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Sample records for commonly prescribed antipsychotic

  1. Editor's introduction: antipsychotic prescribing practices.

    PubMed

    Essock, Susan M

    2002-01-01

    This commentary is an introduction to a set of articles reviewing antipsychotic prescribing practices for individuals with schizophrenia, noting where these practice patterns conform to or deviate from evidence-based practice, and identifying the pressing research questions raised by these variations. The delineation of practices supported by the evidence base is crucial for the practical concerns of creating practice guidelines and monitoring performance, as well as for identifying areas where the reach of clinical practice must exceed the grasp of current knowledge. These gaps in knowledge should guide the development of a research agenda that addresses pressing questions commonly confronted in everyday practice. We know from the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) project and other surveys that clinically significant research findings are not making their way into practice. Additionally, as the articles assembled here indicate, questions of pressing importance in routine practice have yet to make their way into research agendas. PMID:12047008

  2. Simultaneous prescribing of atypical antipsychotics, conventional antipsychotics and anticholinergicsa European study

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, I. W.; van Harten, P. N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent atypical antipsychotics, conventional antipsychotics and anticholinergics are prescribed simultaneously in daily clinical practice in Europe. Method A pharmaco-epidemiological study was carried out in which hospital pharmacists from 45 hospitals in Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, The Netherlands and Scotland participated. Prescription data for 2,725 patients (mainly inpatients) who had been using an atypical antipsychotic for more than 6weeks were analysed. Main outcome measure The frequencies of simultaneous prescription of atypical antipsychotics with other antipsychotics and/or anticholinergics. Results In this sample of patients with an atypical antipsychotic 42.1% was prescribed another antipsychotic (24.1% if low-potent antipsychotics were not included in the analysis) and 30.1% was prescribed an anticholinergic. In total 47.1% of patients were prescribed an atypical antipsychotic without any other antipsychotic or anticholinergic. Conclusion It is common practice to prescribe a combination of atypical antipsychotics and conventional antipsychotics and/or anticholinergics. This suggests that monotherapy involving an atypical antipsychotic is not considered to be an adequate treatment for a substantial number of patients in clinical practice. PMID:17333501

  3. Factors associated with non evidence-based prescribing of antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Non evidence-based prescribing of antipsychotics is common in the UK and internationally with high doses and polypharmacy the norm. These practices often remain even after systematic attempts are made to change. We aimed to establish which factors are linked to antipsychotic prescribing quality so we can identify and target patients for interventions to improve quality and allow us to understand further the drivers of non evidence-based prescribing. Objectives: A cross-sectional survey with a collection of factors potentially affecting antipsychotic prescribing quality outcomes was carried out in eight secondary care units in England. Participants were inpatients prescribed regular antipsychotics on the day of the survey. Antipsychotic dose, polypharmacy, type and route were the main outcome measures. Objectives: Data were collected for 1198 patients. Higher total dose was associated with greater weight, higher number of previous admissions, longer length of admission, noncompliance with medication and use of an atypical antipsychotic. A lower total dose was associated with clozapine use. Polypharmacy was associated with not being a patient at the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust centre, the subject having a forensic history, a greater number of previous admissions and higher total dose. Younger age, not being detained under a Mental Health Act section, atypical antipsychotic use and oral route were predictors of antipsychotic monotherapy. Atypical antipsychotic use was associated with oral route, higher total dose, being administered only one antipsychotic, having had fewer previous antipsychotics and no anticholinergic use. Use of the oral route was associated with not being sectioned under the Mental Health Act, atypical antipsychotic use, younger age, non-schizophrenia diagnosis, fewer previous admissions and a lower total dose. Objectives: In patients with chronic illness who are detained, heavier, noncompliant, not taking clozapine and on a depot antipsychotic, prescribers use larger doses and antipsychotic polypharmacy. We found that use of percentage of licensed maximum doses favours typical antipsychotics arbitrarily, and that high doses and polypharmacy are inextricably linked. PMID:25489476

  4. Antipsychotic Prescribing Patterns in First-episode Schizophrenia: A Five-year Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Daeyoung; Chang, Jhin-Goo; Yoon, Sol; Kim, Chan-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective Early treatment choice is critical in first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The purpose of this study was to describe prescribing trends of antipsychotics use in patients with first-episode schizophrenia in 2005 and 2010, respectively. Methods We reviewed the medical records of newly treated patients with schizophrenia from a university psychiatric hospital in 2005 (n=47) and 2010 (n=52). We defined patients as receiving a high antipsychotic dose if their ratio of prescribed daily dose (PDD) to defined daily dose (DDD) was greater than 1.5. Results The rates of high-dose antipsychotic prescription were 61.7% and 53.8% in 2005 and 2010, respectively. The rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy were 34.6% in 2005 and 34.0% in 2010. The most common first-prescribed antipsychotics were (in descending order of prescription frequency) olanzapine, risperidone, aripiprazole, and haloperidol in 2005 and risperidone, quetiapine, paliperidone, and olanzapine in 2010. High-dose antipsychotics were significantly associated with antipsychotic poly-pharmacy (odds ratio=23.97; p<0.01). More individuals were treated with mood stabilizers in 2010 than in 2005 (p=0.003). Conclusion The practice of prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and associated antipsychotic polypharmacy were common even for initial treatment of first-episode schizophrenia in 2005 and 2010. In 2010, the list of the most common first-prescribed antipsychotics changed, and the use of mood stabilizers increased in non-affective schizophrenia. PMID:26598586

  5. Antipsychotic polypharmacy: a Japanese survey of prescribers' attitudes and rationales.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Taishiro; Watanabe, Koichiro; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Mimura, Masaru; Kane, John M; Correll, Christoph U

    2013-10-30

    While combining antipsychotics is common in schizophrenia treatment, the literature on the reasons for antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is limited. We aimed to identify prescriber attitudes and rationales for APP in Japan where high APP utilization is reported. Two-hundred and seventeen psychiatrists participated in the survey, which assessed APP attitudes and behaviors. Prescribing APP to 47.7±24.7% (mean±S.D.) of their patients, psychiatrists reported that they were "moderately" concerned about APP. The most APP-justifiable factors were (1="not at all" to 5="extreme") cross titration (4.50±0.67), randomized controlled evidence (3.67±0.83), and treatment of comorbid conditions (3.31±0.83). Conversely, APP-discouraging factors were chronic side effects (4.14±0.64), difficulty determining cause and effect (4.07±0.74), and acute side effects (3.99±0.81). Comparing high to low APP prescribers (>50% vs. ≤50% of patients), no differences emerged regarding APP justification and concerns. In multivariate analyses, high APP use was associated with practice at a psychiatric hospital (OR: 2.70, 95% CI: 1.29-5.67, p=0.009), concern about potential drug-drug interactions (OR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.04-2.35, p=0.031), and less reliance on case reports of APP showing efficacy (OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.44-0.92, p=0.017) (r(2)=0.111, p=0.001). High and low APP prescribers shared a comparable degree of justifications and concerns. Future research should examine the impact of cultural determinants on APP. PMID:23602697

  6. Nature and Quality of Antipsychotic Prescribing Practice in UK Psychiatry of Intellectual Disability Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paton, C.; Flynn, A.; Shingleton-Smith, A.; McIntyre, S.; Bhaumik, S.; Rasmussen, J.; Hardy, S.; Barnes, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotics are perceived to be over-used in the management of behavioural problems in people with an intellectual disability (ID). Published guidelines have set good practice standards for the use of these drugs for behavioural indications. We sought to identify the range of indications for which antipsychotic drugs are prescribed

  7. Youth, Caregiver, and Prescriber Experiences of Antipsychotic-Related Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrea Lynn; Gardner, David Martin; Cooke, Charmaine; Kutcher, Stanley Paul; Hughes, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the lived experience of youth, caregivers, and prescribers with antipsychotic medications. Design. We conducted a qualitative interpretive phenomenology study. Youth aged 11 to 25 with recent experience taking antipsychotics, the caregivers of youth taking antipsychotics, and the prescribers of antipsychotics were recruited. Subjects. Eighteen youth, 10 caregivers (parents), and 11 prescribers participated. Results. Eleven of 18 youth, six of ten parents, and all prescribers discussed antipsychotic-related weight gain. Participants were attuned to the numeric weight changes usually measured in pounds. Significant discussions occurred around weight changes in the context of body image, adherence and persistence, managing weight increases, and metabolic effects. These concepts were often inextricably linked but maintained the significance as separate issues. Participants discussed tradeoffs regarding the perceived benefits and risks of weight gain, often with uncertainty and inadequate information regarding the short- and long-term consequences. Conclusion. Antipsychotic-related weight gain in youth influences body image and weight management strategies and impacts treatment courses with respect to adherence and persistence. In our study, the experience of monitoring for weight and metabolic changes was primarily reactive in nature. Participants expressed ambiguity regarding the short- and long-term consequences of weight and metabolic changes. PMID:24533223

  8. Quality Concerns in Antipsychotic Prescribing for Youth: A Review of Treatment Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kealey, Edith; Scholle, Sarah Hudson; Byron, Sepheen C.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leckman-Westin, Emily; Kelleher, Kelly; Finnerty, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic prescribing for youth has increased rapidly, is linked with serious health concerns, and lacks clear measures of quality for pediatric care. We reviewed treatment guidelines relevant to 7 quality concepts for appropriate use and management of youth on antipsychotics: 1) use in very young children, 2) multiple concurrent antipsychotics, 3) higher-than-recommended doses, 4) use without a primary indication, 5) access to psychosocial interventions, 6) metabolic screening, and 7) follow-up visits with a prescriber. Methods We searched for clinical practice guidelines meeting the following criteria: developed or endorsed by a national body, published after 2000, and specific treatment recommendations made related to 1 or more of the 7 quality concepts. Sources included electronic databases, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Web site, and stakeholder and expert advisory committee recommendations. Two raters reviewed the 11 guidelines identified, extracting treatment recommendations, including details that could support measure definitions, and ratings of strength of recommendation and evidence. Results All 7 quality concepts were strongly endorsed by 1 or more guidelines, and 2 or more guidelines assigned their highest strength of recommendation ratings to 6 of the 7 concepts. Two guidelines rated evidence, providing high strength of evidence for 2 quality concepts: psychosocial interventions and metabolic monitoring. Conclusions Guidelines provide support for 7 quality concepts addressing antipsychotic prescribing for youth. However, guideline support is often based on strong clinical consensus rather than a robust evidence base. PMID:25169461

  9. Concomitant use of two or more antipsychotic drugs is common in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Bergendal, Annica; Schiler, Helena; Wettermark, Bjrn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of concomitant use of two or more antipsychotic drugs and other psychotropic drugs in the Swedish population. Methods: Data for this observational cohort study were collected from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register including all dispensed drugs to the entire Swedish population (9.4 million inhabitants). We identified all individuals with at least one dispensed prescription of antipsychotic drug during January to June 2008. After 12 months, a second exposure period was chosen. Individuals who were dispensed two or more antipsychotic drugs in both periods were considered long-time users of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: In 2008, 1.5% of the Swedish population was dispensed antipsychotic drugs, the majority (75%) using only one antipsychotic drug. Out of individuals who were dispensed 2 or more antipsychotic drugs during the first period, 62% also was also dispensed at least 2 antipsychotic drugs during the second period. A total of 665 different unique combinations were used in 2008. Individuals prescribed two or more antipsychotic drugs during both periods were more often dispensed anxiolytics and sedatives than those who were dispensed only one antipsychotic drug. Elderly were dispensed antipsychotic drugs much more often than younger persons. Conclusions: In Sweden, 25% of patients dispensed antipsychotic drugs receive a combination of two or more antipsychotic drugs. Individuals who are dispensed antipsychotic polypharmacy are more often dispensed anxiolytics and sedatives than those prescribed only one antipsychotic drug. Long-term observational studies are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of such combinations. PMID:26301078

  10. Inappropriate long-term use of antipsychotic drugs is common among people with dementia living in specialized care units

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic drugs are widely used for the treatment of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD), despite their limited efficacy and concerns about safety. The aim of this study was to describe antipsychotic drug therapy among people with dementia living in specialized care units in northern Sweden. Methods This study was conducted in 40 specialized care units in northern Sweden, with a total study population of 344 people with dementia. The study population was described in regard to antipsychotic drug use, ADL function, cognitive function and BPSD, using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS). These data were collected at baseline and six months later. Detailed data about antipsychotic prescribing were collected from prescription records. Results This study showed that 132 persons (38%) in the study population used antipsychotic drugs at the start of the study. Of these, 52/132 (39%) had prescriptions that followed national guidelines with regard to dose and substance. After six months, there were 111 of 132 persons left because of deaths and dropouts. Of these 111 people, 80 (72%) were still being treated with antipsychotics, 63/111 (57%) with the same dose. People who exhibited aggressive behavior (OR: 1.980, CI: 1.515-2.588), or passiveness (OR: 1.548, CI: 1.150-2.083), or had mild cognitive impairment (OR: 2.284 CI: 1.046-4.988), were at increased risk of being prescribed antipsychotics. Conclusion The prevalence of antipsychotic drug use among people with dementia living in specialized care units was high and inappropriate long-term use of antipsychotic drugs was common. PMID:23391323

  11. The heterogeneity of concentrated prescribing behavior: Theory and evidence from antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Ernst R; Gibbons, Robert S; Kolotilin, Anton; Taub, Anna Levine

    2015-03-01

    We present two new findings based on annual antipsychotic US prescribing data from IMS Health on 2867 psychiatrists who wrote 50 or more prescriptions in 2007. First, many of these psychiatrists have prescription patterns that are statistically significantly different than random draws from national market shares for prescriptions by psychiatrists. For example, many have prescription patterns that are significantly more concentrated than such draws. Second, among psychiatrists who are the most concentrated, different prescribers often concentrate on distinct drugs. Motivated by these two findings, we then construct a model of physician learning-by-doing that fits these facts and generates two further predictions: both concentration (on one or a few drugs) and deviation (from the prescription patterns of others) should be smaller for high-volume physicians. We find empirical support for these predictions. Furthermore, our model outperforms an alternative theory concerning detailing by pharmaceutical representatives. PMID:25575344

  12. Antipsychotic Medication Prescription Patterns in Adults with Developmental Disabilities Who Have Experienced Psychiatric Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Yona; Elserafi, Jonny

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic medication rates are high in adults with developmental disability. This study considered rates of antipsychotic use in 743 adults with developmental disability who had experienced a psychiatric crisis. Nearly half (49%) of these adults were prescribed antipsychotics. Polypharmacy was common with 22% of those prescribed antipsychotics

  13. Reducing the rates of prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on psychiatric inpatient and intensive care units: results of a 6-year quality improvement programme

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no conclusive evidence that either high doses or combinations of antipsychotics are more effective than standard doses or monotherapy alone. Nonetheless, prescription of both remains prevalent in the UK. In 2006 the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLAM) participated in a national survey of prescription of antipsychotic medications, organized by the Prescribing Observatory for Mental Health. Over half of the patients on SLAM inpatient or psychiatric intensive care units were prescribed a high-dose antipsychotic or a combination of antipsychotics. Prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy in SLAM was found to be among the highest in the UK. Aim: To assess the impact of a 6-year quality improvement programme aimed at reducing the rates of prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on SLAM inpatients and psychiatric intensive care units. Results: There was a significant reduction between baseline and final survey in the rates of prescription of both high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on SLAM inpatients and intensive care units (58% versus 10% p < 0.0001 and 57% versus 16%, p < 0.0001 respectively). The proportion of patients at final survey prescribed a high-dose antipsychotic and a combination was substantially lower in SLAM than in the national sample (10% versus 28%, p < 0.0001 and 16% versus 38%, p < 0.0001 respectively). Clinical implications: A sustained change in the prescribing culture of an organization can be achieved through a targeted improvement programme. PMID:25653825

  14. Second-generation antipsychotics in a tertiary care hospital: prescribing patterns, metabolic profiles, and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Niedrig, David F; Gtt, Carmen; Fischer, Anja; Mller, Sabrina T; Greil, Waldemar; Bucklar, Guido; Russmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We carried out an observational study that analyzed population characteristics, metabolic profiles, potentially interacting pharmacotherapy, and related adverse events in second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) users of a tertiary care hospital. Within our pharmacoepidemiological database derived from electronic medical records of 82?358 hospitalizations, we identified 1136 hospitalizations contributing 9165 patient-days with exposure to SGA. Blood pressure, blood glucose, lipids, and BMI had been documented in 97.7, 75.7, 24.6, and 77.4% of hospitalizations, respectively. Among these, the prevalence of hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and BMI 30?kg/m or more was 36.9, 22.6, 61.1, and 23.1%, respectively. A total of 63.4, 70.8, and 37.1% of SGA users with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, respectively, received no pharmacotherapy for these conditions. We identified 614 patient-days with SGA plus formally contraindicated comedication and another 1066 patient-days with other high-risk combinations for QTc prolongation. Among those there was one case with associated neutropenia and four cases with abnormal QTc interval. However, specific monitoring for such adverse events was not documented in 45.5% of hospitalizations with contraindicated and 89.8% with high-risk QTc-prolonging combinations. Our study identified targets for improved monitoring and management in SGA users. These may be implemented as automated alerts into electronic prescribing systems and thereby efficiently support safer pharmacotherapy in clinical practice. PMID:26473524

  15. Effect of an interdisciplinary educational program on antipsychotic prescribing among residents with dementia in two long-term care centers.

    PubMed

    Monette, Johanne; Monette, Michele; Sourial, Nadia; Vandal, Alain C; Wolfson, Christina; Champoux, Nathalie; Fletcher, John; Savoie, Maryse L

    2013-10-01

    The effect of an educational program on antipsychotic prescribing was assessed in two Canadian long-term care centers (LTCC). In each center (Center A residents, n = 258 and Center B residents, n = 191, with dementia at program inception), the rate of change in the odds of using antipsychotics in residents was estimated using mixed-effects logistic regression during a 6-month program period and a 4-month postprogram period, with baseline proportions of use estimated during the 6 months prior to the program. Preprogram proportions of antipsychotic use were 41.6% and 46.2%, respectively. Antipsychotic use decreased during the program in both centers: (odds ratio with 95% CI: 0.943 per week [0.921, 0.965] and 0.969 per week [0.944, 0.994], respectively). During the postprogram period, antipsychotic use increased in Center A (1.039 per week [1.007, 1.072]) but decreased progressively in Center B. The study results suggest the need to implement an ongoing educational program in LTCC. PMID:25474800

  16. Consultant psychiatrists experiences of and attitudes towards shared decision making in antipsychotic prescribing, a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shared decision making represents a clinical consultation model where both clinician and service user are conceptualised as experts; information is shared bilaterally and joint treatment decisions are reached. Little previous research has been conducted to assess experience of this model in psychiatric practice. The current project therefore sought to explore the attitudes and experiences of consultant psychiatrists relating to shared decision making in the prescribing of antipsychotic medications. Methods A qualitative research design allowed the experiences and beliefs of participants in relation to shared decision making to be elicited. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants from a range of clinical backgrounds and with varying length of clinical experience. A semi-structured interview schedule was utilised and was adapted in subsequent interviews to reflect emergent themes. Data analysis was completed in parallel with interviews in order to guide interview topics and to inform recruitment. A directed analysis method was utilised for interview analysis with themes identified being fitted to a framework identified from the research literature as applicable to the practice of shared decision making. Examples of themes contradictory to, or not adequately explained by, the framework were sought. Results A total of 26 consultant psychiatrists were interviewed. Participants expressed support for the shared decision making model, but also acknowledged that it was necessary to be flexible as the clinical situation dictated. A number of potential barriers to the process were perceived however: The commonest barrier was the clinicians beliefs regarding the service users insight into their mental disorder, presented in some cases as an absolute barrier to shared decision making. In addition factors external to the clinician - service user relationship were identified as impacting on the decision making process, including; environmental factors, financial constraints as well as societal perceptions of mental disorder in general and antipsychotic medication in particular. Conclusions This project has allowed identification of potential barriers to shared decision making in psychiatric practice. Further work is necessary to observe the decision making process in clinical practice and also to identify means in which the identified barriers, in particular lack of insight, may be more effectively managed. PMID:24886121

  17. Nature and Quality of Antipsychotic Prescribing Practice in UK Psychiatry of Intellectual Disability Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paton, C.; Flynn, A.; Shingleton-Smith, A.; McIntyre, S.; Bhaumik, S.; Rasmussen, J.; Hardy, S.; Barnes, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotics are perceived to be over-used in the management of behavioural problems in people with an intellectual disability (ID). Published guidelines have set good practice standards for the use of these drugs for behavioural indications. We sought to identify the range of indications for which antipsychotic drugs are prescribed…

  18. Attitudinal barriers to prescribing LAI antipsychotics in the outpatient setting: communicating with patients, families, and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Kane, John M

    2014-12-01

    Patients with schizophrenia who are nonadherent to medication are at risk for repeated relapse and rehospitalization from this chronic and lifelong mental illness. Effective, oral medications can be difficult for patients to maintain on a daily basis, and long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics can help to alleviate this challenge. However, some physicians' attitudinal barriers that need to be overcome include the belief that patients do not have adherence problems, concerns about LAI antipsychotic efficacy over traditional oral agents, the perception that the time and cost to administer this formulation outweighs its benefit, and the perception that injectable medications undermine patients' autonomy. A better understanding of LAIs and their potential benefits may help physicians to implement a long-term treatment plan that provides the best outcome for patients. PMID:25551245

  19. Patient and prescriber perspectives on long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics and analysis of in-office discussion regarding LAI treatment for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The research goal is to better understand prescriber, patient, and caregiver perspectives about long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotic therapy and how these perspectives affect LAI use. Addressing these perspectives in the clinic may lead to greater success in achieving therapeutic goals for the patient with schizophrenia. Methods Ethnographic information was collected from a non-random sample of 69 prescriber-patient conversations (60 with community mental health center [CMHC] psychiatrists; 9 with nurse-practitioners) recorded during treatment visits from August 2011 to February 2012, transcribed and analyzed. Discussions were categorized according to 11 predetermined CMHC topics. In-person observations were also conducted at 4 CMHCs, including home visits by researchers (n?=?15 patients) prior to the CMHC visit and observations of patients receiving injections and interacting with staff. Telephone in-depth interviews with psychiatrists, patients, and caregivers to gather additional information on LAI discussion, prescription, or use were conducted. Results Antipsychotic treatment decisions were made without patient or caregiver input in 40 of 60 (67%) of psychiatrist-patient conversations. Involvement of patients or caregivers in treatment decisions was greater when discussing LAI (15 of 60 [25%]) vs oral antipsychotic treatment (5 of 60 [8%]). LAIs were not discussed by psychiatrists in 11 of 22 (50%) patients taking oral antipsychotics. When offered, more LAI-nave patients expressed neutral (9 of 19 [47%]) rather than favorable (3 of 19 [16%]) or unfavorable (7 of 19 [37%]) responses. Prescribers were most concerned about potentially damaging the therapeutic relationship and side-effects when discussing LAIs while patient resistance was often related to negative feelings about injections. Psychiatrists had some success in overcoming patient objections to LAIs by addressing and decomposing initial resistance. More than half (11 of 19 [58%]) of LAI-nave patients agreed to start LAI treatment following office visits. Patient-described benefits of LAIs vs orals included perceived rapid symptom improvement and greater overall efficacy. Conclusions In this study, many psychiatrists did not offer LAIs and most patients and caregivers were not involved in antipsychotic treatment decision making. Opportunities to increase active patient engagement, address resistances, guide patient drug-formulation selection, and provide better LAI-relevant information for more individualized approaches to treating the patient with schizophrenia were present. PMID:24131801

  20. Twelve-Month Prospective Randomized Study of Pharmacists Utilizing Point-Of-Care Testing for Metabolic Syndrome and Related Conditions in Subjects Prescribed Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Sara M.; Davey, Cynthia S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Determine the percentage of subjects taking antipsychotics who meet criteria for metabolic syndrome based on point-of-care testing analyses. Evaluate pharmacist comprehensive medication management services using point-of-care tests to reduce the mean difference in number of metabolic syndrome risk parameters at 6 and 12 months. Method: This 12-month, prospective, multisite, randomized, controlled study included 120 subjects taking antipsychotics (mean [SD] age of 42.9 [11.3] years) recruited from 3 community mental health clinics in Minnesota. Subjects consented to receive either pharmacist (PCS; n = 60) or no pharmacist (NCS; n = 60) comprehensive medication management services. Data were collected from February 2010 to January 2012. Results: No statistical differences in metabolic syndrome based on point-of-care tests were observed between the 2 groups at baseline (PCS: 85.2%, n = 46 versus NCS: 71.2%, n = 42, P = .073) or at 12 months (PCS: 84.4%, n = 38 versus NCS: 70.2%, n = 33, P = .104). Subjects, overall, screened positive at baseline for dyslipidemia (85.8%, n = 106), hypertension (52.5%, n = 63), and diabetes (22.5%, n = 27) based on point-of-care testing for metabolic risk criteria. After 12 months, a nonsignificant (P = .099) higher adjusted mean number of metabolic syndrome parameters in PCS subjects compared to NCS subjects (mean difference [95% CI] = 0.41 [−0.08 to 0.90]) were found. Conclusions: A relatively high proportion of subjects met criteria for metabolic syndrome, although no significant improvement was observed between the groups after 12 months. Point-of-care test analyses identified a high proportion of subjects meeting criteria for dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes. Utilizing point-of-care tests in mental health settings and fostering interprofessional partnerships with comprehensive medication management pharmacists may improve identification and long-term management of metabolic risks among patients prescribed antipsychotics. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02029989 PMID:25667811

  1. Differential risk of death in older residents in nursing homes prescribed specific antipsychotic drugs: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess risks of mortality associated with use of individual antipsychotic drugs in elderly residents in nursing homes. Design Population based cohort study with linked data from Medicaid, Medicare, the Minimum Data Set, the National Death Index, and a national assessment of nursing home quality. Setting Nursing homes in the United States. Participants 75?445 new users of antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone). All participants were aged ?65, were eligible for Medicaid, and lived in a nursing home in 2001-5. Main outcome measures Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare 180 day risks of all cause and cause specific mortality by individual drug, with propensity score adjustment to control for potential confounders. Results Compared with risperidone, users of haloperidol had an increased risk of mortality (hazard ratio 2.07, 95% confidence interval 1.89 to 2.26) and users of quetiapine a decreased risk (0.81, 0.75 to 0.88). The effects were strongest shortly after the start of treatment, remained after adjustment for dose, and were seen for all causes of death examined. No clinically meaningful differences were observed for the other drugs. There was no evidence that the effect measure modification in those with dementia or behavioural disturbances. There was a dose-response relation for all drugs except quetiapine. Conclusions Though these findings cannot prove causality, and we cannot rule out the possibility of residual confounding, they provide more evidence of the risk of using these drugs in older patients, reinforcing the concept that they should not be used in the absence of clear need. The data suggest that the risk of mortality with these drugs is generally increased with higher doses and seems to be highest for haloperidol and least for quetiapine. PMID:22362541

  2. The atypical antipsychotic blonanserin reverses (+)-PD-128907- and ketamine-induced deficit in executive function in common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Manato; Enomoto, Takeshi; Murai, Takeshi; Nakako, Tomokazu; Iwamura, Yoshihiro; Kiyoshi, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Ikejiri, Masaru; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Ogi, Yuji; Ikeda, Kazuhito

    2016-05-15

    Antagonism of the dopamine D3 receptor is considered a promising strategy for the treatment of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia. We have previously reported that the atypical antipsychotic blonanserin, a dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, highly occupies dopamine D3 receptors at its antipsychotic dose range in rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of blonanserin on executive function in common marmosets using the object retrieval with detour (ORD) task. The dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist (+)-PD-128907 at 1mg/kg decreased success rate in the difficult trial, but not in the easy trial. Since the difference between the two trials is only cognitive demand, our findings indicate that excess activation of dopamine D3 receptors impairs executive function in common marmosets. Blonanserin at 0.1mg/kg reversed the decrease in success rate induced by (+)-PD-128907 in the difficult trial. This finding indicates that blonanserin has beneficial effect on executive function deficit induced by activation of the dopamine D3 receptor in common marmosets. Next, and based on the glutamatergic hypothesis of schizophrenia, the common marmosets were treated with the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. Ketamine at sub-anesthetic doses decreased success rate in the difficult trial, but not in the easy trial. Blonanserin at 0.1mg/kg reversed the decrease in success rate induced by ketamine in the difficult trial. The findings of this study suggest that blonanserin might have beneficial effect on executive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26970575

  3. Commonly prescribed ?-lactam antibiotics induce C. trachomatis persistence/stress in culture at physiologically relevant concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Kintner, Jennifer; Lajoie, Dawn; Hall, Jennifer; Whittimore, Judy; Schoborg, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease agent worldwide, enters a viable, non-dividing and non-infectious state (historically termed persistence and more recently referred to as the chlamydial stress response) when exposed to penicillin G in culture. Notably, penicillin G-exposed chlamydiae can reenter the normal developmental cycle upon drug removal and are resistant to azithromycin-mediated killing. Because penicillin G is less frequently prescribed than other ?-lactams, the clinical relevance of penicillin G-induced chlamydial persistence/stress has been questioned. The goal of this study was to determine whether more commonly used penicillins also induce C. trachomatis serovar E persistence/stress. All penicillins tested, as well as clavulanic acid, induced formation of aberrant, enlarged reticulate bodies (RB) (called aberrant bodies or AB) characteristic of persistent/stressed chlamydiae. Exposure to the penicillins and clavulanic acid also reduced chlamydial infectivity by >95%. None of the drugs tested significantly reduced chlamydial unprocessed 16S rRNA or genomic DNA accumulation, indicating that the organisms were viable, though non-infectious. Finally, recovery assays demonstrated that chlamydiae rendered essentially non-infectious by exposure to ampicillin, amoxicillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin, penicillin V, and clavulanic acid recovered infectivity after antibiotic removal. These data definitively demonstrate that several commonly used penicillins induce C. trachomatis persistence/stress at clinically relevant concentrations. PMID:24783061

  4. Metabolic consequences of second-generation antipsychotics in youth: appropriate monitoring and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Krill, Rebecca A; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the metabolic consequences of second-generation antipsychotics in youth and current monitoring and intervention guidelines for optimal treatment. Background Second-generation antipsychotics have largely replaced the use of first-generation antipsychotics in treating psychotic disorders in youth. In addition, there has been a dramatic increase in using these medications to treat a variety of nonpsychotic disorders. These medications have significant metabolic side effects, including weight gain. This raises concern, given the problem of pediatric obesity. Materials and methods A review of current literature looking at prescribing practices and possible reasons for the increased use of second-generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents was conducted. Review of the mechanisms for why youth may be particularly vulnerable to the metabolic consequences (particularly weight gain) was similarly completed. In addition, data supporting the efficacy, rationale, and unique side-effect profile of each individual second-generation drug were evaluated to help inform providers on when and what to prescribe, along with current monitoring practices. The current evidence base for possible interventions regarding the management of antipsychotic-induced weight gain was also evaluated. Results and conclusion On the basis of the literature review, there are several speculated reasons for the increase in prescriptions of second-generation antipsychotics. The choice of antipsychotic for youth should be based upon the disorder being treated along with the unique side-effect profile for the most commonly used second-generation antipsychotics. Monitoring strategies are also individualized to each antipsychotic. The current interventions recommended for antipsychotic-induced weight gain include lifestyle management, switching medication to a drug with a lower propensity for weight gain, and pharmacologic (particularly metformin) treatment. PMID:25298741

  5. Assessing the Comparative-Effectiveness of Antidepressants Commonly Prescribed for Depression in the US Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cameron; Zhang, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression is among the most common chronic illnesses in the US elderly Medicare population, affecting approximately 11.5% of beneficiaries with estimated costs of about US$65 billion annually. Patients with depression are typically treated with antidepressants - most commonly the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). SSRIs vary substantially in their costs, side effect profiles and convenience of use. All these factors might affect medication adherence and subsequently down-stream medical costs. Aims of Study To assess the comparative-effectiveness of three antidepressants (escitalopram, citalopram, sertraline) commonly-prescribed for depression in Medicare. Methods We used pharmacy and medical claims data for a 5 percent national random sample of Medicare beneficiaries who were diagnosed with depression in 2008 and followed until 12/31/2009. Key measures included drug spending, medication adherence to antidepressants, down-stream non-drug medical costs at three levels: all, psychiatric and depression related costs. Three methods were conducted to test robustness: generalized linear regression (GLM), propensity score matching, and instrumental variables (IV) approach. For the instrumental variables approach, we used a two-stage residual inclusion model, using geographic variation in the use of the various drugs as instruments. Specifically, we calculated the ratio of the number of individuals who used each drug to the total number of individuals using any antidepressants at the 306 Dartmouth hospital-referral regions. Results The regression and the propensity score matching method each showed that patients using escitalopram had significantly worse adherence, higher drug costs, and higher medical costs than patients using either citalopram or sertraline. However, our IV analysis yielded different results. While drug costs remained significantly higher for escitalopram patients, we found that escitalopram users had lower non-drug medical spending than patients who used citalopram, which was enough to offset the higher drug costs. The instrumental variables results also suggested that sertraline users had lower non-drug medical costs than citalopram users. The differences between sertraline and escitalopram were not statistically significant for medical spending, but sertraline users had lower drug costs and better adherence than escitalopram users. Discussion The IV method yielded somewhat different results than the GLM regressions and the propensity score matching methods. Once we controlled for selection bias using the instrumental variables, we found that escitalopram is actually associated with lower medical spending. One interpretation is that the IV approach mitigates selection biases due to unobserved factors that are not controlled in regular regressions. However, one conclusion remains the same: in every model, we found that sertraline was at least as cost-effective as or more cost-effective than the other drugs. Limitations Potential unobserved factors affecting the choice of three antidepressants are possible. Implications for Health Policies All methods indicated that sertraline is the most cost-effective drug to treat depression. Substantial savings to Medicare could be realized by using more cost-effective antidepressants such as sertraline. Implications for Further Research Geographic variation in the use of prescription drugs has been underutilized as an instrumental variable in comparative-effectiveness research. Our study demonstrates that it can help to control for selection biases in observational data. PMID:23525835

  6. Antipsychotic polypharmacy in a regional health service: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To analyse the extent and profile of outpatient regular dispensation of antipsychotics, both in combination and monotherapy, in the Barcelona Health Region (Spain), focusing on the use of clozapine and long-acting injections (LAI). Methods Antipsychotic drugs dispensed for people older than 18 and processed by the Catalan Health Service during 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. First and second generation antipsychotic drugs (FGA and SGA) from the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification (ATC) code N05A (except lithium) were included. A patient selection algorithm was designed to identify prescriptions regularly dispensed. Variables included were age, gender, antipsychotic type, route of administration and number of packages dispensed. Results A total of 117,811 patients were given any antipsychotic, of whom 71,004 regularly received such drugs. Among the latter, 9,855 (13.9%) corresponded to an antipsychotic combination, 47,386 (66.7%) to monotherapy and 13,763 (19.4%) to unspecified combinations. Of the patients given antipsychotics in association, 58% were men. Olanzapine (37.1%) and oral risperidone (36.4%) were the most common dispensations. Analysis of the patients dispensed two antipsychotics (57.8%) revealed 198 different combinations, the most frequent being the association of FGA and SGA (62.0%). Clozapine was dispensed to 2.3% of patients. Of those who were receiving antipsychotics in combination, 6.6% were given clozapine, being clozapine plus amisulpride the most frequent association (22.8%). A total of 3.800 patients (5.4%) were given LAI antipsychotics, and 2.662 of these (70.1%) were in combination. Risperidone was the most widely used LAI. Conclusions The scant evidence available regarding the efficacy of combining different antipsychotics contrasts with the high number and variety of combinations prescribed to outpatients, as well as with the limited use of clozapine. PMID:22587453

  7. Concurrent Oral Antipsychotic Drug Use Among Schizophrenia Patients Initiated on Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics Post-Hospital Discharge.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jalpa A; Pettit, Amy R; Stoddard, Jeffrey J; Zummo, Jacqueline; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-08-01

    Pharmacological treatment is central to effective management of schizophrenia. Prescribing clinicians have an increasing array of options from which to choose, and oral antipsychotic polypharmacy is common in routine clinical practice. Practice guidelines recommend long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations, typically viewed as monotherapeutic alternatives, for patients with established nonadherence. Yet there are limited data on the prevalence and nature of concurrent oral antipsychotic prescriptions in patients receiving LAIs. Our observational, claims-based study examined the frequency and duration of concurrent oral prescriptions in 340 Medicaid patients receiving LAI therapy. Specifically, we examined patients with a recent history of nonadherence and hospitalization for schizophrenia and included both first-generation antipsychotic depot medications (fluphenazine decanoate, haloperidol decanoate) and more recently available second-generation injectables (LAI risperidone, paliperidone palmitate). Of all patients initiated on LAIs, 75.9% had a concurrent oral antipsychotic prescription in the 6 months post-hospital discharge. Patients receiving concurrent prescriptions were frequently prescribed an oral formulation of their LAI agent, but many first-generation LAI users received a concurrent second-generation oral medication. The lowest rate of concurrent prescribing (58.8%) was found with paliperidone palmitate, whereas the highest rate was with LAI risperidone (88.9%). Overlap in oral and LAI prescriptions typically occurred for a substantial period of time (ie, >30 days) and for a notable percentage of the days covered by LAIs (often 50% or more). Our findings highlight the need to further examine such prescribing patterns, to probe the reasons for them, and to clarify the optimal roles of different antipsychotic treatments in clinical practice. PMID:26075492

  8. Flupentixol use and adverse reactions in comparison with other common first- and second-generation antipsychotics: data from the AMSP study.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, R; Engel, R R; Mller, H-J; Rther, E; van der Velden, J W; Stbner, S

    2014-03-01

    This study compares the first-generation antipsychotic (FGA) flupentixol to haloperidol and common second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) as to drug utilization and severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in clinical treatment of schizophrenia inpatients using data from the drug safety program Arzneimittelsicherheit in der Psychiatrie (AMSP). AMSP drug utilization and reported ADR data were analyzed. Type and frequency of severe ADRs attributed to flupentixol were compared with haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and amisulpride in a total of 56,861 schizophrenia inpatients exposed to these drugs. In spite of increasing prescription of SGAs, flupentixol was consistently used in schizophrenic inpatients (about 5%) over time. Reporting rates of severe ADR ranged from 0.38 to 1.20% for the individual antipsychotics (drugs imputed alone); flupentixol ranked lowest. The type of ADR differed considerably; as to severe EPMS, flupentixol (0.27%), such as risperidone (0.28%), held an intermediate position between haloperidol/amisulpride (0.55/0.52%) and olanzapine/quetiapine (<0.1%). The study is a heuristic approach, not a confirmatory test. Flupentixol has a stable place in the treatment of schizophrenia in spite of the introduction of different SGAs. Comparative ADR profiles suggest an intermediate position between FGAs and SGAs for flupentixol in clinical practice. PMID:23835526

  9. Indications of atypical antipsychotics in the elderly.

    PubMed

    McKean, Andrew; Monasterio, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAP) have become some of the most commonly prescribed medications in primary and specialist care settings. Off-label prescribing accounts for much of the expanded use of AAPs. This has become common in the elderly. Marketing by pharmaceutical companies appears to have contributed to the off-label use of AAPs, in situations where their safety and efficacy is far from established. Although evidence provides varying degrees of support for their use for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, augmentation of antidepressants in depression, anxiety, insomnia and in the management of psychosis in Parkinson's Disease, there are a number of potential problems with their expanded use in the elderly. These include weight gain, type two diabetes mellitus, sudden cardiac death and increased mortality rates in the elderly with dementia. It is recommended that whenever AAPs are used off-label, a review date is identified, informed consent is obtained and treatment and side-effects are closely monitored. PMID:25354148

  10. Comparative Effectiveness of Second-Generation Antipsychotic Medications in Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Olfson, Mark; Gerhard, Tobias; Huang, Cecilia; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Bobo, William V.; Crystal, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Scant information exists to guide pharmacological treatment of early-onset schizophrenia. We examine variation across commonly prescribed second-generation antipsychotic medications in medication discontinuation and psychiatric hospital admission among children and adolescents clinically diagnosed with schizophrenia. A 45-state Medicaid claims file (20012005) was analyzed focusing on outpatients, aged 617 years, diagnosed with schizophrenia or a related disorder prior to starting a new episode of antipsychotic monotherapy with risperidone (n = 805), olanzapine (n = 382), quetiapine (n = 260), aripiprazole (n = 173), or ziprasidone (n = 125). Cox proportional hazard regressions estimated adjusted hazard ratios of 180-day antipsychotic medication discontinuation and 180-day psychiatric hospitalization for patients treated with each medication. During the first 180 days following antipsychotic initiation, most youth treated with quetiapine (70.7%), ziprasidone (73.3%), olanzapine (73.7%), risperidone (74.7%), and aripirazole (76.5%) discontinued their medication (?2 = 1.69, df = 4, P = .79). Compared with risperidone, the adjusted hazards of antipsychotic discontinuation did not significantly differ for any of the 4-comparator medications. The percentages of youth receiving inpatient psychiatric treatment while receiving their initial antipsychotic medication ranged from 7.19% (aripiprazole) to 9.89% (quetiapine) (?2 = 0.79, df = 4, P = .94). As compared with risperidone, the adjusted hazard ratio of psychiatric hospital admission was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.571.61) for olanzapine, 1.03 (95% CI: 0.591.81) for quetiapine, 0.85 (95% CI: 0.431.70) for aripiprazole, and 1.22 (95% CI: 0.602.51) for ziprasidone. The results suggest that rapid antipsychotic medication discontinuation and psychiatric hospital admission are common in the community treatment of early-onset schizophrenia. No significant differences were detected in risk of either adverse outcome across 5 commonly prescribed second-generation antipsychotic medications. PMID:21307041

  11. Meta-analysis: the effects of smoking on the disposition of two commonly used antipsychotic agents, olanzapine and clozapine

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Yoshiyuki; Saruwatari, Junji; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To clarify the effects of smoking on the disposition of two commonly used antipsychotics, olanzapine and clozapine, and to create standards to adjust the doses of these drugs in clinical practice based on the smoking status. Design A meta-analysis was conducted by searching MEDLINE, Scopus and the Cochrane Library for relevant prospective and retrospective studies. Included studies We included the studies that investigated the effects of smoking on the concentration to dose (C/D) ratio of olanzapine or clozapine. Primary outcome measure The weighted mean difference was calculated using a DerSimonian-Laird random effects model, along with 95% CI. Results Seven association studies, comprising 1094 patients (652 smokers and 442 non-smokers) with schizophrenia or other psychiatric disorders, were included in the meta-analysis of olanzapine. The C/D ratio was significantly lower in smokers than in non-smokers (p<0.00001), and the mean difference was ?0.75 (ng/mL)/(mg/day) (95% CI ?0.89 to ?0.61). Therefore, it was estimated that if 10 and 20?mg/day of olanzapine would be administered to smokers, about 7 and 14?mg/day, respectively, should be administered to non-smokers in order to obtain the equivalent olanzapine concentration. Four association studies of clozapine were included in the meta-analysis of clozapine, comprising 196 patients (120 smokers and 76 non-smokers) with schizophrenia or other psychiatric disorders. The C/D ratio was significantly lower in smokers than in non-smokers (p<0.00001), and the mean difference was ?1.11 (ng/mL)/(mg/day) (95% CI ?1.53 to ?0.70). Therefore, it was estimated that if 200 and 400?mg/day of clozapine would be administered to smokers, about 100 and 200?mg/day, respectively, should be administered to non-smokers. Conclusions We suggest that the doses of olanzapine and clozapine should be reduced by 30% and 50%, respectively, in non-smokers compared with smokers in order to obtain an equivalent olanzapine or clozapine concentration. PMID:24595134

  12. The clinical impact of reported variance in potency of antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Dewan, M J; Koss, M

    1995-04-01

    There is significant disagreement on the clinical equivalence (or potency) of antipsychotic agents, with up to 500% variance reported in texts. To address the extent and consequences of these discrepancies, we took a random sample of 18 common psychiatry, psychopharmacology and pharmacology texts for antipsychotic equivalence tables. We found a marked variation in stated equivalences for the majority of antipsychotics. Most affected were the high potency (haloperidol, fluphenazine) and newer (molindone) drugs, which had a 500% variance. This variation inadvertently contributes to the misuse of these agents. For instance, high-potency antipsychotics are prescribed in far larger doses than necessary, leading to decreased efficacy and increased side effects. Steps to simplify and rationalize the use of these agents are recommended. PMID:7625202

  13. Common Variants near the Melanocortin 4 Receptor Gene are Associated with Severe Antipsychotic Drug-induced Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Anil K.; Correll, Christoph U.; Chowdhury, Nabilah I.; Mller, Daniel J.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; Tiwari, Arun K.; Kane, John M.; Fleischhacker, Wolfgang W.; Kahn, Rene S.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Meltzer, Herbert Y.; Lencz, Todd; Kennedy, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Context Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are increasingly used in the treatment of many psychotic and non-psychotic disorders. Unfortunately, SGAs are often associated with substantial weight gain, with no means to predict which patients are at greatest risk. Objective To detect alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with antipsychotic drug-induced weight gain. Design Pharmacogenetic association study Setting Discovery cohort was collected at a U.S. general psychiatric hospital. Three additional cohorts were collected from psychiatric hospitals in the U.S. and Germany, and from a European antipsychotic drug trial. Participants The discovery cohort was comprised of 139 pediatric patients undergoing first exposure to SGA treatment. An additional three cohorts were comprised of 73, 40 and 92 subjects. Intervention Patients in the discovery cohort were treated with SGAs for twelve weeks. Additional cohorts were treated for six and twelve weeks. Main outcome measure We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) assessing weight gain associated with twelve weeks of SGA treatment in patients undergoing first exposure to antipsychotic treatment. We next genotyped three independent cohorts of subjects assessed for antipsychotic drug-induced weight gain. Results GWAS yielded twenty SNPs at a single locus exceeding a statistical threshold of p < 10?5. This locus, near the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) gene, overlaps a region previously identified by large-scale GWAS of obesity in the general population. Effects were recessive, with minor allele homozygotes gaining extreme amounts of weight over the 12-week trial. These results were replicated in three additional cohorts with SNP rs489693 demonstrating consistent recessive effects; meta analysis revealed a genome-wide significant effect (p=5.5910?12). Moreover, we observed consistent effects on related metabolic indices, including triglycerides, leptin, insulin, and HOMA-IR in our discovery cohort. Conclusion These data implicate the MC4R locus in extreme SGA-induced weight gain and related metabolic disturbances. A priori identification of high-risk subjects could lead to alternative treatment strategies in this population. PMID:22566560

  14. Antipsychotic treatments for the elderly: efficacy and safety of aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Kohen, Izchak; Lester, Paula E; Lam, Sum

    2010-01-01

    Delusions, hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms can accompany a number of conditions in late life. As such, elderly patients are commonly prescribed antipsychotic medications for the treatment of psychosis in both acute and chronic conditions. Those conditions include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and dementia. Elderly patients are at an increased risk of adverse events from antipsychotic medications because of age-related pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes as well as polypharmacy. Drug selection should be individualized to the patients previous history of antipsychotic use, current medical conditions, potential drug interactions, and potential side effects of the antipsychotic. Specifically, metabolic side effects should be closely monitored in this population. This paper provides a review of aripiprazole, a newer second generation antipsychotic agent, for its use in a variety of psychiatric disorders in the elderly including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, dementia, Parkinsons disease and depression. We will review the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of aripiprazole as well as dosing, diagnostic indications, efficacy studies, and tolerability including its metabolic profile. We will also detail patient focused perspectives including quality of life, patient satisfaction and adherence. PMID:20361061

  15. Comparative analysis of anti-toxoplasmic activity of antipsychotic drugs and valproate.

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; Macgregor, Alexandra; Tamouza, Ryad; Hamdani, Nora; Meary, Alexandre; Leboyer, Marion; Dubremetz, Jean-Francois

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have shown a strong link between Toxoplasma gondii infection and psychiatric disorders, especially schizophrenia and bipolar disorders (odd ratio ?2.7 for each disorder). Antipsychotic drugs and mood stabilizers may have anti-toxoplasmic activity that potentially may be associated with better effectiveness in these disorders, but previous results have been few in number and conflicting. We therefore sought to determine which daily prescribed antipsychotics and mood stabilizer have the best anti-toxoplasmic activity during the development phase of the parasite. In the present study, we examined the effects of commonly used antipsychotic drugs (amisulpride, cyamemazine, fluphenazine, haloperidol, levomepromazine, loxapine, olanzapine, risperidone and tiapride) and one mood-stabilizing agent (valproate) on toxoplasmic activity. We replicated that fluphenazine has a high anti-toxoplasmic activity, but it does not seem to be a phenothiazine-specific class effect: indeed, we found that another first-generation antipsychotic, zuclopenthixol, has a high anti-toxoplasmic activity. Valproate, tiapride and amisulpride have no anti-toxoplasmic activity on parasite growth, and the other antipsychotic drugs showed low or intermediate anti-toxoplasmic activity. As it is not possible to know the intracellular concentrations of antipsychotics in the brain, further clinical studies are warranted to determine whether these in vitro findings have potential implications in treatment of toxo-positive patients with schizophrenia. These findings may be potentially relevant for the choice of the first-line antipsychotic drug or mood stabilizer in previously infected patients. PMID:23771405

  16. Socio demographic profile and utilization pattern of antipsychotic drugs among schizophrenic inpatients: a cross sectional study from western region of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently a large number of atypical antipsychotics available in the market are endorsed as better option for treating schizophrenia than the typical antipsychotics. Information regarding the utilization pattern of antipsychotic drugs is lacking in Nepalese population particularly in Western Nepal. By means of this study one is expected to acquire an idea concerning clinicians preference to the antipsychotic drugs in actual clinical setup. The main objective of the study was to find the commonest antipsychotics prescribed in a tertiary care center among hospitalized patients in Western Nepal. Methods This cross sectional study was carried out between 1st January 2009 and 31th December 2010 at Manipal Teaching Hospital, Nepal. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was based on ICD-10 (Tenth revision).The main outcome variables of the study was commonest antipsychotic drug prescribed. Z test, Chi square test and logistic regression were used for analytical purpose. P-value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. This is the first study done on the utilization pattern of antipsychotics drugs among hospitalized patients in Nepal. Results Out of 210 cases of schizophrenia, most of the patients were less than 40yrs. 78.6%, male 61.9%, unemployed 86.7% and having their monthly income less than NPR 10000 /month 80.5%. As far as religion, 78.1% patients were the Hindus and ethnically schizophrenia was common among the Dalit 26.2%. The study revealed that 46.2% of patients were students followed by 25.2% of housewives. Olanzapine was the commonest antipsychotic drug to be prescribed 34.3%. It was observed that the psychiatrists had a tendency of using antipsychotic drugs by trade names [OR 3.3 (1.407, 8.031)] in male patients as compared to female patients. Conclusion According to the utilization pattern of antipsychotics, it is concluded that atypical antipsychotics were used relatively more commonly than that of typical antipsychotics. Among the atypical antipsychotic drugs, there is a trend of using Olanzapine during Schizophrenia as compared to other atypical antipsychotic drugs in Western Nepal. PMID:23522357

  17. High-risk prescribing and monitoring in primary care: how common is it, and how can it be improved?

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The safety of medication use in primary care is an area of increasing concern for health systems internationally. Systematic reviews estimate that 3–4% of all unplanned hospital admissions are due to preventable drug-related morbidity, the majority of which have been attributed to shortcomings in the prescribing and monitoring stages of the medication use process. We define high-risk prescribing as medication prescription by professionals, for which there is evidence of significant risk of harm to patients, and which should therefore either be avoided or (if avoidance is not possible) closely monitored and regularly reviewed for continued appropriateness. Although prevalence estimates vary depending on the instrument used, cross-sectional studies conducted in primary care equivocally show that it is common and there is evidence that it can be reduced. Quality improvement strategies, such as clinical decision support, performance feedback and pharmacist-led interventions have been shown to be effective in reducing prescribing outcomes but evidence of improved patient outcomes remains limited. The increasing implementation of electronic medical records in primary care offer new opportunities to combine different strategies to improve medication safety in primary care and to integrate services provided by different stakeholders. In this review article, we describe the spectrum of high-risk medication use in primary care, review approaches to its measurement and summarize research into its prevalence. Based on previously developed interventions to change professional practice, we propose a systematic approach to improve the safety of medication use in primary care and highlight areas for future research. PMID:25083235

  18. Dilemma of prescribing aripiprazole under the Taiwan health insurance program: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Chien; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Hsin-An; Kao, Yu-Chen; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Refractory major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious problem leading to a heavy economic burden. Antipsychotic augmentation treatment with aripiprazole and quetiapine is approved for MDD patients and can achieve a high remission rate. This study aimed to examine how psychiatrists in Taiwan choose medications and how that choice is influenced by health insurance payments and administrative policy. Design Descriptive study. Outcome measures Eight questions about the choice of treatment strategy and atypical antipsychotics, and the reason to choose aripiprazole. Intervention We designed an augmentation strategy questionnaire for psychiatrists whose patients had a poor response to antidepressants, and handed it out during the annual meeting of the Taiwanese Society of Psychiatry in October 2012. It included eight questions addressing the choice of treatment strategy and atypical antipsychotics, and the reason whether or not to choose aripiprazole as the augmentation antipsychotic. Results Choosing antipsychotic augmentation therapy or switching to other antidepressant strategies for MDD patients with an inadequate response to antidepressants was common with a similar probability (76.1% vs 76.4%). The most frequently used antipsychotics were aripiprazole and quetiapine, however a substantial number of psychiatrists chose olanzapine, risperidone, and sulpiride. The major reason for not choosing aripiprazole was cost (52.1%), followed by insurance official policy audit and deletion in the claims review system (30.1%). Conclusion The prescribing behavior of Taiwanese psychiatrists for augmentation antipsy-chotics is affected by health insurance policy. PMID:25657586

  19. Psychotropic Medication Burden and Factors Associated with Antipsychotic Use: An Analysis of a Population-Based Sample of Community-Dwelling Older Persons with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, YongJoo; Csernansky, John G.; Emanuel, Linda L.; Chang, Chang-Gok; Shega, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the proportion of community dwelling older adults with dementia being prescribed a psychotropic and identify patient and caregiver factors associated with antipsychotics use. Methods Retrospective cohort study of The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) from 2002 to 2004 designed to assess dementia severity and service use among community-dwelling older adults. The frequency of psychotropic medication (antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants and benzodiazepines) use was tabulated and weighted to the US population by dementia diagnosis. Logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with antipsychotic use. Results The 307 participants of ADAMS had the following dementia diagnosis: Alzheimers disease (69.29%), vascular dementia (17.74%) and other dementia (12.39%). The proportion of participants prescribed a psychotropic medication broken down by therapeutic class was as 19.07% antipsychotics, 29.08% antidepressants, 9.84% benzodiazepines, and 8.85% anticonvulsants. Older adults with dementia were significantly more likely to receive an antipsychotic if they had moderate dementia (OR =7.4, p<0.05), or severe dementia (OR=5.80, p<0.05), compared to mild dementia or were diagnosed with Alzheimer (OR =6.7, p<0.05) dementia compared to vascular dementia. Older adults with dementia who lived with their caregivers in were significantly less likely to be medicated with antipsychotics (OR= 0.19, p<0.05) compared to those who lived alone. Also, persons with dementia were significantly less likely to be prescribed an antipsychotic if the caregivers were clinically depressed (OR=0.03, p<0.05) compared to those who were not depressed. Conclusion We found psychotropic medication use is common among community-dwelling older adults with dementia. Caregivers appear to have a substantial impact on whether or not an antipsychotic is prescribed, which adds additional complexity to conversations discussing the risk-benefit ratio of this medication class. PMID:22092099

  20. Use of Antipsychotics among Older Residents in Veterans Administration Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Gellad, WF; Aspinall, SL; Handler, SM; Stone, RA; Castle, N; Semla, TP; Good, CB; Fine, MJ; Dysken, M; Hanlon, JT

    2013-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic medications are commonly prescribed to nursing home residents despite their well-established adverse event profiles. Because little is known about their use in Veterans Administration(VA) nursing homes (i.e., Community Living Centers(CLCs)), we assessed the prevalence and risk factors for their use in older residents of VA CLCs. Methods This cross-sectional study included 3,692 Veterans ?age 65 who were admitted between January 2004-June 2005 to one of 133 VA CLCs and had a stay of ?90 days. We used VA Pharmacy Benefits Management data to examine antipsychotic use and VA Medical SAS datasets and the Minimum Data Set to identify evidence-based indications for antipsychotic use (e.g., schizophrenia, dementia with psychosis). We used multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to identify factors independently associated with antipsychotic use. Results Overall, 948/3,692(25.7%) residents used an antipsychotic, of which 59.3% had an evidence-based indication for use. Residents with aggressive behavior (odds ratio[OR]=2.74, 95% confidence interval[CI]=2.04-3.67) and polypharmacy (9+ drugs; OR=1.84, 95%CI=1.41-2.40) were more likely to receive antipsychotics, as were users of antidepressants (OR=1.37, 95%CI=1.14-1.66), anxiolytic/hypnotics (OR=2.30, 95%CI=1.64-3.23) or drugs for dementia (OR=1.52, 95%CI=1.21-1.92). Those residing in Alzheimer's/dementia special care units were also more likely to use an antipsychotic (OR=1.66, 95%CI=1.26-2.21). Veterans with dementia but no documented psychosis were as likely as those with an evidence-based indication to receive an antipsychotic (OR=1.10, 95%CI=0.82-1.47). Conclusions Antipsychotic use is common in older VA CLC residents, including those without a documented evidence-based indication for use. Further quality improvement efforts are needed to reduce potentially inappropriate antipsychotic prescribing. PMID:23047785

  1. Antipsychotic Use in Nursing Homes Varies by Psychiatric Consultant

    PubMed Central

    Tjia, Jennifer; Field, Terry; Lemay, Celeste; Mazor, Kathleen; Pandolfi, Michelle; Spenard, Ann; Ho, Shih-Yieh; Kanaan, Abir; Donovan, Jennifer; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Briesacher, Becky

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between psychiatric consultation and antipsychotic prescribing in nursing homes (NH) is unknown. Objective To identify the association between psychiatric consultant groups and NH-level antipsychotic prescribing after adjustment for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Research Design & Subjects Nested cross-sectional study of 60 NHs in a cluster randomized trial. We linked facility leadership surveys to October 2009-September 2010 Minimum Data Set, Nursing Home Compare, U.S. Census and pharmacy dispensing data. Measures The main exposure is the psychiatric consultant group and the main outcome is NH-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use. We calculated annual means and interquartile ranges of NH-level antipsychotic use for each consultant group and arrayed consultant groups from lowest to highest prevalence. Generalized linear models were used to predict antipsychotic prescribing adjusting for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Observed versus predicted antipsychotic prescribing levels were compared for each consultant group. Results Seven (7) psychiatric consultant groups served a range of 3 to 27 study facilities. Overall mean facility-level antipsychotic prescribing was 19.2%. Mean prevalence of antipsychotic prescribing ranged from 12.2% (SD 5.8) in the lowest consultant group to 26.4% (SD 3.6) in the highest group. All facilities served by the highest-ranked consultant group had observed antipsychotic levels exceeding the overall study mean with half exceeding predictions for on-label indications, while most facilities served by the lowest-ranked consultant group had observed levels below the overall study and predicted means. Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests that psychiatric consultant groups affect NH antipsychotic prescribing independent of resident case-mix and facility characteristics. PMID:24374410

  2. Prevalence and correlates of antipsychotic polypharmacy in children and adolescents receiving antipsychotic treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Toteja, Nitin; Gallego, Juan A.; Saito, Ema; Gerhard, Tobias; Winterstein, Almut; Olfson, Mark; Correll, Christoph U.

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP), which is common in adults with psychotic disorders, is of unproven efficacy and raises safety concerns. Although youth are increasingly prescribed antipsychotics, little is known about APP in this population. We performed a systematic PubMed search (last update 26 January 2013) of studies reporting the prevalence of APP in antipsychotic-treated youth. Summary statistics and statistical tests were calculated at the study level and not weighted by sample size. Fifteen studies (n=58 041, range 6823 183) reported on APP in youth [mean age=13.41.7 yr, 67.110.2% male, 77.927.4% treated with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs)]. Data collected in these studies covered 19932008. The most common diagnoses were attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; 39.923.5%) and conduct disorder/oppositional defiant disorder (CD/ODD; 33.624.8). In studies including predominantly children (mean age=<13 yr, N=5), the most common diagnosis were ADHD (50.625.4%) and CD/ODD (39.527.5%); while in studies with predominantly adolescents (mean age =?13 yr, N=7) the most common diagnoses were schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (28.623.8%), anxiety disorders (26.914.9%) and bipolar-spectrum disorders (26.67.0%), followed closely by CD/ODD (25.817.7). The prevalence of APP among antipsychotic-treated youth was 9.67.2% (5.94.5% in child studies, 12.07.9% in adolescent studies, p=0.15). Higher prevalence of APP was correlated with a bipolar disorder or schizophrenia diagnosis (p=0.019) and APP involving SGA+SGA combinations (p=0.0027). No correlation was found with APP definition [?1 d (N=10) vs. >30?90 d (N=5), p=0.88]. Despite lacking safety and efficacy data, APP in youth is not uncommon, even in samples predominantly consisting of non-psychotic patients. The duration, clinical motivations and effectiveness of this practice require further study. PMID:23673334

  3. Use of Antipsychotic Medications for Nonpsychotic Children: Risks and Implications for Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Daviss, William B; Barnett, Erin; Neubacher, Katrin; Drake, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Antipsychotic medications, especially second-generation antipsychotics, have increasingly been prescribed to children under age 18 in the United States. They are approved to treat pediatric bipolar and psychotic disorders and aggressive behaviors among patients with autism, but they are often used off label to control disruptive behaviors of children without autism and treat mood problems of children without bipolar disorder. The most vulnerable children, such as those in foster care, are the most likely recipients. Common known risks are potentially serious, and suspected long-term developmental risks to the brain and body are largely unstudied. Safer and equally efficacious therapies, both psychosocial and pharmacological, are available. Critical implications for mental health services include implementing prevention activities, training and monitoring prescribers and other clinicians, increasing efforts to protect children as the most vulnerable patients receiving these medications, increasing access to safer medications and evidence-based psychosocial interventions, educating all stakeholders, and enhancing shared decision making. PMID:26725298

  4. Uncomplicated E Coli Urinary Tract Infection in College Women: A Follow-Up Study of E Coli Sensitivities to Commonly Prescribed Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansbach, Robert K.; Dybus, Karen; Bergeson, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has changed in the past few years with researchers advocating empiric treatment for shorter periods of time without the use of cultures. Researchers report that antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli (E coli) to commonly prescribed antibiotics in uncomplicated UTIs has been increasing.

  5. Uncomplicated E Coli Urinary Tract Infection in College Women: A Follow-Up Study of E Coli Sensitivities to Commonly Prescribed Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansbach, Robert K.; Dybus, Karen; Bergeson, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has changed in the past few years with researchers advocating empiric treatment for shorter periods of time without the use of cultures. Researchers report that antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli (E coli) to commonly prescribed antibiotics in uncomplicated UTIs has been increasing.…

  6. Antipsychotics can induce pre-shock in very elderly patients: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Satoshi; Omori, Ataru; Shioya, Touko; Okubo, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotics have often been administered to treat delirium and intractable insomnia in elderly patients with or without dementia. However, antipsychotics sometimes cause severe adverse effects. We report two cases of very elderly patients who developed pre-shock after the administration of antipsychotics in a clinical consultation-liaison setting. These cases suggest that antipsychotics can induce fatal adverse events in very elderly patients. Although there has been little evidence regarding the most appropriate kind of drug and dosage for such patients, psychiatrists should exercise great caution in the use of antipsychotics for the very elderly, including deciding to prescribe the lowest dose or not prescribing them at all. PMID:25914062

  7. Psychotropic drug prescribing in an Australian specialist child and adolescent eating disorder service: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To describe the rates, indications, and adverse effects of psychotropic drug prescription in a specialist tertiary hospital child and adolescent eating disorder service. Methods Retrospective case note study of all active eating disorder patients (N?=?115) over the period of treatment from referral to time of study (M?=?2years), covering patient demographics, clinical characteristics, drug prescriptions, indications, and adverse effects. Results Psychotropic drugs were prescribed in 45% of cases, most commonly antidepressants (41%), followed by anxiolytics (29%) and antipsychotics (22%), with 8% initiated before referral to the specialist eating disorder program. Common indications were depressed mood, agitation, anxiety, and insomnia. Patient clinical severity and complexity was associated with prescribing. Adverse effects, mostly minor, were recorded in 23% of antidepressant prescriptions, 39% of antipsychotic prescriptions, and 13% of anxiolytic prescriptions. Second generation antipsychotic prescription was associated with subsequent new onset binge eating, in this preliminary observational study. Self-harm by overdose of psychotropics occurred in 11% of patients prescribed medication. Conclusions Psychotropic medications were frequently prescribed to adolescent eating disorder patients to treat distressing symptoms. Prospective randomised controlled trials to clarify efficacy and safety are needed. Given the difficulties of conducting clinical trials in this population, services are encouraged to monitor and audit medication safety and efficacy in everyday practice, and to report their findings. PMID:24999406

  8. Electronic Prescribing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Do you prescribe electronically?” For more information about electronic prescribing, call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633- ... to the pharmacy, and my prescription was ready. Electronic eRx Prescribing CMS Product No. 11382 Revised July ...

  9. Prescribing azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, Brendan J; Mostaghim, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Summary Azithromycin is a broad-spectrum macrolide antibiotic with a long half-life and excellent tissue penetration. It is primarily used for the treatment of respiratory, enteric and genitourinary infections and may be used in preference to other macrolides for some sexually transmitted and enteric infections. Azithromycin has additional immunomodulatory effects and has been used in chronic respiratory inflammatory diseases for this purpose. Potential major adverse effects include cardiovascular arrhythmias and hearing loss. Macrolide resistance is also a problem, as are interactions with commonly prescribed drugs. PMID:26648627

  10. Antipsychotic Medication and People with Intellectual Disabilities: Their Knowledge and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Rachel; Withers, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotics are the most frequently prescribed psychotropic medication for people with intellectual disabilities. Many people are prescribed this medication for "challenging behaviours" without having had a formal diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder. Antipsychotics have been reported to have severe side-effect profiles, which can

  11. Quantitation of first- and second-generation antipsychotics by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Elizabeth R; Antonides, Heather M

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are becoming a larger part of the prescription drug market. In combination with -traditional indications for prescribing these drugs, new effective therapies are proving worthwhile as well. Here, a successful method for detecting both first- and second-generation antipsychotics is presented using a solid phase extraction method and LC-MS/MS detection. This method is used for many sample matrices and can also be used for detecting antidepressants, which are often prescribed in conjunction with antipsychotics. PMID:22767119

  12. A Non-Interventional Naturalistic Study of the Prescription Patterns of Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia from the Spanish Province of Tarragona

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Víctor; Rico, Guillem; Labad, Javier; de Pablo, Joan; Vilella, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of prescribing patterns in entire catchment areas contributes to global mapping of the use of antipsychotics and may improve treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the pattern of long-term antipsychotic prescription in outpatients with schizophrenia in the province of Tarragona (Catalonia-Spain). Methods A naturalistic, observational, retrospective, non-interventional study based on the analysis of registries of computerized medical records from an anonymized database of 1,765 patients with schizophrenia treated between 2011 and 2013. Results The most used antipsychotic was risperidone, identified in 463 (26.3%) patients, followed by olanzapine in 249 (14.1%), paliperidone in 225 (12.7%), zuclopenthixol in 201 (11.4%), quetiapine in 141 (8%), aripiprazole in 100 (5.7%), and clozapine in 100 (5.7%). Almost 8 out of 10 patients (79.3%) were treated with atypical or second-generation antipsychotics. Long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations were used in 44.8% of patients. Antipsychotics were generally prescribed in their recommended doses, with clozapine, ziprasidone, LAI paliperidone, and LAI risperidone being prescribed at the higher end of their therapeutic ranges. Almost 7 out of 10 patients (69.6%) were on antipsychotic polypharmacy, and 81.4% were on psychiatric medications aside from antipsychotics. Being prescribed quetiapine (OR 14.24, 95% CI 4.94–40.97), LAI (OR 9.99, 95% CI 6.45–15.45), psychiatric co-medications (OR 4.25, 95% CI 2.72–6.64), and paliperidone (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.23–7.92) were all associated with an increased likelihood of polypharmacy. Being prescribed risperidone (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.35–0.83) and older age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97–0.99) were related to a low polypharmacy probability. Conclusions Polypharmacy is the most common pattern of antipsychotic use in this region of Spain. Use of atypical antipsychotics is extensive. Most patients receive psychiatric co-medications such as anxiolytics or antidepressants. Polypharmacy is associated with the use of quetiapine or paliperidone, use of a LAI, younger age, and psychiatric co-medication. PMID:26427051

  13. ACNP White Paper: Update on Use of Antipsychotic Drugs in Elderly Persons with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Dilip V.; Blazer, Dan; Casey, Daniel; Meeks, Thomas; Salzman, Carl; Schneider, Lon; Tariot, Pierre; Yaffe, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    In elderly persons, antipsychotic drugs are clinically prescribed off-label for a number of disorders outside of their Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indications (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder). The largest number of antipsychotic prescriptions in older adults is for behavioral disturbances associated with dementia. In April 2005, the FDA, based on a meta-analysis of 17 double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials among elderly people with dementia, determined that atypical antipsychotics were associated with a significantly (1.6?1.7 times) greater mortality risk compared with placebo, and asked that drug manufacturers add a black box warning to prescribing information for these drugs. Most deaths were due to either cardiac or infectious causes, the two most common immediate causes of death in dementia in general. Clinicians, patients, and caregivers are left with unclear choices of treatment for dementia patients with psychosis and/or severe agitation. Not only are psychosis and agitation common in persons with dementia but they also frequently cause considerable caregiver distress and hasten institutionalization of patients. At the same time, there is a paucity of evidence-based treatment alternatives to antipsychotics for this population. Thus, there is insufficient evidence to suggest that psychotropics other than antipsychotics represent an overall effective and safe, let alone better, treatment choice for psychosis or agitation in dementia; currently no such treatment has been approved by the FDA for these symptoms. Similarly, the data on the efficacy of specific psychosocial treatments in patients with dementia are limited and inconclusive. The goal of this White Paper is to review relevant issues and make clinical and research recommendations regarding the treatment of elderly dementia patients with psychosis and/or agitation. The role of shared decision making and caution in using pharmacotherapy for these patients is stressed. PMID:17637610

  14. Pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pouget, Jennie G; Müller, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotics are the mainstay treatment for schizophrenia. There is large variability between individuals in their response to antipsychotics, both in efficacy and adverse effects of treatment. While the source of interindividual variability in antipsychotic response is not completely understood, genetics is a major contributing factor. The identification of pharmacogenetic markers that predict antipsychotic efficacy and adverse reactions is a growing area of research, and holds the potential to replace the current trial-and-error approach to treatment selection in schizophrenia with a personalized medicine approach.In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current state of pharmacogenetics in schizophrenia treatment. The most promising pharmacogenetic findings are presented for both antipsychotic response and commonly studied adverse reactions. The application of pharmacogenetics to schizophrenia treatment is discussed, with an emphasis on the clinical utility of pharmacogenetic testing and directions for future research. PMID:25150876

  15. Managing patients on antipsychotics: your domain, too.

    PubMed

    Moore, Richard; DeJoseph, Daniel; Simmons, B Brent

    2014-03-01

    Primary care physicians are increasingly likely to care for patients taking antipsychotics. Here's what you need to know about the common adverse effects, major risks, and monitoring required. PMID:24701600

  16. Impact of prescribed medications on patient safety in older people

    PubMed Central

    Anathhanam, Sujo; Powis, Rachel A.; Robson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate prescribing for older adults presents unique challenges to the prescriber. An understanding of the scale of the problems and contributing factors is essential when designing interventions to improve patient safety. The altered pharmacology of ageing, the existence of multiple medical conditions and the exclusion of elderly patients from many trials render this subgroup of the population particularly vulnerable to underprescribing and overprescribing. Adverse drug events are common, causing significant morbidity and mortality as well as having economic implications. High-risk medications such as opioids, anticoagulants and antipsychotics can have benefits in this group of patients but strategies to optimize their safety are required. Tools exist that help to identify those at risk of adverse drug reactions and to screen for inappropriate prescribing. Developments in information technology are ongoing, and it is hoped that these may enhance the process of medication reconciliation across healthcare transitions and alert the prescriber to potential adverse drug events. This review addresses commonly encountered issues when prescribing for older people, considers strategies to improve medication safety and offers a list of top tips to aid the clinician. PMID:25083234

  17. [Frontal brain volume reduction due to antipsychotic drugs?].

    PubMed

    Aderhold, V; Weinmann, S; Hägele, C; Heinz, A

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the results of longitudinal studies on frontal brain volume reduction in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and focuses on the relationship with antipsychotic treatment. Based on a systematic literature search all studies were included in which results on changes of brain volumes over a longer period of time were correlated with antipsychotic treatment dose and disease severity. The findings indicate that there is evidence for grey and white matter volume changes of the frontal brain, which cannot be explained by the severity of the disease alone but are also very likely a manifestation of long-term effects of antipsychotics. Whether second generation antipsychotics have an advantage compared to first generation antipsychotics is currently unclear. Considering the contribution of antipsychotics to the changes in brain structure, which seem to depend on cumulative dosage and can exert adverse effects on neurocognition, negative and positive symptoms and psychosocial functioning, the guidelines for antipsychotic long-term drug treatment should be reconsidered. This is the reason why we and others recommend prescribing the lowest dose necessary to control symptoms. In non-schizophrenic psychiatric disorders, antipsychotics should be used only with great caution after a careful risk-benefit assessment. Moreover, treatment approaches which can help to minimize antipsychotic medication or even administer them only selectively are of increasing importance. PMID:24859153

  18. A Qualitative Study of Antipsychotic Medication Experiences of Youth

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrea L.; Gardner, David M.; Kisely, Steve; Cooke, Charmaine; Kutcher, Stan P.; Hughes, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the lived experience of youth who are prescribed antipsychotics. Methods: We conducted an interpretive phenomenology study of young people with recent experience of taking antipsychotics. Youth were interviewed and a staged approach was used for data analysis of transcriptions. We collected approximately 13 hours of audio from 18 youth aged 13 to 26 years between January and August of 2010. Results: Ambivalence was significant and antipsychotic adverse effects frequently tempered benefits. Both illness and antipsychotics had significant impacts on physical and mental wellbeing with adverse effects on relationships and functioning in various contexts (e.g., school). Stigma related to both antipsychotics and illness was also prominent. Participants’ limited knowledge about their antipsychotics and pressure to conform within their youth culture and context affected decisions on starting, adhering to, and persisting with treatment. Conclusions: The lived experience of youth taking antipsychotics is complex and the benefits (e.g., symptom improvement) and consequences (e.g., adverse effects) associated with antipsychotics affect all facets of life. More research is needed to better understand youth priorities in treatment decisions and whether youth who demonstrate substantive gaps in their knowledge about antipsychotics are truly given the opportunity to be informed and engage in management decisions including whether to initiate, persist with, and discontinue treatments. PMID:26336383

  19. [Negative symptoms : which antipsychotics?].

    PubMed

    Maurel, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    Treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia is a major issue and a challenge for the functional and social prognosis of the disease, to which they are closely linked. First- and second-generation antipsychotics allow a reduction of all negative symptoms. The hope of acting directly on primary negative symptoms with any antipsychotic is not supported by the literature. However, the effectiveness of first- and second-generation antipsychotics is demonstrated on secondary negative symptoms. PMID:26776390

  20. Antidepressant and antipsychotic use in an Italian pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The safety and effectiveness of psychotropic drug use in the paediatric population is widely debated, in particular because of the lack of data concerning long term effects. In Italy the prevalence of psychotropic drug prescriptions increased in the early 2000s and decreased afterwards. In such a context, a study with the aim to estimate the incidence and prevalence of psychotropic drug prescription in the paediatric population and to describe diagnostic and therapeutic approaches was performed. Methods The study population was composed of 76,000 youths less than 18 years and living in the area covered by the local health unit of Verona, Italy. The data source was the Verona local health unit's administrative prescription database. Prevalence and incidence of antidepressant and/or antipsychotic drug prescriptions in the 2004-2008 period were estimated. Children and adolescents receiving antidepressant and/or antipsychotic drug prescriptions between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006 were identified and questionnaires were sent to the prescribers with the aim to collect data concerning diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and care strategies. Results The prevalence of psychotropic drug prescriptions did not change in the 2004-2008 period, while incidence slightly increased (from 7.0 in 2005 to 8.3 per 10,000 in 2008). Between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006, 111 youths received at least one psychotropic drug prescription, 91 of whom received antidepressants. Only 28 patients attended child and adolescent psychiatry services. Information concerning diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and care strategies was collected for 52 patients (47%). Anxiety-depressive syndrome and attention disorders were the diseases for which psychotropic drugs were most commonly prescribed. In all, 75% youths also received psychological support and 20% were prescribed drugs for 2 or more years. Conclusions Despite the low drug prescription prevalence, the finding that most children were not cared for by child and adolescent psychiatric services is of concern and calls for a systematic, continuous monitoring of psychopharmacological treatments. PMID:21605367

  1. Prescribed Burn

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Iowa State Grad students Devan McGranahan and Torre Hovick, along with DNR private land specialist Josh Rusk and ISU Research Technician Shannon Rusk ignite a prescribed fire on a patch-burn grazing research pasture in southern Iowa. The goals of the prescribed fire include reducing invasive eastern...

  2. Prescribing patterns of the four most commonly used sedatives in endoscopic examination in Korea: propofol, midazolam, diazepam, and lorazepam.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ju-Young; Lee, Shin Haeng; Shin, Sun Mi; Kim, Mi Hee; Park, Sung Geon; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-04-01

    As the sedative use increases due to the effectiveness and relatively safe profile, the abuse potential is also increasing. This study was conducted to examine the usage of four sedative agents in endoscopic examination and to compare the propofol use with the other three sedatives. Using National Health Insurance claims data from 2008 to 2012, we identified the number of cases of conscious sedation during endoscopy using one or more of the following agents: propofol, midazolam, diazepam, and lorazepam. The general characteristics of patients and medical service providers were analyzed, and the regional and annual distributions of frequency of use were compared. We also identified patient cases with excessive number of endoscopic examinations. Among the total of 3,156,231 sedatives users, midazolam was the most commonly used agent (n=2,845,250, 90.1%). However, the largest increase in patient number, which increased from 11,410 in 2008 to 28,170 in 2012, was observed with propofol. While the majority of patients received an annual endoscopy, we identified several suspected abuse cases of patients receiving endoscopies repetitively as many as 114 times in five years. The rise of sedative use in endoscopic examinations and several patient cases of repeated sedative administration suggest a potential risk for abuse. Medical service providers should be cautious when using sedatives and carefully review each patient's medical history prior to the procedure. PMID:25659208

  3. Association of cannabis use with hospital admission and antipsychotic treatment failure in first episode psychosis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robin; Jackson, Richard; Ball, Michael; Shetty, Hitesh; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether cannabis use is associated with increased risk of relapse, as indexed by number of hospital admissions, and whether antipsychotic treatment failure, as indexed by number of unique antipsychotics prescribed, may mediate this effect in a large data set of patients with first episode psychosis (FEP). Design Observational study with exploratory mediation analysis. Setting Anonymised electronic mental health record data from the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Participants 2026 people presenting to early intervention services with FEP. Exposure Cannabis use at presentation, identified using natural language processing. Main outcome measures admission to psychiatric hospital and clozapine prescription up to 5 years following presentation. Mediator Number of unique antipsychotics prescribed. Results Cannabis use was present in 46.3% of the sample at first presentation and was particularly common in patients who were 16–25, male and single. It was associated with increased frequency of hospital admission (incidence rate ratio 1.50, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.80), increased likelihood of compulsory admission (OR 1.55, 1.16 to 2.08) and greater number of days spent in hospital (β coefficient 35.1 days, 12.1 to 58.1). The number of unique antipsychotics prescribed, mediated increased frequency of hospital admission (natural indirect effect 1.09, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.18; total effect 1.50, 1.21 to 1.87), increased likelihood of compulsory admission (natural indirect effect (NIE) 1.27, 1.03 to 1.58; total effect (TE) 1.76, 0.81 to 3.84) and greater number of days spent in hospital (NIE 17.9, 2.4 to 33.4; TE 34.8, 11.6 to 58.1). Conclusions Cannabis use in patients with FEP was associated with an increased likelihood of hospital admission. This was linked to the prescription of several different antipsychotic drugs, indicating clinical judgement of antipsychotic treatment failure. Together, this suggests that cannabis use might be associated with worse clinical outcomes in psychosis by contributing towards failure of antipsychotic treatment. PMID:26940105

  4. Assessment of the knowledge and attitudes of intern doctors to medication prescribing errors in a Nigeria tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ajemigbitse, Adetutu A.; Omole, Moses Kayode; Ezike, Nnamdi Chika; Erhun, Wilson O.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Junior doctors are reported to make most of the prescribing errors in the hospital setting. Aims: The aim of the following study is to determine the knowledge intern doctors have about prescribing errors and circumstances contributing to making them. Settings and Design: A structured questionnaire was distributed to intern doctors in National Hospital Abuja Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: Respondents gave information about their experience with prescribing medicines, the extent to which they agreed with the definition of a clinically meaningful prescribing error and events that constituted such. Their experience with prescribing certain categories of medicines was also sought. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 17 (SPSS Inc Chicago, Ill, USA). Chi-squared analysis contrasted differences in proportions; P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The response rate was 90.9% and 27 (90%) had <1 year of prescribing experience. 17 (56.7%) respondents totally agreed with the definition of a clinically meaningful prescribing error. Most common reasons for prescribing mistakes were a failure to check prescriptions with a reference source (14, 25.5%) and failure to check for adverse drug interactions (14, 25.5%). Omitting some essential information such as duration of therapy (13, 20%), patient age (14, 21.5%) and dosage errors (14, 21.5%) were the most common types of prescribing errors made. Respondents considered workload (23, 76.7%), multitasking (19, 63.3%), rushing (18, 60.0%) and tiredness/stress (16, 53.3%) as important factors contributing to prescribing errors. Interns were least confident prescribing antibiotics (12, 25.5%), opioid analgesics (12, 25.5%) cytotoxics (10, 21.3%) and antipsychotics (9, 19.1%) unsupervised. Conclusions: Respondents seemed to have a low awareness of making prescribing errors. Principles of rational prescribing and events that constitute prescribing errors should be taught in the practice setting. PMID:24808682

  5. Electronic Prescribing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 1-877-486-2048 . I went to the pharmacy, and my prescription was ready. Electronic eRx Prescribing ... write and send your prescriptions directly to your pharmacy. This means no more prescriptions on paper and ...

  6. Antipsychotic drugs and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Christoph U.; Lencz, Todd; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying antipsychotic cardiometabolic adverse effects are incompletely understood. This hampers the identification of high-risk patients, low-risk antipsychotics and preventive/ameliorative treatments. Recent clinical, molecular, and genetic data suggest that i) antipsychotic-naïve samples provide the greatest power for mechanistic studies; ii) weight and metabolic effects can be discordant, pointing to overlapping and distinct mechanisms; iii) antipsychotics affect satiety and energy homeostasis signaling; iv) the specific peptides mediating these effects are unknown but likely overlap with those involved in idiopathic obesity; and v) single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding known neurotransmitter receptors and metabolic proteins are promising pharmacogenomic targets for countering adverse affects. However, sophisticated molecular studies and genome-wide association studies, ideally in antipsychotic-naïve/first episode samples, are needed to further advance the field. PMID:21185230

  7. Staff Knowledge of the Side Effects of Anti-Psychotic Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fretwell, Christine; Felce, David

    2007-01-01

    Background: Anti-psychotic medications are widely prescribed to people with intellectual disabilities and have a range of negative side effects. The aim was to identify the level of knowledge of anti-psychotic medications and their side effects among key carers or home managers of adults with intellectual disabilities living in residential group

  8. Off-label use of atypical antipsychotics: cause for concern?

    PubMed

    McKean, Andrew; Monasterio, Erik

    2012-05-01

    Licensed indications for medicines were designed to regulate the claims that can be made about a medicine by a pharmaceutical company. Off-label prescribing (i.e. prescribing a drug for an indication outside of that for which it is licensed) is legal and an integral part of medical practice. In psychiatry, off-label prescribing is common and gives clinicians scope to treat patients who are refractory to standard therapy or where there is no licensed medication for an indication. However, efficacy or safety of such off-label use may not be established. There is a growing list of licensed indications for atypical antipsychotics (AAP) beyond schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder, and also more evidence for other indications where pharmaceutical companies have not obtained a license. Pharmaceutical companies have promoted AAPs for off-label indications to increase sales and consequently have been fined by the US FDA for this. Since the 1990s, AAP use has expanded considerably, for example, the off-label use of quetiapine alone accounted for an estimated 17% of the AAP spend in New Zealand in 2010. There are a number of potential problems with the expanded use of AAPs outside of schizophrenia and related psychoses. A larger population will be exposed to their adverse effects, which include weight gain, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sudden cardiac death and increased mortality rates in the elderly with dementia. There are also concerns with the abuse of these agents, in particular quetiapine. Given that an increasing percentage of the population is being treated with these agents, off-label prescribing of AAPs is a cause for concern; they have a propensity to cause significant side effects and their efficacy and long-term safety for most off-label indications remains largely unknown, and therefore the risks and benefits of their use should be carefully weighed up prior to prescribing these agents off-label. PMID:22448598

  9. Managing antipsychotic-induced acute and tardive dystonia.

    PubMed

    Raja, M

    1998-07-01

    Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects continue to be a serious problem in the treatment of psychotic disorders. While the pathophysiology of these adverse effects is not well understood, much recent research has focused on improving our ability to use available pharmacotherapy in the most effective and least toxic manner. Acute dystonic reactions only occur within the first days of antipsychotic treatment. They are often distressing and frightening for the patient and may even be dangerous. However, they can be effectively prevented or reversed with anticholinergics. Furthermore, the growing use of the new atypical antipsychotics will lead to a significant decrease in the rate of acute dystonic reactions. In contrast, tardive dystonia is a long-lasting menace in the course of antipsychotic treatment, for which there is no established therapy. Tardive dystonia is sometimes disabling or disfiguring and, like other tardive disorders, is potentially irreversible. Because, in most cases, patients need to continue taking the antipsychotic that has caused the adverse effect to prevent relapse of the mental illness, preventive measures are crucial. Antipsychotics should be prescribed only for patients affected by psychotic disorders, when definitely indicated and at the lowest effective dosage. The use of clozapine and other novel antipsychotic agents is also likely to represent an important step in the prevention and treatment of tardive dystonia. Compared with traditional antipsychotics, most of the new antipsychotics are characterised by a low acute extrapyramidal adverse effects liability and they also bring the hope of reducing the risk of tardive disorders. If tardive dystonia has occurred, switching to clozapine or another atypical antipsychotic and treatment with tetrabenazine, reserpine and botulinum toxin are possible options. PMID:9673858

  10. Pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic treatment response and side effects

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, B; Souza, RP; Likhodi, O; Tiwari, AK; Zai, CC; Sturgess, J

    2011-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are particularly interesting in pharmacogenetic studies as they are associated with a large interindividual variability in terms of response and side effects and, therefore, frequently need to be discontinued, requiring switches to other antipsychotics. Any information that allows the prediction of outcome to a given antipsychotic in a particular patient will, therefore, be of great help for the clinician to minimize time and find the right drug for the right patient, thus optimizing response and minimizing side effects. This will also have a substantial impact on compliance and doctorpatient relationships. Moreover, antipsychotic drug treatments are often required for life-long treatment and are also frequently prescribed to the more vulnerable populations: children, adolescents and the elderly. This article focuses on some important studies performed with candidate gene variants associated with antipsychotic response. In addition, important findings in pharmacogenetic studies of antipsychotic-induced side effects will be briefly summarized, such as antipsychotic treatment induced tardive dyskinesia and weight gain. PMID:22287936

  11. Antipsychotics, mood stabilisers, and risk of violent crime

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Zetterqvist, Johan; Larsson, Henrik; Långström, Niklas; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Antipsychotics and mood stabilisers are prescribed widely to patients with psychiatric disorders worldwide. Despite clear evidence for their efficacy in relapse prevention and symptom relief, their effect on some adverse outcomes, including the perpetration of violent crime, is unclear. We aimed to establish the effect of antipsychotics and mood stabilisers on the rate of violent crime committed by patients with psychiatric disorders in Sweden. Methods We used linked Swedish national registers to study 82 647 patients who were prescribed antipsychotics or mood stabilisers, their psychiatric diagnoses, and subsequent criminal convictions in 2006–09. We did within-individual analyses to compare the rate of violent criminality during the time that patients were prescribed these medications versus the rate for the same patients while they were not receiving the drugs to adjust for all confounders that remained constant within each participant during follow-up. The primary outcome was the occurrence of violent crime, according to Sweden's national crime register. Findings In 2006–09, 40 937 men in Sweden were prescribed antipsychotics or mood stabilisers, of whom 2657 (6·5%) were convicted of a violent crime during the study period. In the same period, 41 710 women were prescribed these drugs, of whom 604 (1·4 %) had convictions for violent crime. Compared with periods when participants were not on medication, violent crime fell by 45% in patients receiving antipsychotics (hazard ratio [HR] 0·55, 95% CI 0·47–0·64) and by 24% in patients prescribed mood stabilisers (0·76, 0·62–0·93). However, we identified potentially important differences by diagnosis—mood stabilisers were associated with a reduced rate of violent crime only in patients with bipolar disorder. The rate of violence reduction for antipsychotics remained between 22% and 29% in sensitivity analyses that used different outcomes (any crime, drug-related crime, less severe crime, and violent arrest), and was stronger in patients who were prescribed higher drug doses than in those prescribed low doses. Notable reductions in violent crime were also recorded for depot medication (HR adjusted for concomitant oral medications 0·60, 95% CI 0·39–0·92). Interpretation In addition to relapse prevention and psychiatric symptom relief, the benefits of antipsychotics and mood stabilisers might also include reductions in the rates of violent crime. The potential effects of these drugs on violence and crime should be taken into account when treatment options for patients with psychiatric disorders are being considered. Funding The Wellcome Trust, the Swedish Prison and Probation Service, the Swedish Research Council, and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare. PMID:24816046

  12. Antipsychotic Drug Side Effects for Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Mahan, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are the most frequently prescribed of the psychotropic drugs among the intellectually disabled (ID) population. Given their widespread use, efforts to systematically assess and report side effects are warranted. Specific scaling methods such as the "Matson Evaluation of Side Effects" ("MEDS"), the "Abnormal Inventory Movement

  13. Synchronized separation of seven medications representing most commonly prescribed antihypertensive classes by using reversed-phase liquid chromatography: Application for analysis in their combined formulations.

    PubMed

    Ebeid, Walid M; Elkady, Ehab F; El-Zaher, Asmaa A; El-Bagary, Ramzia I; Patonay, Gabor

    2014-04-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide, along with six drugs representing the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive pharmacological classes such as atenolol, a selective ?1 blocker, amlodipine besylate, a calcium channel blocker, moexipril hydrochloride, an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, valsartan and candesartan cilexetil, which are angiotensin II receptor blockers, and aliskiren hemifumarate, a renin inhibitor, using irbesartan as an internal standard. The chromatographic separation was achieved using acetonitrile/sodium phosphate dibasic buffer (0.02 M, pH 5.5) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min in gradient elution mode at ambient temperature on a stationary phase composed of an Eclipse XDB-C18 (4.6 150 mm, 5?m) column. UV detection was carried out at 220 nm. The method was validated according to ICH guidelines. Linearity, accuracy, and precision were satisfactory over the concentration ranges of 2-40?g/mL for hydrochlorothiazide and candesartan cilexetil, 20-120, 10-160, 5-40, 20-250, and 5-50?g/mL for atenolol, valsartan, moexipril hydrochloride, aliskiren hemifumarate, and amlodipine besylate, respectively. The method was successfully applied for the determination of each of the studied drugs in their combined formulations with hydrochlorothiazide. The developed method is suitable for the quality control and routine analysis of the cited drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms. PMID:24482404

  14. Pharmacogenetics and outcome with antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Pouget, Jennie G; Shams, Tahireh A; Tiwari, Arun K; Mller, Daniel J

    2014-12-01

    Antipsychotic medications are the gold-standard treatment for schizophrenia, and are often prescribed for other mental conditions. However, the efficacy and side-effect profiles of these drugs are heterogeneous, with large interindividual variability. As a result, treatment selection remains a largely trial-and-error process, with many failed treatment regimens endured before finding a tolerable balance between symptom management and side effects. Much of the interindividual variability in response and side effects is due to genetic factors (heritability, h(2)~ 0.60-0.80). Pharmacogenetics is an emerging field that holds the potential to facilitate the selection of the best medication for a particular patient, based on his or her genetic information. In this review we discuss the most promising genetic markers of antipsychotic treatment outcomes, and present current translational research efforts that aim to bring these pharmacogenetic findings to the clinic in the near future. PMID:25733959

  15. Pharmacogenetics and outcome with antipsychotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Jennie G.; Shams, Tahireh A.; Tiwari, Arun K.; Mller, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic medications are the gold-standard treatment for schizophrenia, and are often prescribed for other mental conditions. However, the efficacy and side-effect profiles of these drugs are heterogeneous, with large interindividual variability. As a result, treatment selection remains a largely trial-and-error process, with many failed treatment regimens endured before finding a tolerable balance between symptom management and side effects. Much of the interindividual variability in response and side effects is due to genetic factors (heritability, h2~ 0.60-0.80). Pharmacogenetics is an emerging field that holds the potential to facilitate the selection of the best medication for a particular patient, based on his or her genetic information. In this review we discuss the most promising genetic markers of antipsychotic treatment outcomes, and present current translational research efforts that aim to bring these pharmacogenetic findings to the clinic in the near future. PMID:25733959

  16. Antipsychotic Medication and QT Prolongation

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Paramdip Singh; Mittal, Raman; Javed, Afzal

    2015-01-01

    The QT interval represents ventricular depolarisation and repolarisation. Prolongation of this interval can lead to life-threatening complications. These can include arrhythmias such as Torsades de Pointes and Ventricular Fibrillation, which may ultimately lead to death. Many risk factors have been identified in prolonging the QT interval, one of which is medication commonly used in the treatment of Psychiatric ailments. This article describes Antipsychotic drugs causing prolonged QT interval and the possible underlying mechanisms alongside the current best practice on the management of this potentially fatal complication. PMID:26649027

  17. Osteoporosis Associated with Antipsychotic Treatment in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haishan; Deng, Lu; Zhao, Lipin; Zhao, Jingping; Li, Lehua; Chen, Jindong

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common global mental diseases, with prevalence of 1%. Patients with schizophrenia are predisposed to diabetes, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and osteoporosis, than the normal. In comparison with the metabolic syndrome, for instance, there are little reports about osteoporosis which occurs secondary to antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia. There are extensive recent works of literature indicating that osteoporosis is associated with schizophrenia particularly in patients under psychotropic medication therapy. As osteoporotic fractures cause significantly increased morbidity and mortality, it is quite necessary to raise the awareness and understanding of the impact of antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia on physical health in schizophrenia. In this paper, we will review the relationship between schizophrenia, antipsychotic medication, hyperprolactinaemia, and osteoporosis. PMID:23690768

  18. Depression: Should You Consider Antipsychotics?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are drugs that are usually used to treat schizophrenia. They are also sometimes used with an antidepressant ... an antipsychotic drug? Antipsychotic drugs can have serious side effects. Many people stop taking them because of the ...

  19. Rethinking antipsychotic formulary policy.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, R A; Leslie, D L; Busch, Susan; Rofman, Ethan S; Sernyak, Michael

    2008-03-01

    In this commentary, we review recent research suggesting that (a) second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) may be no more effective than first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs), (b) the reduced risk of EPS and tardive dyskinesia with SGAs is more weakly supported by the research literature than has been appreciated, and (c) benefits may be offset by greater metabolic risks of some SGAs and their substantially greater cost. Bearing in mind, as well, that risperidone, currently the least expensive SGA, will soon be available as an even less expensive generic drug, we propose a new algorithm for maintenance antipsychotic therapy. We further outline a cautious implementation procedure that relies on standardized documentation and feedback, without a restrictive formulary that would limit physician choice. The algorithm outlined here and the process for its implementation are intended as a stimulus for discussion of potential policy responses, not as a finalized proposition. PMID:17634413

  20. Defining and Assessing Adherence to Oral Antipsychotics: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Velligan, Dawn I.; Lam, Yui-Wing Francis; Glahn, David C.; Barrett, Jennifer A.; Maples, Natalie J.; Ereshefsky, Larry; Miller, Alexander L.

    2006-01-01

    The definition and assessment of adherence vary considerably across studies. Increasing consensus regarding these issues is necessary to improve our understanding of adherence and the development of more effective treatments. We review the adherence literature over the past 3 decades to explore the definitions and assessment of adherence to oral antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients. A total of 161 articles were identified through MEDLINE and PsycINFO searches. The most common method used to assess adherence was the report of the patient. Subjective and indirect methods including self-report, provider report, significant other report, and chart review were the only methods used to assess adherence in over 77% (124/161) of studies reviewed. Direct or objective measures including pill count, blood or urine analysis, electronic monitoring, and electronic refill records were used in less than 23% (37/161) of studies. Even in studies utilizing the same methodology to assess adherence, definitions of an adherent subject varied broadly from agreeing to take any medication to taking at least 90% of medication as prescribed. We make suggestions for consensus development, including the use of recommended terminology for different subject samples, the increased use of objective or direct measures, and the inclusion in all studies of an estimate of the percentage of medication taken as prescribed in an effort to increase comparability among studies. The suggestions are designed to advance the field with respect to both understanding predictors of adherence and developing interventions to improve adherence to oral antipsychotic medications. PMID:16707778

  1. Use of antipsychotics - an analysis of lifetime treatment in 66 patients with psychoses.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Erik G; Saetre, Peter; Vares, Maria; Strålin, Pontus; Levander, Sten; Lindström, Eva

    2011-05-15

    Only a minority of patients treated with antipsychotics in clinical studies continue their treatments throughout a longer study period. Few studies address this issue from a lifetime perspective. In this naturalistic study, we aimed at analysing the prescription pattern of antipsychotic drugs among a sample of Swedish patients with a diagnosis of psychotic illness, from the first contact with psychiatry (typically between 1973 and 1997) until the last written note in the case history documents. A retrospective descriptive analysis was performed of all case history data of 66 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or related psychotic disorders. Patients with schizophrenia were prescribed antipsychotic medication more than 90% of the time. Each patient generally had been prescribed several (up to 16) different antipsychotic drugs and a quarter of the patients had been prescribed two or more antipsychotics for a third of their prescription time. Patients with psychosis were exposed to a cumulatively growing number of antipsychotics. Various factors, including clinician and patient expectations, and specific strengths and limitations of available antipsychotics may account for frequent medication changes over time. PMID:21095015

  2. Challenge of changing nursing home prescribing culture.

    PubMed

    Tjia, Jennifer; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Briesacher, Becky A

    2012-02-01

    This article described a framework for improving prescribing in nursing homes (NH) by focusing on the whole facility as a system that has created a "prescribing culture." We offered this paradigm as an alternative to focused interventions that target prescribers only. We used the example of atypical antipsychotics to illustrate the approach. We also highlighted elements of the NH culture change movement that are germane to medication prescribing, and illustrated which elements of NH culture were shown to be associated with suboptimal quality of care. We concluded by describing current models, including our study funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, to identify the best methods of disseminating evidence-based medication use guides in NHs. PMID:22264855

  3. Cortical Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors Are a Common Site of Action for Antipsychotic Drugs—An Original Patient Data Meta-analysis of the SPECT and PET In Vivo Receptor Imaging Literature

    PubMed Central

    Stone, James M.; Davis, John M.; Leucht, Stefan; Pilowsky, Lyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Subject numbers in neuroreceptor imaging studies of antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia are generally insufficient to directly test the relationship of regional D2/D3 and 5HT2A receptor binding to clinical efficacy. We selected positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies of antipsychotic dose vs occupancy at both temporal cortex and striatal D2/D3 receptors. We selected corresponding SPECT and PET studies of 5HT2A receptor occupancy. We also selected randomized double-blind clinical trials of antipsychotics, where patients were treated with randomly assigned fixed doses. For each antipsychotic drug, we compared the optimum effective antipsychotic dose with the dose inducing maximal occupancy of D2/D3 receptors in striatum and in temporal cortex as well as at 5HT2A receptors. Both first- and second-generation antipsychotic (FGA, SGA) drugs produced high temporal cortex D2/D3 occupancy. Only FGA produced high striatal D2/D3 receptor occupancy. The clinically effective dose showed correlation with doses inducing maximal dopamine D2/D3 receptor occupancy both in striatum and in temporal cortex, the strongest correlation being with temporal cortex binding. Extrapyramidal side effects (EPSE) were primarily related to striatal D2/D3 receptor occupancy. There was no correlation between 5HT2A occupancy and clinically effective dose. We conclude that cortical dopamine D2/D3 receptor occupancy is involved in antipsychotic efficacy, with striatal D2/D3 occupancy having a likely therapeutic role while also inducing EPSE. We found no evidence for 5HT2A blockade involvement in antipsychotic action, although we cannot exclude this possibility. PMID:18303092

  4. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Corrected QT Interval: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Takefumi; Remington, Gary; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective: It remains unclear whether antipsychotic polypharmacy, a common clinical practice, is related to an increased risk of corrected time between start of Q wave and end of T wave (QTc) interval prolongation. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to address this important issue. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in October 2014, using MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. Studies and case reports were included if they reported QTc intervals or QTc interval changes before and after antipsychotic polypharmacy or QTc intervals in both antipsychotic polypharmacy and monotherapy groups. Results: A total of 21 articles (10 clinical trials, 4 observational studies, and 7 case reports) met inclusion criteria. The clinical trials have shown that a combination treatment with risperidone or pimozide is not obviously related to an increase in QTc interval, whereas ziprasidone or sertindole combined with clozapine may prolong QTc interval. Among the 4 observational studies, antipsychotic polypharmacy was not clearly associated with QTc prolongation in 3 studies, each cross-sectional. In contrast, one prospective study showed a significant increase in QTc interval following antipsychotic coadministration. The case reports indicated an increased risk of QTc prolongation in at least some patients receiving antipsychotic polypharmacy. Conclusions: Currently available evidence fails to confirm that antipsychotic polypharmacy worsens QTc prolongation in general, although the evidence is scarce and inconsistent. Clinicians are advised to remain conservative in resorting to antipsychotic polypharmacy, as a combination of some QTc-prolongation liable antipsychotics may further prolong QTc interval, and efficacy supporting the clinical benefits of antipsychotic polypharmacy is equivocal, at best. PMID:26174525

  5. Atypical Antipsychotics for Older Adults: Are They Safe and Effective As We Once Thought?

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Dilip V.; Maglione, Jeanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The initial enthusiasm for atypical antipsychotics as being safe and effective for treating older adults with psychotic disorders has diminished. Despite multiple short-term double-blind trials, these drugs have not been approved by the FDA for the most common form of psychosis in this population i.e., psychosis associated with dementia. On the contrary, these drugs have received FDA warnings for adverse cerebrovascular events and mortality in these patients. Our pragmatic clinical trial failed to show evidence of either safety or effectiveness of the four most commonly prescribed atypical antipsychotics in middle-aged and older patients with different psychotic disorders schizophrenia as well as psychosis associated with mood disorders, dementia or PTSD. A reconsideration of the common use of these medications, especially off-label use, in older patients is warranted. Unfortunately, there are no evidence-based alternatives to these agents in the target population. Wider employment of psychosocial interventions, cautious and limited use of medications, shared decision making, and greater research on developing better treatments are the order of the day. PMID:24236673

  6. Tardive dyskinesia in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics: case series and brief review of etiologic and treatment considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungjin; MacMaster, Eric; Schwartz, Thomas L

    2014-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a disfiguring side-effect of antipsychotic medications that is potentially irreversible in affected patients. Newer atypical antipsychotics are felt by many to have a lower risk of TD. As a result, many clinicians may have developed a false sense of security when prescribing these medications. We report five cases of patients taking atypical antipsychotics who developed TD, review the risk of TD, its potential etiologic mechanisms, and treatment options available. The goal of this paper is to alert the reader to continue to be diligent in obtaining informed consent and monitoring for the onset of TD in patients taking atypical antipsychotics. PMID:24744806

  7. Antipsychotic long-acting injections: mind the gap.

    PubMed

    Patel, Maxine X; Taylor, Mark; David, Anthony S

    2009-11-01

    Long-acting injections of antipsychotic medication (or depots) were developed specifically to promote treatment adherence and are a valuable option for maintenance medication in psychotic illnesses. Approximately 40-60% of patients with schizophrenia are partially or totally non-adherent to their antipsychotic regimen, but only 30% or less are prescribed a long-acting injection. The use of such injections has declined in recent years after the introduction of second-generation (atypical) oral antipsychotic drugs. Research shows that possible reasons for this decline include concerns that may be based on suboptimal knowledge, as well as an erroneous assumption that one's own patient group is more adherent than those of one's colleagues. Research on attitudes has also revealed that psychiatrists feel that long-acting injections have an ;image' problem. This editorial addresses the gaps in knowledge and behaviour associated with possible underutilisation of these formulations, highlighting the role of stigma and the need for more research. PMID:19880911

  8. Antipsychotic drugs and risks of myocardial infarction: a self-controlled case series study

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Ruth; Smeeth, Liam; Anaya-Izquierdo, Karim; Timmis, Adam; Denaxas, Spiros C.; Farrington, C. Paddy; Whitaker, Heather; Hemingway, Harry; Douglas, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Aim Antipsychotics increase the risk of stroke. Their effect on myocardial infarction remains uncertain because people prescribed and not prescribed antipsychotic drugs differ in their underlying vascular risk making between-person comparisons difficult to interpret. The aim of our study was to investigate this association using the self-controlled case series design that eliminates between-person confounding effects. Methods and results All the patients with a first recorded myocardial infarction and prescription for an antipsychotic identified in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to the Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project were selected for the self-controlled case series. The incidence ratio of myocardial infarction during risk periods following the initiation of antipsychotic use relative to unexposed periods was estimated within individuals. A classical casecontrol study was undertaken for comparative purposes comparing antipsychotic exposure among cases and matched controls. We identified 1546 exposed cases for the self-controlled case series and found evidence of an association during the first 30 days after the first prescription of an antipsychotic, for first-generation agents [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.03.99] and second-generation agents (IRR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.185.32). Similar results were found for the casecontrol study for new users of first- (OR: 3.19, 95% CI: 1.95.37) and second-generation agents (OR: 2.55, 95% CI: 0.937.01) within 30 days of their myocardial infarction. Conclusion We found an increased risk of myocardial infarction in the period following the initiation of antipsychotics that was not attributable to differences between people prescribed and not prescribed antipsychotics. PMID:25005706

  9. Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Nursing Homes and Pharmaceutical Marketing

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Camilla B.; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Field, Terry S.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Kanaan, Abir O.; Lemay, Celeste A.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Tjia, Jennifer; Briesacher, Becky A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many nursing home (NH) residents are prescribed atypical antipsychotics despite US Food and Drug Administration warnings of increased risk of death in older adults with dementia. Aggressive pharmaceutical marketing has been cited as a potential cause, although data are scarce. The objectives of this study were to describe the current extent and type of pharmaceutical marketing in NHs in one state, and to provide preliminary evidence for the potential influence of pharmaceutical marketing on the use of atypical antipsychotics in NHs. DESIGN Nested mixed-methods, cross-sectional study of NHs in a cluster randomized trial. SETTING 41 NHs in Connecticut. PARTICIPANTS NH administrators, directors of nursing and medical directors (n = 93, response rate 75.6%). MEASUREMENTS Quantitative data, including prescription drug dispensing data (September 2009–August 2010) linked with Nursing Home Compare data (April 2011), were used to determine facility-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use, facility-level characteristics, NH staffing and NH quality. Qualitative data, including semi-structured interviews and surveys of NH leaders conducted in the first quarter of 2011, were used to determine encounters with pharmaceutical marketing. RESULTS Leadership at 46.3% of NHs (19/41) reported pharmaceutical marketing encounters, consisting of educational training, written/Internet-based materials and/or sponsored training. No association was detected between the level of atypical antipsychotic prescribing and reports of any pharmaceutical marketing by at least one NH leader. CONCLUSION NH leaders frequently encounter pharmaceutical marketing through a variety of ways, although the impact on atypical antipsychotic prescribing is unclear. PMID:25688605

  10. Predictors of antipsychotic medication change.

    PubMed

    Sernyak, Michael J; Leslie, Douglas; Rosenheck, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics account for more than 60% of antipsychotic prescriptions written for the treatment of schizophrenia. While switching from one antipsychotic to another is a dynamic process, there has been no research on individual patient and institutional characteristics that predict antipsychotic switching. VA national administrative data were used to identify patients (n = 9660) with schizophrenia maintained on antipsychotic medication. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of medication switching. Independent variables included information about service utilization, sociodemographic and clinical variables as well as institutional characteristics. This model was repeated for more specific switches between classes of medications and between specific medications. High levels of outpatient and inpatient service use were the most powerful predictors of switching. Sociodemographic, institutional, diagnostic, and functional measures were also predictive in some cases. Controlling for independent sociodemographic, diagnostic, and functional measures, frequency of clinical contact was the most robust predictor of switching antipsychotics. PMID:15632800

  11. [Improve safety monitoring of antipsychotics in the French pediatric population].

    PubMed

    Menard, M-L; Askenazy, F; Auby, P; Bonnot, O; Cohen, D

    2015-01-01

    In France, as in the rest of the world, the prescription of second generation antipsychotics is on the rise in the pediatric population. At the same time, the use of first generation antipsychotics continues, although it is declining in France as in other countries. In France, we lack data on the pediatric population to ensure a safe prescription, unlike other countries such as Canada and the United States. This is disturbing when many adverse events, potentially serious for young patients' health (neuromuscular complications, risk factors, cardiovascular problems) are beginning to be identified. This article reports the current French and international knowledge on antipsychotics in the pediatric population. It appears that data in the French population are nearly nonexistent and that the methodological tools used are not always relevant (population already exposed to psychotropic drugs, short studies, debatable rating scale and somatic parameters). Within this context, a safety monitoring procedure for the naive pediatric population treated with antipsychotics was developed (ETAPE study) to determine the incidence of adverse events appearing with these drugs. Safety monitoring during the 12-month study period will include clinical assessments and laboratory testing. These assessments will be performed before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the introduction of the antipsychotic drug. This study received funding from the National Security Agency of Medicines (ANSM 2012 No.40). The results should contribute to educating all practitioners (general physicians, pediatricians, psychiatrists, child psychiatrists) on adverse events, helping practitioners with prescribing decisions, reinforcing the French system of monitoring adverse events caused by atypical antipsychotic drugs, and developing recommendations to improve the safety of atypical antipsychotic drugs in child psychiatry. PMID:25482998

  12. Diabetic control and atypical antipsychotics: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Romina Lopez; George, Mohan; Azhahan, Nangai

    2008-01-01

    Introduction People with schizophrenia are at increased risk of developing metabolic disturbances. This risk may be further exacerbated by the use of antipsychotic agents. Research is still ongoing to determine the metabolic impact of antipsychotics on glucose regulation. In this case report we review some of the possible mechanisms of action of antipsychotic medication on glucose regulation. Case presentation We present the case of a 50-year-old man diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia who developed type 2 diabetes mellitus whilst on treatment with second generation antipsychotics (SGA). His diabetes was controlled by a combination of antidiabetic drugs that were associated with his psychotropic treatment. Due to deterioration in his mental state, the patient was admitted on two occasions to a psychiatric unit during which his prescribed medication (olanzapine and risperidone) was discontinued and changed to aripiprazole. On both occasions, the patient suffered hypoglycaemic episodes and his antidiabetic treatment had to be adjusted accordingly. The patient did not require any antidiabetic treatment whilst on aripiprazole during the follow up period. Conclusion Clinicians face regular dilemmas in trying to find the right balance between achieving control over a patient's mental illness and reducing any adverse effects associated with the prescribed medication. In patients receiving concomitant antidiabetic therapy, caution should be exercised when changing from one SGA to another. Whilst more longitudinal data are required, a trial of alternative SGAs, including aripiprazole in those developing type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance may be a worthwhile therapeutic option. PMID:18479520

  13. Drug development for anxiety disorders: new roles for atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Carson, William H; Kitagawa, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are prevalent and frequently comorbid with depression. Rates of response and remission for anxiety disorders are low despite marked improvements in treatment in the past several decades. Antidepressants and anxiolytics remain the most frequently prescribed agents for anxiety disorders, but the numbers of prescriptions for novel forms of therapy, such as anticonvulsants and atypical antipsychotics are increasing. For the atypical antipsychotics, agonist activity at the 5-HT1A receptor has been hypothesized to translate into anxiolytic effects. A small, but growing, literature suggests that atypical antipsychotics are useful as augmentation therapy for treatment of refractory anxiety disorders. The next generation antipsychotic, aripiprazole, has a unique mechanism of action (ie, combined D2 and 5-HT1A partial agonist and 5-HT2A antagonist) and improves depressive and depressive/anxiety symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Further studies examining the effect of aripiprazole and other atypical antipsychotic drugs on depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients with refractory anxiety disorders are warranted. Psychopharmacology Bulletin. 2004;38(Suppl 1): 38-45. PMID:15278017

  14. Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing use of antipsychotic drugs in pediatric and psychiatry practice for a wide range of behavioral and affective disorders. These drugs have prominent side effects of interest to pediatric endocrinologists, including weight gain and associated metabolic risk factors and hyperprolactinemia. The drugs block dopamine action, thus disinhibiting prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia is especially prominent with first-generation antipsychotics such as haloperidol and the second-generation drugs, most commonly risperidone, with some patients developing gynecomastia or galactorrhea or, as a result of prolactin inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone from the hypothalamus, amenorrhea. With concern about the long-term effects of antipsychotics on bone mass and pituitary tumor formation, it is prudent to monitor serum prolactin levels in antipsychotic drug-treated pediatric patients and consider treatment with an agent less likely to induce hyperprolactinemia. PMID:20871665

  15. Partnership to decrease antipsychotic medication use in nursing homes: impact at the state level.

    PubMed

    Mort, Jane R; Sailor, Ryan; Hintz, Lori

    2014-02-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) established a partnership among stakeholders to decrease the percentage of residents in nursing homes receiving an antipsychotic agent by 15 percent. This goal emanated from concerns including the large percentage of residents taking antipsychotic agents, the questionable use of antipsychotics (e.g., off-label use), the high cost of inappropriate antipsychotic use, and toxicity in patients with dementia (e.g., black box warning regarding mortality). The successful achievement of this goal is evaluated via quality measures, which are greatly influenced by changes in exclusion of residents from the population examined. The partnership is focused on optimizing use of antipsychotic agents by training clinicians on nonpharmacologic approaches, educating on the dangers of antipsychotic medication use and sharing data on antipsychotic medications. In South Dakota, these efforts have yielded a 12 percent relative reduction (21.3 percent to 18.7 percent) in the percent of residents prescribed antipsychotic agents from the second quarter of 2012 to the second quarter of 2013. Future efforts in South Dakota include a Nursing Home Quality Care Collaborative that involves the majority of facilities across the state learning from peers and national experts. The South Dakota Dementia Coalition includes 17 stakeholders who guide education activities and communicate these opportunities to their constituents. PMID:24624602

  16. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  17. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective titanic. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the Seven C's. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  18. Understanding doctors' perceptions of their prescribing competency and the value they ascribe to an electronic prescribing system.

    PubMed

    Baysari, Melissa T; Westbrook, Johanna I; Day, Richard O

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to adoption has been identified as one of the major barriers to successful implementation of technological systems in hospitals. Acceptance of an electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) system is expected to occur if prescribers perceive a need for e-prescribing systems to reduce prescribing errors. We set out to examine doctors' perceptions of their prescribing competency and to identify perceived advantages and disadvantages of using an e-prescribing system, with the objective of determining the value doctors ascribed to the e-prescribing system. This study was conducted at a teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Sixteen prescribers participated in a 20-minute semi-structured interview where they were asked to comment on prescribing errors (their own errors and errors they believed to be common) and advantages and disadvantages of the e-prescribing system. Prescribers held the view that they rarely made prescribing errors. Although users recognised advantages and disadvantages of using the e-prescribing system, most preferred paper to electronic prescribing. Prescribers most likely overestimated their prescribing competency and so failed to see the value of an e-prescribing system to reduce prescribing errors. E-prescribing system implementation is a challenging task for any hospital. These results suggest that keeping prescribers informed about their prescribing errors and the quality improvement benefits of e-prescribing may lead to greater acceptance of and satisfaction with an e-prescribing system. PMID:22797011

  19. Potentially Suboptimal Prescribing for Older Veteran Nursing Home Patients with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Aspinall, Sherrie L.; Handler, Steven M.; Gellad, Walid F.; Stone, Roslyn A.; Semla, Todd P.; Pugh, Mary Jo V.; Dysken, Maurice W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nursing home patients with dementia may be more likely to suffer adverse drug events from suboptimal prescribing. Previous studies have not had national samples nor have they examined multiple types of suboptimal prescribing by dementia severity. Objective To examine the prevalence of, and factors associated with, potentially suboptimal prescribing in older Veteran nursing home patients with dementia. Methods This is a retrospective descriptive study of 1303 Veterans 65 years or older admitted between 1/1/046/3/05 with dementia for long stays (90+ days) to 133 Veterans Affairs Community Living Centers. Dementia severity was determined by Cognitive Performance Scale and functional status dependencies. Results Overall,70.2% with mild-moderate dementia (n = 1076) had underuse as they did not receive an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI), and 27.2% had evidence of inappropriate use due to a drug-disease or drug-drug-disease interaction. Of the 227 with severe dementia, 36.1% had overuse by receiving an AChEI, lipid-lowering or other agents, and 25.1% had evidence of inappropriate use due to a drug-disease or drug-drug interaction. Multinomial logistic regression analyses among those with mild to moderate dementia identified that living in the South versus other regions was the single factor associated with all three types of suboptimal prescribing. In those with severe dementia, antipsychotic use was associated with all three suboptimal prescribing types. Conclusions Potentially suboptimal prescribing was common in older Veteran nursing home patients with dementia. Clinicians should develop a heightened awareness of these problems. Future studies should examine associations between potentially suboptimal prescribing and health outcomes in patients with dementia. PMID:25380592

  20. Biomarkers for antipsychotic therapies.

    PubMed

    Pich, Emilio Merlo; Vargas, Gabriel; Domenici, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Molecular biomarkers for antipsychotic treatments have been conceptually linked to the measurements of dopamine functions, mostly D(2) receptor occupancy, either by imaging using selective PET/SPECT radioactive tracers or by assessing plasma prolactin levels. A quest for novel biomarkers was recently proposed by various academic, health service, and industrial institutions driven by the need for better treatments of psychoses. In this review we conceptualize biomarkers within the Translational Medicine paradigm whose goal was to provide support to critical decision-making in drug discovery. At first we focused on biomarkers as outcome measure of clinical studies by searching into the database clinicaltrial.gov. The results were somewhat disappointing, showing that out of 1,659 antipsychotic trials only 18 used a biomarker as an outcome measure. Several of these trials targeted plasma lipids as sentinel marker for metabolic adverse effects associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, while only few studies were aimed to new disease specific biological markers. As an example of a mechanistic biomarker, we described the work done to progress the novel class of glycine transporter inhibitors as putative treatment for negative symptoms of schizophrenia. We also review how large-scale multiplex biological assays were applied to samples from tissues of psychiatric patients, so to learn from changes of numerous analytes (metabolic products, lipids, proteins, RNA transcripts) about the substrates involved in the disease. We concluded that a stringent implementation of these techniques could contribute to the endophenotypic characterization of patients, helping in the identification of key biomarkers to drive personalized medicine and new treatment development. PMID:23129338

  1. Patterns of antipsychotic prescription to patients with schizophrenia in Korea: results from the health insurance review & assessment service-national patient sample.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Myung-Soo; Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to analyze the patterns of antipsychotic prescription to patients with schizophrenia in Korea. Using the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service-National Patients Sample (HIRA-NPS), which was a stratified sampling from the entire population under the Korean national health security system (2009), descriptive statistics for the patterns of the monopharmacy and polypharmacy, neuropsychiatric co-medications, and prescribed individual antipsychotic for patients with schizophrenia were performed. Comparisons of socioeconomic and clinical factors were performed among patients prescribed only with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. Of 126,961 patients with schizophrenia (age 18-80 yr), 13,369 were prescribed with antipsychotic monopharmacy and the rest 113,592 with polypharmacy. Two or more antipsychotics were prescribed to 31.34% of the patients. Antiparkinson medications (66.60%), anxiolytics (65.42%), mood stabilizers (36.74%), and antidepressants (25.90%) were co-medicated. Patients who were prescribed only with first-generation antipsychotics (n=26,254) were characterized by significantly older age, greater proportion of male, higher proportion of medicaid, higher total medical cost, lower self-payment cost, and higher co-medication rates of antiparkinson agents and anxiolytics than those who were prescribed only with second-generation antipsychotics (n=67,361). In this study, it has been reported substantial prescription rates of first-generation antipsychotics and antipsychotic polypharmacy and relatively small prescription rate of clozapine to patients with schizophrenia. Since this study has firstly presented the patterns of antipsychotic prescription to schizophrenic patients in Korean national population, the findings of this study can be compared with those of later investigations about this theme. PMID:24851031

  2. A systematic review of the efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotics in patients with psychological and behavioral symptoms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Carson, Susan; McDonagh, Marian S; Peterson, Kim

    2006-02-01

    Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved atypical antipsychotics for use in patients with dementia, they are commonly prescribed in this population. Recent concerns about increased risk of cerebrovascular events and mortality have led to warnings. A systematic review was conducted to assess the benefits and harms of atypical antipsychotics when used in patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Electronic searches (through March 2005) of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, and PsycINFO were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists, dossiers submitted by pharmaceutical companies, and a review of the FDA Website and industry-sponsored results database. Using predetermined criteria, each study was assessed for inclusion, and data about study design, population, interventions, and outcomes were abstracted. An overall quality rating (good, fair, or poor) was assigned based on internal validity. The evidence for olanzapine and risperidone supports their effectiveness compared with placebo. Short-term adverse events were similar to placebo. Risperidone had no advantage over haloperidol on efficacy measures in the better-quality studies. Risperidone had an advantage over haloperidol on some measures of extrapyramidal symptoms. Evidence for the other atypical antipsychotics is too limited to assess efficacy and safety. Trials were short term and conducted in highly selected populations. The potential for increased risk of cerebrovascular adverse events and mortality is a serious concern. To make judgments about when the benefits of atypical antipsychotics outweigh the potential harms, clinicians need more information. Additional data from existing trials and more-complete reporting of trial results could provide this information. PMID:16460391

  3. Prevalence of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Antidepressants and Antipsychotics in Stockholm, Sweden: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindh, Jonatan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is considered an underused tool in psychiatric care, the prevalence of TDM is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of TDM for antidepressants and antipsychotics during 20062013. Methods: The study population consisted of individuals ?5 years of age residing in Stockholm County. The prevalence of TDM for each study year was calculated with the number of individuals in whom TDM had been performed as nominator (extracted from the TDM database at Karolinska University Laboratory) and the number of treated individuals as denominator (extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register). All data were obtained at the third and the fifth level of the anatomical therapeutic chemical classification system (pharmacological subgroup and chemical substance, respectively). The prevalence of TDM was compared between substances according to the level of TDM recommendation by guidelines. Results: For antidepressants, the prevalence of TDM decreased from 0.48% (95% confidence interval, 0.45%0.52%) in 2006 to 0.36% (0.33%0.39%) in 2013 (among 133,275 and 162,998 treated individuals, respectively). For antipsychotics, the prevalence of TDM increased from 2.3% (2.2%2.5%) to 4.1% (3.9%4.3%) (31,463 and 32,534 treated individuals). For both drug groups, TDM was more common in men than in women. The most frequently analyzed drugs were clozapine, perphenazine, zuclopenthixol, nortriptyline, and flupentixol. Although not reaching statistical significance, the TDM prevalence was greater for substances strongly recommended for TDM than for substances with a lower level of recommendation, median (interquartile range): 5.6% (2.8%22%) versus 1.1% (0.2%2.2%), P = 0.063. Conclusions: The prevalence of TDM is generally low, more frequent, and increasing for antipsychotics, and more frequent for men and substances where TDM is strongly recommended. PMID:25533882

  4. Prevalence and severity of antipsychotic related constipation in patients with schizophrenia: a retrospective descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic are the cornerstone in the treatment of schizophrenia. They also have a number of side-effects. Constipation is thought to be common, and a potential serious side-effect, which has received little attention in recent literature. Method We performed a retrospective study in consecutively admitted patients, between 2007 and 2009 and treated with antipsychotic medication, linking different electronic patient data to evaluate the prevalence and severity of constipation in patients with schizophrenia under routine treatment conditions. Results Over a period of 22 months 36.3% of patients (99) received at least once a pharmacological treatment for constipation. On average medication for constipation was prescribed for 273 days. Severe cases (N = 50), non-responsive to initial treatment, got a plain x-ray of the abdomen. In 68.4% fecal impaction was found. Conclusion A high prevalence of constipation, often severe and needing medical interventions, was confirmed during the study period. Early detection, monitoring over treatment and early intervention of constipation could prevent serious consequences such as ileus. PMID:21385443

  5. Representation of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Randomised Controlled Trials on Antipsychotic Treatment for Behavioural Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheifes, A.; Stolker, J. J.; Egberts, A. C. G.; Nijman, H. L. I.; Heerdink, E. R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Behavioural problems are common in people with intellectual disability (ID) and are often treated with antipsychotics. Aim: To establish the frequency and characteristics of people with ID included in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on antipsychotic treatment for behavioural problems, and to investigate the quality of these RCTs.

  6. Safety and Tolerability of Antipsychotic Polypharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Juan A.; Nielsen, Jimmi; De Hert, Marc; Kane, John M.; Correll, Christoph U.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP), the concomitant use of ?2antipsychotics, is common in clinical practice. Prior reviews have focused on the efficacy of APP, but no systematic review exists regarding the safety and tolerability of this practice. Areas covered in this review We conducted a systematic review of adverse effects associated with APP. Case series with ?2 patients, chart reviews, naturalistic, data base, cohort and randomized studies that reported on the association between APP in general or specific APP combinations and global or specific adverse effect were included. We discuss methodological limitations of available studies and provide recommendations for clinicians and future research. Expert Opinion Across mostly small and uncontrolled studies, APP has been associated with increased global side effect burden, rates of Parkinsonian side effects, anticholinergic use, hyperprolactinemia, sexual dysfunction, hypersalivation, sedation/somnolence, cognitive impairment, and diabetes. Effects on akathisia and mortality were inconclusive. Although some combinations, particularly aripiprazole augmentation of an agent with greater side effect burden, may reduce weight gain, dyslipidemia, hyperprolactinemia and sexual dysfunction, APP should remain a last resort treatment option after monotherapy, switching and non-antipsychotic combinations have failed. More and high quality data are needed to further inform the individualized risk-benefit evaluation of APP. PMID:22563628

  7. Long-acting Injectable Antipsychotics in First-episode Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun-Ghang

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic medications are important for the successful management of schizophrenia. Continuous treatment with medication is superior in relapse prevention and non-adherence to antipsychotic medication is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIs) that can guarantee adherence to a treatment regimen could be a useful treatment option. With the introduction of second-generation atypical antipsychotics-long acting injection (SGA-LAI), the risks for extrapyramidal adverse events are decreased. The indications for SGA-LAI have been extended from chronic, stabilized patients to acute psychotic patients. Some studies investigated the use of LAI in first-episode schizophrenia patients and raised the possibility of prescribing LAI as a treatment option. However, there is still limited research using LAI in first-episode schizophrenia. More well-designed, randomized, controlled clinical trials using SGA-LAIs in first episode schizophrenia are needed. Additionally, studies on side effects of SGA-LAI in long-term use are required prior to recommending LAI for patients with first episode schizophrenia. PMID:23678347

  8. Antipsychotic medication for early episode schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bola, John; Kao, Dennis; Soydan, Haluk; Adams, Clive E

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term treatment with antipsychotic medications in early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders is common, but both short and long-term effects on the illness are unclear. There have been numerous suggestions that people with early episodes of schizophrenia appear to respond differently than those with multiple prior episodes. The number of episodes may moderate response to drug treatment. Objectives To assess the effects of antipsychotic medication treatment on people with early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group register (July 2007) as well as references of included studies. We contacted authors of studies for further data. Selection criteria Studies with a majority of first and second episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders comparing initial antipsychotic medication treatment with placebo, milieu, or psychosocial treatment. Data collection and analysis Working independently, we critically appraised records from 681 studies, of which five studies met inclusion criteria. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) where possible. For continuous data, we calculated mean difference (MD). We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results Five studies (combined total n=998) met inclusion criteria. Four studies (n=724) provided leaving the study early data and results suggested that individuals treated with a typical antipsychotic medication are less likely to leave the study early than those treated with placebo (Chlorpromazine: 3 RCTs n=353, RR 0.4 CI 0.3 to 0.5, NNT 3.2, Fluphenaxine: 1 RCT n=240, RR 0.5 CI 0.3 to 0.8, NNT 5; Thioridazine: 1 RCT n=236, RR 0.44 CI 0.3 to 0.7, NNT 4.3, Trifulperazine: 1 RCT n=94, RR 0.96 CI 0.3 to 3.6). Two studies contributed data to assessment of adverse effects and present a general pattern of more frequent side effects among individuals treated with typical antipsychotic medications compared to placebo. One trial suggested a higher rehospitalisation rate for those receiving chlorpromazine compared to placebo (n=80, RR 2.29 CI 1.3 to 4.0, NNH 2.9). However, a higher attrition in the placebo group is likely to have introduced a survivor bias into this comparison, as this difference becomes non-significant in a sensitivity analysis on intent-to-treat participants (n=127, RR 1.69 CI 0.9 to 3.0). One study contributes data to a comparison of trifluoperazine to psychotherapy on long-term health in favour of the trifluoperazine group (n=92, MD 5.8 CI 1.6 to 0.0); however, data from this study are also likely to contain biases due to selection and attrition. One other study contributes data to a comparison of typical antipsychotic medication to psychosocial treatment on six-week outcome measures of global psychopathology (n=89, MD 0.01 CI ?0.6 to 0.6) and global improvement (n=89, MD ?0.03 CI ?0.5 to 0.4), indicating no between-group differences. On the whole, there is very little useable data in the few studies meeting inclusion criteria. Authors conclusions With only a few studies meeting inclusion criteria, and with limited useable data in these studies, it is not possible to arrive at definitive conclusions. The preliminary pattern of evidence suggests that people with early episode schizophrenia treated with typical antipsychotic medications are less likely to leave the study early, but more likely to experience medication-related side effects. Data are too sparse to assess the effects of antipsychotic medication on outcomes in early episode schizophrenia. PMID:21678355

  9. Fracture Risk among Nursing Home Residents Initiating Antipsychotic Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rigler, Sally K.; Shireman, Theresa I.; Cook-Wiens, Galen J.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Whittle, Jeffrey C.; Mehr, David R.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives to determine whether antipsychotic medication initiation is associated with subsequent fracture in nursing home residents, whether fracture rates differ between first-generation versus second-generation antipsychotic use, and whether fracture rates differ among users of haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. Design time-to-event analyses were conducted in a retrospective cohort using linked Medicaid, Medicare, Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification and Reporting data sets. Setting and Participants nursing home residents aged ? 65 years in CA, FL, MO, NJ and PA. Measurements fracture outcomes (any fracture; hip fracture) in first-versus second-generation antipsychotic users, and specifically among users of haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine. Comparisons incorporated propensity scores that included patient-level variables (demographics, comorbidity, diagnoses, weight, fall history, concomitant medications, cognitive performance, physical function, aggressivebehavior) and facility-level variables (nursing home size, ownership factors, staffing levels). Results Among 8,262 subjects (within 4,131 pairs), 4.3% suffered any fracture during observation with 1% having a hip fracture during an average follow up period of 93 71 days; range 1 to 293 days). Antipsychotic initiation was associated with any fracture (hazard ratio (HR) 1.39, p=0.004) and with hip fracture (HR 1.76, p=0.024). The highest risk was found for hip fracture when antipsychotic use was adjusted for dose(HR=2.96; p=0.008). However, no differences in time-to-fracture were found in first-versus second-generation agents or across competing individual drugs. Conclusion Antipsychotic initiation is associated with fracture in nursing home residents, but risk does not differ across commonly used antipsychotics. PMID:23590366

  10. Pharmacological management of acute mania: does current prescribing practice reflect treatment guidelines?

    PubMed

    Streeruwitz, A; Barnes, T R E; Fehler, J; Ohlsen, R; Curtis, V A

    2007-03-01

    The records of 70 inpatients with an acute manic episode were audited, to examine the relationship between current prescribing practice, the recommendations of recent clinical guidance and short-term clinical outcomes. Overall, 38 combinations of medication were prescribed. Within the first 24 hours of treatment, monotherapy with a second generation antipsychotic was favoured. At discharge, combination treatment (a mood stabilizer and a second generation antipsychotic) predominated. Early initiation of medication was significantly associated with an earlier clinical decision to discharge. Prescribing was generally in accord with published guidelines. The findings reinforce the value of prescribing surveys in mental health and the need to share understanding of the constraints that may lead to deviation from prescribing guidelines. PMID:17329301

  11. Indirect (repeat) prescribing

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The term 'repeat prescribing' is inaccurate in modern general practice. New definitions with guidelines for practice systems are given together with some comments on quantities of drugs to be prescribed on each occasion. PMID:19790808

  12. Pharmacogenetics of Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Eva J; Kennedy, James L; Mller, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: During the past decades, increasing efforts have been invested in studies to unravel the influence of genetic factors on antipsychotic (AP) dosage, treatment response, and occurrence of adverse effects. These studies aimed to improve clinical care by predicting outcome of treatment with APs and thus allowing for individualized treatment strategies. We highlight most important findings obtained through both candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors. Methods: We reviewed studies on pharmacogenetics of AP response and adverse effects published on PubMed until early 2012. Owing to the high number of published studies, we focused our review on findings that have been replicated in independent studies or are supported by meta-analyses. Results: Most robust findings were reported for associations between polymorphisms of the cytochrome P450 system, the dopamine and the serotonin transmitter systems, and dosage, treatment response, and adverse effects, such as AP-induced weight gain or tardive dyskinesia. These associations were either detected for specific medications or for classes of APs. Conclusion: First promising and robust results show that pharmacogenetics bear promise for a widespread use in future clinical practice. This will likely be achieved by developing algorithms that will include many genetic variants. However, further investigation is warranted to replicate and validate previous findings, as well as to identify new genetic variants involved in AP response and for replication of existing findings. PMID:24881126

  13. High and very high dosage antipsychotics: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Aubree, J C; Lader, M H

    1980-10-01

    Since antipsychotic drugs were introduced over 25 years ago, controversy has continued concerning the relative effectivness of standard and high dosage. Uncontrolled studies suggested that some psychotic patients responded to high but not to low drug dosage. Extrapyramidal effects seemed the same as with standard dosage. Our review of 14 controlled trials suggests some superiority of the high dosage over standard antipsychotic drug dosage but that extrapyramidal effects are more common. It is concluded that a minority of pychotic patients may benefit from high doses of neuroleptic medication, pharmacokinetic factors possibly being important. PMID:6107290

  14. Atypical antipsychotics: pharmacokinetics, therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacological interactions.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Maria Augusta; Mandrioli, Roberto; Sabbioni, Cesare; Pucci, Vincenzo

    2004-02-01

    The development of new "atypical" antipsychotic agents, which are safer than classical neuroleptics and also active against the negative symptoms and neurocognitive deficits caused by the illness, has produced a significant advancement in the treatment of schizophrenia. The atypical (or "second generation") antipsychotics have several therapeutical properties in common, however they can significantly differ with regard to clinical potency and side effects. The main features regarding pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacological interactions of the most important atypical antipsychotics, namely clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone, are treated herein. Several analytical methods available for the therapeutic drug monitoring of these drugs are also presented, as well as the novel formulations, which can notably improve the therapy of schizophrenia. Other very recent atypical agents, such as ziprasidone, aripiprazole, iloperidone, sertindole and zotepine will also be briefly described. PMID:14965232

  15. Repurposing antipsychotics as glioblastoma therapeutics: Potentials and challenges

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JIN-KU; NAM, DO-HYUN; LEE, JEONGWU

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most lethal primary brain tumor, with tragically little therapeutic progress over the last 30 years. Surgery provides a modest benefit, and GBM cells are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. Despite significant development of the molecularly targeting strategies, the clinical outcome of GBM patients remains dismal. The challenges inherent in developing effective GBM treatments have become increasingly clear, and include resistance to standard treatments, the blood-brain barrier, resistance of GBM stem-like cells, and the genetic complexity and molecular adaptability of GBM. Recent studies have collectively suggested that certain antipsychotics harbor antitumor effects and have potential utilities as anti-GBM therapeutics. In the present review, the anti-tumorigenic effects and putative mechanisms of antipsychotics, and the challenges for the potential use of antipsychotic drugs as anti-GBM therapeutics are reviewed. PMID:26893731

  16. Clozapine: a novel antipsychotic agent.

    PubMed

    Bablenis, E; Weber, S S; Wagner, R L

    1989-02-01

    Clozapine is an antipsychotic without the extra-pyramidal adverse effects associated with currently marketed antipsychotics. In animals, this drug has not been shown to induce catalepsy and only weakly antagonizes the stereotypic movements induced by apomorphine and the amphetamines. Clozapine is rapidly absorbed after both single and repeated oral doses, with steady-state concentrations attained within eight to ten days after beginning therapy. It is metabolized to N-oxideclozapine and N-desmethylclozapine, which have less pharmacological activity than the parent compound and are excreted in the urine and, to a lesser extent, in the feces. Clozapine has overall therapeutic efficacy and/or superiority to currently marketed antipsychotics in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia. Usual doses (25-900 mg/d) of clozapine cause fewer extrapyramidal adverse reactions than available antipsychotics. Hypotension, dizziness, salivation, and sedation are the most frequently reported adverse effects and tend to subside over time. Agranulocytosis is the most serious adverse reaction, and those receiving clozapine should undergo weekly white blood cell count determinations. Clozapine is useful for those treatment-resistant patients who have not responded to adequate trials of other antipsychotics. PMID:2658370

  17. Novel antipsychotics: issues and controversies. Typicality of atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed Central

    Stip, E

    2000-01-01

    The typicality of atypical antipsychotic drugs remains debatable. Preclinical studies and findings from randomized, controlled and open trials of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone and a substituted benzamide were examined. A MEDLINE search was conducted using key words, including "extrapyramidal side effects," "cognition," "schizophrenia" and the generic drug names. Over 140 articles from peer-reviewed journals were reviewed, some of which were based on a meta-analysis. New-generation neuroleptic agents were found to have greater efficacy on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia and to cause fewer unwanted extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) than the traditional antipsychotic drugs. On one hand, atypical neuroleptic agents could be strictly defined as any neuroleptic agent with antipsychotic effects at a dosage that does not cause extrapyramidal side effects. Thus, clozapine is regarded as the "standard" atypical antipsychotic drug. On the other hand, typicality is about dimension rather than category, and we suggest the use of the term "spectrum of atypicality." For example, an emphasis is placed on quetiapine to illustrate where a new compound fits in this spectrum. Although dose-related, atypicality may be more a question of prescription attitude than of a specific characteristic of a compound. The degree to which a new compound is clinically superior to another atypical antipsychotic drug, in terms of improving positive, negative or affective symptoms, cognitive function and long-term outcome, will require further a priori hypotheses based on conceptual frameworks that are clinically meaningful. In addition, the results from industry-sponsored trials should be more comparable to those obtained from investigator-leading trials. Finally, the patient characteristics that define a patient's response to a specific antipsychotic drug are unknown. PMID:10740987

  18. Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical…

  19. Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical

  20. Antipsychotic drug use in pregnancy: high dimensional, propensity matched, population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Tara; Wilton, Andrew S; Taylor, Valerie H; Ray, Joel G

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate maternal medical and perinatal outcomes associated with antipsychotic drug use in pregnancy. Design High dimensional propensity score (HDPS) matched cohort study. Setting Multiple linked population health administrative databases in the entire province of Ontario, Canada. Participants Among women who delivered a singleton infant between 2003 and 2012, and who were eligible for provincially funded drug coverage, those with ?2 consecutive prescriptions for an antipsychotic medication during pregnancy, at least one of which was filled in the first or second trimester, were selected. Of these antipsychotic drug users, 1021 were matched 1:1 with 1021 non-users by means of a HDPS algorithm. Main outcome measures The main maternal medical outcomes were gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and venous thromboembolism. The main perinatal outcomes were preterm birth (<37 weeks), and a birth weight <3rd or >97th centile. Conditional Poisson regression analysis was used to generate rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for additionally prescribed non-antipsychotic psychotropic medications. Results Compared with non-users, women prescribed an antipsychotic medication in pregnancy did not seem to be at higher risk of gestational diabetes (rate ratio 1.10 (95% CI 0.77 to 1.57)), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (1.12 (0.70 to 1.78)), or venous thromboembolism (0.95 (0.40 to 2.27)). The preterm birth rate, though high among antipsychotic users (14.5%) and matched non-users (14.3%), was not relatively different (rate ratio 0.99 (0.78 to 1.26)). Neither birth weight <3rd centile or >97th centile was associated with antipsychotic drug use in pregnancy (rate ratios 1.21 (0.81 to 1.82) and 1.26 (0.69 to 2.29) respectively). Conclusions Antipsychotic drug use in pregnancy had minimal evident impact on important maternal medical and short term perinatal outcomes. However, the rate of adverse outcomes is high enough to warrant careful assessment of maternal and fetal wellbeing among women prescribed an antipsychotic drug in pregnancy. PMID:25972273

  1. Atypical Antipsychotic Augmentation for Treatment-Resistant Depression: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinyu; Keitner, Gabor I; Qin, Bin; Ravindran, Arun V; Bauer, Michael; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Zhao, Jingping; Liu, Yiyun; Fang, Yiru; Zhang, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous meta-analyses of atypical antipsychotics for depression were limited by few trials with direct comparisons between two treatments. We performed a network meta-analysis, which integrates direct and indirect evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs), to investigate the comparative efficacy and tolerability of adjunctive atypical antipsychotics for treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Methods: Systematic searches resulted in 18 RCTs (total n = 4422) of seven different types and different dosages of atypical antipsychotics and a placebo that were included in the review. Results: All standard-dose atypical antipsychotics were significantly more efficacious than placebo in the efficacy (standardized mean differences [SMDs] ranged from -0.27 to -0.43). There were no significant differences between these drugs. Low-dose atypical antipsychotics were not significantly more efficacious than the placebo. In terms of tolerability, all standard-dose atypical antipsychotics, apart from risperidone, had significantly more side-effect discontinuations than placebo (odds ratios [ORs] ranged from 2.72 to 6.40). In terms of acceptability, only quetiapine (mean 250350mg daily) had significantly more all-cause discontinuation than placebo (OR = 1.89). In terms of quality of life/functioning, standard-dose risperidone and standard-dose aripiprazole were more beneficial than placebo (SMD = -0.38; SMD = -0.26, respectively), and standard-dose risperidone was superior to quetiapine (mean 250350mg daily). Conclusions: All standard-dose atypical antipsychotics for the adjunctive treatment of TRD are efficacious in reducing depressive symptoms. Risperidone and aripiprazole also showed benefits in improving the quality of life of patients. Atypical antipsychotics should be prescribed with caution due to abundant evidence of side effects. PMID:26012350

  2. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sárvári, Anitta K.; Veréb, Zoltán; Uray, Iván P.; Fésüs, László; Balajthy, Zoltán

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin and adiponectin, suggesting that both glucose and fat metabolism may be affected by these drugs. These data further suggest that antipsychotic treatments in patients alter the gene expression patterns in adipocytes in a coordinated fashion and priming them for a low-level inflammatory state.

  3. All-Cause Mortality Associated With Atypical and Conventional Antipsychotics Among Nursing Home Residents With Dementia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Liperoti, Rosa; Onder, Graziano; Landi, Francesco; Lapane, Kate L.; Mor, Vincent; Bernabei, Roberto; Gambassi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Objective A recent meta-analysis has indicated that, in patients with dementia, the use of atypical antipsychotics is associated with an excess mortality. Later observational studies have suggested that conventional antipsychotics may pose an even greater risk of death. None of these studies could evaluate the risk associated with single antipsychotics nor could they provide any conclusive evidence concerning the risk among nursing home residents. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to compare the risk of death associated with atypical and conventional antipsychotics in a large population of nursing home residents with dementia. Method We identified 6,524 new users of atypical antipsychotics and 3,205 new users of conventional antipsychotics living in 1,581 Medicare- or Medicaid-certified nursing homes in 5 US states during the years 19982000. The outcome measure was all-cause mortality, which was determined during 6-months of follow-up. Results After adjusting for potential confounders relative to users of atypicals, the rate of death was increased for users of conventional antipsychotics (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% CI, 1.131.42). Relative to risperidone, a higher rate of death was documented for haloperidol (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.131.53), phenothiazines (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.001.38) and other conventional medications (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.991.80). No atypical antipsychotic was associated with a differential risk relative to risperidone. Conclusions Conventional antipsychotics are associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality than atypical agents. It seems advisable that they are not used in substitution for atypical antipsychotics among nursing home residents with dementia even when short-term therapy is being prescribed. PMID:19906339

  4. Attitudes towards the administration of long-acting antipsychotics: a survey of physicians and nurses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Discontinuation of antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia can interrupt improvement and exacerbate the illness. Reasons for discontinuing treatment are multifactorial and include adherence, efficacy and tolerability issues. Poor adherence may be addressed through non-pharmacological approaches as well as through pharmacological ones, ie ensured delivery of medication, such as that achieved with long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics. However, attitudes of healthcare professionals (HCPs) towards LAI antipsychotics may influence their prescribing decisions and may influence medication choices offered to patients. We therefore conducted a survey to investigate factors driving LAI use as well as physician and nurse attitudes to LAI antipsychotics and to different injection sites. Methods An independent market research agency conducted the survey of HCPs across Europe. Participants were recruited by telephone and completed the survey online. Using conjoint analyses (a multivariate statistical technique analysing preferences on the basis of ranking a limited number of attributes which are presented repetitively), attitudes to oral versus LAI medication and gluteal versus deltoid injection routes were assessed. Results A total of 891 HCPs across Europe were surveyed. Of these, 40% would choose LAI antipsychotics for first episode patients whereas 90% would select LAI antipsychotics for chronic patients with two to five psychotic episodes. Dominant elements in antipsychotic choice were low sedation but no tardive dyskinesia, no or mild pain at injection and low risk of embarrassment or impact upon therapeutic alliance. Eighty-six per cent of respondents considered that having the choice of a deltoid as well as gluteal administration site was beneficial over not having that choice. Two thirds of respondents said they agreed that medication administration via the deltoid muscle may reduce social embarrassment associated with LAI antipsychotics and most respondents (61%) believed that administration of LAI antipsychotics into the deltoid muscle as opposed to the gluteal muscle may be more respectful to the patient. Conclusions In this survey of physicians and nurses, attitudes towards LAI antipsychotics compared with oral medication were generally positive. Respondents considered that the availability of a deltoid administration route would offer increased choice in LAI antipsychotic administration and may be perceived as more respectful and less socially embarrassing. PMID:23414331

  5. [The prescribing of dressings].

    PubMed

    Faucher, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Dressings must be prescribed as accurately as possible, whether the prescription is written by a nurse or by a doctor. The pharmacist is then able to dispense the exact product prescribed. Knowledge of the different classes of dressings and their indications ensures the adapted management of chronic and acute wounds. PMID:26763569

  6. Beliefs about antipsychotic versus hypoglycemic medications among individuals with serious mental illness and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Aakre, Jennifer M; Medoff, Deborah R; Dixon, Lisa B; Kreyenbuhl, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    Background This study compared the beliefs held by individuals with coexisting serious mental illness and type 2 diabetes regarding the necessity and risks of taking antipsychotic versus hypoglycemic medications. We also investigated whether nonadherent patients differed from adherent patients in their beliefs about medications. Methods Forty-four individuals with type 2 diabetes and serious mental illness who were prescribed hypoglycemic and antipsychotic medications completed a cross-sectional assessment of medication beliefs and adherence for both medication types. Results Patients perceived a greater need for hypoglycemic versus antipsychotic medications; however, their beliefs were not associated with nonadherence to either medication type. Conclusion These results suggest that individuals with coexisting serious mental illness and type 2 diabetes have stronger convictions regarding the necessity of their diabetes medication for maintaining their health. PMID:22654509

  7. Serotonergic basis of antipsychotic drug effects in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, J A; Mailman, R B; Duncan, G; Sikich, L; Chakos, M; Nichols, D E; Kraus, J E

    1998-12-01

    Recent attention has been focused on the involvement of serotonin (5-HT) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and its role in mediating antipsychotic drug effects. There are two reasons for the new emphasis: the tremendous success of the so-called "atypical" antipsychotic drugs (a common feature of which is their high affinity for specific 5-HT receptor subtypes); and the elucidation of a complex family of 5-HT receptors whose function and pharmacology is only beginning to be understood. This paper will review the evidence that pertains to the role of 5-HT in mediating antipsychotic drug effects. The interaction of dopamine and 5-HT systems will be reviewed, and the mechanisms of action of atypical antipsychotic drugs will be evaluated in this context. The impact of serotonin on neurodevelopment, and the involvement of serotonin in the psychotomimetic and psychotogenic properties of hallucinogens, will be discussed. Together, these facts will be placed into the context of changes in serotonergic function in schizophrenia. PMID:9836014

  8. Adverse Effects of Common Drugs: Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Felix, Todd Matthew; Lewis, Peter R

    2015-09-01

    Drug use and harms are increasingly common among newborns, infants, children, and adolescents during ambulatory practice, emergency department, and in-hospital treatment, including treatment in pediatric intensive care units. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of drugs often are different for children compared with adults and must be considered before prescribing. Drug exposure and the potential for harms also should be considered for fetuses and breastfeeding infants. As with adult patients, a thorough drug and allergy history (including nonprescription drugs and herbal and dietary supplements) should be obtained and reviewed at each medical visit. Children and adolescents are increasingly at risk of drug harm/overdose through accidental or intentional ingestion of nonprescription and prescription drugs (eg, cough and cold preparations, candy-appearing vitamins, stimulants, narcotics). Parents and caregivers should receive training in the proper use, storage, and administration of all drugs. Prescribing clinicians should be vigilant in withholding unnecessary drugs, such as antibiotics for viral infections. When prescribing, clinicians should be aware of common drugs frequently associated with adverse reactions, including stimulants, antipsychotics, analgesics, asthma therapies, acne therapies, and tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. Scientifically based prescribing practices should be used and consultation with evidence-based resources and pharmacists sought as needed. PMID:26375994

  9. Antipsychotic therapeutic drug monitoring: psychiatrists’ attitudes and factors predicting likely future use

    PubMed Central

    Law, Suzanne; Haddad, Peter M.; Chaudhry, Imran B.; Husain, Nusrat; Drake, Richard J.; Flanagan, Robert J.; David, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore predictive factors for future use of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) and to further examine psychiatrists’ current prescribing practices and perspectives regarding antipsychotic TDM using plasma concentrations. Method: A cross-sectional study for consultant psychiatrists using a postal questionnaire was conducted in north-west England. Data were combined with those of a previous London-based study and principal axis factor analysis was conducted to identify predictors of future use of TDM. Results: Most of the 181 participants (82.9%, 95% confidence interval 76.7–87.7%) agreed that ‘if TDM for antipsychotics were readily available, I would use it’. Factor analysis identified five factors from the original 35 items regarding TDM. Four of the factors significantly predicted likely future use of antipsychotic TDM and together explained 40% of the variance in a multivariate linear regression model. Likely future use increased with positive attitudes and expectations, and decreased with potential barriers, negative attitudes and negative expectations. Scientific perspectives of TDM and psychiatrist characteristics were not significant predictors. Conclusion: Most senior psychiatrists indicated that they would use antipsychotic TDM if available. However, psychiatrists’ attitudes and expectations and the potential barriers need to be addressed, in addition to the scientific evidence, before widespread use of antipsychotic TDM is likely in clinical practice. PMID:26301077

  10. Temporal and Spatial Transcriptional Fingerprints by Antipsychotic or Propsychotic Drugs in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Kensuke; Komatsu, Hidetoshi; Maruyama, Minoru; Imaichi, Sachiko; Habata, Yugo; Mori, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Various types of antipsychotics have been developed for the treatment of schizophrenia since the accidental discovery of the antipsychotic activity of chlorpromazine. Although all clinically effective antipsychotic agents have common properties to interact with the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) activation, their precise mechanisms of action remain elusive. Antipsychotics are well known to induce transcriptional changes of immediate early genes (IEGs), raising the possibility that gene expressions play an essential role to improve psychiatric symptoms. Here, we report that while different classes of antipsychotics have complex pharmacological profiles against D2R, they share common transcriptome fingerprint (TFP) profile of IEGs in the murine brain in vivo by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our data showed that various types of antipsychotics with a profound interaction of D2R including haloperidol (antagonist), olanzapine (antagonist), and aripiprazole (partial agonist) all share common spatial TFPs closely homologous to those of D2R antagonist sulpiride, and elicited greater transcriptional responses in the striatum than in the nucleus accumbens. Meanwhile, D2R agonist quinpirole and propsychotic NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP) exhibited the contrasting TFP profiles. Clozapine and propsychotic drug methamphetamine (MAP) displayed peculiar TFPs that reflect their unique pharmacological property. Our results suggest that transcriptional responses are conserved across various types of antipsychotics clinically effective in positive symptoms of schizophrenia and also show that temporal and spatial TFPs may reflect the pharmacological features of the drugs. Thus, we propose that a TFP approach is beneficial to evaluate novel drug candidates for antipsychotic development. PMID:25693194

  11. Use Pattern and Off-Label Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Bipolar Disorder, 1998–2002

    PubMed Central

    Demland, Jeffery A.; Jing, Yonghua; Kelton, Christina M. L.; Guo, Jeff J.; Li, Hong; Wigle, Patricia R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Postmarketing surveillance that identifies patients at high risk for receiving off-label medications will help ensure that the benefits of such treatment outweigh the risks. Because many off-label uses have little scientific support, tracking the extent to which they occur as well as the particular circumstances under which they occur is important. Objective To describe the drug-use pattern for patients with bipolar disorder, and to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with off-label use of atypical antipsychotics before US Food and Drug Administration approval for this indication. Methods Using the PHARMetrics medical claims database, a total of 105,771 adult patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder were evaluated during the 5-year (1998–2002) study period. Study drugs included mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Off-label use of an atypical antipsychotic was defined as a patient taking olanzapine before March 2000 (when it received an indication for bipolar disorder) or any other atypical antipsychotic during the entire study period. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the odds ratio of receiving a drug off-label. Results Utilization of and reimbursement for atypical antipsychotics increased during the 5-year period. Of the 10.5% of patients who took atypical antipsychotics, 7.1% took these drugs off-label. In addition, 11% of patients received lithium, 25% received other anticonvulsants, and 34% received antidepressants. Off-label use of atypical antipsychotics was associated with psychiatry specialist prescribers (odds ratio = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.44–1.59) and certain comorbidities, such as substance abuse (odds ratio = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.38–1.66), anxiety disorder (odds ratio = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.14–1.26), diabetes mellitus (odds ratio = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16–1.37), cerebral vascular disease (odds ratio = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.10–1.45), and hypertension (odds ratio = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05–1.20). Over time, there has been an increase in the number of drug therapies, including atypical antipsychotics, used to treat bipolar disorder. Conclusion Because of the significant association found between atypical antipsychotic use and several key comorbidities, it is important for physicians to recognize these associations and weigh the risks and benefits of atypical antipsychotics in their treatment strategies. PMID:25126291

  12. Antipsychotic poisoning in young children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; Balit, Corrine R; Kilham, Henry A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this review was to determine the spectrum and severity of effects of unintentional antipsychotic poisoning in children. A computerised literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to February 2005) and EMBASE (1980 to February 2005) was undertaken. The Internet was searched using URL: www.google.com. The proceedings of the North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology (NACCT) and the European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists (EAPCCT) were hand searched. All cases of unintentional antipsychotic (all classes) poisoning in children aged 0-6 years were included. The data extracted included the age, weight, antipsychotic, dose, clinical effects, treatment and outcomes. The toxic dose was estimated as the lowest dose causing objective adverse effects.Sixty-eight reports were identified. Few contained all of the required information. Most of the case series included multiple antipsychotics with limited information on individual drugs or all ages with limited paediatric information. For most antipsychotics the ingestion of one tablet caused symptoms that were sometimes severe and usually lasted from 1 to 3 days. Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) were often delayed for up to 12-24 hours. Chlorpromazine caused CNS depression, hypotension and miosis; EPS and cardiac effects were rare, and the toxic dose was estimated to be 15 mg/kg. Haloperidol caused drowsiness (rarely coma) and over one-half of patients had neuromuscular effects (mainly EPS), with a toxic dose estimated at 0.15 mg/kg. Thioridazine caused CNS depression and potentially cardiac effects, with a toxic dose of 1.4 mg/kg. Atypical antipsychotics caused significant CNS depression (except risperidone); EPS were less common. Toxic doses were clozapine 2.5 mg/kg, olanzapine 0.5 mg/kg and aripiprazole 3 mg/kg. EPS responded to anticholinergic drug treatment. In summary, unintentional antipsychotic ingestion in children can cause severe effects that last 1-3 days, often with one tablet. Children potentially ingesting a toxic dose or who are symptomatic should be considered for assessment in hospital. Most cases resolve with good supportive care. Toxic doses are only estimates that are based on limited data and should be used with caution until prospective studies are undertaken. PMID:16231955

  13. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs. PMID:26511432

  14. A Review Exploring the Relationship Between Nursing Home Staffing and Antipsychotic Medication Use.

    PubMed

    Mattingly, T Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Staffing level requirements for nursing homes exist at state and federal levels in the United States. While quality of care measures may include antipsychotic (AP) prescribing, the appropriate use of APs as chemical restraints in nursing homes continues to be debated. Although the two variables appear to be related, improved research methods and availability of accurate staffing data will be needed to understand causal relationships regarding AP use for facility dwelling patients. PMID:26662363

  15. Recommendations for switching antipsychotics. A position statement of the Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Miquel; Vieta, Eduard; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Alamo, Cecilio; Bobes, Julio

    2011-07-01

    Switching antipsychotics is common in the clinical practice setting and is associated with potential clinically relevant complications. An expert group selected by Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry has reviewed the evidence provided by randomized clinical trials and other relevant information to reach consensus recommendations for switching antipsychotics. In this article, we will review all the information that has led to those recommendations and which includes: indications and contraindications for switching antipsychotics, pharmacological issues, switching strategies, switching antipsychotics due to efficacy problems, switching antispychotics due to tolerability issues (including extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia, weight gain, metabolic disorders, hyperprolactinemia, sexual dysfunction, persistent sedation, and QT prolongation), switching antypsychotics due to lack of treatment compliance, and switching antipsychotics in patients with bipolar disorders. PMID:23446195

  16. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David Cm; Kirkpatrick, Carl Mj

    2015-06-01

    The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  17. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David CM; Kirkpatrick, Carl MJ

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  18. A Prospective Cohort Study of Antipsychotic Medications in Pregnancy: The First 147 Pregnancies and 100 One Year Old Babies

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Jayashri; Worsley, Roisin; Gilbert, Heather; Gavrilidis, Emorfia; Van Rheenen, Tamsyn E.; Wang, Wei; McCauley, Kay; Fitzgerald, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Many women diagnosed with varying psychiatric disorders take antipsychotic medications during pregnancy. The safety of antipsychotic medications in pregnancy is largely unknown. Methods We established the National Register of Antipsychotic Medications in Pregnancy in 2005. Women who are pregnant and taking an antipsychotic medication are interviewed every 6 weeks during pregnancy and then followed until their babies are one year old. The baby's progress is closely followed for the first year of life. Findings As of April 18 2012, 147 pregnancies had been followed through to completion. There were 142 live births and data is available for 100 one year old babies. 18% of babies were born preterm, with a higher dose of antipsychotic medication correlating to an increased likelihood of premature delivery; 43% of babies required special care nursery or intensive care after birth; 37% had any degree of respiratory distress and 15% of babies developed withdrawal symptoms. Congenital anomalies were seen in eight babies. Most pregnancies resulted in the birth of live, healthy babies. The use of mood stabilisers or higher doses of antipsychotics during pregnancy increased the likelihood of babies experiencing respiratory distress or admission to Special Care Nursery or Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Conclusion There is a great need for safety and efficacy information about the use of antipsychotic medications in pregnancy. Live, healthy babies are the most common outcome following the use of antipsychotic medication in pregnancy, but clinicians should be particularly mindful of neonatal problems such as respiratory distress. PMID:24787688

  19. Evaluation of Monitoring for Metabolic Effects in Children Treated With Second Generation Antipsychotics in a Pediatric Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Honey, Brooke L.; Ramos, Lourdes; Brahm, Nancy C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this retrospective study was to identify the frequency of recommended metabolic monitoring and follow-up in pediatric patients on second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) medications from a pediatric clinic. METHODS A retrospective review of electronic medical records of all patients on antipsychotics from an academic medical center pediatric clinic was conducted. Inclusion criteria required patients to be established members of the pediatric clinic, < 19 years of age, and on ? 1 SGA for at least 1 year, regardless of medical diagnosis. Data collection consisted of patient demographic information and frequency of family history, vital signs, and recommended laboratory monitoring. RESULTS A total of 67 patients on antipsychotics were identified. After the application of inclusion criteria, 32 patients qualified for review. The average age was 13.5 4 years and gender distribution included 72% males. Only 4 (13%) patients had documented baseline monitoring that included weight, blood pressure, and fasting lipid panel. No patient had a fasting plasma glucose recorded at any point during antipsychotic therapy. Follow-up monitoring decreased over time, with the exception of quarterly weight and annual blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study highlight the lack of baseline and periodic monitoring that occur when pediatric patients are prescribed antipsychotic medications, putting the patient at risk for adverse events. The marked increase in antipsychotic prescribing and concerns related to their safety emphasize the need for improvement in monitoring of antipsychotic medications. This gap in patient care and safety opens an excellent opportunity for a clinical pharmacy team to provide education and assistance with SGA monitoring for the purpose of providing optimal patient care. PMID:24719589

  20. A cross-sectional observational study of healthcare professional views of factors affecting teenage adherence with antipsychotic medication.

    PubMed

    Ramdour, S; Duxbury, J A; Becket, G; Wilson, S

    2015-09-01

    Delays in effective treatment of a first episode psychosis can result in more severe symptoms, a longer time to achieve symptom control and a poorer quality of life; yet around 40% do not take antipsychotic medication as prescribed. There is evidence that patients and staff have different perceptions of what affects adherence with medication. Research in adults suggests healthcare professionals and patients understand the importance of good insight in promoting adherence with medication for schizophrenia; however, healthcare staff may overestimate the impact of side effects and underestimate the importance of medication effectiveness. There is also some evidence to suggest that motivations to take prescribed medication may differ in first and multi-episode psychosis. This research therefore sought views of staff working with adolescents diagnosed with first episode psychosis about what factors affected adherence with antipsychotic medication. Staff responding to the survey felt that young people were more likely to take medication if they felt it would make them better, prevent relapse and if they had a positive rapport with staff. As in an adult population, side effects, particularly weight gain, sedation and muscular side effects, were expressed as a common reason for poor adherence. Doctors and nurses assigned differing importance to parameters such as family views of medication, fear of admission and a preference for cannabis over medication suggesting that views may differ between professional groups Views of young people will be obtained in the next phase of the research study to enable comparison with staff views and consideration of staff interventions to better promote medication adherence. Antipsychotic medication is an effective treatment for first episode psychosis; yet 40% of patients do not take medication as prescribed. Previous research in adults with schizophrenia comparing healthcare professional and patient views suggests that while healthcare professionals recognize the importance of insight in promoting medication adherence, they underestimate the importance of medication efficacy and overestimate the impact of side effects. It was hypothesized that staff in this study would also recognize the importance of insight and positive medication attitudes in teenagers with psychosis, but overestimate the impact of side effects on medication adherence. This cross-sectional observational study sought staff views about factors affecting antipsychotic medication adherence in those aged between 14 and 18 years. An online survey was distributed and 60 responses were subsequently returned. Staff felt that good medication insight as well as positive relationships with staff were important determinants of good medication adherence. The most important influences of poor adherence were poor insight, side effects of medication and a wish to exert personal control around medication decisions. The results therefore confirmed the initial hypothesis. Published literature also provides support for some, but not all, of the staff views expressed in survey responses. PMID:25990303

  1. Weight gain associated with antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, R

    1999-01-01

    Weight gain has been reported with nearly every antipsychotic drug on the market (molindone is an exception). Weight gain occurs no matter what the patient's age, sex, or race and is seen with both oral and depot drug formulations. Numerous studies have found that patients gain weight when treated with a conventional antipsychotic, such as chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, and haloperidol. The newer, novel antipsychotics offer advantages over conventional antipsychotics, especially a relative lack of extrapyramidal symptoms, but some still have the disadvantage of causing weight gain. Clozapine and olanzapine in particular appear to cause substantial weight gain, much more so than do most conventional neuroleptics and novel agents such as risperidone. Given the risks to health and treatment compliance associated with weight gain and obesity, clinicians should monitor weight during the course of antipsychotic therapy and consider switching agents if excessive weight gain occurs. PMID:10548138

  2. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical

  3. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  4. Assessing prescribing competence

    PubMed Central

    Mucklow, John; Bollington, Lynne; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Prescribing of medicines is the key clinical activity in the working life of most doctors. In recent years, a broad consensus regarding the necessary competencies has been achieved. Each of these is a complex mix of knowledge, judgement and skills. Surveys of those on the threshold of their medical careers have revealed widespread lack of confidence in writing prescriptions. A valid and reliable assessment of prescribing competence, separate from an overall assessment of medical knowledge and skill, would have many benefits for clinical governance and patient safety, and would provide a measure of the success of training programmes in therapeutics. Delivering such an assessment presents many challenges, not least of which are the difficulty in identifying a surrogate marker for competent prescribing in clinical practice and the challenge of ensuring that competence assessed in a controlled environment predicts performance in clinical practice. This review makes the case for an on-line OSCE as the most valid form of assessment and sets out the requirements for its development, scope, composition and delivery. It describes an on-going attempt to develop a national assessment of prescribing skills towards the end of undergraduate medical training in the UK. PMID:22114902

  5. The effects of novel and newly approved antipsychotics on serum prolactin levels: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Peuskens, J; Pani, L; Detraux, J; De Hert, M

    2014-05-01

    Since the 1970s, clinicians have increasingly become more familiar with hyperprolactinemia (HPRL) as a common adverse effect of antipsychotic medication, which remains the cornerstone of pharmacological treatment for patients with schizophrenia. Although treatment with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) as a group is, compared with use of the first-generation antipsychotics, associated with lower prolactin (PRL) plasma levels, the detailed effects on plasma PRL levels for each of these compounds in reports often remain incomplete or inaccurate. Moreover, at this moment, no review has been published about the effect of the newly approved antipsychotics asenapine, iloperidone and lurasidone on PRL levels. The objective of this review is to describe PRL physiology; PRL measurement; diagnosis, causes, consequences and mechanisms of HPRL; incidence figures of (new-onset) HPRL with SGAs and newly approved antipsychotics in adolescent and adult patients; and revisit lingering questions regarding this hormone. A literature search, using the MEDLINE database (1966-December 2013), was conducted to identify relevant publications to report on the state of the art of HPRL and to summarize the available evidence with respect to the propensity of the SGAs and the newly approved antipsychotics to elevate PRL levels. Our review shows that although HPRL usually is defined as a sustained level of PRL above the laboratory upper limit of normal, limit values show some degree of variability in clinical reports, making the interpretation and comparison of data across studies difficult. Moreover, many reports do not provide much or any data detailing the measurement of PRL. Although the highest rates of HPRL are consistently reported in association with amisulpride, risperidone and paliperidone, while aripiprazole and quetiapine have the most favorable profile with respect to this outcome, all SGAs can induce PRL elevations, especially at the beginning of treatment, and have the potential to cause new-onset HPRL. Considering the PRL-elevating propensity of the newly approved antipsychotics, evidence seems to indicate these agents have a PRL profile comparable to that of clozapine (asenapine and iloperidone), ziprasidone and olanzapine (lurasidone). PRL elevations with antipsychotic medication generally are dose dependant. However, antipsychotics having a high potential for PRL elevation (amisulpride, risperidone and paliperidone) can have a profound impact on PRL levels even at relatively low doses, while PRL levels with antipsychotics having a minimal effect on PRL, in most cases, can remain unchanged (quetiapine) or reduce (aripiprazole) over all dosages. Although tolerance and decreases in PRL values after long-term administration of PRL-elevating antipsychotics can occur, the elevations, in most cases, remain above the upper limit of normal. PRL profiles of antipsychotics in children and adolescents seem to be the same as in adults. The hyperprolactinemic effects of antipsychotic medication are mostly correlated with their affinity for dopamine D2 receptors at the level of the anterior pituitary lactotrophs (and probably other neurotransmitter mechanisms) and their blood-brain barrier penetrating capability. Even though antipsychotics are the most common cause of pharmacologically induced HPRL, recent research has shown that HPRL can be pre-existing in a substantial portion of antipsychotic-nave patients with first-episode psychosis or at-risk mental state. PMID:24677189

  6. Do prescribing formularies help GPs prescribe from a narrower range of drugs? A controlled trial of the introduction of prescribing formularies for NSAIDs.

    PubMed Central

    Avery, A J; Walker, B; Heron, T; Teasdale, S J

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that prescribing formularies may promote rational prescribing. The range of drugs prescribed may be one aspect of rational prescribing. AIM: To determine whether the introduction of prescribing formularies helps general practitioners (GPs) to prescribe from a narrower range of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). METHOD: General practices in Lincolnshire were offered help in developing prescribing formularies. Ten practices decided to develop a formulary for NSAIDs. Level 3 PACT data were used to determine whether changes in prescribing had occurred with the introduction of the formulary. Matched controls were used to determine whether similar changes had occurred in other practices. RESULTS: Between April and June 1992, and during the same period in 1993, practices that introduced a formulary for NSAIDs reduced the mean number of different drugs used (14.3 versus 13.1, P = 0.04) and increased the percentage of NSAID-defined daily doses coming from the three most commonly used drugs (70.1% versus 74.8%, P = 0.02). Similar changes were not seen in control practices. CONCLUSION: Following the development of a formulary for NSAIDs, practices prescribed from a narrower range of drugs and focused a greater proportion of their prescribing on their three most commonly used drugs. PMID:9463982

  7. Antipsychotics in children and adolescents with schizophrenia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the efficacy and tolerability data of antipsychotics in children and adolescents with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: Pubmed, Google scholar and Psych Info were searched to identify studies published in peer-reviewed English language journals. All studies evaluating the efficacy of antipsychotics in children and adolescents with schizophrenia and having 3 or more participants were included. Of the studies identified, only randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. Data was analysed using effect size calculation as per Cohen's d. Fifty published studies were identified which reported use of antipsychotics in children and adolescents with schizophrenia. Of these, 15 randomized controlled studies were included in meta-analysis. Results: Evidence suggests that both first generation antipsychotics (FGA) and second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are better than placebo (effect size [ES] 2.948, confidence interval [CI] 1.368 to 4.528, sample size 31; and ES 0.454, CI 0.414 to 0.542, sample size 1308 respectively). However, FGAs seemed to be inferior to SGAs (ES -0.363, CI -0.562 to -0.163, sample size of 243) and clozapine is superior to all other antipsychotics (ES 0.848, CI 0.748 to 0.948, and sample size 85) in treatment of schizophrenia in children and adolescents. The extrapyramidal side effects are more common with FGAs while metabolic adverse effects are more common with SGAs. Conclusion: FGAs and SGAs are effective in the treatment of children and adolescents with schizophrenia. Clozapine apparently is the most effective antipsychotic in this condition. PMID:24130376

  8. 'He was like a zombie': off-label prescription of antipsychotic drugs in dementia.

    PubMed

    Harding, Rosie; Peel, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This paper explores the legal position of the off-label prescription of antipsychotic medications to people with dementia who experience behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Dementia is a challenging illness, and BPSD can be very difficult for carers to manage, with evidence that this contributes to carer strain and can result in the early institutionalisation of people with dementia. As a result, the prescription of antipsychotic and other neuroleptic medications to treat BPSD has become commonplace, in spite of these drugs being untested and unlicensed for use to treat older people with dementia. In recent years, it has become apparent through clinical trials that antipsychotic drugs increase the risk of cerebrovascular accident (stroke) and death in people with dementia. In addition, these types of medication also have other risk factors for people with dementia, including over-sedation and worsening of cognitive function. Drawing on recent questionnaire (n = 185), focus group (n = 15), and interview (n = 11) data with carers of people with dementia, this paper explores the law relating to off-label prescription, and the applicability of medical negligence law to cases where adverse events follow the use of antipsychotic medication. It is argued that the practice of off-label prescribing requires regulatory intervention in order to protect vulnerable patients. PMID:23047844

  9. Antipsychotics in pregnancy and lactation

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Girish N.; Desai, Geetha; Chandra, Prabha S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on psychotropic medications during pregnancy and lactation is limited as often involves complex ethical issues. Information on safety of psychotropic drugs during these critical phases is either inconclusive or undetermined. Many women with severe mental illness have unplanned pregnancies and require antipsychotic medication during pregnancy and lactation. Multiple issues have to be considered while choosing safe treatments for pregnant and lactating women and the best approach is to individualize the treatment. Medication should be guided primarily by its safety data and by the psychiatric history of the patient. Important issues to be kept in mind include pre-pregnancy counseling for all women, including planning pregnancies; folate supplementation, discussion with patient and family regarding options, and active liaison with obstetricians, ultrasonologists and pediatricians. Whenever possible, non-pharmacological approaches should be used in addition. PMID:26330648

  10. Early antipsychotic intervention and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Yin; Lu, Chao-Lin; Lo, Shih-Mao; Peng, Chia-Ho; Liu, Yia-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a major mental disorder in which patients' cognitive functions gradually deteriorate. Pharmacological intervention with antipsychotics has proven effective, yet it is still debatable whether to initiate treatment in patients' premorbid stage. Based on the developmental origins of schizophrenia, we hypothesize that for those who are at high risk for schizophrenia, particularly with gating problems, an early pharmacological intervention would be beneficial. We performed a pilot rodent study to evaluate this hypothesis. Our results demonstrated that isolation rearing-induced sensorimotor gating dysfunction could be reversed by a chronic risperidone regimen initiated at different age time points. As expected, interventions that we initiated earlier (in adolescent stage) appeared to have better efficacy than interventions initiated four weeks later (in young adult stage). Our hypothesis may contribute new insight for both prevention and treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:26048359

  11. Antipsychotics in pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Babu, Girish N; Desai, Geetha; Chandra, Prabha S

    2015-07-01

    Research on psychotropic medications during pregnancy and lactation is limited as often involves complex ethical issues. Information on safety of psychotropic drugs during these critical phases is either inconclusive or undetermined. Many women with severe mental illness have unplanned pregnancies and require antipsychotic medication during pregnancy and lactation. Multiple issues have to be considered while choosing safe treatments for pregnant and lactating women and the best approach is to individualize the treatment. Medication should be guided primarily by its safety data and by the psychiatric history of the patient. Important issues to be kept in mind include pre-pregnancy counseling for all women, including planning pregnancies; folate supplementation, discussion with patient and family regarding options, and active liaison with obstetricians, ultrasonologists and pediatricians. Whenever possible, non-pharmacological approaches should be used in addition. PMID:26330648

  12. The effect of antidepressants and antipsychotics on weight gain in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Reekie, J; Hosking, S P M; Prakash, C; Kao, K-T; Juonala, M; Sabin, M A

    2015-07-01

    Psychiatric illness in the paediatric population is increasing and the weight effect of medications for these problems is often unclear. A comprehensive literature search was undertaken to identify studies reporting weight in relation to antipsychotic and antidepressant use in children and adolescents. From 636 articles, 42 were selected for review. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) do not cause weight gain and may lead to improvements in weight status over the short, but not, long term. Antipsychotics were generally associated with weight gain. In drug comparison studies, risperidone had a larger weight gain effect than lithium, divalproex sodium and pimozide. Studies assessing the weight-protective effects of augmentation therapy with metformin or topiramate show less weight gain with addition of these agents. In conclusion, prescribing of SSRIs and SNRIs may be associated with improvements in weight status in children and adolescents but trials assessing their use in obesity, outside of established psychiatric illness, are limited and still experimental. Youth prescribed antipsychotic medication should be monitored for exaggerated weight gain and in those where obesity is a pre-existing concern agents other than olanzapine, clozapine and risperidone may be advantageous. PMID:26016407

  13. Synergistic interactions between ampakines and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S A; Luu, N T; Herbst, T A; Knapp, R; Lutz, D; Arai, A; Rogers, G A; Lynch, G

    1999-04-01

    Tests were made for interactions between antipsychotic drugs and compounds that enhance synaptic currents mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid-type glutamate receptors ("ampakines"). Typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs decreased methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats; the effects of near or even subthreshold doses of the antipsychotics were greatly enhanced by the ampakines. Interactions between the ampakine CX516 and low doses of different antipsychotics were generally additive and often synergistic. The ampakine did not exacerbate neuroleptic-induced catalepsy, indicating that the interaction between the different pharmacological classes was selective. These results suggest that positive modulators of cortical glutamatergic systems may be useful adjuncts in treating schizophrenia. PMID:10087029

  14. Pharmacogenetic Aspects of Antipsychotic Drug-induced Weight Gain - A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Gavin P

    2012-08-01

    Treatment with several antipsychotic drugs can result in weight gain, which may lead to further morbidity such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease via the development of metabolic syndrome. These important and problematic metabolic consequences of antipsychotic drug treatment probably reflect a pharmacological disruption of the mechanisms involved in control of food intake and body weight. The extent of weight gain following antipsychotic drug treatment shows substantial variability between individuals, due in part to genetic factors. Common functional polymorphisms in many candidate genes implicated in the control of body weight and various aspects of energy and lipid metabolism have been investigated for association with weight gain in subjects receiving antipsychotic drug treatment, and with metabolic pathology in chronic schizophrenia. Perhaps the strongest and most replicated findings are the associations with promoter polymorphisms in the 5-HT2C receptor and leptin genes, although many other possible genetic risk factors, including polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene and genes for the alpha2A adrenoceptor and melanocortin4 receptor, have been reported. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have also addressed antipsychotic-induced weight gain and other indicators of metabolic disturbances. However there is as yet little consistency between these studies or between GWAS and classical candidate gene approaches. Identifying common genetic factors associated with drug-induced weight gain and its metabolic consequences may provide opportunities for personalized medicine in the predictive assessment of metabolic risk as well as indicating underlying physiological mechanisms. PMID:23431082

  15. Prospective study of antibiotic prescribing for children.

    PubMed Central

    Pennie, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To observe the frequency with which children in outpatient primary care settings are prescribed antibiotics and to investigate why these antibiotics are prescribed. To compare the prescribing behaviour of family doctors, primary care pediatricians, and urgent care physicians and to determine where refinements in management are most needed to reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions appropriately. DESIGN: Prospective study using a data entry form with mostly closed-ended questions. SETTING: Ten primary care offices in urban south-central and eastern Ontario: five family practices, three pediatric practices, and two urgent care centres (UCC). PARTICIPANTS: Every child younger than 16 years visiting these offices during a 3-week period in February and March 1997. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency, clinical indications, and nature of the antibiotics prescribed. RESULTS: There were 4344 observed visits. Of 1706 antibiotic prescriptions, 1481 were for 10 days, and 1577 (92%) were for acute respiratory infections, 920 (53%) specifically for acute otitis media (AOM). Full courses of antibiotics were given immediately (i.e., without test results) to 321 (76%) of 425 children with pharyngitis. Antibiotics were prescribed for 145 (90%) of 163 children with bronchitis. Urgent care physicians were significantly more likely than pediatricians or family physicians to prescribe immediate antibiotics and to disregard guidelines when choosing antibiotics for uncomplicated AOM. CONCLUSIONS: Three diagnoses accounted for 82% of antibiotic prescriptions: AOM, pharyngitis, and bronchitis. Physicians should be more selective when deciding whether, and for how long, to prescribe antibiotics for those three common conditions. Substantial reductions in antibiotic use will require changes in how physicians manage suspected AOM, the most common indication for antibiotics. PMID:9789665

  16. Prevalence of Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Associated Factors among Outpatients with Schizophrenia Attending Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tesfaye, Siranesh; Debencho, Nigussie; Kisi, Teresa; Tareke, Minale

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite recommendations by guidelines to avoid combinations of antipsychotics unless after multiple trials of antipsychotic monotherapy, it is quite a common practice to use combinations. This practice leads to unnecessary expenses and exposes the patient to severe drug adverse effects. Methods. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May 2014. Systematic random sampling technique was used to select 423 study subjects. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify associated factors of antipsychotic polypharmacy among schizophrenia outpatients. Result. The overall prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was found to be 28.2%. Extra pyramidal side effects (AOR = 2.80; 95% CI: 1.38, 5.71), repeated psychiatric hospitalization (AOR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.45, 5.50), history of substance use (AOR = 2.82; 95% CI: 1.36, 5.88), longer duration of treatment (AOR = 2.10; 95% CI: 1.14, 3.87), and drug nonadherence (AOR = 1.84; 95% CI: 1.14, 2.98) were found to be significantly associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy. Conclusion. Prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was found to be high among the current study participants. Individuals who had extra pyramidal side effects, admission, substance use, duration of treatment, and drug nonadherence were associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy. PMID:26904586

  17. Prevalence of Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Associated Factors among Outpatients with Schizophrenia Attending Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Siranesh; Debencho, Nigussie; Kisi, Teresa; Tareke, Minale

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite recommendations by guidelines to avoid combinations of antipsychotics unless after multiple trials of antipsychotic monotherapy, it is quite a common practice to use combinations. This practice leads to unnecessary expenses and exposes the patient to severe drug adverse effects. Methods. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May 2014. Systematic random sampling technique was used to select 423 study subjects. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify associated factors of antipsychotic polypharmacy among schizophrenia outpatients. Result. The overall prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was found to be 28.2%. Extra pyramidal side effects (AOR = 2.80; 95% CI: 1.38, 5.71), repeated psychiatric hospitalization (AOR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.45, 5.50), history of substance use (AOR = 2.82; 95% CI: 1.36, 5.88), longer duration of treatment (AOR = 2.10; 95% CI: 1.14, 3.87), and drug nonadherence (AOR = 1.84; 95% CI: 1.14, 2.98) were found to be significantly associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy. Conclusion. Prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was found to be high among the current study participants. Individuals who had extra pyramidal side effects, admission, substance use, duration of treatment, and drug nonadherence were associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy. PMID:26904586

  18. Antipsychotic drugs on maternal behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Rat maternal behavior is a complex social behavior. Many clinically used antipsychotic drugs, including the typical drug haloperidol and the atypical drugs clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, and amisulpride, disrupt active maternal responses (e.g. pup retrieval, pup licking, and nest building) to various extents. In this review, I present a summary of recent studies on the behavioral effects and neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic action on maternal behavior in rats. I argue that antipsychotic drugs at clinically relevant doses disrupt active maternal responses primarily by suppressing maternal motivation. Atypical drug-induced sedation also contributes to their disruptive effects, especially that on pup nursing. Among many potential receptor mechanisms, dopamine D2 receptors and serotonin 5-HT2A/2C receptors are shown to be critically involved in the mediation of the maternal disruptive effects of antipsychotic drugs, with D2 receptors contributing more to typical antipsychotic-induced disruptions, whereas 5-HT2A/2C receptors contributing more to atypical drug-induced disruptions. The nucleus accumbens shell-related reward circuitry is an essential neural network in the mediation of the behavioral effects of antipsychotic drugs on maternal behavior. This research not only helps understand the extent and mechanisms of impact of antipsychotic medications on human maternal care, but is also important for enhancing our understanding of the neurochemical basis of maternal behavior. It is also valuable for understanding the complete spectrum of therapeutic effects and side-effects of antipsychotic treatment. This knowledge may facilitate the development of effective intervening strategies to help patients coping with such undesirable effects. PMID:26221833

  19. Antipsychotic medication and cognitive function in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Hiroko; Hashimoto, Ryota; Nakabayashi, Tetsuo; Omori, Mayu; Takahashi, Sho; Tsukue, Ryotaro; Anami, Kimitaka; Hirabayashi, Naotsugu; Harada, Seiichi; Saitoh, Osamu; Iwase, Masao; Kajimoto, Osami; Takeda, Masatoshi; Okabe, Shigeo; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2006-09-01

    Antipsychotic polypharmacy and excessive dosing still prevail worldwide in the treatment of schizophrenia, while their possible association with cognitive function has not well been examined. We examined whether the "non-standard" use of antipsychotics (defined as antipsychotic polypharmacy or dosage >1,000 mg/day of chlorpromazine equivalents) is associated with cognitive function. Furthermore, we compared cognitive function between patients taking only atypical antipsychotics and those taking only conventionals. Neurocognitive functions were assessed in 67 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 92 controls using the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R), the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and the Advanced Trail Making Test (ATMT). Patients showed markedly poorer performance than controls on all these tests. Patients on non-standard antipsychotic medication demonstrated poorer performance than those on standard medication on visual memory, delayed recall, performance IQ, and executive function. Patients taking atypical antipsychotics showed better performance than those taking conventionals on visual memory, delayed recall, and executive function. Clinical characteristics such as duration of medication, number of hospitalizations, and concomitant antiparkinsonian drugs were different between the treatment groups (both dichotomies of standard/non-standard and conventional/atypical). These results provide evidence for an association between antipsychotic medication and cognitive function. This association between antipsychotic medication and cognitive function may be due to differential illness severity (e.g., non-standard treatment for severely ill patients who have severe cognitive impairment). Alternatively, poorer cognitive function may be due in part to polypharmacy or excessive dosing. Further investigations are required to draw any conclusions. PMID:16793238

  20. Management of Antipsychotic-Related Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Maayan, Lawrence; Correll, Christoph U.

    2012-01-01

    Despite variations across individuals and agents, antipsychotics are associated with clearly documented weight gain and adverse metabolic effects. Although increased appetite/caloric intake and various receptors, hormones and peptides have been implicated, biological mechanisms contributing to the increase in weight and glucose and lipid abnormalities with antipsychotics are largely unknown. This has hampered the creation of antipsychotics that are free of cardiometabolic effects, even in antipsychotic-naïve/early-phase patients, as well as the development of strategies that can prevent or drastically diminish the adverse cardiometabolic effects. In general, three strategies can reduce the cardiometabolic risk of antipsychotics: 1) switching to a less orexigenenic/metabolically adverse antipsychotic, 2) adjunctive behavioral treatments and 3) adjunctive pharmacologic interventions. However each of these strategies has only been modestly effective. Among different behavioral interventions (N=14, n=746), group and individual treatment, dietary counseling and cognitive-behavioral therapy seem to be similarly effective. Among 15 different pharmacologic strategies (N=35 , n=1,629), only metformin, fenfluramine, sibutramine, topiramate and reboxetine were more effective than placebo, with the most evidence being available for metformin, yet without any head-to-head trials comparing individual pharmacologic interventions. Even in the most successful trials, however, the risk reduction was modest. Weight was not decreased to a pre-treatment level, and despite superiority compared to placebo, weight gain still often occurred, particularly in antipsychotic-naïve patients and when interventions were “preventively” co-initiated with antipsychotics. Future research should focus on combining treatment modalities or agents and on exploring novel mechanism-based interventions. PMID:20586697

  1. Responsible prescribing for asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Linda

    Respiratory medicines are expensive and, for common respiratory conditions, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there are opportunities to make significant savings by optimising their use. Responsible and cost-efficient respiratory prescribing can ensure value for money without compromising the quality of care. Nurses should be aware of the differing regimens recommended for patients with asthma and COPD. PMID:23240219

  2. Safe and Effective Prescribing for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macarthur, Colin; Rockwood, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    Drug-induced iatrogenic disease is more common among elderly patients than in any other patient population. Factors associated with adverse drug reactions in the elderly include excessive and inappropriate prescribing practices (such as the failure to adjust drug dose to age or complex drug regimens), the aging process itself (altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics), and concurrent illness. PMID:21229126

  3. Antipsychotic medication and seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Dawson; Jeppson, Kreg; Whitehead, Paul

    2003-07-01

    Both first-generation and second-generation antipsychotic medications can lower the seizure threshold, increasing the chances of seizure induction. This article reviews the published literature concerning the seizure-lowering effects of first- and second-generation antipsychotic medication. Unfortunately, rigorously controlled studies are relatively infrequent, and case reports form a large part of the available literature, limiting the confidence with which firm conclusions can be drawn. Of the first-generation antipsychotic medications, chlorpromazine appears to be associated with the greatest risk of seizure provocation, although other first-generation antipsychotics also lower seizure threshold. Conversely, molindone, haloperidol, fluphenazine, pimozide and trifluoperazine are associated with a lower risk of seizure induction. Clozapine is the second-generation antipsychotic most frequently associated with seizures, with risperidone appearing to confer a relatively low risk. Other factors such as history of seizure activity, concurrent use of other drugs that lower seizure threshold, rapid dose titration, slow drug metabolism, metabolic factors and drug-drug interactions appear to increase the chances of an antipsychotic medication inducing seizure activity. PMID:12973403

  4. Antipsychotics activate the TGF? pathway effector SMAD3

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, T.; Sundaresh, S.; Levine, F.

    2014-01-01

    Although effective in treating an array of neurological disorders, antipsychotics are associated with deleterious metabolic side effects. Through high-throughput screening, we previously identified phenothiazine antipsychotics as modulators of the human insulin promoter. Here, we extended our initial finding to structurally diverse typical and atypical antipsychotics. We then identified the TGF? pathway as being involved in the effect of antipsychotics on the insulin promoter, finding that antipsychotics activated SMAD3, a downstream effector of the TGF? pathway, through a receptor distinct from the TGF? receptor family and known neurotransmitter receptor targets of antipsychotics. Of note, antipsychotics that do not cause metabolic side effects did not activate SMAD3. In vivo relevance was demonstrated by reanalysis of gene expression data from human brains treated with antipsychotics, which showed altered expression of SMAD3 responsive genes. This work raises the possibility that antipsychotics could be designed that retain beneficial CNS activity while lacking deleterious metabolic side effects. PMID:22290122

  5. Prescribed fire effects on resource selection by cattle in mesic sagebrush steppe. Part 2: Mid-summer grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prescribed fire can release herbaceous forages from woody plant competition thus promoting increased forage plant production, vigor, and accessibility. Prescribe fire also consumes standing litter thereby improving forage quality and palatability. Consequently, prescribed fire is commonly consider...

  6. Prescribing costs in dispensing practices.

    PubMed Central

    Morton-Jones, T J; Pringle, M A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine differences in prescribing between dispensing and non-dispensing practices. SETTING--The 108 practices covered by Lincolnshire Family Health Services Authority. DESIGN--Analysis of prescribing data for 1990-1 from PD2 reports from the Prescription Pricing Authority in relation to data on practice characteristics obtained from Lincolnshire Family Health Services Authority; and aggregated level 3 prescribing and cost information (PACT data) for 10 selected drugs from the Prescription Pricing Authority to examine amounts prescribed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prescribing cost per patient, items per patient, and cost per item in dispensing and non-dispensing practices. RESULTS--Dispensing practices had higher prescribing costs per patient than non-dispensing practices. This difference held for non-dispensing patients within dispensing practices. Structural features failed to explain the differences in prescribing cost, except for the higher numbers of elderly patients in dispensing practices (which explained 13% of the difference) and the number of partners (5%). The main determinant of the difference was the lower use of generic drugs in dispensing practices (84%). Dispensing patients were prescribed lower quantities of drugs on average for each item. CONCLUSIONS--Dispensing practices could reduce their prescribing expenditure to that of non-dispensing practices by increasing their prescribing of generic drugs. The shorter prescribing intervals for dispensing patients may be due to dispensing fees being related to the number of prescribed items. PMID:8499855

  7. Antipsychotic Medicines for Children and Teens: A Review of the Research for Parents and Caregivers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Caregivers" /> Consumer Summary Sept. 4, 2012 Antipsychotic Medicines for Children and Teens: A Review of the ... gov/pedantipsych.cfm . Understanding Antipsychotics What are antipsychotic medicines? Antipsychotic medicines were made to help people who ...

  8. The use of anti-psychotic drugs with adults with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, C; Reeves, D; Alborz, A

    1995-08-01

    The use of anti-psychotic medication with an adult population of people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviours was investigated as part of an epidemiological study covering seven district health authorities and corresponding local authorities in North West England. The study found a high rate of prescription of anti-psychotic drugs (48.1%). Chlorpromazine was the most frequently prescribed drug, followed by Thioridazine and Haloperidol. Three variables, psychiatric diagnosis, where the person was resident (hospital disturbed ward, hospital non-disturbed ward, hostel or family home) and district of origin were found to be significant determinants of prescriptions when all other variables were controlled. Of the variables reflecting individual characteristics those significantly related to prescription suggested that the socially disruptive effects of challenging behaviour were determining prescription. The results are discussed in the context of differing prescription practices across residence and district in the context of the management of socially disruptive behaviour. PMID:7579984

  9. Use of Antipsychotic Medications in Pediatric Populations: What Do the Data Say?

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, Robert B.; Stewart, Christine; Hunkeler, Enid M.; Madden, Jeanne M.; Cummings, Janet; Owen-Smith, Ashli A.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Lu, Christine; Lynch, Frances L.; Waitzfelder, Beth E.; Coleman, Karen A.; Ahmedani, Brian K.; Beck, Arne L.; Zeber, John E.; Simon, Greg E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports of antipsychotic medication use in pediatric populations describe large increases in rates of use. Much interest in the increasing use has focused on potentially inappropriate prescribing for non FDA-approved uses and use amongst youth with no mental health diagnosis. Different studies of antipsychotic use have used different time periods, geographic and insurance populations of youth, and aggregations of diagnoses. We review recent estimates of use and comment on the similarities and dissimilarities in rates of use. We also report new data obtained on 11 Health Maintenance Organizations that are members of the Mental Health Research Network in order to update and extend the knowledge base on use by diagnostic indication. Results indicate that most use in pediatric populations is for disruptive behaviors and not psychotic disorders. Differences in estimates are likely a function of differences in methodology; however, there is remarkable consistency in estimates of use by diagnosis. PMID:24258527

  10. Using A Pharmacy-Based Intervention To Improve Antipsychotic Adherence Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Valenstein, Marcia; Kavanagh, Janet; Lee, Todd; Reilly, Peter; Dalack, Gregory W.; Grabowski, John; Smelson, David; Ronis, David L.; Ganoczy, Dara; Woltmann, Emily; Metreger, Tabitha; Wolschon, Patricia; Jensen, Agnes; Poddig, Barbara; Blow, Frederic C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Similar to patients with other chronic disorders, patients with serious mental illness (SMI) are often poorly adherent with prescribed medications. Objective: We conducted a randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of a pharmacy-based intervention (Meds-Help) in increasing antipsychotic medication adherence among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients with SMI. We also examined the impact of Meds-Help on psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and satisfaction with care. Methods: We enrolled 118 patients from 4 VA facilities with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or bipolar disorder who were on long-term antipsychotics but had antipsychotic medication possession ratios (MPRs) <0.8 in the prior year. Patients were randomized to usual care (UC; n = 60) or the pharmacy-based intervention (Meds-Help; n = 58). We reassessed adherence at 6 and 12 months, at which time patients completed Positive and Negative Symptom Scales (PANSS), Quality of Well-being Scales (QWB), and Client Satisfaction Questionnaires (CSQ-8). Results: Prior to enrollment, Meds-Help and UC patients had mean antipsychotic MPRs of 0.54 and 0.55, respectively. At 6 months, mean MPRs were 0.91 for Meds-Help and 0.64 for UC patients; at 12 months, they were 0.86 for Meds-Help and 0.62 for UC patients. In multivariate analyses adjusting for patient factors, Meds-Help patients had significantly higher MPRs at 6 and 12 months (P < .0001). There were no significant differences between groups in PANSS, QWB, or CSQ-8 scores, but power to detect small effects was limited. Conclusions: Congruent with prior studies of patients with other disorders, a practical pharmacy-based intervention increased antipsychotic adherence among patients with SMI. However, SMI patients may require additional care management components to improve outcomes. PMID:19933540

  11. Tensions in antibiotic prescribing.

    PubMed

    Metlay, Joshua P

    2002-05-01

    Since 1999, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has funded seven centers across the country to provide practical guidance to physicians and other health care professionals about the drugs they prescribe. These Centers for Education and Research on Therapeutics (CERTs) develop, translate and disseminate objective information on drugs to improve practice. The University of Pennsylvania's CERTs focuses on developing evidence for optimal treatment strategies for infectious diseases, and promoting the judicious use of antibiotics to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. This Issue Brief explores one of the fundamental challenges physicians face in optimizing antibiotic use: the potential conflict between what is best for an individual patient, and what is best for society as a whole. PMID:12528744

  12. Quality of prescribing for schizophrenia: evidence from a national audit in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Patel, Maxine X; Bishara, Delia; Jayakumar, Simone; Zalewska, Krysia; Shiers, David; Crawford, Mike J; Cooper, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    The National Audit of Schizophrenia (NAS) examined the quality of care received in England and Wales. Part of the audit set out to determine whether six prescribing standards, set by the national clinical guidelines for schizophrenia, were being implemented and to prompt improvements in care. Mental Health Trusts and Health Boards provided data obtained from case-notes for adult patients living in the community with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. An audit of practice tool was developed for data collection. Most of the 5055 patients reviewed were receiving pharmacological treatment according to national guidelines. However, 15.9% of the total sample (95%CI: 14.9-16.9) were prescribed two or more antipsychotics concurrently and 10.1% of patients (95%CI: 9.3-10.9) were prescribed medication in excess of recommended limits. Overall 23.7% (95%CI: 22.5-24.8) of patients were receiving clozapine. However, there were many with treatment resistance who had no clear reason documented as to why they had not had a trial of clozapine (430/1073, 40.1%). In conclusion, whilst most people were prescribed medication in accordance with nationally agreed standards, there was considerable variation between service providers. Antipsychotic polypharmacy, high dose prescribing and clozapine underutilisation in treatment resistance were all key concerns which need to be further addressed. PMID:24491953

  13. Pharmaceutical marketing research and the prescribing physician.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jeremy A

    2007-05-15

    Surveillance of physicians' prescribing patterns and the accumulation and sale of these data for pharmaceutical marketing are currently the subjects of legislation in several states and action by state and national medical associations. Contrary to common perception, the growth of the health care information organization industry has not been limited to the past decade but has been building slowly over the past 50 years, beginning in the 1940s when growth in the prescription drug market fueled industry interest in understanding and influencing prescribing patterns. The development of this surveillance system was not simply imposed on the medical profession by the pharmaceutical industry but was developed through the interactions of pharmaceutical salesmen, pharmaceutical marketers, academic researchers, individual physicians, and physician organizations. Examination of the role of physicians and physician organizations in the development of prescriber profiling is directly relevant to the contemporary policy debate surrounding this issue. PMID:17502635

  14. Weight Gain, Schizophrenia and Antipsychotics: New Findings from Animal Model and Pharmacogenomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Panariello, Fabio; De Luca, Vincenzo; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Excess body weight is one of the most common physical health problems among patients with schizophrenia that increases the risk for many medical problems, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, osteoarthritis, and hypertension, and accounts in part for 20% shorter life expectancy than in general population. Among patients with severe mental illness, obesity can be attributed to an unhealthy lifestyle, personal genetic profile, as well as the effects of psychotropic medications, above all antipsychotic drugs. Novel atypical antipsychotic drugs represent a substantial improvement on older typical drugs. However, clinical experience has shown that some, but not all, of these drugs can induce substantial weight gain. Animal models of antipsychotic-related weight gain and animal transgenic models of knockout or overexpressed genes of antipsychotic receptors have been largely evaluated by scientific community for changes in obesity-related gene expression or phenotypes. Moreover, pharmacogenomic approaches have allowed to detect more than 300 possible candidate genes for antipsychotics-induced body weight gain. In this paper, we summarize current thinking on: (1) the role of polymorphisms in several candidate genes, (2) the possible roles of various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in this adverse drug reaction, and (3) the state of development of animal models in this matter. We also outline major areas for future research. PMID:22988505

  15. Risk of Ischemic Stroke Associated with the Use of Antipsychotic Drugs in Elderly Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ju-Young; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Lee, Joongyub; Seong, Jong-Mi; Park, Mi-Ju; Lee, Shin Haeng; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Strong concerns have been raised about whether the risk of ischemic stroke differs between conventional antipsychotics (CAPs) and atypical antipsychotics (AAPs). This study compared the risk of ischemic stroke in elderly patients taking CAPs and AAPs. Method We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 71,584 elderly patients who were newly prescribed the CAPs (haloperidol or chlorpromazine) and those prescribed the AAPs (risperidone, quetiapine, or olanzapine). We used the National Claims Database from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. Incident cases for ischemic stroke (ICD-10, I63) were identified. The hazard ratios (HR) for AAPs, CAPs, and for each antipsychotic were calculated using multivariable Cox regression models, with risperidone as a reference. Results Among a total of 71,584 patients, 24,668 patients were on risperidone, 15,860 patients on quetiapine, 3,888 patients on olanzapine, 19,564 patients on haloperidol, and 7,604 patients on chlorpromazine. A substantially higher risk was observed with chlorpromazine (HR = 3.47, 95% CI, 1.975.38), which was followed by haloperidol (HR = 2.43, 95% CI, 1.183.14), quetiapine (HR = 1.23, 95% CI, 0.782.12), and olanzapine (HR = 1.12, 95% CI, 0.592.75). Patients who were prescribed chlorpromazine for longer than 150 days showed a higher risk (HR = 3.60, 95% CI, 1.836.02) than those who took it for a shorter period of time. Conclusions A much greater risk of ischemic stroke was observed in patients who used chlorpromazine and haloperidol compared to risperidone. The evidence suggested that there is a strong need to exercise caution while prescribing these agents to the elderly in light of severe adverse events with atypical antipsychotics. PMID:25790285

  16. Social determinants of prescribed and non-prescribed medicine use

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to describe the use of prescribed and non prescribed medicines in a non-institutionalised population older than 15 years of an urban area during the year 2000, in terms of age and gender, social class, employment status and type of Primary Health Care. Methods Cross-sectional study. Information came from the 2000 Barcelona Health Interview Survey. The indicators used were the prevalence of use of prescribed and non-prescribed medicines in the two weeks prior to the interview. Descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Results More women than men took medicines (75.8% vs. 60% respectively). The prevalence of use of prescribed medicines increased with age while the prevalence of non-prescribed use decreased. These age differences are smaller among those with poor perceived health. In terms of social class, a higher percentage of men with good health in the more advantaged classes took non-prescribed medicines compared with disadvantaged classes (38.7% vs 31.8%). In contrast, among the group with poor health, more people from the more advantaged classes took prescribed medicines, compared with disadvantaged classes (51.4% vs 33.3%). A higher proportion of people who were either retired, unemployed or students, with good health, used prescribed medicines. Conclusion This study shows that beside health needs, there are social determinants affecting medicine consumption in the city of Barcelona. PMID:20441578

  17. [Good prescribing practice].

    PubMed

    Seidling, Hanna M; Haefeli, Walter E

    2014-06-01

    Drug prescription is the very first step initiating a cascade of events in the medication process. It is, hence, decisive for success or failure of any pharmacologic treatment. A good prescription must therefore consider (1) relevant patient factors and co-morbidities, (2) evidence-based knowledge on medically sound prescribing practices, and (3) the setting in which a prescription is issued. The setting will determine which partners will participate, contribute, and safeguard the ongoing medication process and how much responsibility can be shared. Partners in the medication process refer to other healthcare professionals dispensing the drug, teaching the patient, or administering the medicines. It also involves the patients or their relatives with their information needs and often variable motivation and conviction to use a drug. By issuing a prescription, the physician must provide the partners with sufficient and appropriate information, must ensure that they understand the meaning of the prescription and are able to perform their assigned tasks during the medication process. Lastly, medication prescription is also subject to formal constraints and must meet legal criteria that are relevant for reimbursement by health insurance companies. PMID:24867345

  18. Modern antipsychotic drugs: a critical overview

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, David M.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Waraich, Paul

    2005-01-01

    CONVENTIONAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC DRUGS, used for a half century to treat a range of major psychiatric disorders, are being replaced in clinical practice by modern atypical antipsychotics, including aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone among others. As a class, the newer drugs have been promoted as being broadly clinically superior, but the evidence for this is problematic. In this brief critical overview, we consider the pharmacology, therapeutic effectiveness, tolerability, adverse effects and costs of individual modern agents versus older antipsychotic drugs. Because of typically minor differences between agents in clinical effectiveness and tolerability, and because of growing concerns about potential adverse long-term health consequences of some modern agents, it is reasonable to consider both older and newer drugs for clinical use, and it is important to inform patients of relative benefits, risks and costs of specific choices. PMID:15967975

  19. Borderline Personality Disorder: Bipolarity, Mood Stabilizers and Atypical Antipsychotics in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Akbudak, Mahir

    2012-01-01

    In this article, it is aimed to review the efficacies of mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics, which are used commonly in psychopharmacological treatments of bipolar and borderline personality disorders. In this context, common phenomenology between borderline personality and bipolar disorders and differential features of clinical diagnosis will be reviewed in line with the literature. Both disorders can demonstrate common features in the diagnostic aspect, and can overlap phenomenologically. Concomitance rate of both disorders is quite high. In order to differentiate these two disorders from each other, quality of mood fluctuations, impulsivity types and linear progression of disorders should be carefully considered. There are various studies in mood stabilizer use, like lithium, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, sodium valproate and lamotrigine, in the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Moreover, there are also studies, which have revealed efficacies of risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine as atypical antipsychotics. It is not easy to differentiate borderline personality disorder from the bipolar disorders. An intensively careful evaluation should be performed. This differentiation may be helpful also for the treatment. There are many studies about efficacy of valproate and lamotrigine in treatment of borderline personality disorder. However, findings related to other mood stabilizers are inadequate. Olanzapine and quetiapine are reported to be more effective among atypical antipsychotics. No drug is approved for the treatment of borderline personality disorder by the entitled authorities, yet. Psychotherapeutic approaches have preserved their significant places in treatment of borderline personality disorder. Moreover, symptom based approach is recommended in use of mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics. PMID:23024731

  20. DISRUPTION OF CONDITIONED REWARD ASSOCIATION BY TYPICAL AND ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS

    PubMed Central

    Danna, C.L.; Elmer, G.I.

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are broadly classified into typical and atypical compounds; they vary in their pharmacological profile however a common component is their antagonist effects at the D2 dopamine receptors (DRD2). Unfortunately, diminished DRD2 activation is generally thought to be associated with the severity of neuroleptic-induced anhedonia. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine and typical antipsychotic haloperidol in a paradigm that reflects the learned transfer of incentive motivational properties to previously neutral stimuli, namely autoshaping. In order to provide a dosing comparison to a therapeutically relevant endpoint, both drugs were tested against amphetamine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition as well. In the autoshaping task, rats were exposed to repeated pairings of stimuli that were differentially predictive of reward delivery. Conditioned approach to the reward predictive cue (sign-tracking) and to the reward (goal-tracking) increased during repeated pairings in the vehicle treated rats. Haloperidol and olanzapine completely abolished this behavior at relatively low doses (100 ?g/kg). This same dose was the threshold dose for each drug to antagonize the sensorimotor gating deficits produced by amphetamine. At lower doses (330 ?g/kg) both drugs produced a dose-dependent decrease in conditioned approach to the reward predictive cue. There was no difference between drugs at this dose range which indicates that olanzapine disrupts autoshaping at a significantly lower proposed DRD2 receptor occupancy. Interestingly, neither drug disrupted conditioned approach to the reward at the same dose range that disrupted conditioned approach to the reward predictive cue. Thus, haloperidol and olanzapine, at doses well below what is considered therapeutically relevant, disrupts the attribution of incentive motivational value to previously neutral cues. Drug effects on this dimension of reward processing are an important consideration in the development of future pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:20416333

  1. What is a prescribing error?

    PubMed Central

    Dean, B; Barber, N; Schachter, M

    2000-01-01

    N Barber, professor of the practice of pharmacy M Schachter, senior lecturer and honorary consultant physician ObjectiveTo develop a practitioner led definition of a prescribing error for use in quantitative studies of their incidence. DesignTwo stage Delphi technique. SubjectsA panel of 34 UK judges, which included physicians, surgeons, pharmacists, nurses and risk managers. Main outcome measuresThe extent to which judges agreed with a general definition of a prescribing error, and the extent to which they agreed that each of 42 scenarios represented a prescribing error. ResultsResponses were obtained from 30 (88%) of 34 judges in the first Delphi round, and from 26 (87%) of 30 in the second round. The general definition of a prescribing error was accepted. The panel reached consensus that 24 of the 42 scenarios should be included as prescribing errors and that five should be excluded. In general, transcription errors, failure to communicate essential information, and the use of drugs or doses inappropriate for the individual patient were considered prescribing errors; deviations from policies or guidelines were not. ConclusionsHealth care professionals are in broad agreement about the types of events that should be included and excluded as prescribing errors. A general definition of a prescribing error has been developed, together with more detailed guidance regarding the types of events that should be included. This definition allows the comparison of prescribing error rates among different prescribing systems and different hospitals, and is suitable for use in both research and clinical governance initiatives. (Quality in Health Care 2000;9:232237) Key Words: prescribing errors; medication errors; definition of error PMID:11101708

  2. Psychoactive Drugs: Improving Prescribing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghodse, Hamid, Ed.; Khan, Inayat, Ed.

    This book presents a wide-ranging analysis of what can be done to reduce the misuse of psychoactive drugs without compromising appreciation for their therapeutic value. Emphasis is placed on the need to give physicians guidelines for deciding to whom to prescribe, what to prescribe, how much, and for how long. Chapter 1 provides an introduction

  3. Risk of Mortality Among Patients Treated With Antipsychotic Medications: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Yuan, Shin-Sheng; Yang, Kang-Chung; Yang, Chun-Ju; Lee, Tung-Liang; Shyu, Yu-Chiau

    2016-02-01

    In this nationwide population-based study, we examined whether haloperidol exposure is associated with a higher risk of mortality than are other antipsychotic medications. Patients who newly received monotherapy with chlorpromazine (n = 2133), haloperidol (n = 4454), quetiapine (n = 1513), and risperidone (n = 1046) between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2011, were selected from a random sample of the 1 million enrollees of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The association between antipsychotic prescription and mortality was estimated through Cox proportional hazard regression. To examine the mortality rates of antipsychotics at different exposure durations, we compared the differences among short-term (?30 days), midterm (31-90 days), and long-term (>90 days) antipsychotic use. The mortality rates during the follow-up among the chlorpromazine, haloperidol, quetiapine, and risperidone groups were 17.4%, 45.5%, 26.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. The mortality risk among patients receiving haloperidol was the highest within 30 days of the prescription, after which the risk reduced rapidly. Compared with the patients receiving chlorpromazine, the mortality risk was higher in short-term (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.87-2.39) and midterm haloperidol users (1.86; 1.54-2.25) than in long-term users (0.99; 0.61-1.61). In conclusion, haloperidol use is associated with higher mortality risk than other antipsychotic medications. The mortality risk varies according to the duration of drug exposure. Underlying characteristics and medical conditions may influence the estimation of the mortality risk. Clinicians should pay attention to the mortality risk when prescribing antipsychotic medications, particularly for the elderly and critically ill patients. PMID:26658260

  4. Clinical pharmacology of atypical antipsychotics: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, M.C.; Paletta, S.; Maffini, M.; Colasanti, A.; Dragogna, F.; Di Pace, C.; Altamura, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    This review will concentrate on the clinical pharmacology, in particular pharmacodynamic data, related to atypical antipsychotics, clozapine, risperidone, paliperidone, olanzapine, que¬tiapine, amisulpride, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, asenapine, iloperidone, lurasidone and cariprazine. A summary of their acute pharmacokinetics properties are also reported. Four new second-generation antipsychotics are available: iloperidone, asenapine, lurasidone and in the next future cariprazine. Similar to ziprasidone and aripiprazole, these new agents are advisable for the lower propensity to give weight gain and metabolic abnormalities in comparison with older second-generation antipsychotics such as olanzapine or clozapine. Actually lurasidone seems to be best in terms of minimizing unwanted alterations in body weight and metabolic variables. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not strictly necessary for all of the new antipsychotic drugs because there are no unequivocal data supporting a relationship between plasma drug levels and clinical outcomes or side effects. The exception can be represented by clozapine for which plasma levels of 350-420 ng/ml are reported to be associated with an increased probability of a good clinical response. Also for olanzapine an established therapeutic range (20-50 ng/ml) is proposed to yield an optimal response and minimize side effects. PMID:26417330

  5. Benzodiazepine prescribing in children under 15?years of age receiving free medical care on the General Medical Services schemein Ireland

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, K; Reulbach, U; Boland, F; Motterlini, N; Kelly, D; Bennett, K; Fahey, T

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence and secular trends in benzodiazepine (BZD) prescribing in the Irish paediatric population. In addition, we examine coprescribing of antiepileptic, antipsychotic, antidepressant and psychostimulants in children receiving BZD drugs and compare BZD prescribing in Ireland to that in other European countries. Setting Data were obtained from the Irish General Medical Services (GMS) scheme pharmacy claims database from the Health Service Executive (HSE)Primary Care Reimbursement Services (PCRS). Participants Children aged 015?years, on the HSE-PCRS database between January 2002 and December 2011, were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures Prescribing rates were reported over time (20022011) and duration (? or >90?days). Age (04, 511, 1215) and gender trends were established. Rates of concomitant prescriptions for antiepileptic, antipsychotics, antidepressants and psychostimulants were reported. European prescribing data were retrieved from the literature. Results Rates decreased from 2002 (8.56/1000 GMS population: 95% CI 8.20 to 8.92) to 2011 (5.33/1000 GMS population: 95% CI 5.10 to 5.55). Of those children currently receiving a BZD prescription, 6% were prescribed BZD for >90?days. Rates were higher for boys in the 04 and 511 age ranges, whereas for girls they were higher in the 1215 age groups. A substantial proportion of children receiving BZD drugs are also prescribed antiepileptic (27%), antidepressant (11%), antipsychotic (5%) and psychostimulant (2%) medicines. Prescribing rates follow a similar pattern to that in other European countries. Conclusions While BZD prescribing trends have decreased in recent years, this study shows that a significant proportion of the GMS children population are being prescribed BZD in the long term. This study highlights the need for guidelines for BZD prescribing in children in terms of clinical indication and responsibility, coprescribing, dosage and duration of treatment. PMID:26059522

  6. Role of community pharmacists in the use of antipsychotics for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD): a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Lydia; Hilton, Andrea; Iqbal, Naveed; Child, Anne; Shaw, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to use qualitative methodology to understand the current role of community pharmacists in limiting the use of antipsychotics prescribed inappropriately for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Design A qualitative study employing focus groups was conducted. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Setting 3 different geographical locations in the England. Participants Community pharmacists (n=22). Results The focus groups identified an array of factors and constraints, which affect the ability of community pharmacists to contribute to initiatives to limit the use of antipsychotics. 3 key themes were revealed: (1) politics and the medical hierarchy, which created communication barriers; (2) how resources and remit impact the effectiveness of community pharmacy; and (3) understanding the nature of the treatment of dementia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that an improvement in communication between community pharmacists and healthcare professionals, especially general practitioners (GPs) must occur in order for community pharmacists to assist in limiting the use of antipsychotics in people with dementia. Additionally, extra training in working with people with dementia is required. Thus, an intervention which involves appropriately trained pharmacists working in collaboration with GPs and other caregivers is required. Overall, within the current environment, community pharmacists question the extent to which they can contribute in helping to reduce the prescription of antipsychotics. PMID:26983947

  7. Nonadherence to antipsychotics: the role of positive attitudes towards positive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Steffen; Hünsche, Alexandra; Lincoln, Tania M

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 50-75% of all patients do not take their antipsychotic medication as prescribed. The current study examined reasons why patients continue versus discontinue antipsychotic medication. We were particularly interested to which extent positive attitudes towards psychotic symptoms foster medication nonadherence. An anonymous online questionnaire was set up to decrease response biases. After a strict selection process, 91 participants with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were retained for the final analyses. On average, 6.2 different reasons for nonadherence were reported. Side-effects (71.4%), sudden subjective symptom improvement (52.4%) and forgetfulness (33.3%) emerged as the most frequent reasons for drug discontinuation. Approximately one fourth of all participants (27.3%) reported at least one positive aspect of psychosis as a reason for nonadherence. In contrast, patients reported on average 3.5 different reasons for adherence (e.g., want to live a normal life (74.6%) and fear of psychotic symptoms (49.3%)). The belief that paranoia represents a survival strategy (subscale derived from the Beliefs about Paranoia Scale) was significantly associated with nonadherence. Patients' attitudes toward medication and the individual illness model need to be carefully considered when prescribing medication. In particular for patients who are likely to discontinue psychopharmacological treatment complementary or alternative psychological treatment should be sought because of a largely increased risk of relapse in the case of sudden drug discontinuation. PMID:25444234

  8. Management recommendations for metabolic complications associated with second-generation antipsychotic use in children and youth

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Josephine; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; McCrindle, Brian; Grisaru, Silviu; Pringsheim, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Second-generation antipsychotics are commonly associated with metabolic complications. These medications are being used more frequently for the treatment of mental health disorders in children, which has stimulated the need for creating formal guidelines on monitoring their safety and effectiveness. Previous guidelines have been developed for monitoring metabolic and neurological complications. To assist practitioners who perform these monitoring procedures, a complementary set of treatment recommendations have been created for situations in which abnormal measurements or results are encountered. OBJECTIVE: To create evidence-based recommendations to assist in managing metabolic complications in children being treated with second-generation antipsychotics. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature on metabolic complications of second-generation antipsychotic medications in children was conducted. Members of the consensus group evaluated the information gathered from the systematic review of the literature and used a nominal group process to reach a consensus on treatment recommendations. Wherever possible, references were made to existing guidelines on the evaluation and treatment of metabolic abnormalities in children. RESULTS: Evidence-based recommendations are presented to assist in managing metabolic complications including weight gain; increased waist circumference; elevation in prolactin, cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose levels; abnormal liver function tests and abnormal thyroid studies. CONCLUSION: The use of second-generation antipsychotics requires proper monitoring procedures. The present treatment guideline provides guidance to clinicians on the clinical management of metabolic complications if they occur. PMID:23115501

  9. Molecular imaging PET and SPECT approaches for improving productivity of antipsychotic drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Catafau, A M; Bullich, S

    2013-01-01

    The need for innovation in research is leading to an increased use of imaging biomarkers, which have shown to reduce timings and increase productivity, thus saving costs. PET and SPECT neurotransmission imaging has shown usefulness in the discovery and development of drugs for the central nervous system, providing unique information on drug-target interactions in the living human brain. Among the different therapeutic areas, antipsychotic drugs pioneered the application of these technologies in early phases of development. PET and SPECT radioligands for the most commonly targeted neurotransmission systems in the development of these drugs, such as the dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems are available, thus fostering the inclusion of PET and SPECT studies in the antipsychotic drug development plans. Radioligands for other neurotransmission systems more recently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, such as the glutamatergic system, are being currently investigated. This review focuses on neurotransmission PET and SPECT aiming to serve as guidance for procedure requirements and methodology choices to be applied in antipsychotic drug development, through specific examples. Cutting-edge study designs and quantification approaches will be reviewed. Finally, some clues to get the most out of the PET and SPECT studies in the development of antipsychotic drugs will be provided. PMID:23157630

  10. [What criteria for an ideal antipsychotic treatment?].

    PubMed

    Bordet, R

    2015-02-01

    Antipsychotics are, by definition, drugs to treat all symptomatic dimensions of schizophrenia, even if, following the discovery of chlorpromazine, the effect assessment has been focused on the ability to reduce positive symptoms. Nevertheless, expectations of treatment are no longer limited to only support this one dimension, but integrate the need to treat negative, cognitive and affective symptoms, through long-term modulation of dopamine transmission but also non-dopaminergic pathways. Beyond symptomatic treatment, it is also necessary to have a treatment modifying the evolution course of the disease (disease modifier), acting by a long-term effect on neuropathological and neurochemical abnormalities. The limitation of long-term effect remains the issue of therapeutic observance. Moreover, this concern for efficiency should be at the cost of reduced induction of adverse effects to maximize the benefit/risk ratio. All these dimensions should the components to profile an ideal antipsychotic treatment in 2015. PMID:25638050

  11. Adverse Effects and Toxicity of the Atypical Antipsychotics: What is Important for the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Rasimas, J.J.; Liebelt, Erica L.

    2012-01-01

    Medications are being used with greater frequency to address pediatric mental health problems, and in recent years atypical antipsychotic (AAP) prescriptions have increased more than any other class. Acute care practitioners must be aware of the pharmacology of AAPs and the conditions, on- and off-label, for which they are prescribed. This involves identifying and managing side effects that manifest both mentally and physically. Although “atypicality” confers a lower risk of movement side effects compared to conventional agents, children are more sensitive than adults to extrapyramidal reactions. Like adults, they also may present with toxic sedation, confusion, cardiovascular dysfunction, and metabolic derangements. Evaluation and management of these toxicities requires an index of suspicion, a careful symptom and medication history, physical examination, and targeted interventions. This review is designed to orient the emergency practitioner to the challenging task of recognizing and treating adverse effects related to acute and chronic atypical antipsychotic exposure in children. PMID:23471213

  12. Methodological Issues in Current Antipsychotic Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Leucht, Stefan; Heres, Stephan; Hamann, Johannes; Kane, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Every year numerous reports on antipsychotic drug trials are being published in neuropsychiatric journals, adding new information to our knowledge in the field. The information however is often hard for the reader to interpret, sometimes contradictory to comparable available studies and leaves more questions open than it actually answers. Although the overall quality of the studies is rather good, there are manifold options for further improvement in the conception, conduct, and reporting of antipsychotic drug trials. In this survey, we address methodological challenges such as the limited generalizability of outcomes due to patient selection and sample size; the vague or even lacking definition of key outcome parameters such as response, remission or relapse, insufficient blinding techniques, the pitfalls of surrogate outcomes and their assessment tools; the varying complex statistical approaches; and the challenge of balancing various ways of reporting outcomes. The authors present practical examples to highlight the current problems and propose a concrete series of suggestions on how to further optimize antipsychotic drug trials in the future. PMID:18234700

  13. THE ANTIPSYCHOTIC POTENTIAL OF MUSCARINIC ALLOSTERIC MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Thomas M.; LeBois, Evan P.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Wood, Michael R.; Jones, Carrie K.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The cholinergic hypothesis of schizophrenia emerged over 50 years ago based on clinical observations with both anticholinergics and pan-muscarinic agonists. Not until the 1990s did the cholinergic hypothesis of schizophrenia receive renewed enthusiasm based on clinical data with xanomeline, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1/M4-preferring orthosteric agonist. In a clinical trial with Alzheimer’s patients, xanomeline not only improved cognitive performance, but also reduced psychotic behaviors. This encouraging data spurred a second clinical trial in schizophrenic patients, wherein xanomeline significantly improved the positive, negative and cognitive symptom clusters. However, the question remained: Was the antipsychotic efficacy due to activation of M1, M4 or both M1/M4? Classical orthosteric ligands lacked the muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity required to address this key question. More recently, functional assays have allowed for the discovery of ligands that bind at allosteric sites, binding sites distinct from the orthosteric (acetylcholine) site, which are structurally less conserved and thereby afford high levels of receptor subtype selectivity. Recently, allosteric ligands, with unprecedented selectivity for either M1 or M4, have been discovered and have demonstrated comparable efficacy to xanomeline in preclinical antipsychotic and cognition models. These data suggest that selective allosteric activation of either M1 or M4 has antipsychotic potential through distinct, yet complimentary mechanisms. PMID:20520852

  14. Side effects of atypical antipsychotics: a brief overview

    PubMed Central

    OK, ALP; GAEBEL, WOLFGANG

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the available evidence concerning the side effects of atypical antipsychotics, including weight gain, type II diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, QTc interval prolongation, myocarditis, sexual side effects, extrapyramidal side effects and cataract. Some recommendations about how to prevent and manage these side effects are also provided. It is concluded that atypical antipsychotics do not represent a homogeneous class, and that differences in side effects should be taken into account by clinicians when choosing an antipsychotic for an individual patient. PMID:18458771

  15. Emergency treatment of psychotic symptoms. Pharmacokinetic considerations for antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Milton, G V; Jann, M W

    1995-06-01

    Psychotic symptoms related to mental and medical disorders can pose a medical emergency. Selecting an appropriate antipsychotic medication to treat this emergency is based on the clinical situation, preferred route of administration, pharmacokinetic profile of the antipsychotic and the medications currently being taken by the patient. Intramuscular preparations are usually preferred over oral medication when the patients are not co-operative and require drugs with a faster onset of action and good bioavailability. High potency antipsychotics such as haloperidol and fluphenazine are effective in stabilising patients with psychotic symptoms quickly. Loxapine is an alternative when sedation is necessary and molindone is useful if a short-acting antipsychotic is required. Rapid neuroleptisation with intramuscular preparations of antipsychotic achieves therapeutic drug concentrations more rapidly, and also provides optimal control of psychotic symptoms. If the patient is cooperative, liquid oral preparations can be used; they are as effective as intramuscular formulations. If long term treatment with an antipsychotic in necessary and patients are stabilised, they can be switched from intramuscular to oral preparations. The oral dose is usually 1.5 to 5 times the total intramuscular dose per day, based on the bioavailability of the antipsychotic medication. If the patient is currently taking antipsychotic medication when the emergency situation occurs, it is usually adequate to increase the dose of antipsychotic drug. Appropriate dose adjustment or antipsychotic selection is necessary when drug interactions are expected. An in-depth knowledge of the pharmacokinetic profile and drug interaction profile of antipsychotic in necessary for the selection of the appropriate antipsychotic for any given emergency situation. PMID:7656507

  16. [Pros and cons of antipsychotics in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Schmeck, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade the indication of antipsychotics has been expanded from the treatment of psychoses to the treatment of impulsive-aggressive behaviors in mentally retarded children and adolescents with conduct disorder or autism spectrum disorders. As a consequence the use of antipsychotics in children and adolescents has increased worldwide. This increase of prescriptions is under critical discussion. In this paper the indication and the potential side-effects of antipsychotics in children and adolescents are described. The risks of antipsychotic medication are contrasted with the potential benefits to arrive at rational treatment recommendations. PMID:26242421

  17. Recurrent multiple endometrial polyposis in patient treated by antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zamurovi?, M; Prorocic, M; Perisic, Z

    2015-01-01

    Irregular uterine bleeding and profuse menstrual bleeding often occur in patients treated by antipsychotics, antiepileptics, and some antihypertensive drugs. Such bleedings represent an important problem in clinical practice, especially when related to antipsychotic treatment. Nonetheless, this problem has not been often analyzed in references. This paper describes a recurrent multiple endometrial polyposis accompanied by profuse menstrual bleeding in a patient undergoing a multi-year treatment of bipolar affective disorder by antipsychotics and discusses the possibilities of prevention of irregular and profuse menstrual bleeding in patients that must use antipsychotic therapy in order to treat a psychiatric illness. PMID:26524834

  18. Medicaid Cost Control Measures Aimed at Second Generation Antipsychotics Led to Less Use of All Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, William B.; Joyce, Geoffrey; Xia, Jing; Dirani, Riad; Wan, George; Goldman, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics and other psychotherapeutics are increasingly subject to prior authorization and other restrictions in state Medicaid programs, begging the question of how these formulary restrictions affect the drug treatments being delivered. To find an answer we collected drug-level information on utilization management for 30 state Medicaid programs over the past 10 years and drug-level utilization data for state Medicaid programs. We find that prior authorization requirements on atypical antipsychotics and other psychotherapeutics greatly reduced the utilization of these drugs and this reduction is not offset by substitution to other drugs in the same drug classeswith the adverse consequence that fewer patients are receiving pharmacotherapy. PMID:22147863

  19. To prescribe codeine or not to prescribe codeine?

    PubMed

    Fleming, Marc L; Wanat, Matthew A

    2014-09-01

    A recently published study in Pediatrics by Kaiser et al. (2014; Epub April 21, DOI: 10.1542/peds.2013-3171) reported that on average, over the past decade, children aged 3 to 17 were prescribed approximately 700,000 prescriptions for codeine-containing products each year in association with emergency department (ED) visits. Although, guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics issued warnings in 1997 and reaffirmed their concerns regarding the safety and effectiveness of codeine in 2006, it is still often prescribed for pain and cough associated with upper respiratory infection. With the impending rescheduling of hydrocodone combination products to Schedule II, physicians and mid-level prescribers may be compelled to prescribe codeine-containing products (e.g., with acetaminophen) due to reduced administrative burden and limits on Schedule II prescriptive authority for nurse practitioners and physician assistants in some states. This commentary expounds on the safety and effectiveness concerns of codeine, with a primary focus on patients in the ED setting. PMID:25102040

  20. Conducting a Prescribed Burn and Prescribed Burning Checklist

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasslands of the central Great Plains developed with periodic fire. Prescribed burning is an important tool for managing grasslands to maintain desirable species composition, increase grazing livestock performance, maintain productivity, and control invasive weeds. The safe and effective use of pre...

  1. Impact of long-acting injectable antipsychotics on medication adherence and clinical, functional, and economic outcomes of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gabriel; Casoy, Julio; Zummo, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating chronic disease that requires lifelong medical care and supervision. Even with treatment, the majority of patients relapse within 5 years, and suicide may occur in up to 10% of patients. Poor adherence to oral antipsychotics is the most common cause of relapse. The discontinuation rate for oral antipsychotics in schizophrenia ranges from 26% to 44%, and as many as two-thirds of patients are at least partially nonadherent, resulting in increased risk of hospitalization. A very helpful approach to improve adherence in schizophrenia is the use of long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics, although only a minority of patients receive these. Reasons for underutilization may include negative attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs of both patients and health care professionals. Research shows, however, significant improvements in adherence with LAIs compared with oral drugs, and this is accompanied by lower rates of discontinuation, relapse, and hospitalization. In addition, LAIs are associated with better functioning, quality of life, and patient satisfaction. A need exists to encourage broader LAI use, especially among patients with a history of nonadherence with oral antipsychotics. This paper reviews the impact of nonadherence with antipsychotic drug therapy overall, as well as specific outcomes of the schizophrenia patient, and highlights the potential benefits of LAIs. PMID:24265549

  2. Tardive Dyskinesia and Intellectual Disability: An Examination of Demographics and Topography in Adults with Dual Diagnosis and Atypical Antipsychotic Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodstad, Jill C.; Bamburg, Jay W.; Matson, Johnny L.; Mahan, Sara; Hess, Julie A.; Neal, Daniene; Holloway, Jodie

    2010-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications are commonly used in large-scale residential care facilities for adults with developmental disabilities. While the benefits of this class of psychotropics are noted, debate exists whether the side effect profile of these medications outweigh their therapeutic benefit, especially in those who use them long-term.

  3. Off-label second generation antipsychotics for impulse regulation disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Scheltema Beduin, Albertine; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2010-01-01

    Impulse regulation disorders and substance abuse disorders have considerable consequences for treatment and prognosis of comorbid psychiatric disorders. Second generation antipsychotics (SGA) are frequently prescribed off-label for these disorders. This off label use of SGA entails some systematic problems, such as lack of knowledge about their long-term efficacy and effects, including side-effects, and unclarity about doses in certain disorders and patient groups, for example children and adolescents. In this review we describe the evidence that supports off-label use of the second generation antipsychotics risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine, ziprasidone, quetiapine and aripiprazole in impulse regulation disorders and substance abuse disorders. We discuss these disorders together since we argue that the central feature of impulsivity in both disorders is a possible target for antipsychotic medication. Subsequently we discuss the adverse effects of these agents and we consider some hypotheses about the mechanism of action in these disorders. Several double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trials have proven that risperidone is effective in attention-deficit and disruptive behavior disorders in children and adolescents, in behavioral problems and subaverage intelligence and in tic disorders. Some double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trials, open-label studies and case reports find efficacy of olanzapine in tic disorders and pervasive developmental disorder. Risperidone and olanzapine are found to be ineffective in substance use disorders. In tic disorders two double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trials show inefficacy of clozapine and efficacy of ziprasidone. Some open-label studies found no benefit of quetiapine in pervasive developmental disorder. Single-blind and open-label studies argue the benefit of clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole in substance abuse and dependence. A few open-label studies and case reports suggest efficacy of quetiapine, aripiprazole and ziprasidone in attention-deficit and disruptive behavior disorders in children and adolescents and in tic disorders. Metabolic side effects such as hyperglycaemia and diabetes mellitus, weight gain and hyperlipidaemia are reported in all SGA, but especially in clozapine and olanzapine. In children they seem to be more pronounced than in adults. The most reported side effect in off-label SGA use in children, adolescents and adults is sedation. More double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trials into the long-term efficacy and safety of second generation antipsychotics are needed. Moreover head to head comparison of SGA against each other and against first-generation antipsychotic medication is still needed to determine the superiority of specific agents in treatment of specific disorders. PMID:21150846

  4. PGN Prescribed Burn Research Summary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1997, we have been studying the effects of prescribed burns conducted during late winter on shortgrass steppe on the Pawnee National Grassland. During 1997 – 2002, we studied burns on the western (Crow Valley) portion of the Pawnee by comparing plant growth on burns conducted by the Forest Ser...

  5. Behavior Disorders in Persons with Mental Retardation Receiving Antipsychotic Medication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ono, Yoshiro

    1998-01-01

    The behavior disorders of 54 Japanese individuals with mental retardation receiving antipsychotic medication were compared to 52 subjects receiving anticonvulsants and 202 subjects without medication. Results found the problem behaviors of subjects receiving antipsychotic drugs were more severe and severity of disability was associated with higher

  6. The role of antipsychotics in smoking and smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Annette M; Wilson, Vanessa B; Mitchell, Suzanne H

    2011-04-01

    Persons with severe and persistent mental illnesses, e.g. schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, smoke at a much higher rate than the general population. Treatment options for schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder often include the first-generation (typical) and second-generation (atypical) antipsychotics, which have been shown to be effective in treating both psychotic and mood symptoms. This article reviews studies examining the relationship between antipsychotic medication and cigarette smoking. These studies suggest that in persons with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, typical antipsychotics may increase basal smoking and decrease people's ability to stop smoking, whereas atypical antipsychotics decrease basal smoking and promote smoking cessation. However, we found that the data available were generally of moderate quality and from small studies, and that there were conflicting findings. The review also critically assesses a number of potential mechanisms for this effect: the use of smoking as a form of self-medication for the side effects of antipsychotics, the effect of antipsychotics on smoking-related cues and the effect of antipsychotics on the appreciation of the economic cost of smoking behaviour. Gaps in the research are noted and recommendations for further study are included. More study of this important issue is needed to clarify the effect of antipsychotics on smoking behaviours. PMID:21425883

  7. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  8. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were

  9. Sertindole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Lewis, Ruth; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and, if so, how much the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. Objectives To evaluate the effects of sertindole compared with other second generation antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) and ClinicalTrials.gov (February 2009). Selection criteria We included all randomised trials comparing oral sertindole with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone or zotepine for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes two short-term low-quality randomised trials (total n=508) both comparing sertindole with risperidone. One third of participants left the studies early (2 RCTs, n=504, RR 1.23 CI 0.94 to 1.60). There was no difference in efficacy (2 RCTs, n=493, WMD PANSS total change from baseline 1.98 CI −8.24 to 12.20). Compared with relatively high doses of risperidone (between 4 and 12 mg/day), sertindole produced significantly less akathisia and parkinsonism (1 RCT, n=321, RR 0.24 CI 0.09 to 0.69, NNT 14, CI 8 to 100). Sertindole produced more cardiac effects (2 RCTs, n=508, RR QTc prolongation 4.86 CI 1.94 to 12.18), weight change (2 RCTs, n=328, WMD 0.99 CI 0.12 to 1.86) and male sexual dysfunction (2 RCTs, n=437, RR 2.90 CI 1.32 to 6.35, NNH 13 CI 8 to 33). Authors’ conclusions Sertindole may induce fewer movement disorders, but more cardiac effects, weight change and male sexual dysfunction than risperidone. However these data are based on only two studies and are too limited to allow firm conclusions. Nothing can be said about the effects of sertindole compared with second generation antipsychotics other than risperidone. There are several relevant trials underway or completed and about to report. PMID:19370652

  10. Choices in antipsychotic therapy in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Frankenburg, F R

    1999-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy for the treatment of schizophrenia now consists, for the most part, of two groups of agents. The conventional antipsychotic agents are exemplified by chlorpromazine and haloperidol, and the atypical agents by clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. In this article, the history of the development of these two groups, and their advantages and disadvantages, are reviewed. Effectiveness, side-effect burden, mode of delivery, and cost are discussed. The new practice of "stalled or reversed taper" is described. The clinician now has a wider range of options from which to choose, but many clinical questions remain unanswered. PMID:10372289

  11. Antipsychotics in the treatment of autism

    PubMed Central

    Posey, David J.; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Erickson, Craig A.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics have become indispensable in the treatment of a variety of symptoms in autism. They are frequently used to treat irritability and associated behaviors including aggression and self injury. They may also be efficacious for hyperactivity and stereotyped behavior. This review presents the rationale for the use of this drug class in autism and reviews the most important studies published on this topic to date. Significant adverse effects, including weight gain and the possibility of tardive dyskinesia, are reviewed. Future research directions are discussed. PMID:18172517

  12. A comparison of psychotropic medication prescribing patterns in East of England prisons and the general population.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Lamiece; Senior, Jane; Frisher, Martin; Edge, Dawn; Shaw, Jenny

    2014-04-01

    While the prevalence of mental illness is higher in prisons than in the community, less is known about comparative rates of psychotropic medicine prescribing. This is the first study in a decade to determine the prevalence and patterns of psychotropic medication prescribing in prisons. It is also the first study to comprehensively adjust for age when making comparisons with the general population. Four East of England prisons, housing a total of 2222 men and 341 women were recruited to the study. On census days, clinical records were used to identify and collect data on all prisoners with current, valid prescriptions for hypnotic, anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antimanic, antidepressant and/or stimulant medication, as listed in chapters 4.1 to 4.4 of the British National Formulary. Data on 280,168 patients were obtained for comparison purposes from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. After adjusting for age, rates of psychotropic prescribing in prison were 5.5 and 5.9 times higher than in community-based men and women, respectively. We also found marked differences in the individual psychotropic drugs prescribed in prison and community settings. Further work is necessary to determine whether psychotropic prescribing patterns in prison reflect an appropriate balance between managing mental illness, physical health risks and medication misuse. PMID:24569096

  13. Medical school gift restriction policies and physician prescribing of newly marketed psychotropic medications: difference-in-differences analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of attending a medical school with an active policy on restricting gifts from representatives of pharmaceutical and device industries on subsequent prescribing behavior. Design Difference-in-differences approach. Setting 14 US medical schools with an active gift restriction policy in place by 2004. Participants Prescribing patterns in 2008 and 2009 of physicians attending one of the schools compared with physicians graduating from the same schools before the implementation of the policy, as well as a set of contemporary matched controls. Main outcome measure Probability that a physician would prescribe a newly marketed medication over existing alternatives of three psychotropic classes: lisdexamfetamine among stimulants, paliperidone among antipsychotics, and desvenlafaxine among antidepressants. None of these medications represented radical breakthroughs in their respective classes. Results For two of the three medications examined, attending a medical school with an active gift restriction policy was associated with reduced prescribing of the newly marketed drug. Physicians who attended a medical school with an active conflict of interest policy were less likely to prescribe lisdexamfetamine over older stimulants (adjusted odds ratio 0.44, 95% confidence interval 0.22 to 0.88; P=0.02) and paliperidone over older antipsychotics (0.25, 0.07 to 0.85; P=0.03). A significant effect was not observed for desvenlafaxine (1.54, 0.79 to 3.03; P=0.20). Among cohorts of students who had a longer exposure to the policy or were exposed to more stringent policies, prescribing rates were further reduced. Conclusion Exposure to a gift restriction policy during medical school was associated with reduced prescribing of two out of three newly introduced psychotropic medications. PMID:23372175

  14. Evidence base for using atypical antipsychotics for psychosis in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Datta, Soumitra S; Kumar, Ajit; Wright, Stephen D; Furtado, Vivek A; Russell, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications have been the first line of treatment for adolescents with psychosis in the past couple of decades. Till the late 90s, there were very few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the treatment of adolescents with psychosis, although a fifth of schizophrenia starts during adolescence. Most of the treatment guidelines for adolescents with psychosis were derived from data on adults. In the past 10 years, there has been increasing number of studies on adolescents with psychosis. The current paper summarizes the findings of trials on adolescents with psychosis in 4 groups: (a) atypical antipsychotic medications vs placebo, (b) atypical antipsychotic medication vs typical antipsychotic medications, (c) one atypical antipsychotic medication vs another atypical antipsychotic medication, and (d) Low dose vs standard dose of atypical antipsychotic medication. We included 13 RCTs, with a total of 1112 participants. Although our review suggest that atypical antipsychotic medications are as effective as typical antipsychotic medications as regards clinical efficacy, atypical antipsychotic medications have a preferred side effect profile and lesser drop-out rate from trials. Obviously, this is extremely important as treatment adherence is key to successful remission of psychotic symptoms and also in some case prevent relapse of illness. Treatment with olanzapine, risperidone, and clozapine is often associated with weight gain. Aripiprazole is not associated with increased prolactin or with dyslipidemia. Adolescents may respond better to standard-dose as opposed to lower dose risperidone, but for aripiprazole and ziprasidone, lower doses may be equally effective. Future trial should be longer term and have uniform ways of reporting side effects. PMID:24361758

  15. Evidence Base for Using Atypical Antipsychotics for Psychosis in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Soumitra S.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications have been the first line of treatment for adolescents with psychosis in the past couple of decades. Till the late 90s, there were very few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the treatment of adolescents with psychosis, although a fifth of schizophrenia starts during adolescence. Most of the treatment guidelines for adolescents with psychosis were derived from data on adults. In the past 10 years, there has been increasing number of studies on adolescents with psychosis. The current paper summarizes the findings of trials on adolescents with psychosis in 4 groups: (a) atypical antipsychotic medications vs placebo, (b) atypical antipsychotic medication vs typical antipsychotic medications, (c) one atypical antipsychotic medication vs another atypical antipsychotic medication, and (d) Low dose vs standard dose of atypical antipsychotic medication. We included 13 RCTs, with a total of 1112 participants. Although our review suggest that atypical antipsychotic medications are as effective as typical antipsychotic medications as regards clinical efficacy, atypical antipsychotic medications have a preferred side effect profile and lesser drop-out rate from trials. Obviously, this is extremely important as treatment adherence is key to successful remission of psychotic symptoms and also in some case prevent relapse of illness. Treatment with olanzapine, risperidone, and clozapine is often associated with weight gain. Aripiprazole is not associated with increased prolactin or with dyslipidemia. Adolescents may respond better to standard-dose as opposed to lower dose risperidone, but for aripiprazole and ziprasidone, lower doses may be equally effective. Future trial should be longer term and have uniform ways of reporting side effects. PMID:24361758

  16. Validation of a claims-based antipsychotic polypharmacy measure.

    PubMed

    Leckman-Westin, Emily; Kealey, Edith; Gupta, Nitin; Chen, Qingxian; Gerhard, Tobias; Crystal, Stephen; Olfson, Mark; Finnerty, Molly

    2014-06-01

    Purpose Given the metabolic and neurologic side effects of antipsychotics and concerns about the increased risks associated with concomitant use, antipsychotic polypharmacy is a quality concern. This study assessed the operating characteristics of a Medicaid claims-based measure of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods A random sample from 10 public mental health clinics and 312 patients met criteria for this study. Medical record extractors were blind to measure status. We examined the prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) in Medicaid claims, testing nine different definitions of antipsychotic polypharmacy, including >14, >60, or >90?days concurrent use of ?2 antipsychotic agents, each with allowable gaps of up to 0, 14, or 32?days in days' supply of antipsychotic medications. Results All Medicaid claims measure definitions tested had excellent specificity and PPV (>91%). Good to excellent sensitivity was dependent upon use of a 32-day gap allowance, particularly as duration of concurrent antipsychotic use increased. The proposed claims-based measure (90-day concurrent use of ?2 or more antipsychotics, allowing for a 32-day gap) had excellent specificity (99.1%, 95%CI: 98.2-99.6) and PPV (90.9%, 95%CI: 83.1-95.7) with good sensitivity (79.4%, 95%CI: 70.4-86.6). The overall level of concordance between claims and medical record-based categorization of antipsychotic polypharmacy was high (96.4%, n?=?301/312 clients, Cohen's K?=?84.7, 95%CI: 75.9-93.5). Discrepant cases were reviewed, and implications are discussed. Conclusions Administrative claims data can be used to construct valid measures of antipsychotic polypharmacy. PMID:24664793

  17. Salivary biomarker levels and diurnal variation: associations with medications prescribed to control children's problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Hibel, Leah C; Granger, Douglas A; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred

    2007-01-01

    This study examined associations between medications prescribed to control children's problem behaviors and levels of, and diurnal variation in, salivary cortisol (C), testosterone (T), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Saliva was collected in the morning, midday, and afternoon from 432 children ages 6-13 years. Relative to a no-medication comparison group, children taking (1) antipsychotics had higher DHEA levels and flat C diurnal rhythms, (2) Ritalin or Adderall had flat T diurnal rhythms, (3) Concerta had higher T and DHEA levels, (4) antidepressants had flat DHEA diurnal rhythms, and (5) hypotensives had flat DHEA diurnal rhythms and higher T levels. Medications prescribed to control children's problem behaviors should be monitored in studies of the endocrine correlates and consequences of developmental psychopathology. PMID:17517013

  18. Patient outcomes within schizophrenia treatment: a look at the role of long-acting injectable antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Bera, Rimal B

    2014-01-01

    Compliance is a critical issue across all chronic conditions, including schizophrenia. Compliance is not an all-or-nothing phenomenon, with a continuum from taking all medications as prescribed to partial compliance to complete noncompliance. Partial compliance is a serious problem that may result in abrupt dose changes leading to unanticipated adverse effects and can demoralize the patient. Further, there is a nearly 5-fold increase in the risk of relapse in first-episode patients when antipsychotic drug treatment is discontinued. Taken together, these data indicate that it is critical to ensure continuous delivery of antipsychotic treatment. Atypical antipsychotic medications were expected to result in better adherence, primarily because of the anticipated improved efficacy and safety profile. However, atypical agents have poor adherence, irrespective of the type of atypical medication, making it difficult to predict which patients are taking their oral medications. Long-acting injectable (LAI) agents may minimize the fluctuations in peak and overall plasma levels compared with oral agents, indicating they may allow more consistent and predictable administration. Based on clinical experience in my practice, several important observations regarding LAI use in patients with schizophrenia have been identified. First, there are potential advantages to using LAIs, including assistance in understanding reasons for poor response, the possibility of eliminating daily pill ingestion, and the elimination of the abrupt loss of medication coverage. There are also several potential obstacles to the use of LAIs, including a lack of infrastructure for the delivery and disposal of syringes and the ease of use with the oral agents. Several strategies can be used to increase patient willingness to initiate and continue LAI therapy. Strategies to improve acceptance involve presenting the option with enthusiasm, ensuring proper goal setting, educating the patient that this treatment is not equivalent to emergency injections, and repeatedly recommending LAI therapy. Adherence can be improved by ensuring samples are available in the clinical setting at all times. PMID:24919169

  19. Prescribing and partnership with patients

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Christine; Blenkinsopp, Alison; Raynor, David K

    2012-01-01

    There have been widespread changes in society and the roles of professionals. This change is also reflected in health care, where there is now acceptance of the need to involve patients in decision making. In prescribing specifically, the concordance agenda was developed alongside these initiatives to encourage improved medication taking and reduce wastage. However the extent to which these partnerships are delivered in practice remains unclear. This paper explores some of the issues to be considered when preparing patients and professionals for partnership and summarizes the limited evidence of barriers to, and benefits of, this approach. Firstly patients must be given the confidence, skills and knowledge to be partners. They need information about medicines, provided in ways known to be acceptable to them. Likewise professionals may need new skills to be partners. They need to understand the patient agenda and may need training and support to change the ways in which they consult with patients. There are also practical issues such as the perceived increase in time taken when consulting in partnership mode, room layout, computer interfaces and record keeping. Health care professionals other than doctors are also expected to behave in partnership mode, whether this is as prescribers in their own right or in supporting the prescribing of others. Whilst much has been claimed for the benefit of partnership approaches, hard evidence is limited. However whilst there is still much more to understand there will be no going back to the paternalistic model of the mid 20th century. PMID:22621201

  20. The Use of Second-Generation Antipsychotics and the Changes in Physical Growth in Children and Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired HIV

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Lisa; Montepiedra, Grace; Sirois, Patricia A.; Oleske, James M.; Malee, Kathleen; Pearson, Deborah A.; Nichols, Sharon L.; Garvie, Patricia A.; Farley, John; Nozyce, Molly L.; Mintz, Mark; Williams, Paige L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are increasingly prescribed to treat psychiatric symptoms in pediatric patients infected with HIV. We examined the relationship between prescribed SGAs and physical growth in a cohort of youth with perinatally acquired HIV-1 infection. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG), Protocol 219C (P219C), a multicenter, longitudinal observational study of children and adolescents perinatally exposed to HIV, was conducted from September 2000 until May 2007. The analysis included P219C participants who were perinatally HIV-infected, 318 years old, prescribed first SGA for at least 1 month, and had available baseline data prior to starting first SGA. Each participant prescribed an SGA was matched (based on gender, age, Tanner stage, baseline body mass index [BMI] z score) with 13 controls without antipsychotic prescriptions. The main outcomes were short-term (approximately 6 months) and long-term (approximately 2 years) changes in BMI z scores from baseline. There were 236 participants in the short-term and 198 in the long-term analysis. In linear regression models, youth with SGA prescriptions had increased BMI z scores relative to youth without antipsychotic prescriptions, for all SGAs (short-term increase?=?0.192, p?=?0.003; long-term increase?=?0.350, p?prescribed SGAs. Future research should investigate the interaction between PIs and SGAs in children and adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection. PMID:19827949

  1. A review of the factors influencing antimicrobial prescribing.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Alvarez-Rocha, Luis; Gudiol, Francisco; Pasquau, Juan

    2013-09-01

    There are multiple benefits of appropriate antimicrobial prescribing: it has a direct impact on clinical outcomes, avoids adverse effects, is cost effective and, perhaps most importantly, it helps to prevent the emergence of resistance. However, any physician can prescribe antibiotics, which is not the case with other clinically relevant drugs. There is great variability in the prescribing physician's (PP) training, motivation, workload and setting, including accessibility to infectious diseases consultants and/or diagnostic techniques, and therefore there is a high risk of inappropriate prescription. Many antibiotic prescribing errors occur around the selection and duration of treatment. This includes a low threshold for the indication of antibiotics, delayed initiation of treatment when indicated, limited knowledge of local antimicrobial resistance patterns by the PPs, errors in the final choice of dose, route or drug and a lack of de-escalation. Similarly, the prescription of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infections, despite being commonly accepted, is suboptimal. Factors that may explain suboptimal use are related to the absence of well-defined protocols, poor knowledge of prophylactic protocols, miscommunication or disagreement between physicians, logistical problems, and a lack of audits. A proper understanding of the prescribing process can guide interventions to improve the PP's practices. Some of the potential interventions included in a stewardship program are education in antimicrobial prescribing, information on the local resistance patterns and accessibility to a qualified infectious diseases consultant. PMID:24129284

  2. Schizophrenia Gene Expression Profile Reverted to Normal Levels by Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Prieto, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the widespread use of antipsychotics, little is known of the molecular bases behind the action of antipsychotic drugs. A genome-wide study is needed to characterize the genes that affect the clinical response and their adverse effects. Methods: Here we show the analysis of the blood transcriptome of 22 schizophrenia patients before and after medication with atypical antipsychotics by next-generation sequencing. Results: We found that 17 genes, among the 21 495 genes analyzed, have significantly-altered expression after medication (p-value adjusted [Padj] <0.05). Six genes (ADAMTS2, CD177, CNTNAP3, ENTPD2, RFX2, and UNC45B) out of the 17 are among the 200 genes that we characterized with differential expression in a previous study between antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and controls (Sainz et al., 2013). This number of schizophrenia-altered expression genes is significantly higher than expected by chance (Chi-test, Padj 1.19E-50), suggesting that at least part of the antipsychotic beneficial effects is exerted by modulating the expression of these genes. Interestingly, all six of these genes were overexpressed in patients and reverted to control levels of expression after treatment. We also found a significant enrichment of genes related to obesity and diabetes, known adverse affects of antipsychotics. Conclusions: These results may facilitate understanding of unknown molecular mechanisms behind schizophrenia symptoms and the molecular mechanisms of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:25522406

  3. Second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Divac, Nevena; Prostran, Milica; Jakovcevski, Igor; Cerovac, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest), high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability. PMID:24995318

  4. Evaluation of the Individual Safe Correction of Antipsychotic Agent Polypharmacy in Japanese Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: Validation of Safe Corrections for Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and the High-Dose Method

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, Tsuruhei; Inagaki, Ataru; Inada, Toshiya; Yoshio, Takashi; Yoshimura, Reiji; Iwata, Nakao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy for schizophrenia treatment is not justified by the available clinical evidence. We evaluated a treatment reduction approach that reduces the dose and number of antipsychotic medications simultaneously prescribed to patients. Methods: In a randomized open study of the Safe Correction of Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and High-Dose Prescriptions program funded by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, we evaluated a drug reduction method consisting of a dose reduction intervention performed on 163 patients with schizophrenia for twelve or 24 weeks. One antipsychotic medication was removed each week from each patient’s treatment regimen by reducing the dose by 0 to 50 chlorpromazine equivalents. Data on health-related indices of quality of life, clinical symptoms, and risk of side effects were analyzed using a two-way repeated-measures mixed linear model. Results: Despite a 23% reduction in antipsychotic dose, no differences in outcomes were observed between the dose reduction and observation groups (effect size = 0.001 – 0.085, P = .24–.97), despite high statistical power (1-β = 0.48–0.97). The findings are limited by the nonuniformity of the participants’ treatment history, duration, and dose reduction amount. Dose reduction protocol patients exhibited no difference in psychotic symptoms or adverse events compared with the observation group. Conclusions: Importantly, the low dropout rate in our study (6.9% of participants withdrew because of patient factors and 23.8% for all secondary reasons) indicates that our “slowly” method is well tolerated. We hope that this approach will result in therapeutic improvements. PMID:25522380

  5. Does fire severity influence shrub resprouting after spring prescribed burning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Cristina; Vega, José A.; Fonturbel, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Prescribed burning is commonly used to reduce the risk of severe wildfire. However, further information about the associated environmental effects is required to help forest managers select the most appropriate treatment. To address this question, we evaluated if fire severity during spring prescribed burning significantly affects the resprouting ability of two common shrub species in shrubland under a Mediterranean climate in NW Spain. Fire behaviour and temperatures were recorded in tagged individuals of Erica australis and Pterospartum tridentatum during prescribed burning. The number and length of resprouted shoots were measured three times (6, 12 and 18 months) after the prescribed burning. The influence of a series of fire severity indicators on some plant resprouting vigour parameters was tested by canonical correlation analysis. Six months and one year after prescribed burning, soil burn severity (measured by the absolute reduction in depth of the organic soil layer, maximum temperatures in the organic soil layer and the mineral soil surface during burning and the post-fire depth of the organic soil layer) reduced the resprouting vigour of E. australis and P. tridentatum. In contrast, direct measurements of fire effects on plants (minimum branch diameter, duration of temperatures above 300 °C in the shrub crown and fireline intensity) did not affect the post-fire plant vigour. Soil burn severity during spring prescribed burning significantly affected the short-term resprouting vigour in a mixed heathland in Galicia. The lack of effects eighteen months after prescribed burning indicates the high resilience of these species and illustrates the need to conciliate fire prevention and conservation goals.

  6. Evaluation of the antipsychotic potential of aqueous fraction of Securinega virosa root bark extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Magaji, M G; Mohammed, M; Magaji, R A; Musa, A M; Abdu-Aguye, I; Hussaini, I M

    2014-03-01

    Securinega virosa (Roxb ex. Willd) Baill. is a plant which is commonly used in African traditional medicine in management of mental illness. Previous study showed that the crude methanolic root bark extract of the plant possesses antipsychotic activity. In this study, the antipsychotic potential of the residual aqueous fraction of the plant was evaluated using two experimental models, apomorphine induced stereotypic climbing behaviour and swim induced grooming, all in mice. The effect of the fraction on haloperidol-induced catalepsy was also evaluated. The fraction significantly reduced the mean climbing score at the highest dose tested (500 mg/kg). In the swim-induced grooming test, the fraction significantly and dose-dependently (125-500 mg/kg) decreased the mean number and mean duration of swim-induced grooming activity in mice. Similarly, the standard haloperidol (1 mg/kg) significantly (p?antipsychotic potential. PMID:24445435

  7. Metabolic status and resistin in chronic schizophrenia over a 2-year period with continuous atypical antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Kentaro; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yoshino, Yuta; Mori, Yoko; Onuma, Hiroshi; Osawa, Haruhiko; Hosoda, Yoshiki; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Common adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic treatments for schizophrenia are weight gain and lipid metabolism abnormality. We aimed to identify the signs of metabolic problems with continuous atypical antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia over a 2-year period. Methods: The participants were 68 schizophrenic patients (29 males, 39 females; ages 53.4 13.5 years old). Changes in carbohydrate metabolism and changes in physical characteristics were studied over a 2-year period. In addition, functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in the transcriptional regulatory region of the resistin gene were examined. Results: We found no changes in the mental state of the participants over a 2-year period. Patients did show a significant decrease in total cholesterol and hemoglobin A1c levels, although physical changes such as body mass index and abdominal girth, were not observed. The amount of resistin may not be associated with mental states and physical parameters. Conclusions: We could not find physical factors related to metabolic changes of antipsychotics in this 2-year study. However, several psychological factors, such as health-related thoughts and behaviors, should be studied in the future. PMID:26557983

  8. Weight Gain and Metabolic Changes During Treatment with Antipsychotics and Antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Minkwitz, Juliane; Kirkby, Kenneth C

    2015-01-01

    Weight gain and metabolic disturbances are common side effects during psychopharmacological treatment with specific antipsychotics and antidepressants. The antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine, and antidepressants tricyclics and mirtazapine have a high risk of inducing weight gain. Recently discovered pathophysiological mechanisms include antihistaminergic effects, activation of hypothalamic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), modulation of hormonal signaling of ghrelin and leptin, changes in the production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-alpha and adipokines such as adiponektin, and the impact of genes, in particular the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C), leptin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) genes. Metabolic changes associated with weight gain include disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism. Clozapine and olanzapine may, in addition to mechanisms resulting from weight gain, impair glucose metabolism by blockade of the muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R). Antidepressants associated with weight gain appear to have fewer unfavourable effects on glucose and lipid metabolism than the second-generation antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine. To assess the risk of weight gain and its consequences for the patient's health, assessing body weight changes and metabolic monitoring in the first week of treatment as well as in long-term treatment is recommended. PMID:26100432

  9. Comparative Cytochrome P450 In Vitro Inhibition by Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gervasini, Guillermo; Caballero, Maria J.; Carrillo, Juan A.; Benitez, Julio

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess in human liver microsomes the inhibitory capacity of commonly used antipsychotics on the most prominent CYP450 drug metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and CYP3A). Chlorpromazine was the only antipsychotic that inhibited CYP1A2 activity (IC50 = 9.5??M), whilst levomepromazine, chlorpromazine, and thioridazine significantly decreased CYP2D6-mediated formation of 1?-hydroxybufuralol (IC50 range, 3.525.5??M). Olanzapine inhibited CYP3A-catalyzed production of 1?, and 4?-hydroxymidazolam (IC50 = 14.65 and 42.20??M, resp.). In contrast, risperidone (IC50 = 20.7??M) and levomepromazine (IC50 = 30??M) showed selectivity towards the inhibition of midazolam 1?-hydroxylation reaction, and haloperidol did so towards 4?-hydroxylation (IC50 of 2.76??M). Thioridazine displayed a Ki of 1.75??M and an inhibitory potency of 1.57 on CYP2D6, suggesting a potential to induce in vivo interactions. However, with this exception, and given the observed Ki values, the potential of the assayed antipsychotics to produce clinically significant inhibitions of CYP450 isoforms in vivo seems limited. PMID:23476805

  10. Antipsychotic Management of Schizoaffective Disorder: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Kaur, Amandeep

    2016-04-01

    Schizoaffective disorder (SAD) is an incapacitating illness that presents clinicians with challenges in terms of both its diagnosis and its psychopharmacological management. Most studies conducted on the psychopharmacological treatment of SAD also include patients with schizophrenia or other psychotic illnesses, thereby providing an unspecific view to the clinician as to the best way of treating patients with SAD. The objective of this article is to review studies on evidence-based treatment of patients with SAD. We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE/PubMed for full-text studies in the English language using the terms 'Schizoaffective and treatment' or 'antipsychotic schizoaffective'. Our review found relatively few studies with either an active comparator or placebo that examined the efficacy of antipsychotics for patients with SAD without an admixture of patients with schizophrenia. Only oral paliperidone extended release (ER), paliperidone long-acting injection (LAI), and risperidone have been shown to be effective and safe in reducing psychotic as well as affective components in acutely ill SAD patients in controlled studies. Paliperidone ER and LAI have also been shown to be efficacious in the maintenance treatment phase of SAD patients. While no supportive data exist, it is possible that other atypical antipsychotics may have similar efficacy to the two mentioned above. We conclude with a number of research recommendations for the study of treatment options for patients with SAD. First, there is a need for studies with patients specifically diagnosed with SAD for both the acute and the maintenance phase. The sample size needs to be adequate to allow a primary analysis of efficacy and to allow for analysis of the SAD subtypes: depressed and bipolar. Another recommendation is the need for studies of patients with SAD stratified into patients with and without mood stabilizers or antidepressants to allow the examination of the adjunctive role of these psychotropic medications. A third recommendation is to focus on specific co-morbid aspects of patients with SAD, such as suicidality and substance use disorders. Data from such studies will fill the gap of evidence-based treatment approaches and help clinicians in making important treatment decisions for patients with this complex condition. PMID:26927951

  11. Antibiotic prescribing: the need for a policy in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, T D; Passmore, C M; Morrow, N C; Reilly, P M

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To see whether changes in prescribing of oral antibacterials in Northern Ireland show the need for a community antibiotics policy. DESIGN--Analysis of prescribing totals for several oral antibiotics obtained retrospectively from the prescription pricing bureau for the years 1983-7. SETTING--Audit of anti-infective prescribing in general practice in Northern Ireland over five years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Respective usage of agents defined as "common" and "occasional" in 1983. RESULTS--There was a gradual decrease in the relative use of common agents from 82% of the total in 1983 to 77% in 1987 together with a complementary increase in the use of occasional agents from 5% to 10%. Pronounced changes were noted in the use of amoxycillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, minocycline, doxycycline, and amoxycillin-clavulanic acid. CONCLUSION--Though this survey found reasonably conservative prescribing, the trend towards increased use of occasional agents has both clinical and cost implications which could be addressed by the use of a prescribing formulary. PMID:2107899

  12. Prescribing in prison: complexities and considerations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Amanda

    2014-01-28

    Prescribing in prison is challenging because of environmental constraints, drug-seeking behaviour and the potential for drug trafficking. Risk management is, therefore, a fundamental part of the non-medical prescriber's role as he or she attempts to balance health needs with security requirements. This article highlights the need for an insightful, yet impartial, approach to prescribing for offenders. PMID:24446642

  13. Can authorities appreciably enhance the prescribing of oral generic risperidone to conserve resources? Findings from across Europe and their implications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Generic atypical antipsychotic drugs offer health authorities opportunities for considerable savings. However, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are complex diseases that require tailored treatments. Consequently, generally there have been limited demand-side measures by health authorities to encourage the preferential prescribing of generics. This is unlike the situation with hypertension, hypercholaesterolaemia or acid-related stomach disorders. The objectives of this study were to compare the effect of the limited demand-side measures in Western European countries and regions on the subsequent prescribing of risperidone following generics; to utilise the findings to provide future guidance to health authorities; and where possible, to investigate the utilisation of generic versus originator risperidone and the prices for generic risperidone. Methods Principally, this was a segmented regression analysis of retrospective time-series data of the effect of the various initiatives in Belgium, Ireland, Scotland and Sweden following the introduction of generic risperidone. The study included patients prescribed at least one atypical antipsychotic drug up to 20 months before and up to 20 months after generic risperidone. In addition, retrospective observational studies were carried out in Austria and Spain (Catalonia) from 2005 to 2011 as well as one English primary care organisation (Bury Primary Care Trust (PCT)). Results There was a consistent steady reduction in risperidone as a percentage of total selected atypical antipsychotic utilisation following generics. A similar pattern was seen in Austria and Spain, with stable utilisation in one English PCT. However, there was considerable variation in the utilisation of generic risperidone, ranging from 98% of total risperidone in Scotland to only 14% in Ireland. Similarly, the price of generic risperidone varied considerably. In Scotland, generic risperidone was only 16% of pre-patent loss prices versus 72% in Ireland. Conclusion Consistent findings of no increased prescribing of risperidone post generics with limited specific demand-side measures suggests no spillover effect from one class to another encouraging the preferential prescribing of generic atypical antipsychotic drugs. This is exacerbated by the complexity of the disease area and differences in the side-effects between treatments. There appeared to be no clinical issues with generic risperidone, and prices inversely reflected measures to enhance their utilisation. PMID:24927744

  14. What Does Schizophrenia Teach Us About Antipsychotics?

    PubMed Central

    Remington, Gary; Agid, Ofer; Foussias, George; Fervaha, Gagan; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Lee, Jimmy; Hahn, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine how advances in our understanding of schizophrenia have shaped thinking about antipsychotics (APs) and their role in treatment. Method: Three specific developments in the field of schizophrenia are highlighted: advances in knowledge related to the earliest stages of schizophrenia, specifically the prodrome; reconceptualization of schizophrenia as an illness of multiple symptom domains; and greater clarification regarding the efficacy of clozapine and a new generation of APs. Results: Evidence indicating that negative and cognitive symptoms are present during the prodrome suggests that intervention at the time of first-episode psychosis constitutes late intervention. The limited efficacy of APs beyond psychosis argues against a magic bullet approach to schizophrenia and for polypharmacy that is symptom domain–specific. Clozapine’s unique, but limited, efficacy in treatment resistance supports subtyping schizophrenia based on treatment response. Conclusions: Advances in our understanding of schizophrenia have important implications regarding the current use of APs, expectations regarding response, and future drug development. PMID:25886675

  15. Pedal edema associated with atypical antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, Santanu; Mukherjee, Shatavisa; Saha, Indranil; Sen, Sukanta

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a patient diagnosed as a case of bipolar affective disorder complaining of bothersome incidence of pedal edema 1 month after the initiation of atypical antipsychotic regimen with risperidone and quetiapine. All hematological and biochemical profiles were found to be normal. On discontinuation of risperidone, the condition remained unresolved even after 2 weeks, and the edema progressed reaching her calves. On tapering the dose of quetiapine, she started showing gradual improvement in edematous condition. Quetiapine was slowly discontinued. No further recurrence of edema occurred, and hence, no further medication changes were implemented. Pedal edema was found to be resolved within weeks of dechallenge of the regimen. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale gave a score of 7 which denotes “probable” adverse drug reaction with quetiapine.

  16. Antipsychotic Treatment of Adolescent Dual Diagnosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Price, Scott A.; Brahm, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND A diagnosis of schizophrenia requires development of a pharmacotherapy regimen that balances many factors in the therapeutic decision-making process. Patient age and the presence or absence of comorbid chemical dependency represent two factors. Comorbid chemical dependency can have a profound impact on the successful treatment of schizophrenia, making patients with dual diagnoses of schizophrenia and chemical dependence a uniquely challenging population. There is little information regarding treatment of schizophrenia and chemical dependence in the pediatric population. Existing data from pediatric and adult populations may facilitate a well-guided and knowledgeable approach to treating pediatric dual diagnosis patients. METHODS A review of the literature for medication trials evaluating antipsychotic medication used to treat schizophrenia in childhood and adolescence as well as antipsychotic use in the treatment of the dual diagnoses of schizophrenia and chemical dependence was done. Databases for Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, and PsycInfo were searched using the terms addiction, adolescence, childhood, dual diagnosis, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. Results were limited to English-language articles. RESULTS Seven articles were identified related to psychotic disorders and substance abuse in pediatric populations. Psychosis measurement instruments included the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and Clinical Global Impression. Mean improvements were insignificant in most cases. Medication trials included clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and molindone. Trial safety concerns included metabolic effects, increased prolactin levels, and akathisia. One study with random assignment to olanzapine was discontinued early because of substantial weight gain without evidence of superior efficacy. Clozapine treatment was associated with more adverse drug events. CONCLUSION There is a great need for more research and use of available data to develop safe and effective treatment guidelines for childhood and adolescent dual diagnosis patients. When appropriate decisions are made regarding treatment of patients with comorbid schizophrenia and chemical dependence, both conditions may benefit with increased remission. PMID:22768007

  17. Screening for the metabolic side effects of antipsychotic medication: findings of a 6-year quality improvement programme in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, T R E; Bhatti, S F; Adroer, R; Paton, C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To increase the frequency and quality of screening for the metabolic syndrome in people prescribed continuing antipsychotic medication. Design An audit-based, quality improvement programme (QIP) with customised feedback to participating mental health services after each audit, including benchmarked data on their relative and absolute performance against an evidence-based practice standard and the provision of bespoke change interventions. Setting Adult, assertive outreach, community psychiatric services in the UK. Participants 6 audits were conducted between 2006 and 2012. 21 mental health Trusts participated in the baseline audit in 2006, submitting data on screening for 1966 patients, while 32 Trusts participated in the 2012 audit, submitting data on 1591 patients. Results Over the 6?years of the programme, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of patients for whom measures for all 4 aspects of the metabolic syndrome had been documented in the clinical records in the previous year, from just over 1 in 10 patients in 2006 to just over 1 in 3 by 2012. The proportion of patients with no evidence of any screening fell from almost to 1 in 7 patients over the same period. Conclusions The findings suggest that audit-based QIPs can help improve clinical practice in relation to physical healthcare screening. Nevertheless, they also reveal that only a minority of community psychiatric patients prescribed antipsychotic medication is screened for the metabolic syndrome in accordance with best practice recommendations, and therefore potentially remediable causes of poor physical health remain undetected and untreated. PMID:26428329

  18. Antipsychotics and diabetes: case reports and cohort studies.

    PubMed

    2003-12-01

    This article reviews case reports and cohort studies involving antipsychotics and diabetes. The first part describes early case reports of new-onset glucose intolerance associated with chlorpromazine and lithium. The rest of the article presents findings from a literature review concerning atypical antipsychotics and the development of de novo diabetes mellitus or the exacerbation of already diagnosed diabetes mellitus. Evidence is presented from 3 types of sources: 1) case reports, 2) pharmacovigilance studies, and 3) retrospective reviews of treatment databases. The strengths and limitations of each of these methods are also discussed. Detailed tables are provided summarizing the findings from all 3 types of studies concerning all the currently available atypical antipsychotics. A discussion is included on the evidence for an association between atypical antipsychotics and an increased risk for diabetes mellitus. Further research is recommended to address important unanswered questions, such as what factors may confer an increased risk for patients with schizophrenia to develop diabetes. PMID:19667653

  19. Antipsychotic Drugs Will Become More Affordable, Study Predicts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Drugs Will Become More Affordable, Study Predicts With patents expiring, access for Medicaid patients will likely expand ... 4, 2015 FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patent expirations on several leading antipsychotic drugs could save ...

  20. Sudden cardiac death secondary to antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sicouri, Serge; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A number of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs are known to increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Based largely on a concern over QT prolongation and the development of life-threatening arrhythmias, a number of antipsychotic drugs have been temporarily or permanently withdrawn from the market or their use restricted. Some antidepressants and antipsychotics have been linked to QT prolongation and the development of Torsade de pointes arrhythmias, whereas others have been associated with a Brugada syndrome phenotype and the development of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. This review examines the mechanisms and predisposing factors underlying the development of cardiac arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death, associated with antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs in clinical use. PMID:18324881

  1. Guideline for Prescribing Opioids to Treat Pain in Injured Workers.

    PubMed

    Mai, Jaymie; Franklin, Gary; Tauben, David

    2015-08-01

    Recently, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of opioids to treat chronic noncancer pain. Opioids are also being prescribed in stronger potencies and larger doses for musculoskeletal injuries. In some cases, the use of opioids for work-related injuries may actually increase the likelihood of disability. Chronic opioid use is associated with increased risk for overdose morbidity and mortality and other nonfatal adverse outcomes. The risk of dependence and addiction is much more common than previously thought. This guideline provides recommendations for prudent opioid prescribing and addresses issues critical to the care and rehabilitation of injured workers. PMID:26231959

  2. Opioid prescribing pitfalls: medicolegal and regulatory issues

    PubMed Central

    Jammal, Walid; Gown, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inappropriate opioid prescribing can lead to patient harm as well as a medicolegal risk to prescribers. Prescribers need to be familiar with the indications, contraindications and harms associated with opioids. When prescribing opioids, doctors must be aware of their clinical, ethical and legal responsibilities, particularly the legislative requirements in their state. Failure to comply with these can result in disciplinary action. To avoid potential conflict with differing state regulations on opioid prescribing, doctors should advise patients to get their prescription dispensed in the same state in which it was written. PMID:26843712

  3. Massive asymptomatic creatine kinase elevation in youth during antipsychotic drug treatment: case reports and critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Milone, Annarita; Viglione, Valentina; Mancini, Alice; Pisano, Simone

    2014-12-01

    A massive asymptomatic creatine kinase elevation (MACKE) has been described during antipsychotic exposure in adult psychotic patients without signs of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), or other most frequent reasons for high creatine kinase (CK) serum level (intramuscular injections, restraints, intense physical activity, dystonic reactions). In this article, we review this clinical condition, and report three cases of MACKE in nonpsychotic, drug-nave youth during treatment with second generation antipsychotics. The diagnosis of MACKE should be considered after ruling out other possible common reasons of CK increase. The finding of MACKE should indicate a need for weekly monitoring of the CK level only when there are reasons to believe elevated CK is toxic or harmful. Further investigations are recommended when signs and symptoms raise a suspicion of NMS or rhabdomyolysis, including flu-like syndrome, fever, weakness, alteration of consciousness, muscle rigidity, tachycardia, hyper-/hypotension, and dark urine. A drug discontinuation should be considered when possible signs of NMS or rhabdomyolysis are suspected, or in cases of very high and persisting CK levels. Empirical evidence indicates that there is not a "safe" antipsychotic medication; therefore, a switch to another antipsychotic with a different profile is not necessarily a safe option. The spontaneously remitting or intermittent course suggests that the "true" MACKE should be kept distinct from both rhabdomyolysis and NMS. Raising awareness with MACKE may reduce the need for unnecessary diagnosis of NMS or rhabdomyolysis, which may otherwise lead to an unnecessary discontinuation of an effective therapeutic agent. PMID:25387323

  4. Using visual prompts to aid analgesia prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Ryland, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Analgesia prescribing is fundamental to a patient's journey, affecting length of stay and patient experience. Laminated prompts are used throughout the NHS Foundation Trust to aid doctors prescribing. A baseline questionnaire was carried out to gather doctors' prescribing habits and current ability to convert opioids to their morphine equivalent. Ninety three percent of doctors said they were moderately to extremely confident when prescribing analgesia. However, when asked to carry out a simple opioid conversion only 14% answered correctly. Eighty three percent of doctors said they were prescribing laxatives alongside opioids frequently (57%) or almost all the time (25%). When actual rates were sampled only 14% of patients were prescribed a concurrent laxative. Laminated pain management guideline cards were created and distributed to doctors at sign in for weekly teaching. Doctor interviews were carried out to see if they were in possession of a prompt card and a simple opioid conversion question was asked. If they did not have a prompt card at the time of interview they were issued with one after answering the conversion question. Rates of concurrent laxative prescribing were collected from the electronic prescribing record of patients on the acute medical unit. Posters were displayed in doctors' offices and drug rooms. Laxative prescribing rates were re-collected and compared with the survey responses. Distribution of laminated prompts increased accuracy of opioid conversion by 86%. Error rates fell as prompt prevalence increased until there was 100% prevalence and 0% error. Concurrent prescribing of laxatives increased to 50% after posters were displayed around the acute medical unit. Doctors reported they were confident when prescribing analgesia. They reported that they often prescribed concurrent medications, however this did not relate to actual prescribing practices. Visual prompts improved doctors analgesia conversion knowledge and prescribing practices. Laminated prompt cards are now incorporated in new doctors' induction packs. PMID:26893883

  5. Clozapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Asenjo Lobos, Claudia; Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic demonstrated to be superior in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia which causes fewer movement disorders. Clozapine, however, entails a significant risk of serious blood disorders such as agranulocytosis which could be potentially fatal. Currently there are a number of newer antipsychotics which have been developed with the purpose to find both a better tolerability profile and a superior effectiveness. Objectives To compare the clinical effects of clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics (such as amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone and zotepine) in the treatment of schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Groups Register (June 2007) and reference lists of all included randomised controlled trials. We also manually searched appropriate journals and conference proceedings relating to clozapine combination strategies and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies. Selection criteria All relevant randomised, at least single-blind trials, comparing clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics, any dose and oral formulations, for people with schizophrenia or related disorders. Data collection and analysis We selected trials and extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 27 blinded randomised controlled trials, which involved 3099 participants. Twelve randomised control trials compared clozapine with olanzapine, five with quetiapine, nine with risperidone, one with ziprasidone and two with zotepine. Attrition from these studies was high (overall 30.1%), leaving the interpretation of results problematic. Clozapine had a higher attrition rate due to adverse effects than olanzapine (9 RCTs, n=1674, RR 1.60 CI 1.07 to 2.40, NNT 25 CI 15 to 73) and risperidone (6 RCTs, n=627, RR 1.88 CI 1.11 to 3.21, NNT 16 CI 9 to 59). Fewer participants in the clozapine groups left the trials early due to inefficacy than risperidone (6 RCTs, n=627, RR 0.40 CI 0.23 to 0.70, NNT 11 CI 7 to 21), suggesting a certain higher efficacy of clozapine. Clozapine was more efficacious than zotepine in improving the participants general mental state (BPRS total score: 1 RCT, n=59, MD −6.00 CI −9.83 to −2.17), but not consistently more than olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. There was no significant difference between clozapine and olanzapine or risperidone in terms of positive or negative symptoms of schizophrenia. According to two studies from China quetiapine was more efficacious for negative symptoms than clozapine (2 RCTs, n=142, MD 2.23 CI 0.99 to 3.48). Clozapine produced somewhat fewer extrapyramidal side-effects than risperidone (use of antiparkinson medication: 6 RCTs, n=304, RR 0.39 CI 0.22 to 0.68, NNT 7 CI 5 to 18) and zotepine (n=59, RR 0.05 CI 0.00 to 0.86, NNT 3 CI 2 to 5). More participants in the clozapine group showed decreased white blood cells than those taking olanzapine, more hypersalivation and sedation than those on olanzapine, risperidone and quetiapine and more seizures than people on olanzapine and risperidone. Also clozapine produced an important weight gain not seen with risperidone. Other differences in adverse effects were less documented and should be replicated, for example, clozapine did not alter prolactin levels whereas olanzapine, risperidone and zotepine did; compared with quetiapine, clozapine produced a higher incidence of electrocardiogram (ECG) alterations; and compared with quetiapine and risperidone clozapine produced a higher increase of triglyceride levels. Other findings that should be replicated were: clozapine improved social functioning less than risperidone and fewer participants in the clozapine group had to be hospitalised to avoid suicide attempts compared to olanzapine. Other important outcomes such as service use, cognitive functioning, satisfaction with care or quality of life were rarely reported. Authors’ conclusions Clozapine may be a little more efficacious than zotepine and risperidone but further trials are required to confirm this finding. Clozapine differs more clearly in adverse effects from other second generation antipsychotics and the side-effect profile could be key in the selection of treatment depending on the clinical situation and a patient’s preferences. Data on other important outcomes such as cognitive functioning, quality of life, death or service use are currently largely missing, making further large and well-designed trials necessary. It is also important to take into account that the large number of people leaving the studies early limits the validity and interpretation of our findings. PMID:21069690

  6. Olanzapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Duggan, Lorna; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of olanzapine differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of olanzapine compared to other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the reference of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised trials that used at least single-blind (rater-blind) design, comparing oral olanzapine with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random effects model. Main results The review currently includes 50 studies and 9476 participants which provided data for six comparisons (olanzapine compared to amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, quetiapine, risperidone or ziprasidone). The overall attrition from the included studies was considerable (49.2%) leaving the interpretation of results problematic. Olanzapine improved the general mental state (PANSS total score) more than aripiprazole (2 RCTs, n=794, WMD ?4.96 CI ?8.06 to ?1.85), quetiapine (10 RCTs, n=1449, WMD ?3.66 CI ?5.39 to ?1.93), risperidone (15 RCTs, n=2390, WMD ?1.94 CI ?3.31 to ?0.58) and ziprasidone (4 RCTs, n=1291, WMD ?8.32 CI ?10.99 to ?5.64), but not more than amisulpride or clozapine. This somewhat better efficacy was confirmed by fewer participants in the olanzapine groups leaving the studies early due to inefficacy of treatment compared to quetiapine (8 RCTs, n=1563, RR 0.56 CI 0.44 to 0.70, NNT 11 CI 6 to 50), risperidone (14 RCTs, n=2744, RR 0.78 CI 0.62 to 0.98, NNT 50 CI 17 to 100) and ziprasidone (5 RCTs, n=1937, RR 0.64 CI 0.51 to 0.79, NNT 17, CI 11 to 33). Fewer participants in the olanzapine group than in the quetiapine (2 RCTs, n=876, RR 0.56 CI 0.41 to 0.77, NNT 11 CI 7 to 25) and ziprasidone (2 RCTs, n=766, RR 0.65 CI 0.45 to 0.93, NNT 17 CI 9 to 100) treatment groups, but not in the clozapine group (1 RCT, n=980, RR 1.28 CI 1.02 to 1.61, NNH not estimable), had to be re-hospitalised in the trials. Except for clozapine, all comparators induced less weight gain than olanzapine (olanzapine compared to amisulpride: 3 RCTs, n=671, WMD 2.11kg CI 1.29kg to 2.94kg; aripiprazole: 1 RCT, n=90, WMD 5.60kg CI 2.15kg to 9.05kg; quetiapine: 7 RCTs, n=1173, WMD 2.68kg CI 1.10kg to 4.26kg; risperidone: 13 RCTs, n=2116, WMD 2.61kg CI 1.48kg to 3.74kg; ziprasidone: 5 RCTs, n=1659, WMD 3.82kg CI 2.96kg to 4.69kg). Associated problems such as glucose and cholesterol increase were usually also more frequent in the olanzapine group. Other differences in adverse effects were less well documented. Nevertheless, olanzapine may be associated with slightly more extrapyramidal side effects than quetiapine (use of antiparkinson medication (6

  7. Prescribing medical cannabis in Canada: Are we being too cautious?

    PubMed

    Lake, Stephanie; Kerr, Thomas; Montaner, Julio

    2015-01-01

    There has been much recent discussion and debate surrounding cannabis in Canada, including the prescribing of medical cannabis for therapeutic purposes. Certain commentators - including the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) - have denounced the prescribing of cannabis for medical purposes due to a perceived lack of evidence related to the drug's efficacy, harms, and mechanism of action. In this commentary, we present arguments in favour of prescribing medical cannabis in Canada. We believe the anti-cannabis position taken by CMA and other commentators is not entirely evidence-based. Using the example of neuropathic pain, we present and summarize the clinical evidence surrounding smoked or vapourized cannabis, including recent evidence pertaining to the effectiveness of cannabis in comparison to existing standard pharmacotherapies for neuropathy. Further, we outline how the concerns expressed regarding cannabis' mechanism of action are inconsistent with current decision-making processes related to the prescribing of many common pharmaceuticals. Finally, we discuss potential secondary public health benefits of prescribing cannabis for pain-related disorders in Canada and North America. PMID:26451996

  8. Teaching safe prescribing to medical students: perspectives in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Hamde; Nazar, Mahdi; Rothwell, Charlotte; Portlock, Jane; Chaytor, Andrew; Husband, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing is a characteristic role of a medical practitioner. On graduating from medical school, students are presumed to have acquired the necessary pharmacology knowledge underpinning the therapeutics and developed their personal skills and behaviors in order to write a safe and effective prescription (The Four Ps). However, there are reports of errors in medical prescribing and dissatisfied feedback from recent graduates, which evidence potential flaws in the current training in the practice of prescribing. We examine the Four Ps from a systems approach and offer scope for educators and curriculum designers to review and reflect on their current undergraduate teaching, learning, and assessment strategies in a similar manner. We also adopt a national framework of common competencies required of all prescribers to remain effective and safe in their area of practice as a more objective layer to the broader learning outcomes of the General Medical Council Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009. This exercise demonstrates where standard, recognized competencies for safe prescribing can be accommodated pedagogically within existing medical curricula. PMID:25945072

  9. The changing nature of prescribing: pharmacists as prescribers and challenges to medical dominance.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Marjorie C; Sutton, Jane

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the potential threat to medical dominance posed by the addition of pharmacists as prescribers in the UK. It explores the role of prescribing as an indicator of professional power, the legitimacy and status of new pharmacist prescribers and the forces influencing professional jurisdictional claims over the task of prescribing. It draws upon 23 interviews with pharmacist supplementary prescribers. Data suggest that the legitimacy of pharmacists as prescribers, as experienced in the workplace, has been aided by: (1) blurred definitions of prescribing; (2) the emphasis on new prescribers' competence urging pharmacist prescribers to limit their areas of clinical practice; and (3) a team approach to patient management. Competence, self-limitation on practice and the benefits of team working as part of the ideology of patient safety were thus an important influence on pharmacists' jurisdictional claim over prescribing. While pharmacists have successfully negotiated a role for themselves as prescribers, medicine has retained its high status, relative to other health professionals and with patients; it controls the knowledge base relevant for prescribing practice and has managed to develop an 'overseer' role over the process of prescribing. Prescribing, as an indicator of medicine's autonomy of control over their work and professional status, has changed. Yet the extent to which new prescribers have been able to threaten the professional dominance of medicine is debatable. PMID:19055585

  10. Prevalence and trends in the use of antipsychotic medications during pregnancy in the U.S., 2001-2007: a population-based study of 585,615 deliveries.

    PubMed

    Toh, Sengwee; Li, Qian; Cheetham, T Craig; Cooper, William O; Davis, Robert L; Dublin, Sascha; Hammad, Tarek A; Li, De-Kun; Pawloski, Pamala A; Pinheiro, Simone P; Raebel, Marsha A; Scott, Pamela E; Smith, David H; Bobo, William V; Lawrence, Jean M; Dashevsky, Inna; Haffenreffer, Katherine; Avalos, Lyndsay A; Andrade, Susan E

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to estimate the prevalence of and temporal trends in prenatal antipsychotic medication use within a cohort of pregnant women in the U.S. We identified live born deliveries to women aged 15-45 years in 2001-2007 from 11 U.S. health plans participating in the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program. We ascertained prenatal exposure to antipsychotics from health plan pharmacy dispensing files, gestational age from linked infant birth certificate files, and ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes from health plan claims files. We calculated the prevalence of prenatal use of atypical and typical antipsychotics according to year of delivery, trimester of pregnancy, and mental health diagnosis. Among 585,615 qualifying deliveries, 4,223 (0.72%) were to women who received an atypical antipsychotic and 548 (0.09%) were to women receiving a typical antipsychotic any time from 60 days before pregnancy through delivery. There was a 2.5-fold increase in atypical antipsychotic use during the study period, from 0.33% (95% confidence interval: 0.29%, 0.37%) in 2001 to 0.82% (0.76%, 0.88%) in 2007, while the use of typical antipsychotics remained stable. Depression was the most common mental health diagnosis among deliveries to women with atypical antipsychotic use (63%), followed by bipolar disorder (43%) and schizophrenia (13%). The number and proportion of pregnancies exposed to atypical antipsychotics has increased dramatically in recent years. Studies are needed to examine the comparative safety and effectiveness of these medications relative to other therapeutic options in pregnancy. PMID:23389622

  11. Prevalence and trends in the use of antipsychotic medications during pregnancy in the U.S., 20012007: A population-based study of 585,615 deliveries

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Sengwee; Li, Qian; Cheetham, T. Craig; Cooper, William O.; Davis, Robert L.; Dublin, Sascha; Hammad, Tarek A.; Li, De-Kun; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Pinheiro, Simone P.; Raebel, Marsha A.; Scott, Pamela E.; Smith, David H.; Bobo, William V.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Dashevsky, Inna; Haffenreffer, Katherine; Avalos, Lyndsay A.; Andrade, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the prevalence of and temporal trends in prenatal antipsychotic medication use within a cohort of pregnant women in the U.S. Methods We identified live born deliveries to women aged 1545 years in 20012007 from 11 U.S. health plans participating in the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program (MEPREP). We ascertained prenatal exposure to antipsychotics from health plan pharmacy dispensing files, gestational age from linked infant birth certificate files, and ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes from health plan claims files. We calculated the prevalence of prenatal use of atypical and typical antipsychotics according to year of delivery, trimester of pregnancy, and mental health diagnosis. Results Among 585,615 qualifying deliveries, 4,223 (0.72%) were to women who received an atypical antipsychotic and 548 (0.09%) were to women receiving a typical antipsychotic any time from 60 days before pregnancy through delivery. There was a 2.5-fold increase in atypical antipsychotic use during the study period, from 0.33% (95% confidence interval: 0.29%, 0.37%) in 2001 to 0.82% (0.76%, 0.88%) in 2007, while the use of typical antipsychotics remained stable. Depression was the most common mental health diagnosis among deliveries to women with atypical antipsychotic use (63%), followed by bipolar disorder (43%) and schizophrenia (13%). Conclusions The number and proportion of pregnancies exposed to atypical antipsychotics has increased dramatically in recent years. Studies are needed to examine the comparative safety and effectiveness of these medications relative to other therapeutic options in pregnancy. PMID:23389622

  12. RESPONSE OF YELLOW BLUESTEM PASTURES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDE APPLICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prescribed burning and herbicide application are commonly used for management of introduced pastures in the Southern Plains but their quantitative impact is not well documented. We determined the impact of prescribed burning or herbicide application on forb populations, the production and nutritive...

  13. Latest views on pill prescribing.

    PubMed

    Kay, C R

    1984-11-01

    Guidelines for prescribing oral contraceptives (Ocs), which take into account recent research findings concerning the relationship between OC use and the development of cervical and breast neoplasia and vascular diseases, were suggested. The findings of M.P. Vessey and his colleagues that the risk of cervical neoplasia increases with the duration of OC use are difficult to interpret. OC is strongly associated with certain types of sexual behavior, e.g., initiation of sexual activity at an early age, frequent intercourse, and intercourse with multiple partners, and these behavioral factors, in turn, are known to be associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. Although an attempt was made to control for the effects of these behavioral factors, the findings of the study require further substantiation. Even if the findings are correct, OC users would appear to have only a minor excess risk of developing invasive carcinoma, and even this minimal increased risk could be avoided encouraging OC users to have cervical smears taken routinely. The findings of Pike and his colleagues in California concerning the risk of breast cancer among OC users are more controversial, and potentially more serious. The study found that there was a 4-fold increased risk of breast cancer in women, under the age of 37, who had used OCs prior to their 25th birthday, and the risk increased with duration of OC use. A study by McPerson and colleagues also reported that breast cancer was associated with the duration of OC use prior to 1st pregnancy. Other intensive studies have failed to reveal a relationship between breast neoplasia and OC use. Pike and his colleagues also published a table listing OC brands in rank order of their progestogen potency. Pike noted that there was a positive relationship between the occurrence of breast cancer and the level of progestogen potency. The table was harshly criticized because it is not possible to determine the potency level of combined formulations. Nevertheless, those brands associated with a higher risk of breast cancer contained high doses of progestogen as well as estrogen, and their use should be avoided. Furthermore, OCs with high progestogen doses should be avoided in order to reduce the risk of vascular diseases among OC users. The RCGP study demonstrated that there is a positive relationship between progestogen dosage and the development of arteriosclerotic diseases. OC formulations with doses exceeding 1 mg of norethisterone acetate and 150 mcg of levonorgestrel should be avoided. Breakthrough bleeding should be controlled by increasing the estrogen dose to 50 mcg rather than by altering the progesterone level. Effort should also be made to carefully tailor OC prescribing to the specific needs of each patient. The risk of vascular diseases among OC users is almost exclusively confined to older women who smoke. Care must be exercised in prescribing OCs for women who smoke and for women who other characteristics that place them at high risk of developing vascular disease. Since women differ considerably in the way they utilize and metabolize the steroids contained in OCs, efforts should be made to develop an inexpensive and simple technique for measuring serum steriod levels. This would allow physicians to reduce the steriod content of OCs for those women whose systems make maximal use of available steriods. PMID:6502571

  14. Update on typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) are best classified as typical or atypical. The distinction is based solely on their ability to cause extrapyramidal side effects (EPS), including tardive dyskinesia (TD). The two classes differ in mechanism of action, with atypical APDs providing important modulation of serotonergic neurotransmission. TD increases the death rate and can be minimized by limiting use of typical APDs. Clozapine is unique among the atypical APDs in its efficacy for ameliorating psychosis in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS), for reduction of suicide, and for improving longevity. The typical and atypical APDs do not differ in improving psychopathology in non-TRS. The atypicals vary in metabolic side effects: some have little burden. Cognitive benefits of the atypical APDs may be superior for some domains of cognition and require less use of anticholinergic drugs, which impair memory, for treatment of EPS. Overall, choosing among the atypical APDs as first-line treatment represents the best course for schizophrenia and most likely other disorders for which APDs are used. PMID:23020880

  15. Pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic-induced side effects

    PubMed Central

    Lencz, Todd; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2009-01-01

    Currently available antipsychotic drugs (APDs) carry significant, though highly variable, liability to neurologic and metabolic side effects. Pharmacogenetics approaches offer the possibility of identifying patient-specific biomarkers for predicting risk of these side effects. To date, a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a handful of genes have received convergent support across multiple studies. The primary focus has been on SNPs in dopamine and serotonin receptor genes: persuasive meta-analytic evidence exists for an effect of the dopamine D2 and D3 receptor genes (DRD2 and DRD3) in risk for tardr inesia (TD) and for an effect of variation at the receptor gene (HTR2C) for liability to APD-inducec gain. However, effect sizes appear to be modest, and pharmacoeconomic considerations have not been sufficiently studied, thereby limiting clinical applicability at this time. Effects of these genes and others on risk for TD, extrapyramidal side effects, hyperprolactinemia, and weight gain are revieved in this article. PMID:20135898

  16. Prescribing in primary dental care: general principles.

    PubMed

    Crighton, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Prescribing medicines is an essential part of comprehensive dental care. Behind this seemingly simple act lies a range of skills. These include understanding the physiological interaction of the medicines in the body as well as their potential for harm either to body systems or when conflicting with other medicines taken by the patient. The decision to prescribe is thus complex even before the efficacy of the drug for the dental condition is considered. This paper reviews some of the issues that the primary care practitioner must consider when prescribing, as well as practical concerns to make prescribing safe and effective. PMID:25668379

  17. Mechanisms of Action of Antipsychotic Drugs of Different Classes, Refractoriness to Therapeutic Effects of Classical Neuroleptics, and Individual Variation in Sensitivity to their Actions: PART II

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R

    2009-01-01

    Rapid-onset psychotic rebound is uncommon on discontinuation of most antipsychotic drugs, as might be expected for antipsychotic drugs with (hypothetically) indirect actions at their final target receptors. Rapid-onset psychosis is more common on withdrawal of clozapine, which might be expected if its action is direct. Drugs other than clozapine (notably thioridazine) may have hitherto unrecognised similarities to clozapine (but without danger of agranulocytosis), and may be useful in treatment of refractory psychosis. Quetiapine fulfils only some criteria for a clozapine-like drug. Clinical response to neuroleptics varies widely at any given plasma level. Haases neuroleptic threshold concept suggests that the dose producing the slightest motor side effects produces most or all of the therapeutic benefit, but analyses presented here suggest that antipsychotic actions are not subject to a sharp all-or-none threshold but increase over a small dose range. This concept could provide a method for quantitative determination of individualized optimal doses. PMID:20514211

  18. Patterns of prescription of antidepressants and antipsychotics across and within pregnancies in a population-based UK cohort.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Andrea V; Kang, Elizabeth M; Hammad, Tarek A

    2014-09-01

    Although antidepressant and antipsychotic utilization by gestational trimester has been described, longitudinal prescription patterns within pregnancies have received less attention. All mothers in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink's Mother Baby Link enrolled from 6months before pregnancy to 3months after delivery, with delivery date between 01/1989 and 12/2010 were included (n=421,645). Drug use prevalence was calculated as the number of women with prescriptions for antidepressants or antipsychotics in capsules/tablets in the 3months before pregnancy (T0), the first (T1), second (T2), or third (T3) pregnancy trimesters, or the 3months after delivery (T4). In each pregnancy, prescriptions in T0 and T3 were compared to identify treatment discontinuation, simplification (some drugs discontinued or dose lowered), no treatment change, intensification (drugs added to prior treatment or dose increased), and start. Antidepressant use in T0 through T4 was 4.69, 2.81, 1.31, 1.34, and 5.46%, respectively. Of 19,774 T0 antidepressant users, 79.57% discontinued, 5.13% simplified, 9.06% did not change, and 2.19% intensified treatment. 0.40% of non-users in T0 started antidepressants by T3. Antipsychotic use in T0 through T4 was 0.57, 1.34, 0.54, 0.28 and 0.38%. Excluding prochlorperazine, it was 0.15, 0.13, 0.08, 0.07 and 0.15%, respectively; of 639 T0 users, 72.30% discontinued, 7.51% simplified, 11.11% did not change, and 4.07% intensified treatment. 0.03% of non-users in T0 started antipsychotics by T3. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses identified a post-conception decrease in antidepressant and antipsychotic prescribing. Longitudinal treatment assessment additionally captured several treatment patterns among those who do not discontinue treatment that usually stay unrecognized. PMID:24374729

  19. Morbidity profile and prescribing patterns among outpatients in a teaching hospital in Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, DC; Giri, BR; Pathak, OK; Panta, OB; Shankar, PR

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent studies on prescribing among outpatients in hospitals in Western Nepal are lacking. The main objectives of the study were to obtain information on the morbidity pattern among outpatients and to analyze prescribing using drug use indicators. Methods A retrospective hospital record based study from 01.01.2004 to 31.12.2004 was carried out among individuals attending the outpatient department (OPD) of the Manipal Teaching hospital, Pokhara, Western Nepal. A total of 32,017 new patients attended the OPD during the study period. Systematic random sampling (1 in every 20 patients) was done and 1600 patients selected. After excluding patients visiting the emergency department, those who got admitted and whose records were not available, 1261 cases were analyzed. The demographic details, morbidity pattern, average number of drugs prescribed, percentage of drugs prescribed by generic names and from the Essential drug list of Nepal (Essential drugs are those which satisfy the priority healthcare needs of the population), percentage of encounters with an antibiotic and an injection prescribed were noted. Results 1261 patients made 1772 visits. Upper respiratory tract infection and acid peptic disease were the most common diagnoses. The mean number of drugs was 1.99. Only 19.5% and 39.6% of drugs were prescribed by generic name and from the Essential drug list. Antibiotics and injections were prescribed in 26.4% and 0.96% of encounters. Cetrizine, vitamins, amoxicillin, the combination of paracetamol and ibuprofen and ranitidine were most commonly prescribed. Conclusions Upper respiratory tract infections and acid peptic disease were the common illnesses. Generic prescribing and use of essential drugs were low. Some of the drug combinations being used were irrational. Prescriber education may be helpful in encouraging rational prescribing. PMID:18523618

  20. Hyperprolactinemia during antipsychotics treatment increases the level of coagulation markers

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Masamichi; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Sugawara, Norio; Furukori, Hanako; Kudo, Shuhei; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective The strong association between psychiatric patients who receive antipsychotics and the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is known. Although previous reports suggest that hyperprolactinemia often increases markers of activated coagulation, few studies have examined the direct relationship between the prolactin level elevated by antipsychotics and activated markers of activated coagulation. Method The participants included 182 patients with schizophrenia (male =89, female =93) who received antipsychotic treatments for at least 3 months. Markers of VTE (D-dimer, fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products, and thrombinantithrombin complex) and serum prolactin concentrations were measured. Results Prolactin levels were significantly correlated with the logarithmic transformation of the D-dimer (r=0.320, P=0.002) and fibrin/fibrinogen degradation product levels (r=0.236, P=0.026) but not of the thrombinantithrombin complex level (r=0.117, ns) among men. However, no correlations were found between the VTE markers and prolactin levels among women. These results were confirmed using multiple regression analyses that included demographic factors and antipsychotic dosages. Conclusion The current study indicates that hyperprolactinemia is associated with an increase in markers of activated coagulation among men receiving antipsychotics. This finding clinically implies that monitoring and modulating prolactin levels among men are important to decrease the risk of VTE. PMID:25750528

  1. Evaluation of an antipsychotic information sheet for patients.

    PubMed

    Whiskey, Eromona; Taylor, David

    2005-01-01

    Introduction. The objective of this study was to develop a decision aid that patients and clinicians might use to help the patient in the process of selecting an antipsychotic medication. In addition, we aimed to determine the antipsychotic that patients would choose given the information contained in the leaflet. Method. We designed a questionnaire for patients to appraise the contents of the leaflet, their understanding of the leaflet and the potential impact of the leaflet on compliance and therapeutic relationship between patient and doctor. Results. We recruited 30 stable patients with a diagnosis of a psychotic illness to evaluate the leaflet and to determine patient choice. Over 90% of patients felt that the leaflet improved their knowledge of antipsychotic medication. Seventy-six percent of patients agreed that the leaflet contained the right type and amount of information. Seventy percent of respondents believed the leaflet would improve the trust between them and their doctors, and almost half (47%) stated they were more likely to take their medicine after reading the leaflet. Forty percent of patients would prefer to switch antipsychotic medication, with quetiapine being the most frequently preferred option. Conclusion. The results indicate that, for patients in the stable phase of their illness, the leaflet is a useful tool in selecting an antipsychotic medication and may represent a way forward in improving outcomes in patients with psychotic disorders. A larger study examining outcomes using this tool would establish its clinical utility. PMID:24930924

  2. Increasing use of atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Richard A.; Bobo, William V.; Shelton, Richard C.; Arbogast, Patrick G.; Morrow, James A.; Wang, Wei; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Cooper, William O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To quantify maternal use of atypical antipsychotics, typical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and lithium during pregnancy. Methods Tennessee birth and death records were linked to Tennessee Medicaid data to conduct a retrospective cohort study of 296,817 women enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid throughout pregnancy who had a live birth or fetal death from 1985 to 2005. Results During the study time period, the adjusted rate of use of any study medication during pregnancy increased from nearly 14 to 31 per 1,000 pregnancies (? = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.07, 0.09). Significant increases were reported in use of anticonvulsants alone among mothers with pain and other psychiatric disorders, atypical antipsychotics alone among mothers with bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders, and more than one studied medication for mothers with epilepsy, pain disorders, bipolar disorders, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders. Significant decreases were reported in use of lithium alone and typical antipsychotics alone for all clinically meaningful diagnosis groups. Conclusions There was a substantial increase in use of atypical antipsychotics alone, anticonvulsants alone, and medications from multiple studied categories among Tennessee Medicaid-insured pregnant women during the study period. Further examination of the maternal and fetal consequences of exposure to these medications during pregnancy is warranted. PMID:23124892

  3. Oculomotor and Neuropsychological Effects of Antipsychotic Treatment for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hill, S. Kristian; Reilly, James L.; Harris, Margret S. H.; Khine, Tin; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement has become an important target for drug therapies in schizophrenia. Treatment development in this area requires assessment approaches that are sensitive to procognitive effects of antipsychotic and adjunctive treatments. Ideally, new treatments will have translational characteristics for parallel human and animal research. Previous studies of antipsychotic effects on cognition have relied primarily on paper-and-pencil neuropsychological testing. No study has directly compared neurophysiological biomarkers and neuropsychological testing as strategies for assessing cognitive effects of antipsychotic treatment early in the course of schizophrenia. Antipsychotic-naive patients with schizophrenia were tested before treatment with risperidone and again 6 weeks later. Matched healthy participants were tested over a similar time period. Test-retest reliability, effect sizes of within-subject change, and multivariate/univariate analysis of variance were used to compare 3 neurophysiological tests (visually guided saccade, memory-guided saccade, and antisaccade) with neuropsychological tests covering 4 cognitive domains (executive function, attention, memory, and manual motor function). While both measurement approaches showed robust neurocognitive impairments in patients prior to risperidone treatment, oculomotor biomarkers were more sensitive to treatment-related effects on neurocognitive function than traditional neuropsychological measures. Further, unlike the pattern of modest generalized cognitive improvement suggested by neuropsychological measures, the oculomotor findings revealed a mixed pattern of beneficial and adverse treatment-related effects. These findings warrant further investigation regarding the utility of neurophysiological biomarkers for assessing cognitive outcomes of antipsychotic treatment in clinical trials and in early-phase drug development. PMID:17932088

  4. Barriers to Primary Care Physicians Prescribing Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Eliza; Catlin, Mary; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Rosenblatt, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the efficacy of buprenorphine-naloxone for the treatment of opioid use disorders, few physicians in Washington State use this clinical tool. To address the acute need for this service, a Rural Opioid Addiction Management Project trained 120 Washington physicians in 20102011 to use buprenorphine. We conducted this study to determine what proportion of those trained physicians began prescribing this treatment and identify barriers to incorporating this approach into outpatient practice. METHODS We interviewed 92 of 120 physicians (77%), obtaining demographic information, current prescribing status, clinic characteristics, and barriers to prescribing buprenorphine. Residents and 7 physicians who were prescribing buprenorphine at the time of the course were excluded from the study. We analyzed the responses of the 78 remaining respondents. RESULTS Almost all respondents reported positive attitudes toward buprenorphine, but only 22 (28%) reported prescribing buprenorphine. Most (95%, n = 21) new prescribers were family physicians. Physicians who prescribed buprenorphine were more likely to have partners who had received a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine. A lack of institutional support was associated with not prescribing the medication (P = .04). A lack of mental health and psychosocial support was the most frequently cited barrier by both those who prescribe and who do not prescribe buprenorphine. CONCLUSION Interventions before and after training are needed to increase the number of physicians who offer buprenorphine for treatment of addiction. Targeting physicians in clinics that agree in advance to institute services, coupled with technical assistance after they have completed their training, their clinical teams, and their administrations is likely to help more physicians become active providers of this highly effective outpatient treatment. PMID:24615308

  5. Sex-Dependent Antipsychotic Capacity of 17β-Estradiol in the Latent Inhibition Model: A Typical Antipsychotic Drug in Both Sexes, Atypical Antipsychotic Drug in Males

    PubMed Central

    Arad, Michal; Weiner, Ina

    2010-01-01

    The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that estrogen is a natural neuroprotector in women and that exogenous estrogen may have antipsychotic potential, but results of clinical studies have been inconsistent. We have recently shown using the latent inhibition (LI) model of schizophrenia that 17β-estradiol exerts antipsychotic activity in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The present study sought to extend the characterization of the antipsychotic action of 17β-estradiol (10, 50 and 150 μg/kg) by testing its capacity to reverse amphetamine- and MK-801-induced LI aberrations in gonadally intact female and male rats. No-drug controls of both sexes showed LI, ie, reduced efficacy of a previously non-reinforced stimulus to gain behavioral control when paired with reinforcement, if conditioned with two but not five tone-shock pairings. In both sexes, amphetamine (1 mg/kg) and MK-801 (50 μg/kg) produced disruption (under weak conditioning) and persistence (under strong conditioning) of LI, modeling positive and negative/cognitive symptoms, respectively. 17β-estradiol at 50 and 150 μg/kg potentiated LI under strong conditioning and reversed amphetamine-induced LI disruption in both males and females, mimicking the action of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) in the LI model. 17β-estradiol also reversed MK-induced persistent LI, an effect mimicking atypical APDs and NMDA receptor enhancers, but this effect was observed in males and OVX females but not in intact females. These findings indicate that in the LI model, 17β-estradiol exerts a clear-cut antipsychotic activity in both sexes and, remarkably, is more efficacious in males and OVX females where it also exerts activity considered predictive of anti-negative/cognitive symptoms. PMID:20613719

  6. Antipsychotic Dose Mediates the Association between Polypharmacy and Corrected QT Interval

    PubMed Central

    Barbui, Corrado; Bighelli, Irene; Carrà, Giuseppe; Castellazzi, Mariasole; Lucii, Claudio; Martinotti, Giovanni; Nosè, Michela; Ostuzzi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic (AP) drugs have the potential to cause prolongation of the QT interval corrected for heart rate (QTc). As this risk is dose-dependent, it may be associated with the number of AP drugs concurrently prescribed, which is known to be associated with increased cumulative equivalent AP dosage. This study analysed whether AP dose mediates the relationship between polypharmacy and QTc interval. We used data from a cross-sectional survey that investigated the prevalence of QTc lengthening among people with psychiatric illnesses in Italy. AP polypharmacy was tested for evidence of association with AP dose and QTc interval using the Baron and Kenny mediational model. A total of 725 patients were included in this analysis. Of these, 186 (26%) were treated with two or more AP drugs (AP polypharmacy). The mean cumulative AP dose was significantly higher in those receiving AP polypharmacy (prescribed daily dose/defined daily dose = 2.93, standard deviation 1.31) than monotherapy (prescribed daily dose/defined daily dose = 0.82, standard deviation 0.77) (z = −12.62, p < 0.001). Similarly, the mean QTc interval was significantly longer in those receiving AP polypharmacy (mean = 420.86 milliseconds, standard deviation 27.16) than monotherapy (mean = 413.42 milliseconds, standard deviation 31.54) (z = −2.70, p = 0.006). The Baron and Kenny mediational analysis showed that, after adjustment for confounding variables, AP dose mediates the association between polypharmacy and QTc interval. The present study found that AP polypharmacy is associated with QTc interval, and this effect is mediated by AP dose. Given the high prevalence of AP polypharmacy in real-world clinical practice, clinicians should consider not only the myriad risk factors for QTc prolongation in their patients, but also that adding a second AP drug may further increase risk as compared with monotherapy. PMID:26840602

  7. Antipsychotic Dose Mediates the Association between Polypharmacy and Corrected QT Interval.

    PubMed

    Barbui, Corrado; Bighelli, Irene; Carr, Giuseppe; Castellazzi, Mariasole; Lucii, Claudio; Martinotti, Giovanni; Nos, Michela; Ostuzzi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic (AP) drugs have the potential to cause prolongation of the QT interval corrected for heart rate (QTc). As this risk is dose-dependent, it may be associated with the number of AP drugs concurrently prescribed, which is known to be associated with increased cumulative equivalent AP dosage. This study analysed whether AP dose mediates the relationship between polypharmacy and QTc interval. We used data from a cross-sectional survey that investigated the prevalence of QTc lengthening among people with psychiatric illnesses in Italy. AP polypharmacy was tested for evidence of association with AP dose and QTc interval using the Baron and Kenny mediational model. A total of 725 patients were included in this analysis. Of these, 186 (26%) were treated with two or more AP drugs (AP polypharmacy). The mean cumulative AP dose was significantly higher in those receiving AP polypharmacy (prescribed daily dose/defined daily dose = 2.93, standard deviation 1.31) than monotherapy (prescribed daily dose/defined daily dose = 0.82, standard deviation 0.77) (z = -12.62, p < 0.001). Similarly, the mean QTc interval was significantly longer in those receiving AP polypharmacy (mean = 420.86 milliseconds, standard deviation 27.16) than monotherapy (mean = 413.42 milliseconds, standard deviation 31.54) (z = -2.70, p = 0.006). The Baron and Kenny mediational analysis showed that, after adjustment for confounding variables, AP dose mediates the association between polypharmacy and QTc interval. The present study found that AP polypharmacy is associated with QTc interval, and this effect is mediated by AP dose. Given the high prevalence of AP polypharmacy in real-world clinical practice, clinicians should consider not only the myriad risk factors for QTc prolongation in their patients, but also that adding a second AP drug may further increase risk as compared with monotherapy. PMID:26840602

  8. Prescribed burning to affect a state transition in a shrub-encroached desert grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prescribed burning is a commonly advocated and historical practice for control of woody species encroachment into grasslands on all continents. However, desert grasslands of the southwestern United States often lack needed herbaceous fuel loads for effective prescriptions, dominant perennial gramin...

  9. 27 CFR 7.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 7.3 Section 7.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES Scope 7.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized...

  10. 8 CFR 299.1 - Prescribed forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prescribed forms. 299.1 Section 299.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION FORMS § 299.1 Prescribed forms. A listing of USCIS, ICE, and CBP approved forms referenced in chapter I can be viewed...

  11. 8 CFR 299.1 - Prescribed forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prescribed forms. 299.1 Section 299.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION FORMS § 299.1 Prescribed forms. A listing of USCIS, ICE, and CBP approved forms referenced in chapter I can be viewed...

  12. 8 CFR 299.1 - Prescribed forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Prescribed forms. 299.1 Section 299.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION FORMS § 299.1 Prescribed forms. A listing of USCIS, ICE, and CBP approved forms referenced in chapter I can be viewed...

  13. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  14. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  15. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  16. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  17. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  18. 27 CFR 4.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 4.3 Section 4.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope 4.3 Forms prescribed. (a)...

  19. 16 CFR 315.5 - Prescriber verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prescriber verification. 315.5 Section 315.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE 315.5 Prescriber verification. (a) Prescription requirement. A seller may sell contact lenses only in accordance with a contact...

  20. Behavioral animal models of antipsychotic drug actions.

    PubMed

    Peleg-Raibstein, Daria; Feldon, Joram; Meyer, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Basic research in animals represents a fruitful approach to study the neurobiological basis of brain and behavioral disturbances relevant to neuropsychiatric disease and to establish and evaluate novel pharmacological therapies for their treatment. In the context of schizophrenia, there are models employing specific experimental manipulations developed according to specific pathophysiological or etiological hypotheses. The use of selective lesions in adult animals and the acute administration of psychotomimetic agents are indispensable tools in the elucidation of the contribution of specific brain regions or neurotransmitters to the genesis of a specific symptom or collection of symptoms and enjoy some degrees of predictive validity. However, they may be inaccurate, if not inadequate, in capturing the etiological mechanisms or ontology of the disease needed for a complete understanding of the disease and may be limited in the discovery of novel compounds for the treatment of negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Under the prevailing consensus of schizophrenia as a disease of neurodevelopmental origin, we have seen the establishment of neurodevelopmental animal models which aim to identify the etiological processes whereby the brain, following specific triggering events, develops into a "schizophrenia-like brain" over time. Many neurodevelopmental models such as the neonatal ventral hippocampus (vHPC) lesion, methylazoxymethanol (MAM), and prenatal immune activation models can mimic a broad spectrum of behavioral, cognitive, and pharmacological abnormalities directly implicated in schizophrenic disease. These models allow pharmacological screens against multiple and coexisting schizophrenia-related dysfunctions while incorporating the disease-relevant concept of abnormal brain development. The multiplicity of existing models is testimonial to the multifactorial nature of schizophrenia, and there are ample opportunities for their integration. Indeed, one ultimate goal must be to incorporate the successes of distinct models into one unitary account of the complex disorder of schizophrenia and to use such unitary approaches in the further development and evaluation of novel antipsychotic treatment strategies. PMID:23129339

  1. Risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second-generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and if so how much the effects of the various SGAs differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone differs from that of other SGAs. Objectives To evaluate the effects of risperidone compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the references of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised, blinded trials comparing oral risperidone with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 45 blinded RCTs with 7760 participants. The number of RCTs available for each comparison varied: four studies compared risperidone with amisulpride, two with aripiprazole, 11 with clozapine, 23 with olanzapine, eleven with quetiapine, two with sertindole, three with ziprasidone and none with zotepine. Attrition from these studies was high (46.9%), leaving the interpretation of results problematic. Furthermore, 60% were industry sponsored, which can be a source of bias. There were few significant differences in overall acceptability of treatment as measured by leaving the studies early. Risperidone was slightly less acceptable than olanzapine, and slightly more acceptable than ziprasidone in this regard. Risperidone improved the general mental state (PANSS total score) slightly less than olanzapine (15 RCTs, n = 2390, MD 1.94 CI 0.58 to 3.31), but slightly more than quetiapine (9 RCTs, n = 1953, MD −3.09 CI −5.16 to −1.01) and ziprasidone (3 RCTs, n = 1016, MD −3.91 CI −7.55 to −0.27). The comparisons with the other SGA drugs were equivocal. Risperidone was also less efficacious than olanzapine and clozapine in terms of leaving the studies early due to inefficacy, but more efficacious than ziprasidone in the same outcome. Risperidone produced somewhat more extrapyramidal side effects than a number of other SGAs (use of antiparkinson medication versus clozapine 6 RCTs, n = 304, RR 2.57 CI 1.47 to 4.48, NNH 6 CI 33 to 3; versus olanzapine 13 RCTs, n = 2599, RR 1.28 CI 1.06 to 1.55, NNH 17 CI 9 to 100; versus quetiapine 6 RCTs, n = 1715, RR 1.98 CI 1.16 to 3.39, NNH 20 CI 10 to 100; versus ziprasidone 2 RCTs, n = 822, RR 1.42 CI 1.03 to 1.96, NNH not estimable; parkinsonism versus sertindole 1 RCT, n = 321, RR 4.11 CI 1.44 to 11.73, NNH 14 CI 100 to 8). Risperidone also increased prolactin levels clearly more than all comparators, except for amisulpride and sertindole for which no data were available. Other adverse events were less consistently reported, but risperidone may well produce more weight gain and/or associated metabolic problems than amisulpride (weight gain: 3 RCTs, n = 585, MD 0.99 CI 0.37 to 1.61), aripiprazole (cholesterol increase: 1 RCT, n = 83, MD 22.30 CI 4.91 to 39.69) and ziprasidone (cholesterol increase 2 RCTs, n = 767, MD 8.58 CI 1.11 to 16.04) but less than clozapine (weight gain 3 RCTs n = 373, MD −3.30 CI −5.65 to −0.95), olanzapine (weight gain 13 RCTs, n = 2116, MD −2.61 CI −3.74 to −1.48), quetiapine (cholesterol increase: 5 RCTs, n = 1433, MD −8.49 CI −12. 23 to −4.75) and sertindole (weight gain: 2 RCTs, n = 328, MD −0.99 CI −1.86 to −0.12). It may be less sedating than clozapine and quetiapine, lengthen the QTc interval less than sertindole (QTc change: 2 RCTs, n = 495, MD −18.60 CI −22.37 to 14.83), produce fewer seizures than clozapine (2 RCTs, n = 354, RR 0.22 CI 0.07 to 0.70, NNT 14 CI 8 to 33) and less sexual dysfunction in men than sertindole (2 RCTs, n = 437, RR 0.34 CI 0.16 to 0.76, NNT 13 CI 8 to 33). Authors’ conclusions Risperidone seems to produce somewhat more extrapyramidal side effects and clearly more prolactin increase than most other SGAs. It may also differ from other compounds in efficacy and in the occurrence of other adverse effects such as weight gain, metabolic problems, cardiac effects, sedation and seizures. Nevertheless, the large proportion of participants leaving studies early and incomplete reporting of outcomes makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions. Further large trials, especially comparing risperidone with those other new drugs for which only a few RCTs are available, are needed. PMID:21249678

  2. Antipsychotic induced weight gain: genetics, epigenetics, and biomarkers reviewed.

    PubMed

    Shams, Tahireh A; Mller, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    Antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG) is a prevalent side effect of antipsychotic treatment, particularly with second generation antipsychotics, such as clozapine and olanzapine. At this point, there is virtually nothing that can be done to predict who will be affected by AIWG. However, hope for the future of prediction lies with genetic risk factors. Many genes have been studied for their association with AIWG with a variety of promising findings. This review will focus on genetic findings in the last year and will discuss the first epigenetic and biomarker findings as well. Although there are significant findings in many other genes, the most consistently replicated findings are in the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), the serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C), the leptin, the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) genes. The study of genetic risk variants poses great promise in creating predictive tools for side effects such as AIWG. PMID:25138234

  3. Does sigma receptor antagonism predict clinical antipsychotic efficacy?

    PubMed

    Borison, R L; Diamond, B I; Dren, A T

    1991-01-01

    The psychotogenic actions of sigma receptor agonists, such as pentazocine, have led to the hypothesis that sigma receptor antagonists may be putative antipsychotic agents. In this study, BW234U, a selective but relatively weak sigma receptor antagonist was compared at two different dosage ranges with chlorpromazine and placebo in a double-blind randomized treatment trial in schizophrenic patients undergoing acute exacerbation. During the 4-week blinded treatment period, there was a modest drop in Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) score in the chlorpromazine group, however, neither dosage range of BW234U, nor placebo produced a significant drop in the BPRS. Our results suggest that BW234U is an ineffective anti-psychotic agent in schizophrenics experiencing acute exacerbation of their illness. Due to BW234U's relatively weak antagonism at the sigma recognition site, this does not rule out the possibility that more potent and equally selective sigma antagonists may possess antipsychotic efficacy. PMID:1681560

  4. Expected incidence of tardive dyskinesia associated with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Glazer, W M

    2000-01-01

    Given the problematic nature of tardive dyskinesia in persons taking conventional antipsychotics, evaluation of newer atypical antipsychotic agents should include a systematic assessment of tardive dyskinesia liability. Results of a prospective double-blind, randomized study of schizophrenic patients who participated in 3 preclinical olanzapine studies and were treated with 5 to 20 mg/day of olanzapine (N = 1192) or haloperidol (N = 522) recently indicated a significantly lower risk of development of tardive dyskinesia with olanzapine treatment than haloperidol treatment. This article discusses the known effects of atypical antipsychotic medications on tardive dyskinesia movements (both withdrawal and persistent) and the incidence rate of tardive dyskinesia among schizophrenic patients undergoing long-term treatment with olanzapine or haloperidol. PMID:10739327

  5. Plantar Fasciitis: Prescribing Effective Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Michael; Fields, Karl B.

    2002-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is an extremely common, painful injury seen among people in running and jumping sports. While prognosis for recovery with conservative care is excellent, prolonged duration of symptoms affects sports participation. Studies on treatment options show mixed results, so finding effective treatments can be challenging. A logical

  6. Antipsychotic Medicines for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: What You Should Know

    MedlinePLUS

    Antipsychotic Drugs for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: What You Should Know What are antipsychotic drugs? Antipsychotics are prescription drugs used to ... In general, almost everyone who is diagnosed with schizophrenia should try an antipsy- chotic drug. If one drug does not work, they should ...

  7. Predictors of Effect of Atypical Antipsychotics on Speech

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Preeti; Vandana, Valiya Parambath; Lewis, Nikita V; Jayaram, Mannaralukrishnaiah; Enderby, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most of the studies have looked into the effect of typical antipsychotics on speech secondary to tardive dyskinesia. Aims: This study was aimed to explore the factors predicting the effect of atypical antipsychotic medications on the production of speech. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty patients on stable regimen of three or more months on risperidone (92), olanzapine (28), aripiprazole (14), and clozapine (6) were recruited for the study. Speech was assessed by maximum phonation duration task, s/z ratio, diadochokinetic task, acoustic analysis and Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment (FDA). Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) were assessed by Simpson Angus scale. Statistical Analysis: Spearman correlation analysis was carried out to find the association between speech parameters and continuous variables. Effect of EPS, duration and dose of antipsychotic treatment on speech parameters was compared using Mann-Whitney test. Results: The risperidone group differ from other antipsychotics groups significantly in s/z ratio (0.07), FDA-total (0.23) and FDA-reflex (0.25). People who took antipsychotic for more than 2 years had lower score of FDA-palate (P = 0.042), and FDA-respiratory (P = 0.04) and higher values in noise-harmonic ratio (P = 0.011) and maximum /fundamental frequency (MFF) for males (P = 0.02). Effect of EPS was seen on MFF for males (spearman correlation coefficient = 0.34) and on almost all sections of FDA (spearman correlation coefficients = -0.2 to -0.33). Conclusion: Both duration of use and propensity of atypical antipsychotics to cause EPS can influence the speech performance of the patients. This information can be useful, particularly in people with the requirement of high quality speech. PMID:26702176

  8. Serial pharmacological prescribing practices for tic management in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mena; Stern, Jeremy S; Simmons, Helen; Robertson, Mary M

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological treatments for Tourette syndrome (TS) vary in efficacy between different patients. The evidence base is limited as even high quality controlled studies tend to be of relatively short duration which may lose relevance in clinical usage. Patients are frequently treated with serial agents in the search for efficacy and tolerability. The success of this strategy has not been previously documented. We examined 400 consecutive TS patients seen over a 10-year period, some with a longer prior history in other clinics; 255/400 (64%) were prescribed medication. We present this heterogeneous cohort in terms of the number of drugs they had tried, and as a proxy measure of some benefit of the last drug used, whether it had been prescribed under our supervision for ≥ 5 months. The most commonly prescribed medications were aripiprazole (64%), clonidine (40%), risperidone (30%) and sulpiride (29%) with changes in prescribing practises over the period examined. The number of different drugs tried were one (n = 155), two (n = 69), three (n = 36), four (n = 14), five (n = 15), six (n = 5), seven (n = 2) and eight (n = 1). The data illustrate the difficulty in drug treatment of tics and suggest that even after trials of several agents there is potential benefit in trying further options. PMID:26299248

  9. Common Wart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... May Prescribe Destruction with freezing (cryosurgery), burning (electrocautery), laser, or cantharidin, podophyllin, tretinoin, or acid application. Injection of chemotherapy drugs. Application of imiquimod, an ...

  10. Iloperidone: a new benzisoxazole atypical antipsychotic drug. Is it novel enough to impact the crowded atypical antipsychotic market?

    PubMed

    Albers, Lawrence James; Musenga, Alessandro; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-01-01

    Iloperidone is a new-generation atypical antipsychotic agent, acting as a serotonin/dopamine (5-HT(2A)/D(2)) antagonist, under development by Vanda Pharmaceuticals for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other psychiatric conditions. Chemically, iloperidone is a benzisoxazole, like risperidone, and shows a multiple receptor binding profile, sharing this feature with the other atypical antipsychotic agents. Administered orally, the drug is highly bound to plasma proteins and extensively metabolised. Several clinical trials have been carried out, to check efficacy, safety and side effects. In order to introduce iloperidone as an agent for the treatment of schizophrenia, a short overview of the disease and of the most important antipsychotic drugs available or under development will be reported. Iloperidone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are presented herein, together with an evaluation of clinical safety and efficacy results. PMID:18095919

  11. Current Regulations Related to Opioid Prescribing.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R; Grabois, Martin

    2015-11-01

    It is the responsibility of medical professionals to do all that is possible to safely alleviate pain. Opioids are frequently prescribed for pain but are associated with the potential for misuse, addiction, diversion, and overdose mortality, and thus they are strictly regulated. To adhere to legitimate practice standards, physicians and other health care providers who prescribe opioids for pain, particularly on a long-term basis, need current information on federal and state laws, treatment guidelines, and regulatory actions aimed at reducing opioid-related harm. The number of opioid-prescribing policies is increasing as federal and state governments increase scrutiny to alleviate opioid-related problems in society. Failure to adequately comply with opioid-prescribing laws and policies may put a prescriber at risk for legal or regulatory sanctions. Necessary actions include thorough documentation of prescribing decisions and assessment and follow-up of patient risk for opioid misuse or addiction. Tools to check for patient adherence to the prescribed regimen include prescription monitoring databases and urine drug screening. This article presents an overview of the legal and regulatory framework surrounding controlled substances law. It further discusses recent actions at the federal and state level to prevent opioid-related harm. PMID:26568503

  12. Impact of prescribed burning on blanket peat hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Joseph; Palmer, Sheila M.; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Wearing, Catherine; Irvine, Brian; Brown, Lee E.

    2015-08-01

    Fire is known to impact soil properties and hydrological flow paths. However, the impact of prescribed vegetation burning on blanket peatland hydrology is poorly understood. We studied 10 blanket peat headwater catchments. Five were subject to prescribed burning, while five were unburnt controls. Within the burnt catchments, we studied plots where the last burn occurred ˜2 (B2), 4 (B4), 7 (B7), or greater than 10 years (B10+) prior to the start of measurements. These were compared with plots at similar topographic wetness index locations in the control catchments. Plots subject to prescribed vegetation burning had significantly deeper water tables (difference in means = 5.3 cm) and greater water table variability than unburnt plots. Water table depths were significantly different between burn age classes (B2 > B4 > B7 > B10+) while B10+ water tables were not significantly different to the unburnt controls. Overland flow was less common on burnt peat than on unburnt peat, recorded in 9% and 17% of all runoff trap visits, respectively. Storm lag times and hydrograph recession limb periods were significantly greater (by ˜1 and 13 h on average, respectively) in the burnt catchments overall, but for the largest 20% of storms sampled, there was no significant difference in storm lag times between burnt and unburnt catchments. For the largest 20% of storms, the hydrograph intensity of burnt catchments was significantly greater than those of unburnt catchments (means of 4.2 × 10-5 and 3.4 × 10-5 s-1, respectively), thereby indicating a nonlinear streamflow response to prescribed burning. Together, these results from plots to whole river catchments indicate that prescribed vegetation burning has important effects on blanket peatland hydrology at a range of spatial scales.

  13. Repeated asenapine treatment produces a sensitization effect in two preclinical tests of antipsychotic activity.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rongyin; Chen, Yingzhu; Li, Ming

    2013-12-01

    Among several commonly used atypical antipsychotic drugs, olanzapine and risperidone cause a sensitization effect in the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) and phencyclidine (PCP)-induced hyperlocomotion paradigms--two well established animal tests of antipsychotic drugs, whereas clozapine causes a tolerance effect. Asenapine is a novel antipsychotic drug recently approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and manic disorders. It shares several receptor binding sites and behavioral features with other atypical antipsychotic drugs. However, it is not clear what type of repeated effect (sensitization or tolerance) asenapine would induce, and whether such an effect is transferrable to other atypicals. In this study, male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were first repeatedly tested with asenapine (0.05, 0.10 or 0.20 mg/kg, sc) for avoidance response or PCP (3.20 mg/kg, sc)-induced hyperlocomotion daily for 5 consecutive days. After 2-3 days of retraining/drug-free recovery, they were then challenged with asenapine (0.10 mg/kg, sc), followed by olanzapine (0.50 mg/kg, sc) and clozapine (2.50 mg/kg, sc). During the 5-day drug test period (the induction phase), repeated asenapine treatment progressively increased its inhibition of avoidance response and PCP-induced hyperlocomotion in a dose-dependent fashion. On the asenapine and olanzapine challenge tests (the expression phase), rats previously treated with asenapine still showed significantly lower avoidance response and lower PCP-induced hyperlocomotion than those previously treated with vehicle. An increased reactivity to clozapine challenge in prior asenapine-treated rats was also found in the PCP-induced hyperlocomotion test. These findings suggest that asenapine is capable of inducing a sensitization effect and a cross-sensitization to olanzapine and clozapine (to a lesser extent). Because the behavioral profile of asenapine in both tests is similar to that of olanzapine, but different from that of clozapine, we suggest that asenapine resembles olanzapine to a greater extent than clozapine in its therapeutic and side effect profiles. PMID:23954676

  14. Differential effects of antipsychotic drugs on insight in first episode schizophrenia: Data from the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST).

    PubMed

    Pijnenborg, G H M; Timmerman, M E; Derks, E M; Fleischhacker, W W; Kahn, R S; Aleman, A

    2015-06-01

    Although antipsychotics are widely prescribed, their effect of on improving poor illness insight in schizophrenia has seldom been investigated and therefore remains uncertain. This paper examines the effects of low dose haloperidol, amisulpride, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone on insight in first-episode schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder. The effects of five antipsychotic drugs in first episode psychosis on insight were compared in a large scale open randomized controlled trial conducted in 14 European countries: the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST). Patients with at least minimal impairments in insight were included in the present study (n=455). Insight was assessed with item G12 of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), administered at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after randomization. The use of antipsychotics was associated with clear improvements in insight over and above improvements in other symptoms. This effect was most pronounced in the first three months of treatment, with quetiapine being significantly less effective than other drugs. Effects of spontaneous improvement cannot be ruled out due to the lack of a placebo control group, although such a large spontaneous improvement of insight would seem unlikely. PMID:25907250

  15. Delusions of pregnancy associated with increased prolactin concentrations produced by antipsychotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ali, Jeffrey A; Desai, Kirtida D; Ali, Lia J

    2003-06-01

    Treatment of psychotic symptoms has traditionally involved conventional antipsychotics. While efficacious, their side-effects have been problematic and the approval by the Food and Drug Administration of the newer antipsychotics with improved side-effects profiles heralded important advances in treating psychoses. Prolactin elevation has been associated with all classical and some atypical antipsychotics. We present cases where elevation of prolactin concentrations secondary to antipsychotic treatment was associated with delusions of pregnancy. Risperidone was the antipsychotic employed and elevation of prolactin concentrations were noted each time. The delusions abated and prolactin concentrations decreased when the drug was discontinued. Rechallenge with risperidone resulted in re-elevation of prolactin levels along with recurrent delusions. Substituting risperidone with another antipsychotic (either olanzapine or quetiapine) also led to abatement of the delusions and lowering of prolactin. Although no direct psychotogenic effects of prolactin are known, it is contended that delusions of pregnancy reported during antipsychotic treatment might be associated with rising prolactin concentrations. PMID:12890303

  16. Antipsychotic Therapy During Early and Late Pregnancy. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Both first- (FGAs) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are routinely used in treating severe and persistent psychiatric disorders. However, until now no articles have analyzed systematically the safety of both classes of psychotropics during pregnancy. Data sources and search strategy: Medical literature information published in any language since 1950 was identified using MEDLINE/PubMed, TOXNET, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library. Additional references were identified from the reference lists of published articles. Bibliographical information, including contributory unpublished data, was also requested from companies developing drugs. Search terms were pregnancy, psychotropic drugs, (a)typical-first-second-generation antipsychotics, and neuroleptics. A separate search was also conducted to complete the safety profile of each reviewed medication. Searches were last updated on July 2008. Data selection: All articles reporting primary data on the outcome of pregnancies exposed to antipsychotics were acquired, without methodological limitations. Conclusions: Reviewed information was too limited to draw definite conclusions on structural teratogenicity of FGAs and SGAs. Both classes of drugs seem to be associated with an increased risk of neonatal complications. However, most SGAs appear to increase risk of gestational metabolic complications and babies large for gestational age and with mean birth weight significantly heavier as compared with those exposed to FGAs. These risks have been reported rarely with FGAs. Hence, the choice of the less harmful option in pregnancy should be limited to FGAs in drug-naive patients. When pregnancy occurs during antipsychotic treatment, the choice to continue the previous therapy should be preferred. PMID:18787227

  17. Antipsychotic treatment modulates glutamate transport and NMDA receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Zink, Mathias; Englisch, Susanne; Schmitt, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia patients often suffer from treatment-resistant cognitive and negative symptoms, both of which are influenced by glutamate neurotransmission. Innovative therapeutic strategies such as agonists at metabotropic glutamate receptors or glycin reuptake inhibitors try to modulate the brain's glutamate network. Interactions of amino acids with monoamines have been described on several levels, and first- and second-generation antipsychotic agents (FGAs, SGAs) are known to exert modulatory effects on the glutamatergic system. This review summarizes the current knowledge on effects of FGAs and SGAs on glutamate transport and receptor expression derived from pharmacological studies. Such studies serve as a control for molecular findings in schizophrenia brain tissue and are clinically relevant. Moreover, they may validate animal models for psychosis, foster basic research on antipsychotic substances and finally lead to a better understanding of how monoaminergic and amino acid neurotransmissions are intertwined. In the light of these results, important differences dependent on antipsychotic substances, dosage and duration of treatment became obvious. While some post-mortem findings might be confounded with multifold drug effects, others are unlikely to be influenced by antipsychotic treatment and could represent important markers of schizophrenia pathophysiology. In similarity to the convergence of toxic and psychotomimetic effects of dopaminergic, serotonergic and anti-glutamatergic substances, the therapeutic mechanisms of SGAs might merge on a yet to be defined molecular level. In particular, serotonergic effects of SGAs, such as an agonism at 5HT1A receptors, represent important targets for further clinical research. PMID:25214389

  18. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to

  19. The influence of atypical antipsychotic drugs on sexual function.

    PubMed

    Just, Marek J

    2015-01-01

    Human sexuality is contingent upon many biological and psychological factors. Such factors include sexual drive (libido), physiological arousal (lubrication/erection), orgasm, and ejaculation, as well as maintaining normal menstrual cycle. The assessment of sexual dysfunction can be difficult due to the intimate nature of the problem and patients' unwillingness to discuss it. Also, the problem of dysfunction is often overlooked by doctors. Atypical antipsychotic treatment is a key component of mental disorders' treatment algorithms recommended by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence, the American Psychiatric Association, and the British Society for Psychopharmacology. The relationship between atypical antipsychotic drugs and sexual dysfunction is mediated in part by antipsychotic blockade of pituitary dopamine D2 receptors increasing prolactin secretion, although direct correlations have not been established between raised prolactin levels and clinical symptoms. Variety of mechanisms are likely to contribute to antipsychotic-related sexual dysfunction, including hyperprolactinemia, sedation, and antagonism of a number of neurotransmitter receptors (?-adrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminic, and muscarinic). Maintaining normal sexual function in people treated for mental disorders can affect their quality of life, mood, self-esteem, attitude toward taking medication, and compliance during therapy. PMID:26185449

  20. The influence of atypical antipsychotic drugs on sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Just, Marek J

    2015-01-01

    Human sexuality is contingent upon many biological and psychological factors. Such factors include sexual drive (libido), physiological arousal (lubrication/erection), orgasm, and ejaculation, as well as maintaining normal menstrual cycle. The assessment of sexual dysfunction can be difficult due to the intimate nature of the problem and patients’ unwillingness to discuss it. Also, the problem of dysfunction is often overlooked by doctors. Atypical antipsychotic treatment is a key component of mental disorders’ treatment algorithms recommended by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence, the American Psychiatric Association, and the British Society for Psychopharmacology. The relationship between atypical antipsychotic drugs and sexual dysfunction is mediated in part by antipsychotic blockade of pituitary dopamine D2 receptors increasing prolactin secretion, although direct correlations have not been established between raised prolactin levels and clinical symptoms. Variety of mechanisms are likely to contribute to antipsychotic-related sexual dysfunction, including hyperprolactinemia, sedation, and antagonism of a number of neurotransmitter receptors (α-adrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminic, and muscarinic). Maintaining normal sexual function in people treated for mental disorders can affect their quality of life, mood, self-esteem, attitude toward taking medication, and compliance during therapy. PMID:26185449

  1. Antipsychotic-like effects of zolpidem in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewski, Pawel; Kolaczkowski, Marcin; Marcinkowska, Monika; Wesolowska, Anna; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Pawlowski, Maciej; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2016-02-15

    Aside from their use in the treatment of anxiety disorders and insomnia, benzodiazepines and other GABAA receptor positive modulators are widely used as add-on treatments in schizophrenic and non-schizophrenic psychoses. However, there is relatively little direct clinical or pre-clinical evidence for antipsychotic effects of GABAergic medications. Previous studies have indicated that zolpidem, a GABAergic drug acting preferentially at α1-containing GABAA receptors, may produce catalepsy through interactions with dopaminergic neurotransmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of zolpidem in experimental models of antipsychotic activity and extrapyramidal side effects in Wistar rats. Effects of zolpidem were compared with that of a classic benzodiazepine drug, diazepam and a second-generation antipsychotic medication, risperidone. High doses of risperidone (10.0mg/kg, i.p.) and zolpidem (10.0mg/kg, i.p.), but not diazepam, induced relatively short-lasting cataleptic responses in the bar test. Zolpidem and risperidone, but not diazepam, produced some antipsychotic-like effects at doses, which produced no catalepsy and did not inhibit spontaneous locomotor activity and apomorphine-induced stereotypies. The present results tend to indicate that zolpidem exerts some neuroleptic-like effects at doses, which do not produce motor side effects. Our findings may provide further rationale for the development of new subtype-selective GABAA receptor modulators for the treatment of psychotic symptoms. PMID:26825544

  2. Which atypical antipsychotics are identified by screening tests?

    PubMed

    Moore, N C; Gershon, S

    1989-06-01

    Only two tests were specific for antipsychotic potential. All effective antipsychotics blocked pharmacologically induced locomotion and affected firing in the mesolimbic DA neurons. The remaining single- (Table 1) and repeated- (Table 2) dose tests identified the atypical antipsychotics. Clozapine, thioridazine, sulpiride, tiospirone, and molindone were atypical in both types of study. Pimozide, pipamperone, aceperon, methylperon, and clotiapine were atypical in single-dose studies, clopenthixol in repeated-dose studies. Since the biochemical abnormality causing psychoses is unknown, it may be that current methods of screening for new antipsychotics are inadequate and possibly inappropriate. If a neurotransmitter other than DA is the primary cause, then totally new tests may be needed. Present tests, especially those involving behavioral paradigms, may continue to select out compounds that cause EPS side-effects. New methods such as positron emission tomography scanning and other brain-imaging techniques hold the promise of studying specific types and subtypes of receptors in the living human brain. The recent discovery of chromosomal abnormalities in psychotic illness may provide new insights into the biochemical causes of such disorders and lead to completely new compounds that will be both safer and more effective. In the meantime we plan to review the literature on the clinical use of the compounds identified as atypical in this article and to develop research protocols to assess their efficacy in treatment-resistant psychoses and intractable conditions such as tardive dyskinesia. PMID:2568176

  3. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  4. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... gov ® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  5. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... gov® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  6. [Appropriate medication prescribing in older people].

    PubMed

    Blain, H; Rambourg, P; Le Quellec, A; Ayach, L; Biboulet, P; Bismuth, M; Blain, A; Boulenger, J-P; Celton, B; Combe, B; Dauvilliers, Y; Davy, J-M; Geny, C; Hemmi, P; Hillaire-Buys, D; Jalabert, A; Jung, B; Leclercq, F; Lglise, M-S; Morel, J; Mourad, G; Ponrouch, M-P; Puisieux, F; Quantin, X; Qur, I; Renard, E; Ribstein, J; Roch-Torreilles, I; Rolland, Y; Rosant, D; Terminet, A; Thuret, R; Villiet, M; Deshormires, N; Bourret, R; Bousquet, J; Jonquet, O; Millat, B

    2015-10-01

    Drug-induced adverse effects are one of the main avoidable causes of hospitalization in older people. Numerous lists of potentially inappropriate medications for older people have been published, as national and international guidelines for appropriate prescribing in numerous diseases and for different age categories. The present review describes the general rules for an appropriate prescribing in older people and summarizes, for the main conditions encountered in older people, medications that are too often under-prescribed, the precautions of use of the main drugs that induce adverse effects, and drugs for which the benefit to risk ratio is unfavourable in older people. All these data are assembled in educational tables designed to be printed in a practical pocket format and used in daily practice by prescribers, whether physicians, surgeons or pharmacists. PMID:26003377

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... per person than others. SOURCE: IMS, National Prescription Audit (NPA TM ), 2012. View larger image and text. ... prescribe at different levels. SOURCE: IMS, National Prescription Audit (NPA TM ), 2012. View larger image and text. ...

  8. Emergency Department Visits Involving Misuse and Abuse of the Antipsychotic Quetiapine: Results from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN)

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Margaret E; Albright, Victoria A; Yoon, Joanna; Council, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Case reports in medical literature suggest that the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine, a medication not previously considered to have abuse potential, is now being subject to misuse and abuse (MUA; ie, taken when not prescribed for them or used in a way other than instructed by their health professional). Here we present systematic, nationally representative data from the 2005 to 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) for prevalence of emergency department (ED) visits among the U.S. general population involving quetiapine and related to MUA, suicide attempts, and adverse reactions. Nationally, quetiapine-related ED visits increased 90% between 2005 and 2011, from 35,581 ED visits to 67,497. DAWN data indicate that when used without medical supervision for recreational/self-medication purposes, quetiapine poses health risks for its users, especially among polydrug users and women. These findings suggest that the medical and public health communities should increase vigilance concerning this drug and its potential for MUA. PMID:26056465

  9. Emergency Department Visits Involving Misuse and Abuse of the Antipsychotic Quetiapine: Results from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN).

    PubMed

    Mattson, Margaret E; Albright, Victoria A; Yoon, Joanna; Council, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Case reports in medical literature suggest that the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine, a medication not previously considered to have abuse potential, is now being subject to misuse and abuse (MUA; ie, taken when not prescribed for them or used in a way other than instructed by their health professional). Here we present systematic, nationally representative data from the 2005 to 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) for prevalence of emergency department (ED) visits among the U.S. general population involving quetiapine and related to MUA, suicide attempts, and adverse reactions. Nationally, quetiapine-related ED visits increased 90% between 2005 and 2011, from 35,581 ED visits to 67,497. DAWN data indicate that when used without medical supervision for recreational/self-medication purposes, quetiapine poses health risks for its users, especially among polydrug users and women. These findings suggest that the medical and public health communities should increase vigilance concerning this drug and its potential for MUA. PMID:26056465

  10. Nurse prescribing ethics and medical marketing.

    PubMed

    Adams, J

    This article suggests that nurse prescribers require an awareness of key concepts in ethics, such as deontology and utilitarianism to reflect on current debates and contribute to them. The principles of biomedical ethics have also been influential in the development of professional codes of conduct. Attention is drawn to the importance of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry's code of practice for the pharmaceutical industry in regulating marketing aimed at prescribers. PMID:21500692

  11. Prenatal Antipsychotic Exposure and Neuromotor Performance During Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Katrina C.; LaPrairie, Jamie L.; Brennan, Patricia A.; Stowe, Zachary N.; Newport, D. Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Context Despite the expanding clinical utility of antipsychotics beyond psychotic disorders to include depressive, bipolar, and anxiety disorders, reproductive safety data regarding the neurodevelopmental sequelae of fetal antipsychotic exposure are scarce. Objective To examine whether intrauterine antipsychotic exposure is associated with deficits in neuromotor performance and habituation in 6-month-old infants. Design, Setting, and Participants A prospective controlled study was conducted from December 1999 through June 2008 at the Infant Development Laboratory of the Emory Psychological Center examining maternal-infant dyads (N=309) at 6 months postpartum with pregnancy exposure to antipsychotics (n=22), antidepressants (n = 202), or no psychotropic agents (n = 85). Examiners masked to maternal-infant exposure status administered a standardized neuromotor examination (Infant Neurological International Battery [INFANIB]) that tests posture, tone, reflexes, and motor skills and a visual habituation paradigm using a neutral female face. Main Outcome Measures The INFANIB composite score; number of trials required to achieve a 50% decrease in infant fixation during a visual habituation task; and mean time looking at the stimulus across 10 trials. Results Infants prenatally exposed to antipsychotics (mean=64.71) showed significantly lower INFANIB scores than those with antidepressant (mean=68.57) or no psychotropic (mean=71.19) exposure, after controlling for significant covariates (F2,281=4.51; P =.01; partial η2=0.033). The INFANIB scores were also significantly associated with maternal psychiatric history, including depression, psychosis, and overall severity/chronicity (P’s<.05) and maternal depression during pregnancy was associated with less efficient habituation (r245=0.16; P <.02). There were no significant differences regarding habituation between medication exposure groups. Conclusions Among 6-month-old infants, a history of intrauterine antipsychotic exposure, compared with antidepressant or no psychotropic exposure, was associated with significantly lower scores on a standard test of neuromotor performance, highlighting the need for further scrutiny of the reproductive safety and neurodevelopmental sequelae of fetal antipsychotic exposure. Disentangling medication effects from maternal illness effects, which also contributed, remains a critical challenge. PMID:22474072

  12. Modeling of Outpatient Prescribing Process in Iran: A Gateway Toward Electronic Prescribing System

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of electronic prescribing system can overcome many problems of the paper prescribing system, and provide numerous opportunities of more effective and advantageous prescribing. Successful implementation of such a system requires complete and deep understanding of work content, human force, and workflow of paper prescribing. The current study was designed in order to model the current business process of outpatient prescribing in Iran and clarify different actions during this process. In order to describe the prescribing process and the system features in Iran, the methodology of business process modeling and analysis was used in the present study. The results of the process documentation were analyzed using a conceptual model of workflow elements and the technique of modeling As-Is business processes. Analysis of the current (as-is) prescribing process demonstrated that Iran stood at the first levels of sophistication in graduated levels of electronic prescribing, namely electronic prescription reference, and that there were problematic areas including bottlenecks, redundant and duplicated work, concentration of decision nodes, and communicative weaknesses among stakeholders of the process. Using information technology in some activities of medication prescription in Iran has not eliminated the dependence of the stakeholders on paper-based documents and prescriptions. Therefore, it is necessary to implement proper system programming in order to support change management and solve the problems in the existing prescribing process. To this end, a suitable basis should be provided for reorganization and improvement of the prescribing process for the future electronic systems. PMID:25237369

  13. Modeling of outpatient prescribing process in iran: a gateway toward electronic prescribing system.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of electronic prescribing system can overcome many problems of the paper prescribing system, and provide numerous opportunities of more effective and advantageous prescribing. Successful implementation of such a system requires complete and deep understanding of work content, human force, and workflow of paper prescribing. The current study was designed in order to model the current business process of outpatient prescribing in Iran and clarify different actions during this process. In order to describe the prescribing process and the system features in Iran, the methodology of business process modeling and analysis was used in the present study. The results of the process documentation were analyzed using a conceptual model of workflow elements and the technique of modeling "As-Is" business processes. Analysis of the current (as-is) prescribing process demonstrated that Iran stood at the first levels of sophistication in graduated levels of electronic prescribing, namely electronic prescription reference, and that there were problematic areas including bottlenecks, redundant and duplicated work, concentration of decision nodes, and communicative weaknesses among stakeholders of the process. Using information technology in some activities of medication prescription in Iran has not eliminated the dependence of the stakeholders on paper-based documents and prescriptions. Therefore, it is necessary to implement proper system programming in order to support change management and solve the problems in the existing prescribing process. To this end, a suitable basis should be provided for reorganization and improvement of the prescribing process for the future electronic systems. PMID:25237369

  14. [Prescribing inappropriate medication: the new STOPP/START criteria].

    PubMed

    Lang, P-O; Boland, B; Dalleur, O

    2015-11-11

    Prescribing inappropriate medication (PIM) is a common public health problem. Mainly due to associated adverse drugs events (ADE), it results in major morbidity and mortality, as well as increased healthcare utilization. For a long time, the systematic review of medications prescribed appeared as a solution for limiting PIM and the ADE associated with such prescriptions. With this aim and since 2008, the list of STOPP-START criteria has appeared as attractive in its design, as well as logical and easy to use. The initial version has just been updated and improved. After having detailed all improvements provided to the 2008 version, we present the result of its adaptation into French language by a group of French-speaking expert from Belgium, Canada, France, and Switzerland. PMID:26727732

  15. Dermatoglyphic correlates of hippocampus volume: Evaluation of aberrant neurodevelopmental markers in antipsychotic-nave schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kalmady, Sunil V; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Gautham, S; Arasappa, Rashmi; Jose, Dania A; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, B N

    2015-10-30

    Schizophrenia is a disorder of aberrant neurodevelopment is marked by abnormalities in brain structure and dermatoglyphic traits. However, the link between these two (i.e. dermatoglyphic parameters and brain structure) which share ectodermal origin and common developmental window has not been explored extensively. The current study examined dermatoglyphic correlates of hippocampal volume in antipsychotic-nave schizophrenia patients in comparison with matched healthy controls. Ridge counts and asymmetry measures for palmar inter-digital areas (a-b, b-c, c-d) were obtained using high resolution digital scans of palms from 89 schizophrenia patients [M:F=48:41] and 48 healthy controls [M:F=30:18]. Brain scans were obtained for subset of subjects including 26 antipsychotic-nave patients [M:F=13:13] and 29 healthy controls [M:F=19:10] using 3 T-MRI. Hippocampal volume and palmar ridge counts were measured by blinded raters with good inter-rater reliability using valid methods. Directional asymmetry (DA) of b-c and bilateral hippocampal volume were significantly lower in patients than controls. Significant positive correlation was found between DA and ridge count of b-c with bilateral anterior hippocampal volume. Study demonstrates the utility of dermatoglyphic markers in identifying structural changes in the brain which may form the basis for neurodevelopmental pathogenesis in schizophrenia. PMID:26385539

  16. Genetics of antipsychotic-induced weight gain: update and current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kao, Amy C C; Mller, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Antipsychotic medications are used to effectively treat various symptoms for different psychiatric conditions. Unfortunately, antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG) is a common side effect that frequently results in obesity and secondary medical conditions. Twin and sibling studies have indicated that genetic factors are likely to be highly involved in AIWG. Over recent years, there has been considerable progress in this area, with several consistently replicated findings, as well as the identification of new genes and implicated pathways. Here, we will review the most recent genetic studies related to AIWG using the Medline database (PubMed) and Google Scholar. Among the steadiest findings associated with AIWG are serotonin 2C receptors (HTR2C) and leptin promoter gene variants, with more recent studies implicating MTHFR and, in particular, MC4R genes. Additional support was reported for the HRH1, BDNF, NPY, CNR1, GHRL, FTO and AMPK genes. Notably, some of the reported variants appear to have relatively large effect sizes. These findings have provided insights into the mechanisms involved in AIWG and will help to develop predictive genetic tests in the near future. PMID:24279860

  17. A multivariate approach linking reported side effects of clinical antidepressant and antipsychotic trials to in vitro binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Michl, Johanna; Scharinger, Christian; Zauner, Miriam; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-09-01

    The vast majority of approved antidepressants and antipsychotics exhibit a complex pharmacology. The mechanistic understanding of how these psychotropic medications are related to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is crucial for the development of novel drug candidates and patient adherence. This study aims to associate in vitro assessed binding affinity profiles (39 compounds, 24 molecular drug targets) and ADRs (n=22) reported in clinical trials of antidepressants and antipsychotics (n>59.000 patients) by the use of robust multivariate statistics. Orthogonal projection to latent structures (O-PLS) regression models with reasonable predictability were found for several frequent ADRs such as nausea, diarrhea, hypotension, dizziness, headache, insomnia, sedation, sleepiness, increased sweating, and weight gain. Results of the present study support many well-known pharmacological principles such as the association of hypotension and dizziness with ?1-receptor or sedation with H1-receptor antagonism. Moreover, the analyses revealed novel or hardly investigated mechanisms for common ADRs including the potential involvement of 5-HT6-antagonism in weight gain, muscarinic receptor antagonism in dizziness, or 5-HT7-antagonism in sedation. To summarize, the presented study underlines the feasibility and value of a multivariate data mining approach in psychopharmacological development of antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:25044049

  18. A multivariate approach linking reported side effects of clinical antidepressant and antipsychotic trials to in vitro binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Michl, Johanna; Scharinger, Christian; Zauner, Miriam; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H.; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of approved antidepressants and antipsychotics exhibit a complex pharmacology. The mechanistic understanding of how these psychotropic medications are related to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is crucial for the development of novel drug candidates and patient adherence. This study aims to associate in vitro assessed binding affinity profiles (39 compounds, 24 molecular drug targets) and ADRs (n=22) reported in clinical trials of antidepressants and antipsychotics (n>59.000 patients) by the use of robust multivariate statistics. Orthogonal projection to latent structures (O-PLS) regression models with reasonable predictability were found for several frequent ADRs such as nausea, diarrhea, hypotension, dizziness, headache, insomnia, sedation, sleepiness, increased sweating, and weight gain. Results of the present study support many well-known pharmacological principles such as the association of hypotension and dizziness with ?1-receptor or sedation with H1-receptor antagonism. Moreover, the analyses revealed novel or hardly investigated mechanisms for common ADRs including the potential involvement of 5-HT6-antagonism in weight gain, muscarinic receptor antagonism in dizziness, or 5-HT7-antagonism in sedation. To summarize, the presented study underlines the feasibility and value of a multivariate data mining approach in psychopharmacological development of antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:25044049

  19. Monitoring and managing metabolic effects of antipsychotics: a cluster randomized trial of an intervention combining evidence-based quality improvement and external facilitation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of psychotic disorders consists primarily of second generation antipsychotics, which are associated with metabolic side effects such as overweight/obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines recommend timely assessment and management of these conditions; however, research studies show deficits and delays in metabolic monitoring and management for these patients. This protocol article describes the project Monitoring and Management for Metabolic Side Effects of Antipsychotics, which is testing an approach to implement recommendations for these practices. Methods/Design This project employs a cluster randomized clinical trial design to test effectiveness of an evidence-based quality improvement plus facilitation intervention. Eligible study sites were VA Medical Centers with ?300 patients started on a new antipsychotic prescription in a six-month period. A total of 12 sites, matched in pairs based on scores on an organizational practice survey, were then randomized within pairs to intervention or control conditions. Study participants include VA employees involved in metabolic monitoring and management of patients treated with antipsychotics at participating sites. The intervention involves researchers partnering with clinical stakeholders to facilitate tailoring of local implementation strategies to address barriers to metabolic side-effect monitoring and management. The intervention includes a Design Phase (initial site visit and subsequent development of a local implementation plan); Implementation Phase (guided by an experienced external facilitator); and a Sustainability Phase. Evaluation includes developmental, implementation-focused, progress-focused and interpretative formative evaluation components, as well as summative evaluation. Evaluation methods include surveys, qualitative data collection from provider participants, and quantitative data analysis of data for all patients prescribed a new antipsychotic medication at a study site who are due for monitoring or management of metabolic side effects during the study phases. Changes in rates of recommended monitoring and management actions at intervention and control sites will be compared using time series analyses. Discussion Improving monitoring for metabolic side effects of antipsychotics, as well as promoting timely evidence-based management when these effects emerge, will lead to improved patient safety and long-term outcomes. This article discusses key strengths and challenges of the study. Trial registration NCT01875861 PMID:24103648

  20. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Pharmacological Interventions for Weight Gain from Antipsychotics and Mood Stabilizers

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Miller, Del D.; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Calarge, Chadi A.; Ellingrod, Vicki L.; Haynes, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological treatments for serious mental illness (SMI) can cause weight gain and adverse metabolic effects. Many second generation antipsychotics and mood stabilizers appear to be particularly problematic in this regard. Several studies have investigated interventions for antipsychotic-induced, or less commonly mood stabilizer induced, weight gain. Both lifestyle and pharmacological interventions have demonstrated effectiveness. We systematically review randomized controlled trials of pharmacological interventions for weight gain related to these medications. We conducted a meta-analysis of clinical trials for the most studied agents to estimate mean weight loss: metformin (2.93 kg, 95% C.I. 0.974.89, p=0.003), H2 antagonists (1.78 kg (95% C.I. ?0.504.06, p=0.13), topiramate (3.95 kg 95% C.I. 1.776.12, p=0.0004), and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (1.30 kg (95% C.I. ?0.062.66, p=0.06). Among the studied options for antipsychotic-related weight gain, metformin has the strongest evidence base and may improve vascular risk factors beyond obesity. The use of topiramate is also supported by the literature and may improve psychotic symptoms in those refractory to treatment. A marginal benefit is seen with norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and any vascular benefits from such weight loss may be counteracted by increases in blood pressure or heart rate. Pharmacological therapies may offer benefits as a means of supplementing the effects of lifestyle changes for weight loss. However, the existing evidence provides little evidence of specificity for pharmacological therapies to antipsychotic-induced weight gain and has not studied any connection between benefits and reduced incidence of diabetes mellitus or any vascular outcomes. PMID:22712004

  1. Trends in the access to and the use of antipsychotic medications and psychotropic co-treatments in Asian patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y-T; Ungvari, G S; Correll, C U; Chiu, H F K; Shinfuku, N

    2016-02-01

    To date, antipsychotics remain the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and related disorders although other psychotropic medications and non-pharmaceutical interventions have been used adjunctively in some patients and settings. Regular surveys on access to and prescription patterns of psychotropic medications in clinical practice are an important and efficient way of examining the use and time trends of treatments in a given population and region. Unlike developed Western countries, Asian countries have not fully undergone deinstitutionalisation of the severely and chronically mentally ill, and community-based mental health services are still under-developed. As a result, a large number of psychiatric patients still receive treatments in psychiatric hospitals. Moreover, there have been very limited studies examining access to and prescription patterns of psychotropic medications for schizophrenia patients in Asian countries. In this paper, we focus on the only international project on the use of psychotropic medications in schizophrenia patients in selected East and Southeast Asian countries/territories summarising its major findings. Most of the first- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs) are available in Asian countries, but the access to psychotropic medications is largely affected by socio-cultural and historical contexts, health insurance schemes, health care policy, medication cost and consumers' preference across different countries/territories. Overall, the proportional use of FGAs, high dose antipsychotic treatment and antipsychotic polypharmacy have decreased, while the use of SGAs and antidepressants have increased and the utilisation of benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers has remained relatively stable over time. However, within these general trends, there is great inter-country variation regarding the psychotropic prescribing patterns and trends in Asian schizophrenia patients that also seems to differ from data in many Western countries. PMID:26289066

  2. An evaluation of the prescribing patterns for under-five patients at a Tertiary Paediatric Hospital in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Christine Princess; James, Peter Bai; Kargbo, Alusine Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is limited information on pediatric prescribing in Sierra Leone. This study evaluated prescribing patterns for under-five patients at Ola During Children's Hospital (ODCH) and assessed the extent of rational prescribing. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional, retrospective study of 294 prescriptions, selected by systematic random sampling was conducted at the outpatient department of ODCH. The World Health Organisation prescribing indicators were analyzed using the SPSS package 16.0. The index of rational drug prescribing (IRDP) was calculated to assess rational prescribing. Results: The average number of medicines per prescription was 3.77. The percentage of medicines prescribed by generic names was 71.0%, while 74.8% and 21.1% of prescriptions had an antibiotic and injection, respectively. The percentage of medicines prescribed from the national essential medicines list was 70.6%. The most commonly prescribed pharmacological groups of medicines were vitamins (85.37%) and antibiotics (82.99%). The IRDP was 2.71, instead of the ideal value of 5. Conclusion: Pediatric prescribing patterns at the outpatient department of ODCH cannot be said to be entirely rational, especially with regards to antibiotic and injection prescribing. PMID:26692736

  3. Targets, attitudes, and goals of psychiatrists treating patients with schizophrenia: key outcome drivers, role of quality of life, and place of long-acting antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Fagiolini, Andrea; Vaggi, Marco; Vampini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This survey of Italian psychiatrists was conducted to better define drivers of schizophrenia treatment choice in real-life practice, particularly for use of long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics. Methods Between October 15 and December 15, 2014, 1,000 surveys were sent to psychiatrists who treat schizophrenic patients; 709 completed questionnaires were analyzed (71% response rate). Results The two most important factors determining therapy success were efficacy (75% of responses) and tolerability (45%) followed by global functioning (24%) and quality of life (17%). LAI antipsychotics were most often used to facilitate regular treatment monitoring (49%), and 41% of psychiatrists thought that patients with low adherence who had failed oral therapy were well-suited for LAI antipsychotics. Only 4% of respondents saw LAI antipsychotics as appropriate for patients without other therapeutic options. Conclusion Although efficacy and tolerability were the most common factors used to evaluate treatment success in schizophrenia, psychiatrists also consider QoL and global functioning to be important. PMID:26811682

  4. Effects of prolonged antipsychotic administration on neuregulin-1/ErbB signaling in rat prefrontal cortex and myocardium: implications for the therapeutic action and cardiac adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ruili; Guo, Yujin; Cai, Hualin; Yang, Ranyao; Liang, Donglou; Lv, Chuanfeng; Jiang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) are at higher risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and neuregulin-1 (NRG1)/ErbB signaling has been identified as a common susceptibility pathway for the comorbidity. Antipsychotic treatment can change NRG1/ErbB signaling in the brain, which has been implicated in their therapeutic actions, whereas the drug-induced alterations of NRG1/ErbB pathway in cardiovascular system might be associated with the prominent cardiac side-effects of antipsychotic medication. To test this hypothesis, we examined NRG1/ErbB system in rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) and myocardium following 4-week intraperitoneal administration of haloperidol, risperidone or clozapine. Generally, the antipsychotics significantly enhanced NRG1/ErbB signaling with increased expression of NRG1 and phosphorylation of ErbB4 and ErbB2 in the brain and myocardium, except that clozapine partly blocked the cardiac NRG1/ErbB2 activation, which could be associated with its more severe cardiac adverse actions. Combined, our data firstly showed evidence of the effect of antipsychotic exposure on myocardial NRG1/ErbB signaling, along with the activated NRG1/ErbB system in brain, providing a potential link between the therapeutic actions and cardiotoxicity. PMID:26961615

  5. Learning to prescribe pharmacists' experiences of supplementary prescribing training in England

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Richard J; Lymn, Joanne; Anderson, Claire; Avery, Anthony; Bissell, Paul; Guillaume, Louise; Hutchinson, Allen; Murphy, Elizabeth; Ratcliffe, Julie; Ward, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background The introduction of non-medical prescribing for professions such as pharmacy and nursing in recent years offers additional responsibilities and opportunities but attendant training issues. In the UK and in contrast to some international models, becoming a non-medical prescriber involves the completion of an accredited training course offered by many higher education institutions, where the skills and knowledge necessary for prescribing are learnt. Aims: to explore pharmacists' perceptions and experiences of learning to prescribe on supplementary prescribing (SP) courses, particularly in relation to inter-professional learning, course content and subsequent use of prescribing in practice. Methods A postal questionnaire survey was sent to all 808 SP registered pharmacists in England in April 2007, exploring demographic, training, prescribing, safety culture and general perceptions of SP. Results After one follow-up, 411 (51%) of pharmacists responded. 82% agreed SP training was useful, 58% agreed courses provided appropriate knowledge and 62% agreed that the necessary prescribing skills were gained. Clinical examination, consultation skills training and practical experience with doctors were valued highly; pharmacology training and some aspects of course delivery were criticised. Mixed views on inter-professional learning were reported insights into other professions being valued but knowledge and skills differences considered problematic. 67% believed SP and recent independent prescribing (IP) should be taught together, with more diagnostic training wanted; few pharmacists trained in IP, but many were training or intending to train. There was no association between pharmacists' attitudes towards prescribing training and when they undertook training between 2004 and 2007 but earlier cohorts were more likely to be using supplementary prescribing in practice. Conclusion Pharmacists appeared to value their SP training and suggested improvements that could inform future courses. The benefits of inter-professional learning, however, may conflict with providing profession-specific training. SP training may be perceived to be an instrumental 'stepping stone' in pharmacists' professional project of gaining full IP status. PMID:19061487

  6. Prosecution of physicians for prescribing opioids to patients.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M; Willis, O

    2007-06-01

    Many patients in pain receive inadequate doses of opioids. Fear of government action against prescribing doctors is one cause of this inadequate treatment. The purpose of the study was to assess criminal prosecutions by reviewing press reports of indictments or trials of doctors for opioid offenses during 2 years. Forty-seven cases were reported involving 53 doctors. Fifteen cases were for offenses unrelated to medical practice. In 32 cases, the charge was based on determining the prescriptions for opioids were outside the bounds of proper medical practice. Only two of these cases were evaluated by a state medical board before indictment. Five doctors were indicted for murder related to drug overdose deaths. None were found guilty of murder. Prosecutorial excesses and hyperbole were common. The state medical board's review of appropriateness of prescribing opioids when a doctor-patient relationship is presumed to exist could decrease inappropriate criminal indictments and reduce this component of fear of prescribing adequate opioid therapy for patients in pain. PMID:17329989

  7. Randomized Trial of the Effect of Four Second-Generation Antipsychotics and One First-Generation Antipsychotic on Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol, and Drug Use in Chronic Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Somaia; Rosenheck, Robert A; Lin, Haiqun; Swartz, Marvin; McEvoy, Joseph; Stroup, Scott

    2015-07-01

    No large-scale randomized trial has compared the effect of different second-generation antipsychotic drugs and any first-generation drug on alcohol, drug and nicotine use in patients with schizophrenia. The Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness study randomly assigned 1432 patients formally diagnosed with schizophrenia to four second-generation antipsychotic drugs (olanzapine, risperidone quetiapine, and ziprasidone) and one first-generation antipsychotic (perphenazine) and followed them for up to 18 months. Secondary outcome data documented cigarettes smoked in the past week and alcohol and drug use severity ratings. At baseline, 61% of patients smoked, 35% used alcohol, and 23% used illicit drugs. Although there were significant effects of time showing reduction in substance use over the 18 months (all p < 0.0001), this study found no evidence that any antipsychotic was robustly superior to any other in a secondary analysis of data on substance use outcomes from a large 18-month randomized schizophrenia trial. PMID:26075840

  8. [Should psychotropic drugs be prescribed to adolescents?].

    PubMed

    David, Jean-Christophe; Marcelli, Daniel

    2005-05-31

    The prescription of a psychotropic drugs to an adolescent is a high-risk prescription that raises numerous issues, imposing a rigorous evaluation of the expected benefit compared with the results that could be obtained by another approach, and the risk of interference with the spontaneous changes inherent to the process of adolescence. If sedatives, anxiolytics and psychostimulants are proscribed, it is possible in the case of absolute necessity, to prescribe neuroleptics and antidepressants. In this case, the medications should be prescribed in efficacious doses, should be the object of negotiation with the adolescent and his parents, and must never be prescribed at the first consultation nor, in any case, consist of the sole therapeutic intervention. It imposes a regular follow-up of the adolescent to assess compliance and to detect possible suicidal ideation. PMID:16097250

  9. Water Vapor Enhancement in Prescribed Fire Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, C. M.; Clements, C. B.; Potter, B. E.; Strenfel, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    In situ radiosonde measurements were obtained during multiple prescribed fires at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center at Ichauway, Georgia in March and July of 2008. Data were obtained from prescribed fires conducted in longleaf pine ecosystems. After significant smoke generation was observed, radiosondes were launched downwind of the fire front and rose directly into the smoke plumes. Radiosondes were also launched before each burn to obtain ambient background conditions. This provided a unique dataset of smoke plume moisture to determine how moisture enhancement from fire smoke alters the dynamics of the smoke plume. Preliminary analysis of results show moisture enhancement occurred in all smoke plumes with relative humidity values increasing by 10 to 30 percent and water vapor mixing ratios increasing by 1 to 4 g kg-1. Understanding the moisture enhancement in prescribed fire smoke plumes will help determine the convective dynamics that occur in major wildland fires and convection columns.

  10. e-Learning initiatives to support prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Simon; Mucklow, John

    2012-01-01

    Preparing medical students to prescribe is a major challenge of undergraduate education. They must develop an understanding of clinical pharmacology and acquire knowledge about drugs and therapeutics, as well as the skills to prescribe for individual patients in the face of multiple variables. The task of delivering the learning required to achieve these attributes relies upon limited numbers of teachers, who have increasingly busy clinical commitments. There is evidence that training is currently insufficient to meet the demands of the workplace. e-Learning provides an opportunity to improve the learning experience. The advantages for teachers are improved distribution of learning content, ease of update, standardization and tracking of learner activities. The advantages for learners are ease of access, greater interactivity and individual choice concerning the pace and mix of learning. Important disadvantages are the considerable resource required to develop e-Learning projects and difficulties in simulating some aspects of the real world prescribing experience. Pre-requisites for developing an e-Learning programme to support prescribing include academic expertise, institutional support, learning technology services and an effective virtual learning environment. e-Learning content might range from complex interactive learning sessions through to static web pages with links. It is now possible to simulate and provide feedback on prescribing decisions and this will improve with advances in virtual reality. Other content might include a student formulary, self-assessment exercises (e.g. calculations), a glossary and an on-line library. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of e-Learning but better research is required into its potential impact on prescribing. PMID:22509885

  11. Antibiotic-prescribing patterns for Iraqi patients during Ramadan

    PubMed Central

    Mikhael, Ehab Mudher; Jasim, Ali Lateef

    2014-01-01

    Background During Ramadan, Muslims fast throughout daylight hours. There is a direct link between fasting and increasing incidence of infections. Antibiotic usage for treatment of infections should be based on accurate diagnosis, with the correct dose and dosing regimen for the shortest period to avoid bacterial resistance. This study aimed to evaluate the practices of physicians in prescribing suitable antibiotics for fasting patients and the compliance of the patients in using such antibiotics at regular intervals. Materials and methods An observational study was carried out during the middle 10 days of Ramadan 2014 in two pharmacies at Baghdad. A total of 34 prescriptions (Rx) for adults who suffered from infections were examined. For each included Rx, the researchers documented the age and sex of the patient, the diagnosis of the case, and the name of the given antibiotic(s) with dose and frequency of usage. A direct interview with the patient was also done, at which each patient was asked about fasting and if he/she would like to continue fasting during the remaining period of Ramadan. The patient was also asked if the physician asked him/her about fasting before writing the Rx. Results More than two-thirds of participating patients were fasting during Ramadan. Antibiotics were prescribed at a higher percentage by dentists and surgeons, for which a single antibiotic with a twice-daily regimen was the most commonly prescribed by physicians for patients during the Ramadan month. Conclusion Physicians fail to take patient fasting status into consideration when prescribing antibiotics for their fasting patients. Antibiotics with a twice-daily regimen are not suitable and best to be avoided for fasting patients in Iraq during Ramadan especially if it occurs during summer months to avoid treatment failure and provoking bacterial resistance. PMID:25473271

  12. General Practitioners' intention to prescribe and prescribing patterns in selected European settings: The OTCSOCIOMED project.

    PubMed

    Tsiantou, Vasiliki; Moschandreas, Joanna; Bertsias, Antonis; Papadakaki, Maria; Saridaki, Aristoula; Agius, Dominic; Alper, Zuleyha; Faresjo, Tomas; Klimkova, Martina; Martinez, Luc; Samoutis, George; Vlček, Jiří; Lionis, Christos

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing intentions and patterns across different European regions using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). A cross-sectional study was undertaken in selected geographically defined Primary Health Care areas in Cyprus, Czech Republic (CZ), France, Greece, Malta, Sweden and Turkey. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a TPB-based questionnaire. The number of GP participants ranged from 39 to 145 per country. Possible associations between TPB direct measures (attitudes, subjective norms (SN) and perceived behavioral control (PBC)) and intention to prescribe were assessed by country. On average, GPs thought positively of, and claimed to be in control of, prescribing. Correlations between TPB explanatory measures and prescribing intention were weak, with TPB direct measures explaining about 25% of the variance in intention to prescribe in Malta and CZ but only between 3% and 5% in Greece, Sweden and Turkey. SN appeared influential in GPs from Malta; attitude and PBC were statistically significant in GPs from CZ. GPs' prescribing intentions and patterns differed across participating countries, indicating that country-specific interventions are likely to be appropriate. Irrational prescribing behaviors were more apparent in the countries where an integrated primary care system has still not been fully developed and policies promoting the rational use of medicines are lacking. Demand-side measures aimed at modifying GPs prescribing behavior are deemed necessary. PMID:26188356

  13. Effects of prescribed fire and herbicide application on cattle grazing and herbage production from yellow bluestem pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prescribed fire and herbicides are commonly used tools to manage introduced grasses in the Southern Plains, but their effects on livestock production are not well documented. The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of prescribed fire or herbicides on the production of grazin...

  14. The role of antipsychotics in the management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Calandre, Elena P; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic generalized pain associated with different somatic symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, balance problems, hypersensitivity to physical and psychological environmental stimuli, depression and anxiety. It has been estimated to affect roughly the 2-4% of the general population in most countries studied, and it has been shown to be much more prevalent in women than in men. Although its pathophysiology is not yet fully understood, it is known that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in its development. Fibromyalgia shares a high degree of co-morbidity with other conditions, including chronic headache, temporomandibular disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, major depression, anxiety disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome. Therefore, this is a syndrome difficult to treat for which multimodal treatments including physical exercise, psychological therapies and pharmacological treatment are recommended. Although different kinds of drugs have been studied for the treatment of fibromyalgia, the most widely used drugs that have the higher degree of evidence for efficacy include the ?(2)? ligands pregabalin and gabapentin, and the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and serotonin noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). However, there is a need to look for newer additional therapeutic pharmacological options for the treatment of this complex and disabling disease. First- and second-generation antipsychotics have shown analgesic properties both in an experimental setting and in humans, although most of the available evidence for the treatment of human pain concerns older antipsychotics and involves clinical trials performed several decades ago. In addition, several second-generation antipsychotics, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine, have shown efficacy in the treatment of some anxiety disorders. Some second-generation antipsychotics, mainly quetiapine, aripiprazole and amisulpride, have demonstrated antidepressant activity, with quetiapine approved for the treatment of bipolar depression and refractory major depression, and aripiprazole approved as an adjunctive treatment for major depressive disorder. Finally, several old and new antipsychotics, including promethazine, levopromazine, olanzapine, quetiapine and ziprasidone, have been shown to improve sleep parameters in healthy subjects. Each of these properties suggests that antipsychotics could represent a new potential alternative for the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome. To date, most of the published studies on the use of antipsychotics in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome have been uncontrolled, either case reports or case series, dealing with olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, levopromazine and amisulpride. The studies on olanzapine and quetiapine have suggested therapeutic efficacy although, in the case of olanzapine, hampered by tolerability problems. A double-blind controlled trial, published in 1980, showed that chlorpromazine increased slow-wave sleep and improved pain and mood disturbances. More recently, four double-blind controlled studies have explored the efficacy of quetiapine, either alone or as an add-on treatment, in fibromyalgia management. None of these trials has yet been published, although two of them have been presented as congress communications, both of them suggesting that quetiapine could be a potential alternative treatment for fibromyalgia. In summary, the current available evidence suggests that at least some antipsychotics, specifically quetiapine, could be useful for the treatment of fibromyalgia and that further studies on the efficacy of these compounds are worth pursuing. PMID:22296316

  15. Improving antipsychotic adherence among patients with schizophrenia: savings for states.

    PubMed

    Predmore, Zachary S; Mattke, Soeren; Horvitz-Lennon, Marcela

    2015-04-01

    This column presents findings of an analysis conducted to quantify the potential net savings to state budgets from interventions to improve adherence to antipsychotic drugs among patients with schizophrenia. Using a financial model based on published data, the authors estimated costs of direct medical care and criminal justice system involvement at state and national levels and validated it against findings from other cost studies. The model estimated an annual cost of $21.4 billion (in 2013 dollars) to Medicaid programs and other state agencies for people with schizophrenia. On the basis of data on the effect on outcomes of increased medication adherence, better adherence could yield annual net savings of $3.28 billion to states or $1,580 per patient per year. Innovations to improve adherence to antipsychotic drugs among schizophrenia patients can yield substantial savings in state budgets. States should consider interventions shown to increase medication adherence in this patient group. PMID:25555222

  16. Impact of Antipsychotics on Geriatric Patients: Efficacy, Dosing, and Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Gerald A.

    2000-01-01

    People today are living longer. Old age is the number one risk factor for dementia, which is often associated with behavioral disturbances and psychosis as well as cognitive and memory impairment. Elderly persons with dementiaparticularly those who are agitated or aggressiveare often placed in nursing homes and consequently treated with antipsychotic medications. Most of the studies of antipsychotic efficacy and safety have been conducted in young schizophrenic patients, but there are differences in dosing schedules, efficacy, and compliance when these drugs are used in elderly patients with dementia and psychosis. A review of both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment is herewith presented for the treatment of elderly dementia patients, especially those living in long-term care facilities. PMID:15014638

  17. 2012 CCNP Innovations Award Paper: Antipsychotic dosing: found in translation

    PubMed Central

    Remington, Gary; Fervaha, Gagan; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Turrone, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In the field of schizophrenia research, as in other areas of psychiatry, there is a sense of frustration that greater advances have not been made over the years, calling into question existing research strategies. Arguably, many purported gains claimed by research have been lost in translation, resulting in limited impact on diagnosis and treatment in the clinical setting. There are exceptions; for example, we would argue that different lines of preclinical and clinical research have substantially altered how we look at antipsychotic dosing. While this story remains a work in progress, advances found in translation have played an important role. Detailing these changes, the present paper speaks to a body of evidence that has already shifted clinical practice and raises questions that may further alter the manner in which antipsychotics have been administered over the last 6 decades. PMID:24467943

  18. Brain receptors for antipsychotic drugs and dopamine: direct binding assays.

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, P; Chau-Wong, M; Tedesco, J; Wong, K

    1975-01-01

    In order to test the suggestion that antipsychotic drugs act by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain, the direct effects of such neuroleptic drugs were tested on the stereospecific binding of [3H]dopamine and of [3H]haloperidol to rat brain striata and their subfractions. The stereospecific component of binding was defined as that amount of [3h]dopamine or [3H]haloperidol bound in the presence of (-)-butaclamol (an inactive drug) minus that bound in the presence of (+)-butaclamol (a potent neuroleptic drug); 100 nM butaclamol was used for the [3H]haloperidol assay, while 1 muM butaclamol was used for the [3H]dopamine assay. Various antipsychotic drugs inhibited this stereospecific component in both the dopamine and haloperidol assays. These inhibitory potencies correlated with the clinical doses used for controlling schizophrenia. PMID:1060115

  19. Movement Disorders Induced by Antipsychotic Drugs: Implications of the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial

    PubMed Central

    Caroff, Stanley N.; Hurford, Irene; Lybrand, Janice; Campbell, E. Cabrina

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Drug-induced movement disorders have dramatically declined with the widespread use of second generation antipsychotics but remain important in clinical practice and for understanding antipsychotic pharmacology. The diagnosis and management of dystonia, parkinsonism, akathisia, catatonia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and tardive dyskinesia are reviewed in relation to the decreased liability of the second generation antipsychotics contrasted with evidence from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) Schizophrenia Trial. Data from the CATIE trial imply that advantages of second generation antipsychotics in significantly reducing extrapyramidal side effects compared with haloperidol may be diminished when compared with modest doses of lower-potency first generation drugs, that the dichotomy between first and second generation drugs may be oversimplified, and that antipsychotics could be conceptualized as a single drug class with a spectrum of risk for movement disorders depending upon receptor binding affinities and individual patient susceptibility. PMID:21172575

  20. Genomewide Pharmacogenomic Analysis of Response to Treatment with Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Joseph L.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Åberg, Karolina; Stroup, Scott; Perkins, Diana O.; Vladimirov, Vladimir I.; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia is an often devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Understanding the genetic variation affecting response to antipsychotics is important to develop novel diagnostic tests to match individual schizophrenic patients to the most effective and safe medication. Here we use a genomewide approach to detect genetic variation underlying individual differences in response to treatment with the antipsychotics olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone and perphenazine. Our sample consisted of 738 subjects with DSM-IV schizophrenia who took part in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE). Subjects were genotyped using the Affymetrix 500K genotyping platform plus a custom 164K chip to improve genomewide coverage. Treatment outcome was measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Our criterion for genomewide significance was a pre-specified threshold that ensures, on average, only 10% of the significant findings are false discoveries. The top statistical result reached significance at our pre-specified threshold and involved a SNP in an intergenic region on chromosome 4p15. In addition, SNPs in ANKS1B and CNTNAP5 that mediated the effects of olanzapine and risperidone on Negative symptoms were very close to our threshold for declaring significance. The most significant SNP in CNTNAP5 is nonsynonymous, giving rise to an amino acid substitution. In addition to highlighting our top results, we provide all p-values for download as a resource for investigators with the requisite samples to carry out replication. This study demonstrates the potential of GWAS to discover novel genes that mediate effects of antipsychotics, which eventually could help to tailor drug treatment to schizophrenic patients. PMID:19721433

  1. Third generation antipsychotic drugs: partial agonism or receptor functional selectivity?

    PubMed Central

    Mailman, Richard B.; Murthy, Vishakantha

    2010-01-01

    Functional selectivity is the term that describes drugs that cause markedly different signaling through a single receptor (e.g., full agonist at one pathway and antagonist at a second). It has been widely recognized recently that this phenomenon impacts the understanding of mechanism of action of some drugs, and has relevance to drug discovery. One of the clinical areas where this mechanism has particular importance is in the treatment of schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs have been grouped according to both pattern of clinical action and mechanism of action. The original antipsychotic drugs such as chlorpromazine and haloperidol have been called typical or first generation. They cause both antipsychotic actions and many side effects (extrapyramidal and endocrine) that are ascribed to their high affinity dopamine D2 receptor antagonism. Drugs such as clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone and others were then developed that avoided the neurological side effects (atypical or second generation antipsychotics). These compounds are divided mechanistically into those that are high affinity D2 and 5-HT2A antagonists, and those that also bind with modest affinity to D2, 5-HT2A, and many other neuroreceptors. There is one approved third generation drug, aripiprazole, whose actions have been ascribed alternately to either D2 partial agonism or D2 functional selectivity. Although partial agonism has been the more widely accepted mechanism, the available data are inconsistent with this mechanism. Conversely, the D2 functional selectivity hypothesis can accommodate all current data for aripiprazole, and also impacts on discovery compounds that are not pure D2 antagonists. PMID:19909227

  2. Antipsychotic Drugs Inhibit the Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Sheng; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Markowitz, John S.; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Yuan, Hong-Jie; DeVane, C. Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    The ABCG2 transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) has been identified in several physiological sites. It has been suggested to play an important role in disposition of many drugs and environmental toxins. We investigated the effects of several antipsychotic drugs, including risperidone, 9-hydroxy-risperidone (paliperidone), olanzapine, quetiapine, clozapine, haloperidol and chlorpromazine, and a positive control inhibitor Ko143 on functions of BCRP in MCF7 and BCRP over-expressing MCF7/MX100 cell lines using a BCRP prototypical substrate mitoxantrone. Our findings indicated that the tested antipsychotics rank order of potency of inhibition of BCRP according to concentrations required to reach 50% of maximum inhibition (IC50) was as follows: Ko143 (0.07 ?M) > risperidone (38.1 ?M) > clozapine (42.0 ?M) > paliperidone (51 ?M) > chlorpromazine (52.2 ?M) > quetiapine (66.1 ?M) > olanzapine = haloperidol (>100.0 ?M). We further tested the effects of various concentrations of risperidone on the BCRP-mediated transport of oestrone-3-sulfate in a colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2, a widely used model to study drug absorption. Our findings show that risperidone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ?M significantly inhibited intracellular accumulation of oestrone-3-sulfate in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The present results suggest that a potential source of pharmacokinetic interactions exists between BCRP substrates and several antipsychotics. PMID:18834354

  3. Adjunctive metformin for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bo, Qi-Jing; Wang, Zhi-Min; Li, Xian-Bin; Ma, Xin; Wang, Chuan-Yue; de Leon, Jose

    2016-03-30

    This systematic review examines adjunctive metformin therapy for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. A computerized search of databases in Chinese and the international databases in English provided three trials with a total of 325 patients including one randomized clinical trial (RCT) and two observational studies (single-group, before-after design). A meta-analysis could not be conducted. The quality of evidence ranged from "very low" to "moderate". Metformin patients had a significant decrease in serum prolactin level with a mean of 54.6μg/l in the three trials. In the RCT, menstruation restarted in 67% of those with menstrual disturbances versus 5% in placebo. In one observational study, 91% of patients no longer had signs or symptoms of galactorrhea. In the RCT, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occurred at similar incidence rates among metformin and placebo patients, except that no significant increases in nausea, insomnia and agitation occurred which were not associated with discontinuations. Our systematic review indicated that adjunctive metformin significantly lowered prolactin level and relieved prolactin-related symptoms in patients with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. Future higher quality RCTs need to verify the currently available limited evidence based on three trials which suggest that adjunctive metformin may be used effectively and safely for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. PMID:26822064

  4. Clinical predictors of therapeutic response to antipsychotics in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Maren; Correll, Christoph U.

    2014-01-01

    The search for clinical outcome predictors for schizophrenia is as old as the field of psychiatry. However, despite a wealth of large, longitudinal studies into prognostic factors, only very few clinically useful outcome predictors have been identified. The goal of future treatment is to either affect modifiable risk factors, or use nonmodifiable factors to parse patients into therapeutically meaningful subgroups. Most clinical outcome predictors are nonspecific and/or nonmodifiable. Nonmodifiable predictors for poor odds of remission include male sex, younger age at disease onset, poor premorbid adjustment, and severe baseline psychopathology. Modifiable risk factors for poor therapeutic outcomes that clinicians can act upon include longer duration of untreated illness, nonadherence to antipsychotics, comorbidities (especially substance-use disorders), lack of early antipsychotic response, and lack of improvement with non-clozapine antipsychotics, predicting clozapine response. It is hoped that this limited capacity for prediction will improve as pathophysiological understanding increases and/or new treatments for specific aspects of schizophrenia become available. PMID:25733955

  5. Dopamine receptor signaling and current and future antipsychotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kevin N.; Mailman, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    All currently efficacious antipsychotic drugs have as part of their mechanism the ability to attenuate some or all of their signaling through the dopamine D2 receptor. More recently, the dopamine D1 receptor has been hypothesized to be a promising target for the treatment of negative and/or cognitive aspects of schizophrenia that are not improved by current antipsychotics. Although cAMP has been presumed to be the primary messenger for signaling through the dopamine receptors, the last decade has unveiled a complexity that has provided exciting avenues for the future discovery of antipsychotic drugs (APDs). We review the signaling mechanisms of currently approved APDs at dopamine D2 receptors, and note that aripiprazole is a compound that is clearly differentiated from other approved drugs. Although aripiprazole has been postulated to cause dopamine stabilization due to its partial D2 agonist properties, a body of literature suggests that an alternate mechanism, functional selectivity, is of primary importance. Finally, we review the signaling at dopamine D1 receptors, and the idea that drugs that activate D1 receptors may have use as APDs for improving negative and cognitive symptoms. We address the current state of drug discovery in the D1 area, and its relationship to novel signaling mechanisms. Our conclusion is that although the first APD targeting dopamine receptors was discovered more than a half-century ago, recent research advances offer the possibility that novel and/or improved drugs will emerge in the next decade. PMID:23129328

  6. Potential antipsychotic properties of central cannabinoid (CB1) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Roser, Patrik; Vollenweider, Franz X; Kawohl, Wolfram

    2010-03-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the principal psychoactive constituent of the Cannabis sativa plant, and other agonists at the central cannabinoid (CB(1)) receptor may induce characteristic psychomotor effects, psychotic reactions and cognitive impairment resembling schizophrenia. These effects of Delta(9)-THC can be reduced in animal and human models of psychopathology by two exogenous cannabinoids, cannabidiol (CBD) and SR141716. CBD is the second most abundant constituent of Cannabis sativa that has weak partial antagonistic properties at the CB(1) receptor. CBD inhibits the reuptake and hydrolysis of anandamide, the most important endogenous CB(1) receptor agonist, and exhibits neuroprotective antioxidant activity. SR141716 is a potent and selective CB(1) receptor antagonist. Since both CBD and SR141716 can reverse many of the biochemical, physiological and behavioural effects of CB(1) receptor agonists, it has been proposed that both CBD and SR141716 have antipsychotic properties. Various experimental studies in animals, healthy human volunteers, and schizophrenic patients support this notion. Moreover, recent studies suggest that cannabinoids such as CBD and SR141716 have a pharmacological profile similar to that of atypical antipsychotic drugs. In this review, both preclinical and clinical studies investigating the potential antipsychotic effects of both CBD and SR141716 are presented together with the possible underlying mechanisms of action. PMID:20218784

  7. Experiencing antipsychotic discontinuation: results from a survey of Australian consumers.

    PubMed

    Salomon, C; Hamilton, B; Elsom, S

    2014-12-01

    Despite high reported rates of antipsychotic non-adherence, little is known about consumer experiences during discontinuation. This study was designed to increase understanding of antipsychotic discontinuation from consumer perspectives. In 2011-2012, 98 Australian consumers involved with participating organizations completed an anonymous survey detailing past antipsychotic discontinuation attempts. Of the 88 participants who reported at least one discontinuation attempt, over half (n = 47, 54.7%) reported stopping without clinician knowledge or support. This group was 35% (confidence interval 15.4-54.6%) more likely to stop abruptly than those (n = 41, 45.3%) stopping with clinician support (P = 0.002). Only 10 participants (23.3%) recalled being given information about discontinuation symptoms other than relapse; however, 68 participants (78.2%) reported experiencing a range of discontinuation symptoms including physical, cognitive, emotional, psychotic or sleep-related disturbances. Findings cannot be readily generalized because of sampling constraints. However, the significant number of participants who reported discontinuation symptoms, in addition to psychosis, is consistent with previous research. This study provides new insight into consumer motivations for discontinuation and possible problems in clinical communication that may contribute to frequent non-collaborative discontinuation attempts. Mental health nurses, who play a pivotal role in medication communication events, may benefit from increased awareness of consumer perspectives on this topic. PMID:25298092

  8. Predicting pharmacokinetic stability by multiple oral administration of atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Akihide; Aoki, Kazuo; Sakiyama, Yojiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sugita, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    Lower fluctuation, i.e., lower peak-to-trough plasma-concentration variation at steady-state pharmacokinetics, has several advantages for the treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics. The reduction of peak concentration can decrease the risk of dose-dependent side effects, such as extrapyramidal symptom and somnolence, and by contrast the increase in trough concentration can decrease the incidence of lack of efficacy due to subtherapeutic drug concentration. Using a one-compartment simulation technique with pharmacokinetic parameters of each atypical antipsychotic collected from package inserts, the fluctuation index was calculated. Among the antipsychotics, the indices varied from 0.018 to 1.9, depending on dosing regimens, formulations and several pharmacokinetic properties. The order of simulated fluctuation index is active-moiety aripiprazole (b.i.d.)

  9. The Effects of Antipsychotics on Prolactin Levels and Women's Menstruation

    PubMed Central

    Bargiota, S. I.; Bonotis, K. S.; Messinis, I. E.; Angelopoulos, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Typical and atypical antipsychotic agent is currently used for treatment in the majority of patients with psychotic disorders. The aim of this review is to assess antipsychotic induced hyperprolactinaemia and the following menstrual dysfunction that affects fertility, quality of life, and therapeutic compliance of women. Method. For this purpose, Medline, PsychInfo, Cochrane library, and Scopus databases were accessed, with a focus on the publication dates between 1954 and 2012. Research of references was also performed and 78 studies were retrieved and used for the needs of this review. Results. A summary of several antipsychotics as well as frequency rates and data on hyperprolactinaemia and menstrual disorders for different agent is presented. Conclusion. Diverse prevalence rates of hyperprolactinaemia and menstrual abnormalities have been found about each medication among different studies. Menstruation plays an important role for women, thus, understanding, careful assessment, and management of hyperprolactinaemia could enhance their lives, especially when dealing with women that suffer from a psychotic disorder. PMID:24490071

  10. Antipsychotic-like effect of minocycline in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Dokuyucu, Recep; Kokacya, Hanifi; Inanir, Sema; Copoglu, Umit Sertan; Erbas, Oytun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Tetracycline antibiotic drug minocycline has strongly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Minocycline has also remarkable brain tissue penetration, is clinically entirely tolerated and properly absorbed when taken orally. In our study, we class with the effects of minocycline and chlorpromazine, a conventional antipsychotic drug, by evaluating the novelty-induced rearing, apomorphine-induced stereotypic behavior, and brain MDA levels in rats. Materials and Methods: Four groups of rat (n = 7) were applied with minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.), chlorpromazine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), or isotonic saline (1 mL/kg, i.p.). One hour later, apomorphine (2 mg/kg, s.c.) was applied to each rat. Result: Our results showed that both doses of minocycline significantly decreased the rearing behavior in rats, whereas the decrease with chlorpromazine was higher. Minocycline also decreased the stereotypy scores in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: We concluded that minocycline has beneficial effects on rearing behavior and stereotypy, which are accepted to be indicators of antipsychotic effect. Taken together, minocycline, as an anti-oxidant and cytoprotective agent, can be useful in neuroprotection especially on early stages of psychosis or prepsychotic patients with insignificant symptoms. Minocycline is worthy of being investigated for its anti-psychotic effects as a primary or an adjunctive drug. PMID:25419368

  11. Treatment patterns and characteristics of older antipsychotic users in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmedt, Niklas; Jobski, Kathrin; Kollhorst, Bianca; Krappweis, Jutta; Rüther, Eckart; Schink, Tania; Garbe, Edeltraut

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics and treatment patterns of older antipsychotic (AP) users in Germany. We carried out a cohort study in the German Pharmacoepidemiological Research Database and identified new AP users aged at least 65 years between 2005 and 2011. Possible indications, comedication, and information on persistence and adherence, concurrent multiple use, and switch of APs were assessed. Overall, 298 847 individuals were included in the cohort. Almost 70% entered the cohort with a typical antipsychotic (TAP). Melperone (23.4%) was used most frequently, followed by promethazine (18.3%), sulpiride (11.0%), and risperidone (10.3%). AP users had a low prevalence of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in contrast to dementia. Initiators of atypical antipsychotics had more treatment episodes compared with TAPs (median 3 vs. 2), but lower median persistence (14 vs. 22 days). Persistence was also lower in patients with, rather than without, dementia. The overall percentage of concurrent multiple use and switch to other APs was low with 5.6%, but higher in patients with, rather than without, dementia. In conclusion, APs were used for a broad range of indications, mostly other than schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. Low persistence and a high number of treatment episodes suggest frequent 'as-needed' treatment, especially in dementia patients. PMID:26871678

  12. Systemic Antifungal Prescribing in Neonates and Children: Outcomes from the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children (ARPEC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Versporten, A.; Doerholt, K.; Warris, A.; Roilides, E.; Sharland, M.; Bielicki, J.; Goossens, H.

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate use of systemic antifungals is vital in the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infection (IFI) in immunosuppressed children and neonates. This multicenter observational study describes the inpatient prescribing practice of antifungal drugs for children and neonates and identifies factors associated with prescribing variability. A single-day point prevalence study of antimicrobial use in hospitalized neonates and children was performed between October and December 2012. The data were entered through a study-specific Web-based portal using a standardized data entry protocol. Data were recorded from 17,693 patients from 226 centers. A total of 136 centers recorded data from 1,092 children and 380 neonates receiving at least one antifungal agent. The most frequently prescribed systemic antifungals were fluconazole (n = 355) and amphotericin B deoxycholate (n = 195). The most common indications for antifungal administration in children were medical prophylaxis (n = 325), empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia (n = 122), and treatment of confirmed or suspected IFI (n = 100 [14%]). The treatment of suspected IFI in low-birthweight neonates accounted for the majority of prescriptions in the neonatal units (n = 103). An analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no significant effect of clinical indication (prophylaxis or treatment of systemic or localized infection) on the total daily dose (TDD). Fewer than one-half of the patients (n = 371) received a TDD within the dosing range recommended in the current guidelines. Subtherapeutic doses were prescribed in 416 cases (47%). The predominance of fluconazole and high incidence of subtherapeutic doses in participating hospitals may contribute to suboptimal clinical outcomes and an increased predominance of resistant pathogenic fungi. A global consensus on antifungal dosing and coordinated stewardship programs are needed to promote the consistent and appropriate use of antifungal drugs in neonates and children. PMID:25403672

  13. Using aripiprazole to reduce antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia: meta-analysis of currently available randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    MENG, Meiling; LI, Wei; ZHANG, Shaowei; WANG, Hongyan; SHENG, Jianhua; WANG, Jijun; LI, Chunbo

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperprolactinemia (HPL) is a common side effect of antipsychotic medications. Recent reports suggest that aripiprazole can ameliorate antipsychotic-induced HPL, but results are inconsistent and the single available systematic review only considered five studies. Aim Conduct an updated meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole as an adjunctive treatment for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. Methods English and Chinese databases were searched for RCTs about the use of aripiprazole in treating antipsychotic-induced HPL published by January 20, 2015. Studies were selected using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to evaluate risk of biases, the Cochrane GRADE measure was used to assess the quality of evidence, and Review Manager 5.3 software was used for data analysis. Results A total of 21 studies, 19 of which were conducted in mainland China, were included in the analysis. Meta-analysis of data from 8 of the studies with a pooled sample of 604 individuals found that compared to the control condition adjunctive aripiprazole significantly increased the proportion of participants who experienced HPL recovery (risk ratio [RR]=19.2, 95%CI=11.0-33.5). The proportion who experienced any adverse effect during follow-up did not differ between the two groups, but the aripiprazole group was more likely to report somnolence (RR=2.76, 95%CI=1.34-5.69) and headaches (RR=2.31, 95%CI=1.08-4.92). High-dose aripiprazole (>5mg/day) was more effective than low-dose (<5mg/day) aripiprazole (RR=30.0, 95%CI=10.2-120.7 v. RR=15.1, 95%CI=8.1-28.1), but this difference was not statistically significant. The risk of bias in the studies was rated as high in 6 of the studies and unclear in 15 studies, and the quality of evidence was rated as high for only 7 of the 57 outcome measures assessed. Conclusions This study systematically reviewed and evaluated all relevant RCTs and found that adjunctive aripiprazole is effective and safe to use in the treatment of antipsychotic-induced HPL. However, the low quality of some of the studies, the incomplete methodological information provided for most of the studies, and the relatively short follow-up time of the studies raises question about the validity of the results. Further work that resolves these methodological and reporting issues is needed. PMID:25852251

  14. C-reactive protein is increased in schizophrenia but is not altered by antipsychotics: meta-analysis and implications.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, B S; Steiner, J; Bernstein, H-G; Dodd, S; Pasco, J A; Dean, O M; Nardin, P; Gonçalves, C-A; Berk, M

    2016-04-01

    The inflammatory hypothesis of schizophrenia (SZ) posits that inflammatory processes and neural-immune interactions are involved in its pathogenesis, and may underpin some of its neurobiological correlates. SZ is the psychiatric disorder causing the most severe burden of illness, not just owing to its psychiatric impairment, but also owing to its significant medical comorbidity. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a commonly used biomarker of systemic inflammation worldwide. There are some conflicting results regarding the behaviour of CRP in SZ. The aims of this study were to verify whether peripheral CRP levels are indeed increased in SZ, whether different classes of antipsychotics divergently modulate CRP levels and whether its levels are correlated with positive and negative symptomatology. With that in mind, we performed a meta-analysis of all cross-sectional studies of serum and plasma CRP levels in SZ compared to healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated longitudinal studies on CRP levels before and after antipsychotic use. Our meta-analyses of CRP in SZ included a total of 26 cross-sectional or longitudinal studies comprising 85 000 participants. CRP levels were moderately increased in persons with SZ regardless of the use of antipsychotics and did not change between the first episode of psychosis and with progression of SZ (g=0.66, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.43 to 0.88, P<0.001, 24 between-group comparisons, n=82 962). The extent of the increase in peripheral CRP levels paralleled the increase in severity of positive symptoms, but was unrelated to the severity of negative symptoms. CRP levels were also aligned with an increased body mass index. Conversely, higher age correlated with a smaller difference in CRP levels between persons with SZ and controls. Furthermore, CRP levels did not increase after initiation of antipsychotic medication notwithstanding whether these were typical or atypical antipsychotics (g=0.01, 95% CI -0.20 to 0.22, P=0.803, 8 within-group comparisons, n=713). In summary, our study provides further evidence of the inflammatory hypothesis of SZ. Whether there is a causal relationship between higher CRP levels and the development of SZ and aggravation of psychotic symptoms, or whether they are solely a marker of systemic low-grade inflammation in SZ, remains to be clarified. PMID:26169974

  15. Hospitalization rates in patients switched from oral anti-psychotics to aripiprazole once-monthly: final efficacy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kane, John M.; Zhao, Cathy; Johnson, Brian R.; Baker, Ross A.; Eramo, Anna; McQuade, Robert D.; Duca, Anna R.; Sanchez, Raymond; Peters-Strickland, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare hospitalization rates in patients with schizophrenia treated prospectively with aripiprazole once-monthly 400 mg (AOM 400; an extended-release injectable suspension) vs the same patients’ retrospective rates with their prior oral anti-psychotic therapy. Research design and methods: Multi-center, open-label, mirror-image, naturalistic study in a community setting in North America. Patients who required a change in treatment and/or would benefit from long-acting injectable anti-psychotic therapy were treated prospectively for 6 months with AOM 400. Retrospective data on hospitalization rates were obtained. Clinical trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01432444. Main outcome measures: The proportion of patients with ≥1 psychiatric inpatient hospitalization with oral anti-psychotic therapy examined retrospectively (months –4 to –1 before oral conversion) and after switching to AOM 400 (months 4–6 after initiating AOM 400). Results: Psychiatric hospitalization rates were significantly lower when patients were treated with AOM 400 compared with oral anti-psychotic therapy both in the 3-month primary efficacy sample (2.7% [n = 9/336] vs 27.1% [n = 91/336], respectively; p < 0.0001) and in the total sample (6-month prospective rate: 8.8% [n = 38/433] vs 6-month retrospective rate: 38.1% [n = 165/433]; p < 0.0001). Discontinuations due to adverse events (AEs) during cross-titration were lower in patients cross-titrated on oral aripiprazole for >1 and <4 weeks (2.9% [n = 7/239]) compared with patients cross-titrated for ≤1 week (10.4% [n = 5/48]). The most common treatment-emergent AEs during the prospective treatment phase were insomnia (6.7% [n = 29/431]) and akathisia (6.5% [n = 28/431]). Patient-rated injection-site pain decreased from the first injection to the last visit. Conclusions: In a community setting, patients with schizophrenia demonstrated significantly lower psychiatric hospitalization rates after switching from their prior oral anti-psychotic therapy to AOM 400. Patients served as their own control, and thus an active control group was not included in this study. Confounding factors, such as insurance coverage and availability of hospital beds, were not examined here and deserve further consideration. PMID:25347448

  16. The Impact of Antipsychotic Polytherapy Costs in the Public Health Care in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Razzouk, Denise; Kayo, Monica; Sousa, Aglaé; Gregorio, Guilherme; Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Cardoso, Andrea Alves; Mari, Jair de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Guidelines for the treatment of psychoses recommend antipsychotic monotherapy. However, the rate of antipsychotic polytherapy has increased over the last decade, reaching up to 60% in some settings. Studies evaluating the costs and impact of antipsychotic polytherapy in the health system are scarce. Objective To estimate the costs of antipsychotic polytherapy and its impact on public health costs in a sample of subjects with psychotic disorders living in residential facilities in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Method A cross-sectional study that used a bottom-up approach for collecting costs data in a public health provider´s perspective. Subjects with psychosis living in 20 fully-staffed residential facilities in the city of Sao Paulo were assessed for clinical and psychosocial profile, severity of symptoms, quality of life, use of health services and pharmacological treatment. The impact of polytherapy on total direct costs was evaluated. Results 147 subjects were included, 134 used antipsychotics regularly and 38% were in use of antipsychotic polytherapy. There were no significant differences in clinical and psychosocial characteristics between polytherapy and monotherapy groups. Four variables explained 30% of direct costs: the number of antipsychotics, location of the residential facility, time living in the facility and use of olanzapine. The costs of antipsychotics corresponded to 94.4% of the total psychotropic costs and to 49.5% of all health services use when excluding accommodation costs. Olanzapine costs corresponded to 51% of all psychotropic costs. Conclusion Antipsychotic polytherapy is a huge economic burden to public health service, despite the lack of evidence supporting this practice. Great variations on antipsychotic costs explicit the need of establishing protocols for rational antipsychotic prescriptions and consequently optimising resource allocation. Cost-effectiveness studies are necessary to estimate the best value for money among antipsychotics, especially in low and middle income countries. PMID:25853709

  17. Examining variations in prescribing safety in UK general practice: cross sectional study using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Akbarov, Artur; Rodgers, Sarah; Avery, Anthony J; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the prevalence of different types of potentially hazardous prescribing in general practice in the United Kingdom, and what is the variation between practices? Methods A cross sectional study included all adult patients potentially at risk of a prescribing or monitoring error defined by a combination of diagnoses and prescriptions in 526 general practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) up to 1 April 2013. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of potentially hazardous prescriptions of anticoagulants, anti-platelets, NSAIDs, ? blockers, glitazones, metformin, digoxin, antipsychotics, combined hormonal contraceptives, and oestrogens and monitoring by blood test less frequently than recommended for patients with repeated prescriptions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and loop diuretics, amiodarone, methotrexate, lithium, or warfarin. Study answer and limitations 49 927 of 949 552 patients at risk triggered at least one prescribing indicator (5.26%, 95% confidence interval 5.21% to 5.30%) and 21 501 of 182 721 (11.8%, 11.6% to 11.9%) triggered at least one monitoring indicator. The prevalence of different types of potentially hazardous prescribing ranged from almost zero to 10.2%, and for inadequate monitoring ranged from 10.4% to 41.9%. Older patients and those prescribed multiple repeat medications had significantly higher risks of triggering a prescribing indicator whereas younger patients with fewer repeat prescriptions had significantly higher risk of triggering a monitoring indicator. There was high variation between practices for some indicators. Though prescribing safety indicators describe prescribing patterns that can increase the risk of harm to the patient and should generally be avoided, there will always be exceptions where the indicator is clinically justified. Furthermore there is the possibility that some information is not captured by CPRD for some practicesfor example, INR results in patients receiving warfarin. What this study adds The high prevalence for certain indicators emphasises existing prescribing risks and the need for their appropriate consideration within primary care, particularly for older patients and those taking multiple medications. The high variation between practices indicates potential for improvement through targeted practice level intervention. Funding, competing interests, data sharing National Institute for Health Research through the Greater Manchester Primary Care Patient Safety Translational Research Centre (grant No GMPSTRC-2012-1). Data from CPRD cannot be shared because of licensing restrictions. PMID:26537416

  18. Understanding Antibiotic Use in Minya District, Egypt: Physician and Pharmacist Prescribing and the Factors Influencing Their Practices

    PubMed Central

    Dooling, Kathleen L.; Kandeel, Amr; Hicks, Lauri A.; El-Shoubary, Waleed; Fawzi, Khaled; Kandeel, Yasser; Etman, Ahmad; Lohiniva, Anna Leena; Talaat, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Overuse of antibiotics has contributed to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria globally. In Egypt, patients can purchase antibiotics without a prescription, and we hypothesized frequent inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and dispensing. We interviewed physicians (n = 236) and pharmacists (n = 483) and conducted focus groups in Minya, Egypt, to assess attitudes and practices regarding antibiotic prescribing for outpatient acute respiratory infections (ARI). Antibiotics were reportedly prescribed most of the time or sometimes for colds by 150 (64%) physicians and 326 (81%) pharmacists. The most commonly prescribed antibiotics were β-lactams. Macrolides were the second most commonly prescribed for colds and sinusitis. The prescription of more than one antibiotic to treat pneumonia was reported by 85% of physicians. Most respondents thought antibiotic overuse contributes to resistance and reported “patient self-medication” as the biggest driver of overuse. Fifty physicians (21%) reported that they had prescribed antibiotics unnecessarily, citing patient over-the-counter access as the reason. Physicians <40 years of age and those who treat adults were more likely to prescribe antibiotics for colds. Overall, we found a high rate of unwarranted outpatient antibiotic prescribing and dispensing for ARIs. Patient access to OTC antibiotics contributes to over-prescribing. National guidelines for ARI treatment, provider education and national policy requiring a physician’s prescription for antibiotics may improve appropriate antibiotic use in Egypt.

  19. Mental illness, challenging behaviour, and psychotropic drug prescribing in people with intellectual disability: UK population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hassiotis, Angela; Walters, Kate; Osborn, David; Strydom, André; Horsfall, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the incidence of recorded mental illness and challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability in UK primary care and to explore the prescription of psychotropic drugs in this group. Design Cohort study. Setting 571 general practices contributing data to The Health Improvement Network clinical database. Participants 33 016 adults (58% male) with intellectual disability who contributed 211 793 person years’ data. Main outcome measures Existing and new records of mental illness, challenging behaviour, and psychotropic drug prescription. Results 21% (7065) of the cohort had a record of mental illness at study entry, 25% (8300) had a record of challenging behaviour, and 49% (16 242) had a record of prescription of psychotropic drugs. During follow-up, the rate of new cases of mental illness in people without a history at cohort entry was 262 (95% confidence interval 254 to 271) per 10 000 person years and the rate of challenging behaviour was 239 (231 to 247) per 10 000 person years. The rate of new psychotropic drug prescription in those without a previous history of psychotropic drug treatment was 518 (503 to 533) per 10 000 person years. Rates of new recording of severe mental illness declined by 5% (95% confidence interval 3% to 7%) per year (P<0.001), and new prescriptions of antipsychotics declined by 4% (3% to 5%) per year P<0.001) between 1999 and 2013. New prescriptions of mood stabilisers also decreased significantly. The rate of new antipsychotic prescribing was significantly higher in people with challenging behaviour (incidence rate ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.90 to 2.27; P<0.001), autism (1.79, 1.56 to 2.04; P<0.001), and dementia (1.42, 1.12 to 1.81; P<0.003) and in those of older age, after control for other sociodemographic factors and comorbidity. Conclusions The proportion of people with intellectual disability who have been treated with psychotropic drugs far exceeds the proportion with recorded mental illness. Antipsychotics are often prescribed to people without recorded severe mental illness but who have a record of challenging behaviour. The findings suggest that changes are needed in the prescribing of psychotropics for people with intellectual disability. More evidence is needed of the efficacy and safety of psychotropic drugs in this group, particularly when they are used for challenging behaviour. PMID:26330451

  20. Preparing to prescribe: How do clerkship students learn in the midst of complexity?

    PubMed

    McLellan, Lucy; Yardley, Sarah; Norris, Ben; de Bruin, Anique; Tully, Mary P; Dornan, Tim

    2015-12-01

    Prescribing tasks, which involve pharmacological knowledge, clinical decision-making and practical skill, take place within unpredictable social environments and involve interactions within and between endlessly changing health care teams. Despite this, curriculum designers commonly assume them to be simple to learn and perform. This research used mixed methods to explore how undergraduate medical students learn to prescribe in the 'real world'. It was informed by cognitive psychology, sociocultural theory, and systems thinking. We found that learning to prescribe occurs as a dynamic series of socially negotiated interactions within and between individuals, communities and environments. As well as a thematic analysis, we developed a framework of three conceptual spaces in which learning opportunities for prescribing occur. This illustrates a complex systems view of prescribing education and defines three major system components: the "social space", where the environmental conditions influence or bring about a learning experience; the "process space", describing what happens during the learning experience; and the intra-personal "cognitive space", where the learner may develop aspects of prescribing expertise. This conceptualisation broadens the scope of inquiry of prescribing education research by highlighting the complex interplay between individual and social dimensions of learning. This perspective is also likely to be relevant to students' learning of other clinical competencies. PMID:25980553

  1. A Comparison between Prescribed Exercise Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultgren, Philip B.; Burke, Edmund J., Jr.

    This paper compares the methods for prescribing exercise according to various contemporary authorities. The programs are compared as to their goals, the testing modalities and physiological parameters used for prescription of the initial training session, and the methods and the progression of training. Regarding goals, there is a general

  2. 27 CFR 4.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 4.3 Section 4.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... mailing a request to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, National Revenue Center, 550...

  3. 27 CFR 5.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 5.3 Section 5.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF...) or by mailing a request to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, National Revenue Center,...

  4. Teacher Aide Individually Prescribed Instructional Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston Univ., AL. Coll. of Education.

    This document contains 59 individually prescribed instructional modules for use in teacher aide education programs. Each module has six sections: 1) Behavioral objectives, 2) purpose, 3) performance criteria, 4) experiences, 5) resources, and 6) taxonomy. The subjects covered include the use of instructional equipment such as language master,

  5. 27 CFR 27.2 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 27.2 Section 27.2 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS IMPORTATION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER Scope of Regulations ...

  6. 27 CFR 1.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 1.3 Section 1.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BASIC PERMIT REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE FEDERAL ALCOHOL ADMINISTRATION...

  7. 27 CFR 27.2 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 27.2 Section 27.2 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS IMPORTATION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER Scope of Regulations ...

  8. 27 CFR 45.27 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 45.27 Section 45.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES Administrative Provisions 45.27 Forms...

  9. 27 CFR 45.27 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 45.27 Section 45.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES Administrative Provisions 45.27 Forms...

  10. 16 CFR 315.5 - Prescriber verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE 315.5 Prescriber verification. (a) Prescription requirement. A seller may sell contact lenses only in accordance with a contact lens prescription for the patient that is: (1) Presented to the seller by...

  11. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  12. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  13. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  14. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  15. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  16. 27 CFR 26.2 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 26.2 Section 26.2 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Scope...

  17. 27 CFR 26.2 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 26.2 Section 26.2 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Scope...

  18. 27 CFR 478.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 478.21 Section 478.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION...

  19. 7 CFR 28.956 - Prescribed fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prescribed fees. 28.956 Section 28.956 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS...

  20. 7 CFR 28.956 - Prescribed fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prescribed fees. 28.956 Section 28.956 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS...

  1. Geriatrician interventions on medication prescribing for frail older people in residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Arjun; Peel, Nancye M; Mitchell, Charles A; Gray, Leonard C; Nissen, Lisa M; Hubbard, Ruth E

    2015-01-01

    Objective In Australian residential aged care facilities (RACFs), the use of certain classes of high-risk medication such as antipsychotics, potent analgesics, and sedatives is high. Here, we examined the prescribed medications and subsequent changes recommended by geriatricians during comprehensive geriatric consultations provided to residents of RACFs via videoconference. Design This is a prospective observational study. Setting Four RACFs in Queensland, Australia, are included. Participants A total of 153 residents referred by general practitioners for comprehensive assessment by geriatricians delivered by video-consultation. Results Residents mean (standard deviation, SD) age was 83.0 (8.1) years and 64.1% were female. They had multiple comorbidities (mean 6), high levels of dependency, and were prescribed a mean (SD) of 9.6 (4.2) regular medications. Ninety-one percent of patients were taking five or more medications daily. Of total medications prescribed (n=1,469), geriatricians recommended withdrawal of 9.8% (n=145) and dose alteration of 3.5% (n=51). New medications were initiated in 47.7% (n=73) patients. Of the 10.3% (n=151) medications considered as high risk, 17.2% were stopped and dose altered in 2.6%. Conclusion There was a moderate prevalence of potentially inappropriate high-risk medications. However, geriatricians made relatively few changes, suggesting either that, on balance, prescription of these medications was appropriate or, because of other factors, there was a reluctance to adjust medications. A structured medication review using an algorithm for withdrawing medications of high disutility might help optimize medications in frail patients. Further research, including a broader survey, is required to understand these dynamics. PMID:26150708

  2. Methods of prescribing relative exercise intensity: physiological and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Mann, Theresa; Lamberts, Robert Patrick; Lambert, Michael Ian

    2013-07-01

    Exercise prescribed according to relative intensity is a routine feature in the exercise science literature and is intended to produce an approximately equivalent exercise stress in individuals with different absolute exercise capacities. The traditional approach has been to prescribe exercise intensity as a percentage of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) or maximum heart rate (HRmax) and these methods remain common in the literature. However, exercise intensity prescribed at a %VO2max or %HRmax does not necessarily place individuals at an equivalent intensity above resting levels. Furthermore, some individuals may be above and others below metabolic thresholds such as the aerobic threshold (AerT) or anaerobic threshold (AnT) at the same %VO2max or %HRmax. For these reasons, some authors have recommended that exercise intensity be prescribed relative to oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R), heart rate reserve (HRR), the AerT, or the AnT rather than relative to VO2max or HRmax. The aim of this review was to compare the physiological and practical implications of using each of these methods of relative exercise intensity prescription for research trials or training sessions. It is well established that an exercise bout at a fixed %VO2max or %HRmax may produce interindividual variation in blood lactate accumulation and a similar effect has been shown when relating exercise intensity to VO2R or HRR. Although individual variation in other markers of metabolic stress have seldom been reported, it is assumed that these responses would be similarly heterogeneous at a %VO2max, %HRmax, %VO2R, or %HRR of moderate-to-high intensity. In contrast, exercise prescribed relative to the AerT or AnT would be expected to produce less individual variation in metabolic responses and less individual variation in time to exhaustion at a constant exercise intensity. Furthermore, it would be expected that training prescribed relative to the AerT or AnT would provide a more homogenous training stimulus than training prescribed as a %VO2max. However, many of these theoretical advantages of threshold-related exercise prescription have yet to be directly demonstrated. On a practical level, the use of threshold-related exercise prescription has distinct disadvantages compared to the use of %VO2max or %HRmax. Thresholds determined from single incremental tests cannot be assumed to be accurate in all individuals without verification trials. Verification trials would involve two or three additional laboratory visits and would add considerably to the testing burden on both the participant and researcher. Threshold determination and verification would also involve blood lactate sampling, which is aversive to some participants and has a number of intrinsic and extrinsic sources of variation. Threshold measurements also tend to show higher day-to-day variation than VO2max or HRmax. In summary, each method of prescribing relative exercise intensity has both advantages and disadvantages when both theoretical and practical considerations are taken into account. It follows that the most appropriate method of relative exercise intensity prescription may vary with factors such as exercise intensity, number of participants, and participant characteristics. Considering a method's limitations as well as advantages and increased reporting of individual exercise responses will facilitate accurate interpretation of findings and help to identify areas for further study. PMID:23620244

  3. Treatment resistant or resistant to treatment? Antipsychotic plasma levels in patients with poorly controlled psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Robert; Beck, Katherine; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Marques, Tiago R; Rogdaki, Maria; Howes, Oliver D

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals with schizophrenia show an inadequate response to treatment with antipsychotics. It can be unclear whether this is secondary to subtherapeutic antipsychotic plasma levels or to medication ineffectiveness. The purpose of the present study was to determine the extent of subtherapeutic antipsychotic plasma levels in a group of patients clinically identified as treatment-resistant. In addition we investigated the frequency of antipsychotic plasma level monitoring in standard clinical practice. Antipsychotic plasma levels were measured in 36 patients identified as having treatment-resistant schizophrenia by their treating clinicians. Sixteen (44%) patients showed either undetectable (19%) or subtherapeutic levels (25%), and 20 (56%) patients had levels in the therapeutic range. Subtherapeutic plasma levels were significantly associated with black ethnicity, shorter duration of current treatment and antipsychotics other than olanzapine and amisulpride. Antipsychotic plasma levels had been measured in only one patient in the year prior to our study. We found over one-third of patients identified as treatment-resistant have subtherapeutic antipsychotic levels. This indicates that they may be under-treated rather than treatment-resistant, and thus should receive different management. Currently the measurement of antipsychotic levels may be under-utilised. PMID:25788157

  4. [Guidelines for the use of second-generation long-acting antipsychotics].

    PubMed

    Jarema, Marek; Wichniak, Adam; Dudek, Dominika; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Bieńkowski, Przemysław; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Long-acting injectable antipsychotics constitute a valuable alternative for the treatment of psychotic disorders, mainly schizophrenia. They assure a more stable drug level, improve treatment compliance, and increase the chances for favorable and long-lasting improvement. Additionally, the long-acting second-generation antipsychotics combine the values of long-acting injectable drugs with the values of atypical antipsychotics. Four second generation long-acting antipsychotics have been described: risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole and paliperidone. The indications for their use, treatment strategy, tolerance, and potential interactions are discussed. PMID:26093588

  5. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) haplotypes correlate with altered response to multiple antipsychotics in the CATIE trial.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Timothy L; Brennan, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) signaling has been shown to have antipsychotic properties in animal models and to impact glucose-dependent insulin release, satiety, memory, and learning in man. Previous work has shown that two coding mutations (rs6923761 and rs1042044) are associated with altered insulin release and cortisol levels. We identified four frequently occurring haplotypes in Caucasians, haplotype 1 through haplotype 4, spanning exons 4-7 and containing the two coding variants. We analyzed response to antipsychotics, defined as predicted change in PANSS-Total (dPANSS) at 18 months, in Caucasian subjects from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness treated with olanzapine (n=139), perphenazine (n=78), quetiapine (n=14), risperidone (n=143), and ziprasidone (n=90). Haplotype trend regression analysis revealed significant associations with dPANSS for olanzapine (best p=0.002), perphenazine (best p=0.01), quetiapine (best p=0.008), risperidone (best p=0.02), and ziprasidone (best p=0.007). We also evaluated genetic models for the two most common haplotypes. Haplotype 1 (uniquely including the rs1042044 [Leu(260)] allele) was associated with better response to olanzapine (p=0.002), and risperidone (p=0.006), and worse response to perphenazine (p=.03), and ziprasidone (p=0.003), with a recessive genetic model providing the best fit. Haplotype 2 (uniquely including the rs6923761 [Ser(168)] allele) was associated with better response to perphenazine (p=0.001) and worse response to olanzapine (p=.02), with a dominant genetic model providing the best fit. However, GLP1R haplotypes were not associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain. These results link functional genetic variants in GLP1R to antipsychotic response. PMID:25449714

  6. Improving Interoperability in ePrescribing

    PubMed Central

    strand, Bengt; Petersson, Gran

    2012-01-01

    Background The increased application of eServices in health care, in general, and ePrescribing (electronic prescribing) in particular, have brought quality and interoperability to the forefront. The application of standards has been put forward as one important factor in improving interoperability. However, less focus has been placed on other factors, such as stakeholders involvement and the measurement of interoperability. An information system (IS) can be regarded to comprise an instrument for technology-mediated work communication. In this study, interoperability refers to the interoperation in the ePrescribing process, involving people, systems, procedures and organizations. We have focused on the quality of the ePrescription message as one component of the interoperation in the ePrescribing process. Objective The objective was to analyze how combined efforts in improving interoperability with the introduction of the new national ePrescription format (NEF) have impacted interoperability in the ePrescribing process in Sweden, with the focus on the quality of the ePrescription message. Methods Consecutive sampling of electronic prescriptions in Sweden before and after the introduction of NEF was undertaken in April 2008 (pre-NEF) and April 2009 (post-NEF). Interoperability problems were identified and classified based on message format specifications and prescription rules. Results The introduction of NEF improved the interoperability of ePrescriptions substantially. In the pre-NEF sample, a total of 98.6% of the prescriptions had errors. In the post-NEF sample, only 0.9% of the prescriptions had errors. The mean number of errors was fewer for the erroneous prescriptions: 4.8 in pre-NEF compared to 1.0 in post-NEF. Conclusions We conclude that a systematic comprehensive work on interoperability, covering technical, semantical, professional, judicial and process aspects, involving the stakeholders, resulted in an improved interoperability of ePrescriptions. PMID:23612314

  7. Development of learning outcomes for an undergraduate prescribing curriculum (British Pharmacological Society prescribing initiative)

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Sarah; Loke, Yoon K

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The question of whether new medical graduates are adequately prepared for the challenge of prescribing has been raised. Although broad outcomes for prescribing competency have been agreed, clarity is needed on the detailed outcomes expected of new graduates. This study aimed to create a consensus on the required competencies for new graduates in the area of prescribing. METHODS We used a modified Delphi approach based on the findings of a systematic review of educational interventions for improved prescribing. Panellists were asked to rank the importance of a list of 53 possible learning outcomes and to add any additional outcomes felt to be missing. RESULTS Of the 48 experts who were invited to participate, 28 agreed (58%). Forty-five learning outcomes were included from the original list of 53. A further nine outcomes were suggested by panellists, of which five were included. The wording of three outcomes was changed in line with suggestions from the panellists. Many of the agreed outcomes relate to improving patient safety through medication review, checking appropriateness of the drug for the patient, recognizing the prescriber's limitations and seeking advice when needed. Enhanced communication with the patient and healthcare team, better documentation in the notes and discharge letters were key areas featured in this Delphi exercise. DISCUSSION This study has identified 50 learning outcomes for teaching prescribing. These build on the existing British Pharmacological Society document by focusing specifically on prescribing, with greater emphasis on avoiding medication errors and better communication. PMID:20840451

  8. Opioids for Back Pain Patients: Primary Care Prescribing Patterns and Use of Services

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Smith, David H.M; Johnson, Eric S.; Donovan, Marilee; Tillotson, Carrie J.; Yang, Xiuhai; Petrik, Amanda; Dobscha, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Opioid prescribing for non-cancer pain has increased dramatically. We examined whether the prevalence of unhealthy lifestyles, psychological distress, healthcare utilization, and co-prescribing of sedative-hypnotics increased with increasing duration of prescription opioid use. Methods We analyzed electronic data for 6 months before and after an index visit for back pain in a large managed care plan. Use of opioids was characterized as none, acute (? 90 days), episodic, or long-term. Associations with lifestyle factors, psychological distress, and utilization were adjusted for demographics and comorbidity. Results There were 26,014 eligible patients. Among these, 61% received a course of opioid therapy, and 19% were long-term users. Psychological distress, unhealthy lifestyles, and utilization were associated in stepwise fashion with duration of opioid prescribing, not just with chronic use. Among long-term opioid users, 59% received only short-acting drugs; 39% received both long and short acting drugs; 44% received a sedative-hypnotic. Of those with any opioid use, 36% had an emergency visit. Conclusions Opioid prescribing was common among patients with back pain. The prevalence of psychological distress, unhealthy lifestyles, and healthcare utilization increased incrementally with duration of opioid use. Despite safety concerns, co-prescribing of sedative-hypnotics was common. These data may help in predicting long-term opioid use and improving the safety of opioid prescribing. PMID:22086815

  9. Physicians investigated for inappropriate prescribing by the Oregon Board of Medical Examiners.

    PubMed Central

    Kofoed, L; Bloom, J D; Williams, M H; Rhyne, C; Resnick, M

    1989-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed all allegations of inappropriate prescribing investigated by the Oregon Board of Medical Examiners from 1981 through 1986. Inappropriate prescription writing accounted for 51% of all investigations during this period, with controlled drugs, primarily opiates and benzodiazepines, accounting for most complaints. Of 130 physicians investigated, more than half had previous complaints; 50 were ultimately restricted or disciplined by the board. Inappropriate prescribing of controlled drugs is probably underdetected and frequently repeated. Available literature suggests that inappropriate prescribing of other drugs, especially antibiotics, is extremely common, but such problems were rarely identified by the current discovery and review processes of the Oregon board. Inappropriate prescribing will require increased attention from physician educators and licensing boards. PMID:2741460

  10. Altered emotional experiences attributed to antipsychotic medications - A potential link with estimated dopamine D2 receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Lako, Irene M; Taxis, Katja; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Leenaars, Cathalijn H C; Burger, Huibert; Wiersma, Durk; Slooff, Cees J; Knegtering, Henderikus; Bruggeman, Richard

    2016-02-28

    Altered emotional experiences in response to antipsychotics may increase the burden of disease in patients with schizophrenia. In a large cross-sectional study, patients with schizophrenia completed the Subjects Reaction to Antipsychotics questionnaire (SRA) to assess whether they attributed altered emotional experiences (flattened affect or depressive symptoms) to their antipsychotics. Association with antipsychotic D2 receptor affinity and occupancy was examined using logistic regression. We compared antipsychotic-attributed emotional experiences between patients using antipsychotic monotherapy and combination therapy. Of the 1298 included patients, 23% attributed flattened affect to their antipsychotics and 16% attributed depressive symptoms to their antipsychotics, based on the SRA. No differences were observed between antipsychotics in patients on monotherapy. We discuss that within these patients' relatively low dose range, altered emotional experiences did not appear to relate to the level of D2 receptor affinity of antipsychotic monotherapy. Patients using antipsychotic combination therapy (22%) were more likely to attribute depressive symptoms to their antipsychotics than patients using antipsychotic monotherapy (OR [95%CI]=1.443 [1.033-2.015]); possibly due to higher D2 receptor occupancies as estimated by dose equivalents. PMID:26791397

  11. Intervention to improve the quality of antimicrobial prescribing for urinary tract infection: a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Vellinga, Akke; Galvin, Sandra; Duane, Sinead; Callan, Aoife; Bennett, Kathleen; Cormican, Martin; Domegan, Christine; Murphy, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Overuse of antimicrobial therapy in the community adds to the global spread of antimicrobial resistance, which is jeopardizing the treatment of common infections. Methods: We designed a cluster randomized complex intervention to improve antimicrobial prescribing for urinary tract infection in Irish general practice. During a 3-month baseline period, all practices received a workshop to promote consultation coding for urinary tract infections. Practices in intervention arms A and B received a second workshop with information on antimicrobial prescribing guidelines and a practice audit report (baseline data). Practices in intervention arm B received additional evidence on delayed prescribing of antimicrobials for suspected urinary tract infection. A reminder integrated into the patient management software suggested first-line treatment and, for practices in arm B, delayed prescribing. Over the 6-month intervention, practices in arms A and B received monthly audit reports of antimicrobial prescribing. Results: The proportion of antimicrobial prescribing according to guidelines for urinary tract infection increased in arms A and B relative to control (adjusted overall odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 3.2; arm A adjusted OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8 to 4.1; arm B adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.0). An unintended increase in antimicrobial prescribing was observed in the intervention arms relative to control (arm A adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.0; arm B adjusted OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.1). Improvements in guideline-based prescribing were sustained at 5 months after the intervention. Interpretation: A complex intervention, including audit reports and reminders, improved the quality of prescribing for urinary tract infection in Irish general practice. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01913860 PMID:26573754

  12. Clinical Setting Influences Off-Label and Unlicensed Prescribing in a Paediatric Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Czarniak, Petra; Bint, Lewis; Favi, Laurent; Parsons, Richard; Hughes, Jeff; Sunderland, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the prevalence of off-label and unlicensed prescribing during 2008 at a major paediatric teaching hospital in Western Australia. Methods A 12-month retrospective study was conducted at Princess Margaret Hospital using medication chart records randomly selected from 145,550 patient encounters from the Emergency Department, Inpatient Wards and Outpatient Clinics. Patient and prescribing data were collected. Drugs were classified as off-label or unlicensed based on Australian registration data. A hierarchical system of age, indication, route of administration and dosage was used. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code. Results A total of 1,037 paediatric patients were selected where 2,654 prescriptions for 330 different drugs were prescribed to 699 patients (67.4%). Most off-label drugs (n = 295; 43.3%) were from the nervous system; a majority of unlicensed drugs were systemic hormonal preparations excluding sex hormones (n = 22, 32.4%). Inpatients were prescribed more off-label drugs than outpatients or Emergency Department patients (p < 0.0001). Most off-label prescribing occurred in infants and children (31.7% and 35.9% respectively) and the highest percentage of unlicensed prescribing (7.2%) occurred in infants (p < 0.0001). There were 25.7% of off-label and 2.6% of unlicensed medications prescribed across all three settings. Common reasons for off-label prescribing were dosage (47.4%) and age (43.2%). Conclusion This study confirmed off-label and unlicensed use of drugs remains common. Further, that prevalence of both is influenced by the clinical setting, which has implications in regards to medication misadventure, and the need to have systems in place to minimise medication errors. Further, there remains a need for changes in the regulatory system in Australia to ensure that manufacturers incorporate, as it becomes available, evidence regarding efficacy and safety of their drugs in children in the official product information. PMID:25756896

  13. Emergency Department Opioid Prescribing Practices for Chronic Pain: a 3-Year Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Victoria J; Mora, Alejandra G; Varney, Shawn M; Bebarta, Vikhyat S

    2015-09-01

    Chronic pain is a common reason for emergency department (ED) visits. Our objective was to describe opioid prescribing practices of ED providers when treating patients with chronic pain. We retrospectively evaluated opioid prescriptions from EDs at two tertiary care military hospitals. We queried the outpatient record database to obtain a list of opioid medications prescribed and ICD-9 codes associated with visits for chronic pain. We collected provider type and gender, number of pills, opioid type, and refills. We compared the incidence with chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Wilcoxon test was used for non-parametric continuous variables. Over 3 years, 28,103 visits generated an opioid prescription. One thousand three hundred twenty-two visits were associated with chronic pain, and 443 (33 %) visits were associated with an opioid prescription. Providers were 79 % physicians, 19 % physician assistants (PAs), 81 % male, and 69 % active duty military. Medications were 43 % oxycodone, 30 % hydrocodone, 9.5 % tramadol, 2.5 % codeine, and 15 % other. The number of pills was 20 [interquartile range (IQR) 15-30] (range 1-240), morphine equivalents (M.E.) per pill was 7.5 [7.5-7.5] (2.5-120) and total M.E. per prescription was 150 [112.5-270] (15-6000). Physicians were more likely to prescribe a non-opioid than PAs (77 vs 45 %, p < 0.0001). Civilian providers were more likely to prescribe an opioid than active duty providers (58 vs 42 %, p < 0.0001). Providers prescribed a median of 20 pills per prescription and most commonly prescribed oxycodone. PAs were more likely to prescribe an opioid for chronic pain than physicians. Civilian providers were more likely to prescribe an opioid than active duty providers. PMID:25468314

  14. Educational interventions to improve prescribing competency: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kamarudin, Gritta; Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on educational interventions to improve prescribing and identify educational methods that improve prescribing competency in both medical and non-medical prescribers. Design A systematic review was conducted. The databases Medline, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), EMBASE and CINAHL were searched for articles in English published between January 1990 and July 2013. Setting Primary and secondary care. Participants Medical and non-medical prescribers. Intervention Education-based interventions to aid improvement in prescribing competency. Primary outcome Improvements in prescribing competency (knows how) or performance (shows how) as defined by Miller's competency model. This was primarily demonstrated through prescribing examinations, changes in prescribing habits or adherence to guidelines. Results A total of 47 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Studies were categorised by their method of assessment, with 20 studies assessing prescribing competence and 27 assessing prescribing performance. A wide variety of educational interventions were employed, with different outcome measures and methods of assessments. In particular, six studies demonstrated that specific prescribing training using the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing increased prescribing competency in a wide variety of settings. Continuing medical education in the form of academic detailing and personalised prescriber feedback also yielded positive results. Only four studies evaluated educational interventions targeted at non-medical prescribers, highlighting that further research is needed in this area. Conclusions A broad range of educational interventions have been conducted to improve prescribing competency. The WHO Guide to Good Prescribing has the largest body of evidence to support its use and is a promising model for the design of targeted prescribing courses. There is a need for further development and evaluation of educational methods for non-medical prescribers. PMID:23996821

  15. Living with antipsychotic medication side-effects: the experience of Australian mental health consumers.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Paul; Meehan, Tom; Stomski, Norman Jay

    2015-06-01

    The present study explores people's experience of living with antipsychotic medication side-effects. Qualitative data were gathered through semistructured interviews with 10 mental health consumers in a community care setting in Australia. The interview transcriptions were content analysed, and enhanced by combining manifest and latent content. Important contextual cues were identified through replaying the audio-recordings. Several main themes emerged from the analysis, including the impact of side-effects, attitudes to the use of medication and side-effects, and coping strategies to manage medication side-effects. Each participant reported between six and seven side-effects on average, which were often pronounced and had a major disruptive impact on their lives. Of these effects, the most commonly mentioned was sedation, which the participants described as leaving them in a 'zombie'-like state. Most participants expressed an attitude of acceptance about the side-effects. The participants' most common strategy to manage side-effects was to change the dosage of the medication. Other common side-effect management strategies involved using other medications to control side-effects, and diverse self-help techniques, the most common of which was relaxation/distraction techniques. PMID:25529392

  16. More than a prescriber: gerontological nurse practitioners' perspectives on prescribing and pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Ladd, Elissa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding about nurse practitioners' (NPs') prescriptive decision making for geriatric patients with attention to pharmaceutical marketing influences. Prior research has focused on physician prescribers and identified suboptimal practices. Because the majority of medications are prescribed to older adults, NPs in geriatric practice were targeted as an information-rich group to interview about prescribing issues. Given the exploratory nature of this research, qualitative focus group methods were employed using content analysis. Fifteen NPs were recruited at an annual national geriatric NP conference. They worked in all regions of the United States, had an average of 9 years prescribing experience, and participated in 1 of the 2 focus groups. The key theme that emerged was that they were more than a prescriber. Findings revealed overwhelming consistency among the NP participants that their nursing background instilled a holistic approach that encompassed both nondrug and therapeutic drug options and skepticism about drug marketing, as well as offered a positive difference by tailoring to their patients' biophysical, psychological, and economic needs with an involvement in the interplay of geriatric care issues not typically addressed by physicians. The participants' reported approaches were in alignment with geriatric prescribing recommendations. PMID:20159350

  17. Prescribing and the regulation of formulation

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    Unless the equivalence of different products has been established, the prescriber must define the product he requires by using the trade name. Present pharmacopoeial standards based on in vitro methods are inadequate to predict equivalence in man. There are many ways in which differences in formulation may influence absorption of drugs, and only comparable absorption profiles can be taken as evidence of equivalence. PMID:4465774

  18. Ethnic Differences in Hormone Replacement Prescribing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Arleen F; Prez-Stable, Eliseo J; Whitaker, Eric E; Posner, Samuel F; Alexander, Mark; Gathe, Julia; Washington, A Eugene

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether prescription patterns of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) differ in African-American, Asian, Latina, Soviet immigrant, and white women. DESIGN Retrospective review of computerized medical records. SETTING The general internal medicine, family medicine, and gynecology practices of an academic medical center. PATIENTS Women aged 50 years or older with at least one outpatient visit from January 1, 1992, to November 30, 1995. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Use of HRT was defined as documentation of systemic estrogen use. The main predictor variable was self-identified ethnicity. Age, diagnosis (coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, or breast cancer), and median income were included in the analysis. Of the 8,968 women (mean age, 65.4 years) included, 50% were white, 20% Asian, 15% African American, 9% Latina, and 6% Soviet immigrants. Whites (33%) were significantly more likely to be prescribed HRT than Asians (21%), African Americans (25%), Latinas (23%), or Soviet immigrants (6.6%), p < 0.01 for each. Multivariate analysis, comparing ethnic groups and controlling for confounding variables, showed that Asians (odds ratio [OR] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49, 0.64), African Americans (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.60, 0.81), Latinas (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.58, 0.84), and Soviet immigrants (OR 0.14; 95% CI 0.10, 0.20) were each less likely to be prescribed HRT than were white women. Although women with osteoporosis were more likely to receive HRT (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.71, 2.99), those with coronary heart disease were not (OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.68, 1.09). CONCLUSIONS Physicians at this medical center were more likely to prescribe HRT for white women and women with osteoporosis. Further study is needed to address whether these differences in HRT prescribing result in different health outcomes. PMID:10571714

  19. Common Wart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... life that do not respond to self-care measures. Diabetics with warts of the feet should be treated by a physician. Treatments Your Physician May Prescribe Destruction with freezing (cryosurgery); burning (electrocautery); laser; or cantharidin, podophyllin, tretinoin, or acid application Injection ...

  20. Patterns of Antimicrobial Prescribing in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Yamani, Abdulrahman; Khamis, Faryal; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Noomani, Hamed; Al-Noomani, Jaleela; Al-Abri, Seif

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been designed to measure and improve the use of antimicrobials to achieve optimal clinical outcomes and reduce bacterial resistance. The aim of this study was to review patterns of antimicrobial prescribing for hospitalized patients in the acute care setting and assess the appropriateness of antimicrobial use among prescribers in a tertiary care hospital in Oman. Methods We conducted a retrospective audit of the appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing in patients admitted to acute care settings in a tertiary care hospital in Oman over a four-week period (1 November to 28 November 2012). The data of all discharged patients were retrieved from the department databases. Patient records and prescriptions were reviewed by an infectious disease consultant. The rationality of antimicrobial use was evaluated, analyzed, and judged based on local standard guidelines and the experience of the evaluating consultant. Results There were 178 patients discharged from acute medical teams over the study period. Sixty-four percent of the patients received a total of 287 antimicrobial agents during admission. The average number of antimicrobials prescribed per patient in those prescribed antimicrobials was 2.5±1.1. The most commonly prescribed antimicrobial agent was piperacillin/tazobactam. Most patients had infections from gram-negative organisms, and high rates of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing organisms were observed. Cultures were obtained before antimicrobial initiation in 25% of patients. Variability in antimicrobial selection for common infections was observed. Conclusions National guidelines for the management of common infections are needed to minimize the overuse and misuse of antimicrobial agents in tertiary care hospitals. A large surveillance study on antimicrobial prescribing appropriateness in different hospital settings is warranted. PMID:26816567

  1. Antibiotic Prescribing among Pediatric Inpatients with Potential Infections in Two Private Sector Hospitals in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ashish; Stlsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Infectious diseases are one of the major causes of child mortality in India. Pediatric patients are commonly prescribed antibiotics for non-bacterial infections. Monitoring of local antibiotic prescribing with respect to the diagnosis is necessary to improve the prescribing practices. The aim of the study was to describe antibiotic prescribing for potential infections among patients admitted in pediatric departments in two private sector hospitals; one teaching (TH) and one non-teaching (NTH) in Central India. Methods Data from all patients admitted at the pediatric departments of both study hospitals was collected manually, for 3 years (20082011) using a customized form. Data from inpatients aged 018 years, diagnosed with; acute gastroenteritis (AGE), respiratory tract infections, enteric fever, viral fever or unspecified fever were focused for analysis. Antibiotic prescriptions were analysed using the WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system and defined daily doses (DDDs). Adherence to the Indian Academy of Pediatrics list of essential medicines (IAP-LEM) was investigated. P-values <0.05 were considered significant. Results Oftotal6, 825 inpatients admitted at two pediatric departments, 510 patients from the TH and 2,479from the NTH were selected based on the assigned potential infectious diagnoses. Of these, 224 patients (44%) at the TH and 2,088 (84%) at the NTH were prescribed at least one antibiotic during hospital stay (odds ratio-0.69, 95%confidence interval-0.52 to 0.93; p<0.001). Patients with AGE, viral- and enteric fever were frequently prescribed antibiotics at both hospitals, yet higher proportion were prescribed antibiotics at the NTH compared to the TH. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were the most commonly prescribed antibiotic class in both hospitals, namely third generation cephalosporins, J01DD (69%) at the TH, and new fixed dose combinations of antibiotics J01R (FDCs, 42%) at the NTH. At the TH, 37% of the antibiotic prescriptions were comprised of antibiotics listed in the IAP-LEM, compared to 24% at the NTH (p<0.05). Conclusions Broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed frequently in both hospitals also for the un-indicated conditions such as viral fever and enteric fever. At the NTH, new FDCs were more frequently prescribed and adherence to the IAP-LEM was substantially lower at the NTH compared to the TH. The results demonstrate need to develop diagnosis-specific prescribing guidelines to facilitate rational use of antibiotics and implement antibiotic stewardship program. PMID:26540104

  2. Observations on Drug Prescribing in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P.; Ahola, S. J.; Grennan, D.; Brooks, P.; Buchanan, W. Watson

    1974-01-01

    A total of 125 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were investigated about their drug therapy before referral to a specialist centre. Most referrals were from general practitioners. Only 47 of the patients had received salicylates as the first drug and 18 had never had them at all. Soluble aspirin was the preparation of salicylates most frequently prescribed (for 63 patients). Only 60 patients had been given an adequate dose and only 62 an adequate course of treatment with salicylates. In 28 patients salicylates had been stopped on account of side effects. About one-third of the patients had been prescribed oral corticosteroids. The referral letters were poor in giving details of past and present drug therapy, and there were serious omissions in reporting of previous side effects. Seventy-five general practitioners were asked to rate several currently marketed antirheumatic drugs in terms of effectiveness. Though prednisolone 15 mg daily ranked higher than aspirin 4 g daily the difference was not significant. The study shows the inadequacies of drug prescribing for rheumatoid arthritis in the Glasgow area. PMID:4544646

  3. Practices of prescribing oral contraceptives in Poland.

    PubMed

    Lech, M M; Swiatek, E J

    2001-03-01

    We developed and performed a survey on practices of prescribing oral contraceptives in Poland. The survey was carried out in Warsaw, the capital city of Poland and one of the most important areas of the country (approximately 4 million inhabitants). The main aim of the study was to recognize the rationale and practices of prescribing oral contraceptives by gynecologists in Poland (oral contraceptives are prescribed mostly by gynecologists, not by general practitioners or midwives). The questions were sent to all members of Warsaw's Association of Gynecologists, but we have received back only 276 answers (79% of the total number of members) and the responses are presented here. The responses revealed that the most popular oral contraceptives are those modern formulations combining low doses of ethinylestradiol and progestogens such as norgestimate, desogestrel, gestodene and levonorgestrel. For gynecologists, the most important factors in the selection of an oral contraceptive were the dose of hormones (20.3%), the formulation (18.5%), tolerance by patients (23.5%) and past clinical experience with the formulation (9.4%). The price was most important for 3.7%, and good marketing practices were most important for 8.3% of the gynecologists. PMID:11334473

  4. Cognitive Function and Depression in Symptom Resolution in Schizophrenia Patients Treated with an Atypical Antipsychotic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stip, Emmanuel; Mancini-Marie, Adham

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate which cognitive and affective features contribute most to responder/non-responder group separation during a switching trial with atypical antipsychotic. Design: A prospective open trial with an atypical antipsychotic (olanzapine). Patients: One hundred and thirty-four patients meeting diagnostic criteria for

  5. Impact of antipsychotic medication on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) effects in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Bose, Anushree; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Chhabra, Harleen; Kalmady, Sunil V; Varambally, Shivarama; Nitsche, Michael A; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2016-01-30

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has generated interest as a treatment modality for schizophrenia. Dopamine, a critical pathogenetic link in schizophrenia, is also known to influence tDCS effects. We evaluated the influence of antipsychotic drug type (as defined by dopamine D2 receptor affinity) on the impact of tDCS in schizophrenia. DSM-IV-TR-diagnosed schizophrenia patients [N=36] with persistent auditory hallucinations despite adequate antipsychotic treatment were administered add-on tDCS. Patients were divided into three groups based on the antipsychotic's affinity to D2 receptors. An auditory hallucinations score (AHS) was measured using the auditory hallucinations subscale of the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales (PSYRATS). Add-on tDCS resulted in a significant reduction inAHS. Antipsychotic drug type had a significant effect on AHS reduction. Patients treated with high affinity antipsychotics showed significantly lesser improvement compared to patients on low affinity antipsychotics or a mixture of the two. Furthermore, a significant sex-by-group interaction occurred; type of medication had an impact on tDCS effects only in women. Improvement differences could be due to the larger availability of the dopamine receptor system in patients taking antipsychotics with low D2 affinity. Sex-specific differences suggest potential estrogen-mediated effects. This study reports a first-time observation on the clinical utility of antipsychotic drug type in predicting tDCS effects in schizophrenia. PMID:26699879

  6. Trends in Antipsychotic Drug Use by Very Young, Privately Insured Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olfson, Mark; Crystal, Stephen; Huang, Cecilia; Gerhard, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study describes recent trends and patterns in antipsychotic treatment of privately insured children aged 2 through 5 years. Method: A trend analysis is presented of antipsychotic medication use (1999-2001 versus 2007) stratified by patient characteristics. Data are analyzed from a large administrative database of privately insured

  7. Trends in Antipsychotic Drug Use by Very Young, Privately Insured Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olfson, Mark; Crystal, Stephen; Huang, Cecilia; Gerhard, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study describes recent trends and patterns in antipsychotic treatment of privately insured children aged 2 through 5 years. Method: A trend analysis is presented of antipsychotic medication use (1999-2001 versus 2007) stratified by patient characteristics. Data are analyzed from a large administrative database of privately insured…

  8. Antipsychotic Trials in Schizophrenia from India: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, S.; Sarkar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic and regional variations have been found in the pharmacological treatment response. Though many efficacy studies have been conducted in India for antipsychotic treatment modalities of schizophrenia, there is a lack meta-analytic data of the existing literature from India. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the antipsychotic treatment trials of schizophrenia in the Indian context. All controlled trials from India evaluating the clinical efficacy of antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia were evaluated and 28 trials were included in the metanalysis. Effect sizes were computed using Cohen's ‘d’ and risk of bias was evaluated. Meta analysis revealed superiority of first generation antipsychotics over placebo (mean effect size of 1.387, confidence interval of 1.127 to 1.648). Second generation antipsychotics were marginally better than first generation antipsychotics (effect size 0.106, confidence intervals 0.009 to 0.204). There was improvement in the methodology of the trials over time (Kendall tau=0.289, P=0.049), though no statistically significant increase in trial duration and sample size was noted. There is lack of data on long term efficacy of antipsychotic in schizophrenia from India. First generation antipsychotics have demonstrated benefits over placebo in patients with schizophrenia in the Indian context, though marginally lesser than second generation ones.

  9. Evaluation of N-desmethylclozapine as a potential antipsychotic--preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Sridhar; Reckless, Greg E; Barlow, Karen B L; Nobrega, Jos N; Kapur, Shitij

    2007-07-01

    There is growing interest in N-desmethylclozapine (NDMC), the major metabolite of clozapine, as a unique antipsychotic because it acts in vitro as a 5-HT(2) antagonist and as a partial agonist to dopamine D(2) and muscarinic receptors. To explore this, we compared NDMC to a typical (haloperidol), atypical (clozapine), and partial-agonist atypical (aripiprazole) antipsychotic in preclinical models. The comparison was carried out using: brain D(2) and 5-HT(2) receptor occupancy; animal models predictive of antipsychotic efficacy (amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion (AIL) and conditioned avoidance response (CAR) models); measures predictive of side effects (catalepsy and prolactin elevation); and molecular markers predictive of antipsychotic action (striatal Fos induction). NDMC (10-60 mg/kg/s.c.) showed high 5-HT(2) (64-79%), but minimal D(2) occupancy (<15% at 60 mg/kg) 1 h after administration. In contrast to other antipsychotics, NDMC was not very effective in reducing AIL or CAR and showed minimal induction of Fos in the nucleus accumbens. However, like atypical antipsychotics, it showed no catalepsy, prolactin elevation, and minimal Fos in the dorsolateral striatum. It seems unlikely that NDMC would show efficacy as a stand-alone antipsychotic, however, its freedom from catalepsy and prolactin elevation, and its unique pharmacological profile (muscarinic agonism) may make it feasible to use this drug as an adjunctive treatment to existing antipsychotic regimens. PMID:17164815

  10. A Systemic Review and Experts’ Consensus for Long-acting Injectable Antipsychotics in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Yuan Hwa; Chu, Po-Chung; Wu, Szu-Wei; Lee, Jen-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Sun, I-Wen; Chang, Chen-Lin; Huang, Chien-Liang; Liu, I-Chao; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Yen, Yung-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a major psychiatric disorder that is easily misdiagnosed. Patient adherence to a treatment regimen is of utmost importance for successful outcomes in BD. Several trials of antipsychotics suggested that depot antipsychotics, including long-acting first- and second-generation agents, are effective in preventing non-adherence, partial adherence, and in reducing relapse in BD. Various long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics are available, including fluphenazine decanoate, haloperidol decanoate, olanzapine pamoate, risperidone microspheres, paliperidone palmitate, and aripiprazole monohydrate. Due to the increasing number of BD patients receiving LAI antipsychotics, treatment guidelines have been developed. However, the clinical applicability of LAI antipsychotics remains a global cause for concern, particularly in Asian countries. Expert physicians from Taiwan participated in a consensus meeting, which was held to review key areas based on both current literature and clinical practice. The purpose of this meeting was to generate a practical and implementable set of recommendations for LAI antipsychotic use to treat BD; target patient groups, dosage, administration, and adverse effects were considered. Experts recommended using LAI antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia, rapid cycling BD, BD I, and bipolar-type schizoaffective disorder. LAI antipsychotic use was recommended in BD patients with the following characteristics: multiple episodes and low adherence; seldom yet serious episodes; low adherence potential per a physician’s clinical judgment; preference for injectable agents over oral agents; and multiple oral agent users still experiencing residual symptoms. PMID:26243837

  11. A Systemic Review and Experts' Consensus for Long-acting Injectable Antipsychotics in Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yuan Hwa; Chu, Po-Chung; Wu, Szu-Wei; Lee, Jen-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Sun, I-Wen; Chang, Chen-Lin; Huang, Chien-Liang; Liu, I-Chao; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Yen, Yung-Chieh

    2015-08-31

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a major psychiatric disorder that is easily misdiagnosed. Patient adherence to a treatment regimen is of utmost importance for successful outcomes in BD. Several trials of antipsychotics suggested that depot antipsychotics, including long-acting first- and second-generation agents, are effective in preventing non-adherence, partial adherence, and in reducing relapse in BD. Various long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics are available, including fluphenazine decanoate, haloperidol decanoate, olanzapine pamoate, risperidone microspheres, paliperidone palmitate, and aripiprazole monohydrate. Due to the increasing number of BD patients receiving LAI antipsychotics, treatment guidelines have been developed. However, the clinical applicability of LAI antipsychotics remains a global cause for concern, particularly in Asian countries. Expert physicians from Taiwan participated in a consensus meeting, which was held to review key areas based on both current literature and clinical practice. The purpose of this meeting was to generate a practical and implementable set of recommendations for LAI antipsychotic use to treat BD; target patient groups, dosage, administration, and adverse effects were considered. Experts recommended using LAI antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia, rapid cycling BD, BD I, and bipolar-type schizoaffective disorder. LAI antipsychotic use was recommended in BD patients with the following characteristics: multiple episodes and low adherence; seldom yet serious episodes; low adherence potential per a physician's clinical judgment; preference for injectable agents over oral agents; and multiple oral agent users still experiencing residual symptoms. PMID:26243837

  12. An overview of the development of nurse prescribing.

    PubMed

    Courtenay, M

    2000-03-01

    This article provides an overview of nurse prescribing in the UK. The initial recommendations for nurse prescribing, perceived benefits of prescribing and the findings from evaluation studies are reported. Current education and training courses available for nurse prescribers are described. The development of nurse prescribing has been slow and, it could be argued, out-dated, as many practitioners are excluded from this initiative. It is important that nurse prescribers receive adequate time and funding to undertake appropriate training and education in this area. PMID:12589240

  13. Placebo Response in Antipsychotic Clinical Trials: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Bret R; Pott, Emily; Tandler, Jane M.; Wall, Melanie M.; Roose, Steven P.; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Because rising placebo response decreases drug-placebo differences and increases failed trials, it is imperative to determine what is causing this trend. Objective We investigated the relationships of antipsychotic medication/placebo response with publication year and identified associated study design and implementation variables. Data Sources Medline, PsycINFO, and PubMed were searched in July 2013 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antipsychotic medications published from 1960-present. Study Selection Included were RCTs lasting 4–24 weeks, contrasting antipsychotic medication with placebo or active comparator, and enrolling patients ≥18 years with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Data Extraction and Synthesis Standardized mean change scores were calculated for each treatment cell, plotted against publication year, and tested with Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients. Hierarchical linear modeling identified factors associated with the standardized mean change across medication and placebo treatment cells. Main Outcome Measure We hypothesized that the mean change in placebo-treated patients would significantly increase from 1960-present, that greater change would be observed in active comparator vs. placebo-controlled trials, and that more protocol visits would increase the symptom change observed. Results In 106 trials examined, the mean change observed in placebo cells increased significantly with year of publication (N = 39, r = 0.52, p = 0.001), while the mean change in effective dose medication cells decreased significantly (N = 208, r = −0.26, p < 0.001). Significant interactions were found between assignment to effective dose medication and publication year (t = −5.55, df 260, p < 0.001), baseline severity (t = 5.08, df 260, p < 0.001), and study duration (t = −3.76, df 260, p < 0.001), indicating that the average drug-placebo difference significantly decreased over time, with decreasing baseline severity, and with increasing study duration. Medication treatment in comparator studies was associated with significantly more improvement than medication treatment in placebo-controlled trials (t = 2.73, df 93, p = 0.008). Conclusions and Relevance The average treatment change associated with placebo treatment in antipsychotic trials rose since 1960, while the change associated with medication treatment decreased. RCT changes leading to increased baseline score inflation, enrolling less severely ill subjects, and inducing higher patient expectancy may be responsible. PMID:25321611

  14. Antipsychotic efficacy in psychosis with co-morbid cannabis misuse: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robin P; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of cannabis use in patients with psychotic mental illness is known to be high and is suspected to exacerbate symptoms and worsen prognosis. We aimed to evaluate evidence of antipsychotic efficacy in reducing the burden of psychotic symptoms and cannabis use in individuals with psychotic mental illness and co-morbid cannabis use. A systematic review was conducted of antipsychotic treatment in those with psychotic mental illness and co-morbid cannabis use. Quality of evidence for each study and outcomes were rated using the 'GRADE' approach. Twenty-two studies were identified: 13 experimental and 9 observational, including a total sample of 1543 patients, 761 of whom had a diagnosed cannabis use disorder. The most frequent antipsychotics compared were risperidone, olanzapine and clozapine with olanzapine, risperidone and haloperidol. No clear differences between antipsychotics were demonstrated. Future studies are needed to confirm whether clozapine is superior to other antipsychotics in reducing cannabis use. PMID:26510450

  15. Antipsychotic Treatment Patterns and Aggressive Behavior Among Adolescents in Residential Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Leslie; Riddle, Mark A.; Pruitt, David; Zachik, Al

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the association between acute aggressive behavior patterns of 145 adolescents in residential treatment facilities with use of and changes in antipsychotic medication for the chronic management of aggression. Seclusion/restraint (S/R) frequency over 12 months was used to categorize youth into none, low, moderate, and high S/R groups. Data were analyzed using longitudinal mixed effects logistic regression models that allowed for intra-subject variability over time. The high and moderate S/R groups were significantly more likely to receive antipsychotics, get higher doses, and have changes in medication compared with the none S/R group. Increases in antipsychotic dose were associated with a lower likelihood of changes in antipsychotic medication over time. Despite persistent antipsychotic use at higher doses, youth in the high and moderate S/R groups continued to be secluded/restrained frequently. The findings question the adequacy of these medications in managing aggressive behavior. PMID:23319375

  16. The role of prescribed burn associations in the application of prescribed fires in rangeland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Toledo, David; Kreuter, Urs P; Sorice, Michael G; Taylor, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Risk and liability concerns regarding fire affect people's attitudes toward fire and have led to human-induced alterations of fire regimes. This has, in turn, contributed to brush encroachment and degradation of many grasslands and savannas. Efforts to successfully restore such degraded ecosystems at the landscape scale in regions of the United States with high proportions of private lands require the reintroduction of fire. Prescribed Burn Associations (PBA) provide training, equipment, and labor to apply fire safely, facilitating the application of this rangeland management tool and thereby reducing the associated risk. PBAs help build networks and social capital among landowners who are interested in using fire. They can also change attitudes toward fire and enhance the social acceptability of using prescribed fire as a management practice. PBAs are an effective mechanism for promoting the widespread use of prescribed fire to restore and maintain the biophysical integrity of grasslands and savannas at the landscape scale. We report findings of a project aimed at determining the human dimensions of using prescribed fire to control woody plant encroachment in three different eco-regions of Texas. Specifically, we examine membership in PBAs as it relates to land manager decisions regarding the use of prescribed fire. Perceived risk has previously been identified as a key factor inhibiting the use of prescribed fire by landowners. Our results show that perceived constraints, due to lack of skill, knowledge, and access to equipment and membership in a PBAs are more important factors than risk perceptions in affecting landowner decisions about the use of fire. This emphasizes the potential for PBAs to reduce risk perceptions regarding the application of prescribed fire and, therefore, their importance for restoring brush-encroached grasslands and savannas. PMID:24333743

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 1-(1,2-benzisothiazol-3-yl)- and (1,2-benzisoxazol-3-yl)piperazine derivatives as potential antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Yevich, J P; New, J S; Smith, D W; Lobeck, W G; Catt, J D; Minielli, J L; Eison, M S; Taylor, D P; Riblet, L A; Temple, D L

    1986-03-01

    Members of the series of title compounds were tested for potential antipsychotic activity in relevant receptor binding assays and behavioral screens. Structure-activity relationships within the series are discussed. Compound 24 (BMY 13859-1), a (1,2-benzisothiazol-3-yl)piperazine derivative, was selected for further study because of its potent and selective profile in primary CNS tests. It was active in the Sidman avoidance paradigm and blocked amphetamine-induced stereotyped behavior in dogs for up to 7 h. The compound's lack of typical neuroleptic-like effects in the rat catalepsy test and its failure to produce dopamine receptor supersensitivity following chronic administration indicate that it should not cause the movement disorders commonly associated with antipsychotic therapy. Although 24 has potent affinity for dopaminergic binding sites, its even greater affinity for serotonin receptors suggests that a serotonergic component may be relevant to its atypical profile. Compound 24 is currently undergoing clinical evaluation in schizophrenic patients. PMID:2869146

  18. Head-to-head comparison of the costs of atypical antipsychotics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barbui, Corrado; Lintas, Camilla; Percudani, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, prescribing guidelines recommend the use of atypical or second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in the first-line treatment of individuals with newly diagnosed schizophrenia. This recommendation has increased the utilisation of these agents and, consequently, produced a progressive increase in the proportion of total direct costs in schizophrenia accounted for by drug therapy. In this still-evolving context of care, it becomes relevant to critically investigate the literature base on the relative cost effectiveness of each SGA in comparison with the others, the purpose being to ascertain whether the data reveal any one agent to be truly more cost effective than the others.A systematic search of economic evaluations comparing two or more SGAs yielded 19 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Of these, 11 were retrospective database or chart review analyses, six were observational prospective or mirror-image studies, and two were randomised clinical trials. Olanzapine and risperidone were compared in 16 studies, two studies compared clozapine, olanzapine and risperidone, and one compared clozapine and risperidone. While experimental studies indicated an absence of differences among the SGAs in terms of total expenditure, database analyses found contrasting evidence. These latter studies, although susceptible to bias and confounding, should theoretically provide an added dimension, in that they are based on observations from 'real world' practice. However, there were too many potential threats to the validity of these analyses to draw a firm conclusion that any one agent is truly more cost effective than the others. In this uncertain situation, clinicians and policy makers should be aware that indirect evidence from independent randomised controlled trials comparing individual SGAs with haloperidol suggested similar cost effectiveness. As healthcare providers in different settings are ultimately the ones who pay for new innovations, it seems appropriate that they commission research into the cost effectiveness of SGAs. PMID:16268665

  19. Antipsychotics inhibit glucose transport: Determination of olanzapine binding site in Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose/H+ symporter

    PubMed Central

    Babkin, Petr; George Thompson, Alayna M.; Iancu, Cristina V.; Walters, D. Eric; Choe, Jun-yong

    2015-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug olanzapine is widely prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, it often causes unwanted side effects, including diabetes, due to disruption of insulin-dependant glucose metabolism through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. To determine if olanzapine can affect the first step in glucose metabolism – glucose transport inside cells – we investigated the effect of this drug on the transport activity of a model glucose transporter. The glucose transporter from Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcPSe) is specific for glucose, inhibited by various human glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitors, has high sequence and structure homology to GLUTs, and is readily amenable to transport assay, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. We found that olanzapine inhibits glucose transport of GlcPSe with an IC50 0.9 ± 0.1 mM. Computational docking of olanzapine to the GlcPSe structure revealed potential binding sites that were further examined through mutagenesis and transport assay to identify residues important for olanzapine inhibition. These investigations suggest that olanzapine binds in a polar region of the cytosolic part of the transporter, and interacts with residues R129, strictly conserved in all GLUTs, and N136, conserved in only a few GLUTs, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4. We propose that olanzapine inhibits GlcPSe by impeding the alternating opening and closing of the substrate cavity necessary for glucose transport. It accomplishes this by disrupting a key salt bridge formed by conserved residues R129 and E362, that stabilizes the outward-facing conformation of the transporter. PMID:25941630

  20. Antipsychotics inhibit glucose transport: Determination of olanzapine binding site in Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose/H(+) symporter.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Petr; George Thompson, Alayna M; Iancu, Cristina V; Walters, D Eric; Choe, Jun-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug olanzapine is widely prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, it often causes unwanted side effects, including diabetes, due to disruption of insulin-dependant glucose metabolism through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. To determine if olanzapine can affect the first step in glucose metabolism - glucose transport inside cells - we investigated the effect of this drug on the transport activity of a model glucose transporter. The glucose transporter from Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcPSe) is specific for glucose, inhibited by various human glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitors, has high sequence and structure homology to GLUTs, and is readily amenable to transport assay, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. We found that olanzapine inhibits glucose transport of GlcPSe with an IC50 0.9 ± 0.1 mM. Computational docking of olanzapine to the GlcPSe structure revealed potential binding sites that were further examined through mutagenesis and transport assay to identify residues important for olanzapine inhibition. These investigations suggest that olanzapine binds in a polar region of the cytosolic part of the transporter, and interacts with residues R129, strictly conserved in all GLUTs, and N136, conserved in only a few GLUTs, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4. We propose that olanzapine inhibits GlcPSe by impeding the alternating opening and closing of the substrate cavity necessary for glucose transport. It accomplishes this by disrupting a key salt bridge formed by conserved residues R129 and E362, that stabilizes the outward-facing conformation of the transporter. PMID:25941630

  1. Lipidomics Reveals Early Metabolic Changes in Subjects with Schizophrenia: Effects of Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Joseph; Baillie, Rebecca A.; Zhu, Hongjie; Buckley, Peter; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Nasrallah, Henry A.; Dougherty, George G.; Yao, Jeffrey K.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need for mapping early metabolic changes in schizophrenia to capture failures in regulation of biochemical pathways and networks. This information could provide valuable insights about disease mechanisms, trajectory of disease progression, and diagnostic biomarkers. We used a lipidomics platform to measure individual lipid species in 20 drug-nave patients with a first episode of schizophrenia (FE group), 20 patients with chronic schizophrenia that had not adhered to prescribed medications (RE group), and 29 race-matched control subjects without schizophrenia. Lipid metabolic profiles were evaluated and compared between study groups and within groups before and after treatment with atypical antipsychotics, risperidone and aripiprazole. Finally, we mapped lipid profiles to n3 and n6 fatty acid synthesis pathways to elucidate which enzymes might be affected by disease and treatment. Compared to controls, the FE group showed significant down-regulation of several n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including 20:5n3, 22:5n3, and 22:6n3 within the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipid classes. Differences between FE and controls were only observed in the n3 class PUFAs; no differences where noted in n6 class PUFAs. The RE group was not significantly different from controls, although some compositional differences within PUFAs were noted. Drug treatment was able to correct the aberrant PUFA levels noted in FE patients, but changes in re patients were not corrective. Treatment caused increases in both n3 and n6 class lipids. These results supported the hypothesis that phospholipid n3 fatty acid deficits are present early in the course of schizophrenia and tend not to persist throughout its course. These changes in lipid metabolism could indicate a metabolic vulnerability in patients with schizophrenia that occurs early in development of the disease. PMID:23894336

  2. Clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antiepileptic drugs with new antidepressants and new antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Spina, Edoardo; Pisani, Francesco; de Leon, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are frequently co-prescribed with new antidepressants (ADs) or new antipsychotics (APs). A PubMed search with no time limit was used to update the review of the clinically significant pharmacokinetic (PK) drug interactions DIs (DIs) between AEDs with new ADs and APs. Our best interpretation of what to expect regarding dosing changes in the average patient after combining AEDs with new ADs or new APs is summarized on updated tables that integrate the information on in vitro metabolism studies, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) studies, case report/series and prospective studies. There will be a need to periodically update these dose correction factors as new knowledge becomes available. These tables will provide some orientation to clinicians with no TDM access and may also encourage clinicians to further study TDM. The clinical relevance of the inductive properties of carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone on new ADs and new APs and the inhibitory properties of valproic acid and some new ADs, are relatively well understood. On the other hand, PK DI studies combining new AEDs with weak inductive properties (particularly oxcarbazepine doses≥1200mg/day), topiramate doses≥400mg/day, clobazam, eslicarbazepine, and rufinamide), with new ADs and new APs are needed. Valproic acid may be 1) an inhibitor and/or inducer of clozapine and olanzapine with potential for clinically relevant DIs, 2) an inhibitor of paliperidone, and 3) a weak inducer of aripiprazole. Fluoxetine and fluvoxamine are relevant inhibitors of phenytoin and valproic acid and possibly of clobazam, lacosamide, phenobarbital, or primidone. PMID:26896788

  3. Association of a Schizophrenia Risk Variant at the DRD2 Locus With Antipsychotic Treatment Response in First-Episode Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Robinson, Delbert G; Gallego, Juan A; John, Majnu; Yu, Jin; Addington, Jean; Tohen, Mauricio; Kane, John M; Malhotra, Anil K; Lencz, Todd

    2015-11-01

    Findings from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium genome-wide association study (GWAS) showed that variation at the DRD2 locus is associated with schizophrenia risk. However, the functional significance of rs2514218, the top DRD2 single nucleotide polymorphism in the GWAS, is unknown. Dopamine D2 receptor binding is a common mechanism of action for all antipsychotic drugs, and DRD2 variants were related to antipsychotic response in previous studies. The present study examined whether rs2514218 genotype could predict antipsychotic response, including efficacy and adverse events, in a cohort of patients with first episode of psychosis treated with either risperidone or aripiprazole for 12 weeks. Subjects were genotyped using the Illumina Infinium HumanOmniExpressExome array platform. After standard quality control, data from 100 subjects (49 randomly assigned to treatment with aripiprazole and 51 assigned to risperidone) was available for analysis. Subjects were assessed for psychotic symptomatology and medication-related adverse events weekly for 4 weeks, then biweekly for 8 weeks. Linear mixed model analysis revealed that the homozygotes for the risk (C) allele at rs2514218 had significantly greater reduction in positive symptoms during 12 weeks of treatment compared to the T allele carriers. In the aripiprazole group, C/C homozygotes also reported more akathisia than the T allele carriers, while in the risperidone group, male T allele carriers demonstrated greater prolactin elevations compared to male C/C homozygotes. These findings suggest that the schizophrenia risk variant at the DRD2 locus (or another variant in close proximity) is associated with observable differences in response to treatments which reduce striatal dopamine signaling. PMID:26320194

  4. Conceptual and methodological issues in the design of clinical trials of antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Honer, William G; Thornton, Allen E; Sherwood, Megan; MacEwan, G William; Ehmann, Tom S; Williams, Richard; Kopala, Lili C; Procyshyn, Ric; Barr, Alasdair M

    2007-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most severe and disabling psychiatric disorders. Antipsychotic drugs offer considerable benefits in controlling symptoms and preventing relapse. The strategy for the present review of clinical trials was to ask 'What are the features of schizophrenia and the existing treatments of the illness that have implications for future clinical trials'? Six key facts were identified.First, schizophrenia is genetically 'complex'. Trials may benefit from designs including genetically related illnesses, by focussing on cross-cutting aspects of the phenotype such as psychosis or cognitive dysfunction, and by collecting information on possible moderators and mediators of treatment response.Second, schizophrenia affects multiple neurotransmitter systems. Multiple signalling pathways may need to be considered, with different time courses of response. Outcome measures from clinical trials could be collected at more frequent intervals, particularly in the early phase of response.Third, the clinical features used to define the illness are a mix of symptoms and social-occupational dysfunction, yet treatment response is often defined only by changes in symptoms. Multiple measures of functioning need to be collected at baseline and at the endpoint of trials. Consensus definitions for response, remission, relapse, recovery and recurrence need to be developed.Fourth, schizophrenia is often highly disabling. Linking treatment response in clinical trials to measures of quality-adjusted life-years will allow comparison with other medical illnesses using common metrics.Fifth, the general health and care of individuals with schizophrenia is often poor. 'Complex' interventions, which include, but are not limited to, antipsychotic medications, need to be designed and tested for the problems facing these patients.Finally, large gaps exist between clinical trials, practice guidelines and patterns of practice. Trials need to be designed to investigate widely used approaches such as antipsychotic polypharmacy, where actual practice diverges from evidence-based guidelines. PMID:17696571

  5. Homoeopathic and herbal prescribing in general practice in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Sarah; Simpson, Colin R; McLay, James S

    2006-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Homoeopathy and herbalism are increasingly popular among the public and prescribed by general practitioners in the NHS. Doctors and regulatory authorities have expressed concerns about their efficacy and safety. Studies from the 1990s suggest that between 5.9 and 7.5% of English NHS general practitioners have prescribed homoeopathy, while less than 1% have prescribed herbal remedies. Current levels of prescribing are unknown but are thought to have increased. What this study adds Sixty percent of Scottish general practices now prescribe homoeopathic or herbal remedies. The prevalence of homoeopathic prescribing in those under 16 years has doubled since 2000 and is maximal in children < 1 year old, of whom 1% are prescribed a homoeopathic remedy. Recognized drugherb interactions were identified in 4% of patients prescribed oral herbal remedies. Aims To investigate the current levels of homoeopathic and herbal prescribing in Scottish general practice. Methods Prescribing of homoeopathic and herbal remedies in primary care was assessed in 1891 669 patients for the year 20032004, using computerized prescribing data retrieved from 323 general practices in Scotland. Results Forty-nine percent of practices prescribed homoeopathic and 32% herbal remedies. A total of 193 homoeopathic and 17 herbal remedies were prescribed, with 5% of practices accounting for 46% of patients and 50% of remedies. Four thousand one hundred and sixty patients (2.2/1000 registered patients) were prescribed at least one homoeopathic remedy during the study period, with the highest prevalence to children under 12 months of age (9.5/1000 children of that age). Children under the age of 16 made up 16% of the population prescribed homoeopathic remedies (2.2/1000 registered patients of that age). Three hundred and sixty-one patients (0.2/1000 registered patients) were prescribed at least one herbal remedy during the study period, 44 of whom were children < 16 years old. Patients prescribed a homoeopathic or herbal remedy were also prescribed a median of four and five conventional medicines, respectively. Of patients prescribed an oral herbal remedy, 4% were also concomitantly prescribed a conventional medicine with which a drugherb interaction has been documented. Conclusions Our study reports that a substantial number of Scottish general practitioners prescribe homoeopathic and herbal remedies, with an approximate doubling in the number of children prescribed homoeopathic remedies. The level of homoeopathic and herbal prescribing raises questions about homoeopathic/herbal provision in the National Health Service and should prompt critical review. PMID:16796701

  6. Assessment of prescribing practices among urban and rural general practitioners in Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Sekharan; Ganeshkumar, Parasuraman; Katta, Ajitha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studying drug use pattern among medical practitioners is of vital importance in the present scenario where irrational drug use and development of drug resistance is becoming rampant. Objective: To assess, the pattern of prescribing practices among the general practitioners in a defined rural and urban area of Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A community based descriptive study was conducted to collect 600 prescriptions from the catchment areas of rural and urban health training centers of a medical college using prescribing indicators as per the WHO How to investigate drug use in health facilities tool. Results: This prescription study revealed that multivitamins (19.5%), antibiotics (19.3%), drugs for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) (18%), analgesic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/ (NSAID's) (15.1%), and antihistaminic (12.5%) were prescribed frequently. Among the antibiotics, amoxicillin (49.2%) was the most commonly prescribed followed by gentamicin (31.7%). Percentage of prescriptions with an antibiotic was 55% and nearly 62% of the practitioners prescribed drugs by their generic names. As a practice of poly-pharmacy, it was observed that the average number of drugs prescribed in urban and rural area was nearly 5 and 4, respectively. Nearly 80% of the urban and rural practitioners were prescribing at least one injection. Study of the quality of prescriptions revealed that there was poor legibility, high usage of abbreviations, inadequate details of the drugs, and absence of signature by practitioners in the prescriptions. Conclusion: This study clearly highlights the practice of poly-pharmacy, low usage of generic drugs, injudicious usage of antibiotics and injections and low usage of drugs prescribed from essential drugs list. PMID:23833368

  7. Concomitant prescribing and dispensing errors at a Brazilian hospital: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria das Dores Graciano; Rosa, Mrio Borges; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Reis, Adriano Max Moreira; Anchieta, Lni Mrcia; Mota, Joaquim Antnio Csar

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prevalence and types of prescribing and dispensing errors occurring with high-alert medications and to propose preventive measures to avoid errors with these medications. INTRODUCTION: The prevalence of adverse events in health care has increased, and medication errors are probably the most common cause of these events. Pediatric patients are known to be a high-risk group and are an important target in medication error prevention. METHODS: Observers collected data on prescribing and dispensing errors occurring with high-alert medications for pediatric inpatients in a university hospital. In addition to classifying the types of error that occurred, we identified cases of concomitant prescribing and dispensing errors. RESULTS: One or more prescribing errors, totaling 1,632 errors, were found in 632 (89.6%) of the 705 high-alert medications that were prescribed and dispensed. We also identified at least one dispensing error in each high-alert medication dispensed, totaling 1,707 errors. Among these dispensing errors, 723 (42.4%) content errors occurred concomitantly with the prescribing errors. A subset of dispensing errors may have occurred because of poor prescription quality. The observed concomitancy should be examined carefully because improvements in the prescribing process could potentially prevent these problems. CONCLUSION: The system of drug prescribing and dispensing at the hospital investigated in this study should be improved by incorporating the best practices of medication safety and preventing medication errors. High-alert medications may be used as triggers for improving the safety of the drug-utilization system. PMID:22012039

  8. Prescribing habits of Peruvian physicians and factors influencing them.

    PubMed

    Zrate Crdenas, E; Liosa Isenrich, L

    1995-12-01

    A survey conducted between September 1991 and August 1992 approached 800 physicians in two marginal areas of the cities of Lima and Chimbote, Peru. Among other things, the survey sought data about information sources influencing the drug prescription practices of Peruvian physicians, about how these practices were modified by experience, and about the rationality of drug treatments prescribed for dealing with selected common ailments. Of the 800 physicians, 184 had already established themselves in private practice, 309 were recent medical school graduates, and 307 did not complete the survey questionnaire. The responses provided suggested that knowledge acquired in medical school had little influence on the prescribing habits of either the established physicians or the recent graduates. Over two-thirds of both groups (69.6% of the physicians in private practice and 79.9% of the recent medical school graduates) indicated that their primary source of drug information was medical literature. Overall, however, data from this and related studies suggest that while the medical school influence was limited, the role of medical literature was less powerful than the survey participants claimed-because advertising materials distributed by pharmaceutical companies appeared to constitute a key source of information, one that tended to promote irrational drug use. PMID:8605524

  9. The Role of Theory in Increasing Adherence to Prescribed Practice

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Julie; Wishart, Laurie; Hanna, Steven

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this article is to apply theoretical frameworks to adherence behaviour and to guide the development of an intervention to increase adherence to prescribed home programmes. Summary of Key Points: Delivering an effective intervention requires establishing one that is evidence based and of adequate dosage. Two-thirds of patients who receive home exercise prescriptions do not adhere to their home programme, which may contribute to their physiotherapy's being ineffective. The mediating concepts of self-efficacy (SE) and outcome expectations (OE) are common to the five relevant theories used to explain adherence to exercise: the health belief model, protection motivation theory, theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behaviour, and social cognitive theory. Conclusion/Recommendations: Few intervention studies with any theoretical underpinning have examined adherence to exercise. Even fewer have been designed to affect and measure change in the theoretical mediators of SE and OE in patient populations. Physiotherapists must consider increasing adherence as a component of effective physiotherapy. Ongoing research is needed to increase our understanding of adherence to prescribed home programmes and to design interventions to affect theoretical mediators for increasing adherence. PMID:20190989

  10. Medications Prescribed and Occurrence of Falls in General Medicine Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Cashin, Richard P; Yang, Meiti

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although falls are multifactorial, medications are a key risk factor that may be modifiable. Falls were among the most common occurrences entered into a risk identification system at the authors hospital. Objectives: To identify whether general medicine inpatients who had experienced a fall were taking any medications known to be associated with falls. Methods: The literature was reviewed to develop a list of high-risk medications that have been associated with falls. In a retrospective quality-improvement database-based study, information from the risk identification system was merged with data from the pharmacy dispensing system for general medicine inpatients who had experienced a fall. The primary end point was the percentage of patients with a documented fall who had a prescription for a high-risk medication. The number of such medications that had been prescribed for patients who fell was also calculated. Results: Eighty-one unique medications were found to be associated with falls. During the study period (April 1, 2008, to March 31, 2009), 151 patients experienced a fall. Of those, 144 (95.4%) were taking at least one high-risk medication. The mean number of high-risk medications per patient who experienced a fall was 2.2. Of all documented falls, a new high-risk medication had been started within 7 days before the fall for 74 (49.0%) and within 24 h before the fall for 17 (11.3%). The most commonly prescribed drugs during all time periods (i.e., within 24 h or 7 days before the fall or since the patients admission) were lorazepam and zopiclone. The pharmacy database did not track administration of medications, so it is possible that some of the drugs prescribed were not actually taken by the patient. Conclusion: Almost all inpatients who experienced a fall during the hospital stay had a prescription for at least one medication associated with a high risk for falls. Lorazepam and zopiclone were the drugs most commonly associated with falls in this hospital, and their use should be reviewed. PMID:22479083

  11. Development and evaluation of a pocket card to support prescribing by junior doctors in an English hospital.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew; Larsson, Elina; Hewitt, Richard; Garfield, Sara; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2015-10-01

    Background Junior doctors do most inpatient prescribing, with a relatively high error rate, and locally had reported finding prescribing very stressful. Objective To develop an intervention to improve Foundation Year 1 (FY1) doctors' experience of prescribing, and evaluate their satisfaction with the intervention and perceptions of its impact. Methods Based on findings of a focus group and questionnaire, we developed a pocket Dose Reference Card ("Dr-Card") for use at the point of prescribing. This summarised common drugs and dosing schedules and was distributed to all new FY1 doctors in a London teaching trust. A post-intervention questionnaire explored satisfaction and perceived impact. Results Focus group participants (n=12) described feeling anxious and time pressured when prescribing; a quick reference resource for commonly prescribed drug doses was suggested. Responses to the exploratory questionnaire reinforced these findings. Following Dr-Card distribution, the post-intervention questionnaire revealed that 29/38 (76%) doctors were still using it 2months after distribution and 38/38 (100%) would recommend ongoing production. Conclusions FY1 doctors reported feeling stressed and time pressured when prescribing; this was perceived to contribute to error. A pocket card presenting common drugs and doses was well-received, perceived to be useful, and recommended for on-going use. PMID:25964139

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Financial Incentives to Promote Adherence to Depot Antipsychotic Medication: Economic Evaluation of a Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Catherine; Knapp, Martin; Yeeles, Ksenija; Bremner, Stephen; Eldridge, Sandra; David, Anthony S.; O’Connell, Nicola; Burns, Tom; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis can promote adherence to depot antipsychotic medication, but the cost-effectiveness of this approach has not been examined. Methods Economic evaluation within a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial. 141 patients under the care of 73 teams (clusters) were randomised to intervention or control; 138 patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizo-affective disorder or bipolar disorder participated. Intervention participants received £15 per depot injection over 12 months, additional to usual acute, mental and community primary health services. The control group received usual health services. Main outcome measures: incremental cost per 20% increase in adherence to depot antipsychotic medication; incremental cost of ‘good’ adherence (defined as taking at least 95% of the prescribed number of depot medications over the intervention period). Findings Economic and outcome data for baseline and 12-month follow-up were available for 117 participants. The adjusted difference in adherence between groups was 12.2% (73.4% control vs. 85.6% intervention); the adjusted costs difference was £598 (95% CI -£4 533, £5 730). The extra cost per patient to increase adherence to depot medications by 20% was £982 (95% CI -£8 020, £14 000). The extra cost per patient of achieving 'good' adherence was £2 950 (CI -£19 400, £27 800). Probability of cost-effectiveness exceeded 97.5% at willingness-to-pay values of £14 000 for a 20% increase in adherence and £27 800 for good adherence. Interpretation Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis is cost-effective in promoting adherence to depot antipsychotic medication. Direct healthcare costs (including costs of the financial incentive) are unlikely to be increased by this intervention. Trial Registration ISRCTN.com 77769281 PMID:26448540

  13. [Should the ophthalmologist prescribe generic drugs?].

    PubMed

    Nordmann, J-P

    2003-10-01

    It seems obvious that an ophthalmologist should encourage the use of generic drugs. However, it is important to know the exact definition of a generic drug and the type of studies to be conducted before a generic drug is released on the market. A generic drug is a drug that has the same composition quantitatively as well as qualitatively of the active compound as the original drug. It also has the same pharmaceutical mode of action and the same bioavailability, as determined with bioavailability studies. Ophthalmic drops contain both an active compound and many adjuvants used to stabilize the drug. Globally speaking, the active compound corresponds to the efficacy of a topical drug and the adjuvant to its tolerance. It is likely that the efficacy of a generic drug is identical to that of the brand-name drug, even though only bioavailability studies in non-human models are required to evaluate tolerance which is less likely to be identical, as adjuvants can differ. A survey of 520 French ophthalmologists has recently been conducted. It shows that doctors rarely think of prescribing generic drugs, as they do not consider cost as a major issue in treating glaucoma. However, they see no reason not to prescribe generic drugs. This mixed perception is shared by patients who willingly accept that doctors prescribe a generic drug, but do not wish the pharmacist to take the initiative of filling a prescription with a generic drug, which sometimes gives patients the impression of being less well treated. The use of generic drugs should be encouraged, keeping in mind that good tolerance should be ensured. PMID:14646825

  14. Common Space, Common Time, Common Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Melody J.

    2005-01-01

    The most valued means of support and learning cited by new teachers at Poland Regional High School in rural Maine are the collegial interactions that common workspace, common planning time, and common tasks make possible. The school has used these everyday structures to enable new and veteran teachers to converse about curricular and pedagogical

  15. Effect of Physician Tutorials on Prescribing Patterns of Graduate Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Lawrence E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Physicians in an experimental group were surveyed to assess their knowledge of the effectiveness, cost, and side effects of antibiotics, and a tutorial was developed to modify some prescribing patterns. Prescribing patterns were statistically different. (Author/MLW)

  16. Enteral nutrition: what the dietitian prescribes is not what the burn patient gets!

    PubMed

    Sudenis, Tess; Hall, Kathryn; Cartotto, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) is commonly interrupted in burn patients for many reasons, which leads to discrepancies between prescribed and actual EN delivery. The magnitude and origin of these discrepancies have never been well documented among burn patients. The purpose of this study was to examine differences between prescribed and actual EN delivery and to identify the specific causes of EN interruption and to quantify these. Retrospective review of patients treated between June 6, 2009 and June 6, 2012 at an adult regional American Burn Association-verified burn center who had ≥10% TBSA burns and who were prescribed EN for at least 24 hours. On postburn days (PBD) 0 to 14 the daily volume of EN prescribed by the dietitian was compared with the actual volume received by the patient. The cause and duration of interruptions to EN delivery were recorded. A total of 90 subjects, [mean (± SD) age 47 ± 18 years, 32% female, median %TBSA burn size 28, median %TBSA full-thickness burn size 11, and a 54% incidence of inhalation injury], were studied. EN was initiated at a median of 9.5 hours after burn center admission. Received calories were significantly less than prescribed calories on every study day. The median daily caloric deficit ranged between 172 and 930 kcal. The median percent of prescribed calories received each day ranged from 19% on PBD 0 to 91% on PBD 14. The mean (± SD) total duration of EN interruption was 8.9 ± 3.0 hours per day. Gradually increasing the feed rate to reach the prescribed EN goal rate ("ramping-in") was the most common cause of a discrepancy between prescribed and actual EN delivery, accounting for 35% of total discrepancy time. Interruptions for surgery accounted for 24% of total discrepancy time. Other causes of discrepancies were physician- or nurse-directed interruptions (16% of time), planned extubation (7%), feed intolerance (11%), tube malfunction (2%), bedside procedures (2%), and dressing changes (3%).Enterally fed burn patients received significantly less nutrition than prescribed. Some of the causes for discrepancies between prescribed and received EN are unavoidable, but many are not, suggesting the need for careful review and possible alteration of existing EN practices. PMID:24722665

  17. Prescribing cannabis: freedom, autonomy, and values.

    PubMed

    Hayry, M

    2004-08-01

    In many Western jurisdictions cannabis, unlike most other psychoactive drugs, cannot be prescribed to patients even in cases where medical professionals believe that it would ease the patient's pain or anxiety. The reasons for this prohibition are mostly ideological, although medical and moral arguments have been formulated to support it. In this paper, it is argued that freedom, properly understood, provides a sound ethical reason to allow the use of cannabis in medicine. Scientific facts, appeals to harm and autonomy, and considerations of symbolic value cannot consistently justify prohibitions. PMID:15289511

  18. Leveraging hospital formularies for improved prescribing.

    PubMed

    Karas, Albert; Kuehl, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Hospital formularies, guided by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, exist to optimize medication use by identifying and designating drugs of choice to guide rational prescribing, ultimately reducing patient risk and costs and improving patient outcomes. Guidelines and a framework exist to guide critical evaluations of medications for formulary listing; however, there may be opportunities to improve and standardize how a formulary change could be instituted in Canadian hospitals. A formulary change at an Ontario hospital revealed that there are some key challenges to the formulary change process including the importance of a robust project plan, appropriate resources, healthcare staff education, and acceptance. PMID:25046967

  19. Differential regulation of D2 and D4 dopamine receptor mRNAs in the primate cerebral cortex vs. neostriatum: effects of chronic treatment with typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Lidow, M S; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1997-11-01

    The RNase Protection Assay was used to examine the regulation of D2 and D4 dopamine receptor mRNAs in the cerebral cortex and neostriatum of nonhuman primates after chronic treatment with a wide spectrum of antipsychotic medications (chlorpromazine, clozapine, haloperidol, molindone, olanzapine, pimozide, remoxipride and risperidone). Tiapride, a D2 antagonist that lacks antipsychotic activity, was also included. All drugs were administered orally for 6 months at doses recommended for humans. All antipsychotic drug treatments examined in this study caused a statistically significant up-regulation of both the long and short isoforms of the D2 receptor mRNAs in the prefrontal and temporal cortex. Tiapride, in contrast, significantly up-regulated only the level of D2-long mRNA in these areas. The same drug treatments produced less uniform effects in the neostriatum than in the cortex: clozapine and olanzapine failed to significantly elevate either D2-long or D2-short receptor messages in this structure unlike all other drugs, including tiapride. In both the cerebral cortex and striatum, D4 receptor mRNA was upregulated by certain typical (chlorpromazine and haloperidol) and certain atypical (clozapine, olanzapine and risperidone) antipsychotic agents as well as by tiapride. Other drugs of the typical (molindone and pimozide) and atypical (remoxipride) classes had no effect on D4 mRNA levels in either cortical or striatal tissue. The finding that up-regulation of D2 dopamine receptor mRNAs was a consistently observed effect of a wide range of antipsychotic agents in the cerebral cortex but not in the neostriatum, coupled with the fact that the D2-short isoforms in the cortex were not regulated by a nonantipsychotic D2 antagonist, tiapride, draws attention to the importance of the D2 dopamine receptor in the cerebral cortex as a potentially critical, common site of action of antipsychotic medications. PMID:9353417

  20. Pharmacogenetics and Antipsychotics: Therapeutic Efficacy and Side Effects Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Antipsychotic drug is the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia, and there are large inter-individual differences is clinical response and side effects. Pharmacogenetics provides a valuable tool to fulfill the promise of personalized medicine by tailoring treatment based on one's genetic markers. Areas covered in this review This article reviews the pharmacogenetic literature from early 1990s to 2010, focusing on two aspects of drug action: pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Genetic variants in the neurotransmitter receptors including dopamine and serotonin, and metabolic pathways of drugs including CYP2D6 and COMT, were discussed in association with clinical drug response and side effects. What the reader will gain Readers are expected to learn the up-to-date evidence in pharmacogenetic research, and to gain familiarity to the issues and challenges facing the field. Take home message Pharmacogenetic research of antipsychotic drugs is both promising and challenging. There is consistent evidence that some genetic variants can affect clinical response and side effects. However, more studies that are designed specifically to test pharmacogenetic hypotheses are clearly needed to advance the field. PMID:21162693

  1. Off-label indications for atypical antipsychotics: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Nimatoudis, Ioannis; Iacovides, Apostolos; Kaprinis, George

    2004-01-01

    Introduction With the introduction of newer atypical antipsychotic agents, a question emerged, concerning their use as complementary pharmacotherapy or even as monotherapy in mental disorders other than psychosis. Material and method MEDLINE was searched with the combination of each one of the key words: risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine with key words that refered to every DSM-IV diagnosis other than schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and dementia and memory disorders. All papers were scored on the basis of the JADAD index. Results The search returned 483 papers. The selection process restricted the sample to 59 papers concerning Risperidone, 37 concerning Olanzapine and 4 concerning Quetiapine (100 in total). Ten papers (7 concerning Risperidone and 3 concerning Olanzapine) had JADAD index above 2. Data suggest that further research would be of value concerning the use of risperidone in the treatment of refractory OCD, Pervasive Developmental disorder, stuttering and Tourette's syndrome, and the use of olanzapine for the treatment of refractory depression and borderline personality disorder. Discussion Data on the off-label usefulness of newer atypical antipsychotics are limited, but positive cues suggest that further research may provide with sufficient hard data to warrant the use of these agents in a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders, either as monotherapy, or as an augmentation strategy. PMID:14975068

  2. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. PMID:24983591

  3. Beyond Dopamine: Glutamate as a Target for Future Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Sendt, Kyra-Verena; Giaroli, Giovanni; Tracy, Derek K.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia remains the primary theoretical framework for the pharmacological treatment of the disorder. Despite various lines of evidence of dopaminergic abnormalities and reasonable efficacy of current antipsychotic medication, a significant proportion of patients show suboptimal treatment responses, poor tolerability, and a subsequent lack of treatment concordance. In recent decades, intriguing evidence for the critical involvement of other neurotransmitter systems in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia has emerged, most notably of dysfunctions within the glutamate pathways. Consequently, the glutamate synapse has arisen as a promising target for urgently needed novel antipsychotic compoundsparticularly in regards to debilitating negative and cognitive symptoms poorly controlled by currently available drugs. In this paper, recent findings integrating glutamatergic and dopaminergic abnormalities in schizophrenia and their implications for novel pharmacological targets are discussed. An overview of compounds in various stages of development is given: drugs enhancing NMDA receptor function as well as metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) are emphasised. Together with other agents more indirectly affecting glutamatergic neurotransmission, their potential future role in the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia is critically evaluated. PMID:22830044

  4. Antipsychotic-induced gene regulation in multiple brain regions.

    PubMed

    Girgenti, Matthew James; Nisenbaum, Laura K; Bymaster, Franklin; Terwilliger, Rosemarie; Duman, Ronald S; Newton, Samuel Sathyanesan

    2010-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs is not well understood. Their complex receptor affinity profiles indicate that their action could extend beyond dopamine receptor blockade. Single gene expression studies and high-throughput gene profiling have shown the induction of genes from several molecular classes and functional categories. Using a focused microarray approach, we investigated gene regulation in rat striatum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus after chronic administration of haloperidol or olanzapine. Regulated genes were validated by in situ hybridization, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Only limited overlap was observed in genes regulated by haloperidol and olanzapine. Both drugs elicited maximal gene regulation in the striatum and least in the hippocampus. Striatal gene induction by haloperidol was predominantly in neurotransmitter signaling, G-protein coupled receptors, and transcription factors. Olanzapine prominently induced retinoic acid and trophic factor signaling genes in the frontal cortex. The data also revealed the induction of several genes that could be targeted in future drug development efforts. The study uncovered the induction of several novel genes, including somatostatin receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The results demonstrating the regulation of multiple receptors and transcription factors suggests that both typical and atypical antipsychotics could possess a complex molecular mechanism of action. PMID:20070867

  5. Atypical antipsychotics in first admission schizophrenia: medication continuation and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mojtabai, Ramin; Lavelle, Janet; Gibson, P Joseph; Bromet, Evelyn J

    2003-01-01

    This study compares the effects of atypical and conventional antipsychotic medications on treatment continuation and outcomes in a first admission sample of patients with schizophrenia treated in usual practice settings. In a sample of 189 participants with a research diagnosis of DSM-IV schizophrenia drawn from the Suffolk County Mental Health Project, we compared the effects of atypical and conventional agents on change of medication, medication gaps, and rehospitalization. For these analyses we used the method of survival analysis for recurrent events, in which the episodes of treatment rather than individual subjects are the units of analysis. In addition, we compared improvement in positive and negative symptoms from intake to 24- or 48-month followups for subjects who stayed on one type of medication or changed to atypicals from conventional antipsychotics. Atypical agents were associated with lower risk of medication change, medication gaps, and rehospitalization. Both conventional and atypical agents were associated with improvement of positive symptoms at followup, but only subjects on atypical agents at followup experienced a significant improvement in negative symptoms. We conclude that in usual practice settings, as in randomized clinical trials, atypical agents are associated with improved treatment continuation and outcomes. PMID:14609245

  6. Antidepressant Prescribing in US Nursing Homes Between 1996 and 2006 and Its Relationship to Staffing Patterns and Use of Other Psychotropic Medications

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Handler, Steven M.; Castle, Nicholas G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined factors associated with antidepressant prescribing in older nursing home residents. Objective The primary objective was to describe the change in antidepressant prescribing for nursing home residents between 1996 and 2006. An additional objective was to examine the association between any change in antidepressant prescribing and staffing patterns or coprescribing of other psychotropic medications in the same cohort. Design Longitudinal. Settings Settings were 12,556 US nursing homes in 1996 and 2006. Data Sources Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data and the Area Resource File (ARF). Measurements Increasing prescribing of antidepressants analyzed using multivariable multinomial generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results Antidepressant prescribing significantly increased (P < .05) from 21.9% in 1996 to 47.5% in 2006. After controlling for resident, organizational, and market factors, increased antidepressant prescribing was associated with more time spent by physician extenders (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.96–2.51), registered nurses (AOR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.10), or nurse aides (AOR 1.08; 95%CI 1.04–1.12) in a facility, as well as the coprescribing of sedative/hypnotics (AOR 1.12; 95% CI 1.08–1.16). Factors found to be protective of increasing antidepressant prescribing (ie, decrease antidepressant prescribing) included having medical directors and physicians spend more time in the facility (AOR 0.60; 95% CI 0.53–0.69 and AOR 0.62; 95% CI 0.54–0.71, respectively), or coprescribing of antianxiety or antipsychotic agents (AOR 0.70; 95% CI 0.68–0.72 and AOR 0.74; 95% CI 0.72–0.77, respectively). Conclusions Prescribing of antidepressants has increased dramatically in the past decade in older nursing home residents and seems to be associated with certain staffing characteristics and the coprescribing of psychotropic medications. Further research is needed to determine if antidepressants are appropriately prescribed, and if overuse is determined, develop interventions to improve the quality of prescribing of these medications in older nursing home residents. PMID:20511098

  7. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory medication—may reduce the risk of death among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to ...

  8. Prescribed fire effects on resource selection by cattle in mesic sagebrush steppe. Part 1: Spring grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prescribed fire is commonly applied world wide as tool for enhancing habitats and altering resource selection patterns of grazing animals. A scientific basic for this management practice has been established in some rangeland ecosystems (e.g montane grasslands, tall grass prairie, mixed prairie, ...

  9. Preparing to Prescribe: How Do Clerkship Students Learn in the Midst of Complexity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Lucy; Yardley, Sarah; Norris, Ben; de Bruin, Anique; Tully, Mary P.; Dornan, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing tasks, which involve pharmacological knowledge, clinical decision-making and practical skill, take place within unpredictable social environments and involve interactions within and between endlessly changing health care teams. Despite this, curriculum designers commonly assume them to be simple to learn and perform. This research used

  10. Preparing to Prescribe: How Do Clerkship Students Learn in the Midst of Complexity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Lucy; Yardley, Sarah; Norris, Ben; de Bruin, Anique; Tully, Mary P.; Dornan, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing tasks, which involve pharmacological knowledge, clinical decision-making and practical skill, take place within unpredictable social environments and involve interactions within and between endlessly changing health care teams. Despite this, curriculum designers commonly assume them to be simple to learn and perform. This research used…

  11. Comparative cost-effectiveness of 11 oral antipsychotics for relapse prevention in schizophrenia within Singapore using effectiveness estimates from a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Zhao, Ying J; Zhou, Hui J; Khoo, Ai L; Teng, Monica; Soh, Lay B; Lim, Boon P; Sim, Kang

    2016-03-01

    This study modelled the cost-effectiveness of 11 oral antipsychotics for relapse prevention among patients with remitted schizophrenia in Singapore. A network meta-analysis determined the relative efficacy and tolerability of 11 oral antipsychotics (amisulpride, aripiprazole, chlorpromazine, haloperidol, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, sulpiride, trifluoperazine and ziprasidone). The clinical estimates were applied in a Markov model to estimate lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life-years gained. Quality-of-life data were obtained from published literature. Resource utilization and cost data were retrieved from local hospital databases. The annual direct cost of healthcare services for a patient experiencing a relapse episode was three-fold that of a patient not in relapse of schizophrenia. The most favourable pharmacological treatment for relapse prevention was olanzapine with an annual probability of relapse of 0.24 (0.13-0.38) with placebo as a reference of 0.75 (0.73-0.78). Olanzapine emerged as the dominant treatment with the highest quality-adjusted life-years gained and lowest lifetime costs. Ziprasidone, aripiprazole and paliperidone incurred higher lifetime costs compared with no treatment. Probability and cost of relapse were key drivers of cost-effectiveness in sensitivity analyses. The data can help prescribers in choosing appropriate treatment and payers in allocating resources for the clinical management of this serious psychiatric disorder. PMID:26619182

  12. Physical activity referrals in Swedish primary health care prescriber and patient characteristics, reasons for prescriptions, and prescribed activities

    PubMed Central

    Leijon, ME; Bendtsen, P; Nilsen, P; Ekberg, K; Sthle, A

    2008-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, practitioners in primary health care (PHC) settings in many countries have issued written prescriptions to patients to promote increased physical activity or exercise. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse a comprehensive physical activity referral (PAR) scheme implemented in a routine PHC setting in stergtland County. The study examines characteristics of the PARs recipients and referral practitioners, identifies reasons why practitioners opted to use PARs with their clients, and discusses prescribed activities and prescriptions in relation to PHC registries. Methods Prospective prescription data were obtained for 90% of the primary health care centres in stergtland County, Sweden, in 2004 and 2005. The study population consisted of patients who were issued PARs after they were deemed likely to benefit from increased physical activity, as assessed by PHC staff. Results During the two-year period, a total of 6,300 patients received PARs. Two-thirds of the patients were female and half of the patients were 4564 years. Half of the patients (50.8%) who received PARs were recommended a home-based activity, such as walking. One third (33%) of the patients issued PARs were totally inactive, reporting no days of physical activity that lasted for 30 minutes, and 29% stated that they reached this level 12 days per week. The number of PARs prescribed per year in relation to the number of unique individuals that visited primary health care during one year was 1.4% in 2004 and 1.2% in 2005. Two-thirds of the combined prescriptions were issued by physicians (38%) and nurses (31%). Physiotherapists and behavioural scientists issued the highest relative number of prescriptions. The most common reasons for issuing PARs were musculoskeletal disorders (39.1%) and overweight (35.4%), followed by high blood pressure (23.3%) and diabetes (23.2%). Conclusion stergtland County's PAR scheme reached a relatively high proportion of physically inactive people visiting local PHC centres for other health reasons. PAR-related statistics, including PAR-rates by individual PHC centres and PAR- rates per health professional category, show differences in prescribing activities, both by patient categories, and by prescribing professionals. PMID:18828898

  13. 20 CFR 416.930 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye when there is an impairment of... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Need to follow prescribed treatment. 416.930... follow prescribed treatment. (a) What treatment you must follow. In order to get benefits, you...

  14. 20 CFR 220.115 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of the claimant's religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye, when... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Need to follow prescribed treatment. 220.115... ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations 220.115 Need to follow prescribed treatment....

  15. 20 CFR 416.930 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye when there is an impairment of... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Need to follow prescribed treatment. 416.930... follow prescribed treatment. (a) What treatment you must follow. In order to get benefits, you...

  16. 20 CFR 220.115 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the claimant's religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye, when... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Need to follow prescribed treatment. 220.115... ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations 220.115 Need to follow prescribed treatment....

  17. 20 CFR 220.115 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of the claimant's religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye, when... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Need to follow prescribed treatment. 220.115... ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations 220.115 Need to follow prescribed treatment....

  18. 20 CFR 416.930 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye when there is an impairment of... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Need to follow prescribed treatment. 416.930... follow prescribed treatment. (a) What treatment you must follow. In order to get benefits, you...

  19. 20 CFR 416.930 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye when there is an impairment of... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Need to follow prescribed treatment. 416.930... follow prescribed treatment. (a) What treatment you must follow. In order to get benefits, you...

  20. 20 CFR 220.115 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of the claimant's religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye, when... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Need to follow prescribed treatment. 220.115... ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations 220.115 Need to follow prescribed treatment....

  1. 20 CFR 416.930 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye when there is an impairment of... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Need to follow prescribed treatment. 416.930... follow prescribed treatment. (a) What treatment you must follow. In order to get benefits, you...

  2. 20 CFR 220.115 - Need to follow prescribed treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of the claimant's religion. (2) The prescribed treatment would be cataract surgery for one eye, when... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Need to follow prescribed treatment. 220.115... ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations 220.115 Need to follow prescribed treatment....

  3. 42 CFR 414.92 - Electronic Prescribing Incentive Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic Prescribing Incentive Program. 414.92... Other Practitioners § 414.92 Electronic Prescribing Incentive Program. Link to an amendment published at... fee schedule which are furnished by an eligible professional. Electronic Prescribing Incentive...

  4. E-Prescribing: History, Issues, and Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J. Warren; Jiang, Ruixuan

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-Prescribing, Computerized Prescribing, or E-RX has increased dramatically of late in the American health care system, a long overdue alternative to the written form for the almost five billion drug treatments annually. This paper examines the history and selected issues in the rise of E-RX by a review of salient literature, interviews, and field observations in Pharmacy. Pharmacies were early adopters of computerization for a variety of factors. The profession in its new corporate forms of chain drug stores and pharmacy benefits firms has sought efficiencies, profit enhancements, and clinical improvements through managed care strategies that rely upon data automation. E-RX seems to be a leading factor in overall physician acceptance of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), although the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) incentives seem to be the propelling force in acceptance. We conclude that greater research should be conducted by public health professionals to focus on resolutions to pharmaceutical use, safety, and cost escalation, which persist and remain dire following health reform. PMID:23569654

  5. E-prescribing: history, issues, and potentials.

    PubMed

    Salmon, J Warren; Jiang, Ruixuan

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-Prescribing, Computerized Prescribing, or E-RX has increased dramatically of late in the American health care system, a long overdue alternative to the written form for the almost five billion drug treatments annually. This paper examines the history and selected issues in the rise of E-RX by a review of salient literature, interviews, and field observations in Pharmacy. Pharmacies were early adopters of computerization for a variety of factors. The profession in its new corporate forms of chain drug stores and pharmacy benefits firms has sought efficiencies, profit enhancements, and clinical improvements through managed care strategies that rely upon data automation. E-RX seems to be a leading factor in overall physician acceptance of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), although the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) incentives seem to be the propelling force in acceptance. We conclude that greater research should be conducted by public health professionals to focus on resolutions to pharmaceutical use, safety, and cost escalation, which persist and remain dire following health reform. PMID:23569654

  6. Does prescribed fire benefit wetland vegetation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, C.; Bounds, D.L.; Ruby, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of fire on wetland vegetation in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States are poorly known, despite the historical use of fire by federal, state, and private landowners in the Chesapeake Bay Region. Prescribed fire is widely used by land managers to promote vegetation that is beneficial to migratory waterfowl, muskrats, and other native wildlife and to reduce competition from less desirable plant species. We compared vegetative response to two fire rotations, annual burns and 3-year burns, and two control sites, Control 1 and Control 2. We tested the effects of fire within six tidal marsh wetlands at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and Fishing Bay Wildlife Management Area in Maryland. We examined changes in total live biomass (all species), total stem density, litter, and changes in live biomass and stem density of four dominant wetland plant species (11 variables). Our results suggest that annual prescribed fires will decrease the accumulation of litter, increase the biomass and stem densities of some wetland plants generally considered less desirable for wildlife, and have little or no effect on other wetland plants previously thought to benefit from fire. ?? 2011 US Government.

  7. An ethnographic exploration of influences on prescribing in general practice: why is there variation in prescribing practices?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribing is a core activity for general practitioners, yet significant variation in the quality of prescribing has been reported. This suggests there may be room for improvement in the application of the current best research evidence. There has been substantial investment in technologies and interventions to address this issue, but effect sizes so far have been small to moderate. This suggests that prescribing is a decision-making process that is not sufficiently understood. By understanding more about prescribing processes and the implementation of research evidence, variation may more easily be understood and more effective interventions proposed. Methods An ethnographic study in three Scottish general practices with diverse organizational characteristics. Practices were ranked by their performance against Audit Scotland prescribing quality indicators, incorporating established best research evidence. Two practices of high prescribing quality and one practice of low prescribing quality were recruited. Participant observation, formal and informal interviews, and a review of practice documentation were employed. Results Practices ranked as high prescribing quality consistently made and applied macro and micro prescribing decisions, whereas the low-ranking practice only made micro prescribing decisions. Macro prescribing decisions were collective, policy decisions made considering research evidence in light of the average patient, one disease, condition, or drug. Micro prescribing decisions were made in consultation with the patient considering their views, preferences, circumstances and other conditions (if necessary). Although micro prescribing can operate independently, the implementation of evidence-based, quality prescribing was attributable to an interdependent relationship. Macro prescribing policy enabled prescribing decisions to be based on scientific evidence and applied consistently where possible. Ultimately, this influenced prescribing decisions that occur at the micro level in consultation with patients. Conclusion General practitioners in the higher prescribing quality practices made two different ‘types’ of prescribing decision; macro and micro. Macro prescribing informs micro prescribing and without a macro basis to draw upon the low-ranked practice had no effective mechanism to engage with, reflect on and implement relevant evidence. Practices that recognize these two levels of decision making about prescribing are more likely to be able to implement higher quality evidence. PMID:23799906

  8. Common Cold

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  9. Metabolic consequences of antipsychotic therapy: preclinical and clinical perspectives on diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Heal, David J; Gosden, Jane; Jackson, Helen C; Cheetham, Sharon C; Smith, Sharon L

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs, particularly second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), have reduced the burden to society of schizophrenia, but many still produce excessive weight gain. A significant number of SGAs also act directly to impair glycemic control causing insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes, and also rarely diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Schizophrenia itself is almost certainly causal in many endocrine and metabolic disturbances, making this population especially vulnerable to the adverse metabolic consequences of treatment with SGAs. Hence, there is an urgent need for a new generation of antipsychotic drugs that provide efficacy equal to the best of the SGAs without their liability to cause weight gain or type 2 diabetes. In the absence of such safe and effective alternatives to the SGAs, there is a substantial clinical need for the introduction of new antipsychotics without adverse metabolic effects and new antiobesity drugs to combat these metabolic side effects. We discuss the adverse metabolic consequences of schizophrenia, its exacerbation by a lack of social care, and the additional burden placed on patients by their medication. A critical evaluation of the animal models of antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances is provided with observations on their strengths and limitations. Finally, we discuss novel antipsychotic drugs with a lower propensity to increase metabolic risk and adjunctive medications to mitigate the adverse metabolic actions of the current generation of antipsychotics. PMID:23129331

  10. Antipsychotic pharmacogenomics in first episode psychosis: a role for glutamate genes.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J M; Reilly, J L; Harris, M S H; Patel, S R; Weiden, P J; Prasad, K M; Badner, J A; Nimgaonkar, V L; Keshavan, M S; Sweeney, J A; Bishop, J R

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors may underlie beneficial and adverse responses to antipsychotic treatment. These relationships may be easier to identify among patients early in the course of disease who have limited exposure to antipsychotic drugs. We examined 86 first episode patients (schizophrenia, psychotic bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder with psychotic features) who had minimal to no prior antipsychotic exposure in a 6-week pharmacogenomic study of antipsychotic treatment response. Response was measured by change in Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale total score. Risperidone monotherapy was the primary antipsychotic treatment. Pharmacogenomic association studies were completed to (1) examine candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes known to be involved with glutamate signaling, and (2) conduct an exploratory genome-wide association study of symptom response to identify potential novel associations for future investigation. Two SNPs in GRM7 (rs2069062 and rs2014195) were significantly associated with antipsychotic response in candidate gene analysis, as were two SNPs in the human glutamate receptor delta 2 (GRID2) gene (rs9307122 and rs1875705) in genome-wide association analysis. Further examination of these findings with those from a separate risperidone-treated study sample demonstrated that top SNPs in both studies were overrepresented in glutamate genes and that there were similarities in neurodevelopmental gene categories associated with drug response from both study samples. These associations indicate a role for gene variants related to glutamate signaling and antipsychotic response with more broad association patterns indicating the potential importance of genes involved in neuronal development. PMID:26905411

  11. Comparative effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenia: what have real-world trials taught us?

    PubMed

    Attard, Azizah; Taylor, David M

    2012-06-01

    Real-world, effectiveness studies add an important new dimension to the evaluation of the benefits of individual antipsychotics. Efficacy studies have already shown the unique effectiveness of clozapine, and suggested improved outcomes for olanzapine compared with some atypical antipsychotics and a reduced tendency to produce acute and chronic movement disorders for atypical compared with typical drugs. Recent effectiveness studies largely confirm these prior observations. The CATIE (Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness), CUtLASS (Cost Utility of the Latest Antipsychotic Drugs in Schizophrenia Study) and SOHO (Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes) programmes confirmed the superiority of clozapine over other antipsychotics; CATIE and SOHO also confirmed olanzapine as probably the second most effective antipsychotic. Effectiveness studies have confirmed the high incidence of adverse metabolic effects with clozapine, olanzapine and (with less certainty) quetiapine but the ZODIAC (Ziprasidone Observational Study of Cardiac Outcomes) study found no excess cardiovascular events or deaths for olanzapine compared with ziprasidone. Prior observations on reduced frequency of movement disorders for second-generation versus first-generation antipsychotics were also largely (but not uniformly) supported. Overall, recent real-world studies have done much to confirm prior observations from efficacy-based randomized, controlled trials. PMID:22668246

  12. Risk of Fetal Death after Treatment with Antipsychotic Medications during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Srensen, Merete Juul; Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Pedersen, Henrik Sndergaard; Vestergaard, Mogens; Christensen, Jacob; Olsen, Jrn; Parner, Erik; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2015-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic medications are increasingly used during pregnancy. Nevertheless, fetal risks are still not fully studied. It is currently unclear whether the antipsychotic treatment might induce a higher risk of fetal death. We aimed to determine if use of antipsychotic medication during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion or stillbirth. Methods In a historical cohort study, we identified all clinically recognized pregnancies registered in the nationwide Danish registries from 1997 to 2008 (N = 1,005,319). Exposure was defined as any prescription of antipsychotic medications redeemed by the pregnant women during the exposure window, and recorded in the Danish National Prescription Register. Outcome was defined as any spontaneous abortion or stillbirth recorded in the Danish National Hospital Register and the Danish Medical Birth Register respectively. Results Women exposed to antipsychotic medications during pregnancy had a 34% higher risk of spontaneous abortion (adjusted relative risk = 1.34; 95% confidence interval = 1.22; 1.46) compared to unexposed women, but a similar risk compared to women exposed prior to (but not during) pregnancy (adjusted relative risk = 1.04; 95% confidence interval = 0.93; 1.17). The risk of spontaneous abortion was not increased in exposed pregnancies when compared to unexposed pregnancies in the same women (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.94; 1.31). A twofold higher risk of stillbirth was found in women exposed to antipsychotic medications compared with unexposed women (relative risk = 2.27; 95% confidence interval = 1.45; 3.55) and compared with women exposed only prior to pregnancy (relative risk = 2.06; 95% confidence interval = 1.01; 4.19). Conclusions The increased risk of spontaneous abortion found in women treated with antipsychotic medications during pregnancy is most likely due to confounding factors. The risk of stillbirth was twofold higher in pregnancies exposed to antipsychotic medication during pregnancy. Treatment with antipsychotic medications during pregnancy requires careful consideration. PMID:26162087

  13. A systematic review of cardiovascular effects following atypical antipsychotic medication overdose

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hock Heck; Hoppe, Jason; Heard, Kennon

    2009-01-01

    As the use of atypical antipsychotic medications (AAPM) increases, the number of overdoses continues to grow. Cardiovascular toxicity was common with older psychiatric medications, but appears uncommon with AAPM. We conducted a systematic literature review to describe the cardiovascular effects reported following overdose of 5 common AAPM: Aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. We included case reports and case series describing overdose of these 5 medications identified in a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and abstracts from major toxicology meetings. We found 13 pediatric cases (<7 yr), 22 adolescent cases (7–16 years) and 185 adult cases. No pediatric case described a ventricular dysrhythmia or a cardiovascular death. In the adolescent and adult cases we found numerous reports of prolonged QTC interval and hypotension, but there were only three cases of ventricular dysrhythmia and three deaths that may have been due to direct cardiovascular toxicity. The results from case series reports were similar to the single case report data. Our review suggests that overdose of AAPM is unlikely to cause significant cardiovascular toxicity. PMID:19497468

  14. Lipid-Lowering Effects of Tetradecylthioacetic Acid in Antipsychotic-Exposed, Female Rats: Challenges with Long-Term Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Skrede, Silje; Fern, Johan; Bjrndal, Bodil; Brede, Wenche Rdseth; Bohov, Pavol; Berge, Rolf Kristian; Steen, Vidar Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychiatric patients often require chronic treatment with antipsychotic drugs, and while rats are frequently used to study antipsychotic-induced metabolic adverse effects, long-term exposure has only partially mimicked the appetite-stimulating and weight-inducing effects found in the clinical setting. Antipsychotic-induced effects on serum lipids are also inconsistent in rats, but in a recent study we demonstrated that subchronic treatment with the orexigenic antipsychotic olanzapine resulted in weight-independent increase in serum triglycerides and activation of lipogenic gene expression in female rats. In addition, a recent long-term study in male rats showed that chronic treatment with antipsychotic drugs induced dyslipidemic effects, despite the lack of weight gain. Aims In the current study, we sought to examine long-term effects of antipsychotic drugs on weight gain, lipid levels and lipid composition after twice-daily administration of antipsychotics to female rats, and to investigate potential beneficial effects of the lipid-lowering agent tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA), a modified fatty acid. Methods Female rats were exposed to orexigenic antipsychotics (olanzapine or clozapine), metabolically neutral antipsychotics (aripiprazole or ziprasidone), or TTA for 8 weeks. Separate groups received a combination of clozapine and TTA or olanzapine and TTA. The effects of TTA and the combination of olanzapine and TTA after 2 weeks were also investigated. Results The antipsychotic-induced weight gain and serum triglyceride increase observed in the subchronic setting was not present after 8 weeks of treatment with antipsychotics, while lipid-lowering effect of TTA was much more pronounced in the chronic than in the subchronic setting, with concomitant upregulation of key oxidative enzymes in the liver. Unexpectedly, TTA potentiated weight gain in rats treated with antipsychotics. Conclusion TTA is a promising candidate for prophylactic treatment of antipsychotic-induced dyslipidemic effects, but a more valid long-term rat model for antipsychotic-induced metabolic adverse effects is required. PMID:23226405

  15. A literature review of clinical outcomes associated with antipsychotic medication use in North American nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yunwen; Bero, Lisa; Hessol, Nancy A; Lexchin, Joel; Harrington, Charlene

    2015-06-01

    The benefits and harms of antipsychotic medication (APM) use in nursing home residents need to be examined because, although commonly used, APMs are considered an off-label use by the Food and Drug Administration for residents with dementia and behavioral problems. The objective of this study was to provide a realist literature review, summarizing original research studies on the clinical effects of conventional and atypical APM use in nursing home residents. Searches of multiple databases identified 424 potentially relevant research articles, of which 25 met the inclusion criteria. Antipsychotic medication use in nursing home residents was found to have variable efficacy when used off-label with an increased risk of many adverse events, including mortality, hip fractures, thrombotic events, cardiovascular events and hospitalizations. Findings suggested certain APM dosing regimens (e.g. fixed-dose) and shorter duration of use might have fewer adverse events. Non-pharmacological interventions should still be considered the first-line treatment option for nursing home residents with dementia related behavioral disturbances, as more studies are needed to establish safer criteria for APM use in nursing homes residents. PMID:25791166

  16. Patient perspectives in the development and use of long-acting antipsychotics in schizophrenia: focus on olanzapine long-acting injection

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic mental disorder generally treated with antipsychotic medication. However, non-adherence and partial adherence to antipsychotic medication treatment is common and long-acting injectable “depot” preparations of antipsychotic medications have been used as an alternative to oral medication therapy for patients for whom adherence is a clinically significant problem, as well as for the sake of convenience and in response to patient preference. Olanzapine long-acting injection (OLAI) is a new treatment option and has been approved by several regulatory agencies for the treatment of schizophrenia. OLAI is a crystalline salt formulation of olanzapine and pamoic acid. Efficacy was established in 2 double-blind randomized clinical trials of OLAI for the treatment of acute schizophrenia and for the maintenance of response. The therapeutic OLAI dosages are 150 mg q2 weeks, 210 mg q2 weeks, 300 mg q2 weeks or q4 weeks, and 405 mg q4 weeks, administered by deep intramuscular gluteal injection with a 19-gauge needle. Injection volume ranges from 1 to 2.7 mL. OLAI has essentially the same general tolerability as that of oral olanzapine; however with the depot there is the additional risk of a post-injection delirium sedation syndrome occurring at a rate of 0.07% of injections, requiring a risk management plan that includes observing the patient for 3 hours post injection. PMID:20016798

  17. Antipsychotic Drug Administration Does Not Correlate with Prolonged Rate-Corrected QT Interval in Children and Adolescents: Results from a Nested CaseControl Study

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Christoph U.; Harris, Jennifer; Figen, Vicki; Kane, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death and may be induced by antipsychotic drugs. Objective To determine the clinical characteristics associated with QTc prolongation (440?msec or greater) in children and adolescents hospitalized for treatment of psychiatric disorders. Method We determined the frequency of baseline prolongation of QTc in 811 psychiatric pediatric inpatients (15.5??2.4 years of age). QTc duration was 440?msec or greater (range 441481?msec) in 16 patients (1.97%). In a 1:5 nested casecontrol design, the 16 patients with prolonged QTc were age- and gender-matched with 80 patients with QTc of <421?msec. Results Patients with normal and prolonged QTc had similar utilization of antipsychotics (43.8% vs. 40.8%) and daily chlorpromazine equivalents (165??110 vs. 168??218?mg). Hypokalemia (p?=?0.009) and obesity (p?=?0.032) were more common among patients with prolonged QTc. The correlation between obesity and QTc prolongation was confirmed in logistic regression analysis. Conclusions In a large cohort of youth hospitalized for treatment of psychiatric disorders, a prolonged QTc on admission was rare and correlated with the presence of obesity, but not with current use of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:21823910

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antipsychotics in reducing schizophrenia relapses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a severe form of mental illness which is associated with significant and long-lasting health, social and financial burdens. The aim of this project is to assess the efficiency of the antipsychotics used in Spain in reducing schizophrenia relapses under the Spanish Health System perspective. Material and methods A decision-analytic model was developed to explore the relative cost-effectiveness of five antipsychotic medications, amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapine, paliperidone Extended-Release (ER) and risperidone, compared to haloperidol, over a 1-year treatment period among people living in Spain with schizophrenia. The transition probabilities for assessed therapies were obtained from the systemic review and meta-analysis performed by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Results Paliperidone ER was the option that yielded more quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained per patient (0.7573). In addition, paliperidone ER was the least costly strategy (€3,062), followed by risperidone (€3,194), haloperidol (€3,322), olanzapine (€3,893), amisulpride (€4,247) and aripiprazole (€4,712). In the incremental cost-effectiveness (ICE) analysis of the assessed antipsychotics compared to haloperidol, paliperidone ER and risperidone were dominant options. ICE ratios for other medications were €23,621/QALY gained, €91,584/QALY gained and €94,558/QALY gained for olanzapine, amisulpride and aripiprazole, respectively. Deterministic sensitivity analysis showed that risperidone is always dominant when compared to haloperidol. Paliperidone ER is also dominant apart from the exception of the scenario with a 20% decrease in the probability of relapses. Conclusions Our findings may be of interest to clinicians and others interested in outcomes and cost of mental health services among patien