Olli-Pekka; Solovieva, Svetlana; Vehmas, Tapio; Luoma, Katariina; Riihimäki, Hilkka; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Männikkö, Minna; Leino-Arjas, Päivi

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of the IL-6 promoter variants G-597A, G-572C and G-174C (rs1800797, rs1800796 and rs1800795, respectively), which have been shown to affect both the transcription and secretion of IL-6, to symptomatic distal interphalangeal (DIP) osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A total of 535 women aged 45 to 63 years were included. Radiographs of both hands were taken and each DIP joint was evaluated (grade 0 to 4) for the presence of OA. Information on symptoms (pain, tenderness) in each joint was collected by using a self-administered questionnaire. Symptomatic DIP OA was defined by the presence of both radiographic findings of grade 2 or more and symptoms in at least two DIP joints, and symmetrical DIP OA by the presence of radiographic findings of grade 2 or more in at least one symmetrical pair of DIP joints. Common polymorphic loci in the IL-6 gene were amplified and the promoter haplotypes were reconstructed from genotype data with the PHASE program. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between the IL-6 genotypes/diplotypes and the DIP OA outcome. Results The G alleles of two promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) G-597A and G-174C were more common among the subjects with symptomatic DIP OA than among those with no disease (P = 0.020 and 0.024, corrected for multiple testing). In addition, the carriage of at least one G allele in these positions increased the risk of disease (P = 0.006 and P = 0.008, respectively). Carrying a haplotype with the G allele in all three promoter SNPs increased the risk of symptomatic DIP OA more than fourfold (odds ratio (OR) 4.45, P = 0.001). Carriage of the G-G diplotype indicated an increased risk of both symmetrical DIP OA (OR 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 2.28) and symptomatic DIP OA (OR 3.67, 95% confidence interval 1.50 to 9.00). Conclusion The present study showed that the presence of G alleles at common IL-6

  12. Blockade of Toll-Like Receptors (TLR2, TLR4) Attenuates Pain and Potentiates Buprenorphine Analgesia in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Jurga, Agnieszka M.; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Pilat, Dominika; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that microglial TLR2 and TLR4 play a significant role in nociception. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the contribution of TLR2 and TLR4 and their adaptor molecules to neuropathy and their ability to amplify opioid effectiveness. Behavioral tests (von Frey's and cold plate) and biochemical (Western blot and qRT-PCR) analysis of spinal cord and DRG tissue were conducted after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. Repeated intrathecal administration of LPS-RS (TLR2 and TLR4 antagonist) and LPS-RS Ultrapure (TLR4 antagonist) attenuated allodynia and hyperalgesia. Biochemical analysis revealed time-dependent upregulation of mRNA and/or protein levels of TLR2 and TLR4 and MyD88 and TRIF adaptor molecules, which was paralleled by an increase in IBA-1/CD40-positive cells under neuropathy. LPS-RS and LPS-RS Ultrapure similarly influenced opioid analgesia by enhancing the effectiveness of buprenorphine but not morphine. Summing up, in light of their upregulation over the course of pain, both TLR2 and TLR4 may indeed play a significant role in neuropathy, which could be linked to the observed activation of IBA-1/CD40-positive cells. Blockade of TLR2 and TLR4 produced analgesia and enhanced buprenorphine's effectiveness, which suggests that they may be a putative target for future pharmacological pain relief tools, especially for opioid rotation, when the effect of morphine is tolerated. PMID:26962463

  13. Coexpression of TLR2 or TLR4 with HLA-DR potentiates the superantigenic activities of Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen.

    PubMed

    Shio, Marina T; Hassan, Ghada S; Shah, Waris A; Nadiri, Amal; El Fakhry, Youssef; Li, Hogmin; Mourad, Walid

    2014-03-15

    Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a member of the superantigen family that structurally differs from other members while still capable of initiating cognate APC/T cell interaction. In addition to the critical role of MHC class II molecules, it has been suggested that TLR2 and TLR4 may cooperate with MHC class II during MAM-induced responses. In this study, we investigated the direct involvement of TLR2 and TLR4 in MAM binding and presentation to T cells. Our results showed that MAM fails to bind to TLR2- and TLR4-transfected cells. However, coexpression of TLR2 or TLR4 with HLA-DR significantly increases MAM binding and the subsequent T cell activation compared with cells expressing HLA-DR alone. The upregulated MAM binding and activity in HLA-DR/TLR-transfected cells is abrogated by an anti-HLA-DR Ab. Interestingly, we also found that MAM complexed with soluble HLA-DR is capable of binding to both TLR2 and TLR4. The enhancing effect of TLR2 or TLR4 on MAM-induced T cell proliferation was not due to TLR ligand contamination in the MAM preparation. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that binding of MAM to HLA-DR leads to a conformational change in MAM structure allowing its interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and a better recognition by T cells. PMID:24493819

  14. Activation of Human Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4)·Myeloid Differentiation Factor 2 (MD-2) by Hypoacylated Lipopolysaccharide from a Clinical Isolate of Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Kubik, Łukasz; Oblak, Alja; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Hamad, Mohamad A; De Soyza, Anthony; Silipo, Alba; Jerala, Roman; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Valvano, Miguel A; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-08-28

    Lung infection by Burkholderia species, in particular Burkholderia cenocepacia, accelerates tissue damage and increases post-lung transplant mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. Host-microbe interplay largely depends on interactions between pathogen-specific molecules and innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which recognizes the lipid A moiety of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The human TLR4·myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) LPS receptor complex is strongly activated by hexa-acylated lipid A and poorly activated by underacylated lipid A. Here, we report that B. cenocepacia LPS strongly activates human TLR4·MD-2 despite its lipid A having only five acyl chains. Furthermore, we show that aminoarabinose residues in lipid A contribute to TLR4-lipid A interactions, and experiments in a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxic shock confirmed the proinflammatory potential of B. cenocepacia penta-acylated lipid A. Molecular modeling combined with mutagenesis of TLR4-MD-2 interactive surfaces suggests that longer acyl chains and the aminoarabinose residues in the B. cenocepacia lipid A allow exposure of the fifth acyl chain on the surface of MD-2 enabling interactions with TLR4 and its dimerization. Our results provide a molecular model for activation of the human TLR4·MD-2 complex by penta-acylated lipid A explaining the ability of hypoacylated B. cenocepacia LPS to promote proinflammatory responses associated with the severe pathogenicity of this opportunistic bacterium. PMID:26160169

  15. Copy number variants are a common cause of non-syndromic hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Copy number variants (CNVs) are a well-recognized cause of genetic disease; however, methods for their identification are often gene-specific, excluded as ‘routine’ in screens of genetically heterogeneous disorders, and not implemented in most next-generation sequencing pipelines. For this reason, the contribution of CNVs to non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) is most likely under-recognized. We aimed to incorporate a method for CNV identification as part of our standard analysis pipeline and to determine the contribution of CNVs to genetic hearing loss. Methods We used targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing to isolate and sequence all exons of all genes known to cause NSHL. We completed testing on 686 patients with hearing loss with no exclusions based on type of hearing loss or any other clinical features. For analysis we used an integrated method for detection of single nucleotide changes, indels and CNVs. CNVs were identified using a previously published method that utilizes median read-depth ratios and a sliding-window approach. Results Of 686 patients tested, 15.2% (104) carried at least one CNV within a known deafness gene. Of the 38.9% (267) of individuals for whom we were able to determine a genetic cause of hearing loss, a CNV was implicated in 18.7% (50). We identified CNVs in 16 different genes including 7 genes for which no CNVs have been previously reported. CNVs of STRC were most common (73% of CNVs identified) followed by CNVs of OTOA (13% of CNVs identified). Conclusion CNVs are an important cause of NSHL and their detection must be included in comprehensive genetic testing for hearing loss. PMID:24963352

  16. No Evidence of a Common DNA Variant Profile Specific to World Class Endurance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfarth, Bernd; Wang, Guan; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Alexeev, Dmitry G.; Ahmetov, Ildus I.; Boulay, Marcel R.; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Eynon, Nir; Filipenko, Maxim L.; Garton, Fleur C.; Generozov, Edward V.; Govorun, Vadim M.; Houweling, Peter J.; Kawahara, Takashi; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Kulemin, Nickolay A.; Larin, Andrey K.; Maciejewska-Karłowska, Agnieszka; Miyachi, Motohiko; Muniesa, Carlos A.; Murakami, Haruka; Ospanova, Elena A.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pavlenko, Alexander V.; Pyankova, Olga N.; Santiago, Catalina; Sawczuk, Marek; Scott, Robert A.; Uyba, Vladimir V.; Yvert, Thomas; Perusse, Louis; Ghosh, Sujoy; Rauramaa, Rainer; North, Kathryn N.; Lucia, Alejandro; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Bouchard, Claude

    2016-01-01

    There are strong genetic components to cardiorespiratory fitness and its response to exercise training. It would be useful to understand the differences in the genomic profile of highly trained endurance athletes of world class caliber and sedentary controls. An international consortium (GAMES) was established in order to compare elite endurance athletes and ethnicity-matched controls in a case-control study design. Genome-wide association studies were undertaken on two cohorts of elite endurance athletes and controls (GENATHLETE and Japanese endurance runners), from which a panel of 45 promising markers was identified. These markers were tested for replication in seven additional cohorts of endurance athletes and controls: from Australia, Ethiopia, Japan, Kenya, Poland, Russia and Spain. The study is based on a total of 1520 endurance athletes (835 who took part in endurance events in World Championships and/or Olympic Games) and 2760 controls. We hypothesized that world-class athletes are likely to be characterized by an even higher concentration of endurance performance alleles and we performed separate analyses on this subsample. The meta-analysis of all available studies revealed one statistically significant marker (rs558129 at GALNTL6 locus, p = 0.0002), even after correcting for multiple testing. As shown by the low heterogeneity index (I2 = 0), all eight cohorts showed the same direction of association with rs558129, even though p-values varied across the individual studies. In summary, this study did not identify a panel of genomic variants common to these elite endurance athlete groups. Since GAMES was underpowered to identify alleles with small effect sizes, some of the suggestive leads identified should be explored in expanded comparisons of world-class endurance athletes and sedentary controls and in tightly controlled exercise training studies. Such studies have the potential to illuminate the biology not only of world class endurance performance but

  17. A Common Variant Of Ubiquinol-Cytochrome c Reductase Complex Is Associated with DDH

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jin; Chen, Dongyang; Xu, Zhihong; Shi, Dongquan; Mao, Ping; Teng, Huajian; Gao, Xiang; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Genetic basis of Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) remains largely unknown. To find new susceptibility genes for DDH, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for DDH. Methods We enrolled 386 radiology confirmed DDH patients and 558 healthy controls (Set A) to conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Quality-control was conducted at both the sample and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) levels. We then conducted a subsequent case-control study to replicate the association between a promising loci, rs6060373 in UQCC gene and DDH in an independent set of 755 cases and 944 controls (set B). Results In the DDH GWAS discovering stage, 51 SNPs showed significance of less than 10-4, and another 577 SNPs showed significance of less than 10-3. In UQCC, all the 12 genotyped SNPs showed as promising risk loci. Genotyping of rs6060373 in set A showed the minor allele A as a promising risk allele (p = 4.82*10-7). In set A, the odds ratio of allele A was 1.77. Genotyping of rs6060373 in Set B produced another significant result (p = 0.0338) with an odds ratio of 1.18 for risk allele A. Combining set A and set B, we identified a total p value of 3.63*10-6 with the odds ratio of 1.35 (1.19–1.53) for allele A. Conclusion Our study demonstrates common variants of UQCC, specifically rs6060373, are associated with DDH in Han Chinese population. PMID:25848760

  18. Common Variants on Chromosome 9p21 Are Associated with Normal Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Takamoto, Mitsuko; Kaburaki, Toshikatsu; Mabuchi, Akihiko; Araie, Makoto; Amano, Shiro; Aihara, Makoto; Tomidokoro, Atsuo; Iwase, Aiko; Mabuchi, Fumihiko; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Shirato, Shiroaki; Yasuda, Noriko; Kawashima, Hidetoshi; Nakajima, Fumiko; Numaga, Jiro; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2012-01-01

    Although intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most definitive cause of glaucoma, a subtype of open angle glaucoma (OAG) termed normal tension glaucoma (NTG), which occurs in spite of normal IOP, accounts for a large part of glaucoma cases, especially in Japan. To find common genetic variants contributing to NTG in Japanese patients, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We performed the first screening for 531,009 autosomal SNPs with a discovery cohort of 286 cases and 557 controls, and then a second screening for the top 30 suggestive loci in an independent cohort of 183 cases and 514 controls. Our findings identified a significantly associated SNP; rs523096 [combined p-value = 7.40× 10−8, odds ratio (OR)  = 2.00 with 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.55–2.58] located 10 kbp upstream of CDKN2B on chromosome 9p21. Moreover, analysis of another independent case-control set successfully replicated the results of the screening studies (combined values of all 3 stages p = 4.96 × 10−11, OR  = 2.13 with 95% CI 1.69–2.68). The SNPs near rs523096 were recently reported to be associated with OAG associated with elevated IOP in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), the predominant subtype of glaucoma in Caucasian populations. Our results revealed that the 9p21 locus is also associated with NTG in Japanese. In addition, we identified SNPs more strongly associated with NTG. PMID:22792221

  19. Common variants in CACNA1C and MDD susceptibility: A comprehensive meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shuquan; Yao, Yao; Zheng, Chuan; Ryan, Joanne; Mao, Canquan; Zhang, Fuquan; Meyre, David; Xu, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders with a relatively high heritability (35-40%). Though rs1006737 in the CACNA1C gene showed significant association with MDD in a British large-scale candidate association study, most of the replication analyses with relatively small sample size reported negative association. Moreover, this locus has never been identified in previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for MDD. Here, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of the association between CACNA1C variants and MDD risk by combining all published data. Genetic data from one European GWAS and five individual follow-up studies, which include up to 12,629 patients of MDD and 28,653 controls, that is, the largest sample size on CACNA1C to date, were collected. Rs1006737 showed significant association with MDD in the fixed-effect model (Z = 2.56, P = 0.011, OR = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.04-1.12) and the association remained after reanalyzing the data according to ethnicity. We additionally analyzed other 25 SNPs, genotyped in only one replication study, across the CACNA1C locus, and found that two SNPs, rs4765905 (P = 0.041, OR = 1.05, 95%CI 1.00-1.09) and rs4765937 (P = 0.025, OR = 1.05, 95%CI 1.01-1.09) showed nominal association with MDD, while rs2239073 (P = 0.002, OR = 1.07, 95%CI 1.02-1.11) exhibited significant association with MDD, which survived from multiple corrections. Our study provides support for positive association between CACNA1C and MDD; however, the current data suggest the necessity of replication analyses in a larger-scale sample. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27260792

  20. The Impact of Ancestry and Common Genetic Variants on QT Interval in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Avery, Christy L.; Evans, Daniel S.; Nalls, Michael A.; Meng, Yan A.; Smith, Erin N.; Palmer, Cameron; Tanaka, Toshiko; Mehra, Reena; Butler, Anne M.; Young, Taylor; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Li, Guo; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Magnani, Jared W.; Chen, Wei; Bis, Joshua C.; Curb, J. David; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Rotter, Jerome I.; Liu, Yongmei; Newman, Anne B.; Limacher, Marian C.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Quibrera, P. Miguel; Schork, Nicholas J.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Solomon, Allen J.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Wallace, Robert; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Zhu-Ming; Post, Wendy S.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Taylor, Herman A.; Murray, Sarah S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Arking, Dan E.; Evans, Michele K.; Fox, Ervin R.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Heckbert, Susan R.; Whitsel, Eric A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnic differences in cardiac arrhythmia incidence have been reported, with a particularly high incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and low incidence of atrial fibrillation in individuals of African ancestry. We tested the hypotheses that African ancestry and common genetic variants are associated with prolonged duration of cardiac repolarization, a central pathophysiological determinant of arrhythmia, as measured by the electrocardiographic QT interval. Methods and Results First, individual estimates of African and European ancestry were inferred from genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in seven population-based cohorts of African Americans (n=12 097) and regressed on measured QT interval from electrocardiograms. Second, imputation was performed for 2.8 million SNPs and a genome-wide association (GWA) study of QT interval performed in ten cohorts (n=13 105). There was no evidence of association between genetic ancestry and QT interval (p=0.94). Genome-wide significant associations (p<2.5×10−8) were identified with SNPs at two loci, upstream of the genes NOS1AP (rs12143842, p=2×10−15) and ATP1B1 (rs1320976, p=2×10−10). The most significant SNP in NOS1AP was the same as the strongest SNP previously associated with QT interval in individuals of European ancestry. Low p-values (p<10−5) were observed for SNPs at several other loci previously identified in GWA studies in individuals of European ancestry, including KCNQ1, KCNH2, LITAF and PLN. Conclusions We observed no difference in duration of cardiac repolarization with global genetic indices of African ancestry. In addition, our GWA study extends the association of polymorphisms at several loci associated with repolarization in individuals of European ancestry to include African Americans. PMID:23166209

  1. Rare copy number variants are a common cause of short stature.

    PubMed

    Zahnleiter, Diana; Uebe, Steffen; Ekici, Arif B; Hoyer, Juliane; Wiesener, Antje; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Reis, André; Doerr, Helmuth-Guenther; Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T

    2013-01-01

    Human growth has an estimated heritability of about 80%-90%. Nevertheless, the underlying cause of shortness of stature remains unknown in the majority of individuals. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) showed that both common single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to height variation under a polygenic model, although explaining only a small fraction of overall genetic variability in the general population. Under the hypothesis that severe forms of growth retardation might also be caused by major gene effects, we searched for rare CNVs in 200 families, 92 sporadic and 108 familial, with idiopathic short stature compared to 820 control individuals. Although similar in number, patients had overall significantly larger CNVs (p-value<1×10(-7)). In a gene-based analysis of all non-polymorphic CNVs>50 kb for gene function, tissue expression, and murine knock-out phenotypes, we identified 10 duplications and 10 deletions ranging in size from 109 kb to 14 Mb, of which 7 were de novo (p<0.03) and 13 inherited from the likewise affected parent but absent in controls. Patients with these likely disease causing 20 CNVs were smaller than the remaining group (p<0.01). Eleven (55%) of these CNVs either overlapped with known microaberration syndromes associated with short stature or contained GWAS loci for height. Haploinsufficiency (HI) score and further expression profiling suggested dosage sensitivity of major growth-related genes at these loci. Overall 10% of patients carried a disease-causing CNV indicating that, like in neurodevelopmental disorders, rare CNVs are a frequent cause of severe growth retardation. PMID:23516380

  2. No Evidence of a Common DNA Variant Profile Specific to World Class Endurance Athletes.

    PubMed

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Fuku, Noriyuki; Wolfarth, Bernd; Wang, Guan; Sarzynski, Mark A; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Ahmetov, Ildus I; Boulay, Marcel R; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Eynon, Nir; Filipenko, Maxim L; Garton, Fleur C; Generozov, Edward V; Govorun, Vadim M; Houweling, Peter J; Kawahara, Takashi; Kostryukova, Elena S; Kulemin, Nickolay A; Larin, Andrey K; Maciejewska-Karłowska, Agnieszka; Miyachi, Motohiko; Muniesa, Carlos A; Murakami, Haruka; Ospanova, Elena A; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Pyankova, Olga N; Santiago, Catalina; Sawczuk, Marek; Scott, Robert A; Uyba, Vladimir V; Yvert, Thomas; Perusse, Louis; Ghosh, Sujoy; Rauramaa, Rainer; North, Kathryn N; Lucia, Alejandro; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Bouchard, Claude

    2016-01-01

    There are strong genetic components to cardiorespiratory fitness and its response to exercise training. It would be useful to understand the differences in the genomic profile of highly trained endurance athletes of world class caliber and sedentary controls. An international consortium (GAMES) was established in order to compare elite endurance athletes and ethnicity-matched controls in a case-control study design. Genome-wide association studies were undertaken on two cohorts of elite endurance athletes and controls (GENATHLETE and Japanese endurance runners), from which a panel of 45 promising markers was identified. These markers were tested for replication in seven additional cohorts of endurance athletes and controls: from Australia, Ethiopia, Japan, Kenya, Poland, Russia and Spain. The study is based on a total of 1520 endurance athletes (835 who took part in endurance events in World Championships and/or Olympic Games) and 2760 controls. We hypothesized that world-class athletes are likely to be characterized by an even higher concentration of endurance performance alleles and we performed separate analyses on this subsample. The meta-analysis of all available studies revealed one statistically significant marker (rs558129 at GALNTL6 locus, p = 0.0002), even after correcting for multiple testing. As shown by the low heterogeneity index (I2 = 0), all eight cohorts showed the same direction of association with rs558129, even though p-values varied across the individual studies. In summary, this study did not identify a panel of genomic variants common to these elite endurance athlete groups. Since GAMES was underpowered to identify alleles with small effect sizes, some of the suggestive leads identified should be explored in expanded comparisons of world-class endurance athletes and sedentary controls and in tightly controlled exercise training studies. Such studies have the potential to illuminate the biology not only of world class endurance performance but

  3. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-01-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the LINC00340, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1 and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated 8 additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNP at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2101 cases and 4202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNP associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014; Pcombined=0.0050; OR=0.88, rs2979704; Pcombined=0.0072; OR=0.87, rs105911; Pcombined=0.0049; OR=0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biological investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens was associated with better overall survival (P=0.03; HR=0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and progression. PMID:25312269

  4. Common single nucleotide variants underlying drug addiction: more than a decade of research.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Kora-Mareen; Giné, Elena; Echeverry-Alzate, Victor; Calleja-Conde, Javier; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; López-Moreno, Jose Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Drug-related phenotypes are common complex and highly heritable traits. In the last few years, candidate gene (CGAS) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a huge number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with drug use, abuse or dependence, mainly related to alcohol or nicotine. Nevertheless, few of these associations have been replicated in independent studies. The aim of this study was to provide a review of the SNPs that have been most significantly associated with alcohol-, nicotine-, cannabis- and cocaine-related phenotypes in humans between the years of 2000 and 2012. To this end, we selected CGAS, GWAS, family-based association and case-only studies published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals (using the PubMed/MEDLINE and Addiction GWAS Resource databases) in which a significant association was reported. A total of 371 studies fit the search criteria. We then filtered SNPs with at least one replication study and performed meta-analysis of the significance of the associations. SNPs in the alcohol metabolizing genes, in the cholinergic gene cluster CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4, and in the DRD2 and ANNK1 genes, are, to date, the most replicated and significant gene variants associated with alcohol- and nicotine-related phenotypes. In the case of cannabis and cocaine, a far fewer number of studies and replications have been reported, indicating either a need for further investigation or that the genetics of cannabis/cocaine addiction are more elusive. This review brings a global state-of-the-art vision of the behavioral genetics of addiction and collaborates on formulation of new hypothesis to guide future work. PMID:25603899

  5. Impaired fasting tolerance among Alaska native children with a common carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A sequence variant.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, Melanie B; Hirschfeld, Matthew; Lowe, Sarah; Matern, Dietrich; Shoemaker, James; Lambert, William E; Koeller, David M

    2011-11-01

    A high prevalence of the sequence variant c.1436C→T in the CPT1A gene has been identified among Alaska Native newborns but the clinical implications of this variant are unknown. We conducted medically supervised fasts in 5 children homozygous for the c.1436C→T variant. Plasma free fatty acids increased normally in these children but their long-chain acylcarnitine and ketone production was significantly blunted. The fast was terminated early in two subjects due to symptoms of hypoglycemia. Homozygosity for the c.1436C→T sequence variant of CPT1A impairs fasting ketogenesis, and can cause hypoketotic hypoglycemia in young children. Trial registration www.clinical trials.gov NCT00653666 "Metabolic Consequences of CPT1A Deficiency" PMID:21763168

  6. Linoleic acid and stearic acid elicit opposite effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent signaling pathways in immortalized hypothalamic N38 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songbo; Xiang, Nana; Yang, Liusong; Zhu, Canjun; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of food intake is a promising way to combat obesity. It has been implicated that various fatty acids exert different effects on food intake and body weight. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) on agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression and secretion in immortalized mouse hypothalamic N38 cells and to explore the likely underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that LA inhibited, while SA stimulated AgRP expression and secretion of N38 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LA suppressed the protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylation levels of JNK and IKKα/β, suggesting the inhibition of TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway. However, the above mentioned inhibitory effects of LA were eliminated by TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, SA promoted TLR4 protein expression and activated TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway, with elevated ratio of p-JNK/JNK. While TLR4 siRNA reversed the stimulatory effects of SA on AgRP expression and TLR4-dependent inflammation. Moreover, we found that TLR4 was also involved in LA-enhanced and SA-impaired leptin/insulin signal pathways in N38 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicated that LA elicited inhibitory while SA exerted stimulatory effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent inflammation and leptin/insulin pathways in N38 cells. These data provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying fatty acids-regulated food intake and suggested the potential role of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids such as LA in reducing food intake and treating obesity. PMID:26879142

  7. Modulation of immune response by RAGE and TLR4 signalling in PBMCs of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Frasnelli, S C T; de Medeiros, M C; Bastos, A de S; Costa, D L; Orrico, S R P; Rossa Junior, C

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased glucose levels and accumulation of glycated products. It is also associated with impairment in the immune response, such as increased susceptibility to infections. In this study, we assessed the possible interactions between TLR4 and RAGE signalling on apoptosis and on the expression of inflammatory cytokines in PBMC from individuals with and without diabetes. PBMCs were isolated from seven diabetic patients and six individuals without diabetes and stimulated in vitro with bacterial LPS (1 μg/ml) associated or not with BSA-AGE (200 μg/ml). This stimulation was performed for 6 h, both in the presence and in the absence of inhibitors of TLR4 (R. sphaeroides LPS, 20 μg/ml) and RAGE (blocking monoclonal antibody). Apoptosis at early and late stages was assessed by the annexin-V/PI staining using flow cytometry. Regulation of TNF-α and IL-10 gene expression was determined by RT-qPCR. PBMCs from diabetes patients tended to be more resistant apoptosis. There were no synergistic or antagonistic effects with the simultaneous activation of TLR4 and RAGE in PBMCs from either diabetes or non-diabetes group. Activation of TLR4 is more potent for the induction of TNF-α and IL-10; RAGE signalling had a negative regulatory effect on TNF-α expression induced by LPS. TLR and RAGE do not have relevant roles in apoptosis of PBMCs. The activation of TLR has greater role than RAGE in regulating the gene expression of IL-10 and TNF-α. PMID:25223881

  8. Retinol-Binding Protein 4 Induces Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy by Activating TLR4/MyD88 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Lin; Cao, Yang; Bao, Ji-Zhang; Liu, Zheng-Xia; Wang, Lian-Sheng; Yang, Qin; Lu, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Insulin resistance plays a major role in the development and progression of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Heart failure in turn promotes insulin resistance and increases the risk for diabetes. The vicious cycle determines significant mortality in patients with heart failure and diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms for the vicious cycle are not fully elucidated. Here we show that circulating levels and adipose expression of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), an adipokine that contributes to systemic insulin resistance, were elevated in cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction and angiotensin-II (Ang-II) infusion. Ang-II increased RBP4 expression in adipocytes, which was abolished by losartan, an Ang-II receptor blocker. The elevated RBP4 in cardiac hypertrophy may have pathophysiological consequences because RBP4 increased cell size, enhanced protein synthesis, and elevated the expression of hypertrophic markers including Anp, Bnp, and Myh7 in primary cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, RBP4 induced the expression and activity of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in cardiomyocytes, resulting in enhanced inflammation and reactive oxygen species production. Inhibition or knockdown of the TLR4/MyD88 pathway attenuated inflammatory and hypertrophic responses to RBP4 stimulation. Importantly, RBP4 also reduced the expression of glucose transporter-4 and impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in cardiomyocytes. This impairment was ameliorated in cardiomyocytes from TLR4 knockout mice. Therefore, RBP4 may be a critical modulator promoting the vicious cycle of insulin resistance and heart failure by activating TLR4/MyD88-mediated inflammatory pathways. Potentially, lowering RBP4 might break the vicious cycle and improve both insulin resistance and cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27100622

  9. TLR4-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Hepatic Cytochrome P450 in Mice with Chemically-Induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaluvadi, Madhusudana R.; Nyagode, Beatrice A.; Kinloch, Ryan D.; Morgan, Edward T.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription and protein expression of many cytochrome P450 (P450) genes are down-regulated in animal models of inflammation and infection. We determined previously that hepatic P450 mRNAs are selectively regulated in a mouse model of enteropathogenic bacterial infection, and that this regulation was not dependent on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor protein toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). In the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) model of chemically-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the reduction in activities of several hepatic P450 enzymes were concluded to be partially dependent on LPS from commensal bacteria (Masubuchi Y and Horie T (2004) Drug Metab. Dispos. 32: 437–441). In the present study, we sought to determine whether colitis induced by LPS regulates hepatic P450 mRNA and protein expression similarly to infectious colitis, and to determine the role of TLR4 in the response to DSS colitis. The role of LPS in the response to DSS was further examined by comparison with the effects of injected LPS. We demonstrate that administration of DSS results in the down-regulation of multiple P450 enzymes in mouse liver. However, there are discernable differences in the pattern of P450 expression in the two models. Some effects of DSS-induced colitis are TLR4-dependent, and others are not. In contrast, the effects of injected LPS on hepatic P450 mRNA expression are entirely TLR4-dependent. Thus, our results indicate that the pattern of hepatic P450 expression, and the mechanism of regulation, during inflammation of the bowel depend on the etiology of the disease. PMID:19027721

  10. Sequence characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 gene in the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana).

    PubMed

    Dai, Q X; Yao, Y F; Qi, Z C; Huang, Y; Ni, Q Y; Zhang, M W; Xu, H L

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the complete coding region sequence of an innate immune-related TLR4 gene was obtained from the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) genome via PCR and direct sequencing. The sequence had a total length of 2481 bp, contained 3 complete exons, and encoded 826 amino acids (AAs); its isoelectric point was 5.703, and the molecular weight was 94.72 kDa. The high structure prediction showed that the protein was comprised of one extracellular region, one transmembrane region, and one intracellular region. There were 48 potential functional sites in the protein, including glycosylation, phosphorylation, and acetylation sites. A homology analysis among 9 primate species, including the Tibetan macaque, human, chimpanzee, gibbon, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus monkey, pig-tailed monkey, squirrel monkey, and small-eared galago, showed that the homology of the nucleotide and AA sequences ranged from 60.9-99.5% and 51.4- 99.0%, respectively. Higher variability was identified in the extracellular region of the TLR4 protein, and its variable sites accounted for 88.79% (AA) of the total variable sites. Additionally, the number of AAs at the 3' end of the intracellular region was notably different among the primate lineages. The phylogenetic tree based on TLR4 gene exons of 9 primate species showed that the Tibetan macaque clustered with the rhesus macaque, cynomolgus monkey, and pig-tailed monkey; it was most distant from the small-eared galago. This study will provide an important basis for further study on the expression, regulation, and polymorphism of the TLR4 gene and the relationship between polymorphisms and host disease susceptibility. PMID:25867333

  11. Electrophilic nitro-fatty acids inhibit vascular inflammation by disrupting LPS-dependent TLR4 signalling in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Luis; Chang, Lin; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Zhang, Jifeng; Petrovic-Djergovic, Danica; Jia, Lingyun; Carlsen, Harald; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Aims Electrophilic fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives, products of unsaturated fatty acid nitration, exert long-term cardiovascular protection in experimental models of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of this study is to examine the effects of nitro-fatty acids in the regulation of upstream signalling events in nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and determine whether low-dose acute administration of nitro-fatty acids reduces vascular inflammation in vivo. Methods and results Using NF-κB-luciferase transgenic mice, it was determined that pre-emptive treatment with nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2), but not oleic acid (OA) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-κB activation both in vivo and in isolated macrophages. Acute intravenous administration of OA-NO2 was equally effective to inhibit leukocyte recruitment to the vascular endothelium assessed by intravital microscopy and significantly reduces aortic expression of adhesion molecules. An acute treatment with OA-NO2 in vivo yielding nanomolar concentrations in plasma, is sufficient to inhibit LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-induced cell surface expression in leukocytes and NF-κB activation. In vitro experiments reveal that OA-NO2 suppresses LPS-induced TLR4 signalling, inhibitor of κB (IκBα) phosphorylation and ubiquitination, phosphorylation of the IκB kinase (IKK), impairing the recruitment of the TLR4 and TNF receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) to the lipid rafts compartments. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that acute administration of nitro-fatty acids is effective to reduce vascular inflammation in vivo. These findings reveal a direct role of nitro-fatty acids in the disruption of the TLR4 signalling complex in lipid rafts, upstream events of the NF-κB pathway, leading to resolution of pro-inflammatory activation of NF-κB in the vasculature. PMID:23334216

  12. Genome Wide Analysis of Drug-Induced Torsades de Pointes: Lack of Common Variants with Large Effect Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Elijah R.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kääb, Stefan; Crawford, Dana C.; Nicoletti, Paola; Floratos, Aris; Sinner, Moritz F.; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Zumhagen, Sven; Guicheney, Pascale; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Marshall, Vanessa; Shakir, Saad; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Bevan, Steve; Jamshidi, Yalda; Bastiaenen, Rachel; Myerburg, Robert J.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Camm, A. John; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Norris, Kris; Altman, Russ B.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Jeffery, Steve; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Shen, Yufeng; George, Alfred L.; Roden, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Marked prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram associated with the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia Torsades de Pointes is a serious adverse event during treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs and other culprit medications, and is a common cause for drug relabeling and withdrawal. Although clinical risk factors have been identified, the syndrome remains unpredictable in an individual patient. Here we used genome-wide association analysis to search for common predisposing genetic variants. Cases of drug-induced Torsades de Pointes (diTdP), treatment tolerant controls, and general population controls were ascertained across multiple sites using common definitions, and genotyped on the Illumina 610k or 1M-Duo BeadChips. Principal Components Analysis was used to select 216 Northwestern European diTdP cases and 771 ancestry-matched controls, including treatment-tolerant and general population subjects. With these sample sizes, there is 80% power to detect a variant at genome-wide significance with minor allele frequency of 10% and conferring an odds ratio of ≥2.7. Tests of association were carried out for each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) by logistic regression adjusting for gender and population structure. No SNP reached genome wide-significance; the variant with the lowest P value was rs2276314, a non-synonymous coding variant in C18orf21 (p  =  3×10−7, odds ratio = 2, 95% confidence intervals: 1.5–2.6). The haplotype formed by rs2276314 and a second SNP, rs767531, was significantly more frequent in controls than cases (p  =  3×10−9). Expanding the number of controls and a gene-based analysis did not yield significant associations. This study argues that common genomic variants do not contribute importantly to risk for drug-induced Torsades de Pointes across multiple drugs. PMID:24223155

  13. Rare and Common Variants in CARD14, Encoding an Epidermal Regulator of NF-kappaB, in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Catherine T.; Cao, Li; Roberson, Elisha D.O.; Duan, Shenghui; Helms, Cynthia A.; Nair, Rajan P.; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Stuart, Philip E.; Goldgar, David; Hayashi, Genki; Olfson, Emily H.; Feng, Bing-Jian; Pullinger, Clive R.; Kane, John P.; Wise, Carol A.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lowes, Michelle A.; Peddle, Lynette; Chandran, Vinod; Liao, Wilson; Rahman, Proton; Krueger, Gerald G.; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T.; Menter, Alan; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disorder of the skin and other organs. We have determined that mutations in CARD14, encoding a nuclear factor of kappa light chain enhancer in B cells (NF-kB) activator within skin epidermis, account for PSORS2. Here, we describe fifteen additional rare missense variants in CARD14, their distribution in seven psoriasis cohorts (>6,000 cases and >4,000 controls), and their effects on NF-kB activation and the transcriptome of keratinocytes. There were more CARD14 rare variants in cases than in controls (burden test p value = 0.0015). Some variants were only seen in a single case, and these included putative pathogenic mutations (c.424G>A [p.Glu142Lys] and c.425A>G [p.Glu142Gly]) and the generalized-pustular-psoriasis mutation, c.413A>C (p.Glu138Ala); these three mutations lie within the coiled-coil domain of CARD14. The c.349G>A (p.Gly117Ser) familial-psoriasis mutation was present at a frequency of 0.0005 in cases of European ancestry. CARD14 variants led to a range of NF-kB activities; in particular, putative pathogenic variants led to levels >2.5× higher than did wild-type CARD14. Two variants (c.511C>A [p.His171Asn] and c.536G>A [p.Arg179His]) required stimulation with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) to achieve significant increases in NF-kB levels. Transcriptome profiling of wild-type and variant CARD14 transfectants in keratinocytes differentiated probably pathogenic mutations from neutral variants such as polymorphisms. Over 20 CARD14 polymorphisms were also genotyped, and meta-analysis revealed an association between psoriasis and rs11652075 (c.2458C>T [p.Arg820Trp]; p value = 2.1 × 10−6). In the two largest psoriasis cohorts, evidence for association increased when rs11652075 was conditioned on HLA-Cw∗0602 (PSORS1). These studies contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis of psoriasis and illustrate the challenges faced in identifying pathogenic variants in common disease. PMID:22521419

  14. Rare and common variants in CARD14, encoding an epidermal regulator of NF-kappaB, in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Catherine T; Cao, Li; Roberson, Elisha D O; Duan, Shenghui; Helms, Cynthia A; Nair, Rajan P; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Stuart, Philip E; Goldgar, David; Hayashi, Genki; Olfson, Emily H; Feng, Bing-Jian; Pullinger, Clive R; Kane, John P; Wise, Carol A; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lowes, Michelle A; Peddle, Lynette; Chandran, Vinod; Liao, Wilson; Rahman, Proton; Krueger, Gerald G; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T; Menter, Alan; Bowcock, Anne M

    2012-05-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disorder of the skin and other organs. We have determined that mutations in CARD14, encoding a nuclear factor of kappa light chain enhancer in B cells (NF-kB) activator within skin epidermis, account for PSORS2. Here, we describe fifteen additional rare missense variants in CARD14, their distribution in seven psoriasis cohorts (>6,000 cases and >4,000 controls), and their effects on NF-kB activation and the transcriptome of keratinocytes. There were more CARD14 rare variants in cases than in controls (burden test p value = 0.0015). Some variants were only seen in a single case, and these included putative pathogenic mutations (c.424G>A [p.Glu142Lys] and c.425A>G [p.Glu142Gly]) and the generalized-pustular-psoriasis mutation, c.413A>C (p.Glu138Ala); these three mutations lie within the coiled-coil domain of CARD14. The c.349G>A (p.Gly117Ser) familial-psoriasis mutation was present at a frequency of 0.0005 in cases of European ancestry. CARD14 variants led to a range of NF-kB activities; in particular, putative pathogenic variants led to levels >2.5× higher than did wild-type CARD14. Two variants (c.511C>A [p.His171Asn] and c.536G>A [p.Arg179His]) required stimulation with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) to achieve significant increases in NF-kB levels. Transcriptome profiling of wild-type and variant CARD14 transfectants in keratinocytes differentiated probably pathogenic mutations from neutral variants such as polymorphisms. Over 20 CARD14 polymorphisms were also genotyped, and meta-analysis revealed an association between psoriasis and rs11652075 (c.2458C>T [p.Arg820Trp]; p value = 2.1 × 10(-6)). In the two largest psoriasis cohorts, evidence for association increased when rs11652075 was conditioned on HLA-Cw*0602 (PSORS1). These studies contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis of psoriasis and illustrate the challenges faced in identifying pathogenic variants in common disease. PMID:22521419

  15. Paracoccin Induces M1 Polarization of Macrophages via Interaction with TLR4.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mateus S; Oliveira, Aline F; da Silva, Thiago A; Fernandes, Fabrício F; Gonçales, Relber A; Almeida, Fausto; Roque-Barreira, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    The fungal human pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis contains paracoccin (PCN), a multi-domain protein that has lectin and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activities, which account for its effects on the growth and morphogenesis of the fungus and on the activation of host macrophages through its interaction with TLR N-glycans. With the purpose of detailing the knowledge on the effects of PCN on macrophages, we used recombinant PCN expressed in Pichia pastoris (p-rPCN) to stimulate isolated murine peritoneal macrophages. The activation of these cells manifested through the release of high levels of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-12p40, and IL-6. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages stimulated with p-rPCN increased the relative expression of STAT1, SOCS3, and iNOS2 mRNA (M1 polarization markers). However, the expression of Arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ1 (M2 polarization markers) remained at basal levels. Interestingly, the observed M1 macrophages' polarization triggered by p-rPCN was abolished in cells obtained from knockout Toll-like receptor-4 mice. In this case, the p-rPCN-induced production of pro-inflammatory mediators was blocked too. These results demonstrate that the classical activation of macrophages induced by paracoccin depends on TLR4. Taken together, the results of our study indicate that paracoccin acts as a TLR agonist able to modulate immunity and exerts biological activities that favor its applicability as an immunotherapeutic agent to combat systemic fungal infections. PMID:27458431

  16. Paracoccin Induces M1 Polarization of Macrophages via Interaction with TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Mateus S.; Oliveira, Aline F.; da Silva, Thiago A.; Fernandes, Fabrício F.; Gonçales, Relber A.; Almeida, Fausto; Roque-Barreira, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal human pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis contains paracoccin (PCN), a multi-domain protein that has lectin and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activities, which account for its effects on the growth and morphogenesis of the fungus and on the activation of host macrophages through its interaction with TLR N-glycans. With the purpose of detailing the knowledge on the effects of PCN on macrophages, we used recombinant PCN expressed in Pichia pastoris (p-rPCN) to stimulate isolated murine peritoneal macrophages. The activation of these cells manifested through the release of high levels of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-12p40, and IL-6. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages stimulated with p-rPCN increased the relative expression of STAT1, SOCS3, and iNOS2 mRNA (M1 polarization markers). However, the expression of Arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ1 (M2 polarization markers) remained at basal levels. Interestingly, the observed M1 macrophages’ polarization triggered by p-rPCN was abolished in cells obtained from knockout Toll-like receptor-4 mice. In this case, the p-rPCN-induced production of pro-inflammatory mediators was blocked too. These results demonstrate that the classical activation of macrophages induced by paracoccin depends on TLR4. Taken together, the results of our study indicate that paracoccin acts as a TLR agonist able to modulate immunity and exerts biological activities that favor its applicability as an immunotherapeutic agent to combat systemic fungal infections. PMID:27458431

  17. TLR2 and TLR4 in autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yin, Heng; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune diseases are immune disorders characterized by T cell hyperactivity and B cell overstimulation leading to overproduction of autoantibodies. Although the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases remains to be elucidated, environmental factors have been thought to contribute to the initiation and maintenance of auto-respond inflammation. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors belonging to innate immunity that recognize and defend invading microorganisms. Besides these exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns, TLRs can also bind with damage-associated molecular patterns produced under strike or by tissue damage or cells apoptosis. It is believed that TLRs build a bridge between innate immunity and autoimmunity. There are five adaptors to TLRs including MyD88, TRIF, TIRAP/MAL, TRAM, and SARM. Upon activation, TLRs recruit specific adaptors to initiate the downstream signaling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Under certain circumstances, ligation of TLRs drives to aberrant activation and unrestricted inflammatory responses, thereby contributing to the perpetuation of inflammation in autoimmune diseases. In the past, most studies focused on the intracellular TLRs, such as TLR3, TLR7, and TLR9, but recent studies reveal that cell surface TLRs, especially TLR2 and TLR4, also play an essential role in the development of autoimmune diseases and afford multiple therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarized the biological characteristics, signaling mechanisms of TLR2/4, the negative regulators of TLR2/4 pathway, and the pivotal function of TLR2/4 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes. PMID:24352680

  18. The HIV Protease Inhibitor Saquinavir Inhibits HMGB1-Driven Inflammation by Targeting the Interaction of Cathepsin V with TLR4/MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Pribis, John P; Al-Abed, Yousef; Yang, Huan; Gero, Domokos; Xu, Hongbo; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Bauer, Eileen M; Kim, Sodam; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Cai, Changchun; Li, Tunliang; Szoleczky, Petra; Szabo, Csaba; Tracey, Kevin J; Billiar, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) (disulfide form), via activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent signaling, is a strong driver of pathologic inflammation in both acute and chronic conditions. Identification of selective inhibitors of HMGB1-TLR4 signaling could offer novel therapies that selectively target proximal endogenous activators of inflammation. A cell-based screening strategy led us to identify first generation HIV-protease inhibitors (PI) as potential inhibitors of HMGB1-TLR4 driven cytokine production. Here we report that the first-generation HIV-PI saquinavir (SQV), as well as a newly identified mammalian protease inhibitor STO33438 (334), potently block disulfide HMGB1-induced TLR4 activation, as assayed by the production of TNF-α by human monocyte-derived macrophages (THP-1). We further report on the identification of mammalian cathepsin V, a protease, as a novel target of these inhibitors. Cellular as well as recombinant protein studies show that the mechanism of action involves a direct interaction between cathepsin V with TLR4 and its adaptor protein MyD88. Treatment with SQV, 334 or the known cathepsin inhibitor SID26681509 (SID) significantly improved survival in murine models of sepsis and reduced liver damage following warm liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models, both characterized by strong HMGB1-TLR4 driven pathology. The current study demonstrates a novel role for cathepsin V in TLR4 signaling and implicates cathepsin V as a novel target for first-generation HIV-PI compounds. The identification of cathepsin V as a target to block HMGB1-TLR4-driven inflammation could allow for a rapid transition of the discovery from the bench to the bedside. Disulfide HMGB1 drives pathologic inflammation in many models by activating signaling through TLR4. Cell-based screening identified the mammalian protease cathepsin V as a novel therapeutic target to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation induced by extracellular HMGB1 (disulfide

  19. Viperin inhibits rabies virus replication via reduced cholesterol and sphingomyelin and is regulated upstream by TLR4.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hai-Bo; Lu, Zhuan-Ling; Wei, Xian-Kai; Zhong, Tao-Zhen; Zhong, Yi-Zhi; Ouyang, Ling-Xuan; Luo, Yang; Xing, Xing-Wei; Liao, Fang; Peng, Ke-Ke; Deng, Chao-Qian; Minamoto, Nobuyuki; Luo, Ting Rong

    2016-01-01

    Viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum-associated, IFN-inducible) is an interferon-inducible protein that mediates antiviral activity. Generally, rabies virus (RABV) multiplies extremely well in susceptible cells, leading to high virus titres. In this study, we found that viperin was significantly up-regulated in macrophage RAW264.7 cells but not in NA, BHK-21 or BSR cells. Transient viperin overexpression in BSR cells and stable expression in BHK-21 cells could inhibit RABV replication, including both attenuated and street RABV. Furthermore, the inhibitory function of viperin was related to reduce cholesterol/sphingomyelin on the membranes of RAW264.7 cells. We explored the up-stream regulation pathway of viperin in macrophage RAW264.7 cells in the context of RABV infection. An experiment confirmed that a specific Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor, TAK-242, could inhibit viperin expression in RABV-infected RAW264.7 cells. These results support a regulatory role for TLR4. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) (by inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) of the IRF3 phosphorylation chaperone), significantly delayed and reduced viperin expression, indicating that IRF3 is involved in viperin induction in RAW264.7 cells. Taken together, our data support the therapeutic potential for viperin to inhibit RABV replication, which appears to involve upstream regulation by TLR4. PMID:27456665

  20. Signaling through NOD-2 and TLR-4 Bolsters the T cell Priming Capability of Dendritic cells by Inducing Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nargis; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Pahari, Susanta; Negi, Shikha; Aqdas, Mohammad; Nadeem, Sajid; Agnihotri, Tapan; Agrewala, Javed N

    2016-01-01

    T cells play a cardinal role in mediating protection against intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). It is important to understand the factors that govern the T cell response; thereby can modulate its activity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the major player in initiation and augmentation of T cell response. Targeting DCs to induce their optimum maturation and activation can lead to a better T cell response. Interestingly, we observed that combinatorial signaling of DCs through NOD-2 and TLR-4 fortified better yield of IL-12p40/70, IL-6 and IFN-γ and upregulated the expression of CD40, CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules. Further, we noticed improved phagocytic capabilities of DCs. Furthermore, NOD-2 and TLR-4 induced autophagy in DCs, which enhanced the activation of T cells. This study signifies that NOD-2 and TLR-4 exhibit synergism in invigorating the activity of DCs. Consequently, this strategy may have significant immunotherapeutic potential in bolstering the function of DCs and thus improving the immunity against pathogens. PMID:26754352

  1. 7-Ketocholesterol-Induced Inflammation Signals Mostly through the TLR4 Receptor Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiahn-Dar; Amaral, Juan; Lee, Jung Wha; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol oxide 7-ketocholesterol (7KCh) has been implicated in numerous age-related diseases such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer and age-related macular degeneration. It is formed by the autooxidation of cholesterol and especially cholesterol-fatty acid esters found in lipoprotein deposits. This molecule causes complex and potent inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. It is suspected of causing chronic inflammation in tissues exposed to oxidized lipoprotein deposits. In this study we have examined the inflammatory pathways activated by 7KCh both in cultured ARPE19 cells and in vivo using 7KCh-containing implants inserted into the anterior chamber of the rat eye. Our results indicate that 7KCh-induced inflammation is mediated mostly though the TLR4 receptor with some cross-activation of EGFR-related pathways. The majority of the cytokine inductions seem to signal via the TRIF/TRAM side of the TLR4 receptor. The MyD88/TIRAP side only significantly effects IL-1β inductions. The 7KCh-induced inflammation also seems to involve a robust ER stress response. However, this response does not seem to involve a calcium efflux-mediated UPR. Instead the ER stress response seems to be mediated by yet identified kinases activated through the TLR4 receptor. Some of the kinases identified are the RSKs which seem to mediate the cytokine inductions and the cell death pathway but do not seem to be involved in the ER stress response. PMID:25036103

  2. Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Through Inhibiting TLR4/MyD88 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Chen, Guang; Yu, Xiangdong; Li, Yunchao; Zhang, Li; He, Zongze; Zhang, Nannan; Yang, Xiuping; Zhao, Yansheng; Li, Na; Qiu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic stroke can activate multiple transcription factors and cause inflammatory reactions, which involve pattern recognition receptors with immunostimulatory effects. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of the receptors related to innate immunity and several inflammatory reactions. The promising anti- inflammatory activity of salvianolic acid B (SAB) had been previously reported, but its effect on ischemic stroke remains unknown. An oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model in vitro and a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in vivo were used in this paper, and the results showned that SAB remarkably increased the viabilities of PC12 cells and primary cortical neurons after OGD/R injury and notably prevented cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. SAB also significantly ameliorated NeuN release from primary cortical neurons. Further research indicated that the neuroprotection of SAB was completed through inhibiting the TLR4/MyD88/TRAF6 signaling pathway. The blocking of TLR4 by SAB also restrained NF-kB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These findings supply a new insight that will aid in clarifying the effect of SAB against cerebral I/R injury and provide the development of SAB as a potential candidate for treating ischemic stroke. PMID:27255374

  3. Signaling through NOD-2 and TLR-4 Bolsters the T cell Priming Capability of Dendritic cells by Inducing Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nargis; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Pahari, Susanta; Negi, Shikha; Aqdas, Mohammad; Nadeem, Sajid; Agnihotri, Tapan; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2016-01-01

    T cells play a cardinal role in mediating protection against intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). It is important to understand the factors that govern the T cell response; thereby can modulate its activity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the major player in initiation and augmentation of T cell response. Targeting DCs to induce their optimum maturation and activation can lead to a better T cell response. Interestingly, we observed that combinatorial signaling of DCs through NOD-2 and TLR-4 fortified better yield of IL-12p40/70, IL-6 and IFN-γ and upregulated the expression of CD40, CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules. Further, we noticed improved phagocytic capabilities of DCs. Furthermore, NOD-2 and TLR-4 induced autophagy in DCs, which enhanced the activation of T cells. This study signifies that NOD-2 and TLR-4 exhibit synergism in invigorating the activity of DCs. Consequently, this strategy may have significant immunotherapeutic potential in bolstering the function of DCs and thus improving the immunity against pathogens. PMID:26754352

  4. rhHMGB1 drives osteoblast migration in a TLR2/TLR4- and NF-κB-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Jing; Li, Fan; Xu, Jian; Liu, Yu-Dong; Hu, Tao; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblast migration is significant in skeletal development. Recently, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has been shown to highly expressed in cartilage to regulate endochondral ossification. Nevertheless, whether HMGB1 can modulate osteoblast proliferation and migration is poorly understood, as well as the intracellular signalling pathways that are involved in this process. Herein, we examined the effects of recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) on the proliferation and migration of rat osteoblasts and investigated whether Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)- and TLR4-dependent signalling pathways are involved in the regulation of intracellular signalling. A transwell chamber assay was used to evaluate the migration of osteoblasts and the MTT assay was used to assess osteoblast proliferation. rhHMGB1 could significantly promote the migration of osteoblasts without inhibiting their proliferation. Meanwhile, rhHMGB1 can increase the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65. Specific siRNA constructs that target TLR2 or TLR4 could markedly inhibit HMGB1-induced migration of osteoblasts and HMGB1-enhanced activation of NF-κB. Collectively, HMGB1 could significantly enhance the migration of osteoblasts in vitro, and TLR2/TLR4-dependent NF-κB pathways are involved in HMGB1-induced osteoblast migration. PMID:26744383

  5. Viperin inhibits rabies virus replication via reduced cholesterol and sphingomyelin and is regulated upstream by TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hai-Bo; Lu, Zhuan-Ling; Wei, Xian-Kai; Zhong, Tao-Zhen; Zhong, Yi-Zhi; Ouyang, Ling-Xuan; Luo, Yang; Xing, Xing-Wei; Liao, Fang; Peng, Ke-Ke; Deng, Chao-Qian; Minamoto, Nobuyuki; Luo, Ting Rong

    2016-01-01

    Viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum-associated, IFN-inducible) is an interferon-inducible protein that mediates antiviral activity. Generally, rabies virus (RABV) multiplies extremely well in susceptible cells, leading to high virus titres. In this study, we found that viperin was significantly up-regulated in macrophage RAW264.7 cells but not in NA, BHK-21 or BSR cells. Transient viperin overexpression in BSR cells and stable expression in BHK-21 cells could inhibit RABV replication, including both attenuated and street RABV. Furthermore, the inhibitory function of viperin was related to reduce cholesterol/sphingomyelin on the membranes of RAW264.7 cells. We explored the up-stream regulation pathway of viperin in macrophage RAW264.7 cells in the context of RABV infection. An experiment confirmed that a specific Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor, TAK-242, could inhibit viperin expression in RABV-infected RAW264.7 cells. These results support a regulatory role for TLR4. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) (by inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) of the IRF3 phosphorylation chaperone), significantly delayed and reduced viperin expression, indicating that IRF3 is involved in viperin induction in RAW264.7 cells. Taken together, our data support the therapeutic potential for viperin to inhibit RABV replication, which appears to involve upstream regulation by TLR4. PMID:27456665

  6. Lipopolysaccharide initiates inflammation in bovine granulosa cells via the TLR4 pathway and perturbs oocyte meiotic progression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bromfield, John J.; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Infections of the reproductive tract or mammary gland with Gram-negative bacteria perturb ovarian function, follicular growth and fecundity in cattle. We hypothesised that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria stimulates an inflammatory response by ovarian granulosa cells that is mediated by TLR4. The present study tested the capacity of bovine ovarian granulosa cells to initiate an inflammatory response to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and determined subsequent effects on the in vitro maturation of oocytes. Granulosa cells elicited an inflammatory response to PAMPs (LPS, lipoteichoic acid, peptidoglycan or Pam3CSK4) with accumulation of the cytokine IL-6, and the chemokine IL-8, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Granulosa cells responded acutely to LPS with rapid phosphorylation of TLR signaling components, p38 and ERK, and increased expression of IL6 and IL8 mRNA, although nuclear translocation of p65 was not evident. Targeting TLR4 with siRNA, attenuated granulosa cell accumulation of IL-6 in response to LPS. Endocrine function of granulosa cells is regulated by FSH, but here FSH also enhanced responsiveness to LPS, increasing IL-6 and IL-8 accumulation. Furthermore, LPS stimulated IL-6 secretion and expansion by cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), and increased rates of meiotic arrest and germinal vesicle breakdown failure. In conclusion, bovine granulosa cells initiate an innate immune response to LPS via the TLR4 pathway leading to inflammation and to perturbation of meiotic competence. PMID:21990308

  7. Prostaglandin E2 blockade enhances the pulmonary anti-Cryptococcus neoformans immune reaction via the induction of TLR-4.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liyun; Liu, Ying

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to explore whether the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 enhances pulmonary anti-Cryptococcus neoformans immunity. Lung colony forming unit (CFU) assays demonstrated that the cryptococcal infection was dramatically depressed in mice given EP2 and EP4 or single EP antagonist treatment compared to the untreated wild type mice (p<0.05), leading to the increased survival of the infected mice by 8-9 days or 2-4 days, respectively. RT-PCR and flow cytometry assays showed that the expression of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-22 in M1 macrophages and IL-10 in M2 macrophages increased significantly at 1 week post-infection in mice with either EP2 or EP4 blockade (p<0.05). The polarization of alveolar macrophages showed that, at 1 week post infection, the alveolar macrophages in untreated wild type mice, TLR4(-/-) mice and TLR4(-/-) mice with EP2 and EP4 blockade were strongly M2 polarized, whereas the alveolar macrophages in wild type mice with EP2 and EP4 blockade were M1 polarized. In conclusion, the blockade of EP2 and EP4 promotes mouse survival after cryptococcus infection by promoting the production of cytokines via TLR4, as well as the enhanced M1 polarization of alveolar macrophages. PMID:26122137

  8. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes breast cancer metastasis via activation of HMGB1/TLR4/NF kappa B axis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Chen, Na; Lin, Yanliang; Ma, Hongyan; Ruan, Yongwei; Li, Zhiwei; Li, Xungeng; Pan, Xiaohua; Tian, Xingsong

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is up-regulated in diverse solid tumors and acts as the critical link between immune response and tumorigenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that MIF overexpression promoted migration of breast cancer cells by elevating TLR4 expression. Further investigation evidenced that MIF induced ROS generation. MIF-induced ROS led to ERK phosphorylation, which facilitated HMGB1 release from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. MIF overexpression also induced caveolin-1 phosphorylation. Caveolin-1 phosphorylation contributed to HMGB1 secretion from the cytoplasm to the extracellular matrix. The extracellular HMGB1 activated TLR4 signaling including NF-κB phosphorylation, which was responsible for the transcription of Snail and Twist as well as MMP2 activation. Furthermore, MIF-induced caveolin-1-dependent HMGB1 secretion might control the recruitment of CD11b+ immune cells. Our data suggested that MIF affected the intrinsic properties of tumors and the host immune response in tumor microenvironment by regulating the TLR4/HMGB1 axis, leading to metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:26952810

  9. Leishmania inhibitor of serine peptidase prevents TLR4 activation by neutrophil elastase promoting parasite survival in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Marilia S.; Reis, Flavia C. G.; Azevedo-Pereira, Ricardo L.; Morrison, Lesley S.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania major is a protozoan parasite that causes skin ulcerations in cutaneous leishmaniasis. In the mammalian host, the parasite resides in professional phagocytes and has evolved to avoid killing by macrophages. We identified L. major genes encoding inhibitors of serine peptidases, ISPs, which are orthologues of bacterial ecotins and found that ISP2 inhibits trypsin-fold S1A family peptidases. Here we show that L. major mutants deficient in ISP2 and ISP3 (Δisp2/3) trigger higher phagocytosis by macrophages through a combined action of the complement type-3 receptor (CR3), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and unregulated activity of neutrophil elastase (NE), leading to parasite killing. While all three components are required to mediate enhanced parasite uptake, only TLR4 and NE are necessary to promote parasite killing after infection. We found that the production of superoxide by macrophages in the absence of ISP2 is the main mechanism controlling the intracellular infection. Furthermore, we show that NE modulates macrophage infection in vivo, and that the lack of ISP leads to reduced parasite burdens at later stages of the infection. Our findings support the hypothesis that ISPs function to prevent the activation of TLR4 by NE during the Leishmania-macrophage interaction in order to promote parasite survival and growth. PMID:21098233

  10. TLR4-dependent tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) in alcohol-associated hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Machida, Keigo; Feldman, Douglas E; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse predisposes individuals to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and synergistically heightens the HCC risk in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The mechanisms of this synergism have been elusive until our recent demonstration of the obligatory role of ectopically expressed TLR4 in liver tumorigenesis in alcohol-fed HCV Ns5a or Core transgenic mice. CD133+/CD49f+ tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) isolated from these models are tumorigenic in a manner dependent on TLR4 and NANOG. TICs' tumor-initiating activity and chemoresistance are causally associated with inhibition of TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway due to NANOG-mediated expression of IGF2BP3 and YAP1. TLR4/NANOG activation causes p53 degradation via phosphorylation of the protective protein NUMB and its dissociation from p53 by the oncoprotein TBC1D15. Nutrient deprivation reduces overexpressed TBC1D15 in TICs via autophagy-mediated degradation, suggesting a possible role of this oncoprotein in linking metabolic reprogramming and self-renewal. PMID:25427905

  11. TLR2, but not TLR4, plays a predominant role in the immune responses to cholera vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae Seung; Kim, Hye Jin; Kang, Seok-Seong; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kim, Dong Wook; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Park, Soon-Jung; Seo, Ho Seong; Finlay, B Brett; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae can cause severe diarrhea and dehydration leading to high mortality and morbidity. Current cholera vaccines are formulated with KVC. Although the innate immune responses following vaccination deeply influence the induction of adaptive immunity, the initial recognition of cholera vaccines by the host innate immune system is not well characterized. In this study, the ability of KVC to induce innate immune responses was investigated. Unlike typical Gram-negative bacteria stimulating TLR2 and TLR4, KVC activated TLR2 but hardly TLR4. However, purified V. cholerae LPS preferentially stimulated TLR4, although not as potently as LPS of other Gram-negative bacteria, implying that LPS is not a major immunostimulatory component of KVC. Instead, MPFs were similar to KVC in the capacity to activate TLR2, transcription factors, and cytokine expression. Furthermore, OmpU is an abundant membrane protein of V. cholerae and could interact with TLR2 for inducing cytokine expression. Notably, cholera vaccine-induced immune responses are impaired in TLR2(-/-) mice. Conclusively, TLR2 is essential for the immune responses to cholera vaccination, and OmpU is the major immunostimulatory component of cholera vaccines. PMID:26078314

  12. Testing Genetic Association with Rare and Common Variants in Family Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Malzahn, Dörthe; Balliu, Brunilda; Li, Cong; Bailey, Julia N.

    2015-01-01

    With the advance of next-generation sequencing technologies in recent years, rare genetic variant data have now become available for genetic epidemiology studies. For family samples however, only a few statistical methods for association analysis of rare genetic variants have been developed. Rare variant approaches are of great interest particularly for family data because samples enriched for trait-relevant variants can be ascertained and rare variants are putatively enriched through segregation. To facilitate the evaluation of existing and new rare variant testing approaches for analyzing family data, Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 (GAW18) provided genotype and next-generation sequencing data and longitudinal blood pressure traits from extended pedigrees of Mexican-American families from the San Antonio Family Study. Our GAW18 group members analyzed real and simulated phenotype data from GAW18 by using generalized linear mixed-effects models or principal components to adjust for familial correlation or by testing binary traits using a correction factor for familial effects. With one exception, approaches dealt with the extended pedigrees in their original state using information based on the kinship matrix or alternative genetic similarity measures. For simulated data, our group demonstrated that the family-based kernel machine score test is superior in power to family-based single-marker or burden tests, except in a few specific scenarios. For real data, three contributions identified significant associations. They substantially reduced the number of tests before performing the association analysis. We conclude from our real data analyses that further development of strategies for targeted testing or more focused screening of genetic variants is strongly desirable. PMID:25112186

  13. Common and rare variants associating with serum levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansson, Ragnar P.; Oddsson, Asmundur; Helgason, Hannes; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Arnadottir, Gudny A.; Jensson, Brynjar O.; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Bragi Walters, G.; Sulem, Gerald; Oskarsdottir, Arna; Benonisdottir, Stefania; Davidsson, Olafur B.; Masson, Gisli; Th Magnusson, Olafur; Holm, Hilma; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are widely used markers of tissue damage. To search for sequence variants influencing serum levels of CK and LDH, 28.3 million sequence variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders were imputed into 63,159 and 98,585 people with CK and LDH measurements, respectively. Here we describe 13 variants associating with serum CK and 16 with LDH levels, including four that associate with both. Among those, 15 are non-synonymous variants and 12 have a minor allele frequency below 5%. We report sequence variants in genes encoding the enzymes being measured (CKM and LDHA), as well as in genes linked to muscular (ANO5) and immune/inflammatory function (CD163/CD163L1, CSF1, CFH, HLA-DQB1, LILRB5, NINJ1 and STAB1). A number of the genes are linked to the mononuclear/phagocyte system and clearance of enzymes from the serum. This highlights the variety in the sources of normal diversity in serum levels of enzymes. PMID:26838040

  14. Common and rare variants associated with kidney stones and biochemical traits.

    PubMed

    Oddsson, Asmundur; Sulem, Patrick; Helgason, Hannes; Edvardsson, Vidar O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Sveinbjörnsson, Gardar; Haraldsdottir, Eik; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Olafsson, Isleifur; Masson, Gisli; Holm, Hilma; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Indridason, Olafur S; Palsson, Runolfur; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Kidney stone disease is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. We conducted a genome-wide association study of 28.3 million sequence variants detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders that were imputed into 5,419 kidney stone cases, including 2,172 cases with a history of recurrent kidney stones, and 279,870 controls. We identify sequence variants associating with kidney stones at ALPL (rs1256328[T], odds ratio (OR)=1.21, P=5.8 × 10(-10)) and a suggestive association at CASR (rs7627468[A], OR=1.16, P=2.0 × 10(-8)). Focusing our analysis on coding sequence variants in 63 genes with preferential kidney expression we identify two rare missense variants SLC34A1 p.Tyr489Cys (OR=2.38, P=2.8 × 10(-5)) and TRPV5 p.Leu530Arg (OR=3.62, P=4.1 × 10(-5)) associating with recurrent kidney stones. We also observe associations of the identified kidney stone variants with biochemical traits in a large population set, indicating potential biological mechanism. PMID:26272126

  15. Rare and common variants in extracellular matrix gene Fibrillin 2 (FBN2) are associated with macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ratnapriya, Rinki; Zhan, Xiaowei; Fariss, Robert N.; Branham, Kari E.; Zipprer, David; Chakarova, Christina F.; Sergeev, Yuri V.; Campos, Maria M.; Othman, Mohammad; Friedman, James S.; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Waseem, Naushin H.; Brooks, Matthew; Rajasimha, Harsha K.; Edwards, Albert O.; Lotery, Andrew; Klein, Barbara E.; Truitt, Barbara J.; Li, Bingshan; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Morgan, Denise J.; Morrison, Margaux A.; Souied, Eric; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Grassmann, Felix; Fishman, Gerald A.; Silvestri, Giuliana; Scholl, Hendrik P.N.; Kim, Ivana K.; Ramke, Jacqueline; Tuo, Jingsheng; Merriam, Joanna E.; Merriam, John C.; Park, Kyu Hyung; Olson, Lana M.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Peachey, Neal S.; Lathrop, Mark; Baron, Robert V.; Igo, Robert P.; Klein, Ronald; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Martin, Tammy M.; Jiang, Yingda; Conley, Yvette; Sahel, Jose-Alan; Zack, Donald J.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Gorin, Michael B.; Klein, Michael L.; Allikmets, Rando; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Weber, Bernhard H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Léveillard, Thierry; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Stambolian, Dwight; Weeks, Daniel E.; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Chew, Emily Y.; Heckenlively, John R.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Swaroop, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affecting the macula constitute a major cause of incurable vision loss and exhibit considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity, from early-onset monogenic disease to multifactorial late-onset age-related macular degeneration (AMD). As part of our continued efforts to define genetic causes of macular degeneration, we performed whole exome sequencing in four individuals of a two-generation family with autosomal dominant maculopathy and identified a rare variant p.Glu1144Lys in Fibrillin 2 (FBN2), a glycoprotein of the elastin-rich extracellular matrix (ECM). Sanger sequencing validated the segregation of this variant in the complete pedigree, including two additional affected and one unaffected individual. Sequencing of 192 maculopathy patients revealed additional rare variants, predicted to disrupt FBN2 function. We then undertook additional studies to explore the relationship of FBN2 to macular disease. We show that FBN2 localizes to Bruch′s membrane and its expression appears to be reduced in aging and AMD eyes, prompting us to examine its relationship with AMD. We detect suggestive association of a common FBN2 non-synonymous variant, rs154001 (p.Val965Ile) with AMD in 10 337 cases and 11 174 controls (OR = 1.10; P-value = 3.79 × 10−5). Thus, it appears that rare and common variants in a single gene—FBN2—can contribute to Mendelian and complex forms of macular degeneration. Our studies provide genetic evidence for a key role of elastin microfibers and Bruch′s membrane in maintaining blood–retina homeostasis and establish the importance of studying orphan diseases for understanding more common clinical phenotypes. PMID:24899048

  16. Allele-specific transcription factor binding to common and rare variants associated with disease and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Marco; Pan, Gang; Nord, Helena; Wallerman, Ola; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Berggren, Olof; Elvers, Ingegerd; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Lindblad Toh, Kerstin; Wadelius, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of disease-associated SNPs, but in few cases the functional variant and the gene it controls have been identified. To systematically identify candidate regulatory variants, we sequenced ENCODE cell lines and used public ChIP-seq data to look for transcription factors binding preferentially to one allele. We found 9962 candidate regulatory SNPs, of which 16 % were rare and showed evidence of larger functional effect than common ones. Functionally rare variants may explain divergent GWAS results between populations and are candidates for a partial explanation of the missing heritability. The majority of allele-specific variants (96 %) were specific to a cell type. Furthermore, by examining GWAS loci we found >400 allele-specific candidate SNPs, 141 of which were highly relevant in our cell types. Functionally validated SNPs support identification of an SNP in SYNGR1 which may expose to the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as an SNP in the last intron of COG6 exposing to the risk of psoriasis. We propose that by repeating the ChIP-seq experiments of 20 selected transcription factors in three to ten people, the most common polymorphisms can be interrogated for allele-specific binding. Our strategy may help to remove the current bottleneck in functional annotation of the genome. PMID:26993500

  17. Contrasted evolutionary histories of two Toll-like receptors (Tlr4 and Tlr7) in wild rodents (MURINAE)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that genes encoding proteins involved in pathogen-recognition by adaptive immunity (e.g. MHC) are subject to intensive diversifying selection. On the other hand, the role and the type of selection processes shaping the evolution of innate-immunity genes are currently far less clear. In this study we analysed the natural variation and the evolutionary processes acting on two genes involved in the innate-immunity recognition of Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs). Results We sequenced genes encoding Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) and 7 (Tlr7), two of the key bacterial- and viral-sensing receptors of innate immunity, across 23 species within the subfamily Murinae. Although we have shown that the phylogeny of both Tlr genes is largely congruent with the phylogeny of rodents based on a comparably sized non-immune sequence dataset, we also identified several potentially important discrepancies. The sequence analyses revealed that major parts of both Tlrs are evolving under strong purifying selection, likely due to functional constraints. Yet, also several signatures of positive selection have been found in both genes, with more intense signal in the bacterial-sensing Tlr4 than in the viral-sensing Tlr7. 92% and 100% of sites evolving under positive selection in Tlr4 and Tlr7, respectively, were located in the extracellular domain. Directly in the Ligand-Binding Region (LBR) of TLR4 we identified two rapidly evolving amino acid residues and one site under positive selection, all three likely involved in species-specific recognition of lipopolysaccharide of gram-negative bacteria. In contrast, all putative sites of LBRTLR7 involved in the detection of viral nucleic acids were highly conserved across rodents. Interspecific differences in the predicted 3D-structure of the LBR of both Tlrs were not related to phylogenetic history, while analyses of protein charges clearly discriminated Rattini and Murini

  18. Giant Onychomatricoma of the Great Toenail: Case Report and Review Focusing on Less Common Variants

    PubMed Central

    Prevezas, Christos; Triantafyllopoulou, Ioanna; Belyayeva, Helena; Sgouros, Dimitrios; Konstantoudakis, Stephanos; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare benign fibroepithelial filamentous tumor originating from the nail matrix. It typically presents with the clinical tetrad of xanthonychia, pachyonychia, proximal splinter hemorrhages and increased transverse overcurvature of the nail plate. The giant variant can easily confuse the clinician due to its extensive nail dystrophy that can mask the characteristic features of this tumor. Benign (fibrokeratoma, ungual fibroma, onycholytic matricoma) and malignant entities (Bowen's disease, squamous cell carcinoma, onycholytic carcinoma) are mimics of the disease. Nail surgery can facilitate the diagnosis, which should always be confirmed by histology, as rare variants do exist. PMID:27386467

  19. Giant Onychomatricoma of the Great Toenail: Case Report and Review Focusing on Less Common Variants.

    PubMed

    Prevezas, Christos; Triantafyllopoulou, Ioanna; Belyayeva, Helena; Sgouros, Dimitrios; Konstantoudakis, Stephanos; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-05-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare benign fibroepithelial filamentous tumor originating from the nail matrix. It typically presents with the clinical tetrad of xanthonychia, pachyonychia, proximal splinter hemorrhages and increased transverse overcurvature of the nail plate. The giant variant can easily confuse the clinician due to its extensive nail dystrophy that can mask the characteristic features of this tumor. Benign (fibrokeratoma, ungual fibroma, onycholytic matricoma) and malignant entities (Bowen's disease, squamous cell carcinoma, onycholytic carcinoma) are mimics of the disease. Nail surgery can facilitate the diagnosis, which should always be confirmed by histology, as rare variants do exist. PMID:27386467

  20. A Common Variant in the FTO Gene Is Associated with Body Mass Index and Predisposes to Childhood and Adult Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frayling, Timothy M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Freathy, Rachel M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Perry, John R. B.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Rayner, Nigel W.; Shields, Beverley; Harries, Lorna W.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J.; Knight, Bridget; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ness, Andrew R.; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ring, Susan M.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Sovio, Ulla; Bennett, Amanda J.; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Karpe, Fredrik; Owen, Katharine R.; Cardon, Lon R.; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Smith, George Davey; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a serious international health problem that increases the risk of several common diseases. The genetic factors predisposing to obesity are poorly understood. A genome-wide search for type 2 diabetes–susceptibility genes identified a common variant in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) gene that predisposes to diabetes through an effect on body mass index (BMI). An additive association of the variant with BMI was replicated in 13 cohorts with 38,759 participants. The 16% of adults who are homozygous for the risk allele weighed about 3 kilograms more and had 1.67-fold increased odds of obesity when compared with those not inheriting a risk allele. This association was observed from age 7 years upward and reflects a specific increase in fat mass. PMID:17434869

  1. A Common Variant in CLDN14 is Associated with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ruqi; Wei, Yiran; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Haoyan; Miao, Qi; Bian, Zhaolian; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Qixia; Wang, Zhaoyue; Lian, Min; Yang, Fan; Jiang, Xiang; Yang, Yue; Li, Enling; Seldin, Michael F; Gershwin, M Eric; Liao, Wilson; Shi, Yongyong; Ma, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a chronic autoimmune liver disease, has been associated with increased incidence of osteoporosis. Intriguingly, two PBC susceptibility loci identified through genome-wide association studies are also involved in bone mineral density (BMD). These observations led us to investigate the genetic variants shared between PBC and BMD. We evaluated 72 genome-wide significant BMD SNPs for association with PBC using two European GWAS data sets (n = 8392), with replication of significant findings in a Chinese cohort (685 cases, 1152 controls). Our analysis identified a novel variant in the intron of the CLDN14 gene (rs170183, Pfdr = 0.015) after multiple testing correction. The three associated variants were followed-up in the Chinese cohort; one SNP rs170183 demonstrated consistent evidence of association in diverse ethnic populations (Pcombined = 2.43 × 10(-5)). Notably, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data revealed that rs170183 was correlated with a decline in CLDN14 expression in both lymphoblastoid cell lines and T cells (Padj = 0.003 and 0.016, respectively). In conclusion, our study identified a novel PBC susceptibility variant that has been shown to be strongly associated with BMD, highlighting the potential of pleiotropy to improve gene discovery. PMID:26842849

  2. A Common Variant in CLDN14 is Associated with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Bone Mineral Density

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ruqi; Wei, Yiran; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Haoyan; Miao, Qi; Bian, Zhaolian; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Qixia; Wang, Zhaoyue; Lian, Min; Yang, Fan; Jiang, Xiang; Yang, Yue; Li, Enling; Seldin, Michael F.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Liao, Wilson; Shi, Yongyong; Ma, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a chronic autoimmune liver disease, has been associated with increased incidence of osteoporosis. Intriguingly, two PBC susceptibility loci identified through genome-wide association studies are also involved in bone mineral density (BMD). These observations led us to investigate the genetic variants shared between PBC and BMD. We evaluated 72 genome-wide significant BMD SNPs for association with PBC using two European GWAS data sets (n = 8392), with replication of significant findings in a Chinese cohort (685 cases, 1152 controls). Our analysis identified a novel variant in the intron of the CLDN14 gene (rs170183, Pfdr = 0.015) after multiple testing correction. The three associated variants were followed-up in the Chinese cohort; one SNP rs170183 demonstrated consistent evidence of association in diverse ethnic populations (Pcombined = 2.43 × 10−5). Notably, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data revealed that rs170183 was correlated with a decline in CLDN14 expression in both lymphoblastoid cell lines and T cells (Padj = 0.003 and 0.016, respectively). In conclusion, our study identified a novel PBC susceptibility variant that has been shown to be strongly associated with BMD, highlighting the potential of pleiotropy to improve gene discovery. PMID:26842849

  3. Common Variants in the MKL1 Gene Confer Risk of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiong-jian; Huang, Liang; van den Oord, Edwin J.; Aberg, Karolina A.; Gan, Lin; Zhao, Zhongming; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have identified multiple risk variants with robust association signals for schizophrenia. However, these variants could explain only a small proportion of schizophrenia heritability. Furthermore, the effect size of these risk variants is relatively small (eg, most of them had an OR less than 1.2), suggesting that additional risk variants may be detected when increasing sample size in analysis. Here, we report the identification of a genome-wide significant schizophrenia risk locus at 22q13.1 by combining 2 large-scale schizophrenia cohort studies. Our meta-analysis revealed that 7 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) on chromosome 22q13.1 reached the genome-wide significance level (P < 5.0×10–8) in the combined samples (a total of 38441 individuals). Among them, SNP rs6001946 had the most significant association with schizophrenia (P = 2.04×10–8). Interestingly, all 7 SNPs are in high linkage disequilibrium and located in the MKL1 gene. Expression analysis showed that MKL1 is highly expressed in human and mouse brains. We further investigated functional links between MKL1 and proteins encoded by other schizophrenia susceptibility genes in the whole human protein interaction network. We found that MKL1 physically interacts with GSK3B, a protein encoded by a well-characterized schizophrenia susceptibility gene. Collectively, our results revealed that genetic variants in MKL1 might confer risk to schizophrenia. Further investigation of the roles of MKL1 in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia is warranted. PMID:25380769

  4. Common Variants Confer Susceptibility to Barrett's Esophagus: Insights from the First Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Palles, Claire; Findlay, John M; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Eight loci have been identified by the two genome-wide association studies of Barrett's esophagus that have been conducted to date. Esophageal adenocarcinoma cases were included in the second study following evidence that predisposing genetic variants for this cancer overlap with those for Barrett's esophagus. Genes with roles in embryonic development of the foregut are adjacent to 6 of the loci identified (FOXF1, BARX1, FOXP1, GDF7, TBX5, and ALDH1A2). An additional locus maps to a gene with known oncogenic potential (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1), but expression quantitative trait data implicates yet another gene involved in esophageal development (PBX4). These results strongly support a model whereby dysregulation of genes involved in esophageal and thoracic development increases susceptibility to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma, probably by reducing anatomical antireflux mechanisms. An additional signal at 6p21 in the major histocompatibility complex also reinforces evidence that immune and inflammatory response to reflux is involved in the development of both diseases. All of the variants identified are intronic or intergenic rather than coding and are presumed to be or to mark regulatory variants. As with genome-wide association studies of other diseases, the functional variants at each locus are yet to be identified and the genes affected need confirming. In this chapter as well as discussing the biology behind each genome-wide association signal, we review the requirements for successfully conducting genome-wide association studies and discuss how progress in understanding the genetic variants that contribute to Barrett's esophagus/esophageal adenocarcinoma susceptibility compares to other cancers. PMID:27573776

  5. The influence of genetic polymorphisms in TLR4 and TIRAP, and their expression levels in peripheral blood, on susceptibility to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANPING; YANG, JINGPING; XU, XIYUAN; LIANG, LIANGSHEN; SUN, HAIXIA; LIU, GUOHUA; ZHANG, LIHONG; SU, YUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether genetic polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-associated protein (TIRAP) genes, and/or their expression levels, influence the susceptibility of a patient to sepsis. A total of 106 patients with sepsis were divided into two groups on the basis of their acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II scores: i) Sepsis group A (APACHE II <20) and ii) Sepsis group B (APACHE II >20). In addition, 100 healthy volunteers were enrolled into the control group. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was used to detect the following genetic polymorphisms: The Ser180Leu allele of the TIRAP gene and the Asp299Gly and Thr399I1e alleles of the TLR4 gene. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of TLR4 and TIRAP were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Genetic polymorphisms were not detected for the TLR4 and TIRAP genes; however, the protein expression levels of TLR4 and TIRAP differed significantly between the control, sepsis A and sepsis B groups (P<0.01). An APACHE II score of 20 was used as a baseline in order to differentiate sepsis severity. Pearson analysis demonstrated that TLR4 and TIRAP protein expression levels were positively correlated with sepsis severity (r=0.931 and 0.972; P<0.05), and TLR4 protein expression levels were positively correlated with those of TIRAP (r=0.936; P<0.05). The results of the present study suggested that the protein expression levels of, but not genetic polymorphisms in, TLR4 and TIRAP were associated with the severity of sepsis. PMID:26889229

  6. CD14 Is a Co-Receptor for TLR4 in the S100A9-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Response in Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhifei; Riva, Matteo; Björk, Per; Swärd, Karl; Mörgelin, Matthias; Leanderson, Tomas; Ivars, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The cytosolic Ca2+-binding S100A9 and S100A8 proteins form heterodimers that are primarily expressed in human neutrophils and monocytes. We have recently shown that S100A9 binds to TLR4 in vitro and induces TLR4-dependent NF-κB activation and a pro-inflammatory cytokine response in monocytes. In the present report we have further investigated the S100A9-mediated stimulation of TLR4 in monocytes. Using transmission immunoelectron microscopy, we detected focal binding of S100A9 to monocyte membrane subdomains containing the caveolin-1 protein and TLR4. Furthermore, the S100A9 protein was detected in early endosomes of the stimulated cells, indicating that the protein could be internalized by endocytosis. Although stimulation of monocytes with S100A9 was strictly TLR4-dependent, binding of S100A9 to the plasma membrane and endocytosis of S100A9 was still detectable and coincided with CD14 expression in TLR4-deficient cells. We therefore investigated whether CD14 would be involved in the TLR4-dependent stimulation and could show that the S100A9-induced cytokine response was inhibited both in CD14-deficient cells and in cells exposed to CD14 blocking antibodies. Further, S100A9 was not internalized into CD14-deficient cells suggesting a direct role of CD14 in endocytosis of S100A9. Finally, we could detect satiable binding of S100A9 to CD14 in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Taken together, these results indicate that CD14 is a co-receptor of TLR4 in the S100A9-induced cytokine response. PMID:27228163

  7. TLR4 Deters Perfusion Recovery and Upregulates Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2) in Ischemic Skeletal Muscle and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia; Benabou, Kelly; Cui, Xiangdong; Madia, Marissa; Tzeng, Edith; Billiar, Timothy; Watkins, Simon; Sachdev, Ulka

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in regulating muscle regeneration and angiogenesis in response to ischemia. TLR2 knockout mice exhibit pronounced skeletal muscle necrosis and abnormal vessel architecture after femoral artery ligation, suggesting that TLR2 signaling is protective during ischemia. TLR4, an important receptor in inflammatory signaling, has been shown to regulate TLR2 expression in other systems. We hypothesize that a similar relationship between TLR4 and TLR2 may exist in hindlimb ischemia in which TLR4 upregulates TLR2, a mediator of angiogenesis and perfusion recovery. We examined the expression of TLR2 in unstimulated and in TLR-agonist treated endothelial cells (ECs). TLR2 expression (low in control ECs) was upregulated by lipopolysaccharide, the danger signal high mobility group box-1, and hypoxia in a TLR4-dependent manner. Endothelial tube formation on Matrigel as well as EC permeability was assessed as in vitro measures of angiogenesis. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that ECs lacking TLR4 formed more tubes, whereas TLR2 knockdown ECs exhibited attenuated tube formation. TLR2 also mediated EC permeability, an initial step during angiogenesis, in response to high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) that is released by cells during hypoxic injury. In vivo, ischemia-induced upregulation of TLR2 required intact TLR4 signaling that mediated systemic inflammation, as measured by local and systemic IL-6 levels. Similar to our in vitro findings, vascular density and limb perfusion were both enhanced in the absence of TLR4 signaling, but not if TLR2 was deleted. These findings indicate that TLR2, in the absence of TLR4, improves angiogenesis and perfusion recovery in response to ischemia. PMID:26181630

  8. Common and Uncommon Anatomical Variants of Intrahepatic Bile Ducts in Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography and its Clinical Implication

    PubMed Central

    Sarawagi, Radha; Sundar, Shyam; Raghuvanshi, Sameer; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Jayaraman, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative knowledge of intrahepatic bile duct (IHD) anatomy is critical for planning liver resections, liver transplantations and complex biliary reconstructive surgery. The purpose of our study was to demonstrate the imaging features of various anatomical variants of IHD using magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) and their prevalence in our population. Material/Methods This observational clinical evaluation study included 224 patients who were referred for MRCP. MRCP was performed in a 1.5-Tesla magnet (Philips) with SSH MRCP 3DHR and SSHMRCP rad protocol. A senior radiologist assessed the biliary passage for anatomical variations. Results The branching pattern of the right hepatic duct (RHD) was typical in 55.3% of subjects. The most common variant was right posterior sectoral duct (RPSD) draining into the left hepatic duct (LHD) in 27.6% of subjects. Trifurcation pattern was noted in 9.3% of subjects. In 4% of subjects, RPSD was draining into the common hepatic duct (CHD) and in 0.8% of subjects into the cystic duct. Other variants were noted in 2.6% of subjects. In 4.9% of cases there was an accessory duct. The most common type of LHD branching pattern was a common trunk of segment 2 and 3 ducts joining the segment 4 duct in 67.8% of subjects. In 23.2% of subjects, segment 2 duct united with the common trunk of segment 3 and 4 and in 3.4% of subjects segment 2, 3, and 4 ducts united together to form LHD. Other uncommon branching patterns of LHD were seen in 4.9% of subjects. Conclusions Intrahepatic bile duct anatomy is complex with many common and uncommon variations. MRCP is a reliable non-invasive imaging method for demonstration of bile duct morphology, which is useful to plan complex surgeries and to prevent iatrogenic injuries. PMID:27298653

  9. TLR4/IFNγ pathways induce tumor regression via NOS II-dependent NO and ROS production in murine breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Lamrani, Myriam; Sassi, Nejia; Paul, Catherine; Yousfi, Nadhir; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Gauthier, Nolwenn; Labbé, Jérôme; Seignez, Cédric; Racoeur, Cindy; Athias, Anne; Guerreiro, Romain; Vergely, Catherine; Rochette, Luc; Bettaieb, Ali; Jeannin, Jean-François

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 agonists have emerged as a new group of molecules used for cancer therapy. They have been exploited to enhance the immunogenicity of current chemotherapeutic regimens. However, their effects on cancer cells remain elusive. Here, we showed that a TLR4 agonist, namely a synthetic lipid A analog (ALA), OM-174, exhibits antitumor effects in several mammary tumor mouse models. We also showed that immune components are involved in such effects, as attested to by the failure of ALA to induce tumor regression or an increase of animal survival in mice knocked-out for interferon γ (IFNγ) or TLR4. TLR4 and IFNγ receptor (INFR2) expressed by cancer cells are involved in the antitumor efficacy of ALA since this last did not inhibit tumor growth in mice bearing a tumor but lacking TLR4 or IFNγ receptor 2 (IFNR2). Mechanistic investigations revealed that nitric oxide (NO), superoxide and peroxynitrite produced by uncoupling of inducible NO synthase (NOS II) in cancer cells are key mediators of ALA and IFNγ-mediated tumor growth inhibition. We present here a comprehensive picture of tumor cell death induction, in vivo and in vitro, by immunotherapy and for the first time the involvement of the TLR4/IFNγ/NOS II pathway in immunotherapy was investigated. PMID:27467924

  10. Expression of TLR4-MyD88 and NF-κB in the Iris during Endotoxin-Induced Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shang; Lu, Hong; Hu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Wei; Xu, Yingzhi; Wang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To observe the expression of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor kappa B p65 (NF-κB p65) in iris tissue during endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) and evaluate the significance of these factors in uveitis. Methods. Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (0 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, n = 10/group). Animal model of acute anterior uveitis was established by a hind footpad injection of 200 μg Cholera vibrio LPS. Expression of TLR4, MyD88, and NF-κB p65 in iris ciliary body tissue was detected through immunohistochemical staining. Results. Expression of TLR4 was not detected in normal iris-ciliary body complex, TLR4 positive cells with round morphology appeared in the iris stroma 12 hours after injection, significantly increased (P < .001) 48 hours after injection, and decreased gradually 72 hours after injection. Expression of MyD88 and NF-κB p65 is consistent with the change of the TLR4. Conclusions. The increased expression of TLR4 and its downstream signal transduction moleculesMyD88, NF-κB p65 indicate the potential role of pathway in the pathogenesis of acute anterior uveitis (AAU). PMID:20847811

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of transcription of tlr4 in vitro is reversed by dexamethasone and correlates with presence of conserved NFκB binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Camila P.; Baccarin, Raquel Y.A.; Nostell, Katarina; Nahum, Laila A.; Fossum, Caroline; de Camargo, Maristela M.

    2013-01-01

    Engagement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a master trigger of the deleterious effects of septic shock. Horses and humans are considered the most sensitive species to septic shock, but the mechanisms explaining these phenomena remain elusive. Analysis of tlr4 promoters revealed high similarity among LPS-sensitive species (human, chimpanzee, and horse) and low similarity with LPS-resistant species (mouse and rat). Four conserved nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) binding sites were found in the tlr4 promoter and two in the md2 promoter sequences that are likely to be targets for dexamethasone regulation. In vitro treatment of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) with LPS decreased transcripts of tlr4 and increased transcription of md2 (myeloid differentiation factor 2) and cd14 (cluster of differentiation 14). Treatment with dexamethasone rescued transcription of tlr4 after LPS inhibition. LPS-induced transcription of md2 was inhibited in the presence of dexamethasone. Dexamethasone alone did not affect transcription of tlr4 and md2. PMID:23402753

  12. Evaluation of the Therapeutic Potential of Anti-TLR4-Antibody MTS510 in Experimental Stroke and Significance of Different Routes of Application

    PubMed Central

    Czech-Zechmeister, Bozena; Könnecke, Birte; Lühder, Fred; Trendelenburg, George

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are central sensors for the inflammatory response in ischemia-reperfusion injury. We therefore investigated whether TLR4 inhibition could be used to treat stroke in a standard model of focal cerebral ischemia. Anti-TLR4/MD2-antibody (mAb clone MTS510) blocked TLR4-induced cell activation in vitro, as reported previously. Here, different routes of MTS510 application in vivo were used to study the effects on stroke outcome up to 2d after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 45min in adult male C57Bl/6 wild-type mice. Improved neurological performance, reduced infarct volumes, and reduced brain swelling showed that intravascular application of MTS510 had a protective effect in the model of 45min MCAO. Evaluation of potential long-term adverse effects of anti-TLR4-mAb-treament revealed no significant deleterious effect on infarct volumes nor neurological deficit after 14d of reperfusion in a mild model of stroke (15min MCAO). Interestingly, inhibition of TLR4 resulted in an altered adaptive immune response at 48 hours after reperfusion. We conclude that blocking TLR4 by the use of specific mAb is a promising strategy for stroke therapy. However, long-term studies with increased functional sensitivity, larger sampling sizes and use of other species are required before a clinical use could be envisaged. PMID:26849209

  13. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Induces Apoptosis in Cultured Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes by Modulating the TLR4/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiantao; Sun, Yuhan; Yang, Huafeng; Lu, Yuanxi; Li, Lang

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and explore the possible mechanisms. We evaluated whether ox-LDL-induced apoptosis depended in part on the activation of toll-like receptor-4(TLR4)/Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. Cells were cultivated with and without ox-LDL. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Immunofluorescence, western blot analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were conducted to assess protein or mRNA expressions. Resatorvid (TAK-242), an exogenous synthetic antagonist for TLR4, was used to inhibit TLR4 signal transduction. Dose- and time-dependent apoptotic index of cardiomyocytes occurred after ox-LDL treatment. Incubation of cardiomyocytes with ox-LDL (50 μg/mL) for 24 hours increased TLR4 and NF-κB expressions significantly. Decrease of Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio, activation of caspase-3 and 9 were also detected. Ox-LDL-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, TLR4 and NF-κB expressions were attenuated by pretreatment with TAK-242. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the apoptosis induced by ox-LDL in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes at least in part by modulating the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27279424

  14. TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway mediates HMGB1-induced pancreatic injury in mice with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    LI, GANG; WU, XUEJUN; YANG, LE; HE, YUXIANG; LIU, YANG; JIN, XING; YUAN, HAI

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an extremely dangerous acute abdominal disorder which causes multiple complications and has a high mortality rate. Previous research has suggested that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP; however, the mechanisms underlying this strong correlation remain unclear. In this study, to further investigate whether HMGB1 acts as a stimulating factor, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) acts as its major mediator in the development of pancreatic injury during SAP, recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) and TLR4-deficient mice were used. We found that HMGB1 and TLR4 were highly expressed, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was activated in our mouse model of SAP. We noted that the rhHMGB1 pancreas-targeted injection activated the TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway and induced pancreatic injury in wild-type mice. In TLR4-deficient mice, the rhHMGB1-induced activation of NF-κB and pathological changes in the pancreas were less evident than in wild-type mice. Therefore, this study provides evidence that HMGB1 promotes the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, and its downstream TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential important mediator in the development of this form of pancreatic injury. PMID:26719855

  15. Lipopolysaccharide clearance, bacterial clearance, and systemic inflammatory responses are regulated by cell type-specific functions of TLR4 during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Meihong; Scott, Melanie J; Loughran, Patricia; Gibson, Gregory; Sodhi, Chhinder; Watkins, Simon; Hackam, David; Billiar, Timothy R

    2013-05-15

    The morbidity associated with bacterial sepsis is the result of host immune responses to pathogens, which are dependent on pathogen recognition by pattern recognition receptors, such as TLR4. TLR4 is expressed on a range of cell types, yet the mechanisms by which cell-specific functions of TLR4 lead to an integrated sepsis response are poorly understood. To address this, we generated mice in which TLR4 was specifically deleted from myeloid cells (LysMTLR4KO) or hepatocytes (HCTLR4KO) and then determined survival, bacterial counts, host inflammatory responses, and organ injury in a model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), with or without antibiotics. LysM-TLR4 was required for phagocytosis and efficient bacterial clearance in the absence of antibiotics. Survival, the magnitude of the systemic and local inflammatory responses, and liver damage were associated with bacterial levels. HCTLR4 was required for efficient LPS clearance from the circulation, and deletion of HCTLR4 was associated with enhanced macrophage phagocytosis, lower bacterial levels, and improved survival in CLP without antibiotics. Antibiotic administration during CLP revealed an important role for hepatocyte LPS clearance in limiting sepsis-induced inflammation and organ injury. Our work defines cell type-selective roles for TLR4 in coordinating complex immune responses to bacterial sepsis and suggests that future strategies for modulating microbial molecule recognition should account for varying roles of pattern recognition receptors in multiple cell populations. PMID:23562812

  16. Elevated CD14 (Cluster of Differentiation 14) and Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 4 Signaling Deteriorate Periapical Inflammation in TLR2 Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Rider, Daniel; Furusho, Hisako; Xu, Shuang; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Kuo, Winston Patrick; Hirai, Kimito; Susa, Mako; Bahammam, Laila; Stashenko, Philip; Fujimura, Akira; Sasaki, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    Apical periodontitis (periapical lesions) is an infection-induced chronic inflammation in the jaw, ultimately resulting in the destruction of apical periodontal tissue. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are prominent in the initial recognition of pathogens. Our previous study showed that TLR4 signaling is proinflammatory in periapical lesions induced by a polymicrobial endodontic infection. In contrast, the functional role of TLR2 in regulation of periapical tissue destruction is still not fully understood. Using TLR2 deficient (KO), TLR2/TLR4 double deficient (dKO), and wild-type (WT) mice, we demonstrate that TLR2 KO mice are highly responsive to polymicrobial infection-induced periapical lesion caused by over activation of TLR4 signal transduction pathway that resulted in elevation of NF-kB (nuclear factor kappa B) and proinflammatory cytokine production. The altered TLR4 signaling is caused by TLR2 deficiency-dependent elevation of CD14 (cluster of differentiation 14), which is a co-receptor of TLR4. Indeed, neutralization of CD14 strikingly suppresses TLR2 deficiency-dependent inflammation and tissue destruction in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that a network of TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 is a key factor in regulation of polymicrobial dentoalveolar infection and subsequent tissue destruction. Anat Rec, 299:1281-1292, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27314637

  17. TLR4, IL10RA, and NOD2 mutation in paediatric Crohn's disease patients: an association with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and TLR4 and IL10RA expression.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Josef; Skinner, Narelle A; Catto-Smith, Anthony G; Cameron, Donald J S; Michalski, Wojtek P; Visvanathan, Kumar; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). The role of CD susceptibility genes in association with these microbes is not known. Sixty-two early onset paediatric CD patients and 46 controls with known MAP status were analysed for an association with 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 18 CD susceptibility genes. Functional studies on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were conducted on 17 CD patients with known CD mutations to assess IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α expression upon stimulation with MAP precipitated protein derivative (PPD) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, surface expression of IL10R and TLR4 on resting B cells, NK cells, T cells, and monocytes was assessed. A mutation in TLR4 (rs4986790) and IL10RA (rs22291130) was significantly associated with MAP-positive CD patients compared to MAP-negative CD patients (27.6 vs. 6.1 %, p = 0.021, and 62.1 vs. 33.3 %, p = 0.024, respectively). PPD and LPS significantly increased IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α production in PBMCs. IL-10 and TNF-α production were significantly lower in a subgroup of CD patients (5/12) with a known NOD2 mutation. Receptor for IL-10 was significantly higher expressed on NK cells (CD56low) and on NK T cells harbouring a NOD2 mutations compared to wildtype cells (p = 0.031 and 0.005, respectively). TLR4 was significantly higher expressed on NK cells (CD56high) harbouring a NOD2 mutations compared to wildtype cells (p = 0.038). PMID:23455702

  18. Biparietal variant of Alzheimer's disease: a rare presentation of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês B; Tábuas-Pereira, Miguel; Milheiro, Miguel; Santana, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a clinically heterogeneous disease that may have atypical presentations with focal cortical syndromes and relatively preserved episodic memory. The posterior variant of AD has two subtypes: occipitotemporal, presenting with visuoperceptive impairment, and biparietal, presenting with visuospatial dysfunction and apraxia. We report a case of a 51-year-old woman with progressive limb apraxia and choreiform movements. Her neuropsychological evaluation was compatible with dementia, and revealed ideomotor and ideational limb apraxia, severe visuoconstructive ability impairment, dyscalculia and posterior aphasia. Workup excluded metabolic, infectious, inflammatory or neoplastic causes, and hereditary conditions as Huntington's disease and familial AD. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers revealed β-amyloid reduction and τ protein increase. Brain imaging showed marked biparietal atrophy and hypoperfusion, and widespread cortical β-amyloid deposition. Biparietal variant of AD was diagnosed and acetylcholinesterase inhibitor treatment induced clinical stabilisation. AD may present with atypical features and a high clinical suspicion is necessary for an early diagnosis. PMID:25564588

  19. Common variants upstream of KDR encoding VEGFR2 and in TTC39B associate with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Aradottir, Kristrun; Feenstra, Bjarke; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Stefansdottir, Lilja; Kristinsdottir, Anna M; Zink, Florian; Halldorsson, Gisli H; Munk Nielsen, Nete; Geller, Frank; Melbye, Mads; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Geirsson, Reynir T; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) of endometriosis using 25.5 million sequence variants detected through whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 8,453 Icelanders and imputed into 1,840 cases and 129,016 control women, followed by testing of associated variants in Danish samples. Here we report the discovery of a new endometriosis susceptibility locus on 4q12 (rs17773813[G], OR=1.28; P=3.8 × 10(-11)), upstream of KDR encoding vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). The variant correlates with disease severity (P=0.0046) when moderate/severe endometriosis cases are tested against minimal/mild cases. We further report association of rs519664[T] in TTC39B on 9p22 with endometriosis (P=4.8 × 10(-10); OR=1.29). The involvement of KDR in endometriosis risk highlights the importance of the VEGF pathway in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:27453397

  20. Common variants upstream of KDR encoding VEGFR2 and in TTC39B associate with endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Aradottir, Kristrun; Feenstra, Bjarke; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Stefansdottir, Lilja; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Zink, Florian; Halldorsson, Gisli H.; Munk Nielsen, Nete; Geller, Frank; Melbye, Mads; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Geirsson, Reynir T.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) of endometriosis using 25.5 million sequence variants detected through whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 8,453 Icelanders and imputed into 1,840 cases and 129,016 control women, followed by testing of associated variants in Danish samples. Here we report the discovery of a new endometriosis susceptibility locus on 4q12 (rs17773813[G], OR=1.28; P=3.8 × 10−11), upstream of KDR encoding vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). The variant correlates with disease severity (P=0.0046) when moderate/severe endometriosis cases are tested against minimal/mild cases. We further report association of rs519664[T] in TTC39B on 9p22 with endometriosis (P=4.8 × 10−10; OR=1.29). The involvement of KDR in endometriosis risk highlights the importance of the VEGF pathway in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:27453397

  1. Rare, low frequency and common coding variants in CHRNA5 and their contribution to nicotine dependence in European and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Olfson, E; Saccone, N L; Johnson, E O; Chen, L-S; Culverhouse, R; Doheny, K; Foltz, S M; Fox, L; Gogarten, S M; Hartz, S; Hetrick, K; Laurie, C C; Marosy, B; Amin, N; Arnett, D; Barr, R G; Bartz, T M; Bertelsen, S; Borecki, I B; Brown, M R; Chasman, D I; van Duijn, C M; Feitosa, M F; Fox, E R; Franceschini, N; Franco, O H; Grove, M L; Guo, X; Hofman, A; Kardia, S L R; Morrison, A C; Musani, S K; Psaty, B M; Rao, D C; Reiner, A P; Rice, K; Ridker, P M; Rose, L M; Schick, U M; Schwander, K; Uitterlinden, A G; Vojinovic, D; Wang, J-C; Ware, E B; Wilson, G; Yao, J; Zhao, W; Breslau, N; Hatsukami, D; Stitzel, J A; Rice, J; Goate, A; Bierut, L J

    2016-05-01

    The common nonsynonymous variant rs16969968 in the α5 nicotinic receptor subunit gene (CHRNA5) is the strongest genetic risk factor for nicotine dependence in European Americans and contributes to risk in African Americans. To comprehensively examine whether other CHRNA5 coding variation influences nicotine dependence risk, we performed targeted sequencing on 1582 nicotine-dependent cases (Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence score⩾4) and 1238 non-dependent controls, with independent replication of common and low frequency variants using 12 studies with exome chip data. Nicotine dependence was examined using logistic regression with individual common variants (minor allele frequency (MAF)⩾0.05), aggregate low frequency variants (0.05>MAF⩾0.005) and aggregate rare variants (MAF<0.005). Meta-analysis of primary results was performed with replication studies containing 12 174 heavy and 11 290 light smokers. Next-generation sequencing with 180 × coverage identified 24 nonsynonymous variants and 2 frameshift deletions in CHRNA5, including 9 novel variants in the 2820 subjects. Meta-analysis confirmed the risk effect of the only common variant (rs16969968, European ancestry: odds ratio (OR)=1.3, P=3.5 × 10(-11); African ancestry: OR=1.3, P=0.01) and demonstrated that three low frequency variants contributed an independent risk (aggregate term, European ancestry: OR=1.3, P=0.005; African ancestry: OR=1.4, P=0.0006). The remaining 22 rare coding variants were associated with increased risk of nicotine dependence in the European American primary sample (OR=12.9, P=0.01) and in the same risk direction in African Americans (OR=1.5, P=0.37). Our results indicate that common, low frequency and rare CHRNA5 coding variants are independently associated with nicotine dependence risk. These newly identified variants likely influence the risk for smoking-related diseases such as lung cancer. PMID:26239294

  2. Common variants in FKBP5 gene and major depressive disorder (MDD) susceptibility: a comprehensive meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shuquan; Yao, Yao; Ryan, Joanne; Li, Tao; Wang, Duan; Zheng, Chuan; Xu, Yong; Xu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the association between common variants in FKBP5 and MDD; however, the results remain inconsistent. In order to conduct a comprehensive meta-analysis of the association between FKBP5 variants and MDD risk, seven studies involving 26582 subjects, including 12491 cases with MDD and 14091 controls, were enrolled totally. Four common SNPs (rs1360780, rs4713916, rs3800373 and rs755658) with complete data from two or more studies were analyzed. In the total sample, there was no evidence of a significant association between MDD and any of the four SNPs using a random-effects model. However, after removing one heterogeneous German study, as indicated by sensitivity analysis, both the rs1360780 T-allele (Z = 2.95, P = 0.003, OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02-1.11) and the rs3800373 C-allele (Z = 3.05, P = 0.002, OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.02-1.12) were significantly associated with MDD in a fixed-effect model. Our study thus provides support for an association between specific FKBP5 genetic variants and MDD risk. Rs4713916 was not significantly associated with MDD; However, this analysis had limited statistical power and larger sample sizes are required to further validate this result. Future research should also investigate possible gender- and ethnicity-specific differences in the association between FKBP5 and MDD. PMID:27601205

  3. Common 5S rRNA variants are likely to be accepted in many sequence contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Lee, Youn-Hyung; Fox, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Over evolutionary time RNA sequences which are successfully fixed in a population are selected from among those that satisfy the structural and chemical requirements imposed by the function of the RNA. These sequences together comprise the structure space of the RNA. In principle, a comprehensive understanding of RNA structure and function would make it possible to enumerate which specific RNA sequences belong to a particular structure space and which do not. We are using bacterial 5S rRNA as a model system to attempt to identify principles that can be used to predict which sequences do or do not belong to the 5S rRNA structure space. One promising idea is the very intuitive notion that frequently seen sequence changes in an aligned data set of naturally occurring 5S rRNAs would be widely accepted in many other 5S rRNA sequence contexts. To test this hypothesis, we first developed well-defined operational definitions for a Vibrio region of the 5S rRNA structure space and what is meant by a highly variable position. Fourteen sequence variants (10 point changes and 4 base-pair changes) were identified in this way, which, by the hypothesis, would be expected to incorporate successfully in any of the known sequences in the Vibrio region. All 14 of these changes were constructed and separately introduced into the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA sequence where they are not normally found. Each variant was evaluated for its ability to function as a valid 5S rRNA in an E. coli cellular context. It was found that 93% (13/14) of the variants tested are likely valid 5S rRNAs in this context. In addition, seven variants were constructed that, although present in the Vibrio region, did not meet the stringent criteria for a highly variable position. In this case, 86% (6/7) are likely valid. As a control we also examined seven variants that are seldom or never seen in the Vibrio region of 5S rRNA sequence space. In this case only two of seven were found to be potentially valid. The

  4. The role of microglia and the TLR4 pathway in neuronal apoptosis and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although microglia and the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway have long been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), thus far only correlations have been made. In this study, we attempted to solidify the relationship between microglia and the TLR pathway using depletion and genetic knockouts, respectively. Methods Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in TLR4−/−, TRIF−/−, MyD88−/− and wild type C57BL/6 mice by injecting 60 μl of autologous blood near the mesencephalon; animals were euthanized 1 to 15 days after SAH for immunohistochemical analysis to detect microglia or apoptotic cells. Lastly, microglial depletion was performed by intracerebroventricular injection of clodronate liposomes. Results On post operative day (POD) 7 (early phase SAH), neuronal apoptosis was largely TLR4-MyD88-dependent and microglial-dependent. By POD 15 (late phase SAH), neuronal apoptosis was characterized by TLR4- toll receptor associated activator of interferon (TRIF)-dependence and microglial-independence. Similarly, vasospasm was also characterized by an early and late phase with MyD88 and TRIF dependence, respectively. Lastly, microglia seem to be both necessary and sufficient to cause vasospasm in both the early and late phases of SAH in our model. Conclusion Our results suggest that SAH pathology could have different phases. These results could explain why therapies tailored to aSAH patients have failed for the most part. Perhaps a novel strategy utilizing immunotherapies that target Toll like receptor signaling and microglia at different points in the patient’s hospital course could improve outcomes. PMID:23849248

  5. Predisposition to Childhood Otitis Media and Genetic Polymorphisms within the Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Kentala, Erna; Hammarén-Malmi, Sari; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; MacArthur, Carol J.; Wilmot, Beth; Casselbrant, Margaretha; Conley, Yvette P.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Mandel, Ellen M.; Vaarala, Outi; Kallio, Anna; Melin, Merit; Nieminen, Janne K.; Leinonen, Eira; Kere, Juha; Mattila, Petri S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Predisposition to childhood otitis media (OM) has a strong genetic component, with polymorphisms in innate immunity genes suspected to contribute to risk. Studies on several genes have been conducted, but most associations have failed to replicate in independent cohorts. Methods We investigated 53 gene polymorphisms in a Finnish cohort of 624 cases and 778 controls. A positive association signal was followed up in a tagging approach and tested in an independent Finnish cohort of 205 cases, in a British cohort of 1269 trios, as well as in two cohorts from the United States (US); one with 403 families and the other with 100 cases and 104 controls. Results In the initial Finnish cohort, the SNP rs5030717 in the TLR4 gene region showed significant association (OR 1.33, P = .003) to OM. Tagging SNP analysis of the gene found rs1329060 (OR 1.33, P = .002) and rs1329057 (OR 1.29, P = .003) also to be associated. In the more severe phenotype the association was stronger. This finding was supported by an independent Finnish case cohort, but the associations failed to replicate in the British and US cohorts. In studies on TLR4 signaling in 20 study subjects, the three-marker risk haplotype correlated with a decreased TNFα secretion in myeloid dendritic cells. Conclusions The TLR4 gene locus, regulating the innate immune response, influences the genetic predisposition to childhood OM in a subpopulation of patients. Environmental factors likely modulate the genetic components contributing to the risk of OM. PMID:26177520

  6. Role of TLR4-Mediated PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β Signaling Pathway in Apoptosis of Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian; Jiang, Daorong; Jiang, Wei; Zhao, Min; Gan, Jianhe

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of the Toll-like receptor 4- (TLR4-) mediated PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β signaling pathway in rat hepatocytes apoptosis induced by LPS. The cultured rat hepatocytes were treated with LPS alone or first pretreated with TLR4 inhibitor, AKT inhibitor, and GSK-3β inhibitor, respectively, and then stimulated with the same dose of LPS. Cell viability, cell apoptotic rate, and apoptosis morphology were assessed; the level of P-AKTSer473, P-GSK-3βSer9, and active Caspase-3 and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 were evaluated. The results indicated that cell viability decreased, while cell apoptotic rate increased with time after LPS stimulation. The expression of P-AKTSer473 and P-GSK-3βSer9 in the LPS group decreased compared with the control, while the level of active Caspase-3 and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 were significantly increased. These effects were attenuated by pretreatment with CLI-095. In addition, the apoptotic ratio decreased after pretreatment with LiCl but increased following pretreatment with LY294002. The expression of P-AKTSer473 further decreased following pretreatment with LY294002 and the expression of P-GSK-3βSer9 increased following pretreatment with LiCl. Moreover, pretreatment with CLI-095 weakened LPS-induced nuclear translocation of GSK-3β. Our findings suggest that the TLR4-mediated PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β signaling pathway is present in rat hepatocytes and participates in apoptosis of BRL-3A cells. PMID:26770978

  7. Evaluating Effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in Mouse DCs

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Barzkar, Zahra; Babaee, Maryam; Naghdi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells and recent findings suggest immunomodulatory effect of them on immune cells including T cells and dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are the most potent antigen presenting cells. It seems because of immunoregulatory properties of MSCs, they can affect the maturation and differentiation of DCs. DCs express a kind of surface receptors called toll-like receptors (TLRs) and play a key role in maturation process and activation of DCs. The aim of this study was to evaluate expression of TLR2 and TLR4 on DCs after exposure to mesenchymal stem cell’s supernatant in culture media containing LPS and devoid of it. Methods: In this experimental study, MSCs and DCs were extracted from adult Balb/c mouse bone marrow and spleen, respectively. MSCs supernatant were collected 24 and 48 h after 5th passage, and in adjusted with DCs culture. Isolated DCs were co-cultured with MSCs supernatant, incubation time were 24 and 48 hours. mRNA levels of TLR2 and TLR4 were evaluated using real time PCR technique. Results: The results demonstrated that although, expressions of these two receptors were up-regulated in culture media lacking LPS in comparison with the control group but the increase was not significant. There were no significant associations between LPS stimulated DCs with and without MSCs supernatants. Conclusion: According to the results presented here, it appears that TLR2 and TLR4 gene expressions on the DCs are not affected by MSCs supernatant. PMID:27478779

  8. TLR4-activated microglia require IFN-γ to induce severe neuronal dysfunction and death in situ.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Ismini E; Lewen, Andrea; Galow, Lukas V; Cesetti, Tiziana; Scheffel, Jörg; Regen, Tommy; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Kann, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Microglia (tissue-resident macrophages) represent the main cell type of the innate immune system in the CNS; however, the mechanisms that control the activation of microglia are widely unknown. We systematically explored microglial activation and functional microglia-neuron interactions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, i.e., postnatal cortical tissue that lacks adaptive immunity. We applied electrophysiological recordings of local field potential and extracellular K(+) concentration, immunohistochemistry, design-based stereology, morphometry, Sholl analysis, and biochemical analyses. We show that chronic activation with either bacterial lipopolysaccharide through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or leukocyte cytokine IFN-γ induces reactive phenotypes in microglia associated with morphological changes, population expansion, CD11b and CD68 up-regulation, and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and nitric oxide (NO) release. Notably, these reactive phenotypes only moderately alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and gamma oscillations (30-100 Hz), which emerge from precise synaptic communication of glutamatergic pyramidal cells and fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons, in local hippocampal networks. Short-term synaptic plasticity and extracellular potassium homeostasis during neural excitation, also reflecting astrocyte function, are unaffected. In contrast, the coactivation of TLR4 and IFN-γ receptors results in neuronal dysfunction and death, caused mainly by enhanced microglial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO release, because iNOS inhibition is neuroprotective. Thus, activation of TLR4 in microglia in situ requires concomitant IFN-γ receptor signaling from peripheral immune cells, such as T helper type 1 and natural killer cells, to unleash neurotoxicity and inflammation-induced neurodegeneration. Our findings provide crucial mechanistic insight into the complex process of microglia activation, with

  9. Sinomenine down-regulates TLR4/TRAF6 expression and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and osteolysis.

    PubMed

    He, Longgang; Duan, Heng; Li, Xianglian; Wang, Song; Zhang, Yueyang; Lei, Linsheng; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-05-15

    Sinomenine (SIN) is an anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic alkaloid derived from Sinomenioum acutum. Effects of SIN on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteolysis have not been reported. Here, we found that SIN reduced LPS-induced erosion of skull bones in C57BL/6 mice significantly. LPS can induce bone-absorbing osteoclast formation independent of RANKL in pre-osteoclastic RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Here, SIN suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast survival in RAW264.7 cells. Expression of osteoclastic-specific marker genes was also inhibited by SIN during osteoclast differentiation and osteoclast survival stimulated with LPS. SIN showed much stronger inhibitory effects on expression of Fra-1 and MMP-9 mRNA in osteoclast differentiation rather than osteoclast survival. SIN dramatically inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α production in vitro and in vivo. Further signaling studies revealed that SIN suppressed the activation and relative gene expression of three notable nuclear factors (NF-κB, AP-1, NFAT), reduced intracellular levels of Ca(2+), and down-regulated phosphorylation of MAPK p38 (but not JNK) in LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Focusing on upstream signals after LPS stimulation, SIN decreased expression of TLR4 and TRAF6 during osteoclast differentiation, and reduced expression of TLR4 (but not TRAF6) in osteoclast survival. These data suggest that SIN might be a potential agent for the treatment of osteolysis caused by Gram-negative bacteria infection or inflammation due to its inhibition of osteoclastogenesis through reduction of TLR4/TRAF6 expression and downstream signal transduction. PMID:26965104

  10. A 90-Day Toxicology Study of Meat from Genetically Modified Sheep Overexpressing TLR4 in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rui; Kan, Tongtong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Ling; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-01-01

    Genetic modification offers alternative strategies to traditional animal breeding. However, the food safety of genetically modified (GM) animals has attracted increasing levels of concern. In this study, we produced GM sheep overexpressing TLR4, and the transgene-positive offsprings (F1) were confirmed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot. The expression of TLR4 was 2.5-fold compared with that of the wild-type (WT) sheep samples. During the 90-day safety study, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with three different dietary concentrations (3.75%, 7.5%, and 15% wt/wt) of GM sheep meat, WT sheep meat or a commercial diet (CD). Blood samples from the rats were collected and analyzed for hematological and biochemical parameters, and then compared with hematological and biochemical reference ranges. Despite a few significant differences among the three groups in some parameters, all other values remained within the normal reference intervals and thus were not considered to be affected by the treatment. No adverse diet-related differences in body weights or relative organ weights were observed. Furthermore, no differences were observed in the gross necropsy findings or microscopic pathology of the rats whose diets contained the GM sheep meat compared with rats whose diets contained the WT sheep meat. Therefore, the present 90-day rat feeding study suggested that the meat of GM sheep overexpressing TLR4 had no adverse effect on Sprague-Dawley rats in comparison with WT sheep meat. These results provide valuable information regarding the safety assessment of meat derived from GM animals. PMID:25874566