Science.gov

Sample records for communicable disease update

  1. ISS Update: High Rate Communications System

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Diego Serna, Communications and Tracking Officer, about the High Rate Communications System. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the ha...

  2. [Update on celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Moscoso J, Felipe; Quera P, Rodrigo

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of Celiac disease in the general population is approximately 1% and remains undiagnosed in a significant proportion of individuals. Its clinical presentation includes the classical malabsorption syndrome, unspecific and extra-intestinal manifestations, and silent celiac disease. The serologic diagnosis has an elevated sensitivity and specificity and, at least in adult population, it must be confirmed by biopsy in every case. Diagnosis in subjects already on gluten free diet includes HLA typing and gluten challenge with posterior serologic and histologic evaluation. The core of the treatment is the gluten free diet, which must be supervised by an expert nutritionist. Monitoring must be performed with serology beginning at 3-6 months, and with histology two years after the diagnosis, unless the clinical response is poor. Poor disease control is associated with complications such as lymphoma and small bowel adenocarcinoma. In the future, it is likely that new pharmacologic therapies will be available for the management of celiac disease. PMID:27092676

  3. [Ebola virus disease: Update].

    PubMed

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Arsuaga-Vicente, Marta; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arnalich-Fernandez, Francisco; Arribas, Jose Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The first known Ebola outbreak occurred in 1976. Since then, 24 limited outbreaks had been reported in Central Africa, but never affecting more than 425 persons. The current outbreak in Western Africa is the largest in history with 28,220 reported cases and 11,291 deaths. The magnitude of the epidemic has caused worldwide alarm. For the first time, evacuated patients were treated outside Africa, and secondary cases have occurred in Spain and the United States. Since the start of the current epidemic, our knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical picture, laboratory findings, and virology of Ebola virus disease has considerably expanded. For the first time, experimental treatment has been tried, and there have been spectacular advances in vaccine development. A review is presented of these advances in the knowledge of Ebola virus disease. PMID:26774254

  4. Teratogen update: Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D J; Eppes, S C; Klein, J D

    2001-11-01

    We reviewed the world literature concerning the reproductive effects of Lyme disease (LD). Borrelia burgdorferi, which is the etiology of LD, is a spirochete and, as such, may share the potential for causing fetal infection, which may occur in the setting of maternal spirochetemia. Information concerning the effects of gestational LD derives from case reports and series, epidemiologic studies, and experimental animal models. Although provocative, these studies fail to define a characteristic teratogenic effect. However, skin and cardiac involvement have predominated in some reports. Pregnancy wastage has been suggested primarily by animal studies. Gestational LD appears to be associated with a low risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, particularly with appropriated antibiotic therapy. Suggestions for management of clinical situations are presented. PMID:11745834

  5. Agent Communication for Dynamic Belief Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Mikito; Tojo, Satoshi

    Thus far, various formalizations of rational / logical agent model have been proposed. In this paper, we include the notion of communication channel and belief modality into update logic, and introduce Belief Update Logic (BUL). First, we discuss that how we can reformalize the inform action of FIPA-ACL into communication channel, which represents a connection between agents. Thus, our agents can send a message only when they believe, and also there actually is, a channel between him / her and a receiver. Then, we present a static belief logic (BL) and show its soundness and completeness. Next, we develop the logic to BUL, which can update Kripke model by the inform action; in which we show that in the updated model the belief operator also satisfies K45. Thereafter, we show that every sentence in BUL can be translated into BL; thus, we can contend that BUL is also sound and complete. Furthermore, we discuss the features of CUL, including the case of inconsistent information, as well as channel transmission. Finally, we summarize our contribution and discuss some future issues.

  6. [Parkinson disease and communication].

    PubMed

    Barat, M; Daverat, P; Mazaux, J M

    1992-01-01

    Communication abilities imply multifactorial analysis. These disorders in Parkinson's disease involve speech, graphism, functional and paraverbal gestures. The patient's isolation in a major form of disease is dramatic. Functional study requires an analysis of each factor; progress should be realized for an objective approach. With a therapeutic objective in view, the most impaired features, and the patients real situation and way of life must be evaluated. Some training measures are useful especially for social adjustment and motivational reinforcement. PMID:1344546

  7. Communicable Diseases in Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networks, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter addresses managing the spread of communicable diseases in childhood settings as well as educational program concerns for children who are HIV infected. Noting that communicable diseases are a source of concern no matter how minor they might appear, the newsletter suggests that it is important for individuals who work with the…

  8. [Update in Infectious Diseases 2016].

    PubMed

    Candel, F J; García-García, A B; Peñuelas, M; García-Alvarez, A; Chiarella, F; López-González, L; García-Salguero, C; Lejárraga, C; Rodríguez-Avial, I

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance increases it health, social and economic impact. in all areas (state, regional and local), initiatives to try to contain the problem of resistance arise. In the update of this year 2016, we study microbiological, epidemiological and clinical aspects of multi-resistant bacteria, as well as resources for therapeutic approach, from ancient to modern drugs from therapeutic combinations to optimization Stewardship programs. In the case of fungal infection, we analyze clinical scenarios with different species in yeast or new clinical settings in filamentous fungi. Taking paediatric population, homologies and differences with adults in invasive fungal infection were compared. Finally in the field of parasitology, treatment of severe malaria imported or that resistant to antimalarial drugs were reviewed. PMID:27608304

  9. [Diabetic kidney disease - Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Sourij, Harald; Edlinger, Roland; Prischl, Friedrich; Auinger, Martin; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Säemann, Marcus D; Prager, Rudolf; Clodi, Martin; Schernthaner, Guntram; Mayer, Gert; Oberbauer, Rainer; Rosenkranz, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    Recent epidemiological evaluations have shown that approximately 5% of all Austrians suffer from diabetes including renal involvement, i. e. 400.000 people in Austria are affected. The risk of start and progression of this disease can be ameliorated by lifestyle interventions as well as optimization of blood pressure and glucose levels. The present article represents the joint recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association and the Austrian Society for Nephrology for the prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:27052231

  10. Congenital Chagas disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Yves; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Buekens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Congenital infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is a global problem, occurring on average in 5% of children born from chronically infected mothers in endemic areas, with variations depending on the region. This presentation aims to focus on and update epidemiological data, research methods, involved factors, control strategy and possible prevention of congenital infection with T. cruzi. Considering that etiological treatment of the child is always effective if performed before one year of age, the diagnosis of infection in pregnant women and their newborns has to become the standard of care and integrated into the surveillance programs of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus. In addition to the standard tests, polymerase chain reaction performed on blood of neonates of infected mothers one month after birth might improve the diagnosis of congenital infection. Recent data bring out that its transmission can be prevented through treatment of infected women before they become pregnant. The role of parasite genotypes and host genetic factors in parasite transmission and development of infection in foetuses/neonates has to be more investigated in order to better estimate the risk factors and impact on health of congenital infection with T. cruzi. PMID:25760448

  11. Complete Edentulism and Comorbid Diseases: An Update.

    PubMed

    Felton, David A

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between complete edentulism, which is the terminal outcome of a multifactorial oral disease process and other comorbid diseases, was first reported in 2009. Although the relationship between edentulism and a multitude of systemic diseases was reported, none of the publications studied could determine causality of tooth loss on the incidence of any comorbid disease. Since that publication, there has been a renewed interest in this relationship, and a plethora of new articles have been published. This article will provide an update on articles published since 2008 on the relationship between edentulism and comorbid diseases, and will include the relationship between complete edentulism and such comorbid conditions as malnutrition, obesity, cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, pulmonary diseases (including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), cancer, and even mortality. PMID:26371954

  12. Update on pleural diseases - 2007

    PubMed Central

    Bishay, Ayman; Raoof, Suhail; Esan, Adebayo; Sung, Arthur; Wali, Siraj; Lee, Leonard Y.; George, Liziamma; Saleh, Anthony; Baumann, Michael

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New information is available on pleural diseases. The authors selected articles to make recommendations on diagnostic and treatment aspects of pleural diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven articles published in the English language between 2004 and 2007 were chosen. The basis of selection of the articles was the impact on daily practice, change in prior thinking of a disease process or specific treatment modality, as well as proper design and execution of the study. 5-amino-laevulinic acid with fluorescent light combined with white light may allow further diagnostic yield in undiagnosed pleural disease. FDG-PET may allow prognostication of patients with pleural tumors. Utilizing ultrasound by trained Emergency Department physicians is a rapid and effective technique to evaluate non-traumatic pleural effusions in symptomatic patients. Serum osteopontin levels may distinguish patients exposed to asbestos with benign disease from those with pleural mesothelioma. Administration of streptokinase in patients with empyema does not need for surgical drainage, length of hospital stay, or mortality as compared to conventional treatment with chest tube drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Silver nitrate may be an alternative agent to talc for producing pleurodesis. Routine use of graded talc (50% particles greater than 25 microns) is recommended to reduce the morbidity associated with talc pleurodesis. Study design does not permit us to conclude that aspiration of spontaneous pneumothorax is as effective as chest tube drainage. Pleural catheter may prove to be an important palliative modality in treating debilitated patients or patients with trapped lung who show symptomatic improvement with drainage; however, at the present time, these catheters cannot be considered a first line treatment option for patients with malignant pleural effusion. One of the studies reviewed showed no significant difference in tract metastasis in patients with malignant mesothelioma

  13. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. PMID:24355558

  14. Underground communications and tracking systems update

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-01-15

    Today, when it comes to having systems to communicate with track and locate underground coal miners, mining companies have many equipment choices, as a direct response to the USA's 2006 MINER Act and the West Virginia Legislative Rule 56-4-8. Coal Age spoke to several companies about their leaky feeder and purely wireless systems which are either approved by the US MSHA or have been submitted for approval. The article gives details of: a UHF leaky feeder system developed by Pillar Innovations, designed to exit a mine at multiple points and then tie the leads back together on the surface; the Venture/Helicomm MineTrader system for tracking, monitoring and emergency messaging for mines; Rajant Corp.'s BreadCrumb wireless system using battery-powered wireless access nodes that enable voice and data communications across a self-healing network; the SubterraCom Wireless Solution's communications systems; a wireless mesh peer-to-peer communications system and an ultra widebade (UWB)-base real-time location tracking system from L-3 Communications; and VHF and UHF leaky feeder amplifiers from Tunnel Radio. MSHA approved communications and tracking systems are tabulated. 11 photos., 1 tab.

  15. Alzheimer's disease therapy - an update.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, R

    1998-05-01

    The 5th International Geneva/Springfield Symposium on Advances in Alzheimer Therapy focused on new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Alzheimer 's disease (AD) based on the latest basic science data. The two major pharmacological principles of cholinergic therapy are 1) reduction of acetylcholine hydrolysis by means of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors; and 2) direct stimulation of nicotinic or muscarinic receptors with selective agonists. Currently used AChE inhibitors are tacrine, donepezil hydrochloride, rivastigmine and metrifonate. In the area of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor modulation, studies were presented on AF-102B and AF-150(S), BIBN-99, CI-1017, RJR-2403, ABT-418, ABT-089, GTS-21 and SIB-1553A. Based on evidence of inflammatory mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AD, selective COX-2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of AD are a target of several pharmaceutical companies. Concerning known antiinflammatory drugs, results from controlled trials are expected soon. Estrogen replacement has been reported to produce cognitive and affective improvement in women with AD, and results from a number of studies were presented. Age-associated increases in oxidative stress may play a role in AD and thus antioxidants may also have a place in the therapy of this disease. The antioxidants vitamin E and selegiline are being investigated. Other drugs under investigation are propentofylline, Cerebrolysin, citicoline sodium, CDP-choline, memantine, Egb-761, calagualine and AIT-082. Iododoxorubicin may represent a new class of compounds able to interfere with the beta-amyloid cascade in AD and other brain amyloid diseases. Future preventive strategies in AD include genotype analysis and screening, presymptomatic diagnosis and avoidance of environmental risk factors. PMID:15616667

  16. [Update in Infectious Diseases 2015].

    PubMed

    Candel, Francisco Javier; López González, Laura; García-García, Ana Belén; Chiarella, Flavia; Picazo, Juan José

    2015-09-01

    Infectious disease remains current worldwide. During the second half of 2014 an outbreak of ebolavirus hit West Africa with implications in the rest of the world. In fact, Spain declared the first imported case of this infection. Multiresistant enterobacteria outbreaks are emerging all around the world in a moment on which WHO draws attention to the limited resources, coining the term "post antibiotic era". On the other hand, 2014 went down in history as one in which hepatitis C is cured. Are also current HIV epidemiological control or strategies for antiviral and antifungal prophylaxis in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:26365724

  17. Nephrology Update: Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmeela; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more than 1 in 10 individuals in the United States. The care of these patients must be managed by family physicians and nephrology subspecialists. The kidneys often are affected by systemic processes such as diabetes and hypertension, and optimal management of these conditions is critical to slow decline in renal function in CKD patients. These patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin therapy is recommended for adults with CKD who are at least age 50 years and not receiving dialysis. Patients with CKD and anemia can be treated with iron therapy and often with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent. Electrolyte abnormalities are managed with dietary changes and drugs. Sodium restriction and modification of dietary protein intake also may be needed. Consultation with a renal dietitian may be helpful. Because many drugs are metabolized by the kidneys, physicians should ensure that drug dosages are appropriate for the level of renal function. Early consultation with or referral to a nephrology subspecialist for patients with reduced renal function, resistant hypertension or electrolyte levels, and other conditions have been associated with improved outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:27163761

  18. Update on Oxalate Crystal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Elizabeth C.; Michet, Claude J.; Milliner, Dawn S.; Lieske, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate arthropathy is a rare cause of arthritis characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals within synovial fluid. This condition typically occurs in patients with underlying primary or secondary hyperoxaluria. Primary hyperoxaluria constitutes a group of genetic disorders resulting in endogenous overproduction of oxalate, whereas secondary hyperoxaluria results from gastrointestinal disorders associated with fat malabsorption and increased absorption of dietary oxalate. In both conditions oxalate crystals can deposit in the kidney leading to renal failure. Since oxalate is primarily renally eliminated, it accumulates throughout the body in renal failure, a state termed oxalosis. Affected organs can include bones, joints, heart, eyes and skin. Since patients can present with renal failure and oxalosis before the underlying diagnosis of hyperoxaluria has been made, it is important to consider hyperoxaluria in patients who present with unexplained soft tissue crystal deposition. The best treatment of oxalosis is prevention. If patients present with advanced disease, treatment of oxalate arthritis consists of symptom management and control of the underlying disease process. PMID:23666469

  19. International law and communicable diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Aginam, Obijiofor

    2002-01-01

    Historically, international law has played a key role in global communicable disease surveillance. Throughout the nineteenth century, international law played a dominant role in harmonizing the inconsistent national quarantine regulations of European nation-states; facilitating the exchange of epidemiological information on infectious diseases; establishing international health organizations; and standardization of surveillance. Today, communicable diseases have continued to re-shape the boundaries of global health governance through legally binding and "soft-law" regimes negotiated and adopted within the mandate of multilateral institutions - the World Health Organization, the World Trade Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and the Office International des Epizooties. The globalization of public health has employed international law as an indispensable tool in global health governance aimed at diminishing human vulnerability to the mortality and morbidity burdens of communicable diseases. PMID:12571722

  20. Communicable Disease Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The COSMIC program FITLOS is used regularly by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), for analyzing data from radioimmunoassays, which involve testing human body substances to provide information on how deficits or excesses of those substances affect a body's ability to ward off disease. A liquid scintillation counter's data is analyzed by the FITLOS program. FITLOS data, then aids in establishing reference methods for hospitals and other health laboratories in their radioimmunoassays. CDC's use of this program enabled them to avoid the cost of designing and developing a new program.

  1. Mobile satellite communications - Vehicle antenna technology update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D.; Naderi, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses options for vehicle antennas to be used in mobile satellite communications systems. Two types of antennas are identified. A non-steerable, azimuthally omnidirectional antenna with a modest gain of 3 to 5 dBi is suggested when a low cost is desired. Alternatively, mechanically or electronically steerable antennas with a higher gain of 10 to 12 dBi are suggested to alleviate power and spectrum scarcity associated with mobile satellite communications. For steerable antennas, both open-loop and closed-loop pointing schemes are discussed. Monopulse and sequential lobing are proposed for the mechanically steered and electronically steered antennas, respectively. This paper suggests a hybrid open-loop/closed-loop pointing technique as the best performer in the mobile satellite environment.

  2. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2011 Update

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Véronique L.; Go, Alan S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Adams, Robert J.; Berry, Jarett D.; Brown, Todd M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Dai, Shifan; de Simone, Giovanni; Ford, Earl S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Gillespie, Cathleen; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Hailpern, Susan M.; Heit, John A.; Ho, P. Michael; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kittner, Steven J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Makuc, Diane M.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Marelli, Ariane; Matchar, David B.; McDermott, Mary M.; Meigs, James B.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mussolino, Michael E.; Nichol, Graham; Paynter, Nina P.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Sorlie, Paul D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Turan, Tanya N.; Turner, Melanie B.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Summary Each year, the American Heart Association (AHA), in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and other government agencies, brings together the most up-to-date statistics on heart disease, stroke, other vascular diseases, and their risk factors and presents them in its Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update. The Statistical Update is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, healthcare policy makers, media professionals, the lay public, and many others who seek the best national data available on disease morbidity and mortality and the risks, quality of care, medical procedures and operations, and costs associated with the management of these diseases in a single document. Indeed, since 1999, the Statistical Update has been cited more than 8700 times in the literature (including citations of all annual versions). In 2009 alone, the various Statistical Updates were cited ≈1600 times (data from ISI Web of Science). In recent years, the Statistical Update has undergone some major changes with the addition of new chapters and major updates across multiple areas. For this year’s edition, the Statistics Committee, which produces the document for the AHA, updated all of the current chapters with the most recent nationally representative data and inclusion of relevant articles from the literature over the past year and added a new chapter detailing how family history and genetics play a role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Also, the 2011 Statistical Update is a major source for monitoring both cardiovascular health and disease in the population, with a focus on progress toward achievement of the AHA’s 2020 Impact Goals. Below are a few highlights from this year’s Update. Death Rates From CVD Have Declined, Yet the Burden of Disease Remains High The 2007 overall death rate from CVD (International Classification of Diseases 10, I00–I99) was 251.2 per 100 000. The rates were 294

  3. Communicable Diseases and Outbreak Control.

    PubMed

    Ameli, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Infectious disease during an emergency condition can raise the death rate 60 times in comparison to other causes including trauma. An epidemic, or outbreak, can occur when several aspects of the agent (pathogen), population (hosts), and the environment create an ideal situation for spread. Overcrowding, poor regional design and hygiene due to poverty, dirty drinking water, rapid climate changes, and natural disasters, can lead to conditions that allow easier transmission of disease. Once it has been established that an emergency condition exists, there must be a prompt and thorough response for communicable disease control. A camp should be created, and the disease managed rapidly. The overall goals are rapid assessment, prevention, surveillance, outbreak control, and disease management. PMID:27437528

  4. Biologic therapy for autoimmune diseases: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biologic therapies for rheumatologic diseases, which are targeted at molecules involved in the mechanisms of the immune system, provide an alternative to the existing treatment methods of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and other immunosuppressive medications. However, the current drawbacks of biologic therapies, including the inconvenience of intravenous administration, the high costs of these drugs, and the adverse events associated with them, prevent their wide use as first-line medications. This review provides an update of the recent literature on the new biologic therapies available. The review concentrates on nine drugs: tocilizumab, rituximab, ofatumumab, belimumab, epratuzumab, abatacept, golimumab, certolizumab, and sifalimumab, which are used as therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, or vasculitis. PMID:23557513

  5. Estrogen receptors and human disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    A myriad of physiological processes in mammals are influenced by estrogens and the estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ. As we reviewed previously, given the widespread role for estrogen in normal human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen is implicated in the development or progression of a number of diseases. In this review, we are giving a 5-year update of the literature regarding the influence of estrogens on a number of human cancers (breast, ovarian, colorectal, prostate, and endometrial), endometriosis, fibroids, and cardiovascular disease. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into human disease, but for this review, the literature citations were limited to articles published after our previous review (Deroo and Korach in J Clin Invest 116(3):561–570, 2006) and will focus in most cases on human data and clinical trials. We will describe the influence in which estrogen’s action, through one of or both of the ERs, mediates the aforementioned human disease states. PMID:22648069

  6. Recent updates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airways inflammation and progressive airflow limitation, is a common, preventable and treatable disease. Worldwide, COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor. This translational review of recent updates in COPD care for the primary care audience, includes recommendations from the 2015 Global Initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) report on diagnosis, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, prevalence of comorbidities, management of exacerbations and the asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, with a focus on the importance and benefit of physical activity and exercise in COPD patients. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity of COPD in individual patients. Management of exacerbations includes reducing the impact of the current exacerbation and preventing development of subsequent episodes. Healthcare professionals need to be alert to comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, anxiety/depression, lung cancer, infections and diabetes, which are common in COPD patients and can have a significant impact on HRQoL and prognosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended by a number of guidelines for all symptomatic COPD patients, regardless of severity, and involves exercise training, patient education, nutritional advice and psychosocial support. At all stages of COPD, regular physical activity and exercise can aid symptom control, improve HRQoL, reduce rates of hospitalization, and improve morbidity and respiratory mortality. Healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in improving HRQoL and health-related outcomes in COPD patients to meet their specific needs and in providing appropriate diagnosis, management and advice on smoking cessation. PMID:26560514

  7. Chronic non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Unwin, N; Alberti, K G M M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD) account for almost 60% of global mortality, and 80% of deaths from NCD occur in low- and middle-income countries. One quarter of these deaths--almost 9 million in 2005--are in men and women aged <60 years. Taken together, NCD represent globally the single largest cause of mortality in people of working age, and their incidences in younger adults are substantially higher in the poor countries of the world than in the rich. The major causes of NCD-attributable mortality are cardiovascular disease (30% of total global mortality), cancers (13%), chronic respiratory disease (7%) and diabetes (2%). These conditions share a small number of behavioural risk factors, which include a diet high in saturated fat and low in fresh fruit and vegetables, physical inactivity, tobacco smoking, and alcohol excess. In low- and middle-income countries such risk factors tend to be concentrated in urban areas and their prevalences are increasing as a result of rapid urbanization and the increasing globalisation of the food, tobacco and alcohol industries. Because NCD have a major impact on men and women of working age and their elderly dependents, they result in lost income, lost opportunities for investment, and overall lower levels of economic development. Reductions in the incidences of many NCD and their complications are, however, already possible. Up to 80% of all cases of cardiovascular disease or type-2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer, for example, are probably preventable based on current knowledge. In addition, highly cost-effective measures exist for the prevention of some of the complications of established cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Achieving these gains will require a broad range of integrated, population-based interventions as well as measures focused on the individuals at high risk. At present, the international-assistance community provides scant resources for the control of NCD in poor countries, partly, at least

  8. Alzheimer's disease. Physician-patient communication.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J. B.; Molloy, D. W.; Lever, J. A.; Darzins, P.; Ganesan, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The number of cognitively impaired elderly in Canada has increased greatly during the past two decades; nearly all have Alzheimer's disease (AD). The memory problems and changes in language and communication of these patients place tremendous strain on physicians who are searching for a differential diagnosis and are trying to communicate with them. Reviewing the salient language and communication features of AD patients leads to strategies for improving effective physician-patient communication. PMID:8019193

  9. Enhancing Disease Surveillance Event Communication Among Jurisdictions

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, Nathaniel R.; Loschen, Wayne A.; Jorgensen, Joel; Suereth, Joshua; Coberly, Jacqueline S.; Holtry, Rekha S.; Sikes, Marvin L.; Babin, Steven M.; Lewis, Sheryl L. Happel

    2009-01-01

    Automated disease surveillance systems are becoming widely used by the public health community. However, communication among non-collocated and widely dispersed users still needs improvement. A web-based software tool for enhancing user communications was completely integrated into an existing automated disease surveillance system and was tested during two simulated exercises and operational use involving multiple jurisdictions. Evaluation of this tool was conducted by user meetings, anonymous surveys, and web logs. Public health officials found this tool to be useful, and the tool has been modified further to incorporate features suggested by user responses. Features of the automated disease surveillance system, such as alerts and time series plots, can be specifically referenced by user comments. The user may also indicate the alert response being considered by adding a color indicator to their comment. The web-based event communication tool described in this article provides a common ground for collaboration and communication among public health officials at different locations. PMID:27325909

  10. [Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease): update 2015].

    PubMed

    Klein-Weigel, Peter; Volz, Theresa Sophie; Richter, Jutta

    2015-10-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) is a vasculitis with undulating clinical course multisegmentarily affecting small and medium-sized arteries and veins. The disease is closely linked to tobacco-use. Increasing knowledge of autoimmunologic mechanisms in the complex pathophyiology of the disease let to the formulation of an autoimmunity-hypothesis now serving as a new paradigma. New treatment options comprise progenitor-cell-therapy, immunoadsorption, use of sendothelin-receptor-blocking agent Bosentan, and prescriptions of antiphosphodiesterase-V-inhibitors. PMID:26445249

  11. ADVANCES AND UPDATE ON MAREK'S DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease virus has evolved toward greater forms of virulence within the last 50 years. The two consequences of such evolution to the poultry industry are the more complicated diagnosis and the lower protection conferred by the currently available vaccines. Diagnosis of Marek's disease has bec...

  12. UPDATE ON SWINE DISEASE AND GENOMICS RESEARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review will summarize advances in swine genomics and how it has altered approaches for swine disease and vaccination research. The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive p...

  13. Clinical update in sexually transmitted diseases-2014.

    PubMed

    Fanfair, Robyn Neblett; Workowski, Kimberly A

    2014-02-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and their associated syndromes are extremely common in clinical practice. Early diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and partner management are important to ensure sexual, physical, and reproductive health in our patients. PMID:24493491

  14. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Leal, Raquel Franco; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:27438429

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients. PMID:26521325

  16. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  17. Crohn’s disease: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Francis; Khalil, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease is increasing in prevalence worldwide. It arises from a complex interplay between both genetic predisposition and environmental influence. A search of databases and clinical practice guidelines was performed to provide the most up-to-date evidence-based approach for diagnosing and managing patients with Crohn’s disease. No single gold standard investigation exists. Whilst full ileocolonoscopy with biopsies remains the mainstay for diagnosis, other less invasive imaging modalities are being actively considered in the workup, as well as the use of serological markers. Management should incorporate dietary and lifestyle modifications where necessary, the use of medications in induction and remission of disease, and consideration of surgical intervention where medical therapy has failed. PMID:26557891

  18. ISS Update: Alvin Drew Talks about Delayed Communications

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Brandi Dean interviews NASA astronaut Alvin Drew about the Autonomous Mission Operations Test. Drew, who is the commander for the test, talks about the past, current and futu...

  19. Communicable disease epidemiology training in Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Aavitsland, P; Andresen, S

    2001-03-01

    The five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) have a long tradition of collaboration in communicable disease epidemiology and control. The state epidemiologists and the immunisation programme managers have met regularly to discuss common challenges and exchange experiences in surveillance and control of communicable diseases. After the three Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania) regained independence in 1991 and the Soviet Union dissolved, contacts were made across the old iron curtain in several areas, such as culture, education, business, military and medicine. Each of the Nordic communicable disease surveillance institutes started projects with partners in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania or the Russian Federation. The projects were in such diverse areas as HIV surveillance and prevention, vaccination programmes and antibiotic resistance. PMID:11682716

  20. Avian Disease & Oncology Lab (ADOL) Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Employing Genomics, Epigenetics, and Immunogenetics to Control Diseases Induced by Avian Tumor Viruses - Gene expression is a major factor accounting for phenotypic variation. Taking advantage of allele-specific expression (ASE) screens, we found the use of genetic markers was superior to traditiona...

  1. Nephrology Update: Glomerular Disease in Children.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Beth

    2016-05-01

    Although kidney disease is much less common in children than in adults, clinicians must remain alert for the renal conditions that occur in this population because prompt diagnosis and management are essential. Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis occurs as an uncommon sequela of streptococcal and other infections. Management is focused on providing supportive measures, including management of fluid-electrolyte imbalance and hypertension, until the patient recovers. Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy is a primary glomerulonephritis related to abnormal IgA glycosylation. The most common renal issue in children involves recurrent episodes of painless macroscopic hematuria during times of acute infection. Renal involvement occurs in the majority of children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), with most experiencing asymptomatic hematuria and low level proteinuria. More severe forms of HSP nephritis, including rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, may progress to end-stage kidney disease. Nephrotic syndrome commonly is related to steroid-responsive minimal change disease, and follows a course of relapses and remissions over time. However, a minority of children have steroid-resistant disease with potential for poor renal outcome. PMID:27163763

  2. Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Charles A; Asinger, Richard W; Berger, Alan K; Charytan, David M; Díez, Javier; Hart, Robert G; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; McCullough, Peter A; Passman, Rod S; DeLoach, Stephanie S; Pun, Patrick H; Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international group of experts defined the current state of knowledge and the implications for patient care in important topic areas, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, peripheral arterial disease, and sudden cardiac death. Although optimal strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and management of these complications likely should be modified in the presence of CKD, the evidence base for decision making is limited. Trials targeting CVD in patients with CKD have a large potential to improve outcomes. PMID:21750584

  3. Update on Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patzkó, Ágnes; Shy, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. CMT results from mutations in more than 40 genes expressed in Schwann cells and neurons causing overlapping phenotypes. The classic CMT phenotype reflects length-dependent axonal degeneration characterized by distal sensory loss and weakness, deep tendon reflex abnormalities, and skeletal deformities. Recent articles have provided insight into the molecular pathogenesis of CMT, which, for the first time, suggest potential therapeutic targets. Although there are currently no effective medications for CMT, multiple clinical trials are ongoing or being planned. This review will focus on the underlying pathomechanisms and diagnostic approaches of CMT and discuss the emerging therapeutic strategies. PMID:21080241

  4. [Coeliac disease in children--an update].

    PubMed

    Benkebil, F; Nydegger, A

    2007-02-28

    Coeliac disease (CD), considered as an autoimmune disease with genetic predisposition can occur at any age. Several types can be observed: a) typical cases presenting early in life with signs of intestinal malabsorption; b() atypical cases showing milder, often extraintestinal symptoms; c() silent cases that are occasionally discovered because of serological screening and (d) potential/latent cases showing isolated positivity of celiac serology at first testing and eventually the typical intestinal damage later in life. To date, the method of choice to make a diagnosis is the dosage of anti-transglutaminase IgA antibodies (including total IgA to prevent false negative results), followed by intestinal biopsy. Addition of moderate amounts of oats to a gluten-free diet does not prevent clinical or small bowel mucosal healing in children. PMID:17410937

  5. Respiratory Conditions Update: Restrictive Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Robinson, H Coleman

    2016-09-01

    Restrictive lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by a restrictive pattern on spirometry and confirmed by a reduction in total lung volume. Patients with more severe symptoms may have a reduced diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Etiologies can be intrinsic with lung parenchymal involvement, as in interstitial lung diseases, or extrinsic to the lung, as in obesity and neuromuscular disorders. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic progressive interstitial pneumonia with fibrosis for which treatment is primarily supportive with oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and management of comorbid conditions. Newer drugs for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as pirfenidone and nintedanib, can slow disease progression. Referral for evaluation for lung transplantation is recommended for appropriate patients. Obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increasingly are common health issues, with symptoms that can include snoring, daytime somnolence, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, witnessed apneas, and morning headaches. Serum bicarbonate may serve as a biomarker in screening for subclinical obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Preoperative evaluations should assess pulmonary risk in addition to cardiac risk with a thorough history, laboratory tests, and functional capacity assessments. Optimization of management may include weight loss, pulmonary rehabilitation, oxygen therapy, and respiratory support. PMID:27576233

  6. Periodontal Disease and Systemic Diseases: An Update for the Clinician.

    PubMed

    John, Vanchit; Alqallaf, Hawra; De Bedout, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    A link between periodontal disease and various systemic diseases has been investigated for several years. Interest in unearthing such a link has grown as the health care profession is looking for a better understanding of disease processes and their relationships to periodontal and other oral diseases. The article aims to provide recent information on the relationship between periodontal disease and systemic diseases such as; cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and reproductive system related abnormalities. PMID:26939411

  7. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions. PMID:27576232

  8. Treatment of Cushing's disease: a mechanistic update.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Fleseriu, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is characterized by an ACTH-producing anterior corticotrope pituitary adenoma. If hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis physiology is disrupted, ACTH secretion increases, which in turn stimulates adrenocortical steroidogenesis and cortisol production. Medical treatment plays an important role for patients with persistent disease after surgery, for those in whom surgery is not feasible, or while awaiting effects of radiation. Multiple drugs, with different mechanisms of action and variable efficacy and tolerability for controlling the deleterious effects of chronic glucocorticoid excess, are available. The molecular basis and clinical data for centrally acting drugs, adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors, and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists are reviewed, as are potential novel molecules and future possible targets for CD treatment. Although progress has been made in the understanding of specific corticotrope adenoma receptor physiology and recent clinical studies have detected improved effects with a combined medical therapy approach, there is a clear need for a more efficacious and better-tolerated medical therapy for patients with CD. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms in CD and of HPA axis physiology should advance the development of new drugs in the future. PMID:25134660

  9. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26974003

  10. Celiac disease 2015 update: new therapies.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Gopal; Leffler, Daniel A; Kaswala, Dharmesh H; Mukherjee, Rupa

    2015-07-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic, small intestinal, immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Currently, lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only available treatment. However, GFD alone is not sufficient to relieve symptoms, control small intestinal inflammation and prevent long-term complications in many patients. The GFD has its challenges including issues related to adherence, lifestyle restrictions and cost. As a result, there is growing interest in and a need for non-dietary therapies to manage this condition. In recent years, different targets in the immune-mediated cascade of CD have been identified in clinical and pre-clinical trials for potential therapies. This review will discuss the latest non-dietary therapies in CD, including endopeptidases, modulators of enterocyte tight junctions and agents involved in gluten tolerization and immunomodulation. We will also discuss the potential implications of approved therapeutics on CD clinical practice. PMID:25864708

  11. ISS Update: Communication Delays During Deep Space Missions

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Jeremy Frank, Autonomous Mission Operations Test Principal Investigator, about how communication delays will affect future deep space missions and...

  12. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  13. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-12-10

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  14. Practice improvement, part II: update on patient communication technologies.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Coleman, Mary Thoesen

    2013-11-01

    Patient portals (ie, secure web-based services for patient health record access) and secure messaging to health care professionals are gaining popularity slowly. Advantages of web portals include timely communication and instruction, access to appointments and other services, and high patient satisfaction. Limitations include inappropriate use, security considerations, organizational costs, and exclusion of patients who are uncomfortable with or unable to use computers. Attention to the organization's strategic plan and office policies, patient and staff expectations, workflow and communication integration, training, marketing, and enrollment can facilitate optimal use of this technology. Other communication technologies that can enhance patient care include automated voice or text reminders and brief electronic communications. Social media provide another method of patient outreach, but privacy and access are concerns. Incorporating telehealthcare (health care provided via telephone or Internet), providing health coaching, and using interactive health communication applications can improve patient knowledge and clinical outcomes and provide social support. PMID:24261435

  15. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (recent update).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil; Moon, Carolyn Seungyoun; Khogali, Azza; Haidous, Ali; Chabenne, Anthony; Ojo, Comfort; Jelebinkov, Miriana; Kurdi, Yousef; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder mostly affecting the aging population over sixty. Cardinal symptoms including, tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooling, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are already destroyed. Hence we need early, sensitive, specific, and economical peripheral and/or central biomarker(s) for the differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. These can be classified as clinical, biochemical, genetic, proteomic, and neuroimaging biomarkers. Novel discoveries of genetic as well as nongenetic biomarkers may be utilized for the personalized treatment of PD during preclinical (premotor) and clinical (motor) stages. Premotor biomarkers including hyper-echogenicity of substantia nigra, olfactory and autonomic dysfunction, depression, hyposmia, deafness, REM sleep disorder, and impulsive behavior may be noticed during preclinical stage. Neuroimaging biomarkers (PET, SPECT, MRI), and neuropsychological deficits can facilitate differential diagnosis. Single-cell profiling of dopaminergic neurons has identified pyridoxal kinase and lysosomal ATPase as biomarker genes for PD prognosis. Promising biomarkers include: fluid biomarkers, neuromelanin antibodies, pathological forms of α-Syn, DJ-1, amyloid β and tau in the CSF, patterns of gene expression, metabolomics, urate, as well as protein profiling in the blood and CSF samples. Reduced brain regional N-acetyl-aspartate is a biomarker for the in vivo assessment of neuronal loss using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T2 relaxation time with MRI. To confirm PD diagnosis, the PET biomarkers include [(18)F]-DOPA for estimating dopaminergic neurotransmission, [(18)F]dG for mitochondrial bioenergetics, [(18)F]BMS for mitochondrial complex-1, [(11)C](R)-PK11195 for microglial activation, SPECT imaging with (123)Iflupane and βCIT for dopamine transporter, and urinary

  16. From Sirtuin Biology to Human Diseases: An Update*

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián, Carlos; Satterstrom, F. Kyle; Haigis, Marcia C.; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2012-01-01

    Originally rising to notoriety for their role in the regulation of aging, sirtuins are a family of NAD+-dependent enzymes that have been connected to a steadily growing set of biological processes. In addition to regulating aging, sirtuins play key roles in the maintenance of organismal metabolic homeostasis. These enzymes also have primarily protective functions in the development of many age-related diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease. In this minireview, we provide an update on the known roles for each of the seven mammalian sirtuins in these areas. PMID:23086954

  17. Update on Bone Health in Pediatric Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristen M

    2016-06-01

    Children and adolescents with chronic disease are predisposed to impaired bone health. Pediatric illness, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, and cystic fibrosis, have significant risk of low bone mineralization and fracture due to underlying inflammation, malabsorption, lack of physical activity, and delayed puberty. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the primary imaging method to assess bone health in this population. The purpose of this review is to update readers about the assessment and management of bone health in children with common pediatric chronic illnesses and review recent advances in the prevention and treatment of impaired bone health. PMID:27241973

  18. Remembering the forgotten non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alan D; Williams, Thomas N; Levin, Adeera; Tonelli, Marcello; Singh, Jasvinder A; Burney, Peter G J; Rehm, Jürgen; Volkow, Nora D; Koob, George; Ferri, Cleusa P

    2014-01-01

    The forthcoming post-Millennium Development Goals era will bring about new challenges in global health. Low- and middle-income countries will have to contend with a dual burden of infectious and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Some of these NCDs, such as neoplasms, COPD, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, cause much health loss worldwide and are already widely recognised as doing so. However, 55% of the global NCD burden arises from other NCDs, which tend to be ignored in terms of premature mortality and quality of life reduction. Here, experts in some of these 'forgotten NCDs' review the clinical impact of these diseases along with the consequences of their ignoring their medical importance, and discuss ways in which they can be given higher global health priority in order to decrease the growing burden of disease and disability. PMID:25604462

  19. 42 CFR 70.3 - All communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false All communicable diseases. 70.3 Section 70.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.3 All communicable diseases. A person who has a communicable disease in...

  20. 42 CFR 70.3 - All communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false All communicable diseases. 70.3 Section 70.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.3 All communicable diseases. A person who has a communicable disease in...

  1. 42 CFR 70.3 - All communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false All communicable diseases. 70.3 Section 70.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.3 All communicable diseases. A person who has a communicable disease in...

  2. 42 CFR 70.3 - All communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false All communicable diseases. 70.3 Section 70.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.3 All communicable diseases. A person who has a communicable disease in...

  3. 42 CFR 70.3 - All communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false All communicable diseases. 70.3 Section 70.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.3 All communicable diseases. A person who has a communicable disease in...

  4. Dreamweaver and Flash: Strategies for Updating Communication Systems Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Roger B.

    2004-01-01

    The rate of innovation and change impacting technology education communication systems instruction has been vigorous for longer than most people can remember. Trends have included analog systems being replaced by digital systems, integration of networks and system devices, computerization, optical storage, and wireless transmission of data. The…

  5. Health systems, communicable diseases and integration.

    PubMed

    Shigayeva, Altynay; Atun, Rifat; McKee, Martin; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    The HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria pandemics pose substantial challenges globally and to health systems in the countries they affect. This demands an institutional approach that can integrate disease control programmes within health and social care systems. Whilst integration is intuitively appealing, evidence of its benefits remains uncertain and evaluation is beset by lack of a common understanding of what it involves. The aim of this paper is to better define integration in health systems relevant to communicable disease control. We conducted a critical review of published literature on concepts, definitions, and analytical and methodological approaches to integration as applied to health system responses to communicable disease. We found that integration is understood and pursued in many ways in different health systems. We identified a variety of typologies that relate to three fundamental questions associated with integration: (1) why is integration a goal (that is, what are the driving forces for integration); (2) what structures and/or functions at different levels of health system are affected by integration (or the lack of); and (3) how does integration influence interactions between health system components or stakeholders. The frameworks identified were evaluated in terms of these questions, as well as the extent to which they took account of health system characteristics, the wider contextual environment in which health systems sit, and the roles of key stakeholders. We did not find any one framework that explicitly addressed all of these three questions and therefore propose an analytical framework to help address these questions, building upon existing frameworks and extending our conceptualization of the 'how' of integration to identify a continuum of interactions that extends from no interactions, to partial integration that includes linkage and coordination, and ultimately to integration. We hope that our framework may provide a basis for

  6. Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Vigoder, Felipe de Mello; Ritchie, Michael Gordon; Gibson, Gabriella; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound “signatures” may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e.g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects. PMID:24473800

  7. Central Venous Disease in Hemodialysis Patients: An Update

    SciTech Connect

    Modabber, Milad; Kundu, Sanjoy

    2013-08-01

    Central venous occlusive disease (CVD) is a common concern among the hemodialysis patient population, with the potential to cause significant morbidity. Endovascular management of CVD, comprising percutaneous balloon angioplasty and bare-metal stenting, has been established as a safe alternative to open surgical treatment. However, these available treatments have poor long-term patency, requiring close surveillance and multiple repeat interventions. Recently, covered stents have been proposed and their efficacy assessed for the treatment of recalcitrant central venous stenosis and obstruction. Moreover, newly proposed algorithms for the surgical management of CVD warrant consideration. Here, we seek to provide an updated review of the current literature on the various treatment modalities for CVD.

  8. Noise and communication: a three-year update.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Anthony J; Laroche, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Noise is omnipresent and impacts us all in many aspects of daily living. Noise can interfere with communication not only in industrial workplaces, but also in other work settings (e.g. open-plan offices, construction, and mining) and within buildings (e.g. residences, arenas, and schools). The interference of noise with communication can have significant social consequences, especially for persons with hearing loss, and may compromise safety (e.g. failure to perceive auditory warning signals), influence worker productivity and learning in children, affect health (e.g. vocal pathology, noise-induced hearing loss), compromise speech privacy, and impact social participation by the elderly. For workers, attempts have been made to: 1) Better define the auditory performance needed to function effectively and to directly measure these abilities when assessing Auditory Fitness for Duty, 2) design hearing protection devices that can improve speech understanding while offering adequate protection against loud noises, and 3) improve speech privacy in open-plan offices. As the elderly are particularly vulnerable to the effects of noise, an understanding of the interplay between auditory, cognitive, and social factors and its effect on speech communication and social participation is also critical. Classroom acoustics and speech intelligibility in children have also gained renewed interest because of the importance of effective speech comprehension in noise on learning. Finally, substantial work has been made in developing models aimed at better predicting speech intelligibility. Despite progress in various fields, the design of alarm signals continues to lag behind advancements in knowledge. This summary of the last three years' research highlights some of the most recent issues for the workplace, for older adults, and for children, as well as the effectiveness of warning sounds and models for predicting speech intelligibility. Suggestions for future work are also discussed

  9. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  10. Treatment of Nongout Joint Deposition Diseases: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Richette, Pascal; Flipo, René-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This update develops the actual therapeutic options in the management of the joint involvement of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), basic calcium phosphate (BCP) deposition disease, hemochromatosis (HH), ochronosis, oxalosis, and Wilson's disease. Conventional pharmaceutical treatment provides benefits for most diseases. Anti-interleukine-1 (IL-1) treatment could provide similar results in CPPD than in gout flares. There is only limited evidence about the efficacy of preventive long-term colchicine intake, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine in chronic CPPD. Needle aspiration and lavage have satisfactory short and midterm results in BCP. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy has also proved its efficacy for high-doses regimes. Phlebotomy does not seem to have shown real efficacy on joint involvement in HH so far. Iron chelators' effects have not been assessed on joint involvement either, while IL-1 blockade may prove useful. NSAIDs have limited efficacy on joint involvement of oxalosis, while colchicine and steroids have not been assessed either. The use of nitisinone for ochronotic arthropathy is still much debated, but it could provide beneficial effects on joint involvement. The effects of copper chelators have not been assessed either in the joint involvement of Wilson's disease. NSAIDs should be avoided because of the liver affection they may worsen. PMID:24895535

  11. Treatment of nongout joint deposition diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Pascart, Tristan; Richette, Pascal; Flipo, René-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This update develops the actual therapeutic options in the management of the joint involvement of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), basic calcium phosphate (BCP) deposition disease, hemochromatosis (HH), ochronosis, oxalosis, and Wilson's disease. Conventional pharmaceutical treatment provides benefits for most diseases. Anti-interleukine-1 (IL-1) treatment could provide similar results in CPPD than in gout flares. There is only limited evidence about the efficacy of preventive long-term colchicine intake, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine in chronic CPPD. Needle aspiration and lavage have satisfactory short and midterm results in BCP. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy has also proved its efficacy for high-doses regimes. Phlebotomy does not seem to have shown real efficacy on joint involvement in HH so far. Iron chelators' effects have not been assessed on joint involvement either, while IL-1 blockade may prove useful. NSAIDs have limited efficacy on joint involvement of oxalosis, while colchicine and steroids have not been assessed either. The use of nitisinone for ochronotic arthropathy is still much debated, but it could provide beneficial effects on joint involvement. The effects of copper chelators have not been assessed either in the joint involvement of Wilson's disease. NSAIDs should be avoided because of the liver affection they may worsen. PMID:24895535

  12. The Right Ventricle: Biologic Insights and Response to Disease: Updated

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lori A; Buttrick, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Despite ample evidence that right ventricular function is a critical determinant of the clinical response to a spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, there has been only a limited analysis of the unique and distinguishing physiologic properties of the RV under normal circumstances and in response to pathologic insults. This knowledge deficit is increasingly acknowledged. This review highlights some of these features and underscores the fact that rational therapy in RV failure needs to acknowledge its unique physiology and ought to be chamber specific. That is proven therapies for LV dysfunction do not necessarily apply to the RV. The updated version of this review now acknowledges recent advances in the understanding of metabolic, inflammatory and gender-specific influences on the right ventricle. PMID:23092273

  13. Center for Disease Control's Diethylstilbestrol Update: a case for effective operationalization of messaging in social marketing practice.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Marifran; Basu, Ambar

    2010-07-01

    The Center for Disease Control's (CDC) Diethylstilbestrol (DES) Update, a campaign to educate people who may have been exposed to the drug DES, is framed on the premises of the social marketing model, namely formative research, audience segmentation, product, price, placement, promotion, and campaign evaluation. More than that, the campaign takes a critical step in extending the social marketing paradigm by highlighting the need to situate the messaging process at the heart of any health communication campaign. This article uses CDC's DES Update as a case study to illustrate an application of a message development tool within social marketing. This tool promotes the operationalization of messaging within health campaigns. Ultimately, the goal of this project is to extend the social marketing model and provide useful theoretical guidance to health campaign practitioners on how to accomplish stellar communication within a social marketing campaign. PMID:19116422

  14. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Endometriosis linked to heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript052316.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Endometriosis linked to heart disease : 05/23/2016 To ... use MedlinePlus to follow up on weekly topics. Endometriosis significantly increases the risk of developing heart disease ...

  15. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Salt linked to heart disease among CKD patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript072516.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Salt linked to heart disease among CKD patients : 07/ ... kidney disease - and eat a diet high in salt - comparatively increase their odds of a heart attack ...

  16. Communicable Diseases Report, NSW, November and December 2008.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    For updated information, including data and facts on specific diseases, visit www.health.nsw.gov.au and click on Infectious Diseases or access the site directly at: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/publichealth/infectious/index.asp. PMID:19261214

  17. 42 CFR 70.5 - Certain communicable diseases; special requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Certain communicable diseases; special requirements. 70.5 Section 70.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.5 Certain communicable diseases; special requirements. The following provisions...

  18. Some Aspects of Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Pacific Island Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gani, Azmat

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the incidence of the communicable and non-communicable diseases in Pacific Island countries. Available health statistics confirms that children continue to die annually due to neonatal causes, diarrhoeal diseases, pneumonia and measles. The adult population in several countries reveals presence and emergence of…

  19. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease--an update.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Anette

    2004-07-01

    In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) disturbances of mental state constitute some of the most difficult treatment challenges of advanced disease, often limiting effective treatment of motor symptoms and leading to increased disability and poor quality of life. This article provides an update on the current knowledge of these complications and the use of old and new drugs in their management. Mental state alterations in PD include depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment, apathy, and treatment-related psychiatric symptoms. The latter range from vivid dreams and hallucinations to delusions, manic symptoms, hypersexuality, dopamine dysregulation syndrome and delirium. While some of these symptoms may be alleviated by anti-parkinsonian medication, especially if they are off-period related, treatment-related phenomena are usually exacerbated by increasing the number or dosage of antiparkinsonian drugs. Elimination of exacerbating factors and simplification of drug regimes are the first and most important steps in improvement of such symptoms. However, the advent of atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine has dramatically helped the management of treatment-related psychiatric complications in PD. In patients with dementia associated with PD cognitive functioning and behavioural problems appear to respond to cholinesterase inhibitors, such as rivastigmine or donepezil. Depression is a common problem in early as well as advanced PD, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, reboxetine, and tricyclic antidepressants have been reported to be effective and well tolerated antidepressants. Randomised, controlled studies are required to assess the differential efficacy and tolerability of antidepressants in patients with PD, including the newer antidepressants with serotonergic and noradrenergic properties. PMID:15258780

  20. Recommendations for kidney disease guideline updating: a report by the KDIGO Methods Committee.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Katrin; Berns, Jeffrey S; Carville, Serena; Chan, Wiley; Cheung, Michael; Guyatt, Gordon H; Hart, Allyson; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Tonelli, Marcello; Webster, Angela C; Wilt, Timothy J; Kasiske, Bertram L

    2016-04-01

    Updating rather than de novo guideline development now accounts for the majority of guideline activities for many guideline development organizations, including Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international kidney disease guideline development entity that has produced guidelines on kidney diseases since 2008. Increasingly, guideline developers are moving away from updating at fixed intervals in favor of more flexible approaches that use periodic expert assessment of guideline currency (with or without an updated systematic review) to determine the need for updating. Determining the need for guideline updating in an efficient, transparent, and timely manner is challenging, and updating of systematic reviews and guidelines is labor intensive. Ideally, guidelines should be updated dynamically when new evidence indicates a need for a substantive change in the guideline based on a priori criteria. This dynamic updating (sometimes referred to as a living guideline model) can be facilitated with the use of integrated electronic platforms that allow updating of specific recommendations. This report summarizes consensus-based recommendations from a panel of guideline methodology professionals on how to keep KDIGO guidelines up to date. PMID:26994574

  1. Disease Ontology 2015 update: an expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data.

    PubMed

    Kibbe, Warren A; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J; Binder, Janos X; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; Parkinson, Helen; Schriml, Lynn M

    2015-01-01

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years. These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. This will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning. PMID:25348409

  2. Disease Ontology 2015 update: An expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data

    SciTech Connect

    Kibbe, Warren A.; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J.; Binder, Janos X.; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; Parkinson, Helen; Schriml, Lynn M.

    2014-10-27

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years. These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. In conclusion, this will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning.

  3. Disease Ontology 2015 update: An expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kibbe, Warren A.; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J.; Binder, Janos X.; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; et al

    2014-10-27

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years.more » These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. In conclusion, this will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning.« less

  4. Disease Ontology 2015 update: an expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data

    PubMed Central

    Kibbe, Warren A.; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J.; Binder, Janos X.; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; Parkinson, Helen; Schriml, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years. These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. This will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning. PMID:25348409

  5. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Preventing disease spillover from animals to humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... update Transcript Preventing disease spillover from animals to humans : 07/11/2016 To use the sharing features ... accessible by entering the terms 'PREDICT (in all capital letters) - and UC Davis' in any search engine. ...

  6. INFECTIOUS AND COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. RESOURCE MATERIAL FOR TEACHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABRAMS, IRVING; HAWKINS, BARBARA A.

    DESCRIPTIONS OF TWENTY-FIVE INFECTIOUS AND COMMUNICABLE DISEASES INCLUDE CAUSES, SYMPTOMS, EFFECTS, TREATMENT AND PREVENTIVE MEASURES. IT HAS BEEN DISCOVERED THAT RESPIRATORY AILMENTS OF A COMMUNICABLE NATURE ARE THE MOST COMMON CAUSE OF ABSENTEEISM AMONG STUDENTS. INFORMATION IS INTENDED FOR THE USE OF TEACHERS OF HEALTH EDUCATION OR OTHER…

  7. Non-communicable diseases in the Arab world.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Hanan F Abdul; Sibai, Abla; Khader, Yousef; Hwalla, Nahla; Fadhil, Ibtihal; Alsiyabi, Huda; Mataria, Awad; Mendis, Shanthi; Mokdad, Ali H; Husseini, Abdullatif

    2014-01-25

    According to the results of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010, the burden of non-communicable diseases (cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic lung diseases, and diabetes) in the Arab world has increased, with variations between countries of different income levels. Behavioural risk factors, including tobacco use, unhealthy diets, and physical inactivity are prevalent, and obesity in adults and children has reached an alarming level. Despite epidemiological evidence, the policy response to non-communicable diseases has been weak. So far, Arab governments have not placed a sufficiently high priority on addressing the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases, with variations in policies between countries and overall weak implementation. Cost-effective and evidence-based prevention and treatment interventions have already been identified. The implementation of these interventions, beginning with immediate action on salt reduction and stricter implementation of tobacco control measures, will address the rise in major risk factors. Implementation of an effective response to the non-communicable-disease crisis will need political commitment, multisectoral action, strengthened health systems, and continuous monitoring and assessment of progress. Arab governments should be held accountable for their UN commitments to address the crisis. Engagement in the global monitoring framework for non-communicable diseases should promote accountability for effective action. The human and economic burden leaves no room for inaction. PMID:24452044

  8. Some observations on the communicable diseases as public health problems

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W. Chas.; Assaad, F.

    1973-01-01

    Notwithstanding the deficiencies in reporting, an attempt is made in the present study to provide some useful information on the importance of the communicable diseases in the world over the decade 1957-58 to 1967-68. In this period health authorities in the developing countries almost invariably reported communicable diseases as their main public health problems, whereas, in the developed countries, the only communicable diseases still considered as public health problems were tuberculosis, venereal diseases, and hepatitis. In the developing countries nearly half of the principal causes of death were communicable diseases, and in both the developing and developed countries respiratory infections ranked high on the list. Deaths from tuberculosis have come down markedly in the developed countries and to a lesser degree in the developing countries. Infectious diseases of childhood are no longer a problem in the developed countries but are still important in the developing countries. The communicable diseases of importance to the developing countries may be divided into two groups—those requiring long-term development for their solution (e.g., dysentery, typhoid fever, parasitic diseases, and respiratory infections) and those that would respond rapidly to control by such methods as immunization. PMID:4545151

  9. Learning Rate Updating Methods Applied to Adaptive Fuzzy Equalizers for Broadband Power Line Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Moisés V.

    2004-12-01

    This paper introduces adaptive fuzzy equalizers with variable step size for broadband power line (PL) communications. Based on delta-bar-delta and local Lipschitz estimation updating rules, feedforward, and decision feedback approaches, we propose singleton and nonsingleton fuzzy equalizers with variable step size to cope with the intersymbol interference (ISI) effects of PL channels and the hardness of the impulse noises generated by appliances and nonlinear loads connected to low-voltage power grids. The computed results show that the convergence rates of the proposed equalizers are higher than the ones attained by the traditional adaptive fuzzy equalizers introduced by J. M. Mendel and his students. Additionally, some interesting BER curves reveal that the proposed techniques are efficient for mitigating the above-mentioned impairments.

  10. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Use of genomics to identify QTL, genes, and proteins associated with resistance to Marek’s disease. Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the p...

  11. The burden of non-communicable diseases in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mayosi, Bongani M; Flisher, Alan J; Lalloo, Umesh G; Sitas, Freddy; Tollman, Stephen M; Bradshaw, Debbie

    2009-09-12

    15 years after its first democratic election, South Africa is in the midst of a profound health transition that is characterised by a quadruple burden of communicable, non-communicable, perinatal and maternal, and injury-related disorders. Non-communicable diseases are emerging in both rural and urban areas, most prominently in poor people living in urban settings, and are resulting in increasing pressure on acute and chronic health-care services. Major factors include demographic change leading to a rise in the proportion of people older than 60 years, despite the negative effect of HIV/AIDS on life expectancy. The burden of these diseases will probably increase as the roll-out of antiretroviral therapy takes effect and reduces mortality from HIV/AIDS. The scale of the challenge posed by the combined and growing burden of HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases demands an extraordinary response that South Africa is well able to provide. Concerted action is needed to strengthen the district-based primary health-care system, to integrate the care of chronic diseases and management of risk factors, to develop a national surveillance system, and to apply interventions of proven cost-effectiveness in the primary and secondary prevention of such diseases within populations and health services. We urge the launching of a national initiative to establish sites of service excellence in urban and rural settings throughout South Africa to trial, assess, and implement integrated care interventions for chronic infectious and non-communicable diseases. PMID:19709736

  12. Communicable Disease Reporting Systems in the World: A Systematic Review Article

    PubMed Central

    JANATI, Ali; HOSSEINY, Mozhgan; GOUYA, Mohammad Mehdi; MORADI, Ghobad; GHADERI, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Communicable disease reporting and surveillance system has poor infrastructure and supporters in most of countries. Its quality improvement is a challenge and requires an accurate and efficient care and reporting systems at all levels to achieve new and simple models. This study evaluates reporting systems of communicable diseases using systematic review. Methods: This was a systematic review study. For data collection, we used the following database and search engines: Proquest, Science direct, Pub MED, Scopes, Springer, and EBESCO. For Persian databases, we used SID, Iranmedex and Magiran. Our key words were “Communicable Diseases”, “Notifiable Disease”, “Disease Notification”, “Reporting System”,” Surveillance Systems” and “evaluation”. Two independent researchers reviewed the resources and the results were classified in different domains. Results: From 1889 cases, only 66 resources were studied. The results were classified in several domains, including those who were reporting, reporting methods and procedures, responsibilities and reporting system characteristics, problems and solutions of the report, the reporting process, and receptor level. Conclusion: Disease-reporting system has similar problems in all parts of the world. Change, improve, update and continuous monitoring of the reporting system are very important. Although the reporting process can vary in different regions, but being perfect and timely are important principles in system design. Detailed explanations of tasks and providing appropriate instructions are the most important points to integrate an efficient reporting system. PMID:26744702

  13. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the poultry industry. The fear of MD is further enhanced by unpredictable vaccine breaks that result in ...

  14. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: An Update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Al-Herz, Waleed; Bousfiha, Aziz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chapel, Helen; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Fischer, Alain; Franco, Jose Luis; Geha, Raif S.; Hammarström, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele; Ochs, Hans Dieter; Puck, Jennifer M.; Roifman, Chaim M.; Seger, Reinhard; Tang, Mimi L. K.

    2011-01-01

    We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiency diseases, compiled by the ad hoc Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. As compared to the previous edition, more than 15 novel disease entities have been added in the updated version. For each disorders, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This updated classification is meant to help in the diagnostic approach to patients with these diseases. PMID:22566844

  15. Policies for control of communicable disease in day care centres.

    PubMed Central

    Chouillet, A; Maguire, H; Kurtz, Z

    1992-01-01

    A survey was carried out to identify the availability and quality of guidelines for the prevention and control of communicable disease and procedures in use in child day care centres within the South West Thames Regional Health Authority. A sample of 50 day care centres was investigated including those funded by social services and privately funded day care centres. Policies for the prevention and control of communicable disease for children and staff showed a wide variation between different centres. Exclusion criteria were unclear especially in relation to carriers of the hepatitis B virus and HIV positive children. Channels for reporting and seeking advice were inconsistent. It is recommended that clear and up to date written guidelines on the prevention and control of communicable diseases should be available in all day care centres with clear indications of good practice and channels for reporting and advice. It is desirable that guidelines are agreed by the different health and local authorities throughout the region. PMID:1417054

  16. Performance Assessment of Communicable Disease Surveillance in Disasters: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Babaie, Javad; Ardalan, Ali; Vatandoost, Hasan; Goya, Mohammad Mehdi; Akbarisari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to identify the indices and frameworks that have been used to assess the performance of communicable disease surveillance (CDS) in response to disasters and other emergencies, including infectious disease outbreaks. Method: In this systematic review, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, ScienceDirect, ProQuest databases and grey literature were searched until the end of 2013. All retrieved titles were examined in accordance with inclusion criteria. Abstracts of the relevant titles were reviewed and eligible abstracts were included in a list for data abstraction. Finally, the study variables were extracted. Results: Sixteen articles and one book were found relevant to our study objectives. In these articles, 31 criteria and 35 indicators were used or suggested for the assessment/evaluation of the performance of surveillance systems in disasters. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) updated guidelines for the evaluation of public health surveillance systems were the most widely used. Conclusion: Despite the importance of performance assessment in improving CDS in response to disasters, there is a lack of clear and accepted frameworks. There is also no agreement on the use of existing criteria and indices. The only relevant framework is the CDC guideline, which is a common framework for assessing public health surveillance systems as a whole. There is an urgent need to develop appropriate frameworks, criteria, and indices for specifically assessing the performance of CDS in response to disasters and other emergencies, including infectious diseases outbreaks. Key words: Disasters, Emergencies, Communicable Diseases, Surveillance System, Performance Assessment PMID:25774323

  17. Update on viral diseases of the equine respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, James R; Bailey, Kirsten E; Diaz-Méndez, Andrés; Hartley, Carol A

    2015-04-01

    Many viral agents have been associated with respiratory disease of the horse. The most important viral causes of respiratory disease in horses are equine influenza and the equine alphaherpesviruses. Agents such as equine viral arteritis virus, African horse sickness virus, and Hendra virus establish systemic infections. Clinical signs of disease resulting from infection with these agents can manifest as respiratory disease, but the respiratory tract is not the major body system affected by these viruses. Treatment of viral respiratory disease is generally limited to supportive therapies, whereas targeted antimicrobial therapy is effective in cases of bacterial infection. PMID:25648568

  18. Glycogen storage disease types I and II: treatment updates.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, D D; Kishnani, P S; Chen, Y T

    2007-04-01

    Prior to 2006 therapy for glycogen storage diseases consisted primarily of dietary interventions, which in the case of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type II (GSD II; Pompe disease) remained essentially palliative. Despite improved survival and growth, long-term complications of GSD type I (GSD I) have not responded to dietary therapy with uncooked cornstarch or continuous gastric feeding. The recognized significant risk of renal disease and liver malignancy in GSD I has prompted efforts towards curative therapy, including organ transplantation, in those deemed at risk. Results of clinical trials in infantile Pompe disease with alglucosidase alfa (Myozyme) showed prolonged survival reversal of cardiomyopathy, and motor gains. This resulted in broad label approval of Myozyme for Pompe disease in 2006. Furthermore, the development of experimental therapies, such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy, holds promise for the availability of curative therapy in GSD I and GSD II/Pompe disease in the future. PMID:17308886

  19. Glycogen storage disease types I and II: Treatment updates

    PubMed Central

    Kishnani, P. S.; Chen, Y. T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Prior to 2006 therapy for glycogen storage diseases consisted primarily of dietary interventions, which in the case of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type II (GSD II; Pompe disease) remained essentially palliative. Despite improved survival and growth, long-term complications of GSD type I (GSD I) have not responded to dietary therapy with uncooked cornstarch or continuous gastric feeding. The recognized significant risk of renal disease and liver malignancy in GSD I has prompted efforts towards curative therapy, including organ transplantation, in those deemed at risk. Results of clinical trials in infantile Pompe disease with alglucosidase alfa (Myozyme) showed prolonged survival reversal of cardiomyopathy, and motor gains. This resulted in broad label approval of Myozyme for Pompe disease in 2006. Furthermore, the development of experimental therapies, such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy, holds promise for the availability of curative therapy in GSD I and GSD II/Pompe disease in the future. PMID:17308886

  20. Celiac Disease and Overweight in Children: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Diamanti, Antonella; Capriati, Teresa; Basso, Maria Sole; Panetta, Fabio; Di Ciommo Laurora, Vincenzo Maria; Bellucci, Francesca; Cristofori, Fernanda; Francavilla, Ruggiero

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation of celiac disease in children is very variable and differs with age. The prevalence of atypical presentations of celiac disease has increased over the past 2 decades. Several studies in adults and children with celiac disease indicate that obesity/overweight at disease onset is not unusual. In addition, there is a trend towards the development of overweight/obesity in celiac patients who strictly comply with a gluten-free diet. However, the pathogenesis and clinical implications of the coexistence of classic malabsorption (e.g., celiac disease) and overweight/obesity remain unclear. This review investigated the causes and main clinical factors associated with overweight/obesity at the diagnosis of celiac disease and clarified whether gluten withdrawal affects the current trends of the nutritional status of celiac disease patients. PMID:24451308

  1. 2013 Update on Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pellicano, Rinaldo; De Angelis, Claudio; Ribaldone, Davide Giuseppe; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Astegiano, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder, characterized by small intestinal inflammation and villous atrophy after the ingestion of gluten by genetically susceptible individuals. Several extraintestinal manifestations have been associated to celiac disease. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a primary disorder of the esophagus characterized by upper gastrointestinal symptoms, absence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field in biopsy specimens. Both celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are caused by aberrant, but distinct, immune responses to ingested antigens and can be responsive to restricted food intake. The aim of this review is to assess whether there is an association between these two pathologies. In the majority of the studies examined, including the studies in pediatric population, the prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in subjects with celiac disease was about 10-times that of the general population. We suggest searching for eosinophilic esophagitis in all children undergoing endoscopy for suspicious celiac disease. PMID:23974065

  2. Drug-induced valvular heart disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Andrejak, Michel; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Numerous reports have shown an unquestionable association between fibrotic valve disease and the following drugs: ergot alkaloids (such as methysergide and ergotamine), ergot-derived dopaminergic agonists (such as pergolide and cabergoline) and drugs metabolized into norfenfluramine (such as fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine and benfluorex). This review focuses on different aspects of drug-induced valvular heart disease: historical background; echocardiographic features; different drugs recognized as being responsible for valvular heart disease; and pathophysiology. PMID:23769407

  3. Intestinal Ultrasound in Rare Gastrointestinal Diseases, Update, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Lembcke, B; Jenssen, C; Hocke, M; Ignee, A; Hollerweger, A

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal ultrasound has become an established and valid diagnostic method for inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, appendicitis, bowel obstruction, perforation and intussusception. However, little is known about sonographic findings in other rarer intestinal diseases. Ultrasound may display the transformation of the intestinal wall from a normal to a pathological state both in inflammatory and neoplastic disease. Besides demonstrating the transmural aspect, it also shows the mesenteric reaction as well as complications such as fistula, abscesses, stenosis, or ileus. Furthermore, in some diseases intestinal ultrasound may serve as a diagnostic clue if typical patterns of the bowel wall and impaired peristalsis can be demonstrated. This may lead to an important reduction of invasive and expensive (follow-up) procedures. The information gained by ultrasound regarding intestinal disease, however, is as important and valid as e. g. in case of focal lesions of the liver. Serving as tertiary referral centers for a broad spectrum of intestinal diseases, we therefore report some aspects of ultrasound in patients with less often recognized diseases. The article is divided into two parts, the first focusing on examination techniques, infectious diseases and celiac sprue and the second on hereditary, vascular and neoplastic diseases and varia. PMID:26091002

  4. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer. PMID:24535580

  5. Update and new approaches in the treatment of Castleman disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kah-Lok; Lade, Stephen; Prince, H Miles; Harrison, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    First described 60 years ago, Castleman disease comprises a rare and heterogeneous cluster of disorders, characterized by lymphadenopathy with unique histological features and associated with cytokine-driven constitutional symptoms and biochemical disturbances. Although unicentric Castleman disease is curable with complete surgical excision, its multicentric counterpart is a considerable therapeutic challenge. The recent development of biological agents, particularly monoclonal antibodies to interleukin-6 and its receptor, allow for more targeted disease-specific intervention that promises improved response rates and more durable disease control; however, further work is required to fill knowledge gaps in terms of underlying pathophysiology and to facilitate alternative treatment options for refractory cases. PMID:27536166

  6. Research update on exotic and emerging poultry diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic and emerging diseases of poultry continue to be a threat to US poultry. Studies over the past year have demonstrated: 1) cooking poultry meat at minimum of 70C kills avian influenza (AI) and Newcastle disease (ND) viruses in a few seconds, 2) low pathogenicity (LP) AI viruses isolated from fr...

  7. An Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Liver Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice

    2013-01-01

    Liver inherited diseases are a group of genetically determined clinical entities that appear with an early chronic liver involvement. They include Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), hereditary hemochromatosis, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, cystic fibrosis, although it is not specifically a liver disease, may cause a severe liver involvement in a significant percentage of cases. For all these pathologies, the disease gene is known, and molecular analysis may contribute to the unequivocal diagnosis. This approach could avoid the patient invasive procedures and limit complications associated with a delay in diagnosis. We review liver inherited diseases on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the contribution of molecular analysis in the multistep diagnostic workup. PMID:24222913

  8. When Are High-Tech Communicators Effective in Parkinson's Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriero, Giorgio; Caligari, Marco; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Franchignoni, Franco

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a 63-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease showing loss of intelligibility of speech and severely impaired handwriting, despite undergoing physical and speech therapies. As the patient had sufficient residual motor abilities and adequate cognitive function and motivation, a computer-based communication aid with a software…

  9. [Non-communicable disease and their significance for dental medicine].

    PubMed

    Türp, Jens Christoph; Spranger, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, cancers, and diabetes mellitus, are responsible for most deaths worldwide. In view of the rising prevalence and the long-term consequences of NCDs, their prevention is a public health priority. Dentistry plays an important role in this endeavor. Since oral and general diseases share common risk factors (e.g., poor oral hygiene, unhealthy diet, alcohol abuse, tobacco consumption, distress), preventive measures may target both oral diseases (e.g., dental caries, periodontal diseases, oral tumors) and medical NCDs. Consequently, dental medicine assumes an important medical and social role, which has been recognized by the World Health Organization and the General Assembly of the United Nations. To fulfill its mission successfully, consideration of the principles of evidence-based dentistry is a prerequisite. At the same time, the new development provides dentistry with the opportunity to critically reflect on its current and future orientation. PMID:27279058

  10. Update on the Management of Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset upper and lower airway disease consisting of eosinophilic nasal polyps, asthma, and respiratory reactions to cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Management includes guideline-based treatment of asthma and sinus disease, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and for some patients aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy. Despite this, many patients have inadequately controlled symptoms and require multiple sinus surgeries. In this review, we discuss the current standard approaches to the management of AERD, and we introduce several therapeutics under development that may hold promise for the treatment of AERD. PMID:27126722

  11. [Update on the use of PET radiopharmaceuticals in inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    The use of molecular imaging with PET/CT technology using different radiotracers, especially the (18)F-FDG is currently spreading beyond the area of oncology, the most interest being placed on inflammatory and infectious diseases. This article presents a review of its contribution in different inflammatory conditions in the context of structural and conventional nuclear medicine imaging. Special emphasis is placed on the more significant diseases such as large-vessel vasculitis, sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease and the study of the atheroma plaque. PMID:24028819

  12. Update on Janus kinase antagonists in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Boland, Brigid S; Sandborn, William J; Chang, John T

    2014-09-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have emerged as a novel orally administered small-molecule therapy for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and possibly Crohn disease. These molecules are designed to selectively target the activity of specific JAKs and to offer a targeted mechanism of action without risk of immunogenicity. Based on data from clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis and phase 2 studies in inflammatory bowel disease, tofacitinib and other JAK inhibitors are likely to become a new form of medical therapy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25110261

  13. Update on Berberine in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Song, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Berberine (BBR), an active ingredient from nature plants, has demonstrated multiple biological activities and pharmacological effects in a series of metabolic diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The recent literature points out that BBR may be a potential drug for NAFLD in both experimental models and clinical trials. This review highlights important discoveries of BBR in this increasing disease and addresses the relevant targets of BBR on NAFLD which links to insulin pathway, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, gut environment, hepatic lipid transportation, among others. Developing nuanced understanding of the mechanisms will help to optimize more targeted and effective clinical application of BBR for NAFLD. PMID:23843872

  14. Update on the Management of Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Kathleen M; Laidlaw, Tanya M

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset upper and lower airway disease consisting of eosinophilic nasal polyps, asthma, and respiratory reactions to cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Management includes guideline-based treatment of asthma and sinus disease, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and for some patients aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy. Despite this, many patients have inadequately controlled symptoms and require multiple sinus surgeries. In this review, we discuss the current standard approaches to the management of AERD, and we introduce several therapeutics under development that may hold promise for the treatment of AERD. PMID:27126722

  15. Reporting of ethnicity in research on chronic disease: update

    PubMed Central

    O'Loughlin, J; Dugas, E; Maximova, K; Kishchuk, N

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the inclusion of ethnicity and race as variables in current, leading edge research on chronic disease and its risk factors. Of 100 randomly selected original research articles published in high‐impact journals in 2005, 85% did not report either a definition of ethnicity or its conceptualisation in terms of theoretical reasoning, and 98% did not report an actual measurement item. Ethnicity and race remain non‐standardised and largely underdescribed variables in research on chronic disease. This represents an important loss of opportunity to articulate and test hypotheses about the mechanisms underlying ethnic group differences in chronic disease. PMID:17099093

  16. JAK Kinases in Health and Disease: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, Arian; Pesu, Marko; Silvennoinen, Olli; O’Shea, John

    2012-01-01

    Janus kinases (Jaks) are critical signaling elements for a large subset of cytokines. As a consequence they play pivotal roles in the patho-physiology of many diseases including neoplastic and autoimmune diseases. Small molecule Jak inhibitors as therapeutic agents have become a reality and the palette of such inhibitors will likely expand. This review will summarize our current knowledge on these key enzymes and their associated pharmaceutical inhibitors. PMID:23028408

  17. Update on persistent symptoms associated with Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carlos R.; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The pathogenesis, ecology, and epidemiology of Lyme disease have been well described, and antimicrobial treatment is very effective. There has been controversy about whether infection can persist and cause chronic symptoms despite treatment with antimicrobials. This review summarizes recent studies that have addressed this issue. Recent findings The pathogenesis of persistent nonspecific symptoms in patients who were treated for Lyme disease is poorly understood, and the validity of results of attempts to demonstrate persistent infection with B. burgdorferi has not been established. One study attempted to use xenodiagnosis to detect B. burgdorferi in patients who have been treated for Lyme disease. Another study assessed whether repeated episodes of erythema migrans were due to the same or different strains of B. burgdorferi. A possible cause of persistent arthritis in some treated patients is slow clearance of nonviable organisms that may lead to prolonged inflammation. The results of all of these studies continue to provide evidence that viable B. burgdorferi do not persist in patients who receive conventional antimicrobial treatment for Lyme disease. Summary Patients with persistent symptoms possibly associated with Lyme disease often provide a challenge for clinicians. Recent studies have provided additional evidence that viable B. burgdorferi do not persist after conventional treatment with antimicrobials, indicating that ongoing symptoms in patients who received conventional treatment for Lyme disease should not be attributed to persistent active infection. Video abstract http://links.lww.com/MOP/A23 PMID:25490690

  18. Personalized medicine: an update of salivary biomarkers for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Korte, Dina L; Kinney, Janet

    2016-02-01

    This article provides an up-to-date review of the more robust salivary biomarkers, as well as of panels of combinatorial markers and periodontal pathogens, that reveal high sensitivity and specificity for enhancing clinical decision-making in periodontal disease progression, risk and diagnosis. Periodontal diseases are complex and require an inflammatory response to bacterial pathogens in a susceptible host to stimulate tissue destruction. When used alone, traditional clinical assessments provide a diagnosis of periodontitis only after the biologic onset of the disease process, and are unable to substantiate disease activity or future risk. New technologies are becoming available that are capable of measuring combinations of inflammatory cytokines and proteinases for rapid chair-side testing. Utilizing saliva to identify and measure specific phenotypes and host-derived mediators will allow highly individualized diagnosis, prognosis and treatments for periodontal diseases. This personalized medicine approach will strengthen the power of the clinical oral examination and medical history assessments, providing patients with evidence-based, targeted risk care. PMID:26662480

  19. Inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases – an update

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Sandra; Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Breur, Marjolein; Valk, Paul; Baker, David; Noort, Johannes M

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive dysfunction and loss of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), is the major cause of cognitive and motor dysfunction. While neuronal degeneration is well-known in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, it is also observed in neurotrophic infections, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, neoplastic disorders, prion diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as neuropsychiatric disorders and genetic disorders. A common link between these diseases is chronic activation of innate immune responses including those mediated by microglia, the resident CNS macrophages. Such activation can trigger neurotoxic pathways leading to progressive degeneration. Yet, microglia are also crucial for controlling inflammatory processes, and repair and regeneration. The adaptive immune response is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases contributing to tissue damage, but also plays important roles in resolving inflammation and mediating neuroprotection and repair. The growing awareness that the immune system is inextricably involved in mediating damage as well as regeneration and repair in neurodegenerative disorders, has prompted novel approaches to modulate the immune system, although it remains whether these approaches can be used in humans. Additional factors in humans include ageing and exposure to environmental factors such as systemic infections that provide additional clues that may be human specific and therefore difficult to translate from animal models. Nevertheless, a better understanding of how immune responses are involved in neuronal damage and regeneration, as reviewed here, will be essential to develop effective therapies to improve quality of life, and mitigate the personal, economic and social impact of these diseases. PMID:24329535

  20. Milk, milk products, and disease free health: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, R; Behare, P V; Kumar, M; Mohania, D; Yadav, M; Jain, S; Menon, S; Parkash, O; Marotta, F; Minelli, E; Henry, C J K; Yadav, H

    2012-01-01

    The cow and its milk have been held sacred in the world since the dawn of human civilization. Indian ancient Vedic texts describe the virtues of milk and dairy products, as is authenticated by modern scientific principles and proofs. Therefore, milk has been considered as one of the most natural and highly nutritive part of a daily balanced diet. Currently, the integration of advanced scientific knowledge with traditional information is gaining incredible momentum toward developing the concept of potential therapeutic foods. Furthermore, new advances toward understanding the therapeutic roles of milk and milk products have also given a new impetus for unraveling the age old secrets of milk. At present, the best-known examples of therapeutic foods are fermented milk products containing health promoting probiotic bacteria. In the present article, we have tried to review the various aspects of the therapeutic nature of milk and fermented dairy products in a highly up-dated manner, and offer an in-depth insight into the development of targeted therapeutic future foods as per the requirements of consumers. PMID:22332596

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and dyslipidemia: An update.

    PubMed

    Katsiki, Niki; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide, progressing from simple steatosis to necroinflammation and fibrosis (leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), and in some cases to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance are involved in NAFLD development and progression. NAFLD has been associated with several cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension and smoking. NAFLD is also characterized by atherogenic dyslipidemia, postprandial lipemia and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction. Most importantly, NAFLD patients have an increased risk for both liver and CV disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. In this narrative review, the associations between NAFLD, dyslipidemia and vascular disease in NAFLD patients are discussed. NAFLD treatment is also reviewed with a focus on lipid-lowering drugs. Finally, future perspectives in terms of both NAFLD diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets are considered. PMID:27237577

  2. Organelle communication: signaling crossroads between homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Chiong, Mario; Hill, Joseph A; Simmen, Thomas; Quest, Andrew F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    Cellular organelles do not function as isolated or static units, but rather form dynamic contacts between one another that can be modulated according to cellular needs. The physical interfaces between organelles are important for Ca2+ and lipid homeostasis, and serve as platforms for the control of many essential functions including metabolism, signaling, organelle integrity and execution of the apoptotic program. Emerging evidence also highlights the importance of organelle communication in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cancer, skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction. Here, we provide an overview of the current literature on organelle communication and the link to human pathologies. PMID:24534274

  3. The Non-Surgical Treatment of Peyronie Disease: 2013 Update

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Eric James; Mitchell, Gregory Clyde; Tan, Ronny B.; Sangkum, Premsant

    2013-01-01

    Peyronie disease is a common cause of penile deformity and sexual dysfunction. Although surgery is regarded as the definitive management for this condition, there are many medical and minimally invasive therapies available, with widely varying efficacy reported in the literature. The purpose of this review is to describe the current state-of-the-art for each of the most commonly used as well as several developing non-surgical treatments. Further, we hope to offer perspectives that will aid practitioners in deciding among these treatments that are either already in use or have the potential to be used as alternatives to surgery in the management of this frustrating disease. PMID:24459651

  4. The non-surgical treatment of peyronie disease: 2013 update.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Eric James; Mitchell, Gregory Clyde; Tan, Ronny B; Sangkum, Premsant; Hellstrom, Wayne John G

    2013-12-01

    Peyronie disease is a common cause of penile deformity and sexual dysfunction. Although surgery is regarded as the definitive management for this condition, there are many medical and minimally invasive therapies available, with widely varying efficacy reported in the literature. The purpose of this review is to describe the current state-of-the-art for each of the most commonly used as well as several developing non-surgical treatments. Further, we hope to offer perspectives that will aid practitioners in deciding among these treatments that are either already in use or have the potential to be used as alternatives to surgery in the management of this frustrating disease. PMID:24459651

  5. A technological update of molecular diagnostics for infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Tsueng

    2008-01-01

    Identification of a causative pathogen is essential for the choice of treatment for most infectious diseases. Many FDA approved molecular assays; usually more sensitive and specific compared to traditional tests, have been developed in the last decade. A new trend of high throughput and multiplexing assays are emerging thanks to technological developments for the human genome sequencing project. The applications of microarray and ultra high throughput sequencing technologies for diagnostic microbiology are reviewed. The race for the $1000 genome technology by 2014 will have a profound impact in diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases in the near future. PMID:18782035

  6. Implications of prion diseases for dentistry: an update.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Sánchez, Begoña; Esparza-Gómez, Germán C; Campo-Trapero, Julián; Cerero-Lapiedra, Rocío

    2008-03-01

    Prions are normal proteins present in all mammals, especially in the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphoreticular tissue. Their transformation into a highly infectious molecule gives rise to a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), which cause vacuolar degeneration of gray matter and produce a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Prion diseases have attracted considerable attention in recent years, and this review of the literature was designed to determine their implications for dentistry, studying the possibility of cross-transmission in the dental office and describing their oral manifestations. The main oral manifestations are dysphagia, dysarthria, paresthesias, dysesthesias, and dysgeusia. The most frequently involved oral tissues are the trigeminal ganglion, posterior third of the tongue, tonsils, and, much less commonly, alveolar nerves, gingiva, and salivary glands. Although no contagion has been reported in the dental setting to date, prions resist the usual dental sterilization systems and transmission of this type of disease remains a potential risk. It is therefore important for dentists to be aware of these diseases, to identify high-risk patients by obtaining an adequate clinical history, and to know the appropriate procedures to be followed. PMID:18280965

  7. AN UPDATE OF RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella associated human illnesses, linked to consumption of contaminated poultry, have remained significantly above public health targets of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) whereas E. coli O157:H7, Campylobacter, and Listeria associated morbidities are approaching Healthy People 2010 goals...

  8. Fatty acids in cardiovascular health and disease: a comprehensive update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research dating back to the 1950s reported an association between the consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and risk of coronary heart disease. Recent epidemiological evidence, however, challenges these findings. It is well accepted that the consumption of SFAs increases low-density lipoprotei...

  9. UPDATE OF GRAY KERNEL DISEASE OF MACADAMIA - 2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray kernel is an important disease of macadamia that affects the quality of kernels with gray discoloration and a permeating, foul odor that can render entire batches of nuts unmarketable. We report on the successful production of gray kernel in raw macadamia kernels artificially inoculated with s...

  10. Update on pulmonary disease due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Stout, Jason E; Koh, Won-Jung; Yew, Wing Wai

    2016-04-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emerging worldwide as significant causes of chronic pulmonary infection, posing a number of challenges for both clinicians and researchers. While a number of studies worldwide have described an increasing prevalence of NTM pulmonary disease over time, population-based data are relatively sparse and subject to ascertainment bias. Furthermore, the disease is geographically heterogeneous. While some species are commonly implicated worldwide (Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium abscessus), others (e.g., Mycobacterium malmoense, Mycobacterium xenopi) are regionally important. Thoracic computed tomography, microbiological testing with identification to the species level, and local epidemiology must all be taken into account to accurately diagnose NTM pulmonary disease. A diagnosis of NTM pulmonary disease does not necessarily imply that treatment is required; a patient-centered approach is essential. When treatment is required, multidrug therapy based on appropriate susceptibility testing for the species in question should be used. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are needed to optimize the management of these complicated infections. PMID:26976549

  11. The pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Somlo, S; Markowitz, G S

    2000-07-01

    The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the two major genes responsible for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, are the seminal discoveries upon which much of the current investigation into the pathogenesis of this common heritable disease is based. A major mechanistic insight was achieved with the discovery that autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease occurs by a two-hit mechanism requiring somatic inactivation of the normal allele in individual polarized epithelial cells. Most recent advances are focused on the function of the respective protein products, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2. Indirect evidence supports an interaction between polycystin-1 and -2, albeit it is unlikely that they work in concert in all tissues and at all times. They associate in yeast two hybrid and cotransfection assays and there is a striking similarity in the renal and pancreatic cystic phenotypes of Pkd2-/- and Pkd1del34/del34 mice. Also, the respective homologues of both proteins are expressed in the same sensory neuronal cells in the nematode and the human disease phenotypes remain completely overlapping with the major difference being in relative severity. Mounting evidence supports the hypothesis that polycystin-1 is a cell surface receptor. A close homologue in the sea urchin sperm mediates the acrosome reaction in response to contact with egg-jelly, the nematode homologue functions in mechano- or chemosensation, and the solution structure of the repeated extracellular polycystic kidney disease domains reveals a beta-sandwich fold commonly found in surface receptor molecules. Indirect evidence also supports the initial hypothesis that polycystin-2 is a calcium channel subunit. Several closely related homologues retain the calcium channel signature motif but differ in their predicted interaction domains, and one of these homologues has been shown to be a calcium regulated cation channel. Several important distinctions in polcystin-1 and -2 function have also been

  12. Update of fecal markers of inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Judd, Thomas A; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A; Turner, Dan; Leach, Steven T

    2011-10-01

    The diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of disease activity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) require investigating clinical, radiological, and histological criteria, as well as serum inflammatory markers. However, a range of fecal inflammatory markers now appears to have the potential to greatly assist in these processes. Calprotectin, a prominent neutrophil protein, was identified two decades ago as a potentially revolutionary marker for IBD. Following this discovery, numerous additional markers, including S100A12, lactoferrin, and M2-pyruvate kinase, have also been suggested as novel markers of IBD. In the present study, we provide an up-to-date review of fecal markers of IBD, and further, provide a novel analysis of each of these fecal markers in severe ulcerative colitis and compare their expression pattern in contrast to calprotectin. PMID:21777275

  13. Nonsurgical Interventions for Peyronie's Disease: Update as of 2016

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a debilitating condition of the penis that leads to significant pain, erectile dysfunction, and emotional distress in men. PD is likely underreported due to lack of knowledge of the disease and the absence of well-established available treatments. Surgical treatment can lead to sustained improvements, but is often associated with penile shortening and places the patient at risk for perioperative morbidity. Nonsurgical management has been studied for several years as an alternative to surgery for men with PD. Currently, much of the data on nonsurgical management is conflicting, with only one treatment that has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Significant effort has been devoted to advancing non-surgical treatments for PD that can be implemented outside of the operating room. This review aims to describe the research behind current nonsurgical therapies for PD and to highlight the recent advances that have been made within the last three years. PMID:27574590

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Update

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Gilmer, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known to be upregulated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other inflammatory conditions, but while their involvement is clear, their role in many settings has yet to be determined. Studies of the involvement of MMPs in IBD since 2006 have revealed an array of immune and stromal cells which release the proteases in response to inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Through digestion of the extracellular matrix and cleavage of bioactive proteins, a huge diversity of roles have been revealed for the MMPs in IBD, where they have been shown to regulate epithelial barrier function, immune response, angiogenesis, fibrosis, and wound healing. For this reason, MMPs have been recognised as potential biomarkers for disease activity in IBD and inhibition remains a huge area of interest. This review describes new roles of MMPs in the pathophysiology of IBD and suggests future directions for the development of treatment strategies in this condition. PMID:25948887

  15. The Worldwide Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: An update.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, James A; Finger, Brad; Weiner, Michael W; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Rowe, Christopher C; Kim, Seong Yoon; Guinjoan, Salvador M; Sevlever, Gustavo; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), launched in 2004, has worked to accelerate drug development by validating imaging and blood/cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease clinical treatment trials. ADNI is a naturalistic (nontreatment) multisite longitudinal study. A true public-private partnership, the initiative has set a new standard for data sharing without embargo and for the use of biomarkers in dementia research. The ADNI effort in North America is not the only such effort in the world. The Alzheimer's Association recognized these global efforts and formed Worldwide ADNI (WW-ADNI). By creating a platform for international collaboration and cooperation, WW-ADNI's goals are to harmonize projects and results across geographical regions and to facilitate data management and availability to investigators around the world. WW-ADNI projects include those based in North America, Europe, Japan, Australia, Korea, and Argentina. PMID:26194318

  16. MPTP Mouse Models of Parkinson’s Disease: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Gloria E.; Rademacher, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Among the most widely used models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are those that employ toxins, especially 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Depending on the protocol used, MPTP yields large variations in nigral cell loss, striatal dopamine loss and behavioral deficits. Motor deficits do not fully replicate those seen in PD. Nonetheless, MPTP mouse models mimic many aspects of the disease and are therefore important tools for understanding PD. In this review, we will discuss the ability of MPTP mouse models to replicate the pathophysiology of PD, the mechanisms of MPTP-induced neurotoxicity, strain differences in susceptibility to MPTP, and the models’ roles in testing therapeutic approaches. PMID:23275799

  17. An update: vitamin E supplementation and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2002-01-01

    In vitro studies and experiments in animal models provide a large and compelling body of evidence that oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and/or related oxidative mechanisms play a critical role in the initiation and progression of atherogenesis. A corollary to the theory that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species ("free radicals") are the key molecules in this process is that antioxidants that can protect LDL from peroxidation should decrease the risk of developing atherosclerosis, attenuate its progression, or even reverse established disease. However, recently, clinical trials employing the principal lipid-soluble dietary antioxidant, vitamin E, have provided mixed results indicating either benefit, no effect, or an adverse impact on patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Consideration of the design and outcome of these studies together with new reports about the action of antioxidants suggests approaches for new studies as well as a basis for current advice to patients. PMID:12134710

  18. Nonsurgical Interventions for Peyronie's Disease: Update as of 2016.

    PubMed

    Joice, Gregory A; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-08-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a debilitating condition of the penis that leads to significant pain, erectile dysfunction, and emotional distress in men. PD is likely underreported due to lack of knowledge of the disease and the absence of well-established available treatments. Surgical treatment can lead to sustained improvements, but is often associated with penile shortening and places the patient at risk for perioperative morbidity. Nonsurgical management has been studied for several years as an alternative to surgery for men with PD. Currently, much of the data on nonsurgical management is conflicting, with only one treatment that has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Significant effort has been devoted to advancing non-surgical treatments for PD that can be implemented outside of the operating room. This review aims to describe the research behind current nonsurgical therapies for PD and to highlight the recent advances that have been made within the last three years. PMID:27574590

  19. [Multimodal imaging of ischemic heart diseases: A 2015 update].

    PubMed

    Di Marco, L; Rosset, M; Zhang-Yin, J; Ohana, M

    2016-05-01

    Current realities and future possibilities of imaging in the ischemic heart diseases are very broad and constantly evolving, with the improvement of existing technologies and the introduction of new features such as dual-energy CT, strain ultrasound, multimodality fusion or perfusion MRI. Regular collaboration between prescribing clinicians, cardiologists, radiologists and nuclear radiologists is therefore essential to tailor the examination to the specific clinical question. The indications for each modality will therefore depend on its diagnostic performance, cost, acquisition and post-processing times and eventual radiation exposure. This review will detail principles and applications of current cardiac imaging examinations: echocardiography, nuclear medicine, MRI, CT and coronary angiography, emphasizing their current strengths and weaknesses in the ischemic heart diseases management. PMID:26775644

  20. Hypertension management in patients with vascular disease: An update.

    PubMed

    Kohlman-Trigoboff, Debra

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. About 80 million U.S. adults (33%) have HTN. Of these individuals, approximately 77% use antihypertensive medication, however, only 54% have controlled HTN. Studies have demonstrated that patients whose blood pressures are controlled achieve a minimum of 50% reduction in cardiovascular events compared to similar patients with poorly controlled blood pressure. This article will define HTN and its consequences. Diagnostic evaluation and evidence-based treatment guidelines for HTN to include lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapy will be discussed. Finally, this article will examine why the treatment of HTN can prevent the development and reduce the progression of atherosclerosis in vascular disease. PMID:27568315

  1. Updating our understanding of pulmonary disease associated with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Estébanez-Muñoz, Miriam; Soto-Abánades, Clara I; Ríos-Blanco, Juan J; Arribas, Jose R

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in a reduction of opportunistic infections associated with cellular and humoral immunosuppression. However, what is still unclear is the impact of HAART on the development of other diseases not associated with AIDS, such as lung cancer and COPD. The aim of this paper is to review the most innovative and relevant aspects of lung pathology in patients infected with HIV. PMID:22257776

  2. Update in tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial disease 2012.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Dick; Nahid, Payam

    2013-10-15

    In 2012, new publications in the Journal described both the predictive value of the new IFN-γ release assays for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis (TB), but also provided evidence that these new tests cannot be interpreted simply as positive or negative, as initially hoped. Surgical masks can reduce transmission of TB infection, but other measures such as state-wide implementation of targeted testing and treatment of latent TB or active case finding require substantial and sustained effort to successfully reduce TB morbidity and mortality. A quasiexperimental study revealed that a package of social interventions could substantially reduce risk of TB disease in heavily exposed (and infected) children in the preantibiotic era. A study in a high-TB burden setting suggested that a new rapid drug-susceptibility test for TB may be more practical for implementation than traditional culture-based phenotypic tests. And two studies of TB vaccines revealed that currently used bacillus Calmette-Guérin strains vary in their ability to affect correlates of immunogenicity, whereas a new candidate vaccine, MVA85A, was safe and immunogenic in adults. Studies of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) described a rapid rise in the prevalence and spatial clustering of NTM in the United States over the past decade. Although risk factors for pulmonary NTM such as advanced age and low BMI are known, the mechanisms underlying infection and disease remain mysterious. Four studies of therapy of NTM disease highlighted the pressing need for well-designed international randomized controlled trials to improve our management of NTM disease. PMID:24127799

  3. Impact of Diabetes on Cardiovascular Disease: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Matheus, Alessandra Saldanha de Mattos; Tannus, Lucianne Righeti Monteiro; Cobas, Roberta Arnoldi; Palma, Catia C. Sousa; Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Gomes, Marilia de Brito

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The proposed mechanisms that can link accelerated atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular risk in this population are poorly understood. It has been suggested that an association between hyperglycemia and intracellular metabolic changes can result in oxidative stress, low-grade inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Recently, epigenetic factors by different types of reactions are known to be responsible for the interaction between genes and environment and for this reason can also account for the association between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The impact of clinical factors that may coexist with diabetes such as obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are also discussed. Furthermore, evidence that justify screening for subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic patients is controversial and is also matter of this review. The purpose of this paper is to describe the association between poor glycemic control, oxidative stress, markers of insulin resistance, and of low-grade inflammation that have been suggested as putative factors linking diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23533715

  4. An update on the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Joseph

    2006-07-01

    Although levodopa remains the most effective symptomatic drug for Parkinson's disease (PD), its use is limited by the emergence of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, particularly in young-onset patients. Dopamine agonists, catechol-O-methyltransferasee inhibitors and other anti-parkinsonian drugs have been found to diminish or prevent these complications and possibly to exert disease-modifying effects. The finding that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidum internus (GPi) are abnormally active in PD has led to effective surgical treatments designed to improve patients' quality of life. The relative benefits of targeting STN or GPi with high-frequency stimulation are still being debated. Experimental therapeutics of PD include novel delivery systems, anti-apoptotic strategies and implantation of genetically engineered cells, and stem cells. Despite encouraging results from early pre-clinical and clinical studies, trials of human fetal grafts and intraventricular and intraparenchymal infusion of glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor have not shown clinically meaningful benefits. Future therapeutic strategies should focus not only on ameliorating the symptoms of PD, but also on neuroprotective or neurorescue therapies that can favorably modify the natural course of the disease and slow the progression of both motor and nonmotor manifestations of PD. PMID:16878274

  5. Update on hand-foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Ventarola, Daniel; Bordone, Lindsey; Silverberg, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a viral exanthem caused, primarily by Coxsackie A16 and enterovirus 71 with typical clinical features of fever, painful papules and blisters over the extremities and genitalia and an enanthem involving ulceration of the mouth, palate, and pharynx. Other enteroviruses have recently been noted to cause severe neurologic illness and paralysis (enterovirus 68) with variable cutaneous features. A recent outbreak of Coxsackie A6 infection has been seen worldwide with cases reported in the United States, Japan, Southeast Asia, and Europe. These cases have caused extensive cutaneous disease variants, some of which are not previously recognized in Coxsackie infection, namely vesicobullous and erosive eruptions, extensive cutaneous involvement, periorificial lesions, localization in areas of atopic dermatitis or in children with atopic dermatitis (the so-called eczema coxsackium), Gianotti-Crosti-like lesions, petechial/purpuric eruptions, delayed onychomadesis, and palmoplantar desquamation. Finally, adult cases appear to occur with this form of hand-foot-and-mouth disease, likely due to fecal-oral transmission in a household setting. PMID:25889136

  6. Tarui disease and distal glycogenoses: clinical and genetic update.

    PubMed

    Toscano, A; Musumeci, O

    2007-10-01

    Phosphofructokinase deficiency (Tarui disease) was the first disorder recognized to directly affect glycolysis. Since the discovery of the disease, in 1965, a wide range of biochemical, physiological and molecular studies have greatly contributed to our knowledge concerning not only phosphofructokinase function in normal muscle but also on the general control of glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. Studies on phosphofructokinase deficiency vastly enriched the field of glycogen storage diseases, making a relevant improvement also in the molecular genetic area. So far, more than one hundred patients have been described with prominent clinical symptoms characterized by muscle cramps, exercise intolerance, rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria, often associated with haemolytic anaemia and hyperuricaemia. The muscle phosphofructokinase gene is located on chromosome 12 and about 20 mutations have been described. Other glycogenoses have been recognised in the distal part of the glycolytic pathway: these are infrequent but some may induce muscle cramps, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis. Phosphoglycerate Kinase, Phosphoglycerate Mutase, Lactate Dehydrogenase, beta-Enolase and Aldolase A deficiencies have been described as distal glycogenoses. From the molecular point of view, the majority of these enzyme deficiencies are sustained by "private" mutations. PMID:18421897

  7. Update on Legionnaires’ disease: pathogenesis, epidemiology, detection and control

    PubMed Central

    Hilbi, Hubert; Jarraud, Sophie; Hartland, Elizabeth; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Legionellosis or Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging and often-fatal form of pneumonia that is most severe in elderly and immunocompromised people, an ever-increasing risk group for infection. In recent years, the genomics of Legionella spp. has significantly increased our knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease by providing new insights into the evolution and genetic and physiological basis of Legionella–host interactions. The 7th international conference on Legionella, Legionella 2009, illustrated many recent conceptual advances in epidemiology, pathogenesis and ecology. Experts in different fields presented new findings on basic mechanisms of pathogen–host interactions and bacterial evolution, as well as the clinical management and environmental prevalence and persistence of Legionella. The presentations revealed remarkable facts about the genetic and metabolic basis of the intracellular lifestyle of Legionella and reported on its striking ability to manipulate host cell processes by molecular mimicry. Together, these investigations will lead to new approaches for the treatment and prevention of Legionnaires’ disease. PMID:20149105

  8. A family living with Alzheimer's disease: The communicative challenges.

    PubMed

    Jones, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease irrevocably challenges a person's capacity to communicate with others. Earlier research on these challenges focused on the language disorders associated with the condition and situated language deficit solely in the limitations of a person's cognitive and semantic impairments. This research falls short of gaining insight into the actual interactional experiences of a person with Alzheimer's and their family. Drawing on a UK data set of 70 telephone calls recorded over a two-and-a-half year period (2006-2008) between one elderly woman with Alzheimer's disease, and her daughter and son-in-law, this paper explores the role which communication (and its degeneration) plays in family relationships. Investigating these interactions, using a conversation analytic approach, reveals that there are clearly communicative difficulties, but closer inspection suggests that they arise due to the contingencies that are generated by the other's contributions in the interaction. That being so, this paper marks a departure from the traditional focus on language level analysis and the assumption that deficits are intrinsic to the individual with Alzheimer's, and instead focuses on the collaborative communicative challenges that arise in the interaction itself and which have a profound impact on people's lives and relationships. PMID:24339113

  9. Communicative function in patients with questionable Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heller, R B; Dobbs, A R; Rule, B G

    1992-09-01

    The communicative skills of patients with questionable Alzheimer's disease (AD) were examined by having patients describe events shown in a silent video cartoon. As anticipated, questionable AD patients provided fewer clauses in their descriptions than did education- and age-matched controls. This finding was independent of differences in word finding ability. More important, the patients failed to describe as many of the thematically important events as did the controls, a difference that affected the overall informativeness of the communication. Even though the patients were sensitive to event importance, there was no evidence of compensation in their descriptions (i.e., a greater concentration of important events). Several interpretations are presented that focus on possible deficits in the pragmatic or semantic systems of language or both as an early symptom of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:1388860

  10. Thyroid disease among the Rongelap and Utirik population - an update

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.E.; Vaswani, A.; Heotis, P.

    1997-07-01

    In 1954, 253 Marshallese were accidentally exposed to fallout radiation from the hydrogen bomb, BRAVO. The Marshall Islands Medical Program (MIMP) was established by the Department of Energy in 1955 to monitor and treat radiation-related disease pursuant to this accident. Medical teams from Brookhaven National laboratory, a federal institution, regularly visit the Marshall Islands to give medical care to the exposed population. The most significant complication of the exposure has been found to be thyroid disease due to the ingestion of radioactive iodides from the fallout. In 1963 the first thyroid nodules were found in Rongelap subjects and in 1969 in Utirik. Non-neoplastic adenomatous nodules were associated with higher doses of radiation and neoplastic nodules developed in individuals receiving lower doses of radiation. Women were more susceptible to the development of palpable thyroid nodules than men. In 1994 the MIMP initiated examination of the thyroid by ultrasound to supplement the clinical examination. One hundred and sixty-four patients were evaluated. No significant differences were found in the incidence of thyroid nodules or the mean nodule count between the three groups of Rongelap and Utirik exposed and a comparison patient population. There was no significant difference in the incidence of thyroid nodules in males vs. females. Five exposed patients were referred for surgical excision of a nodule detected only by ultrasound. These ultrasound findings are unexpected in that females are known to have a higher incidence of thyroid disease than males and we expected that the incidence of ultrasound nodules would be higher in the exposed population. 36 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. AB005. Treatment of Peyronie’s disease: 2016 updates

    PubMed Central

    Lue, Tom F.

    2016-01-01

    The approval of Xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) by the FDA in the US in December of 2013 has significantly changed the management of Peyronie’s disease. Based on author’s experience in treating the disease for more than 25 years and giving more than 1,000 Xiaflex injections, a refined medical and surgical approach is proposed. (I) Detailed history and focused physical examination: should obtain the following critical information: duration of disease, symptoms (the tetrad of pain, deformity, plaque, and erectile dysfunction), prior treatment and outcome, emotional stress and expectations; (II) physical examination: thorough examination of the genitalia, hands and feet if history suggests. The number, size, consistency, and location of plaques, local tenderness should be documented; (III) assessment: evaluate and document penile deformity and erectile function- by patient’s own erection photos, erection in clinic by manual stimulation, as well as oral or injection of vasoactive agent. A high-resolution penile ultrasound is a valuable tool in identification of septal fibrosis, calcification, and intracavernous fibrosis; (IV) discussion of therapies at first visit: we recommend pentoxifylline for 3 to 6 months in men with the following: recent onset (a few months), calcifications, pain, and tenderness. The goal is to stop progression of deformity and calcification and give the patient some time to understand the more effective but more invasive therapies; (V) discussion of more invasive therapies: pentoxifylline + vacuum device or penile stretching device; collagenase (Xiaflex) injection + modeling, plication surgery, extratunical grafting surgery, tunica-sparing excision of ossified plaque, penile prosthesis. More detailed discussion and clinical examples will be presented at the meeting.

  12. Update on Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Disease Course of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Eric L; Irvine, Alan D; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Friedlander, Sheila F

    2016-06-01

    Studies of the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) have provided insights into associated environmental risk factors, demonstrating the complex interactions between the presence of filaggrin (FLG) gene defects and environment. Among other important findings is that elevated transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in newborns is a strong predictor of AD, regardless of FLG status. Recently recognized predictors of disease course and severity include onset of AD signs and symptoms before 12 months of age and the presence of an FLG mutation and concomitant immunoglobulin E sensitization early in life. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp5):S84-S88. PMID:27525380

  13. Communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations in Spain.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Esparcia, Antonio; López-Villafranca, Paloma

    2016-08-01

    The current study focuses on communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations. The aims of these organizations are: educate and inform the public about rare diseases, raise awareness of the problems related to rare diseases, and achieve social legitimacy in order give visibility to their demands. We analyzed the portrayal of rare disease and patient organizations by Spain's major media organizations in terms of circulation and viewership - the press (El País, El Mundo, La Vanguardia,ABC and El Periódico), radio (CadenaSer, Onda Cero, Cope and RNE), and television (Telecinco, Antena 3, La 1, La Sexta, Cuatro) -between 2012 and 2014.We then carried out a descriptive analysis of communication activities performed via the World Wide Web and social networks by 143 national organizations. Finally, we conducted a telephone questionnaire of a representative sample of 90 organizations in order to explore the association between media presence and funding and public image. The triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed us to meet the study's objectives. Increased visibility of the organizations afforded by an increase in the coverage of the topic by the medialed to an increase in membership - but not in donations - and increased awareness of these diseases. PMID:27557016

  14. Coeliac disease in children - an update for general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Paul, S P; Kirkham, E N; John, R; Staines, K; Basude, D

    2016-05-13

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated systemic disorder caused by ingestion of gluten found in wheat, rye and barley. It affects around 1% of children, but 90% of cases are considered to remain undiagnosed. CD classically presents with gastrointestinal manifestations including diarrhoea, bloating, weight loss and abdominal pain, but extra-intestinal features (including oral and dental manifestations) are increasingly being reported. Dental and oral manifestations such as dental enamel defects, delayed eruption of teeth, recurrent aphthous ulcers are well-recognised manifestations of CD. In patients with yet undiagnosed CD, these can sometimes be the only presenting features. Dentists have regular contact with well children, and therefore the visit to the dentist is an opportunity to suspect CD. When CD is suspected, Dental practitioners can liaise with the general medical practitioner to organise screening for coeliac disease. Positive serology will prompt onward referral to a paediatric gastroenterologist to confirm the diagnosis. The recent European Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) guidelines revised in 2012 have streamlined the diagnostic pathway for faster diagnosis of CD. Management involves strict adherence to a gluten free diet, which should lead to resolution of symptoms, recovery of intestinal mucosa and prevention of long-term complications associated with it. This article aims to describe CD, inform of recent changes to the diagnostic pathway and highlight the dental manifestations of the condition to equip dental practitioners to aid early diagnosis and initiation of treatment for children with CD. PMID:27173708

  15. Update on the Pharmacological Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, Fadi; Gauthier, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder. Worldwide prevalence of the disease is estimated at more than 24 million cases. With aging of populations, this number will likely increase to more than 80 million cases by the year 2040. The annual incidence worldwide is estimated at 4.6 million cases which is the equivalent of one new case every seven seconds! The pathophysiology of AD is complex and largely misunderstood. It is thought to start with the accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) that leads to deposition of insoluble neuritic or senile plaques. Secondary events in this “amyloid cascade” include hyperphosphorylation of the protein tau into neurofibrillary tangles, inflammation, oxidation, and excitotoxicity that eventually cause activation of apoptotis, cell death and neurotransmitter deficits. This review will briefly summarize recent advances in the pathophysiology of AD and focus on the pharmacological treatment of the cognitive and functional symptoms of AD. It will discuss the roles of vascular prevention, cholinesterase inhibitors and an NMDA-antagonist in the management of AD. It will address the issues thought to be related to the lack of persistence or discontinuation of therapy with cholinesterase inhibitors shown in recent studies and some of the solutions proposed. These include setting realistic expectations in light of a neurodegenerative condition and available symptomatic treatments, slowly titrating medications, and using alternate routes of administration. Finally, it will introduce future therapeutic options currently under study. PMID:20808547

  16. Advances in alcoholic liver disease: An update on alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Randy; Liu, Andy; Perumpail, Ryan B; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is a pro-inflammatory chronic liver disease that is associated with high short-term morbidity and mortality (25%-35% in one month) in the setting of chronic alcohol use. Histopathology is notable for micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, hepatocellular necrosis, perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis, and Mallory hyaline bodies found in ballooned hepatocytes. Other findings include the characteristic eosinophilic fibrillar material (Mallory’s hyaline bodies) found in ballooned hepatocytes. The presence of focal intense lobular infiltration of neutrophils is what typically distinguishes alcoholic hepatitis from other forms of hepatitis, in which the inflammatory infiltrate is primarily composed of mononuclear cells. Management consists of a multidisciplinary approach including alcohol cessation, fluid and electrolyte correction, treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and pharmacological therapy based on the severity of the disease. Pharmacological treatment for severe alcoholic hepatitis, as defined by Maddrey’s discriminant factor ≥ 32, consists of either prednisolone or pentoxifylline for a period of four weeks. The body of evidence for corticosteroids has been greater than pentoxifylline, although there are higher risks of complications. Recently head-to-head trials between corticosteroids and pentoxifylline have been performed, which again suggests that corticosteroids should strongly be considered over pentoxifylline. PMID:26576078

  17. Mucin function in inflammatory bowel disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Boltin, Doron; Perets, Tsachi T; Vilkin, Alex; Niv, Yaron

    2013-02-01

    MUC2 is the primary component of the mucin barrier that separates the intestinal microbiota and the intestinal epithelium. This mucous barrier is affected by both luminal/microbial factors and host/immune factors, both of which have genetic and environmental determinants. The complex interactions between these players in health and disease states are not fully understood. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has both genetic and environmental etiologies that lead to the breakdown of the epithelial barrier. In this review, we explore the up-to-date evidence that implicates mucin in the pathogenesis of IBD. In IBD, quantitative changes in mucin secretion occur, as well as structural changes in mucin's glycoprotein core and the sulfation and sialylation of mucin's oligosaccharide residues. These changes are associated with a diminished functionality of the mucous barrier. We identify the various genetic mutations associated with these changes and outline the animal models that have enhanced the current understanding of the genetic basis for IBD. Further study is needed to better characterize the immune and genetic influences on mucin expression and secretion and role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and a defective unfolded protein response in mediating these changes. PMID:23164684

  18. Solar disinfection of water reduces diarrhoeal disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Conroy, R M; Meegan, M E; Joyce, T; McGuigan, K; Barnes, J

    1999-10-01

    349 Maasai children younger than 6 years old were randomised by alternate household to drink water either left in plastic bottles exposed to sunlight on the roof of the house or kept indoors (control). The trial was run in Maasai by Maasai community elders. Children drinking solar disinfected water had a significantly lower risk of severe diarrhoeal disease over 8705 two weekly follow up visits; two week period prevalence was 48.8% compared with 58.1% in controls, corresponding to an attributable fraction of 16.0%. While this reduction is modest, it was sustained over a year in free living children. It confirms solar disinfection as effective in vivo as a free, low technology, point of consumption method of improving water quality. The continuing use of solar disinfection by the community underlines the value of community participation in research. PMID:10490440

  19. Alzheimer's Disease Clinical and Research Update for Health Care Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    DeFina, Philip A.; Lichtenstein, Jonathan D.; Fellus, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 6.8 million Americans who have been diagnosed with dementia, over 5 million have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Due to the rise in the aging population, these figures are expected to double by 2050. The following paper provides an up-to-date review of clinical issues and relevant research. Research related to the methods of the earliest possible detection of AD is ongoing. Health care professionals should play a critical role in differentially diagnosing AD patients, as well as supporting their families. Novel interventions, including medications, natural supplements, and behavioral techniques, are constantly appearing in the literature. It is necessary for the health practitioner to remain current, regarding AD, as such information will facilitate better care for patients and their families. PMID:24083026

  20. Parkinson's disease. Update in diagnosis and symptom management.

    PubMed

    Marjama-Lyons, J M; Koller, W C

    2001-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a high burden of morbidity. Because no diagnostic test exists for PD, clinical knowledge and skill are key to making an early, accurate diagnosis. Diagnostic criteria for PD require at least two of three motor signs: tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesia. Levodopa and the dopamine agonists are considered first-line drug therapy. Recent studies have shown a lower incidence of dyskinesia in patients who began therapy with a dopamine agonist, although levodopa may be better tolerated by patients age 70 or older. Combinations of medications and rehabilitative, alternative, and surgical therapies can often help patients achieve adequate control of PD motor symptoms and maintain a high quality of independent living. PMID:11505857

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease surveillance in Australia: update to December 2014.

    PubMed

    Klug, Genevieve M; Boyd, Alison; Sarros, Shannon; Stehmann, Christiane; Simpson, Marion; McLean, Catriona; Masters, Colin L; Collins, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Nation-wide surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (also known as prion diseases), the most common being Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is performed by the Australian National Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Registry, based at the University of Melbourne. Prospective surveillance has been undertaken since 1993 and over this dynamic period in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy research and understanding, the unit has evolved and adapted to changes in surveillance practices and requirements concomitant with the emergence of new disease subtypes, improvements in diagnostic capabilities and the overall heightened awareness of prion diseases in the health care setting. In 2014, routine national surveillance continued and this brief report provides an update of the cumulative surveillance data collected by the Australian National Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Registry prospectively from 1993 to December 2014, and retrospectively to 1970. PMID:27522131

  2. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions in liver disease: An update

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Pietro; De Martin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition and induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes are the most frequent and dangerous drug-drug interactions. They are an important cause of serious adverse events that have often resulted in early termination of drug development or withdrawal of drugs from the market. Management of such interactions by dose adjustment in clinical practice is extremely difficult because of the wide interindividual variability in their magnitude. This review examines the genetic, physiological, and environmental factors responsible for this variability, focusing on an important but so far neglected cause of variability, liver functional status. Clinical studies have shown that liver disease causes a reduction in the magnitude of interactions due to enzyme inhibition, which is proportional to the degree of liver function impairment. The effect of liver dysfunction varies quantitatively according to the nature, reversible or irreversible, of the inhibitory interaction. The magnitude of reversible inhibition is more drastically reduced and virtually vanishes in patients with advanced hepatocellular insufficiency. Two mechanisms, in order of importance, are responsible for this reduction: decreased hepatic uptake of the inhibitory drug and reduced enzyme expression. The extent of irreversible inhibitory interactions is only partially reduced, as it is only influenced by the decreased expression of the inhibited enzyme. Thus, for appropriate clinical management of inhibitory drug interactions, both the liver functional status and the mechanism of inhibition must be taken into consideration. Although the inducibility of drug-metabolizing enzymes in liver disease has long been studied, very conflicting results have been obtained, mainly because of methodological differences. Taken together, the results of early animal and human studies indicated that enzyme induction is substantially preserved in compensated liver cirrhosis, whereas no definitive conclusion as to whether it is

  3. Dengue disease surveillance: an updated systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Runge-Ranzinger, S; McCall, P J; Kroeger, A; Horstick, O

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review the evidence for the application of tools for dengue outbreak prediction/detection and trend monitoring in passive and active disease surveillance systems in order to develop recommendations for endemic countries and identify important research needs. Methods This systematic literature review followed the protocol of a review from 2008, extending the systematic search from January 2007 to February 2013 on PubMed, EMBASE, CDSR, WHOLIS and Lilacs. Data reporting followed the PRISMA statement. The eligibility criteria comprised (i) population at risk of dengue, (ii) dengue disease surveillance, (iii) outcome of surveillance described and (iv) empirical data evaluated. The analysis classified studies based on the purpose of the surveillance programme. The main limitation of the review was expected publication bias. Results A total of 1116 papers were identified of which 36 articles were included in the review. Four cohort-based prospective studies calculated expansion factors demonstrating remarkable levels of underreporting in the surveillance systems. Several studies demonstrated that enhancement methods such as laboratory support, sentinel-based reporting and staff motivation contributed to improvements in dengue reporting. Additional improvements for passive surveillance systems are possible by incorporating simple data forms/entry/electronic-based reporting; defining clear system objectives; performing data analysis at the lowest possible level (e.g. district); seeking regular data feedback. Six studies showed that serotype changes were positively correlated with the number of reported cases or with dengue incidence, with lag times of up to 6 months. Three studies found that data on internet searches and event-based surveillance correlated well with the epidemic curve derived from surveillance data. Conclusions Passive surveillance providing the baseline for outbreak alert should be strengthened and appropriate threshold levels for outbreak

  4. Macular diseases: update on diagnostic and therapeutic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, P.; De Libero, C.; Donati, C.; La Torre, A.

    2004-09-01

    Purpose of this course is to review the principles that guide the diagnosis and the classification of macular diseases, and the new options available for this purpose. Among new treatments modalities, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been recently introduced in the clinical practice for treating subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV). In age-related macular degeneration (AMD), eyes in which the classic CNV components covers at least 50% of the entire lesion, called predominantly classic lesions, benefit from a substantial reduction of the rate of moderate visual loss during the first year. Preliminary results in other types of CNV also indicate a possible efficacy. We will present the theoretical basis and mechanisms of action of PDT and then comment on the main results of the TAP study; the preliminary results available from the VIP will also be displayed. Numerous cases treated with PDT, one year after its introduction in the clinical practice, will be shown and discussed. The introduction of PDT has probably reduced the applicability of surgical techniques for treating CNV. Yet, surgeons are developing less invasive techniques to minimize the complications associated with membrane removal and the various types of translocation. This innovation will be illustrated, as well as the criteria for patients selection in the era of PDT.

  5. Cat-scratch disease in Crete: an update

    PubMed Central

    Minadakis, Georgios; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2011-01-01

    There are few epidemiological and clinical studies about the presence of cat scratch disease (CSD) on the island of Crete. The objective of this study was to analyze a large number of patients with suspected CSD to define the frequency of Bartonella infections in Crete. From January 2005 to October 2008, we studied patients with suspected CSD from hospitals in Crete. Sera of the referred patients were tested by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). For some patients, we also received lymph nodes and blood samples that we tested for the presence of Bartonella henselae by molecular assays. Overall, we tested 507 serum samples and we found 56 (11%) cases of CSD. PCR assay was positive for 2 patients; one had a B. henselae positive lymph node and the other a positive whole blood sample. Significantly more CSD cases (62.5%, 35 of 56) were reported in children than in infants and adults (P<0.05). Moreover, we identified that most cases of CSD occurred between May and September (P=0.002) and December and January. CSD is prevalent in Crete and is mostly associated with an increase in outdoor activity. PMID:24470912

  6. Update on pulmonary hypertension complicating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Jyothula, Soma; Safdar, Zeenat

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is the hemodynamic manifestation of various pathological processes that result in elevated pulmonary artery pressures (PAP). The National Institutes of Health Registry defined pulmonary arterial hypertension as the mean PAP of more than 25 mm Hg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure or left atrial pressure equal to or less than 15 mm Hg. This definition remains the currently accepted definition of PH that is used to define PH related to multiple clinical conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The estimated US prevalence of COPD by the National Health Survey in 2002 in people aged >25 was 12.1 million. There is a lack of large population-based studies in COPD to document the correct prevalence of PH and outcome. The major cause of PH in COPD is hypoxemia leading to vascular remodeling. Echocardiogram is the initial screening tool of choice for PH. This simple noninvasive test can provide an estimate of right ventricular systolic and right atrial pressures. Right heart catheterization remains the gold standard to diagnose PH. It provides accurate measurement of mean PAP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Oxygen therapy remains the cornerstone therapeutic for hypoxemia in COPD patients. Anecdotal reports suggest utility of PDE5-inhibitors and prostacyclin to treat COPD-related PH. Large randomized clinical trials are needed before the use of these drugs can be recommended. PMID:19802350

  7. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Update on the Role of Dietary Fat

    PubMed Central

    Kirpich, Irina A.; Miller, Matthew E.; Cave, Matthew C.; Joshi-Barve, Swati; McClain, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) spans a spectrum of liver pathology, including fatty liver, alcoholic steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that dietary factors, including dietary fat, as well as alcohol, play critical roles in the pathogenesis of ALD. The protective effects of dietary saturated fat (SF) and deleterious effects of dietary unsaturated fat (USF) on alcohol-induced liver pathology are well recognized and documented in experimental animal models of ALD. Moreover, it has been demonstrated in an epidemiological study of alcoholic cirrhosis that dietary intake of SF was associated with a lower mortality rates, whereas dietary intake of USF was associated with a higher mortality. In addition, oxidized lipids (dietary and in vivo generated) may play a role in liver pathology. The understanding of how dietary fat contributes to the ALD pathogenesis will enhance our knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms of ALD development and progression, and may result in the development of novel diet-based therapeutic strategies for ALD management. This review explores the relevant scientific literature and provides a current understanding of recent advances regarding the role of dietary lipids in ALD pathogenesis. PMID:26751488

  8. Effect of the vegetarian diet on non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo

    2014-01-30

    A vegetarian diet generally includes plenty of vegetables and fruits, which are rich in phytochemicals, antioxidants, fiber, magnesium, vitamins C and E, Fe³⁺, folic acid and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and is low in cholesterol, total fat and saturated fatty acid, sodium, Fe²⁺, zinc, vitamin A, B₁₂ and D, and especially n-3 PUFA. Mortality from all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and circulatory and cerebrovascular diseases was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivorous populations. Compared with omnivores, the incidence of cancer and type 2 diabetes was also significantly lower in vegetarians. However, vegetarians have a number of increased risk factors for non-communicable diseases such as increased plasma homocysteine, mean platelet volume and platelet aggregability compared with omnivores, which are associated with low intake of vitamin B₁₂ and n-3 PUFA. Based on the present data, it would seem appropriate for vegetarians to carefully design their diet, specifically focusing on increasing their intake of vitamin B₁₂ and n-3 PUFA to further reduce already low mortality and morbidity from non-communicable diseases. PMID:23965907

  9. Hormone therapy in menopause: An update on cardiovascular disease considerations.

    PubMed

    Hale, Georgina E; Shufelt, Chrisandra L

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the number one cause of death and morbidity worldwide, and while overall CVD incidence rates declined in both genders between 1999 and 2007, age-specific data suggest that coronary risk factors in women are on the rise. While early observational data favored menopausal hormone therapy's (MHT's) role in primary CVD prevention, the initial interventional study data from the WHI did not. Further detailed analyses of both observational and interventional data have pointed to the possibility that MHT may play a role in primary CVD prevention if initiated within 10 years of menopause and less than 60 years of age (the timing hypothesis). Unanswered questions remain regarding the optimal route and dosage of estrogen in MHT. Data so far, favor transdermal estradiol over conventional-dose CEE with respect to CVD risk and oral estradiol over conventional-dose CEE with respect to stroke risk. Low-dose oral CEE may similarly have benefit over conventional-dose oral CEE for some CVD events. In addition, the transdermal route of delivery may avoid the excess risk of certain CVD events associated with MHT and lower doses of estrogen may have fewer adverse effects than the doses previously tested in WHI. Because questions regarding benefits versus risks remain, MHT is yet to be recommended for CVD prevention. However, it is indicated for menopausal symptom management in women within 10 years of menopause and under the age of 60 years, in whom it does not appear to carry increased cardiovascular risk. Additional research is ongoing and needed to confirm or refute the comparative safety of the various MHT options. PMID:26270318

  10. When are high-tech communicators effective in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Ferriero, Giorgio; Caligari, Marco; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Franchignoni, Franco

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a 63-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease showing loss of intelligibility of speech and severely impaired handwriting, despite undergoing physical and speech therapies. As the patient had sufficient residual motor abilities and adequate cognitive function and motivation, a computer-based communication aid with a software program for word prediction and voice output was tested, and was prescribed after a training period. One year later, the patient was still using the customized device to communicate and for leisure time, showing a high degree of satisfaction with the aid (assessed by QUEST 2.0), which had a positive impact on her well-being and quality of life (assessed by Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scales). In conclusion, in selected patients with Parkinson's disease, high-tech augmentative and alternative communication devices may be considered, tested, and prescribed after a positive training period. Follow-ups are necessary to monitor the effectiveness of the assistive device and respond to specific patient needs that may arise with using the device. PMID:22186614

  11. [Update assessment of mental health diseases for sick pay--experience of the AWMF guideline].

    PubMed

    Dörmann, M

    2016-03-01

    In August 2012, we reported (VersMed 1/2014, S. 9) the results for the first 12 months following implementation of AWMF guideline 051-029 in the medical assessment of mental health diseases with a view to sick pay and supplementary disability insurance (BU). Today we provide an update of the experience gained in the last three years. We are glad to report that the results have remained stable. PMID:27111955

  12. Role of the kidney in the fetal programming of adult cardiovascular disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reetu R; Denton, Kate M

    2015-04-01

    It is well established that an adverse in utero environment can impinge upon fetal development and place the offspring on a track leading to future cardiovascular disease. Significantly, this may occur in the absence of any outward manifestations at birth. In this brief review, we focus on potential renal mechanisms that lead to adaptations in glomerular and tubular function that initiate hypertension of developmental origin and examine potential therapeutic interventions. This report updates recent data in this field. PMID:25588322

  13. International Dermatology Outcome Measures Initiative as Applied to Psoriatic Disease Outcomes: An Update.

    PubMed

    Merola, Joseph F; Armstrong, April W; Saraiya, Ami; Latella, John; Garg, Amit; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2016-05-01

    Previous publications have described the International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) group, comprising patients, physicians, health economists, participating pharmaceutical industry partners, payers, and regulatory agencies. The goal of IDEOM is to create patient-centered, validated measures of dermatologic disease progression and treatment efficacy for use in both clinical trials and clinical practice. We provide an update of IDEOM activities as of our 2015 IDEOM meeting in Washington, DC, USA. PMID:27134269

  14. Inspiratory muscle training in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an update of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Geddes, E Lynne; O'Brien, Kelly; Reid, W Darlene; Brooks, Dina; Crowe, Jean

    2008-12-01

    The purpose was to update an original systematic review to determine the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, exercise capacity, dyspnea and quality of life for adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The original MEDLINE and CINAHL search to August 2003 was updated to January 2007 and EMBASE was searched from inception to January 2007. Randomized controlled trials, published in English, with adults with stable COPD, comparing IMT to sham IMT or no intervention, low versus high intensity IMT, and different modes of IMT were included. Nineteen of 274 articles in the original search met the inclusion criteria. The updated search revealed 17 additional articles; 6 met the inclusion criteria, all of which compared targeted, threshold or normocapneic hyperventilation IMT to sham IMT. An update of the sub-group analysis comparing IMT versus sham IMT was performed with 10 studies from original review and 6 from the update. Sixteen meta-analyses are reported. Results demonstrated significant improvements in inspiratory muscle strength (PI(max), PI(max) % predicted, peak inspiratory flow rate), inspiratory muscle endurance (RMET, inspiratory threshold loading, MVV), exercise capacity (Ve(max), Borg Score for Respiratory Effort, 6MWT), Transitional Dyspnea Index (focal score, functional impairment, magnitude of task, magnitude of effort), and the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (quality of life). Results suggest that targeted, threshold or normocapneic hyperventilation IMT significantly increases inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, improves outcomes of exercise capacity and one measure of quality of life, and decreases dyspnea for adults with stable COPD. PMID:18708282

  15. Prevention of cancer and non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Geoffrey; Gupta, Prakash; Gomes, Fabio; Kerner, Jon; Parra, William; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Kim, Jeongseon; Moore, Malcolm; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for approximately 7.6 million deaths (13% of all deaths) in 2008. Cancer mortality is projected to increase to 11 million deaths in 2030, with the majority occurring in regions of the world with the least capacity to respond. However, cancer is not only a personal, societal and economic burden but also a potential societal opportunity in the context of functional life - the years gained through effective prevention and treatment, and strategies to enhance survivorship. The United Nations General Assembly Special Session in 2011 has served to focus attention on key aspects of cancer prevention and control. Firstly, cancer is largely preventable, by feasible means. Secondly, cancer is one of a number of chronic, non- communicable diseases that share common risk factors whose prevention and control would benefit a majority of the world's population. Thirdly, a proportion of cancers can be attributed to infectious, communicable causal factors (e.g., HPV, HBV, H.pylori, parasites, flukes) and that strategies to control the burden of infectious diseases have relevance to the control of cancer. Fourthly, that the natural history of non-communicable diseases, including cancer, from primary prevention through diagnosis, treatment and care, is underwritten by the impact of social, economic and environmental determinants of health (e.g., poverty, illiteracy, gender inequality, social isolation, stigma, socio-economic status). Session 1 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on the social, economic and environmental, as well as biological and behavioural, modifiers of the risk of cancer through one plenary presentation and four interactive workshop discussions. The workshop sessions concerned 1) the Global Adult Tobacco Survey and social determinants of tobacco use in high burden low- and middle-income countries; 2) the role of diet, including alcohol, and physical activity in modifying the

  16. Communicable Disease Case Entry Using PDAs and Public Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lober, WB; Bliss, D; Dockrey, MR; Davidson, AJ; Karras, BT

    2003-01-01

    Concerns about detecting and responding to attacks with biowarfare agents have resulted in the development of deployable case reporting systems, e.g. RSVP1. We implement a proof of concept web-based information system to be used securely from personal digital assistants over public wireless networks, by public health field workers for routine and emergent case reporting. The system collects data for a local health jurisdiction, provides content- and event-based notification, and forwards case reports to the Colorado State communicable disease reporting system (CEDRS). We believe this demonstrates a useful integration of portable and web-based technologies with public health practice. PMID:14728422

  17. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions. PMID:24842077

  18. Update on host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Hector, Andreas; Frey, Nina; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections are hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. In the era of long-term inhaled antibiotics and increasing CF patient survival, new "emerging" pathogens are detected in CF airways, yet their pathophysiological disease relevance remains largely controversial and incompletely defined. As a response to chronic microbial triggers, innate immune cells, particularly neutrophils, are continuously recruited into CF airways where they combat pathogens but also cause tissue injury through release of oxidants and proteases. The coordinated interplay between host immune cell activation and pathogens is essential for the outcome of CF lung disease. Here, we provide a concise overview and update on host-pathogen interactions in CF lung disease. PMID:26905568

  19. 21 CFR 1271.145 - Prevention of the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... spread of communicable diseases. 1271.145 Section 1271.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... diseases. You must recover, process, store, label, package, and distribute HCT/Ps, and screen and test cell... diseases....

  20. 21 CFR 1271.145 - Prevention of the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... spread of communicable diseases. 1271.145 Section 1271.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... diseases. You must recover, process, store, label, package, and distribute HCT/Ps, and screen and test cell... diseases....

  1. 21 CFR 1271.145 - Prevention of the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... spread of communicable diseases. 1271.145 Section 1271.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... diseases. You must recover, process, store, label, package, and distribute HCT/Ps, and screen and test cell... diseases....

  2. 21 CFR 1271.145 - Prevention of the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... spread of communicable diseases. 1271.145 Section 1271.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... diseases. You must recover, process, store, label, package, and distribute HCT/Ps, and screen and test cell... diseases....

  3. Updates to the zoonotic niche map of Ebola virus disease in Africa.

    PubMed

    Pigott, David M; Millear, Anoushka I; Earl, Lucas; Morozoff, Chloe; Han, Barbara A; Shearer, Freya M; Weiss, Daniel J; Brady, Oliver J; Kraemer, Moritz Ug; Moyes, Catherine L; Bhatt, Samir; Gething, Peter W; Golding, Nick; Hay, Simon I

    2016-01-01

    As the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa is now contained, attention is turning from control to future outbreak prediction and prevention. Building on a previously published zoonotic niche map (Pigott et al., 2014), this study incorporates new human and animal occurrence data and expands upon the way in which potential bat EVD reservoir species are incorporated. This update demonstrates the potential for incorporating and updating data used to generate the predicted suitability map. A new data portal for sharing such maps is discussed. This output represents the most up-to-date estimate of the extent of EVD zoonotic risk in Africa. These maps can assist in strengthening surveillance and response capacity to contain viral haemorrhagic fevers. PMID:27414263

  4. Updates to the zoonotic niche map of Ebola virus disease in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, David M; Millear, Anoushka I; Earl, Lucas; Morozoff, Chloe; Han, Barbara A; Shearer, Freya M; Weiss, Daniel J; Brady, Oliver J; Kraemer, Moritz UG; Moyes, Catherine L; Bhatt, Samir; Gething, Peter W; Golding, Nick; Hay, Simon I

    2016-01-01

    As the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa is now contained, attention is turning from control to future outbreak prediction and prevention. Building on a previously published zoonotic niche map (Pigott et al., 2014), this study incorporates new human and animal occurrence data and expands upon the way in which potential bat EVD reservoir species are incorporated. This update demonstrates the potential for incorporating and updating data used to generate the predicted suitability map. A new data portal for sharing such maps is discussed. This output represents the most up-to-date estimate of the extent of EVD zoonotic risk in Africa. These maps can assist in strengthening surveillance and response capacity to contain viral haemorrhagic fevers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16412.001 PMID:27414263

  5. Using Talking Mats to Support Communication in Persons with Huntington's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferm, Ulrika; Sahlin, Anna; Sundin, Linda; Hartelius, Lena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many individuals with Huntington's disease experience reduced functioning in cognition, language and communication. Talking Mats is a visually based low technological augmentative communication framework that supports communication in people with different cognitive and communicative disabilities. Aims: To evaluate Talking Mats as a…

  6. [Economic crisis and communicable diseases. SESPAS report 2014].

    PubMed

    Llácer, Alicia; Fernández-Cuenca, Rafael; Martínez-Navarro, Ferrán

    2014-06-01

    Past economic crises have increased the impact of communicable diseases especially on groups particularly vulnerable to the social and health consequences of the recession. However, it has been shown that the impact of these crises largely depends on the response of governments and the inhabitants of affected countries. We describe the consequences of the current crisis in the causal chain of infectious disease, including the response of the health system, and explore whether there is evidence of its impact in Spain. It is assumed that the possible effect of the crisis on living and working conditions is due to individual and social debt coupled with high unemployment as defining features of the crisis. We highlight the potential negative consequences of healthcare cuts on vulnerable populations, which have been partly excluded with the recent reform of health coverage. We compare mortality and morbidity data between two periods: before and after 2008, integrating, where possible, observed trends and institutional reports. Overall, no effect on infectious disease has been detected so far, although some signs of worsening, which could be compatible with the effects of the crisis, have been observed and need to be monitored and confirmed. We review the limitations of data sources that may not be sufficiently sensitive or up-to-date to detect changes that may require a latency period to become manifest. Instead of cutting resources, surveillance of these diseases should be improved, and an equitable social health response, which targets the population most affected by the crisis, should be guaranteed. PMID:24863999

  7. Presymptomatic risk assessment for chronic non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Padhukasahasram, Badri; Halperin, Eran; Wessel, Jennifer; Thomas, Daryl J; Silver, Elana; Trumbower, Heather; Cargill, Michele; Stephan, Dietrich A

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of common chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs) far overshadows the prevalence of both monogenic and infectious diseases combined. All CNCDs, also called complex genetic diseases, have a heritable genetic component that can be used for pre-symptomatic risk assessment. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that tag risk haplotypes across the genome currently account for a non-trivial portion of the germ-line genetic risk and we will likely continue to identify the remaining missing heritability in the form of rare variants, copy number variants and epigenetic modifications. Here, we describe a novel measure for calculating the lifetime risk of a disease, called the genetic composite index (GCI), and demonstrate its predictive value as a clinical classifier. The GCI only considers summary statistics of the effects of genetic variation and hence does not require the results of large-scale studies simultaneously assessing multiple risk factors. Combining GCI scores with environmental risk information provides an additional tool for clinical decision-making. The GCI can be populated with heritable risk information of any type, and thus represents a framework for CNCD pre-symptomatic risk assessment that can be populated as additional risk information is identified through next-generation technologies. PMID:21217814

  8. Visual Communication en Masse: An Update on the Purdue University Virtual Visit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohler, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses issues related to delivering spatially oriented data to the general public, since communication through computer graphics should be accessible to the masses as well as to specialists. The second half of the paper describes the Purdue University Virtual Visit, a resource being used for visualization and communication at Purdue University…

  9. An update of neurological manifestations of vasculitides and connective tissue diseases: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bougea, Anastasia; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Spandideas, Nikolaos; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos; Kararizou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitides comprise a heterogeneous group of autoimmune disorders, occurring as primary or secondary to a broad variety of systemic infectious, malignant or connective tissue diseases. The latter occur more often but their pathogenic mechanisms have not been fully established. Frequent and varied central and peripheral nervous system complications occur in vasculitides and connective tissue diseases. In many cases, the neurological disorders have an atypical clinical course or even an early onset, and the healthcare professionals should be aware of them. The purpose of this brief review was to give an update of the main neurological disorders of common vasculitis and connective tissue diseases, aiming at accurate diagnosis and management, with an emphasis on pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:26313435

  10. Frameworks for risk communication and disease management: the case of Lyme disease and countryside users

    PubMed Central

    Quine, Christopher P.; Barnett, Julie; Dobson, Andrew D. M.; Marcu, Afrodita; Marzano, Mariella; Moseley, Darren; O'Brien, Liz; Randolph, Sarah E.; Taylor, Jennifer L.; Uzzell, David

    2011-01-01

    Management of zoonotic disease is necessary if countryside users are to gain benefit rather than suffer harm from their activities, and to avoid disproportionate reaction to novel threats. We introduce a conceptual framework based on the pressure–state–response model with five broad responses to disease incidence. Influencing public behaviour is one response and requires risk communication based on an integration of knowledge about the disease with an understanding of how publics respond to precautionary advice. A second framework emphasizes how risk communication involves more than information provision and should address dimensions including points-of-intervention over time, place and audience. The frameworks are developed by reference to tick-borne Lyme borreliosis (also known as Lyme disease), for which informed precautionary behaviour is particularly relevant. Interventions to influence behaviour can be directed by knowledge of spatial and temporal variation of tick abundance, what constitutes risky behaviour, how people respond to information of varying content, and an understanding of the social practices related to countryside use. The frameworks clarify the response options and help identify who is responsible for risk communication. These aspects are not consistently understood, and may result in an underestimation of the role of land-based organizations in facilitating appropriate precautionary behaviour. PMID:21624921

  11. Preventing & Managing Communicable Diseases. Training Guides for the Head Start Learning Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman (James) Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    This training guide is intended to improve the skills of Head Start staff and families in dealing with communicable diseases. The guide addresses attitudes toward communicable diseases, how to reduce the spread of disease, and how to recognize and manage illnesses more effectively. The guide consists of six working sections. The first three are…

  12. Communicable disease control: a 'Global Public Good' perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard; Woodward, David; Acharya, Arnab; Beaglehole, Robert; Drager, Nick

    2004-09-01

    Despite the increasing 'globalization' of health, the responsibility for it remains primarily national, generating a potential mismatch between global health problems and current institutions and mechanisms to deal with them. The 'Global Public Good' (GPG) concept has been suggested as a framework to address this mismatch in different areas of public policy. This paper considers the application of the GPG concept as an organizing principle for communicable disease control (CDC), considering in particular its potential to improve the health and welfare of the developing world. The paper concludes that there are significant limitations to the GPG concept's effectiveness as an organizing principle for global health priorities, with respect to CDC. More specifically, there are few areas of CDC which qualify as GPG, and even among those that can be considered GPGs, it is not necessarily appropriate to provide everything which can be considered a GPG. It is therefore suggested that it may be more useful to focus instead on the failure of 'collective action', where the GPG concept may then: (1) provide a rationale to raise funds additional to aid from developed countries' domestic budgets; (2) promote investment by developed countries in the health systems of developing countries; (3) promote strategic partnerships between developed and developing countries to tackle major global communicable diseases; and (4) guide the political process of establishing, and mechanisms for providing and financing, global CDC programmes with GPG characteristics, and GPGs which have benefits for CDC. In short, the GPG concept is not without limitations and weaknesses as an organizing principle, but does provide, at least in some areas, guidance in improving collective action at the international level for the improvement of global CDC. PMID:15310662

  13. Communication and Huntington's Disease: Qualitative Interviews and Focus Groups with Persons with Huntington's Disease, Family Members, and Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartelius, Lena; Jonsson, Maria; Rickeberg, Anneli; Laakso, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Background: As an effect of the cognitive, emotional and motor symptoms associated with Huntington's disease, communicative interaction is often dramatically changed. No study has previously included the subjective reports on this subject from individuals with Huntington's disease. Aims: To explore the qualitative aspects of how communication is…

  14. Communicable disease control in China: From Mao to now.

    PubMed

    Hipgrave, David

    2011-12-01

    China's progress on communicable disease control (CDC) in the 30 years after establishment of the People's Republic in 1949 is widely regarded as remarkable. Life expectancy soared by around 30 years, infant mortality plummeted and smallpox, sexually transmitted diseases and many other infections were either eliminated or decreased massively in incidence, largely as a result of CDC. By the mid-1970s, China was already undergoing the epidemiologic transition, years ahead of other nations of similar economic status. These early successes can be attributed to population mobilization, mass campaigns and a focus on sanitation, hygiene, clean water and clean delivery, and occurred despite political instability and slow economic progress. The 10-year Cultural Revolution from 1966 brought many hardships, but also clinical care and continuing public health programs to the masses through community-funded medical schemes and the establishment of community-based health workers. These people-focused approaches broke down with China's market reforms from 1980. Village doctors turned to private practice as community funding ceased, and the attention paid to rural public health declined. CDC relied on vertical programs, some of them successful (such as elimination of lymphatic filariasis and child immunisation), but others (such as control of schistosomiasis and tuberculosis) demonstrating only intermittent progress due to failed strategies or reliance on support by the poorest governments and health workers, who could not or would not collaborate. In addition, China's laissez-faire approach to public health placed it at great risk, as evidenced by the outbreak in 2003 of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Since then, major changes to disease reporting, the priority given to CDC including through major new domestic resources and reform of China's health system offer encouragement for CDC. While decentralized funding and varying quality diagnosis, reporting and treatment of

  15. Communicable disease control in China: From Mao to now

    PubMed Central

    Hipgrave, David

    2011-01-01

    China’s progress on communicable disease control (CDC) in the 30 years after establishment of the People’s Republic in 1949 is widely regarded as remarkable. Life expectancy soared by around 30 years, infant mortality plummeted and smallpox, sexually transmitted diseases and many other infections were either eliminated or decreased massively in incidence, largely as a result of CDC. By the mid-1970s, China was already undergoing the epidemiologic transition, years ahead of other nations of similar economic status. These early successes can be attributed to population mobilization, mass campaigns and a focus on sanitation, hygiene, clean water and clean delivery, and occurred despite political instability and slow economic progress. The 10-year Cultural Revolution from 1966 brought many hardships, but also clinical care and continuing public health programs to the masses through community-funded medical schemes and the establishment of community-based health workers. These people-focused approaches broke down with China’s market reforms from 1980. Village doctors turned to private practice as community funding ceased, and the attention paid to rural public health declined. CDC relied on vertical programs, some of them successful (such as elimination of lymphatic filariasis and child immunisation), but others (such as control of schistosomiasis and tuberculosis) demonstrating only intermittent progress due to failed strategies or reliance on support by the poorest governments and health workers, who could not or would not collaborate. In addition, China’s laissez-faire approach to public health placed it at great risk, as evidenced by the outbreak in 2003 of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Since then, major changes to disease reporting, the priority given to CDC including through major new domestic resources and reform of China’s health system offer encouragement for CDC. While decentralized funding and varying quality diagnosis, reporting and

  16. Disease, communication, and the ethics of (in) visibility.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak-Franger, Monika Monika; Holmes, Martha Stoddard

    2014-12-01

    As the recent Ebola outbreak demonstrates, visibility is central to the shaping of political, medical, and socioeconomic decisions. The symposium in this issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry explores the uneasy relationship between the necessity of making diseases visible, the mechanisms of legal and visual censorship, and the overall ethics of viewing and spectatorship, including the effects of media visibility on the perception of particular "marked" bodies. Scholarship across the disciplines of communication, anthropology, gender studies, and visual studies, as well as a photographer's visual essay and memorial reflection, throw light on various strategies of visualization and (de)legitimation and link these to broader socioeconomic concerns. Questions of the ethics of spectatorship, such as how to evoke empathy in the representation of individuals' suffering without perpetuating social and economic inequalities, are explored in individual, (trans-)national, and global contexts, demonstrating how disease (in)visibility intersects with a complex nexus of health, sexuality, and global/national politics. A sensible management of visibility--an "ecology of the visible"--can be productive of more viable ways of individual and collective engagement with those who suffer. PMID:25391918

  17. Communicative competence in Alzheimer's disease: metaphor and sarcasm comprehension.

    PubMed

    Maki, Yohko; Yamaguchi, Tomoharu; Koeda, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deficits of metaphor and sarcasm comprehension in Alzheimer's disease (AD), as pragmatic interpretation such as metaphor and sarcasm comprehension is required in social communication. A total of 31 young normal controls, 104 aged normal controls (ANC), 42 patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and 30 patients with mild AD were evaluated by Metaphoric and Sarcastic Scenario Test, which consists of 5 metaphoric and 5 sarcastic questions with 5 answer choices. Scores were analyzed using the repeated measures analysis of variance (metaphor/sarcasm vs 4 participant groups). Sarcasm comprehension, which requires second-order Theory of Mind (ToM), started to deteriorate in ANC, and metaphor comprehension, which requires first-order ToM, started to deteriorate in aMCI, and both deteriorated as disease progressed. Literal interpretation of pragmatic language is characteristic in patients with mild AD. Such misinterpretation would result in social miscommunication, even if they still retained semantic-lexical competence. PMID:23221027

  18. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's disease): An updated review of ocular disease manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kubaisi, Buraa; Abu Samra, Khawla; Foster, C. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a potentially lethal systemic disorder that is characterized by necrotizing vasculitis of small arteries and veins. The respiratory system is most commonly affected in limited forms of the disease, however upper and lower respiratory system, systemic vasculitis, and necrotizing glomerulonephritis are the characteristic components of the disease triad. The peak incidence is observed at 64–75 years of age, with a prevalence of 8–10 per million depending on geographic location. In this review we focus on the ocular manifestations of the disease which occur in nearly in one third of the patients. In addition we describe the neuro-ophthalmic complications which occur in up to half of cases. We also discuss the current systemic treatment options including corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and the available biologic response modifiers including rituximab. The disease remains difficult to diagnose due to the generalized symptomatic presentation of patients with GPA. As a result, several sets of diagnostic criteria have been developed which include clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to varying extents. Early diagnosis and multi-specialty collaboration among physicians is necessary to adequately manage the disease and the potential complications that may result from drugs used in the treatment of the disease. Despite recent advances, more research is necessary to prevent the high rates of mortality from the disease itself and from therapeutic side effects. PMID:27195187

  19. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging. PMID:26315381

  20. Mycoplasmosis and upper respiratory tract disease of tortoises: a review and update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Elliott R.; Brown, Mary B.; Wendland, Lori; Brown, Daniel R.; Klein, Paul A.; Christopher, Mary M.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2014-01-01

    Tortoise mycoplasmosis is one of the most extensively characterized infectious diseases of chelonians. A 1989 outbreak of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in free-ranging Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) brought together an investigative team of researchers, diagnosticians, pathologists, immunologists and clinicians from multiple institutions and agencies. Electron microscopic studies of affected tortoises revealed a microorganism in close association with the nasal mucosa that subsequently was identified as a new species, Mycoplasma agassizii. Over the next 24 years, a second causative agent, Mycoplasma testudineum, was discovered, the geographic distribution and host range of tortoise mycoplasmosis were expanded, diagnostic tests were developed and refined for antibody and pathogen detection, transmission studies confirmed the pathogenicity of the original M. agassizii isolate, clinical (and subclinical) disease and laboratory abnormalities were characterized, many extrinsic and predisposing factors were found to play a role in morbidity and mortality associated with mycoplasmal infection, and social behavior was implicated in disease transmission. The translation of scientific research into management decisions has sometimes led to undesirable outcomes, such as euthanasia of clinically healthy tortoises. In this article, we review and assess current research on tortoise mycoplasmosis, arguably the most important chronic infectious disease of wild and captive North American and European tortoises, and update the implications for management and conservation of tortoises in the wild.

  1. Neurologic manifestations, diagnosis and management of Wilson's disease in children - an update.

    PubMed

    Alam, S T; Rahman, M M; Islam, K A; Ferdouse, Z

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper (Cu) metabolism. It is a progressive hepatolenticular degenerative disease due to toxic accumulation of copper in the various tissues particularly in the liver, brain and eyes. The neurologic manifestations of Wilson's disease are extremely varied like simple behavioral change such as irritability, depression, deterioration of school performance to severe form of neurologic presentations like dystonia, dysarthria, tremor and gait disturbance. Early diagnosis is possible by history of progressive neurologic dysfunction, clinical examination of Kayser Flescher rings (K-F rings) in eyes, along with some important investigations like low serum ceruloplasmin, high 24 hours urinary excretion of copper, presence of basal ganglia lesion in neuro imaging of the brain. Though hepatic copper estimation done by liver biopsy is the gold standard, is not available in Bangladesh. Most of the neurodegenerative diseases have no specific treatment and worse outcome. But it has a specific treatment with life long medication that reduces copper absorption or removes the excess copper from the body. Children on therapy must be monitored regularly for response, side effects and compliance. The aim of this article is to gather update information of neurologic manifestations of Wilson's disease and proper management as well to prevent the major neurological complications and better out come. PMID:24584398

  2. Update - The Earth Observing System (EOS) forward and return link data processing and communications services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Kelly, A. C.; Smith, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the EOS ground support services in order to identify interfaces to and drivers of the data processing and communication systems. Generic system requirements are compared with those specifically needed for EOS, including processing requirements for forward link and return link data. Communications requirements for transporting the forward link data from the EOS Operations Center and for the transfer of level zero data to the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Distributed Active Archive Centers are specified. The forward and return link processing requirements of the EOS instruments from the international partners are also addressed. The overall context of EOSDIS in the Mission to Planet Earth Program is addressed.

  3. Communication, Control, and Computer Access for Disabled and Elderly Individuals. ResourceBook 4: Update to Books 1, 2, and 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Peter A., Ed.; Vanderheiden, Gregg C., Ed.

    This update to the three-volume first edition of the "Rehab/Education ResourceBook Series" describes special software and products pertaining to communication, control, and computer access, designed specifically for the needs of disabled and elderly people. The 22 chapters cover: speech aids; pointing and typing aids; training and communication…

  4. Preparation in Augmentative and Alternative Communication: An Update for Speech-Language Pathology Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Ann; Koul, Rajinder; Lloyd, Lyle L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report on data from the current survey about academic and clinical education in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), as well as to compare these findings with earlier surveys in an attempt to identify any changes being made as programs in the United States implement the new certification standards of the American…

  5. Medical Education and Communication Companies Involved in CME: An Updated Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Eric D.; Overstreet, Karen M.; Parochka, Jacqueline N.; Lemon, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical Education and Communication Companies (MECCs) represent approximately 21% of the providers accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), yet relatively little is known about these organizations in the greater continuing medical education (CME) community. Two prior studies described them,…

  6. Update: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with cadaveric dura mater grafts--Japan, 1978-2008.

    PubMed

    2008-10-24

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most common of the human prion diseases (also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies), which, according to the leading hypothesis, are caused by an abnormal protein (i.e., prion) that is able to induce abnormal folding of normal cellular prion proteins. Annual worldwide incidence of these always fatal neurodegenerative diseases is estimated at 0.5-2.0 cases per million population. CJD can occur sporadically, or as a genetic disease, or can be transmitted iatrogenically. In 1996, a new human prion disease, variant CJD (vCJD), was first described in the United Kingdom. This disease was believed to have resulted from human consumption of cattle products contaminated with the prions responsible for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, commonly known as mad cow disease). That year, in part to check for possible vCJD cases, a national survey was conducted in Japan; 821 CJD cases were identified, including 43 cases associated with receipt of cadaveric dura mater grafts. A single brand of dural graft (Lyodura) produced by a German manufacturer before May 1987 was identified as the most likely vehicle of transmission in all but one case. By 2003, continued surveillance in Japan had identified a total of 97 such cases. Since then, an additional 35 cases have been identified. This report updates previous reports and summarizes the investigation of all 132 cases to date linked to dural grafts. The results suggest that, because of the long incubation period between graft receipt and symptom onset (possibly >24.8 years), continued surveillance in Japan might identify additional CJD cases associated with dural grafts. PMID:18946463

  7. Mild Cognitive Impairment: an update in Parkinson's Disease and lessons learned from Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Jennifer G.; Aggarwal, Neelum T.; Schroeder, Cynthia D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cognitive dysfunction is an important focus of research in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). While the concept of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as a prodrome to AD has been recognized for many years, the construct of MCI in PD is a relative newcomer with recent development of diagnostic criteria, biomarker research programs, and treatment trials. Controversies and challenges, however, regarding PD-MCI's definition, application, heterogeneity, and different trajectories have arisen. This review will highlight current research advances and challenges in PD-MCI. Furthermore, lessons from the AD field, which has witnessed an evolution in MCI/AD definitions, relevant advances in biomarker research, and development of disease-modifying and targeted therapeutic trials will be discussed. PMID:26517759

  8. Helicobacter pylori: Effect of coexisting diseases and update on treatment regimens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The presence of concomitant diseases is an independent predictive factor for non-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) peptic ulcers. Patients contracting concomitant diseases have an increased risk of developing ulcer disease through pathogenic mechanisms distinct from those of H. pylori infections. Factors other than H. pylori seem critical in peptic ulcer recurrence in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and cirrhotic patients. However, early H. pylori eradication is associated with a reduced risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in patients with ESRD and liver cirrhosis. Resistances to triple therapy are currently detected using culture-based and molecular methods. Culture susceptibility testing before first- or second-line therapy is unadvisable. Using highly effective empiric first-line and rescue regimens can yield acceptable results. Sequential therapy has been included in a recent consensus report as a valid first-line option for eradicating H. pylori in geographic regions with high clarithromycin resistance. Two novel eradication regimens, namely concomitant and hybrid therapy, have proven more effective in patients with dual- (clarithromycin- and metronidazole-) resistant H. pylori strains. We aim to review the prevalence of and eradication therapy for H. pylori infection in patients with ESRD and cirrhosis. Moreover, we summarized the updated H. pylori eradication regimens. PMID:26558147

  9. The beneficial role of curcumin on inflammation, diabetes and neurodegenerative disease: A recent update.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shatadal; Banerjee, Sharmistha; Sil, Parames C

    2015-09-01

    The concept of using phytochemicals has ushered in a new revolution in pharmaceuticals. Naturally occurring polyphenols (like curcumin, morin, resveratrol, etc.) have gained importance because of their minimal side effects, low cost and abundance. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a component of turmeric isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa. Research for more than two decades has revealed the pleiotropic nature of the biological effects of this molecule. More than 7000 published articles have shed light on the various aspects of curcumin including its antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. Apart from these well-known activities, this natural polyphenolic compound also exerts its beneficial effects by modulating different signalling molecules including transcription factors, chemokines, cytokines, tumour suppressor genes, adhesion molecules, microRNAs, etc. Oxidative stress and inflammation play a pivotal role in various diseases like diabetes, cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular diseases. Curcumin, therefore, could be a therapeutic option for the treatment of these diseases, provided limitations in its oral bioavailability can be overcome. The current review provides an updated overview of the metabolism and mechanism of action of curcumin in various organ pathophysiologies. The review also discusses the potential for multifunctional therapeutic application of curcumin and its recent progress in clinical biology. PMID:26066364

  10. Random Assignment to Illness: Teaching Illness and Disease in the Introductory Health Communication Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Jennifer B.; Riley, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A key concept in health communication is the difference between disease and illness: disease refers to the physical manifestations of a condition, while illness encompasses the physical, emotional, social, communicative, and psychological experience of living with a condition. The individual illness experience takes into account the full story of…

  11. Safety Measures with Communicable Diseases. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarbrough, Stephen

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Safety Measures with Communicable Diseases" program developed by Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon. (This program--not contained in this document--is designed to teach means of preventing the spread of communicable respiratory diseases and ways of protecting oneself.) Part A describes the program in…

  12. Impact of an EMR-Based Daily Patient Update Letter on Communication and Parent Engagement in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Jonathan P.; Keller, Heather; Godin, Margie; Wayman, Karen; Cohen, Ronald S.; Rhine, William D.; Longhurst, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To evaluate the impact of using electronic medical record (EMR) data in the form of a daily patient update letter on communication and parent engagement in a level II neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design Parents of babies in a level II NICU were surveyed before and after the introduction of an EMR-generated daily patient update letter, Your Baby’s Daily Update (YBDU). Results Following the introduction of the EMR-generated daily patient update letter, 89% of families reported using YBDU as an information source; 83% of these families found it “very useful”, and 96% of them responded that they “always” liked receiving it. Rates of receiving information from the attending physician were not statistically significantly different pre- and post-implementation, 81% and 78%, respectively (p = 1). Though there was no statistically significant improvement in parents’ knowledge of individual items regarding the care of their babies, a trend towards statistical significance existed for several items (p <.1), and parents reported feeling more competent to manage information related to the health status of their babies (p =.039). Conclusion Implementation of an EMR-generated daily patient update letter is feasible, resulted in a trend towards improved communication, and improved at least one aspect of parent engagement—perceived competence to manage information in the NICU. PMID:23730532

  13. The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance: updated case definitions of oral disease endpoints.

    PubMed

    Shiboski, C H; Patton, L L; Webster-Cyriaque, J Y; Greenspan, D; Traboulsi, R S; Ghannoum, M; Jurevic, R; Phelan, J A; Reznik, D; Greenspan, J S

    2009-07-01

    The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (OHARA) is part of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest HIV clinical trials organization in the world. Its main objective is to investigate oral complications associated with HIV/AIDS as the epidemic is evolving, in particular, the effects of antiretrovirals on oral mucosal lesion development and associated fungal and viral pathogens. The OHARA infrastructure comprises: the Epidemiologic Research Unit (at the University of California San Francisco), the Medical Mycology Unit (at Case Western Reserve University) and the Virology/Specimen Banking Unit (at the University of North Carolina). The team includes dentists, physicians, virologists, mycologists, immunologists, epidemiologists and statisticians. Observational studies and clinical trials are being implemented at ACTG-affiliated sites in the US and resource-poor countries. Many studies have shared end-points, which include oral diseases known to be associated with HIV/AIDS measured by trained and calibrated ACTG study nurses. In preparation for future protocols, we have updated existing diagnostic criteria of the oral manifestations of HIV published in 1992 and 1993. The proposed case definitions are designed to be used in large-scale epidemiologic studies and clinical trials, in both US and resource-poor settings, where diagnoses may be made by non-dental healthcare providers. The objective of this article is to present updated case definitions for HIV-related oral diseases that will be used to measure standardized clinical end-points in OHARA studies, and that can be used by any investigator outside of OHARA/ACTG conducting clinical research that pertains to these end-points. PMID:19594839

  14. THE RARE DISEASES CLINICAL RESEARCH NETWORK CONTACT REGISTRY UPDATE: FEATURES AND FUNCTIONALITY

    PubMed Central

    Richesson, Rachel; Sutphen, Rebecca; Shereff, Denise; Krischer, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) Contact Registry has grown in size and scope since it was first reported in this journal in 2007. In this paper, we reflect on our seven years’ experience developing and expanding the RDCRN Contact Registry to include many more rare diseases. We present the functional and data requirements that motivated this registry, and the new features and policies that have been developed since. Given the high costs and long-term commitment required to build patient registries, the RDCRN Contact Registry experience represents a reasonable approach for identifying and cultivating potential research populations, with minimal resources and patient burden. The basic model of a patient-reported registry has not changed since our 2007 report, but the number of diseases has grown from 42 to 201, and the types of information that are exchanged with participants has expanded. A patient-directed information-sharing feature has been added to reduce barriers to communication between investigators and patients affected by rare and genetic diseases. As specific data and research needs arise, the Contact Registry can be leveraged to access needed data or to solicit patients for particular research opportunities. This multiple-disease registry is scalable, expandable, and standards-driven, and has become a model for clinical and translational research across rare and many other diseases. PMID:22405970

  15. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Andre

    The following essays on communication are presented: communication as a condition of survival, communication for special purposes, the means of transmission of communication, communication within social and economic structures, the teaching of communication through the press, the teaching of modern languages, communication as a point of departure,…

  16. Chronic beryllium disease: an updated model interaction between innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Richard T; Maier, Lisa A

    2011-02-01

    During the last decade, there have been concerted efforts to reduce beryllium (Be) exposure in the workplace and thereby reduce potential cases of this occupational lung disorder. Despite these efforts, it is estimated that there are at least one million Be-exposed individuals in the U.S. who are potentially at risk for developing chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Previously, we reviewed the current CBD literature and proposed that CBD represents a model interaction between innate and acquired immunity (Sawyer et al., Int Immunopharmacol 2:249-261, 2002). We closed this review with a section on "future directions" that identified key gaps in our understanding of the pathogenesis of CBD. In the intervening period, progress has been made to fill in some of these gaps, and the current review will provide an update on that progress. Based on recent findings, we provide a new hypothesis to explain how Be drives sustained chronic inflammation and granuloma formation in CBD leading to progressive compromised lung function in CBD patients. This paradigm has direct implications for our understanding of the development of an immune response to Be, but is also likely applicable to other immune-mediated lung diseases of known and unknown etiology. PMID:20981472

  17. [Human herpesvirus-6-associated diseases in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an update].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2016-03-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 belongs to the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily of human herpesviruses. Primary HHV-6 infection commonly causes exanthem subitum. Like other herpesviruses, HHV-6 is capable of persisting in the host after the primary infection. Under conditions of immunosuppression, latent HHV-6 can be reactivated. Between 30% and 70% of patients who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) experience HHV-6 reactivation at 2-4 weeks after transplantation. Accumulating evidence indicates that HHV-6 is an actual cause of encephalitis after allo-HCT. Risk factors for HHV-6 encephalitis include cord blood transplantation and an inflammatory milieu, which occurs in the early period after allo-HCT. Although HHV-6 encephalitis is associated with a poor prognosis, no validated treatments or preventative measures have as yet been established. HHV-6 reactivation may also cause myelitis, bone marrow suppression, lung disease, hepatitis, delirium, and graft-versus-host disease. However, such associations have not been consistently demonstrated and causality remains uncertain. This review updates the latest information regarding the clinical syndrome accompanying HHV-6 reactivation, with a particular focus on HHV-6 encephalitis, in the form of a series of questions and answers. PMID:27076241

  18. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: An Update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Al-Herz, Waleed; Bousfiha, Aziz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chatila, Talal; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Franco, Jose Luis; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Holland, Steven M.; Klein, Christoph; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D.; Oksenhendler, Erik; Picard, Capucine; Puck, Jennifer M.; Sullivan, Kate; Tang, Mimi L. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) compiled by the Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. In comparison to the previous version, more than 30 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. In addition, we have added a table of acquired defects that are phenocopies of PIDs. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This classification is the most up-to-date catalog of all known PIDs and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases. PMID:24795713

  19. [Tooth color matching systems and communication with dental laboratory in indirect restorations: 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, M; Gilboa, I

    2012-01-01

    There has been many technological developments in the last decade. Today's shade-matching technologies have been developed in an effort to increase the success of color matching, communication, reproduction and verification in clinical dentistry and, ultimately, to increase the efficiency of esthetic restorative work within any practice. In general, the output of the color measurements can be classified and specified in several ways. The most common systems for describing color are Munsell's System and the international Commission on Illumination (CIE) L a b color system. Albert Munsell described color as a three-dimensional phenomenon. He described the three dimensions as hue, value (brightness), and chroma (saturation). Visual colour determination by comparison of teeth and shade guides is the most frequently applied method in dentistry. Vitapan Classical (Vita Zahnfabrik, Germany) and its derivations(evidence-based Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide and Linearguide) are the most commonly used shade guides. However, several factors can influence consistency of visual colour selection and specification: individual colour matching ability may vary, the colour perception of any individual may show temporal variation, the range of shades available is inadequate and does not cover the complete colour space of natural teeth, the shade guide tabs are not systematically distributed in their colour space, and changes in lighting conditions can cause alterations in perceived colour. instruments for clinical shade-matching encompass spectrophotometers, colorimeters and digital imaging systems. It can be concluded that different devices have different accuracy and precision. Colorimeters are significantly less reliable than spectrophotometers and digital cameras. Benefits and limitations exist, and the clinician must consider how the technology relates to expectations and needs. Combination of visual colour determination (Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide and Linearguide) with

  20. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 3 - Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed research knowledge gaps in the field of FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) vaccines. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-15) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD vaccine research. Vaccines play a vital role in FMD control, used both to limit the spread of the virus during epidemics in FMD-free countries and as the mainstay of disease management in endemic regions, particularly where sanitary controls are difficult to apply. Improvements in the performance or cost-effectiveness of FMD vaccines will allow more widespread and efficient disease control. FMD vaccines have changed little in recent decades, typically produced by inactivation of whole virus, the quantity and stability of the intact viral capsids in the final preparation being key for immunogenicity. However, these are exciting times and several promising novel FMD vaccine candidates have recently been developed. This includes the first FMD vaccine licensed for manufacture and use in the USA; this adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine causes in vivo expression of viral capsids in vaccinated animals. Another promising vaccine candidate comprises stabilized empty FMDV capsids produced in vitro in a baculovirus expression system. Recombinant technologies are also being developed to improve otherwise conventionally produced inactivated vaccines, for example, by creating a chimeric vaccine virus to increase capsid stability and by inserting sequences into the vaccine virus for desired antigen expression. Other important areas of ongoing research include enhanced adjuvants, vaccine quality control procedures and predicting vaccine protection from immune correlates, thus reducing dependency on animal challenge studies. Globally, the degree of independent vaccine evaluation is highly variable, and this is essential for vaccine quality. Previously neglected, the

  1. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 7 - Pathogenesis and Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    We assessed research knowledge gaps in the fields of FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) pathogenesis and molecular biology by performing a literature review (2011-15) and collecting research updates (2014) from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future research. There have been important advances in FMDV pathogenesis; FMDV remains in lymph nodes of many recovered animals that otherwise do not appear persistently infected, even in species previously not associated with the carrier state. Whether virus retention helps maintain host immunity and/or virus survival is not known. Studies of FMDV pathogenesis in wildlife have provided insights into disease epidemiology, in endemic and epidemic settings. Many aspects of FMDV infection and virus entry remain unknown; however, at the cellular level, we know that expression level and availability of integrins (that permit viral entry), rate of clearance of infected cells and strength of anti-viral type I IFN (interferon) response are key determinants of tissue tropism. Extending findings to improved understanding of transmission requires a standardized approach and adoption of natural routes of infection during experimental study. There has been recognition of the importance of autophagosomes for FMDV entry into the cytoplasm following cell surface receptor binding, and that distinct internal cellular membranes are exploited for viral replication and immune evasion. New roles for viral proteins in blocking type I IFN production and downstream signalling have been identified facilitating research in anti-viral therapeutics. We know more about how infection affects cell protein expression, and research into molecular determinants of capsid stability has aided the development of stable vaccines. We have an expanding knowledge of viral and host molecular determinates of virulence and infectiousness, and of how phylogenetics may be used to estimate vaccine match and strain

  2. The current situation of meningococcal disease in Latin America and updated Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio P; O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela Bravo, Maria Teresa; Brandileone, Maria Cristina C; Gorla, Maria Cecília O; de Lemos, Ana Paula S; Moreno, Gabriela; Vazquez, Julio A; López, Eduardo L; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Borrow, Ray

    2015-11-27

    The Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) was established in 2009 and comprises an international team of scientists, clinicians, and public health officials with expertise in meningococcal disease (MD). Its primary goal is to promote global prevention of MD through education, research, international cooperation, and developing recommendations that include decreasing the burden of severe disease. The group held its first roundtable meeting with experts from Latin American countries in 2011, and subsequently proposed several recommendations to reduce the regional burden of MD. A second roundtable meeting was convened with Latin American representatives in June 2013 to reassess MD epidemiology, vaccination strategies, and unmet needs in the region, as well as to update the earlier recommendations. Special emphasis was placed on the emergence and spread of serogroup W disease in Argentina and Chile, and the control measures put in place in Chile were a particular focus of discussions. The impact of routine meningococcal vaccination programs, notably in Brazil, was also evaluated. There have been considerable improvements in MD surveillance systems and diagnostic techniques in some countries (e.g., Brazil and Chile), but the lack of adequate infrastructure, trained personnel, and equipment/reagents remains a major barrier to progress in resource-poor countries. The Pan American Health Organization's Revolving Fund is likely to play an important role in improving access to meningococcal vaccines in Latin America. Additional innovative approaches are needed to redress the imbalance in expertise and resources between countries, and thereby improve the control of MD. In Latin America, the GMI recommends establishment of a detailed and comprehensive national/regional surveillance system, standardization of laboratory procedures, adoption of a uniform MD case definition, maintaining laboratory-based surveillance, replacement of polysaccharide vaccines with conjugate

  3. Communication strategies to help reduce the prevalence of non-communicable diseases: Proceedings from the inaugural IFIC Foundation Global Diet and Physical Activity Communications Summit

    PubMed Central

    Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Reed, Kimberly A; Rahavi, Elizabeth B; Dooher, Carrie C

    2012-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), which include cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes, all of which are associated with the common risk factors of poor diet and insufficient physical activity, caused 63% of all deaths globally in 2008. The increasing discussion of global NCDs, including at the 2011 United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases, and a request for multi-stakeholder engagement, prompted the International Food Information Council Foundation to sponsor the Global Diet and Physical Activity Communications Summit: “Insights to Motivate Healthful, Active Lifestyles” on September 19, 2011, in New York City. The Summit brought together a diverse group of stakeholders, representing 34 nations from governments; communication, health, nutrition, and fitness professions; civil society; nonprofits; academia; and the private sector. The Summit provided expert insights and best practices for the use of science-based, behavior-focused communications to motivate individuals to achieve healthful, active lifestyles, with the goal of reducing the prevalence of NCDs. Presented here are some of the highlights and key findings from the Summit. PMID:22537216

  4. Communicating risk and promoting disease mitigation measures in epidemics and emerging disease settings

    PubMed Central

    Schiavo, Renata; Leung, May May; Brown, Mason

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review aims to identify and assess evidence on interventions to communicate risk and promote disease mitigation measures in epidemics and emerging disease outbreak settings. The study focuses on data that are relevant to low and middle-income country (LMIC) settings. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search using five major electronic databases (Pubmed Medline, Biomed Central, EMBASE, Science of Citation Index, and Cochrane Library) and other sources to identify relevant studies published from January 2002 to July 2013. The review was guided by the socio-ecological model/perspective of public health and the ideation theory and focused on interventions at the community, healthcare, and multi-sectoral settings, which also reflect key intervention levels of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Eligible quantitative studies were selected according to specific study criteria and assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) framework. Conversely, qualitative studies, reviews, case studies, and editorials were not included. Studies were selected by two independent reviewers. Results Twenty-nine relevant studies from 16 countries were included. Most studies focused on a single intervention or intervention level, rather than multi-sectoral interventions. The majority of the evidence relates to programs aimed at behavioral and social results (or relevant intermediate steps) within a specific population group. Two studies included implications for improvements in health service delivery, two studies examined the intervention’s impact on health systems-related outcomes, and three had also implications for environmental health outcomes. Cost- and health equity-related implications for select evidence were also discussed. Conclusions The paucity of well-designed quantitative evaluations of interventions to communicate health risk and promote disease control measures in LMICs does not allow for any definitive conclusions. Yet, the

  5. Developmental determinants in non-communicable chronic diseases and ageing.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Berkouk, K; Gergen, P; Antunes, J Pinto; Augé, P; Camuzat, T; Bringer, J; Mercier, J; Best, N; Bourret, R; Akdis, M; Arshad, S H; Bedbrook, A; Berr, C; Bush, A; Cavalli, G; Charles, M A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Gillman, M; Gold, D R; Goldberg, M; Holloway, J W; Iozzo, P; Jacquemin, S; Jeandel, C; Kauffmann, F; Keil, T; Koppelman, G H; Krauss-Etschmann, S; Kuh, D; Lehmann, S; Carlsen, K C Lodrup; Maier, D; Méchali, M; Melén, E; Moatti, J P; Momas, I; Nérin, P; Postma, D S; Ritchie, K; Robine, J M; Samolinski, B; Siroux, V; Slagboom, P E; Smit, H A; Sunyer, J; Valenta, R; Van de Perre, P; Verdier, J M; Vrijheid, M; Wickman, M; Yiallouros, P; Zins, M

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal and peri-natal events play a fundamental role in health, development of diseases and ageing (Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)). Research on the determinants of active and healthy ageing is a priority to: (i) inform strategies for reducing societal and individual costs of an ageing population and (ii) develop effective novel prevention strategies. It is important to compare the trajectories of respiratory diseases with those of other chronic diseases. PMID:25616486

  6. Prion Diseases: Update on Mad Cow Disease, Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, and the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Janka, Jacqueline; Maldarelli, Frank

    2004-08-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorders that share a common spongiform histopathology. TSEs may be transmitted in a sporadic, familial, iatrogenic, or zoonotic fashion. The putative infectious agent of TSE, the prion, represents a novel paradigm of infectious disease with disease transmission in the absence of nucleic acid. Several small but spectacular epidemics of TSEs in man have prompted widespread public health and food safety concerns. Although TSEs affect a comparatively small number of individuals, prion research has revealed fascinating insights of direct relevance to common illnesses. This paper reviews recent advances that have shed new light on the nature of prions and TSEs. PMID:15265460

  7. Update on pathogenesis and predictors of response of therapeutic strategies used in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, Emilio G; Mujagic, Zlatan; Wigge, Simone; Keszthelyi, Daniel; Wachten, Sebastian; Masclee, Ad; Reinisch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The search for biomarkers that characterize specific aspects of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), has received substantial interest in the past years and is moving forward rapidly with the help of modern technologies. Nevertheless, there is a direct demand to identify adequate biomarkers for predicting and evaluating therapeutic response to different therapies. In this subset, pharmacogenetics deserves more attention as part of the endeavor to provide personalized medicine. The ultimate goal in this area is the adjustment of medication for a patient’s specific genetic background and thereby to improve drug efficacy and safety rates. The aim of the following review is to utilize the latest knowledge on immunopathogenesis of IBD and update the findings on the field of Immunology and Genetics, to evaluate the response to the different therapies. In the present article, more than 400 publications were reviewed but finally 287 included based on design, reproducibility (or expectancy to be reproducible and translationable into humans) or already measured in humans. A few tests have shown clinical applicability. Other, i.e., genetic associations for the different therapies in IBD have not yet shown consistent or robust results. In the close future it is anticipated that this, cellular and genetic material, as well as the determination of biomarkers will be implemented in an integrated molecular diagnostic and prognostic approach to manage IBD patients. PMID:26640330

  8. Update on molecular mechanisms of corticosteroid resistance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory and irreversible pulmonary disorder that is characterized by inflammation and airway destruction. In recent years, COPD has become a global epidemic due to increased air pollution and exposure to cigarette smoke. Current therapeutics using bronchiodialator and anti-inflammatory corticosteroids are most widely used for all patients with persistent COPD, but these approaches are disappointing due to limited improvement in symptom control and survival rate. More importantly, a certain number of COPD patients are resistant to the corticosteroid treatment and their symptoms worsen. Therefore, more effective anti-inflammatory drugs and combinational treatment are required. Understanding of the underlying molecular and immunological mechanisms is critical to developing new therapeutics. Lung inflammation and the released pro-inflammatory cytokines affect glucocorticoid receptor (GR), histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) and surfactant protein D (SP-D) activities in many cell types. Macrophages, neutrophils, airway epithelial cells and lymphocytes are involved in the induction of corticosteroid resistance. This review updated the recent advances in molecular and immunological mechanisms of steroid resistance among patients and animal models with COPD. Meanwhile we discussed novel therapeutic approaches in controlling lung inflammation and improving corticosteroid sensitivity among the steroid resistant patients with COPD. PMID:26805715

  9. Molecular determinants of selective dopaminergic vulnerability in Parkinson’s disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Brichta, Lars; Greengard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Numerous disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are attributed to the selective death of distinct neuronal cell populations. Interestingly, in many of these conditions, a specific subset of neurons is extremely prone to degeneration while other, very similar neurons are less affected or even spared for many years. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), the motor manifestations are primarily linked to the selective, progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). In contrast, the very similar DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) demonstrate a much lower degree of degeneration. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of differential DA vulnerability in PD has proven extremely challenging. Moreover, an increasing number of studies demonstrate that considerable molecular and electrophysiologic heterogeneity exists among the DA neurons within the SNpc as well as those within the VTA, adding yet another layer of complexity to the selective DA vulnerability observed in PD. The discovery of key pathways that regulate this differential susceptibility of DA neurons to degeneration holds great potential for the discovery of novel drug targets and the development of promising neuroprotective treatment strategies. This review provides an update on the molecular basis of the differential vulnerability of midbrain DA neurons in PD and highlights the most recent developments in this field. PMID:25565977

  10. Update on the effect of estradiol in postmenopause women with Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yu-Long; Zou, Shuang; Zhang, Changfu; Li, Jun; Xu, Yinghui; Li, Shao

    2016-09-01

    Estradiol (E2) has been used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) for many years but with various responses. Evidence from clinical studies, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and observational studies further underscores the importance of E2 in postmenopause women diagnosed with AD. The purpose of this article is to review all clinical trials to date focusing on the E2 in AD patients to explore the evidence regarding use of E2 in AD treatments. To achieve this objective, clinical studies regarding E2 levels in AD patients and RCTs assessing AD treatment in postmenopause women were identified through searches of MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Web of Science, Ovid, and Google Scholar. E2 has demonstrated good therapeutic effectiveness in AD patients, however, further larger scale, double-blind RCTs are required before a definitive conclusion can be reached and the results need to be compared with other drugs. This update reviews the newest clinical information regarding the role of E2 in postmenopause women with AD. To our knowledge, this is the only systematic review of this area. PMID:26931740

  11. Lung cancer and its association with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: update on nexus of epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Mullapudi, Nandita; Yao, Hongwei; Spivack, Simon D.; Rahman, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The current research is focused on identifying the common and disparate events involved in epigenetic modifications that concurrently occur during the pathogenesis of COPD and lung cancer. The purpose of this review is to describe the current knowledge and understanding of epigenetic modifications in pathogenesis of COPD and lung cancer. Recent findings This review provides an update on advances of how epigenetic modifications are linked to COPD and lung cancer, and their commonalities and disparities. The key epigenetic modification enzymes (e.g. DNA methyltransferases – CpG methylation, histone acetylases/deacetylases and histone methyltransferases/demethylases) that are identified to play an important role in COPD and lung tumorigenesis and progression are described in this review. Summary Distinct DNA methyltransferases and histone modification enzymes are differentially involved in pathogenesis of lung cancer and COPD, although some of the modifications are common. Understanding the epigenetic modifications involved in pathogenesis of lung cancer or COPD with respect to common and disparate mechanisms will lead to targeting of epigenetic therapies against these disorders. PMID:21537190

  12. Alterations of the IKBKG locus and diseases: an update and a report of 13 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Francesca; Pescatore, Alessandra; Bal, Elodie; Ghoul, Aida; Paciolla, Mariateresa; Lioi, Maria Brigida; D'Urso, Michele; Rabia, Smail Hadj; Bodemer, Christine; Bonnefont, Jean Paul; Munnich, Arnold; Miano, Maria Giuseppina; Smahi, Asma; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2008-05-01

    Mutations in the inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase gamma (IKBKG), also called nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB) essential modulator (NEMO), gene are the most common single cause of incontinentia pigmenti (IP) in females and anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) in males. The IKBKG gene, located in the Xq28 chromosomal region, encodes for the regulatory subunit of the inhibitor of kappaB (IkB) kinase (IKK) complex required for the activation of the NF-kB pathway. Therefore, the remarkably heterogeneous and often severe clinical presentation reported in IP is due to the pleiotropic role of this signaling transcription pathway. A recurrent exon 4_10 genomic rearrangement in the IKBKG gene accounts for 60 to 80% of IP-causing mutations. Besides the IKBKG rearrangement found in IP females (which is lethal in males), a total of 69 different small mutations (missense, frameshift, nonsense, and splice-site mutations) have been reported, including 13 novel ones in this work. The updated distribution of all the IP- and EDA-ID-causing mutations along the IKBKG gene highlights a secondary hotspot mutation in exon 10, which contains only 11% of the protein. Furthermore, familial inheritance analysis revealed an unexpectedly high incidence of sporadic cases (>65%). The sum of the observations can aid both in determining the molecular basis of IP and EDA-ID allelic diseases, and in genetic counseling in affected families. PMID:18350553

  13. Guidelines for Analysis of Communicable Disease Control Planning in Developing Countries. Volume 1: Communicable Diseases Control Planning. International Health Planning Methods Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, James

    Intended to assist Agency for International Development (AID) officers, advisors, and health officials in incorporating health planning into national plans for economic development, this first of ten manuals in the International Health Planning Methods Series deals with planning and evaluation of communicable disease control programs. The first…

  14. Guidelines for Communicable Disease Control Policies in Montana Schools: A Guide and Model Policy for Communicable Diseases Including HIV Infected Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    This guide was developed to help local school districts review existing policies or establish new policies to address communicable diseases. Based on current scientific and medical information about the safety in allowing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected students and staff to remain at school, it contains a suggested policy for local…

  15. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 5 - Biotherapeutics and Disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    We assessed knowledge gaps in foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) research. Findings are reported in a series of papers, and in this article, we consider biotherapeutics and disinfectants. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-2015) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD research. While vaccines will remain the key immunological intervention used against FMD virus (FMDV) for the foreseeable future, it takes a few days for the immune system to respond to vaccination. In an outbreak situation, protection could potentially be provided during this period by the application of rapid, short-acting biotherapeutics, aiming either to stimulate a non-specific antiviral state in the animal or to specifically inhibit a part of the viral life cycle. Certain antiviral cytokines have been shown to promote rapid protection against FMD; however, the effects of different immune-modulators appear to vary across species in ways and for reasons that are not yet understood. Major barriers to the effective incorporation of biotherapeutics into control strategies are cost, limited understanding of their effect on subsequent immune responses to vaccines and uncertainty about their potential impact if used for disease containment. Recent research has highlighted the importance of environmental contamination in FMDV transmission. Effective disinfectants for FMDV have long been available, but research is being conducted to further develop methods for quantitatively evaluating their performance under field, or near-field, conditions. During outbreaks in South Korea in 2010 there was public concern about potential environmental contamination after the mass use of disinfectant and mass burial of culled stock; this should be considered during outbreak contingency planning. PMID:27320166

  16. Canadian Thoracic Society recommendations for management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – 2007 update

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Denis E; Aaron, Shawn; Bourbeau, Jean; Hernandez, Paul; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Balter, Meyer; Ford, Gordon; Gervais, Andre; Goldstein, Roger; Hodder, Rick; Kaplan, Alan; Keenan, Sean; Lacasse, Yves; Maltais, Francois; Road, Jeremy; Rocker, Graeme; Sin, Don; Sinuff, Tasmin; Voduc, Nha

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major respiratory illness in Canada that is both preventable and treatable. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of this complex condition continues to grow and our ability to offer effective treatment to those who suffer from it has improved considerably. The purpose of the present educational initiative of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is to provide up to date information on new developments in the field so that patients with this condition will receive optimal care that is firmly based on scientific evidence. Since the previous CTS management recommendations were published in 2003, a wealth of new scientific information has become available. The implications of this new knowledge with respect to optimal clinical care have been carefully considered by the CTS Panel and the conclusions are presented in the current document. Highlights of this update include new epidemiological information on mortality and prevalence of COPD, which charts its emergence as a major health problem for women; a new section on common comorbidities in COPD; an increased emphasis on the meaningful benefits of combined pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies; and a new discussion on the prevention of acute exacerbations. A revised stratification system for severity of airway obstruction is proposed, together with other suggestions on how best to clinically evaluate individual patients with this complex disease. The results of the largest randomized clinical trial ever undertaken in COPD have recently been published, enabling the Panel to make evidence-based recommendations on the role of modern pharmacotherapy. The Panel hopes that these new practice guidelines, which reflect a rigorous analysis of the recent literature, will assist caregivers in the diagnosis and management of this common condition. PMID:17885691

  17. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 2 - Epidemiology, Wildlife and Economics.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Robinson, L; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    We assessed knowledge gaps in foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) research, and in this study, we consider (i) epidemiology, (ii) wildlife and (iii) economics. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-2015) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD research. During 2011-2015, modelling studies were dominant in the broad field of epidemiology; however, continued efforts are required to develop robust models for use during outbreaks in FMD-free countries, linking epidemiologic and economics models. More guidance is needed for both the evaluation and the setting of targets for vaccine coverage, population immunity and vaccine field efficacy. Similarly, methods for seroprevalence studies need to be improved to obtain more meaningful outputs that allow comparison across studies. To inform control programmes in endemic countries, field trials assessing the effectiveness of vaccination in extensive smallholder systems should be performed to determine whether FMD can be controlled with quality vaccines in settings where implementing effective biosecurity is challenging. Studies need to go beyond measuring only vaccine effects and should extend our knowledge of the impact of FMD and increase our understanding of how to maximize farmer participation in disease control. Where wildlife reservoirs of virus exist, particularly African Buffalo, we need to better understand when and under what circumstances transmission to domestic animals occurs in order to manage this risk appropriately, considering the impact of control measures on livelihoods and wildlife. For settings where FMD eradication is unfeasible, further ground testing of commodity-based trade is recommended. A thorough review of global FMD control programmes, covering successes and failures, would be extremely valuable and could be used to guide other control programmes. PMID:27320163

  18. Contrast enhancement and elastography in endoscopic ultrasound: an update of clinical applications in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2016-08-01

    It is well established that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is fundamental in the characterization of many diseases concerning different organs, i.e. pancreaticobiliary diseases, gastrointestinal pathologic conditions, and lymph nodes of unknown origin. It is also well known that many factors can hamper the accuracy of EUS, i.e. biliary stents, chronic pancreatitis, poor operator's expertise. These factors can also lead to suboptimal accuracy when cytological confirmation through EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is indicated. In recent years, new technological tools have rapidly increased their clinical impact improving the diagnostic power of EUS and EUS-FNA. Among these new tools, the most investigated and useful ones are represented by contrast harmonic-EUS (CH-EUS) and EUS-elastography (EUS-E). The purpose of this paper is to provide, through a review of the literature, an update of the applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E in the routine clinical practice in pancreatic diseases. We discussed the first reports and applications of these techniques in our previous review published in Minerva Medica. The applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E to the study of pancreatic diseases appear feasible and safe. The use of both techniques is very simple and does not require any relevant additional workload for the endoscopic personnel. CH-EUS is now considered an important and accurate tool in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses and in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions. CH-EUS targeted FNA is an active field of research. However the available studies show that CH-EUS increases FNA accuracy by a little extent, without statistical significance; moreover, CH-EUS FNA showed a trend toward being more efficient vs. simple EUS FNA (less needle passes and more abundance in cytological material) but this trend did not reach statistical significance. On the other hand, the clinical impact of EUS-E in terms of differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses is still under

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of interleukin genes and the risk of Alzheimer's disease: An update meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Myung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Ho; Choi, Ji-Young; Jang, Won-Cheoul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recently, several meta-analyses have reported an association between interleukin (IL) gene polymorphisms and the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several further papers discussing the relationship with the risk of AD have recently been published. The aim of this meta-analysis was to re-evaluate and update the associations between IL gene polymorphisms and the risk of AD. Methods The search sources were PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Google Scholar up to July 2015, and the following search terms were used: “interleukin 1 or interleukin 6 or interleukin 10” and “variant or polymorphism or SNP” in combination with “Alzheimer's disease”. A meta-analysis using the pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was carried out to assess the associations between four polymorphisms of IL genes (− 889C > T in IL-1α, − 511C > T in IL-1β, − 174G > C in IL-6 and − 1082G > A in IL-10) and the risk of AD under the heterozygous, homozygous, dominant, and recessive models with fixed- or random-effects models. Results A total of 21,864 cases and 40,321 controls from 93 individual studies were included in this meta-analysis. Our results indicated that the − 889C > T polymorphism was strongly associated with the increased risk of AD. However, three polymorphisms were not associated with the risk of AD. Conclusions Similar to previous meta-analyses, our updated meta-analysis suggested that the − 889C > T polymorphism may be a factor in AD. However, the results of our meta-analysis of the − 174G > C polymorphism differed from those of previous meta-analyses. Consequently, we suggest that the − 174G > C polymorphism may not be a risk factor for AD. PMID:27014584

  20. The impact of communicating genetic risks of disease on risk-reducing health behaviour: systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hollands, Gareth J; French, David P; Griffin, Simon J; Prevost, A Toby; Sutton, Stephen; King, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of communicating DNA based disease risk estimates on risk-reducing health behaviours and motivation to engage in such behaviours. Design Systematic review with meta-analysis, using Cochrane methods. Data sources Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to 25 February 2015. Backward and forward citation searches were also conducted. Study selection Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials involving adults in which one group received personalised DNA based estimates of disease risk for conditions where risk could be reduced by behaviour change. Eligible studies included a measure of risk-reducing behaviour. Results We examined 10 515 abstracts and included 18 studies that reported on seven behavioural outcomes, including smoking cessation (six studies; n=2663), diet (seven studies; n=1784), and physical activity (six studies; n=1704). Meta-analysis revealed no significant effects of communicating DNA based risk estimates on smoking cessation (odds ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.63 to 1.35, P=0.67), diet (standardised mean difference 0.12, 95% confidence interval −0.00 to 0.24, P=0.05), or physical activity (standardised mean difference −0.03, 95% confidence interval −0.13 to 0.08, P=0.62). There were also no effects on any other behaviours (alcohol use, medication use, sun protection behaviours, and attendance at screening or behavioural support programmes) or on motivation to change behaviour, and no adverse effects, such as depression and anxiety. Subgroup analyses provided no clear evidence that communication of a risk-conferring genotype affected behaviour more than communication of the absence of such a genotype. However, studies were predominantly at high or unclear risk of bias, and evidence was typically of low quality. Conclusions Expectations that communicating DNA based risk estimates changes behaviour is not supported by existing evidence

  1. The general population cohort in rural south-western Uganda: a platform for communicable and non-communicable disease studies

    PubMed Central

    Asiki, Gershim; Murphy, Georgina; Nakiyingi-Miiro, Jessica; Seeley, Janet; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Karabarinde, Alex; Waswa, Laban; Biraro, Sam; Kasamba, Ivan; Pomilla, Cristina; Maher, Dermot; Young, Elizabeth H; Kamali, Anatoli; Sandhu, Manjinder S

    2013-01-01

    The General Population Cohort (GPC) was set up in 1989 to examine trends in HIV prevalence and incidence, and their determinants in rural south-western Uganda. Recently, the research questions have included the epidemiology and genetics of communicable and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) to address the limited data on the burden and risk factors for NCDs in sub-Saharan Africa. The cohort comprises all residents (52% aged ≥13years, men and women in equal proportions) within one-half of a rural sub-county, residing in scattered houses, and largely farmers of three major ethnic groups. Data collected through annual surveys include; mapping for spatial analysis and participant location; census for individual socio-demographic and household socioeconomic status assessment; and a medical survey for health, lifestyle and biophysical and blood measurements to ascertain disease outcomes and risk factors for selected participants. This cohort offers a rich platform to investigate the interplay between communicable diseases and NCDs. There is robust infrastructure for data management, sample processing and storage, and diverse expertise in epidemiology, social and basic sciences. For any data access enquiries you may contact the director, MRC/UVRI, Uganda Research Unit on AIDS by email to mrc@mrcuganda.org or the corresponding author. PMID:23364209

  2. Communicable and non-communicable diseases among recent immigrants with implications for primary care; a comprehensive immigrant health approach.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Ramin; Naderi, Ramesh; Swedish, Kristin A; Smith, Clyde L; Sckell, Blanca; Doorley, Sara

    2011-12-01

    Data on health status of immigrants and practice recommendations for providers are scarce. We evaluated 99 recent immigrants from developing nations in an immigrant clinic in New York City to assess epidemiology of diseases and to recommend potential screening. Providers received ongoing training. Majority patient was from West Africa and Central America with a mean of 2.1 years in the US. Two thirds were uninsured. Half had positive PPD. Half had prior hepatitis B infection, which was higher in Africans. One quarter had intestinal parasites. Two thirds were overweight; 33% had hypercholesterolemia, 26% were hypertensive, and 25% of women had a Pap smear previously. Eosinophila was higher in African and males (P < 0.05) but didn't predict stool O&P. Recent immigrants were at risk for chronic non-communicable diseases, similar to the US population. Providers should balance their focus on communicable and non-communicable diseases. We recommend practice-based training and on-site comprehensive health services. PMID:21573748

  3. Informing College Students about Venereal Disease: The Mass Communication of a Public Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, John E.

    An information campaign was conducted at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville in cooperation with the student health service to determine the effects of the communication of venereal disease information on the attitudes and behaviors of students. Specifically, the campaign sought to increase students' knowledge of venereal disease and…

  4. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 6 - Immunology.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed gaps and priorities for FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) research in the field of immunology. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-15) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD research. Improved understanding of FMDV immunology facilitates the development of vaccines, adjuvants and diagnostic tests, and will allow better assessment and prediction of vaccine potency and match, with reduced use of animals, particularly large animals, in experimental studies. Continued characterization of the immune systems of several FMD host species has underpinned substantial advances in knowledge of their interaction with FMDV. Recent studies have shed light on the mechanisms underlying formation of the bovine B- and T-cell response; there is also a greater understanding of the significance of non-neutralizing antibodies during FMDV infection and the interactions of antibody-bound virus with immune cells. This knowledge is directly relevant to vaccine development, as well as understanding protection and cross-protection. Despite ongoing research, significant knowledge gaps remain in the areas of neonatal and mucosal immunity. The impact of maternally derived antibody upon the neonate's ability to respond to FMD vaccination has received some attention, but few firm conclusions can be drawn at this stage, and little is known of the cellular response of young animals in general. The mucosal immune system of FMDV-susceptible species requires continued characterization, especially if the potential of mucosal vaccine-delivery systems is to be realized for FMD immunization. PMID:27320167

  5. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 4 - Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Robinson, L; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed knowledge gaps in foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) research in the field of diagnostics. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-15) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from around the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD research. Molecular and genetic technologies, including sequencing, are developing at an increasing rate both in terms of capability and affordability. These advances potentiate progress in many other fields of research, from vaccine development to epidemiology. The development of RT-LAMP represents an important breakthrough allowing greater use and access to molecular diagnostics. It is now possible to determine virus serotype using PCR, although only for certain virus pools, continued progress is needed to cover the global spectrum of FMD viruses. Progress has also been made in the development of pen-side rapid diagnostics, some with the ability to determine serotype. However, further advances in pen-side serotype or strain determination would benefit both FMD-free countries and endemic countries with limited access to well-resourced laboratories. Novel sampling methods that show promise include air sampling and baited ropes, the latter may aid sampling in wildlife and swine. Studies of infrared thermography for the early detection of FMD have not been encouraging, although investigations are ongoing. Multiplex tests have been developed that are able to simultaneously screen for multiple pathogens with similar clinical signs. Crucial for assessing FMDV freedom, tests exist to detect animals that have been infected with FMDV regardless of vaccination status; however, limitations exist, particularly when testing previously vaccinated animals. Novel vaccines are being developed with complementary DIVA tests for this purpose. Research is also needed to improve the current imprecise approaches to FMD vaccine matching. The development of simple, affordable

  6. Association between polymorphism of COMT gene (Val158Met) with Alzheimer's disease: An updated analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weiqian; Zhao, Cheng; Sun, Lu; Tang, Beisha

    2016-02-15

    Previous studies have proposed the association between catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism and the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there has been no solid conclusion from those reports because of the limited sample size and/or racial diversity. Here we aimed to give an in-depth and accurate evaluation of this association by performing a comprehensive literature search on websites including PubMed, EMBASE, Alzgene database, Cochrane library and Ovid database. In further meta-analysis we identified 10 case-control studies which contained total 2777 cases and 2829 controls. Summarized odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were assessed to reveal the association. There was no significant association between COMT Val158Met polymorphism and AD susceptibility in all genetic models for the entire population. In the contrast the subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity revealed significant differences in the Asian population in the dominant (OR=0.66, 95%CI=0.50, 0.87, p=0.004); homozygous (OR=0.66, 95%CI=0.50, 0.89, p=0.006); and heterozygous models (OR=0.65, 95%CI=0.48, 0.87, p=0.004). However, no association was found in the Caucasians population. Similarly to the overall analysis, subgroup analysis of the control population stratified with HWE showed negative results. With the latest comprehensive searching strategy, our updated meta-analysis suggested that COMT Val158Met polymorphism could decrease the risk of AD in the Asian population, but not in the Caucasian or the overall population. PMID:26810551

  7. Monitoring Heart Disease and Diabetes with Mobile Internet Communications

    PubMed Central

    Mulvaney, David; Woodward, Bryan; Datta, Sekharjit; Harvey, Paul; Vyas, Anoop; Thakker, Bhaskar; Farooq, Omar; Istepanian, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A telemedicine system is described for monitoring vital signs and general health indicators of patients with cardiac and diabetic conditions. Telemetry from wireless sensors and readings from other instruments are combined into a comprehensive set of measured patient parameters. Using a combination of mobile device applications and web browser, the data can be stored, accessed, and displayed using mobile internet communications to the central server. As an extra layer of security in the data transmission, information embedded in the data is used in its verification. The paper highlights features that could be enhanced from previous systems by using alternative components or methods. PMID:23213330

  8. Implementing a public web based GIS service for feedback of surveillance data on communicable diseases in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Rolfhamre, Per; Grabowska, Katarzyna; Ekdahl, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Background Surveillance data allow for analysis, providing public health officials and policy-makers with a basis for long-term priorities and timely information on possible outbreaks for rapid response (data for action). In this article we describe the considerations and technology behind a newly introduced public web tool in Sweden for easy retrieval of county and national surveillance data on communicable diseases. Methods The web service was designed to automatically present updated surveillance statistics of some 50 statutory notifiable diseases notified to the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (SMI). The surveillance data is based on clinical notifications from the physician having treated the patient and laboratory notifications, merged into cases using a unique personal identification number issued to all Swedish residents. The web service use notification data from 1997 onwards, stored in a relational database at the SMI. Results The web service presents surveillance data to the user in various ways; tabulated data containing yearly and monthly disease data per county, age and sex distribution, interactive maps illustrating the total number of cases and the incidence per county and time period, graphs showing the total number of cases per week and graphs illustrating trends in the disease data. The system design encompasses the database (storing the data), the web server (holding the web service) and an in-the-middle computer (to ensure good security standards). Conclusions The web service has provided the health community, the media, and the public with easy access to both timely and detailed surveillance data presented in various forms. Since it was introduced in May 2003, the system has been accessed more than 1,000,000 times, by more than 10,000 different viewers (over 12.600 unique IP-numbers). PMID:15191619

  9. Prevention of spread of communicable disease by air travel.

    PubMed

    Evans, Anthony D; Thibeault, Claude

    2009-07-01

    Mathematical modeling suggests that travel restrictions are likely to have only a limited effect on minimizing the spread of disease. Nevertheless, medical screening of travelers remains an option to be considered in a risk-reduction strategy. Screening of departing and/or arriving travelers are possibilities, although the World Health Organization (WHO) favors the former as it is normally easier to geographically contain a disease prior to its transmission outside the outbreak area. Apart from airport screening, several other related issues require consideration, including: transmission of disease on board aircraft; transmission of disease in airport terminal buildings; and contact tracing. A major challenge is to ensure adequate resources are devoted to pandemic preparedness planning in the aviation sector, which may not be fully considered in a national preparedness plan. This is because the prevention of accidents occupies most of the attention of regulatory aviation authorities, and public health authorities do not always see aviation as a priority area. Chief medical officers of regulatory authorities may be in a position to facilitate collaboration between the many stakeholders involved in preparedness planning for aviation. PMID:19601500

  10. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.