Science.gov

Sample records for commute trip reduction

  1. Commute trip reduction in Washington: Base year worksite characteristics and programs

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, D.

    1995-02-01

    Employers in Washington`s eight most populous counties are engaged in an effort to reduce their employees` use of single occupant automobiles for commuting. This report documents the status of those employers at the beginning of the Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) program as a basis for evaluating the impacts of the program. The first section provides a brief exploration of the Washington CTR Law and a history of the first steps in its implementation. The second section presents a summary of the characteristics of the worksites affected by the law. The CTR Law calls for reductions in single occupant vehicle (SOV) commuting and in vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The third section of this report presents baseline measurements of SOV and VMT and goals for reducing them. The fourth section provides summary information on the first year of programs employers planned to implement. The final section very briefly outlines actions the Commute Trip Reduction law calls for between 1995 and 1999.

  2. Spatial interaction models from Irish commuting data: variations in trip length by occupation and gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, Morton E.; Niedzielski, Michael A.; Gleeson, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Core and peripheral contrasts in journey-to-work trip length can be interpreted as imputing the relative value of origin and destination accessibility (yielding theoretical proxies for rent and wages). Because the main variables are shown to be critically dependent on spatial structure, they may be interpreted as showing the shadow prices due to comparative location. There is also a unifying connection between these results and the existing literature on many dimensions: rent gradients, accessibility, and emissivity. In an empirical example, the advantages of a panoramic view of national commuting statistics are shown, using an Irish data set. Variations in the rates of participation in trip making by location, occupation, and gender are examined. Places that emit more trips than would be expected from their relative location are identified. Further, examining ways in which such emissivity is sensitive to a change in trip length highlights the regions where trips could possibly be adjusted to produce a shorter average trip length or which might be especially sensitive to reduction in employment. A careful reinterpretation of one of the key outputs from a calibrated spatial interaction model is shown to be consistent with the declining rent gradient expected from Alonso's theory of land use.

  3. The carbon reduction research of teaching staff commuting aided by Google Earth: taking Guangzhou University as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongyu; Wang, Xixiang; Zhao, Meichan; Zhao, Huaqing; Lin, Zhien

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, taking Guangzhou University as an example, carbon reduction of teaching staff commuting was researched. Firstly, considering carbon emission of teaching staff commuting is come from the fuel consumption of vehicle used to trip, the routes, schedule, vehicle type, fuel type and fuel consumption per 100 km of service express bus, public bus and private car were investigated from relevant department and web questionnaire in office automation system. Secondly, the routes of service express bus, public bus and private car were drawn in Google earth browser to measure distance. Thirdly, combined the bus schedule, school calendar, curriculum timetable of teacher and fuel consumption per 100 km of all kinds of vehicle, the fuel consumption of service express bus, public bus and private car were computed. Fourthly, carbon emission was calculated according to net calorific factor and calorie carbon emission factors of fuel. Finally, the measures of carbon reduction were discussed. The research results show that teaching staff commuting emitted 455.433 tons carbon in 2005-2006 academic year. And reducing usage rate of private car and adding new service express bus line are efficient measure of carbon reduction. Former measure can reduce 33.6891 tons carbon and about 7.4% of original emission. The latter can reduce 7.6317 tons and about 1.68% of original emission.

  4. Babcock and Wilcox Owners' Group program: Trip reduction and transient response improvement

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.T.; Mercado, A.L.; Ganthner, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, the average trip frequency for the industry was 4.3 trips per plant per year while Babcock Wilcox (B W)-designed plants had 4.5 trips. In early 1986, the B W Owners' Group (B WOG) established goals to reduce trip frequency and improve posttrip transient response. Through the recommendations of the B WOG Trip Reduction and Transient Response Improvement Program (TR/TRIP) and other utility initiatives, the trip frequency for the B WOG plants has been on a progressive downward trend and has been consistently below the industry average since 1986. The successful results in trip reduction for the B WOG plants are shown. The B WOG has implemented several programs that have resulted in fewer trips per plant. This success can be attributed to the following: (1) a comprehensive program to evaluate each trip and transient for root-cause determination, define corrective actions, share information, and peer reviews; (2) a broad program to review systems and components that contribute to trips and transients, identify specific recommendations to correct deficiencies, utility commitment to implementation, conduct internal monitoring and indirectly exert peer pressure; (3) an awareness of the goals at all levels in the organization coupled with strong executive-level involvement; and (4) timely implementation of recommendations.

  5. 40 CFR 52.1161 - Incentives for reduction in single-passenger commuter vehicle use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Incentives for reduction in single-passenger commuter vehicle use. 52.1161 Section 52.1161 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... live at the educational institution and who travels to and from classes by any mode of travel....

  6. Commutator identities on associative algebras, the non-Abelian Hirota difference equation and its reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebkov, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    We show that the non-Abelian Hirota difference equation is directly related to a commutator identity on an associative algebra. Evolutions generated by similarity transformations of elements of this algebra lead to a linear difference equation. We develop a special dressing procedure that results in an integrable non-Abelian Hirota difference equation and propose two regular reduction procedures that lead to a set of known equations, Abelian or non-Abelian, and also to some new integrable equations.

  7. "Trip-Sitting" in the Black Hole: A Netnographic Study of Dissociation and Indigenous Harm Reduction.

    PubMed

    Hearne, Evelyn; Van Hout, Marie Claire

    2016-01-01

    An array of dissociative novel psychoactive substances, including "methoxetamine," "3-MeO-PCP," and "methoxphenidine," have emerged as substitutes for the illicit substance "ketamine." A netographic research methodology aimed to describe online, dissociative novel psychoactive substance users' perceptions of risk, informed knowledge around use, and indigenous harm-reduction practices as advocated within online drug fora, so as to provide credible information which can be used to inform public online health education and drug prevention. Systematic Internet searches were performed using the terms "synthetic dissociative," "methoxetamine," "methoxphenidine," "diphenidine," "3-MeO-PCP," "4-MeO-PCP," "2-MDP," and "dissociative research chemical" in combination with "forum." Following screening of 3,476 forum threads with removal of duplicates and exclusion criteria, 90 user trip reports and 115 fora threads from seven drug fora websites were analyzed by conducting content analysis. Five themes emerged with 43 categories. The findings illustrated how forum activity within the cyber drug user community disseminated and exchanged "communal folk pharmacology" relating to the use of dissociative novel psychoactive substances. Further research and consistent monitoring of Internet drug fora are advised to explore variations in harm-reduction tactics throughout dissociative NPS populations, and to consider how existing harm-reduction initiatives are influencing these hard-to-reach groups. PMID:27430659

  8. 75 FR 44924 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Reduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... 44 (75 FR 18356, April 9, 2010) established ACLs for FY 2010. A subsequent action published on May 26, 2010 (75 FR 29459), adjusted allocations based on final rosters of vessels participating in sectors for... FR 29678), reduced the common pool trip limits for five stocks: GOM haddock, GB haddock, GOM...

  9. Making almost commuting matrices commute

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2008-01-01

    Suppose two Hermitian matrices A, B almost commute ({parallel}[A,B]{parallel} {<=} {delta}). Are they close to a commuting pair of Hermitian matrices, A', B', with {parallel}A-A'{parallel},{parallel}B-B'{parallel} {<=} {epsilon}? A theorem of H. Lin shows that this is uniformly true, in that for every {epsilon} > 0 there exists a {delta} > 0, independent of the size N of the matrices, for which almost commuting implies being close to a commuting pair. However, this theorem does not specifiy how {delta} depends on {epsilon}. We give uniform bounds relating {delta} and {epsilon}. The proof is constructive, giving an explicit algorithm to construct A' and B'. We provide tighter bounds in the case of block tridiagonal and tridiagnonal matrices. Within the context of quantum measurement, this implies an algorithm to construct a basis in which we can make a projective measurement that approximately measures two approximately commuting operators simultaneously. Finally, we comment briefly on the case of approximately measuring three or more approximately commuting operators using POVMs (positive operator-valued measures) instead of projective measurements.

  10. Transport improvement, commuting costs, and residential location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stucker, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical framework for evaluating the effects of introducing new transportation on residential travel patterns is presented. Data are based on changes in residential location of urban commuters that alter the mode and length of work trips as well as economic factors.

  11. TRIPPING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Lees, G.W.; McCormick, E.D.

    1962-05-22

    A tripping circuit employing a magnetic amplifier for tripping a reactor in response to power level, period, or instrument failure is described. A reference winding and signal winding are wound in opposite directions on the core. Current from an ion chamber passes through both windings. If the current increases at too fast a rate, a shunt circuit bypasses one or the windings and the amplifier output reverses polarity. (AEC)

  12. Battery cars on superconducting magnetically levitated carriers: One commuting solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, B. Mike; Oman, Henry

    1992-05-01

    Commuting to work in an urban-suburban metropolitan environment is becoming an unpleasant time-wasting process. We applied the technology of communication management to this commuting problem. Communication management is a system-engineering tool that produced today's efficient telephone network. The resulting best commuting option is magnetically levitated carriers of two-passenger, battery-powered, personally-owned local-travel cars. A commuter drives a car to a nearby station, selects a destination, drives on a waiting carrier, and enters an accelerating ramp. A central computer selects an optimum 100 miles-per-hour trunk route, considering existing and forecast traffic; assigns the commuter a travel slot, and subsequently orders switching-station actions. The commuter uses the expensive facilities for only a few minutes during each trip. The cost of travel could be less than 6 cents per mile.

  13. Does Commuting Affect Health?

    PubMed

    Künn-Nelen, Annemarie

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyzes the relation between commuting time and health in the UK. I focus on four different types of health outcomes: subjective health measures, objective health measures, health behavior, and healthcare utilization. Fixed effect models are estimated with British Household Panel Survey data. I find that whereas objective health and health behavior are barely affected by commuting time, subjective health measures are clearly lower for people who commute longer. A longer commuting time is, moreover, related to more visits to the general practitioner. Effects turn out to be more pronounced for women and for commuters driving a car. For women, commuting time is also negatively related to regular exercise and positively to calling in sick. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26010157

  14. Field Trips. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally; Aronson, Susan S.; Stacey, Susan; Winbush, Olga

    2001-01-01

    Five articles highlight benefits and organization of field trips: (1) "Field Trips Promote Child Learning at Its Best"; (2) "Planning for Maximum Benefit, Minimum Risk"; (3) "Coaching Community Hosts"; (4) "The Story of a Field Trip: Trash and Its Place within Children's Learning and Community"; and (5) "Field Trip Stories and Perspectives" (from…

  15. Inductively commutated coilguns

    SciTech Connect

    Mongeau, P.P. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the concept and relevance of power factor is presented in regards to high performance launchers. As the scale of launchers grows and as efforts to improve efficiency continue power factor considerations will become crucial in engineering design and ultimate launcher performance limits. The use of motion induced commutation to improve the power factor are discussed. Various approaches to inductive commutation are presented, including: the brush-commutated 9 MJ Coilgun, the solid state-switched coilgun and the quenchgun.

  16. Inductively commutated coilguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongeau, Peter P.

    1991-01-01

    The concept and relevance of power factor is presented in the context of high-performance launchers. As the scale of launchers grows and efforts to improve efficiency continue, power factor considerations will become crucial in engineering design and ultimate launcher performance limits. The use of motion-induced commutation to improve the power factor are discussed. Various approaches to inductive commutation are presented, including the brush-commutated 9-MJ coilgun, the solid state-switched coilgun, and the quenchgun.

  17. Active Commuting Behaviors in a Nordic Metropolitan Setting in Relation to Modality, Gender, and Health Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Stigell, Erik; Schantz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Active commuting between home and place of work or study is often cited as an interesting source of physical activity in a public health perspective. However, knowledge about these behaviors is meager. This was therefore studied in adult active commuters (n = 1872) in Greater Stockholm, Sweden, a Nordic metropolitan setting. They received questionnaires and individually adjusted maps to draw their normal commuting route. Three different modality groups were identified in men and women: single-mode cyclists and pedestrians (those who only cycle or walk, respectively) and dual-mode commuters (those who alternately walk or cycle). Some gender differences were observed in trip distances, frequencies, and velocities. A large majority of the commuting trip durations met the minimum health recommendation of at least 10-minute-long activity bouts. The median single-mode pedestrians and dual-mode commuters met or were close to the recommended weekly physical activity levels of at least 150 minutes most of the year, whereas the single-mode cyclists did so only during spring–mid-fall. A high total number of trips per year (range of medians: 231–389) adds to the value in a health perspective. To fully grasp active commuting behaviors in future studies, both walking and cycling should be assessed over different seasons and ideally over the whole year. PMID:26690193

  18. How Combined Trip Purposes Are Associated with Transport Choice for Short Distance Trips. Results from a Cross-Sectional Study in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Eline; Slinger, Minke; Wendel-Vos, Wanda; Schuit, Jantine

    2014-01-01

    Background One way to increase physical activity is to stimulate a shift from car use to walking or cycling. In single-purpose trips, purpose was found to be an important predictor of transport choice. However, as far as known, no studies have been conducted to see how trips with combined purposes affect this decision. This study was designed to provide insight into associations between combined purposes and transport choice. Methods An online questionnaire (N = 3,663) was used to collect data concerning transport choice for four primary purposes: shopping, going to public natural spaces, sports, and commuting. Per combination of primary trip purpose and transport choice, participants were asked to give examples of secondary purposes that they combine with the primary purpose. Logistic regression analyses were used to model the odds of both cycling and walking versus car use. Results Primary trip purposes combined with commuting, shopping, visiting private contacts or medical care were more likely to be made by car than by cycling or walking. Combinations with visiting catering facilities, trips to social infrastructure facilities, recreational outings, trips to facilities for the provision of daily requirements or private contacts during the trip were more likely to be made by walking and/or cycling than by car. Conclusion Combined trip purposes were found to be associated with transport choice. When stimulating active transport focus should be on the combined-trip purposes which were more likely to be made by car, namely trips combined with commuting, other shopping, visiting private contacts or medical care. PMID:25474653

  19. Trade, TRIPS, and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D; Correa, Carlos; Oh, Cecilia

    2009-02-21

    The World Trade Organization's Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) set global minimum standards for the protection of intellectual property, substantially increasing and expanding intellectual-property rights, and generated clear gains for the pharmaceutical industry and the developed world. The question of whether TRIPS generates gains for developing countries, in the form of increased exports, is addressed in this paper through consideration of the importance of pharmaceuticals in health-care trade, outlining the essential requirements, implications, and issues related to TRIPS, and TRIPS-plus, in which increased restrictions are imposed as part of bilateral free-trade agreements. TRIPS has not generated substantial gains for developing countries, but has further increased pharmaceutical trade in developed countries. The unequal trade between developed and developing countries (ie, exporting and importing high-value patented drugs, respectively) raises the issue of access to medicines, which is exacerbated by TRIPS-plus provisions, although many countries have not even enacted provision for TRIPS flexibilities. Therefore this paper focuses on options that are available to the health community for negotiation to their advantage under TRIPS, and within the presence of TRIPS-plus. PMID:19167054

  20. Active commuting to school

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declines in physical activity levels have coincided with increasing rates of obesity in children. This is problematic because physical activity has been shown to attenuate weight gain in children. Active commuting to school is one way of increasing children's physical activity. However, given the hi...

  1. Connecting with Commuters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    For the last few years, Georgia State University has taken steps toward becoming a more traditional college instead of a commuter school. It bought two Atlanta hotels to be used as residence halls, started a football team, and is building townhouses for Greek fraternities and sororities. "When alumni come back to campus, they are shocked at all…

  2. Field Trip Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to prepare for and conduct a safe and worry-free educational experience. She shares a few tips that will ensure field trips will be fun, safe, engaging, and productive. She stresses that with proper planning, field trips can be unique ways to explore the world with students.

  3. A Classroom Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Rita

    1977-01-01

    A description of a week-long, vicarious trip to France in a high school French class. The "trip" required students to do all the things a tourist does, and it utilized the four skills for communication purposes. Techniques for facilitating the process and for student evaluation are described. (AMH)

  4. Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gail; Cooper, Garry

    The Internet field trips in this directory allow teachers to take students almost anywhere--without the usual ordeals associated with field trips. Organized by subject and cross-referenced for quick and easy access, this book leads educators and students to the most exciting, educational, and innovative Web sites on the Internet. Chapters cover…

  5. A Biomes Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a field trip designed to give students opportunities to experience relevant data leading to concepts in biogeography. Suggests that teachers (including college instructors) adapt the areas studied and procedures used to their own locations. Includes a suggested field trip handout. (JN)

  6. The effect of commuting microenvironment on commuter exposures to vehicular emission in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, L. Y.; Chan, C. Y.; Qin, Y.

    Vehicular exhaust emission has gradually become the major air pollution source in modern cities and traffic related exposure is found to contribute significantly to total human exposure level. A comprehensive survey was conducted from November 1995 to July 1996 in Hong Kong to assess the effect of traffic-induced air pollution inside different commuting microenvironments on commuter exposure. Microenvironmental monitoring is performed for six major public commuting modes (bus, light bus, MTR, railway, tram, ferry), plus private car and roadside pavement. Traffic-related pollutants, CO, NO x, THC and O 3 were selected as the target pollutants. The results indicate that commuter exposure is highly influenced by the choice of commuting microenvironment. In general, the exposure level in decreasing order of measured pollutant level for respective commuting microenvironments are: private car, the group consisting light bus, bus, tram and pavement, MTR and train, and finally ferry. In private car, the CO level is several times higher than that in the other microenvironments with a trip averaged of 10.1 ppm and a maximum of 24.9 ppm. Factors such as the body position of the vehicle, intake point of the ventilation system, fuel used, ventilation, transport mode, road and driving conditions were used in the analysis. Inter-microenvironment, intra-microenvironment and temporal variation of CO concentrations were used as the major indicator. The low body position and low intake point of the ventilation system of the private car are believed to be the cause of higher intake of exhaust of other vehicles and thus result in high pollution level in this microenvironment. Compared with other metropolis around the world and the Hong Kong Air Quality Objectives (HKAQO), exposure levels of commuter to traffic-related air pollution in Hong Kong are relatively low for most pollutants measured. Only several cases of exceedence of HKAQO by NO 2 were recorded. The strong prevailing wind

  7. Neighborhood Perceptions and Active School Commuting in Low-Income Cities

    PubMed Central

    DeWeese, Robin S.; Yedidia, Michael J.; Tulloch, David L.; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam

    2016-01-01

    Background Few children accumulate the recommended ≥60 minutes of physical activity each day. Active travel to and from school (ATS) is a potential source of increased activity for children, accounting for 22% of total trips and time spent traveling by school-aged children. Purpose This study identifies the association of parents’ perceptions of the neighborhood, geospatial variables, and demographic characteristics with ATS among students in four low-income, densely populated urban communities with predominantly minority populations. Methods Data were collected in 2009–2010 from households with school-attending children in four low-income New Jersey cities. Multivariate logistic regression analyses (n=765) identified predictors of ATS. Analyses were conducted in 2012. Results In all, 54% of students actively commuted to school. Students whose parents perceived the neighborhood as very unpleasant for activity were less likely (OR=0.39) to actively commute, as were students living farther from school, with a 6% reduction in ATS for every 0.10 mile increase in distance to school. Perceptions of crime, traffic, and sidewalk conditions were not predictors of ATS. Conclusions Parents’ perceptions of the pleasantness of the neighborhood, independent of the effects of distance from school, may outweigh concerns about crime, traffic, or conditions of sidewalks in predicting active commuting to school in the low-income urban communities studied. Efforts such as cleaning up graffiti, taking care of abandoned buildings, and providing shade trees to improve neighborhood environments are likely to increase ATS, as are efforts that encourage locating schools closer to the populations they serve. PMID:24050414

  8. Gauge transformation and symmetries of the commutative multicomponent BKP hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanzhong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we defined a new multi-component B type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (BKP) hierarchy that takes values in a commutative subalgebra of {gl}(N,{{C}}). After this, we give the gauge transformation of this commutative multicomponent BKP (CMBKP) hierarchy. Meanwhile, we construct a new constrained CMBKP hierarchy that contains some new integrable systems, including coupled KdV equations under a certain reduction. After this, the quantum torus symmetry and quantum torus constraint on the tau function of the commutative multi-component BKP hierarchy will be constructed.

  9. Probing deformed quantum commutators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Matteo A. C.; Giani, Tommaso; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-07-01

    Several quantum gravity theories predict a minimal length at the order of magnitude of the Planck length, under which the concepts of space and time lose their physical meaning. In quantum mechanics, the insurgence of such a minimal length can be described by introducing a modified position-momentum commutator, which in turn yields a generalized uncertainty principle, where the uncertainty on position measurements has a lower bound. The value of the minimal length is not predicted by theories and must be estimated experimentally. In this paper, we address the quantum bound to the estimability of the minimal uncertainty length by performing measurements on a harmonic oscillator, which is analytically solvable in the deformed algebra induced by the deformed commutation relations.

  10. Reducing employee travelling time through smart commuting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. N. N. A.; Yusoff, Z. M.; Aziz, I. S.; Omar, D.

    2014-02-01

    Extremely congested roads will definitely delay the arrival time of each trip.This certainly impacted the journey of employees. Tardiness at the workplace has become a perturbing issue for companies where traffic jams are the most common worker excuses. A depressing consequence on daily life and productivity of the employee occurs. The issues of commuting distance between workplace and resident area become the core point of this research. This research will emphasize the use of Geographical Information System (GIS) technique to explore the distance parameter to the employment area and will focus on the accessibility pattern of low-cost housing. The research methodology consists of interview sessions and a questionnaire to residents of low-cost housing areas in Melaka Tengah District in Malaysia. The combination of these processes will show the criteria from the selected parameter for each respondent from their resident area to the employment area. This will further help in the recommendation of several options for a better commute or improvement to the existing routes and public transportations system. Thus enhancing quality of life for employees and helping to reduce stress, decrease lateness, absenteeism and improving productivity in workplace.

  11. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report – Inception Through May 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Don Karner; James Francfort; Randall Solomon

    2004-11-01

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric vehicles for transportation in urban applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations, where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK city vehicles is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Ford leased 97 TH!NK city electric vehicles to commuters from Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk counties for $199 per month per vehicle. The first Clean Commute Program vehicle deliveries occurred late in 2001, with data collection commencing in February 2002. Through May 2004, 24 of the lessees have returned their vehicles to Ford and no longer participate in the Clean Commute Program. Reasons given for returning the vehicles include relocation out of the Program area, change in employment status, change in commuting status, and, in a few cases, dissatisfaction with the vehicle. Additionally, 13 vehicles have been returned to Ford as their leases have completed. In August 2002, Ford announced that it was ceasing production of the TH!NK city and would not extend any TH!NK city leases. Through May 2004, participants in the Clean Commute Program have driven their vehicles over 370,000 miles, avoiding the use of over 17,000 gallons of gasoline. The TH!NK city vehicles are driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month, and over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replace trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through May 2004.

  12. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Final Report - Inception through December 2004

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort; Don Karner

    2005-11-01

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric transportation in urban applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations, where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK city vehicles is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Ford leased at total of 97 TH!NK city electric vehicles to commuters from Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk counties for $199 per month. First Clean Commute Program vehicle deliveries occurred late in 2001, with data collection commencing in February 2002. Through May, 2004, 24 of the lessees have returned their vehicles to Ford and no longer participate in the Clean Commute Program. Reasons given for leaving the Program include relocation out of the Program area, change in employment status, change in commuting status, and, in a few cases, dissatisfaction with the vehicle. Additionally, 13 vehicles were returned to Ford when the lease was completed. In August 2002, Ford announced that it was ceasing production of the TH!NK city and would not extend any TH!NK city leases. Mileage accumulation dropped in the last quarter of the program as vehicle leases were returned to Ford. The impact of the program overall was significant as participants in the Clean Commute Program drove their vehicles over 406,074 miles, avoiding the use of over 18,887 gallons of gasoline. During the active portion of the program, the TH!NK city vehicles were driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month. Over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replaced trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through December 2004.

  13. Field Trips: Tradition in Jeopardy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    The school field trip: something fun, different, exciting, exhausting--a break from the school day grind. But the field trip has ramifications beyond just getting out of school for the day. For students, the field trip is to the classroom what the big game is to athletes. For museums and other attractions, the field trip is a way to cultivate…

  14. THE NEXT GENERATION OF VMT REDUCTION PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is structured to provide a clear delineation of factors that influence trip chaining, identify levels of flexibility in commuter travel, present a market segmentation of commuters in terms of their flexibility levels, and estimate the reach of current programs. ...

  15. Radar channel balancing with commutation

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    When multiple channels are employed in a pulse-Doppler radar, achieving and maintaining balance between the channels is problematic. In some circumstances the channels may be commutated to achieve adequate balance. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  16. Instruction set commutivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windley, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present a state property called congruence and show how it can be used to demonstrate commutivity of instructions in a modern load-store architecture. Our analysis is particularly important in pipelined microprocessors where instructions are frequently reordered to avoid costly delays in execution caused by hazards. Our work has significant implications to safety and security critical applications since reordering can easily change the meaning and an instruction sequence and current techniques are largely ad hoc. Our work is done in a mechanical theorem prover and results in a set of trustworthy rules for instruction reordering. The mechanization makes it practical to analyze the entire instruction set.

  17. Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Virginia A.

    1997-01-01

    Virtual field trips can provide experiences beyond the reach of average K-12 students. Describes multimedia products for school use: Africa Trail, Dinosaur Hunter, Louvre Museum, Magic School Bus Explores the Rainforest, and Up to the Himalayas: Kingdoms in the Clouds and provides book and Internet connections for additional learning, highlighting…

  18. Science Activities for School Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quint, Walter C.

    1980-01-01

    Describes ways in which physics-learning activity packets can be used by high school students participating in trips organized by other departments. Provides an example of physics activities incorporated into an airplane trip to Disney World. (CS)

  19. Real Students and Virtual Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Schott, R. C.; Treves, R.; Scientific Team Of Www. Digitalplanet. Org

    2010-12-01

    Field trips have always been one of the major attractions of geoscience education, distinguishing courses in geology, geography, oceanography, etc., from laboratory-bound sciences such as nuclear physics or biochemistry. However, traditional field trips have been limited to regions with educationally useful exposures and to student populations with the necessary free time and financial resources. Two-year or commuter colleges serving worker-students cannot realistically insist on completion of field assignments and even well-endowed universities cannot take students to more than a handful of the best available field localities. Many instructors have attempted to bring the field into the classroom with the aid of technology. So-called Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) cannot replace the real experience for those that experience it but they are much better than nothing at all. We have been working to create transformative improvements in VFTs using four concepts: (i) self-drive virtual vehicles that students use to navigate the virtual globe under their own control; (ii) GigaPan outcrops that reveal successively more details views of key locations; (iii) virtual specimens scanned from real rocks, minerals, and fossils; and (iv) embedded assessment via logging of student actions. Students are represented by avatars of their own choosing and travel either together in a virtual field vehicle, or separately. When they approach virtual outcrops, virtual specimens become collectable and can be examined using Javascript controls that change magnification and orientation. These instructional resources are being made available via a new server under the domain name www.DigitalPlanet.org. The server will log student progress and provide immediate feedback. We aim to disseminate these resources widely and welcome feedback from instructors and students.

  20. Real-World Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsworthy, Richard

    1997-01-01

    In addition to virtual field trips, technology can play a role in planning for real-world field trips. Describes how students at the Woodbridge Academy in Lexington, Kentucky planned a field trip to Washington, DC, using the Internet and computer software to research, administer, and report their experiences. Provides the addresses of related Web…

  1. Computer Based Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kenneth F.; Hosticka, Alice; Schriver, Martha; Bedell, Jackie

    This paper discusses computer based virtual field trips that use technologies commonly found in public schools in the United States. The discussion focuses on the advantages of both using and creating these field trips for an instructional situation. A virtual field trip to Cumberland Island National Seashore, St. Marys, Georgia is used as a point…

  2. How to Conduct a Research Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, David G.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the three phases of a three-day intensive research study field trip: planning and pre-trip training; actual trip; and post-trip report, research and data organization, and final trip evaluation. Included is a sample program of the limnology field trip taken by the Grafton High School, Wisconsin. (CC)

  3. Commuting projections on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Zikatanov, Ludmil T.

    2013-02-19

    For a given (connected) graph, we consider vector spaces of (discrete) functions defined on its vertices and its edges. These two spaces are related by a discrete gradient operator, Grad and its adjoint, ₋Div, referred to as (negative) discrete divergence. We also consider a coarse graph obtained by aggregation of vertices of the original one. Then a coarse vertex space is identified with the subspace of piecewise constant functions over the aggregates. We consider the ℓ2-projection QH onto the space of these piecewise constants. In the present paper, our main result is the construction of a projection π H from the original edge-space onto a properly constructed coarse edge-space associated with the edges of the coarse graph. The projections π H and QH commute with the discrete divergence operator, i.e., we have div π H = QH div. The respective pair of coarse edge-space and coarse vertexspace offer the potential to construct two-level, and by recursion, multilevel methods for the mixed formulation of the graph Laplacian which utilizes the discrete divergence operator. The performance of one two-level method with overlapping Schwarz smoothing and correction based on the constructed coarse spaces for solving such mixed graph Laplacian systems is illustrated on a number of graph examples.

  4. Advanced transportation concept for round-trip space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Chen-Wan L.

    1988-01-01

    A departure from the conventional concept of round-trip space travel is introduced. It is shown that a substantial reduction in the initial load required of the Shuttle or other launch vehicle can be achieved by staging the ascent orbit and leaving fuel for the return trip at each stage of the orbit. Examples of round trips from a low-inclination LEO to a high-inclination LEO and from an LEO to a GEO are used to show the merits of the new concept. Potential problem areas and research needed for the development of an efficient space transportation network are discussed.

  5. Trade-offs between commuting time and health-related activities.

    PubMed

    Christian, Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    To further understand documented associations between obesity and urban sprawl, this research describes individuals' trade-offs between health-related activities and commuting time. A cross-section of 24,861 working-age individuals employed full-time and residing in urban counties is constructed from the American Time Use Survey (2003-2010). Data are analyzed using seemingly unrelated regressions to quantify health-related activity decreases in response to additional time spent commuting. Outcomes are total daily minutes spent in physical activity at a moderate or greater intensity, preparing food, eating meals with family, and sleeping. Commuting time is measured as all travel time between home and work and vice versa. The mean commuting time is 62 min daily, the median is 55 min, and 10.1% of workers commute 120 min or more. Spending an additional 60 min daily commuting above average is associated with a 6% decrease in aggregate health-related activities and spending an additional 120 min is associated with a 12% decrease. The greatest percentage of commuting time comes from sleeping time reductions (28-35%). Additionally, larger proportions of commuting time are taken from physical activity and food preparation relative to the mean commuting length: of 60 min spent commuting, 16.1% is taken from physical activity and 4.1% is taken from food preparation; of 120 min commuting, 20.3% is taken from physical activity and 5.6% is taken from food preparation. The results indicate that longer commutes are associated with behavioral patterns which over time may contribute to obesity and other poor health outcomes. These findings will assist both urban planners and researchers wishing to understand time constraints' impacts on health. PMID:22689293

  6. Damage tolerance for commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The damage tolerance experience in the United States Air Force with military aircraft and in the commercial world with large transport category aircraft indicates that a similar success could be achieved in commuter aircraft. The damage tolerance process is described for the purpose of defining the approach that could be used for these aircraft to ensure structural integrity. Results of some of the damage tolerance assessments for this class of aircraft are examined to illustrate the benefits derived from this approach. Recommendations are given for future damage tolerance assessment of existing commuter aircraft and on the incorporation of damage tolerance capability in new designs.

  7. Electromagnetic Gun With Commutated Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic gun includes electromagnet coil, turns of which commutated in sequence along barrel. Electrical current fed to two armatures by brushes sliding on bus bars in barrel. Interaction between armature currents and magnetic field from coil produces force accelerating armature, which in turn, pushes on projectile. Commutation scheme chosen so magnetic field approximately coincides and moves with cylindrical region defined by armatures. Scheme has disadvantage of complexity, but in return, enables designer to increase driving magnetic field without increasing armature current. Attainable muzzle velocity increased substantially.

  8. Field Trips Within Easy Reach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1983-01-01

    Provides suggestions for conducting field trips at the local school site. Points of interest might include building materials, evidence of chemical/physical weathering, variations in soil type, changes in elevation on school ground, and others. Three simple field trips are described. (JN)

  9. A study of commuter airline economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summerfield, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Variables are defined and cost relationships developed that describe the direct and indirect operating costs of commuter airlines. The study focused on costs for new aircraft and new aircraft technology when applied to the commuter airline industry. With proper judgement and selection of input variables, the operating costs model was shown to be capable of providing economic insight into other commuter airline system evaluations.

  10. Commuting Patterns of Nonmetro Household Heads, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Gladys K.; Beale, Calvin L.

    Data from the Annual Housing Survey indicated that 22% of all employed United States household heads commuted to a county different from that in which they lived in 1975. Commuting was more prevalent among men than among women and slightly higher for whites than for Blacks. Commuting tended to increase until age 25-34 and then to decline after age…

  11. Commuter Family Relationships: Alive and Thriving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sharon Ervin

    This study examined the impact that commuting, as part of a professional career lifestyle, has on family relationships. One hundred commuting couples participated in a paper and pencil survey. They responded to questions about coping as a family; dealing with the complications of children; keeping their relationship healthy; and commuting as a…

  12. 8 CFR 211.5 - Alien commuters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alien commuters. 211.5 Section 211.5 Aliens...: IMMIGRANTS; WAIVERS § 211.5 Alien commuters. (a) General. An alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence.... An alien commuter engaged in seasonal work will be presumed to have taken up residence in the...

  13. 8 CFR 211.5 - Alien commuters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alien commuters. 211.5 Section 211.5 Aliens...: IMMIGRANTS; WAIVERS § 211.5 Alien commuters. (a) General. An alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence.... An alien commuter engaged in seasonal work will be presumed to have taken up residence in the...

  14. Squishy Physics Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Eric R.; Cianci, Gianguido; Habdas, Piotr

    2008-03-01

    Our laboratory studies soft condensed matter, which means we investigate squishy materials such as foams, emulsions, and colloidal suspensions. These materials include common things such as peanut butter, toothpaste, mayonnaise, shampoo, and shaving cream. We have conducted several field trips for grade school students, where they come to our laboratory and play with squishy materials. They do both hands-on table-top projects and also look at samples with a microscope. We have also developed some of these activities into labs appropriate for first-year college students. Our first goal for these activities is to show students that science is fun, and the second goal is to get them intrigued by the idea that there are more phases than just solids, liquids, and gases.

  15. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report – Inception through February 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Don Karner; James Francfort

    2003-07-01

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric transportation in urban applications. The primary Program partners are the New York Power Authority (NYPA) and Ford. The other Program partners providing funding and other support include the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Metro North Railroad, Long Island Railroad, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Long Island Power Authority, New York State Department of Transportation, New York City Department of Transportation, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). The data in this report is being collected via an internet-based questionnaire system by the AVTA through its subcontractor Electric Transportation Applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK cities is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Eighty-seven commuters are using the TH!NK city vehicles, with 80% actively providing data to the AVTA. The participants have driven the vehicles nearly 150,000 miles since Program inception, avoiding the use of almost 7,000 gallons of gasoline. The TH!NK city vehicles are driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month, and over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replace trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through February 2003.

  16. Commuter exposure to aerosol pollution on public transport in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S.; Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Norford, L.

    2013-12-01

    Personal exposure to aerosol pollutants in the transport microenvironment of Singapore has not been well documented. Studies from many cities suggest that brief periods of exposure to high concentrations of airborne pollutants may have significant health impacts. Thus, a large proportion of aerosol exposure may be experienced during daily commuting trips due to the proximity to traffic. A better understanding of the variability across transport modes is therefore needed to design transport policies that minimize commuters' exposure. In light of this, personal exposure measurements of PM10 and PM2.5, particle number (PN), black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAH), and active surface area (SA) were conducted on a selected route in downtown Singapore. Portable and real-time monitoring instruments were carried onto three different modes of public transport (bus, taxi, subway) and by foot. Simultaneous measurements were taken at a nearby park to capture the background concentrations. Large variability was observed amongst the various transport modes investigated. For example, the particle number concentration was on average 1.5, 1.6, 0.8, and 2.2 times higher inside buses, taxis, subway and by foot, respectively, than at the background site. Based on the results, it is possible to come up with a ranking of the 'cleanest' transport mode for Singapore.

  17. Street lighting disturbs commuting bats.

    PubMed

    Stone, Emma Louise; Jones, Gareth; Harris, Stephen

    2009-07-14

    Anthropogenic disturbance is a major cause of worldwide declines in biodiversity. Understanding the implications of this disturbance for species and populations is crucial for conservation biologists wishing to mitigate negative effects. Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasing global problem, affecting ecological interactions across a range of taxa and impacting negatively upon critical animal behaviors including foraging, reproduction, and communication (for review see). Almost all bats are nocturnal, making them ideal subjects for testing the effects of light pollution. Previous studies have shown that bat species adapted to foraging in open environments feed on insects attracted to mercury vapor lamps. Here, we use an experimental approach to provide the first evidence of a negative effect of artificial light pollution on the commuting behavior of a threatened bat species. We installed high-pressure sodium lights that mimic the intensity and light spectra of streetlights along commuting routes of lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros). Bat activity was reduced dramatically and the onset of commuting behavior was delayed in the presence of lighting, with no evidence of habituation. These results demonstrate that light pollution may have significant negative impacts upon the selection of flight routes by bats. PMID:19540116

  18. A Universal Model of Commuting Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lenormand, Maxime; Huet, Sylvie; Gargiulo, Floriana; Deffuant, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    We show that a recently proposed model generates accurate commuting networks on 80 case studies from different regions of the world (Europe and United-States) at different scales (e.g. municipalities, counties, regions). The model takes as input the number of commuters coming in and out of each geographic unit and generates the matrix of commuting flows between the units. The single parameter of the model follows a universal law that depends only on the scale of the geographic units. We show that our model significantly outperforms two other approaches proposing a universal commuting model [1], [2], particularly when the geographic units are small (e.g. municipalities). PMID:23049691

  19. Imprecise probability for non-commuting observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.

    2015-08-01

    It is known that non-commuting observables in quantum mechanics do not have joint probability. This statement refers to the precise (additive) probability model. I show that the joint distribution of any non-commuting pair of variables can be quantified via upper and lower probabilities, i.e. the joint probability is described by an interval instead of a number (imprecise probability). I propose transparent axioms from which the upper and lower probability operators follow. The imprecise probability depend on the non-commuting observables, is linear over the state (density matrix) and reverts to the usual expression for commuting observables.

  20. Commutation circuit for an HVDC circuit breaker

    DOEpatents

    Premerlani, William J.

    1981-01-01

    A commutation circuit for a high voltage DC circuit breaker incorporates a resistor capacitor combination and a charging circuit connected to the main breaker, such that a commutating capacitor is discharged in opposition to the load current to force the current in an arc after breaker opening to zero to facilitate arc interruption. In a particular embodiment, a normally open commutating circuit is connected across the contacts of a main DC circuit breaker to absorb the inductive system energy trapped by breaker opening and to limit recovery voltages to a level tolerable by the commutating circuit components.

  1. Commutation circuit for an HVDC circuit breaker

    DOEpatents

    Premerlani, W.J.

    1981-11-10

    A commutation circuit for a high voltage DC circuit breaker incorporates a resistor capacitor combination and a charging circuit connected to the main breaker, such that a commutating capacitor is discharged in opposition to the load current to force the current in an arc after breaker opening to zero to facilitate arc interruption. In a particular embodiment, a normally open commutating circuit is connected across the contacts of a main DC circuit breaker to absorb the inductive system energy trapped by breaker opening and to limit recovery voltages to a level tolerable by the commutating circuit components. 13 figs.

  2. An Assessment of Commuter Aircraft Noise Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.; Silvati, Laura; Sneddon, Matthew

    1996-01-01

    This report examines several approaches to understanding 'the commuter aircraft noise problem.' The commuter aircraft noise problem in the sense addressed in this report is the belief that some aspect(s) of community response to noise produced by commuter aircraft operations may not be fully assessed by conventional environmental noise metrics and methods. The report offers alternate perspectives and approaches for understanding this issue. The report also develops a set of diagnostic screening questions; describes commuter aircraft noise situations at several airports; and makes recommendations for increasing understanding of the practical consequences of greater heterogeneity in the air transport fleet serving larger airports.

  3. The Societal Costs and Benefits of Commuter Bicycling: Simulating the Effects of Specific Policies Using System Dynamics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Jennie; Witten, Karen; Kearns, Robin; Rees, David; Woodward, Alistair

    2014-01-01

    Background: Shifting to active modes of transport in the trip to work can achieve substantial co-benefits for health, social equity, and climate change mitigation. Previous integrated modeling of transport scenarios has assumed active transport mode share and has been unable to incorporate acknowledged system feedbacks. Objectives: We compared the effects of policies to increase bicycle commuting in a car-dominated city and explored the role of participatory modeling to support transport planning in the face of complexity. Methods: We used system dynamics modeling (SDM) to compare realistic policies, incorporating feedback effects, nonlinear relationships, and time delays between variables. We developed a system dynamics model of commuter bicycling through interviews and workshops with policy, community, and academic stakeholders. We incorporated best available evidence to simulate five policy scenarios over the next 40 years in Auckland, New Zealand. Injury, physical activity, fuel costs, air pollution, and carbon emissions outcomes were simulated. Results: Using the simulation model, we demonstrated the kinds of policies that would likely be needed to change a historical pattern of decline in cycling into a pattern of growth that would meet policy goals. Our model projections suggest that transforming urban roads over the next 40 years, using best practice physical separation on main roads and bicycle-friendly speed reduction on local streets, would yield benefits 10–25 times greater than costs. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first integrated simulation model of future specific bicycling policies. Our projections provide practical evidence that may be used by health and transport policy makers to optimize the benefits of transport bicycling while minimizing negative consequences in a cost-effective manner. The modeling process enhanced understanding by a range of stakeholders of cycling as a complex system. Participatory SDM can be a helpful method

  4. The commuters' exposure to volatile chemicals and carcinogenic risk in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiohara, Naohide; Fernández-Bremauntz, Adrián A.; Blanco Jiménez, Salvador; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    The commuters' exposure levels to volatile organic compounds were investigated in the following public transport modes: private car, microbus, bus, and metro along three commuting routes in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City. The target chemicals were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/ p-xylene, and formaldehyde. Integrated samples were taken while traveling during the morning rush hour (weekdays 7:00-9:00 a.m.) for six consecutive weeks in June and July, 2002. Scheffe test showed that the average concentrations of all chemicals inside cars and microbuses were statistically higher than in metro trains ( P<0.05). For non-formaldehyde chemicals, the average levels inside automobiles were significantly higher than in metro trains and buses ( P<0.05). The exposure level of formaldehyde in the microbus was much higher than those in the car, bus, and metro ( P<0.05). On the other hand, there were no differences in the exposure levels among transport routes. These findings suggest that for commuting trips of comparable durations, car and microbus passengers are exposed to higher levels of volatile organic compounds than bus and metro commuters. These findings are consistent with previous studies looking at exposure of commuters to carbon monoxide. The lifetime carcinogenic risk from commuting by car was 2.0×10 -5-3.1×10 -5, that by microbus was 3.1×10 -5-4.0×10 -5, that by bus was 2.0×10 -5-2.7×10 -5, and that by metro was 1.3×10 -5-1.7×10 -5 in Mexico City.

  5. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for the prototype Loran-C receiver is discussed. The current version of the prototype receiver, the Mini L-80, was tested initially in 1980. The receiver uses a super jolt microcomputer to control a memory aided phase loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The AGC control adjusts the level of each station signal, such that the early portion of each envelope rise is about at the same amplitude in the receiver envelope detector.

  6. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for a prototype Loran C receiver. The receiver uses a microcomputer to control a memory aided phase-locked loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The circuit designed for the AGC is described, and bench and flight test results are presented. The AGC circuit described actually samples starting at a point 40 microseconds after a zero crossing determined by the software lock pulse ultimately generated by a 30 microsecond delay and add network in the receiver front end envelope detector.

  7. A travel mode comparison of commuters' exposures to air pollutants in Barcelona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Fruin, Scott; Westerdahl, Dane; Martinez, David; Ripoll, Anna; Kubesch, Nadine; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Daily commutes may contribute disproportionately to overall daily inhalations of urban air contaminants. Understanding factors that explain variability of exposures during travel, and especially differences across transportation modes, is essential to accurately assess health impacts of traffic emissions and to develop effective mitigating measures. We evaluated exposures and inhaled doses of air pollution and assessed factors that contributed to their variability in different travel modes in Barcelona. Black carbon (BC), ultrafine particles (UFP), carbon monoxide (CO), fine particle mass (PM2.5) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured and compared across walk, bike, bus, and car modes for a total of 172 trips made on two different round trip routes. On average, the car mode experienced highest concentrations for all contaminants. In pairwise t-tests between concurrent mode runs, statistically significant differences were found for cars compared to walking and biking. Car-to-walk or car-to-bike concentration ratios ranged from 1.3 for CO2 to 25 for CO and were 2-3 for PM2.5, BC, and UFP. In multivariate analyses, travel mode explained the greatest variability in travel exposures, from 8% for PM2.5 to 70% for CO. Different modal patterns emerged when estimating daily inhaled dose, with active commuters' two to three times greater total inhalation volume during travel producing about equal UFP and BC daily inhaled doses to car commuters and 33-50% higher UFP and BC doses compared to bus commuters. These findings, however, are specific to the bike and pedestrian lanes in this study being immediately adjacent to the roadways measured. Dedicated bike or pedestrian routes away from traffic would lead to lower active travel doses.

  8. Are GIS-modelled routes a useful proxy for the actual routes followed by commuters?

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Alice M; Jones, Andrew P; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2015-01-01

    Active commuting offers the potential to increase physical activity among adults by being built into daily routines. Characteristics of the route to work may influence propensity to walk or cycle. Geographic information system (GIS) software is often used to explore this by modelling routes between home and work. However, if the validity of modelled routes depends on the mode of travel used, studies of environmental determinants of travel may be biased. We aimed to understand how well modelled routes reflect those actually taken, and what characteristics explain these differences. We compared modelled GIS shortest path routes with actual routes measured using QStarz BT-Q1000X Global Positioning System (GPS) devices in a free-living sample of adults working in Cambridge and using varying travel modes. Predictors of differences, according to length and percentage overlap, between the two route sets were assessed using multilevel regression models and concordance coefficients. The 276 trips, made by 51 participants, were on average 27% further than modelled routes, with an average geographical overlap of 39%. However, predictability of the route depended on travel mode. For route length, there was moderate-to-substantial agreement for journeys made on foot and by bicycle. Route overlap was lowest for trips made by car plus walk (22%). The magnitude of difference depended on other journey characteristics, including travelling via intermediate destinations, distance, and use of busy roads. In conclusion, GIS routes may be acceptable for distance estimation and to explore potential routes, particularly active commuting. However, GPS should be used to obtain accurate estimates of environmental contexts in which commuting behaviour actually occurs. Public health researchers should bear these considerations in mind when studying the geographical determinants and health implications of commuting behaviour, and when recommending policy changes to encourage active travel. PMID

  9. 8 CFR 211.5 - Alien commuters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... shall be made in accordance with 8 CFR 264.5. ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alien commuters. 211.5 Section 211.5 Aliens...: IMMIGRANTS; WAIVERS § 211.5 Alien commuters. (a) General. An alien lawfully admitted for permanent...

  10. 8 CFR 211.5 - Alien commuters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shall be made in accordance with 8 CFR 264.5. ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alien commuters. 211.5 Section 211.5 Aliens...: IMMIGRANTS; WAIVERS § 211.5 Alien commuters. (a) General. An alien lawfully admitted for permanent...

  11. 8 CFR 211.5 - Alien commuters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall be made in accordance with 8 CFR 264.5. ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alien commuters. 211.5 Section 211.5 Aliens...: IMMIGRANTS; WAIVERS § 211.5 Alien commuters. (a) General. An alien lawfully admitted for permanent...

  12. Happiness and Satisfaction with Work Commute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Lars E.; Garling, Tommy; Ettema, Dick; Friman, Margareta; Fujii, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that for many people happiness is being able to make the routines of everyday life work, such that positive feelings dominate over negative feelings resulting from daily hassles. In line with this, a survey of work commuters in the three largest urban areas of Sweden show that satisfaction with the work commute contributes to…

  13. A Nontraditional Geology Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, William Willard

    1989-01-01

    Describes the design and logistics of a one-month, 1600 km bicycle tour field trip in which the travel, not the stops, is the major teaching tool. Provides a map and a summarized itinerary of the geology experience of southern California and Nevada. (RT)

  14. Urban Awareness; A Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    A description of a Title III funded project is presented in this paper. The project, Urban Awareness, involves an urban field trip for high school students from suburban areas. Every year, at least five classes from suburban Hamilton spend a school day in Boston's North End and Roxbury districts as a means of studying the city and its ethnic…

  15. Learning from a Bike Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koren, Mike

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a bike trip which marks the culmination of a unit reviewing map-reading capabilities. In seventh grade, students develop various map skills, including cardinal and intermediate directions, how to measure distance on a map using a scale of miles, how to interpret the legend of a map, and how to locate places…

  16. Mobile Collector for Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravcik, Milos; Kaibel, Andreas; Specht, Marcus; Terrenghi, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Current e-Learning is based on learning management systems that provide certain standard services--course authoring and delivery, tutoring, administration and collaboration facilities. Rapid development of mobile technologies opens a new area of m-Learning to enhance the current educational opportunities. Field trips are a relevant part of the…

  17. Katimavik Out-Trip Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OPCAN, Montreal (Quebec).

    A supplement to the active leisure learning student manual for Katimavik (the 9-month volunteer community service and experiential learning program for 17-21 year old Canadians) provides in greater detail the procedure for preparing and implementing the Outdoor Wilderness Trip. Sections presented are definition of terms, national training,…

  18. The Field Trip: Frill or Essential?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Research reviewed by David Berliner indicates that field trips help students retain and supplement knowledge gained from a unit of study. Ursula Casanova Pinero offers suggestions for making the most out of field trips. (CB)

  19. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  20. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  1. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  2. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  3. One-trip drum operating instruction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    The one trip system is a bagless transfer system for egress of waste from gloveboxes into 55 gallon one-trip drums. The contents of this document give an overview of the assembly, loading, and handling of the one-trip drum for use in the WRAP-1 plant.

  4. 30 CFR 57.14162 - Trip lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trip lights. 57.14162 Section 57.14162 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14162 Trip lights. On underground rail haulage, trip...

  5. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control system (AGC) was designed and constructed for the prototype Loran C receiver. The AGC is designed to improve the signal-to-signal ratio of the received Loran signals. The AGC design does not require any analog to digital conversion and it utilizes commonly available components. The AGC consists of: (1) a circuit which samples the peak of the envelope of the Loran signal to obtain an AGC voltage for each of three Loran stations, (2) a dc gain circuit to control the overall gain of the AGC system, and (3) an AGC amplification of the input RF signal. The performance of the AGC system was observed in bench and flight tests; it has improved the overall accuracy of the receiver. Improvements in the accuracy of the time difference calculations to within approx. + or - 1.5 microseconds of the observed time differnces for a given position are reported.

  6. Fostering Formal Commutativity Knowledge with Approximate Arithmetic.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sonja Maria; Haider, Hilde; Eichler, Alexandra; Godau, Claudia; Frensch, Peter A; Gaschler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    How can we enhance the understanding of abstract mathematical principles in elementary school? Different studies found out that nonsymbolic estimation could foster subsequent exact number processing and simple arithmetic. Taking the commutativity principle as a test case, we investigated if the approximate calculation of symbolic commutative quantities can also alter the access to procedural and conceptual knowledge of a more abstract arithmetic principle. Experiment 1 tested first graders who had not been instructed about commutativity in school yet. Approximate calculation with symbolic quantities positively influenced the use of commutativity-based shortcuts in formal arithmetic. We replicated this finding with older first graders (Experiment 2) and third graders (Experiment 3). Despite the positive effect of approximation on the spontaneous application of commutativity-based shortcuts in arithmetic problems, we found no comparable impact on the application of conceptual knowledge of the commutativity principle. Overall, our results show that the usage of a specific arithmetic principle can benefit from approximation. However, the findings also suggest that the correct use of certain procedures does not always imply conceptual understanding. Rather, the conceptual understanding of commutativity seems to lag behind procedural proficiency during elementary school. PMID:26560311

  7. Fostering Formal Commutativity Knowledge with Approximate Arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Sonja Maria; Haider, Hilde; Eichler, Alexandra; Godau, Claudia; Frensch, Peter A.; Gaschler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    How can we enhance the understanding of abstract mathematical principles in elementary school? Different studies found out that nonsymbolic estimation could foster subsequent exact number processing and simple arithmetic. Taking the commutativity principle as a test case, we investigated if the approximate calculation of symbolic commutative quantities can also alter the access to procedural and conceptual knowledge of a more abstract arithmetic principle. Experiment 1 tested first graders who had not been instructed about commutativity in school yet. Approximate calculation with symbolic quantities positively influenced the use of commutativity-based shortcuts in formal arithmetic. We replicated this finding with older first graders (Experiment 2) and third graders (Experiment 3). Despite the positive effect of approximation on the spontaneous application of commutativity-based shortcuts in arithmetic problems, we found no comparable impact on the application of conceptual knowledge of the commutativity principle. Overall, our results show that the usage of a specific arithmetic principle can benefit from approximation. However, the findings also suggest that the correct use of certain procedures does not always imply conceptual understanding. Rather, the conceptual understanding of commutativity seems to lag behind procedural proficiency during elementary school. PMID:26560311

  8. Corporate/commuter airlines meteorological requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olcott, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The meteorological information requirements of corporate and commuter airlines are reviewed. The skill level and needs of this class of aviator were assessed. An overview of the methodology by which meteorological data is communicated to these users is presented.

  9. Covariant non-commutative space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Jonathan J.; Verlinde, Herman

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a covariant non-commutative deformation of 3 + 1-dimensional conformal field theory. The deformation introduces a short-distance scale ℓp, and thus breaks scale invariance, but preserves all space-time isometries. The non-commutative algebra is defined on space-times with non-zero constant curvature, i.e. dS4 or AdS4. The construction makes essential use of the representation of CFT tensor operators as polynomials in an auxiliary polarization tensor. The polarization tensor takes active part in the non-commutative algebra, which for dS4 takes the form of so (5, 1), while for AdS4 it assembles into so (4, 2). The structure of the non-commutative correlation functions hints that the deformed theory contains gravitational interactions and a Regge-like trajectory of higher spin excitations.

  10. Opportunities and benefits. [commuter air travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    The service characteristics and changes affecting commuter airline operations are summarized. Community and passenger considerations are addressed and the benefits identified in NASA-sponsored aircraft studies are discussed.

  11. Planning for rotorcraft and commuter air transportationn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, W. L.; Stowers, J.

    1981-01-01

    Community planning needs, criteria, and other considerations such as intermodal coordination and regulatory requirements, for rotorcraft and fixed wing commuter air transportation were identified. A broad range of community planning guidelines, issues, and information which can be used to: (1) direct anticipated aircraft technological improvements; (2) assist planners in identifying and evaluating the opportunities and tradeoffs presented by rotorcraft and commuter aircraft options relative to other modes; and (3) increase communication between aircraft technologists and planners for the purpose of on going support in capitalizing on rotorcraft and commuter air opportunities are provided. The primary tool for identifying and analyzing planning requirements was a detailed questionnaire administered to a selected sample of 55 community planners and other involved in planning for helicopters and commuter aviation.

  12. Non-commutativity measure of quantum discord

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Quantum discord is a manifestation of quantum correlations due to non-commutativity rather than entanglement. Two measures of quantum discord by the amount of non-commutativity via the trace norm and the Hilbert-Schmidt norm respectively are proposed in this paper. These two measures can be calculated easily for any state with arbitrary dimension. It is shown by several examples that these measures can reflect the amount of the original quantum discord. PMID:27122226

  13. Non-commutativity measure of quantum discord.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Quantum discord is a manifestation of quantum correlations due to non-commutativity rather than entanglement. Two measures of quantum discord by the amount of non-commutativity via the trace norm and the Hilbert-Schmidt norm respectively are proposed in this paper. These two measures can be calculated easily for any state with arbitrary dimension. It is shown by several examples that these measures can reflect the amount of the original quantum discord. PMID:27122226

  14. Small engine technology payoffs for future commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaehler, H.; Schneider, W.

    1986-01-01

    High payoff technologies for a year 2000 regenerative cycle turboprop engine were identified for a 19 passenger commuter aircraft application. A series of engines incorporating eight levels of advanced technologies were studied and their impact on aircraft performance was evaluated. Four advanced technologies are recommended to achieve a potential reduction in fuel burn of 38.3 percent. At $1.00 per gallon fuel price, a potential direct operating cost (DOC) benefit of 12.5 percent is obtained. At $2.00 per gallon, the potential DOC benefit increases to 17.0 percent.

  15. Non-commutativity in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tweed, D B; Haslwanter, T P; Happe, V; Fetter, M

    1999-05-20

    In non-commutative algebra, order makes a difference to multiplication, so that a x b not equal to b x a. This feature is necessary for computing rotary motion, because order makes a difference to the combined effect of two rotations. It has therefore been proposed that there are non-commutative operators in the brain circuits that deal with rotations, including motor circuits that steer the eyes, head and limbs, and sensory circuits that handle spatial information. This idea is controversial: studies of eye and head control have revealed behaviours that are consistent with non-commutativity in the brain, but none that clearly rules out all commutative models. Here we demonstrate non-commutative computation in the vestibulo-ocular reflex. We show that subjects rotated in darkness can hold their gaze points stable in space, correctly computing different final eye-position commands when put through the same two rotations in different orders, in a way that is unattainable by any commutative system. PMID:10353248

  16. Computer simulation of equilibrium conditions following a plant 'trip'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limb, D.

    When a process or part of a process experiences an emergency 'trip', the contained fluids redistribute themselves based upon the prevailing pressure gradients and depending upon the positions of valves at the time of the trip. Reverse flow through rotating compression machinery may occur, depending upon the locations of non-return valves. Reduction in pressure and mixing of cryogenic fluids of different compositions and/or temperatures can both lead to generation of significant volumes of vapour. This equilibration process is usually largely over in a matter of seconds rather than minutes. Key questions facing process and mechanical designers are: what is the settle-out pressure, and can we ensure relief valves do not lift following a trip? To answer these related questions it is necessary to analyse the state of the system prior to the trip, and then, based upon valve positions, etc., construct a model of the worst case probable scenarios for the qualitative redistribution of fluid inventory. At this point the simulation program may be employed to help calculate rigorously the final settle out conditions for each of the possible scenarios. This technique is particularly appropriate for cryogenic processes including refrigeration cycles. It is illustrated here with the help of a multistage hydrocarbon compressor example. Other related non-standard applications of the steady state process simulation program are identified.

  17. Commuters' exposure to PM1 by common travel modes in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Shan; Shen, Junxiu; Li, Xun; Ma, Weichun; Chen, Limin

    2012-11-01

    A study on commuter's exposure to PM1 in Shanghai was presented. Commuters' real-time exposure concentrations by the common travel modes (bus, walking, cycling, taxi and subway) were measured by DustTrak™ dust monitors, and the average exposure concentrations and inhalation doses were analyzed. The lengths of the routes were designed to be within 30-min walking distance. The average PM1 exposure concentrations during commuting were 0.147 ± 0.092 mg m-3, 0.145 ± 0.088 mg m-3, 0.140 ± 0.086 mg m-3, 0.139 ± 0.086 mg m-3 and 0.122 ± 0.077 mg m-3 for the bus, walking, cycling, taxi and subway trips respectively. The concentrations in the microenvironments were 0.147 ± 0.096 mg m-3, 0.155 ± 0.098 mg m-3, 0.142 ± 0.092 mg m-3 and 0.079 ± 0.051 mg m-3 for the bus station, bus, taxi and train respectively. The concentrations in the microenvironments were close to those in Guangzhou and higher compared to the results in London, Sydney, Florence, etc. The combined effect of exposure concentration, travel time and inhalation rate led to different inter-mode relationship of inhalation doses compared to that of exposure concentrations. The inhalation doses were 54.5 ± 38.9 μg, 45.2 ± 30.1 μg, 29.2 ± 25.4 μg, 28.6 ± 25.9 μg and 12.8 ± 13.4 μg for the cycling, walking, bus, subway and taxi trips respectively. The outdoor fractions of the inhalation doses by bus, taxi and subway were much higher than the indoor fractions.

  18. Commuters and Parking at UNC-G. Preliminary Findings from the Commuting Student Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichard, Donald J.; McArver, Patricia P.

    Data gleaned from items relating to transportation and parking from the Commuting Student Survey are reported. The survey questionnaire was designed to provide an overview of several aspects of the commuting student's relationship with the university and was sent to a stratified random sample of 2,140 students who were enrolled for the spring 1975…

  19. Tertiary Student Attitudes to Bicycle Commuting in a Regional Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whannell, Patricia; Whannell, Robert; White, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide executive management at a regional university with empirical data to justify, or otherwise, a substantial outlay of funds to support bicycle commuting as a viable strategy for the reduction of traffic congestion. Design/methodology/approach: A custom designed questionnaire was completed by 270…

  20. The Fort Collins Commuter Study: Impact of route type and transport mode on personal exposure to multiple air pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Good, Nicholas; Mölter, Anna; Ackerson, Charis; Bachand, Annette; Carpenter, Taylor; Clark, Maggie L; Fedak, Kristen M; Kayne, Ashleigh; Koehler, Kirsten; Moore, Brianna; L'Orange, Christian; Quinn, Casey; Ugave, Viney; Stuart, Amy L; Peel, Jennifer L; Volckens, John

    2016-01-01

    Traffic-related air pollution is associated with increased mortality and morbidity, yet few studies have examined strategies to reduce individual exposure while commuting. The present study aimed to quantify how choice of mode and route type affects personal exposure to air pollutants during commuting. We analyzed within-person difference in exposures to multiple air pollutants (black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), ultrafine particle number concentration (PNC), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5)) during commutes between the home and workplace for 45 participants. Participants completed 8 days of commuting by car and bicycle on direct and alternative (reduced traffic) routes. Mean within-person exposures to BC, PM2.5, and PNC were higher when commuting by cycling than when driving, but mean CO exposure was lower when cycling. Exposures to CO and BC were reduced when commuting along alternative routes. When cumulative exposure was considered, the benefits from cycling were attenuated, in the case of CO, or exacerbated, in the case of particulate exposures, owing to the increased duration of the commute. Although choice of route can reduce mean exposure, the effect of route length and duration often offsets these reductions when cumulative exposure is considered. Furthermore, increased ventilation rate when cycling may result in a more harmful dose than inhalation at a lower ventilation rate. PMID:26507004

  1. The Fort Collins Commuter Study: Impact of route type and transport mode on personal exposure to multiple air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Good, Nicholas; Mölter, Anna; Ackerson, Charis; Bachand, Annette; Carpenter, Taylor; Clark, Maggie L; Fedak, Kristen M; Kayne, Ashleigh; Koehler, Kirsten; Moore, Brianna; L'Orange, Christian; Quinn, Casey; Ugave, Viney; Stuart, Amy L; Peel, Jennifer L; Volckens, John

    2016-06-01

    Traffic-related air pollution is associated with increased mortality and morbidity, yet few studies have examined strategies to reduce individual exposure while commuting. The present study aimed to quantify how choice of mode and route type affects personal exposure to air pollutants during commuting. We analyzed within-person difference in exposures to multiple air pollutants (black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), ultrafine particle number concentration (PNC), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5)) during commutes between the home and workplace for 45 participants. Participants completed 8 days of commuting by car and bicycle on direct and alternative (reduced traffic) routes. Mean within-person exposures to BC, PM2.5, and PNC were higher when commuting by cycling than when driving, but mean CO exposure was lower when cycling. Exposures to CO and BC were reduced when commuting along alternative routes. When cumulative exposure was considered, the benefits from cycling were attenuated, in the case of CO, or exacerbated, in the case of particulate exposures, owing to the increased duration of the commute. Although choice of route can reduce mean exposure, the effect of route length and duration often offsets these reductions when cumulative exposure is considered. Furthermore, increased ventilation rate when cycling may result in a more harmful dose than inhalation at a lower ventilation rate. PMID:26507004

  2. Commuting Distance, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Metabolic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hoehner, Christine M.; Barlow, Carolyn E.; Allen, Peg; Schootman, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Background Limited evidence exists on themetabolic and cardiovascul ar risk correlates of commuting by vehicle, a habitual form of sedentary behavior. Purpose To examine the association between commuting distance, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and metabolic risk indicators. Methods This cross-sectional study included 4297 adults who had a comprehensive medical examination between 2000 and 2007 and geocoded home and work addresses in 12 Texas metropolitan counties. Commuting distance was measured along the road network. Outcome variables included weekly MET-minutes of self-reported physical activity, CRF, BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, plasma glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and continuously measured metabolic syndrome. Outcomes were also dichotomized using established cut-points. Linear and logistic regression models were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, alcohol intake, family history of diabetes, and history of high cholesterol, as well as BMI and weekly MET-minutes of physical activity and CRF (for BMI and metabolic risk models). Analyses were conducted in 2011. Results Commuting distance was negatively associated with physical activity and CRF and positively associated with BMI, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and continuous metabolic score in fully adjusted linear regression models. Logistic regression analyses yielded similar associations; however, of the models with metabolic risk indicators as outcomes, only the associations with elevated blood pressure remained significant after adjustment for physical activity and CRF. Conclusions Commuting distance was adversely associated with physical activity, CRF, adiposity, and indicators of metabolic risk. PMID:22608372

  3. Commuter exposure to ultrafine particles in different urban locations, transportation modes and routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Corradi, Elisabetta; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Schindler, Christian; de Nazelle, Audrey; Jerrett, Michael; Ducret-Stich, Regina E.; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C.

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding of ultrafine particle (UFP) exposure in different urban transport microenvironments is important for epidemiological exposure assessments and for policy making. Three sub-studies were performed to characterize personal exposure to UFP concentration and average particle size distribution diameters in frequently traveled commuter microenvironments in the city of Basel, Switzerland. First, the spatial variation of sidewalk UFP exposures within urban areas and transport-specific microenvironments was explored. Second, exposure to UFP concentration and average particle size were quantified for five modes of transportation (walking, bicycle, bus, tram, car) during different times of the day and week, along the same route. Finally, the contribution of bicycle commuting along two different routes (along main roads, away from main roads) to total daily exposures was assessed by 24-h personal measurements. In general, smaller average particle sizes and higher UFP levels were measured at places and for travel modes in close proximity to traffic. Average trip UFP concentrations were higher in car (31,784 particles cm-³) and on bicycle (22,660 particles cm-³) compared to walking (19,481 particles cm-³) and public transportation (14,055-18,818 particles cm-³). Concentrations were highest for all travel modes during weekday morning rush hours, compared to other time periods. UFP concentration was lowest in bus, regardless of time period. Bicycle travel along main streets between home and work place (24 min on average) contributed 21% and 5% to total daily UFP exposure in winter and summer, respectively. Contribution of bicycle commutes to total daily UFP exposure could be reduced by half if main roads are avoided. Our results show the importance of considering commuter behavior and route choice in exposure assessment studies.

  4. A commuter-based two-step floating catchment area method for measuring spatial accessibility of daycare centers.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Koos; Neutens, Tijs; De Maeyer, Philippe; Deruyter, Greet

    2015-03-01

    This paper puts forward a commuter-based version of the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method, which has gained acceptance in studies on spatial health care accessibility. Current implementations of the 2SFCA method are static in that they consider centroid-based night-time representations of the population. The proposed enhancement to the 2SFCA approach addresses this limitation by accounting for trip-chaining behavior. The presented method is illustrated in a case study of accessibility of daycare centers in the province East Flanders in Belgium. The results show significant spatial differences in accessibility between the original and commuter-based version of the 2SFCA (CB2SFCA). They highlight the importance of giving heed to more complex travel behavior in cases where the need for detailed accessibility calculations is apparent. PMID:25638791

  5. Probing deformed commutators with macroscopic harmonic oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bawaj, Mateusz; Biancofiore, Ciro; Bonaldi, Michele; Bonfigli, Federica; Borrielli, Antonio; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Marconi, Lorenzo; Marino, Francesco; Natali, Riccardo; Pontin, Antonio; Prodi, Giovanni A.; Serra, Enrico; Vitali, David; Marin, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A minimal observable length is a common feature of theories that aim to merge quantum physics and gravity. Quantum mechanically, this concept is associated with a nonzero minimal uncertainty in position measurements, which is encoded in deformed commutation relations. In spite of increasing theoretical interest, the subject suffers from the complete lack of dedicated experiments and bounds to the deformation parameters have just been extrapolated from indirect measurements. As recently proposed, low-energy mechanical oscillators could allow to reveal the effect of a modified commutator. Here we analyze the free evolution of high-quality factor micro- and nano-oscillators, spanning a wide range of masses around the Planck mass mP (≈22 μg). The direct check against a model of deformed dynamics substantially lowers the previous limits on the parameters quantifying the commutator deformation. PMID:26088965

  6. Probing deformed commutators with macroscopic harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bawaj, Mateusz; Biancofiore, Ciro; Bonaldi, Michele; Bonfigli, Federica; Borrielli, Antonio; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Marconi, Lorenzo; Marino, Francesco; Natali, Riccardo; Pontin, Antonio; Prodi, Giovanni A; Serra, Enrico; Vitali, David; Marin, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A minimal observable length is a common feature of theories that aim to merge quantum physics and gravity. Quantum mechanically, this concept is associated with a nonzero minimal uncertainty in position measurements, which is encoded in deformed commutation relations. In spite of increasing theoretical interest, the subject suffers from the complete lack of dedicated experiments and bounds to the deformation parameters have just been extrapolated from indirect measurements. As recently proposed, low-energy mechanical oscillators could allow to reveal the effect of a modified commutator. Here we analyze the free evolution of high-quality factor micro- and nano-oscillators, spanning a wide range of masses around the Planck mass mP (≈ 22 μg). The direct check against a model of deformed dynamics substantially lowers the previous limits on the parameters quantifying the commutator deformation. PMID:26088965

  7. Beating the traffic with commuting alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This pamphlet describes how, by encouraging commuting options, local governments can help reduce air pollution, fuel consumption, and traffic congestion. Minimizing these problems makes the community more appealing to businesses, residents, and visitors and boosts the local economy. Approaches to alternative transportation are as varied as the communities devising and using them. But the critical factor is initiative from local governments, often one of communities largest employers. They can use and promote commuting alternatives among their employees. Local governments can also promote alternative transportation among other employers and the general public. They can provide information on commuting options, improve the infrastructure, and use local authority to require and reward those changes necessary to make alternative transportation a widely accepted part of community life. Best of all, local governments can lead by example and establish a template for other employers to follow.

  8. Power ascension strategy following a reactor trip during EOC coastdown

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.L.; Heibel, M.D. ); Lesnick, D.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The difficulties associated with returning a reactor to the pretrip power level following a reactor trip during an end-of-cycle (EOC) power coastdown maneuver, and maintaining it once achieved, have caused utilities to abandon the restart and enter their refueling outages ahead of schedule. The Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo) Braidwood and Byron units have experienced reactor trips during EOC power coastdown maneuvers and have successfully performed restarts. The installation of the BEACON core monitoring system, which provides core monitoring, measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core prediction capability utilizing a very fast and accurate three-dimensional nodal code, at the CECo Byron, Braidwood, and Zion stations allows the reactor engineers at these units to accurately determine reactor response. The capabilities of the BEACON system allow an optimal return to power strategy to be developed and continuously updated. This paper presents a method for establishing the optimal return to power strategy utilizing the BEACON system.

  9. Reflections on a Trip: Two Decades Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Berman, Jennifer; Berman, Dene

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a longitudinal qualitative study that involves the interviews of four adults who participated in one of two 10-day wilderness therapy trips 25 years ago. Using qualitative data collection techniques, we conducted in-depth interviews. Respondents were asked to reflect on their lives, the wilderness therapy trip, and the…

  10. Creating Enrichment Trips for Your Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Robert M.; Parker, James L. F.

    The paper describes "enrichment trips" in which disadvantaged handicapped students travel to various parts of the country to broaden students' awareness. Students had to earn their way through regular attendance, appropriate school behavior, academic achievement, and active participation in fund raising for the trip. Students and teachers worked…

  11. What? A Field Trip on the Playground?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbutt, Barb

    1983-01-01

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: In this day and age of budget problems, school districts are cutting back on many programs, one of which is field trips. Why worry? There must be dozens of trips that can be made on the playground of your school. Let's look into activities that can be accomplished there. SOIL STUDIES: Have you ever…

  12. Soft-commutated direct current motor

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    1999-01-01

    A method and circuit is disclosed for soft-commutation of a direct current (DC) motor. An attenuation circuit is connected through auxiliary brushes A, A', B and B' to the commutator (16) to drain circuit from successive armature coils (15) before the main brushes (27, 28) disconnects from each of the coils (15). This prevents the spark generation that normally occurs in conventional DC motors. The attenuation circuit may also be connected before energization of the coil (15) for a soft turning on operation.

  13. Soft-commutated direct current motor

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, J.S.

    1999-07-27

    A method and circuit is disclosed for soft-commutation of a direct current (DC) motor. An attenuation circuit is connected through auxiliary brushes A, A[prime], B and B[prime] to the commutator (16) to drain circuit from successive armature coils (15) before the main brushes (27, 28) disconnects from each of the coils (15). This prevents the spark generation that normally occurs in conventional DC motors. The attenuation circuit may also be connected before energization of the coil (15) for a soft turning on operation. 13 figs.

  14. Commutating Permanent-Magnet Motors At Low Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolland, C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides forced commutation during starting. Forced commutation circuit diverts current from inverter SCR's and turns SCR's off during commutation intervals. Silicon controlled rectifier in circuit unnecessary when switch S10 replaced by high-current, high-voltage transistor. At present, high-current, low-voltage device must suffice.

  15. Employees' Perceptions of Cycle Commuting: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Bekkum, Jennifer E.; Williams, Joanne M.; Morris, Paul Graham

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to provide an in-depth individual level understanding of the psychological factors that affect cycle commuting. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 15 participants (eight cycle commuters and seven potential cycle commuters) from a "cycle-friendly" employer based in a Scottish city took part in the study.…

  16. 26 CFR 1.46-11 - Commuter highway vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... qualifying commuter highway vehicle on the return for the taxable year in which the vehicle is placed in... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Commuter highway vehicles. 1.46-11 Section 1.46... Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.46-11 Commuter...

  17. 26 CFR 1.46-11 - Commuter highway vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... qualifying commuter highway vehicle on the return for the taxable year in which the vehicle is placed in... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Commuter highway vehicles. 1.46-11 Section 1.46... Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.46-11 Commuter...

  18. 26 CFR 1.46-11 - Commuter highway vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... qualifying commuter highway vehicle on the return for the taxable year in which the vehicle is placed in... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Commuter highway vehicles. 1.46-11 Section 1.46... Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.46-11 Commuter...

  19. 26 CFR 1.46-11 - Commuter highway vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... qualifying commuter highway vehicle on the return for the taxable year in which the vehicle is placed in... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Commuter highway vehicles. 1.46-11 Section 1.46... Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.46-11 Commuter...

  20. 26 CFR 1.46-11 - Commuter highway vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... qualifying commuter highway vehicle on the return for the taxable year in which the vehicle is placed in... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Commuter highway vehicles. 1.46-11 Section 1.46... Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.46-11 Commuter...

  1. Quantum Gibbs Samplers: The Commuting Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastoryano, Michael J.; Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the problem of preparing quantum Gibbs states of lattice spin Hamiltonians with local and commuting terms on a quantum computer and in nature. Our central result is an equivalence between the behavior of correlations in the Gibbs state and the mixing time of the semigroup which drives the system to thermal equilibrium (the Gibbs sampler). We introduce a framework for analyzing the correlation and mixing properties of quantum Gibbs states and quantum Gibbs samplers, which is rooted in the theory of non-commutative {{L}_p} spaces. We consider two distinct classes of Gibbs samplers, one of them being the well-studied Davies generator modelling the dynamics of a system due to weak-coupling with a large Markovian environment. We show that their spectral gap is independent of system size if, and only if, a certain strong form of clustering of correlations holds in the Gibbs state. Therefore every Gibbs state of a commuting Hamiltonian that satisfies clustering of correlations in this strong sense can be prepared efficiently on a quantum computer. As concrete applications of our formalism, we show that for every one-dimensional lattice system, or for systems in lattices of any dimension at temperatures above a certain threshold, the Gibbs samplers of commuting Hamiltonians are always gapped, giving an efficient way of preparing the associated Gibbs states on a quantum computer.

  2. Quantum Gibbs Samplers: The Commuting Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastoryano, Michael J.; Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the problem of preparing quantum Gibbs states of lattice spin Hamiltonians with local and commuting terms on a quantum computer and in nature. Our central result is an equivalence between the behavior of correlations in the Gibbs state and the mixing time of the semigroup which drives the system to thermal equilibrium (the Gibbs sampler). We introduce a framework for analyzing the correlation and mixing properties of quantum Gibbs states and quantum Gibbs samplers, which is rooted in the theory of non-commutative {mathbb{L}_p} spaces. We consider two distinct classes of Gibbs samplers, one of them being the well-studied Davies generator modelling the dynamics of a system due to weak-coupling with a large Markovian environment. We show that their spectral gap is independent of system size if, and only if, a certain strong form of clustering of correlations holds in the Gibbs state. Therefore every Gibbs state of a commuting Hamiltonian that satisfies clustering of correlations in this strong sense can be prepared efficiently on a quantum computer. As concrete applications of our formalism, we show that for every one-dimensional lattice system, or for systems in lattices of any dimension at temperatures above a certain threshold, the Gibbs samplers of commuting Hamiltonians are always gapped, giving an efficient way of preparing the associated Gibbs states on a quantum computer.

  3. Propulsion opportunities for future commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Circa 1990 propulsion improvement concepts are discussed for 1000 to 5000 SHP conventional turboprop powerplants including engines, gearboxes, and propellers. Cycle selection, power plant configurations and advanced technology elements are defined and evaluated using average stage length DOC for commuter aircraft as the primary merit criterion.

  4. Fast online corrections of tripping responses.

    PubMed

    Potocanac, Zrinka; de Bruin, Janneke; van der Veen, Susanne; Verschueren, Sabine; van Dieën, Jaap; Duysens, Jacques; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    2014-11-01

    Tripping over obstacles is one of the main causes of falls. One potential hazard to actually fall when tripped is inadequate foot landing. Adequate landing is required to control the body's angular momentum, while avoiding dangerous surfaces (slippery patch, uneven ground). To avoid such dangers, foot trajectory needs to be controlled by inhibiting and adjusting the initiated recovery foot path during a tripping reaction. We investigated whether such adjustments can be made without jeopardizing balance recovery. Sixteen healthy young adults (25.1 ± 3.2 years) walked at their comfortable speed over a walkway equipped with 14 hidden obstacles. Participants were tripped 10 times in between a random number of normal walking trials; five trips included a projection of a forbidden zone (FZ, 30 × 50 cm) at the subject's preferred landing position. Participants were instructed to land their recovery foot outside the FZ, if the FZ was presented. Responses were evaluated in terms of foot position and body angular momentum at and following recovery foot landing. Participants successfully landed their recovery foot outside the FZ in 80% of trials, using strategies of either shortening their recovery steps (84%) or side stepping (16%). Their performance improved over trials, and some participants switched strategies. Angular momenta of the adjusted steps remained small at and following recovery foot landing. Young adults can quickly change foot trajectory after tripping by using different strategies, and without detrimental consequences on balance recovery, in terms of the angular momentum. These results open possibilities for training of tripping reactions. PMID:25070085

  5. Fellows in the Middle: Fabulous Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Mary Lou

    2008-05-01

    Montclair State University's NSF GK-12 Program focuses on grades 7 and 8 in five urban public school districts in northern New Jersey. Each year four fieldtrips are taken by the students, middle school teachers, and graduate student Fellows. Many interdisciplinary hands-on lessons are written for use before, during and after each trip with this year's theme of Earth history. The Sterling Hill Mine trip evoked lessons on geology, economics, crystal structure, density, and pH. A virtual trip (webcam link) to scientists in the rainforest of Panama prompted critical thinking, categorizing layers and animals, and construction of model food webs. In the field trip to the NJ School of Conservation the students will build model aquifers, measure tree heights, and measure stream flow to compare to their Hackensack River. Finally the students will travel to MSU for a Math/Science Day with research talks, lab tours, hands-on activities, and a poster session. In January 2008 seventeen teachers, Fellows, and grant personnel took a field trip to China to set up collaborations with researchers and schools in Beijing and Xi'an, including the Beijing Ancient Observatory. All field trips are fabulous! Next year (IYA) our theme will be planetary science and will feature field trips to the Newark Museum's Dreyfuss Planetarium, BCC Buehler Challenger & Science Center, and star parties. We look forward to invigorating middle school science and mathematics with exciting astronomy. Funded by NSF #0638708

  6. Class 2 design update for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Thomas R.; Hendrich, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the final report of seven on the design of a family of commuter airplanes. This design effort was performed in fulfillment of NASA/USRA grant NGT-8001. Its contents are as follows: (1) the class 1 baseline designs for the commuter airplane family; (2) a study of takeoff weight penalties imposed on the commuter family due to implementing commonality objectives; (3) component structural designs common to the commuter family; (4) details of the acquisition and operating economics of the commuter family, i.e., savings due to production commonality and handling qualities commonality are determined; (5) discussion of the selection of an advanced turboprop propulsion system for the family of commuter airplanes, and (6) a proposed design for an SSSA controller design to achieve similar handling for all airplanes. Final class 2 commuter airplane designs are also presented.

  7. 2001: A Space Odyssey Revisited: The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2003-01-01

    The prospects for 24 hour commuter flights to the Moon, similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale, are examined using two near term, high leverage technologies: liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and lunar-derived oxygen (LUNOX) production. Iron-rich volcanic glass, or orange soil, discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow, has produced a 4 percent oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way. LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an afterburner into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the engine's choked sonic throat, essentially scramjet propulsion in reverse. By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that big engine performance can be obtained using smaller, more affordable, easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or in-line Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an expendable mode initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased payload is

  8. "2001: A Space Odyssey" Revisited: The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for "24 hour" commuter flights to the Moon. similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale. are examined using two near term. "high leverage" technologies-liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and "lunar-derived" oxygen (LUNOX) production. Iron-rich volcanic glass. or "orange soil," discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow. has produced a 4% oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way. LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an "afterburner" into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the engine's choked sonic throat-essentially "scramjet propulsion in reverse." By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that "big engine" performance can be obtained using smaller. more affordable. easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low-density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or "in-line" Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an "expendable mode" initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased

  9. "2001: A Space Odyssey" Revisited--The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    1998-01-01

    The prospects for "24 hour" commuter flights to the Moon, similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale, are examined using two near term, "high leverage" technologies--liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and "lunar-derived" oxygen (LUNOX) production. Ironrich volcanic glass, or "orange soil," discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow, has produced a 4% oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way, LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an "afterburner" into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging front the engine's choked sonic throat--essentially "scramjet propulsion in reverse." By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that "big engine" performance can be obtained using smaller, more affordable, easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low-density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or "in-line" Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an "expendable mode" initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased

  10. Can Walking or Biking to Work Really Make a Difference? Compact Development, Observed Commuter Choice and Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Wojan, Timothy R.; Hamrick, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Promoting active commuting is viewed as one strategy to increase physical activity and improve the energy balance of more sedentary individuals thereby improving health outcomes. However, the potential effectiveness of promotion policies may be seriously undermined by the endogenous choice of commute mode. Policy to promote active commuting will be most effective if it can be demonstrated that 1) those in compact cities do not necessarily have a preference for more physical activity, and 2) that current active commuting is not explained by unobserved characteristics that may be the true source of a lower body mass index (BMI). Methods Daily time-use diaries are used in combination with geographical characteristics of where respondents live and work to test 1) whether residents of more compact settlements are characterized by higher activity levels; and 2) whether residents of more compact settlements are more likely to bike or walk to work. An endogenous treatment model of active commuting allows testing whether reductions in BMI associated with walking or biking to work are in fact attributable to that activity or are more strongly associated with unobserved characteristics of these active commuters. Results The analysis of general activity levels confirms that residents of more compact cities do not expend more energy than residents of more sprawling cities, indicating that those in compact cities do not necessarily have a preference for more physical activity. The endogenous treatment model is consistent with walking or biking to work having an independent effect on BMI, as unobserved factors that contribute to a higher likelihood of active commuting are not associated with lower BMI. Conclusions Despite evidence that more compact settlement patterns enable active commuting, only a small share of workers in these areas choose to walk or bike to work. In general, the activity level of residents in more compact cities and residents in more sprawling

  11. A Field Trip with a New Twist!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Eileen B.

    1980-01-01

    In an individualized field trip approach, office procedures students identify an organization in their field of interest and observe an employee on the job to gain insight into job skills and clarify their career goals. (SK)

  12. A review of commuter exposure to ultrafine particles and its health effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knibbs, Luke D.; Cole-Hunter, Tom; Morawska, Lidia

    2011-05-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs, <100 nm) are produced in large quantities by vehicular combustion and are implicated in causing several adverse human health effects. Recent work has suggested that a large proportion of daily UFP exposure may occur during commuting. However, the determinants, variability and transport mode-dependence of such exposure are not well-understood. The aim of this review was to address these knowledge gaps by distilling the results of 'in-transit' UFP exposure studies performed to-date, including studies of health effects. We identified 47 exposure studies performed across 6 transport modes: automobile, bicycle, bus, ferry, rail and walking. These encompassed approximately 3000 individual trips where UFP concentrations were measured. After weighting mean UFP concentrations by the number of trips in which they were collected, we found overall mean UFP concentrations of 3.4, 4.2, 4.5, 4.7, 4.9 and 5.7 × 10 4 particles cm -3 for the bicycle, bus, automobile, rail, walking and ferry modes, respectively. The mean concentration inside automobiles travelling through tunnels was 3.0 × 10 5 particles cm -3. While the mean concentrations were indicative of general trends, we found that the determinants of exposure (meteorology, traffic parameters, route, fuel type, exhaust treatment technologies, cabin ventilation, filtration, deposition, UFP penetration) exhibited marked variability and mode-dependence, such that it is not necessarily appropriate to rank modes in order of exposure without detailed consideration of these factors. Ten in-transit health effects studies have been conducted and their results indicate that UFP exposure during commuting can elicit acute effects in both healthy and health-compromised individuals. We suggest that future work should focus on further defining the contribution of in-transit UFP exposure to total UFP exposure, exploring its specific health effects and investigating exposures in the developing world.

  13. Quantifying commuter exposures to volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayne, Ashleigh

    Motor-vehicles can be a predominant source of air pollution in cities. Traffic-related air pollution is often unavoidable for people who live in populous areas. Commuters may have high exposures to traffic-related air pollution as they are close to vehicle tailpipes. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one class of air pollutants of concern because exposure to VOCs carries risk for adverse health effects. Specific VOCs of interest for this work include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), which are often found in gasoline and combustion products. Although methods exist to measure time-integrated personal exposures to BTEX, there are few practical methods to measure a commuter's time-resolved BTEX exposure which could identify peak exposures that could be concealed with a time-integrated measurement. This study evaluated the ability of a photoionization detector (PID) to measure commuters' exposure to BTEX using Tenax TA samples as a reference and quantified the difference in BTEX exposure between cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed. To determine the suitability of two measurement methods (PID and Tenax TA) for use in this study, the precision, linearity, and limits of detection (LODs) for both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were determined in the laboratory with standard BTEX calibration gases. Volunteers commuted from their homes to their work places by cycling or driving while wearing a personal exposure backpack containing a collocated PID and Tenax TA sampler. Volunteers completed a survey and indicated if the windows in their vehicle were open or closed. Comparing pairs of exposure data from the Tenax TA and PID sampling methods determined the suitability of the PID to measure the BTEX exposures of commuters. The difference between BTEX exposures of cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed in Fort Collins was determined. Both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were precise and linear when evaluated in the

  14. 28 CFR 570.41 - Medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical escorted trips. 570.41 Section... COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.41 Medical escorted trips. (a) Medical escorted trips are intended to provide an inmate with medical treatment not available within the institution. There are two...

  15. Field Trips as Valuable Learning Experiences in Geography Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakowka, Amy Richmond

    2012-01-01

    Field trips have been acknowledged as valuable learning experiences in geography. This article uses Kolb's (1984) experiential learning model to discuss how students learn and how field trips can help enhance learning. Using Kolb's experiential learning theory as a guide in the design of field trips helps ensure that field trips contribute to…

  16. Cybertrips in Social Studies. Online Field Trips for All Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Scott

    The Internet can take students on virtual field trips to anywhere earth, under the seas, out in space, or back in time. This book demonstrates how teachers can use the Internet to take students on field trips. Composed of two parts, part 1, "Preparing for the Trip," discusses the background of virtual field trips what they are, and why they are…

  17. 28 CFR 570.41 - Medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical escorted trips. 570.41 Section... COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.41 Medical escorted trips. (a) Medical escorted trips are intended to provide an inmate with medical treatment not available within the institution. There are two...

  18. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Non-medical escorted trips. 570.42... RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.42 Non-medical escorted trips. (a) Non-medical escorted trips allow an inmate to leave the institution under staff escort for approved, non-medical...

  19. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Non-medical escorted trips. 570.42... RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.42 Non-medical escorted trips. (a) Non-medical escorted trips allow an inmate to leave the institution under staff escort for approved, non-medical...

  20. 28 CFR 570.41 - Medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical escorted trips. 570.41 Section... COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.41 Medical escorted trips. (a) Medical escorted trips are intended to provide an inmate with medical treatment not available within the institution. There are two...

  1. Mapping commuter cycling risk in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Yiannakoulias, Nikolaos; Bennet, Scott A; Scott, Darren M

    2012-03-01

    Cycling is becoming an increasingly important transportation option for commuters. Cycling offers exercise opportunities and reduces the burden of motor vehicle travel on society. Mapping the risk of collision between cyclists and motor vehicles in urban areas is important to understanding safe cyclist route opportunities, making informed transportation planning decisions, and exploring patterns of injury epidemiology. To date, many geographic analyses and representations of cyclist risk have not taken the concept of exposure into account. Instead, risk is either expressed as a rate per capita, or as a count of events. Using data associated with the City of Hamilton, Canada, we illustrate a method for mapping commuter cyclist collision risk per distance travelled. This measure can be used to more realistically represent the underlying geography of cycling risk, and provide more geographically and empirically meaningful information to those interested in understanding how cycling safety varies over space. PMID:22269497

  2. A study of commuter air service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belina, F. W.; Bush, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    A regionally oriented overview of the commuter air service industry is provided. A framework for an eventual assessment of potential technology directions that may be of benefit to the industry is presented. Data are provided on the industry's market characteristics, service patterns, patronage characteristics, aircraft and airport needs, economic characteristics and institutional issues. Using personal interview and literature survey methods, investigation of a considerable cross-section of the industry was made.

  3. Delayed commutation in quantum computer networks.

    PubMed

    García-Escartín, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2006-09-15

    In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communication. We propose a nonclassical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes, we can route a qubit packet after part of it has left the network node. PMID:17025870

  4. p-adic commutation relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochubei, Anatoly N.

    1996-10-01

    Representations of the canonical and deformed commutation relations by bounded operators on p-adic Banach spaces are constructed. Functions from the Mahler basis of the space of p-adic continuous functions and their multiplicative analogues are shown to be the p-adic counterparts of the Hermite and q-Hermite functions. The analogue of the Stone - von Neumann uniqueness theorem fails in the p-adic case.

  5. Ride quality systems for commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, D. R.; Hammond, T. A.; Amin, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in Active Ride Augmentation, specifically in terms of its feasibility for commuter aircraft applications. A literature survey was done, and the principal results are presented here through discussion of different Ride Quality Augmentation System (RQAS) designs and advances in related technologies. Recommended follow-on research areas are discussed, and a preliminary RQAS configuration for detailed design and development is proposed.

  6. A study of commuter airplane design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Wyatt, R. D.; Griswold, D. A.; Hammer, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Problems of commuter airplane configuration design were studied to affect a minimization of direct operating costs. Factors considered were the minimization of fuselage drag, methods of wing design, and the estimated drag of an airplane submerged in a propellor slipstream; all design criteria were studied under a set of fixed performance, mission, and stability constraints. Configuration design data were assembled for application by a computerized design methodology program similar to the NASA-Ames General Aviation Synthesis Program.

  7. The green valley: the use of mobile narratives for reducing stress in commuters.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Alessandra; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    New technologies have influenced communication and interaction among people, enabling them to overcome face-to-face limitations and eliminating the need for persons in a communicative relationship to be in the same place at the same time. This project aimed to test the effectiveness of mobile phone usage applied to emotion induction. The authors wanted to check whether or not mobile narratives supported by multimedia mobile phones can enhance relaxation and reduce anxiety in a sample of commuters. The project sample consisted of 120 commuters, college students aged 20 to 25 years. The sample was randomly assigned into four conditions: the Vidnar group experienced the mobile narrative on a mobile phone during their daily train trip; the Nonar group experienced only video content proposed on a mobile phone; the MP3 group experienced only the audio content proposed on an MP3 player; and the Control group provided a no-intervention condition. The study measured participants' emotional state (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] State questionnaire), trait (STAI Trait questionnaire, Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale), and sense of presence (Slater-Usoh-Steed Questionnaire [UCL-SUS] and the International Test Commission-Sense of Presence Inventory [ITC-SOPI]) before and after the experience. The main results showed a significant decrease in anxiety level (p < 0.05, assessed by STAI State questionnaire) and an increase in relaxation level (p < 0.001) assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). No significant differences were found in other conditions. PMID:19275475

  8. Non-commutativity from the double sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, Dimitri; Wang, Peng; Wu, Houwen; Yang, Haitang

    2015-03-01

    We show how non-commutativity arises from commutativity in the double sigma model. We demonstrate that this model is intrinsically non-commutative by calculating the propagators. In the simplest phase configuration, there are two dual copies of commutative theories. In general rotated frames, one gets a non-commutative theory and a commutative partner. Thus a non-vanishing B also leads to a commutative theory. Our results imply that O( D, D) symmetry unifies not only the big and small torus physics, but also the commutative and non-commutative theories. The physical interpretations of the metric and other parameters in the double sigma model are completely dictated by the boundary conditions. The open-closed relation is also an O( D, D) rotation and naturally leads to the Seiberg-Witten map. Moreover, after applying a second dual rotation, we identify the description parameter in the Seiberg-Witten map as an O( D, D) group parameter and all theories are non-commutative under this composite rotation. As a bonus, the propagators of general frames in double sigma model for open string are also presented.

  9. Quantifying commuter exposures to volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayne, Ashleigh

    Motor-vehicles can be a predominant source of air pollution in cities. Traffic-related air pollution is often unavoidable for people who live in populous areas. Commuters may have high exposures to traffic-related air pollution as they are close to vehicle tailpipes. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one class of air pollutants of concern because exposure to VOCs carries risk for adverse health effects. Specific VOCs of interest for this work include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), which are often found in gasoline and combustion products. Although methods exist to measure time-integrated personal exposures to BTEX, there are few practical methods to measure a commuter's time-resolved BTEX exposure which could identify peak exposures that could be concealed with a time-integrated measurement. This study evaluated the ability of a photoionization detector (PID) to measure commuters' exposure to BTEX using Tenax TA samples as a reference and quantified the difference in BTEX exposure between cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed. To determine the suitability of two measurement methods (PID and Tenax TA) for use in this study, the precision, linearity, and limits of detection (LODs) for both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were determined in the laboratory with standard BTEX calibration gases. Volunteers commuted from their homes to their work places by cycling or driving while wearing a personal exposure backpack containing a collocated PID and Tenax TA sampler. Volunteers completed a survey and indicated if the windows in their vehicle were open or closed. Comparing pairs of exposure data from the Tenax TA and PID sampling methods determined the suitability of the PID to measure the BTEX exposures of commuters. The difference between BTEX exposures of cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed in Fort Collins was determined. Both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were precise and linear when evaluated in the

  10. FET commutated current-FED inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor); Edwards, Dean B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A shunt switch comprised of a field-effect transistor (Q.sub.1) is employed to commutate a current-fed inverter (10) using thyristors (SCR1, SCR2) or bijunction transistors (Q.sub.2, Q.sub.3) in a full bridge (1, 2, 3, 4) or half bridge (5, 6) and transformer (T.sub.1) configuration. In the case of thyristors, a tapped inverter (12) is employed to couple the inverter to a dc source to back bias the thyristors during commutation. Alternatively, a commutation power supply (20) may be employed for that purpse. Diodes (D.sub.1, D.sub.2) in series with some voltage dropping element (resistor R.sub.12 or resistors R.sub.1, R.sub.2 or Zener diodes D.sub.4, D.sub.5) are connected in parallel with the thyristors in the half bridge and transformer configuration to assure sharing the back bias voltage. A clamp circuit comprised of a winding (18) negatively coupled to the inductor and a diode (D.sub.3) return stored energy from the inductor to the power supply for efficient operation with buck or boost mode.

  11. [Tuberculosis microepidemic in a commuter bus].

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Sasaki, Y; Yamagishi, F; Mizutani, F; Wada, A; Kuroda, F

    1999-06-01

    A tuberculosis microepidemic in a commuter bus was reported. Index patient was a 22-year-old woman who was an employee of an electronic company. An abnormal shadow was found on her chest roentgenogram during an annual medical check-up in June, 1996. As her sputum smear was Gaffky 6, she was admitted to our hospital for medication. Extraordinary examinations including PPD skin test and chest X-ray were carried out on 49 employees of the company in October, 1996. As the result of these examinations, the distribution of maximum diameters of erythema in PPD skin test showed bimodal distribution, and tuberculosis was discovered in two patients by Chest X-ray examination. Moreover, preventive administration of Isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) was indicated for 3 employees based on very strong skin reaction to PPD. These five employees were working separately from the index patient and had little contact with the patient in the work places, but using a same commuter bus. Therefore, we strongly suspect that they were infected from the index patient not in the work place but in the commuter bus. The air-conditioning of the bus used a closed recirculation system, hence insufficient ventilation in the bus contributed to the spread of tuberculosis infection. PMID:10423962

  12. Hawking-Moss tunneling in non-commutative eternal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Yifu; Wang Yi E-mail: wangyi@itp.ac.cn

    2008-01-15

    The quantum behavior of non-commutative eternal inflation is quite different from the usual scenario. Unlike the usual eternal inflation, non-commutative eternal inflation has quantum fluctuation suppressed by the Hubble parameter. Because of this, we need to reconsider many conceptions of eternal inflation. In this paper we study the Hawking-Moss tunneling in non-commutative eternal inflation using the stochastic approach. We obtain a brand new form of tunneling probability for this process and find that the Hawking-Moss tunneling is more unlikely to take place in the non-commutative case than in the usual one. We also conclude that the lifetime of a metastable de Sitter vacuum in the non-commutative spacetime is longer than that in the commutative case.

  13. Generalized Uncertainty Relations in the Non-commutative Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study two-dimensional noncommutative quantum mechanics (NCQM) with the generalized uncertainty relations . We find the new NCQM algebra from the generalized uncertainty relations. We construct a operator commuting with and discuss two possibilities; One is the case that also commutes with and another is the case that does not commute with . For both case we consider a motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field with a harmonic oscillator potential in the noncommutative plane.

  14. Voltage reapplication rate control for commutation of thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor); Edwards, Dean B. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A circuit for commutating a thyristor (21) by shunting its current for a minimum interval, thereby removing sustaining voltage to said thyristor, then subsequently restoring voltage to said thyristor at a predetermined rate, utilizes a series combination of a commutation electronic switch (22) and an isolated dc voltage supply (23) connected in parallel with the thyristor. The voltage supply is arranged with a polarity that permits the current flowing through the thyristor in one direction to be bypassed through the series combination while the commutation switch is turned on and to reverse bias the thyristor when the commutation switch is fully on. A dv/dt control circuit (24) limits the rate of rise of voltage across the commutation switch (22) as it is turned off in response to a command input signal. The dv/dt control circuit is comprised of a constant current drive (31) and a capacitor (32) connected between the output terminal of the commutation switch and the control input terminal of the commutation switch. The thyristor may be a triac (40) with two commutation switches (42, 43), one for current of each polarity, or with a single commutation switch (55) and a bridge circuit (52-55) for selecting the polarity of the switch (56).

  15. Predictive Process Optimization for Fracture Ductility in Automotive TRIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiadong

    stabilizing aging treatment was proposed to address the enhancement of hole-expansion ductility in this class of steel, through optimization of retained austenite stability for transformation toughening. Using a commercial galvannealed TRIP steel of 800 MPa strength level as an example, the paraequilibrium model was established with carbon partition stored energy fitted with experimental data and applied in the thermodynamic simulations by Thermo-CalcRTM and DICTRARTM. It is found the specimens aged at 447 °C for 2 minutes demonstrate evident improvement in the fracture ductility compared with original as-received galvannealed TRIP steel. The true fracture strain grows from 0.45 to 0.71, associated with a reduction of Ms sigma from 70 °C to 15 °C. Further application of the computational design model on a series of similar TRIP steels confirms the effect of the stability optimization on enhancing the hole-expansion ratio by ˜ 30% on average. The optimum processing parameters along with the new stabilizing aging heat-treatment was predictively designed to successfully improve the material meeting the objectives.

  16. Trip Information Log Tracking System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-06-23

    The system is focused on the Employee Business Travel Event. The system must be able to CRUD (Create, Retrieve, Update, Delete) instances of the Travel Event as well as the ability to CRUD frequent flyer milage associated with airline travel. Additionally the system must provide for a compliance reporting system to monitor reductions in travel costs and lost opportunity costs (i.e., not taking advantage of business class or 7 day advance tickets).

  17. Future Propulsion Opportunities for Commuter Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Commuter airplane propulsion opportunities are summarized. Consideration is given to advanced technology conventional turboprop engines, advanced propellers, and several unconventional alternatives: regenerative turboprops, rotaries, and diesels. Advanced versions of conventional turboprops (including propellers) offer 15-20 percent savings in fuel and 10-15 percent in DOC compared to the new crop of 1500-2000 SHP engines currently in development. Unconventional engines could boost the fuel savings to 30-40 percent. The conclusion is that several important opportunities exist and, therefore, powerplant technology need not plateau.

  18. Non-commutative tools for topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodan, Emil

    2010-06-01

    This paper reviews several analytic tools for the field of topological insulators, developed with the aid of non-commutative calculus and geometry. The set of tools includes bulk topological invariants defined directly in the thermodynamic limit and in the presence of disorder, whose robustness is shown to have nontrivial physical consequences for the bulk states. The set of tools also includes a general relation between the current of an observable and its edge index, a relation that can be used to investigate the robustness of the edge states against disorder. The paper focuses on the motivations behind creating such tools and on how to use them.

  19. Notes for Brazil sampling frame evaluation trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, R. (Principal Investigator); Hicks, D. R. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Field notes describing a trip conducted in Brazil are presented. This trip was conducted for the purpose of evaluating a sample frame developed using LANDSAT full frame images by the USDA Economic and Statistics Service for the eventual purpose of cropland production estimation with LANDSAT by the Foreign Commodity Production Forecasting Project of the AgRISTARS program. Six areas were analyzed on the basis of land use, crop land in corn and soybean, field size and soil type. The analysis indicated generally successful use of LANDSAT images for purposes of remote large area land use stratification.

  20. Satisfaction with transport and enjoyment of the commute by commuting mode in inner Sydney.

    PubMed

    Rissel, Chris; Crane, Melanie; Wen, Li Ming; Greaves, Stephen; Standen, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Travel satisfaction has become an increasingly popular construct for the assessment and monitoring of transport systems and services. However, satisfaction may not adequately assess emotion or mood towards walking and cycling, especially when infrastructure is biased towards motor vehicle modes. In this exploratory study we sought to examine the associations of both satisfaction with transport and enjoyment from the commute to work or study by commute mode in an Australian inner city context where transport mode choices are readily available. Methods As part of the Sydney Transport and Health Study, 675 baseline study participants (2013) were invited to complete an online questionnaire in September/October 2014 and 512 did so (76% response rate). Participants who did not travel to work were removed from analyses, giving complete data for 473. Participants provided data on usual travel mode to work or study, satisfaction with transport, enjoyment from their commute, and demographics and neighbourhood factors. Results The main mode of travel to work or study in this inner city sample was public transport (41%), followed by motor vehicle (27%), walking (21%) and cycling (10%). Most participants were satisfied with their transport (82%), with little variation by mode. Walkers (49%) and cyclists (52%) reported far higher levels of enjoyment from their commute than car drivers (14%) or public transport users (10%), with an adjusted odds ratio of 6.18 (95% confidence interval 3.10-12.29, P<0.001) for walking and an adjusted odds ratio of 6.15 (95% confidence interval 2.68-14.08, P<0.001) for cycling. Conclusions People who walked or cycled to work or study in inner Sydney reported higher levels of enjoyment from their commute compared with those who drove. This suggests enjoyment may be another benefit of active travel. So what? Focusing on 'enjoyment' associated with walking or cycling to work may be a positive motivator to encourage active travel. PMID

  1. Round-Trip System Available to Measure Path Length Variation in Korea VLBI System for Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Hongjong; Kondo, Tetsuro; Lee, Jinoo; Kim, Tuhwan; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Ju, Hyunhee

    2010-01-01

    The construction project of Korea Geodetic VLBI officially started in October 2008. The construction of all systems will be completed by the end of 2011. The project was named Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG), and its main purpose is to maintain the Korea Geodetic Datum. In case of the KVG system, an observation room with an H-maser frequency standard is located in a building separated from the antenna by several tens of meters. Therefore KVG system will adopt a so-called round-trip system to transmit reference signals to the antenna with reduction of the effect of path length variations. KVG s round-trip system is designed not only to use either metal or optical fiber cables, but also to measure path length variations directly. We present this unique round trip system for KVG.

  2. NEWS: A trip to CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, A. D.

    2000-07-01

    the canteen. Over lunch we mixed with physicists of many different nationalities and backgrounds. Figure 1 Figure 1. In the afternoon we visited Microcosm, the CERN visitors centre, and the LEP control room and also the SPS. Here the students learned new applications for much of the physics of standing waves and resonance that they had been taught in the classroom. Later that night, we visited a bowling alley where momentum and collision theory were put into practice. The following morning we returned to CERN and visited the large magnet testing facility. Here again physics was brought to life. We saw superconducting magnets being assembled and tested and the students gained a real appreciation of the problems and principles involved. The afternoon was rounded off by a visit to a science museum in Geneva - well worth a visit, as some of us still use some of the apparatus on display. Friday was our last full day so we visited Chamonix in the northern Alps. In the morning, we ascended the Aiguille de Midi - by cable car. Twenty minutes and 3842 m later we emerged into 50 km h-1 winds and -10 °C temperature, not counting the -10 °C wind chill factor. A crisp packet provided an unusual demonstration of the effects of air pressure (figure 2). Figure 2 Figure 2. The views from the summit were very spectacular though a few people experienced mild altitude sickness. That afternoon the party went to the Mer de Glace. Being inside a 3 million year-old structure moving down a mountain at 3 cm per day was an interesting experience, as was a tot of whisky with 3 million year-old water. Once again the local scenery was very photogenic and the click and whirr of cameras was a constant background noise. Saturday morning saw an early start for the long drive home. Most students - and some staff - took the opportunity to catch up on their sleep. Thanks are due to many people without whom the trip would never have taken place. Anne Craige, Stuart Williams

  3. Shock Waves and Commutation Speed of Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shao; Tesler, Federico; Marlasca, Fernando Gomez; Levy, Pablo; Dobrosavljević, V.; Rozenberg, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Progress of silicon-based technology is nearing its physical limit, as the minimum feature size of components is reaching a mere 10 nm. The resistive switching behavior of transition metal oxides and the associated memristor device is emerging as a competitive technology for next-generation electronics. Significant progress has already been made in the past decade, and devices are beginning to hit the market; however, this progress has mainly been the result of empirical trial and error. Hence, gaining theoretical insight is of the essence. In the present work, we report the striking result of a connection between the resistive switching and shock-wave formation, a classic topic of nonlinear dynamics. We argue that the profile of oxygen vacancies that migrate during the commutation forms a shock wave that propagates through a highly resistive region of the device. We validate the scenario by means of model simulations and experiments in a manganese-oxide-based memristor device, and we extend our theory to the case of binary oxides. The shock-wave scenario brings unprecedented physical insight and enables us to rationalize the process of oxygen-vacancy-driven resistive change with direct implications for a key technological aspect—the commutation speed.

  4. Variability in baseline travel behaviour as a predictor of changes in commuting by active travel, car and public transport: a natural experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Eva; Ogilvie, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To strengthen our understanding of the impact of baseline variability in mode choice on the likelihood of travel behaviour change. Methods Quasi-experimental analyses in a cohort study of 450 commuters exposed to a new guided busway with a path for walking and cycling in Cambridge, UK. Exposure to the intervention was defined using the shortest network distance from each participant’s home to the busway. Variability in commuter travel behaviour at baseline was defined using the Herfindahl–Hirschman Index, the number of different modes of transport used over a week, and the proportion of trips made by the main (combination of) mode(s). The outcomes were changes in the share of commute trips (i) involving any active travel, (ii) involving any public transport, and (iii) made entirely by car. Variability and change data were derived from a self-reported seven-day record collected before (2009) and after (2012) the intervention. Separate multinomial regression models were estimated to assess the influence of baseline variability on behaviour change, both independently and as an interaction effect with exposure to the intervention. Results All three measures of variability predicted changes in mode share in most models. The effect size for the intervention was slightly strengthened after including variability. Commuters with higher baseline variability were more likely to increase their active mode share (e.g. for HHI: relative risk ratio [RRR] for interaction 3.34, 95% CI 1.41, 7.89) and decrease their car mode share in response to the intervention (e.g. for HHI: RRR 7.50, 95% CI 2.52, 22.34). Conclusions People reporting a higher level of variability in mode choice were more likely to change their travel behaviour following an intervention. Future research should consider such variability as a potential predictor and effect modifier of travel and physical activity behaviour change, and its significance for the design and targeting of interventions. PMID

  5. Unraveling the Image of Commutation Spark Generated in Universal Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazawa, Tamio; Almazroui, Ali; Egashira, Torao

    A universal motor, which is mainly used in vacuum cleaners, generates commutation sparks at the moment when the brush and the commutator segment are separated from each other during rotation. This study investigates the mechanism of commutation spark generation by analyzing high-speed camera images and its electrical aspect. We invented a new external trigger method that used laser light as the trigger signal for the shuttering a high-speed camera. This method enabled us to photograph sparks on any desired commutator segments during high-speed rotation, and that made the analysis after photographing easier. This paper shows that commutation sparks in universal motors are generated on every other commutator segment and at the peak of pulses in the voltage between the brush and commutator segment. Other aspects are also clarified, such as the generation of the singular and plural number of sparks on one commutator segment at a time, the time from the moment of spark generation to extinction, and spark generation during a single rotation.

  6. 75 FR 13680 - Commutation of Sentence: Technical Change

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... Bureau of Prisons 28 CFR Part 571 RIN 1120-AB54 Commutation of Sentence: Technical Change AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Interim rule. SUMMARY: This document makes a minor technical change to the Bureau of Prisons (Bureau) regulations on sentence commutation to clarify that the Bureau...

  7. Parabosonic string and space-time non-commutativity

    SciTech Connect

    Seridi, M. A.; Belaloui, N.

    2012-06-27

    We investigate the para-quantum extension of the bosonic strings in a non-commutative space-time. We calculate the trilinear relations between the mass-center variables and the modes and we derive the Virasoro algebra where a new anomaly term due to the non-commutativity is obtained.

  8. Non-commutative relativistic equation with a Coulomb potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zaim, Slimane; Khodja, Lamine; Delenda, Yazid

    2012-06-27

    We improve the previous study of the Klein-Gordon equation in a non-commutative space-time as applied to the Hydrogen atom to extract the energy levels, by considering the secondorder corrections in the non-commutativity parameter. Phenomenologically we show that noncommutativity plays the role of spin.

  9. Soft commutated direct current motor [summary of proposed paper

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.

    1998-10-22

    A novel soft commutated direct current (DC) motor is introduced. The current of the commutated coil is intentionally drained before the brush disconnects the coil. This prevents the spark generation that normally occurs in conventional DC motors. A similar principle can be applied for DC generators.

  10. Impulse commutating circuit with transformer to limit reapplied voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconville, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Silicon controlled rectifier opens circuit with currents flowing up to values of 30 amperes. Switching concept halves both current and voltage in middle of commutating cycle thereby lowering size and weight requirements. Commutating circuit can be turned on or off by command and will remain on in absence of load due to continuous gate.

  11. Active Commuting Patterns at a Large, Midwestern College Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopp, Melissa; Kaczynski, Andrew; Wittman, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To understand patterns and influences on active commuting (AC) behavior. Participants: Students and faculty/staff at a university campus. Methods: In April-May 2008, respondents answered an online survey about mode of travel to campus and influences on commuting decisions. Hierarchical regression analyses predicted variance in walking…

  12. Understanding What Influences Successful Black Commuter Students' Engagement in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yearwood, Trina Lynn; Jones, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Black and commuter students are disadvantaged when it comes to higher education. Although black students are enrolling in college more than they did in previous years, fewer are earning degrees compared with their counterparts. Research asserts that students who live on campus are more engaged compared with students who commute. This is troubling…

  13. Memorable Experiences of a Science Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Doug

    2000-01-01

    Attempts to learn more about memorable experiences associated with science field trips by conducting a 1-month and an 18-month evaluation of elementary school students who had participated in an environmental science program at a community park in a Midwestern city. Concludes that students' memories were nonspecific and disassociated from…

  14. A Trip to Europe; A Multimedia Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Samuel B., Jr.

    Green Chimneys School, a private school, used its summer session to take an imaginary trip to Europe. In each subject students took part in activities related to travel and European countries. For example, mathematics classes dealt with the monetary system, latitude, longitude, units of measurement, and conversion of money for the countries being…

  15. WIPP site and vicinity geological field trip

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, L.

    1980-10-01

    The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is conducting an assessment of the radiological health risks to people from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As a part of this work, EEG is making an effort to improve the understanding of those geological issues concerning the WIPP site which may affect the radiological consequences of the proposed repository. One of the important geological issues to be resolved is the timing and the nature of the dissolution processes which may have affected the WIPP site. EEG organized a two-day conference of geological scientists, titled Geotechnical Considerations for Radiological Hazard Assessment of WIPP on January 17-18, 1980. During this conference, it was realized that a field trip to the site would further clarify the different views on the geological processes active at the site. The field trip of June 16-18, 1980 was organized for this purpose. This report provides a summary of the field trip activities along with the participants post field trip comments. Important field stops are briefly described, followed by a more detailed discussion of critical geological issues. The report concludes with EEG's summary and recommendations to the US Department of Energy for further information needed to more adequately resolve concerns for the geologic and hydrologic integrity of the site.

  16. Reconceptualizing Electronic Field Trips: A Deweyian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassady, Jerrell C.; Mullen, Laurie J.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic field tripping is a relatively new form of large-scale distance education that attempts to provide contextually rich learning materials embedded within a coherent educational content base. Using Dewey's (1943) framework for the natural learning impulses of children, we describe the potential pedagogical benefits afforded by electronic…

  17. On the Merits of "Unusual Field Trips."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Dean E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the organization and completion of a scientific field trip for a group of high school physics students that was organized primarily around a study of the Manhattan Project. The group visited the Trinity site, Los Alamos, several museums, and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array. Contact information for the various…

  18. Field Trips For Children Under Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leipzig, Judith

    1984-01-01

    This article offers suggestions on planning field trip experiences for young children. Rules should be set and enforced, strollers available, and enough care givers present to manage the group. Grocery stores, fire stations, bookstores, and barbershops are some of the places children enjoy. (DF)

  19. Virtual Field Trips through Video Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pachnowski, Lynne M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of videoconferencing for field trips in elementary and secondary education. Discusses how it works, videoconferencing providers, time involved, costs, amount of interactivity, supplemental hands-on material, content standards, technical support, class preparation, and the need for back-up plans in case of technical difficulties.…

  20. 9 Tips for Affordable Student Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The trick to having a successful and affordable trip is planning ahead and planning thoroughly. Keep the spirits high and the costs low by following a well-traveled ensemble director's suggestions as presented in this article. These tips include finding local attractions that are unique to the city that the group will be visiting, looking at…

  1. School Trips: Are They Worth the Effort?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Even the most basic of school trips will require booking places, arranging transport, writing to parents, collecting payments, planning activities, producing worksheets and, of course, endless risk assessments. It always leaves teachers wondering: "is it really worth all this effort?" Robert Johnston believes that every teacher should…

  2. Field Trip to a Rocky Shore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Cooperative Extension Service.

    Field trip activities designed for use on Maine's coast are provided, with brief definitions of the major physical zones to be found in this area. An introduction to the study of zonation of plants and animals living on the rocky shore is presented along with a list of the materials needed and the procedures to be followed when making a study of…

  3. Trip Leaders Guide. Outdoor Expeditions and Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leister, Bob

    Written to help teachers or leaders plan and lead field trips, excursions, or expeditions which stimulate a motivation to positive action, this pamphlet provides assistance in conducting learning experiences outside the classroom. Topics and subtopics discussed include: (1) Campsites: selection; firebuilding; knives, axes, saws; neat campsites;…

  4. The Educational Value of Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.; Kisida, Brian; Bowen, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The school field trip has a long history in American public education. For decades, students have piled into yellow buses to visit a variety of cultural institutions, including art, natural history, and science museums, as well as theaters, zoos, and historical sites. Schools gladly endured the expense and disruption of providing field trips…

  5. Guidebook for Field Trips in Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exline, Joseph D., Ed.

    Presented is geological information and site descriptions for teachers to use in planning and conducting earth science field trips in Virginia. Among the topics included are: (1) Geology, Soils and Land Use in Central Virginia; (2) Using Coastal Plain Stratigraphy Near Fredericksburg, Virginia as a Teaching Tool; and (3) The Culpepper Basin of the…

  6. Class Trips in Cyberspace: No Passports Required.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberg, Carol S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes examples of electronic field trips for elementary and secondary school students taking place during the 1996-97 school year. Topics include Mayan civilization, wildlife migration, geothermal hot spots, Antarctica, sailboat voyages, baseball and math, viruses, Hong Kong, and offerings from National Geographic. (LRW)

  7. Review on δ-Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) Steels with Low Density: The Concept and Current Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H. L.

    2014-09-01

    Novel alloys with high aluminum addition, so-called δ-transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP), have been developed recently for the third generation of advanced high strength steels for automotive applications, which are promising owing to the potential weldability as well as the combination of strength and ductility. In addition, the high aluminum addition results in a density reduction of approximately 5% in these δ-TRIP alloys without sacrificing the Young's modulus in uniaxial tensile tests. The origin of δ-TRIP concept is introduced first with a review of the published work on δ-TRIP alloys. This review will include methodology for retention of δ-ferrite in casting, rolling and welding conditions, microstructure evolution by austempering, as well as microstructures-properties relationship involving the roles of blocky and lath retained austenite. In addition, currently unresolved problems will be discussed regarding the fundamentals of materials design, automotive application, and industrial manufacturing.

  8. Inflation on a non-commutative space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Fritz, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    We study inflation on a non-commutative space-time within the framework of enveloping algebra approach which allows for a consistent formulation of general relativity and of the standard model of particle physics. We show that within this framework, the effects of the non-commutativity of spacetime are very subtle. The dominant effect comes from contributions to the process of structure formation. We describe the bound relevant to this class of non-commutative theories and derive the tightest bound to date of the value of the non-commutative scale within this framework. Assuming that inflation took place, we get a model independent bound on the scale of space-time non-commutativity of the order of 19 TeV.

  9. Effects of urban growth controls on intercity commuting.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Laudo M

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical study of the effects of urban growth controls on the intercity commuting of workers. Growth controls (land use regulations that attempt to restrict population growth and urban sprawl) have increased housing prices and diverted population growth to uncontrolled cities. It has been suggested that resulting changes in local labour supply might stimulate intercity commuting from uncontrolled to controlled cities. To test this hypothesis, a gravity model of commuting flows between places in California is estimated using alternative econometric methods (OLS, Heckman selection and count-data). The possibility of spatial dependence in commuting flows is also taken into consideration. Results suggest larger commuting flows to destination places that restrict residential growth. PMID:20722227

  10. Almost Commuting Unitary Matrices Related to Time Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, Terry A.; Sørensen, Adam P. W.

    2013-11-01

    The behavior of fermionic systems depends on the geometry of the system and the symmetry class of the Hamiltonian and observables. Almost commuting matrices arise from band-projected position observables in such systems. One expects the mathematical behavior of almost commuting Hermitian matrices to depend on two factors. One factor will be the approximate polynomial relations satisfied by the matrices. The other factor is what algebra the matrices are in, either for , or , the algebra of quaternions. There are potential obstructions keeping k-tuples of almost commuting operators from being close to a commuting k-tuple.We consider two-dimensional geometries and so this obstruction lives in . This obstruction corresponds to either the Chern number or spin Chern number in physics. We show that if this obstruction is the trivial element in K-theory then the approximation by commuting matrices is possible.

  11. Euler polynomials and identities for non-commutative operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Valerio; Vignat, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Three kinds of identities involving non-commutating operators and Euler and Bernoulli polynomials are studied. The first identity, as given by Bender and Bettencourt [Phys. Rev. D 54(12), 7710-7723 (1996)], expresses the nested commutator of the Hamiltonian and momentum operators as the commutator of the momentum and the shifted Euler polynomial of the Hamiltonian. The second one, by Pain [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46, 035304 (2013)], links the commutators and anti-commutators of the monomials of the position and momentum operators. The third appears in a work by Figuieira de Morisson and Fring [J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 9269 (2006)] in the context of non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems. In each case, we provide several proofs and extensions of these identities that highlight the role of Euler and Bernoulli polynomials.

  12. Transforming the radiological interpretation process: the SCAR TRIP initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Morin, Richard L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Carrino, John A.; Erickson, Bradley J.; Horii, Steven C.; Piraino, David W.; Reiner, Bruce I.; Seibert, James A.; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2004-04-01

    The Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) Transforming the Radiological Interpretation Process (TRIP) Initiative aims to spearhead research, education, and discovery of innovative solutions to address the problem of information and image data overload. The initiative will foster inter-disciplinary research on technological, environmental and human factors to better manage and exploit the massive amounts of data. TRIP will focus on the following basic objectives: improving the efficiency of interpretation of large data sets, improving the timeliness and effectiveness of communication, and decreasing medical errors. The ultimate goal of the initiative is to improve the quality and safety of patient care. Interdisciplinary research into several broad areas will be necessary to make progress in managing the ever-increasing volume of data. The six concepts involved include: human perception, image processing and computer-aided detection (CAD), visualization, navigation and usability, databases and integration, and evaluation and validation of methods and performance. The result of this transformation will affect several key processes in radiology, including image interpretation; communication of imaging results; workflow and efficiency within the health care enterprise; diagnostic accuracy and a reduction in medical errors; and, ultimately, the overall quality of care.

  13. Mars rapid round trip mission design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi Amade', Nicola

    The present research is divided in two parts. The first part is a well defined mathematical problem, with exact rules and results, in which the basic constraints for interplanetary round trip travels are used to calculate an interplanetary train schedule (ITS) of missions to Mars, in the general case of orbits with non-zero eccentricity and non-zero inclination. Several possible options for round trip travels to Mars are considered. In particular, options at high energy, which allow rapid round trip missions, are discussed. These options have important applications for human travels to Mars. The second part of the research is about systems engineering aspects, which are intrinsically less exact, since they can change with time due, for example, to technology development or economic and political factors. For the case of a selected human rapid round trip mission to Mars, the development of a mission architecture, an assessment of the masses involved in the mission (such as the initial masses required in LEO), an estimate of the necessary number of launches, and a preliminary analysis of the radiation protection requirements, are performed. The main problem that justifies the existence of basic constraints for round trip missions is that by increasing the DeltaV of a mission, in general the total round trip time does not vary much, because a higher DeltaV can only reduce the transfer time and it simply increases the stay-time on the target planet. However, if the DeltaV is increased beyond a well-defined level, the total round trip time has a sudden drop in duration that makes fast round trips possible. This is due to the fact that the traveler can go back before the home planet makes one extra revolution around the Sun. For a sufficiently high DeltaV, a round trip to Mars can change in duration from 2.7 years to about 5 months. For Mars missions, the round trip times are calculated for different DeltaV's and for different transfer trajectories (T1, T2, etc.). An

  14. Is There "Still" a Considerable Difference? Comparing Residential and Commuter Student Profile Characteristics at a Public, Research, Commuter University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gianoutsos, D.; Rosser, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare the student profile characteristics, which were categorized as demographic, prematriculation, and matriculation, between traditional residential and commuter students at a public, research, commuter university. Using status attainment as the theoretical framework, the researchers employed a discriminant…

  15. Geography via Aerial Field Trips: Do It This Way, 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richason, Benjamin F., Jr.; Guell, Carl E.

    To provide guidance for geography teachers, this booklet presents information on how to plan and execute aerial field trips. The aerial field trip can be employed as an effective visual aid technique in the teaching of geography, especially for presenting earth generalizations and interrelationships. The benefits of an aerial field trip are…

  16. A Trip to the Zoo: Children's Words and Photographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarie, Darlene

    Field trips are a regular part of many programs for young children. Field trips can serve a variety of purposes, such as exposing children to new things or helping children to see familiar things in new ways. The purpose of this study was to learn the meaning children gave to a field trip. Cameras were made available to each of the children in a…

  17. Probabilistic methods in a study of trip setpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Kaulitz, D. E.

    2012-07-01

    Most early vintage Boiling Water Reactors have a high head and high capacity High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) pump to keep the core covered following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). However, the protection afforded by the HPCI pump for mitigating a LOCA introduces the potential that a spurious start of the HPCI pump could oversupply the reactor vessel and lead to an automatic trip of the main turbine due to high water level. A turbine trip and associated increase in moderator density could challenge the bases of fuel integrity operating limits. To prevent turbine trip during spurious operation of the HPCI pump, the reactor protection system includes instrumentation and logic to sense high water level and automatically trip the HPCI pump prior to reaching the turbine trip setpoint. This paper describes an analysis that was performed to determine if existing reactor vessel water level trip instrumentation, logic and setpoints result in a high probability that the HPCI pump will trip prior to actuation of the turbine trip. Using nominal values for the initial water level and for the HPCI pump and turbine trip setpoints, and using the probability distribution functions for measurement uncertainty in these setpoints, a Monte Carlo simulation was employed to determine probabilities of successfully tripping the HPCI pump prior to tripping of the turbine. The results of the analysis established that the existing setpoints, instrumentation and logic would be expected to reliably prevent a trip of the main turbine. (authors)

  18. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., father, brother, sister, spouse, children, step-parents, and foster parents. (2) Non-emergency, non... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Non-medical escorted trips. 570.42... RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.42 Non-medical escorted trips. (a) Non-medical...

  19. A Field Trip Planning Guide for Early Childhood Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sylvia S.; Seevers, Randy L.

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a guide for planning field trips for educational engagement of all children in early childhood education settings. Based on interviews, environmental assessments, and evaluations of activities, it includes field trip considerations and a field trip planning guide that includes the teacher, the parents, and the field site…

  20. Teachers' Sources of Knowledge for Field Trip Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebar, Bryan M.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers draw from many personal and professional experiences when organising and leading field trips. In order to identify the influences on teachers' field trip practices, I used surveys, interviews, artifacts and observations gathered from teachers who led trips to an aquarium. Findings clarified the types of influence and the impact that these…

  1. Revisiting Virtual Field Trips: Perspectives of College Science Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Field trips are an important component of upper undergraduate and graduate-level science courses, especially in the fields of biology, geoscience, and environmental science. Field trips can provide a new perspective to a course's content and quality. Science field trips can facilitate active student learning, yet often can be constrained by time,…

  2. Personal and Environmental Characteristics Associated with Choice of Active Transport Modes versus Car Use for Different Trip Purposes of Trips up to 7.5 Kilometers in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Eline; Wendel-Vos, Wanda; van Kempen, Elise; Panis, Luc Int; Maas, Jolanda; Stipdonk, Henk; Moerman, Menno; den Hertog, Frank; Staatsen, Brigit; van Wesemael, Pieter; Schuit, Jantine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This explorative study examines personal and neighbourhood characteristics associated with short-distance trips made by car, bicycle or walking in order to identify target groups for future interventions. Methods Data were derived from ‘Mobility Research Netherlands (2004–2009; MON)’, a dataset including information regarding trips made by household members (n = ±53,000 respondents annually). Using postal codes of household addresses, MON data were enriched with data on neighbourhood typologies. Multilevel logistic modelling was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) of active transport versus car use associated with four different trip purposes (shopping (reference), commuting, taking or bringing persons or sports). A total of 277,292 short distance trips made by 102,885 persons were included in analyses. Results Compared to women shopping, women less often take active transport to sports clubs (OR = 0.88) and men less often take active transport for shopping (OR = 0.92), or for bringing or taking persons (OR = 0.76). Those aged 25–34 years (OR = 0.83) and 35–44 years (OR = 0.96) were more likely to use active transport for taking or bringing persons than persons belonging to the other age groups (relative to trips made for shopping by those 65 years or over). A higher use of active transport modes by persons with an university or college degree was found and particularly persons living in urban-centre neighbourhoods were likely to use active transport modes. Conclusion In developing policies promoting a mode shift special attention should be given to the following groups: a) men making short distance trips for taking or bringing persons, b) women making short distance trips to sport facilities, c) persons belonging to the age groups of 25–44 years of age, d) Persons with a primary school or lower general secondary education degree and persons with a high school or secondary school degree and e) persons living in rural

  3. Using Virtual Field Trips to Connect Students with University Scientists: Core Elements and Evaluation of zipTrips[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedokun, Omolola A.; Hetzel, Kristin; Parker, Loran Carleton; Loizzo, Jamie; Burgess, Wilella D.; Robinson, J. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Physical field trips to scientists' work places have been shown to enhance student perceptions of science, scientists and science careers. Although virtual field trips (VFTs) have emerged as viable alternatives (or supplements) to traditional physical fieldtrips, little is known about the potential of virtual field trips to provide the same or…

  4. Accelerating commutation circuits in quantum computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Huang, Xu; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zeng-ke

    2012-12-01

    In a high speed and packet-switched quantum computer network, a packet routing delay often leads to traffic jams, becoming a severe bottleneck for speeding up the transmission rate. Based on the delayed commutation circuit proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 110502 (2006), we present an improved scheme for accelerating network transmission. For two more realistic scenarios, we utilize the characteristic of a quantum state to simultaneously implement a data switch and transmission that makes it possible to reduce the packet delay and route a qubit packet even before its address is determined. This circuit is further extended to the quantum network for the transmission of the unknown quantum information. The analysis demonstrates that quantum communication technology can considerably reduce the processing delay time and build faster and more efficient packet-switched networks.

  5. A non-commuting stabilizer formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Xiaotong; Van den Nest, Maarten; Buerschaper, Oliver

    2015-05-15

    We propose a non-commutative extension of the Pauli stabilizer formalism. The aim is to describe a class of many-body quantum states which is richer than the standard Pauli stabilizer states. In our framework, stabilizer operators are tensor products of single-qubit operators drawn from the group 〈αI, X, S〉, where α = e{sup iπ/4} and S = diag(1, i). We provide techniques to efficiently compute various properties related to bipartite entanglement, expectation values of local observables, preparation by means of quantum circuits, parent Hamiltonians, etc. We also highlight significant differences compared to the Pauli stabilizer formalism. In particular, we give examples of states in our formalism which cannot arise in the Pauli stabilizer formalism, such as topological models that support non-Abelian anyons.

  6. Electronically commutated dc motors for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslowski, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A motor development program to explore the feasibility of electronically commutated dc motors (also known as brushless) for electric cars is described. Two different design concepts and a number of design variations based on these concepts are discussed. One design concept is based on a permanent magnet, medium speed, machine rated at 7000 to 9000 rpm, and powered via a transistor inverter power conditioner. The other concept is based on a permanent magnet, high speed, machine rated at 22,000 to 26,000 rpm, and powered via a thyristor inverter power conditioner. Test results are presented for a medium speed motor and a high speed motor each of which have been fabricated using samarium cobalt permanent magnet material.

  7. TRIPS-plus and access to medicines in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Nie, Xiaoyan; Yao, Peng; Shi, Luwen

    2013-05-01

    Ample evidence shows that Trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPS)-plus provisions have seriously affected access to and availability of drugs in the developing countries. In recent years, developed countries have pressured many developing countries to implement TRIPS with stronger intellectual property (IP) protection than required by the TRIPS Agreement. The stronger provisions are called TRIPS-Plus provisions. This article focuses on IP and the health implications of limited access to medicines in China, explores the TRIPS-plus arrangements in Chinese IP laws and regulations, and makes suggestions for China's negotiation strategy in resisting pressure from developed countries to tighten IP laws and regulations. PMID:23552834

  8. Commuting behavior of western U.S. residents

    SciTech Connect

    Caviglia, J. |

    1996-06-01

    Estimation and interpretation of commutes to work has been studied extensively with respect to gender, race, and income. While the literature is extensive in these areas, there has been little research on regional differences between US states and territories. Since data which reports the commute to work is in average minutes, the distance traveled is estimated using estimates of the distance between home and work county centroids. The models differ in estimation of in-county commutes. The first assumes that the commute is equal to the radius of the county and the second estimates the commute as a weighted distance based on place location. Two data sets are compared, US National Guard data and US census data. Goal of this paper is to make conclusions about the commuting behavior of western residents through the use of these estimates, and therefore to provide a estimation method for distance commutes which can be used in further research. It is concluded that the radius method of estimation may be an over estimation, in particular in the western states. Since the non-western states are generally more homogeneously populated, this overestimation is not observed. It is recommended that the place location method be used for similar research, in particular studies dealing with western states. Suggestions are made for further research and recommendations are made for the US Army National Guard in regards to recruiting.

  9. Physical activity during leisure and commuting in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Pekkarinen, Heikki; Hänninen, Osmo; Yu, Zhijie; Tian, Huiguang; Guo, Zeyu; Nissinen, Aulikki

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate physical activity during leisure time and commuting among persons aged 15-69 years in the urban population of Tianjin, China, and to assess its associations with demographic and health-related characteristics. METHODS: In 1996 a cross-sectional survey of 2002 males and 1974 females provided information on physical activity during leisure time and commuting and on demographics and health behaviours. FINDINGS: No leisure-time physical activity was engaged in by 67% of females and 61% of males. However, only 4% of females and 9% of males reported an absence of physical activity during commuting. The mean duration of leisure-time physical activity for the whole population was about 10 min per day. The average commuting time on foot or by bicycle was about 30 min. Leisure-time physical activity was more frequent among highly educated people, people with high incomes, white-collar workers, married people, non-smokers, or people commuting on foot or by bicycle than among other people. Persons with low incomes, male blue-collar workers and married people were more likely than others to engage in 30 min or more per day of physical activity on foot or by bicycle when commuting. CONCLUSION: People in Tianjin engaged in a high level of physical activity when commuting and a low level of leisure-time physical activity. PMID:12571720

  10. The Return Trip Is Felt Shorter Only Postdictively: A Psychophysiological Study of the Return Trip Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Ryosuke; Fujii, Keisuke; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    The return trip often seems shorter than the outward trip even when the distance and actual time are identical. To date, studies on the return trip effect have failed to confirm its existence in a situation that is ecologically valid in terms of environment and duration. In addition, physiological influences as part of fundamental timing mechanisms in daily activities have not been investigated in the time perception literature. The present study compared round-trip and non-round-trip conditions in an ecological situation. Time estimation in real time and postdictive estimation were used to clarify the situations where the return trip effect occurs. Autonomic nervous system activity was evaluated from the electrocardiogram using the Lorenz plot to demonstrate the relationship between time perception and physiological indices. The results suggest that the return trip effect is caused only postdictively. Electrocardiographic analysis revealed that the two experimental conditions induced different responses in the autonomic nervous system, particularly in sympathetic nervous function, and that parasympathetic function correlated with postdictive timing. To account for the main findings, the discrepancy between the two time estimates is discussed in the light of timing strategies, i.e., prospective and retrospective timing, which reflect different emphasis on attention and memory processes. Also each timing method, i.e., the verbal estimation, production or comparative judgment, has different characteristics such as the quantification of duration in time units or knowledge of the target duration, which may be responsible for the discrepancy. The relationship between postdictive time estimation and the parasympathetic nervous system is also discussed. PMID:26061138

  11. The FM-007: An advanced jet commuter for HUB to spoke transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blouke, Peter Scott; Engel, George Bryan; Fordham, Kari Suzanne; Layne, Steven James; Moore, Joel David; Shaver, Frederick Martin; Thornton, Douglas Hershal, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the increasing need for new commuter aircraft, the FM-007 is proposed, a technologically advanced jet propelled short takeoff and landing (STOL) airplane. The proposed commuter is designed for hub to spoke air travel. In order to reduce drag, natural laminar flow technology is integrated into the design using the natural laminar flow airfoil section for the wing. A three lifting surface configuration provides for more efficient cruise flight. This unique design includes a small forward wing (canard), a rear mounted high aspect ratio main wing, and a small horizontal stabilizer high atop the vertical tail. These three surfaces act together to reduce drag by minimizing the downward force the horizontal stabilizer has to account for due to the nose down pitching moment. Commuter aircraft must also incorporate passenger comfort. This is achieved by providing a spacious pressurized cabin with a large galley and reduced cabin noise due to incorporation of noise reduction gear. A basic oval design is adopted, as opposed to a circular design in order to allow for the seating of five passengers abreast. To get STOL capability, an over the wing blown flap is used using a Rolls Royce Tay series engine.

  12. Field trips along the Geological Transpyrenean Road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgio, Marion; Dekeyser, Dominique; Richert, Jean Paul; Gruneisen, Pierre; Vazquez-Prada, Diego; Lacazedieu, Annie

    2015-04-01

    GeolVal association, www.geolval.fr , in collaboration with Geoambiente association, created a serie of pedagogical explanations about Pyrenees landscapes along the road from France to Spain, linking the towns of Pau, Oloron,Jaca and Mallos de Riglos. It was a ten years work that lasted in 2008. http://www.routetranspyreneenne.com/home_f.php We can now use this "treasure" with tourists, students and mix some landscapes explanations from a road site with a little field trip along mountain in order to "touch" the rocks. We are working about the importance of field in the way the students understand geosciences and try to organize field trips that aim to simplify and make concrete some key concepts. We also began an interactive software version of this work, presented through a pilot application, made in collaboration with Total petroleum firm.

  13. Mechanism For Adjustment Of Commutation Of Brushless Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanism enables adjustment of angular position of set of Hall-effect devices that sense instantaneous shaft angle of brushless dc motor. Outputs of sensors fed to commutation circuitry. Measurement of shaft angle essential for commutation; that is, application of voltage to stator windings must be synchronized with shaft angle. To obtain correct angle measurement for commutation, Hall-effect angle sensors positioned at proper reference angle. The present mechanism accelerates adjustment procedure and makes it possible to obtain more accurate indication of minimum-current position because it provides for adjustment while motor running.

  14. Generalized Uncertainty Relation in the Non-commutative Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the non-commutative quantum mechanics (NCQM) with the generalized uncertainty relations {Δ } x1 {Δ } x2 ≥ {θ}/{2}, {Δ} p1 {Δ } p2 ≥ {bar{θ}}/{2}, {Δ } xi {Δ } pi ≥ {hbar _{eff}}/{2} is discussed. Four each uncertainty relation, wave functions saturating each uncertainty relation are explicitly constructed. The unitary operators relating the non-commutative position and momentum operators to the commutative position and momentum operators are also investigated. We also discuss the uncertainty relation related to the harmonic oscillator.

  15. Naturalistic cycling study: identifying risk factors for on-road commuter cyclists.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marilyn; Charlton, Judith; Oxley, Jennifer; Newstead, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The study aim was to identify risk factors for collisions/near-collisions involving on-road commuter cyclists and drivers. A naturalistic cycling study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, with cyclists wearing helmet-mounted video cameras. Video recordings captured cyclists' perspective of the road and traffic behaviours including head checks, reactions and manoeuvres. The 100-car naturalistic driving study analysis technique was adapted for data analysis and events were classified by severity: collision, near-collision and incident. Participants were adult cyclists and each filmed 12 hours of commuter cycling trips over a 4-week period. In total, 127 hours and 38 minutes were analysed for 13 participants, 54 events were identified: 2 collisions, 6 near-collisions and 46 incidents. Prior to events, 88.9% of cyclists travelled in a safe/legal manner. Sideswipe was the most frequent event type (40.7%). Most events occurred at an intersection/intersection-related location (70.3%). The vehicle driver was judged at fault in the majority of events (87.0%) and no post-event driver reaction was observed (83.3%). Cross tabulations revealed significant associations between event severity and: cyclist reaction, cyclist post-event manoeuvre, pre-event driver behaviour, other vehicle involved, driver reaction, visual obstruction, cyclist head check (left), event type and vehicle location (p<0.05). Frequent head checks suggest cyclists had high situational awareness and their reactive behaviour to driver actions led to successful avoidance of collisions/near-collisions. Strategies to improve driver awareness of on-road cyclists and to indicate early before turning/changing lanes when sharing the roadway with cyclists are discussed. Findings will contribute to the development of effective countermeasures to reduce cyclist trauma. PMID:21050610

  16. Naturalistic Cycling Study: Identifying Risk Factors for On-Road Commuter Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Marilyn; Charlton, Judith; Oxley, Jennifer; Newstead, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The study aim was to identify risk factors for collisions/near-collisions involving on-road commuter cyclists and drivers. A naturalistic cycling study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, with cyclists wearing helmet-mounted video cameras. Video recordings captured cyclists’ perspective of the road and traffic behaviours including head checks, reactions and manoeuvres. The 100-car naturalistic driving study analysis technique was adapted for data analysis and events were classified by severity: collision, near-collision and incident. Participants were adult cyclists and each filmed 12 hours of commuter cycling trips over a 4-week period. In total, 127 hours and 38 minutes were analysed for 13 participants, 54 events were identified: 2 collisions, 6 near-collisions and 46 incidents. Prior to events, 88.9% of cyclists travelled in a safe/legal manner. Sideswipe was the most frequent event type (40.7%). Most events occurred at an intersection/intersection-related location (70.3%). The vehicle driver was judged at fault in the majority of events (87.0%) and no post-event driver reaction was observed (83.3%). Cross tabulations revealed significant associations between event severity and: cyclist reaction, cyclist post-event manoeuvre, pre-event driver behaviour, other vehicle involved, driver reaction, visual obstruction, cyclist head check (left), event type and vehicle location (p<0.05). Frequent head checks suggest cyclists had high situational awareness and their reactive behaviour to driver actions led to successful avoidance of collisions/near-collisions. Strategies to improve driver awareness of on-road cyclists and to indicate early before turning/changing lanes when sharing the roadway with cyclists are discussed. Findings will contribute to the development of effective countermeasures to reduce cyclist trauma. PMID:21050610

  17. Scrutinized: the TRIPS agreement and public health.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Junaid

    2006-07-01

    The World Trade Organization's (WTO's) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) of 1994 seeks to implement a uniform set of intellectual property protection across member nations to provide greater stability in international economic relations. Critics argue that the TRIPS agreement provides unnecessarily strong protection of intellectual property rights which serves to prevent the ill in developing nations from having access to affordable essential medications. The first recommendation that this paper makes is to provide two sets of intellectual property protection, one that applies to essential medications such as AIDS drugs and certain antibiotics and another that applies to drugs that treat non-life threatening conditions. The second recommendation builds upon the first recommendation: if two sets of intellectual property protection legislation are enacted, patents on essential medications should be restricted to patents on processes rather than the product itself. The third recommendation seeks to amend the language of the TRIPS agreement to make it obligatory for member nations to implement provisions on compulsory licensing within their domestic legislation. PMID:18523624

  18. Scrutinized: The TRIPS Agreement and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Subhan, Junaid

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The World Trade Organization’s (WTO’s) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) of 1994 seeks to implement a uniform set of intellectual property protection across member nations to provide greater stability in international economic relations. Critics argue that the TRIPS agreement provides unnecessarily strong protection of intellectual property rights which serves to prevent the ill in developing nations from having access to affordable essential medications. The first recommendation that this paper makes is to provide two sets of intellectual property protection, one that applies to essential medications such as AIDS drugs and certain antibiotics and another that applies to drugs that treat non-life threatening conditions. The second recommendation builds upon the first recommendation: if two sets of intellectual property protection legislation are enacted, patents on essential medications should be restricted to patents on processes rather than the product itself. The third recommendation seeks to amend the language of the TRIPS agreement to make it obligatory for member nations to implement provisions on compulsory licensing within their domestic legislation. PMID:18523624

  19. Fast round-trip Mars trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sam

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of limiting the overall duration or else the one-way flight time of a round trip to Mars, as reflected in the sum of impulsive velocity increments required of the spacecraft propulsion system. Ignition-to-burnout mass ratios for a hypothetical single stage spacecraft, obtained from the rocket equation by combining these delta-V sums with appropriate values of specific impulse, are used to evaluate the relative effectiveness of four high-thrust propulsion alternatives. If the flight crew goes to the surface of Mars and stays there for the duration of their stopover, it is much cheaper (in terms of delta-V) to minimize their zero-g exposure by limiting the interplanetary transit time of a conjunction-class mission (round trip time = 800-1000 days, Mars stopover = 450-700 days) than to impose the same limit on an opposition-class mission (round trip time less than 600 days, stopover = 40 days). Using solid-core nuclear thermal propulsion to fly a conjunction-class mission, for a moderate mass penalty the interplanetary transit time (each way) probably could be limited to something in the range of 4 to 6 months, depending on the launch year.

  20. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  1. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  2. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  3. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  4. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... evaluation of commuter category airplanes. 23.574 Section 23.574 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes. For commuter category airplanes— (a) Metallic damage tolerance....

  5. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  6. Inertial spin Hall effect in non-commutative space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, B.; Chowdhury, Debashree; Ghosh, Subir

    2013-10-01

    In the present Letter the study of inertial spin current (that appears in an accelerated frame of reference) is extended to Non-Commutative (NC) space. In the Hamiltonian framework, the Dirac Hamiltonian in an accelerating frame is computed in the low energy regime by exploiting the Foldy-Wouthuysen scheme. The NC θ-effect appears from the replacement of normal products and commutators by Moyal *-products and *-commutators. In particular, the commutator between the external magnetic vector potential and the potential induced by acceleration becomes non-trivial. Expressions for θ-corrected inertial spin current and conductivity are derived explicitly. We have provided yet another way of experimentally measuring θ. The θ bound is obtained from the out of plane spin polarization, which is experimentally observable.

  7. Strong Planck constraints on braneworld and non-commutative inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Ohashi, Junko; Tsujikawa, Shinji E-mail: skuro@rs.tus.ac.jp E-mail: shinji@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp

    2014-03-01

    We place observational likelihood constraints on braneworld and non-commutative inflation for a number of inflaton potentials, using Planck, WMAP polarization and BAO data. Both braneworld and non-commutative scenarios of the kind considered here are limited by the most recent data even more severely than standard general-relativity models. At more than 95 % confidence level, the monomial potential V(φ)∝φ{sup p} is ruled out for p ≥ 2 in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) braneworld cosmology and, for p > 0, also in the high-curvature limit of the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) braneworld and in the infrared limit of non-commutative inflation, due to a large scalar spectral index. Some parameter values for natural inflation, small-varying inflaton models and Starobinsky inflation are allowed in all scenarios, although some tuning is required for natural inflation in a non-commutative spacetime.

  8. Utility of an alternative bicycle commute route of lower proximity to motorised traffic in decreasing exposure to ultra-fine particles, respiratory symptoms and airway inflammation – a structured exposure experiment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bicycle commuting in an urban environment of high air pollution is known to be a potential health risk, especially for susceptible individuals. While risk management strategies aimed to reduce exposure to motorised traffic emissions have been suggested, only limited studies have assessed the utility of such strategies in real-world circumstances. Objectives The potential to lower exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP; < 0.1 μm) during bicycle commuting by reducing proximity to motorised traffic was investigated with real-time air pollution and intermittent acute inflammatory measurements in healthy individuals using their typical higher proximity, and an alternative lower proximity, bicycle commute route. Methods Thirty-five healthy adults (mean ± SD: age = 39 ± 11 yr; 29% female) completed two return trips, one each in the condition of their typical route (HIGH) and a pre-determined alternative route of lower proximity to motorised traffic (LOW); proximity being determined by the proportion of on-road cycle paths. Particle number concentration (PNC) and diameter (PD) were monitored in-commute in real-time. Acute inflammatory indices of respiratory symptoms (as a scalar of frequency from very low to very high / 1 to 5), lung function and spontaneous sputum (for inflammatory cell analyses) were collected immediately pre-commute, and immediately and three hours post-commute. Results In the condition of LOW, compared to in the condition of HIGH, there was a significant decrease in mean PNC (1.91 x e4 ± 0.93 × e4 ppcc vs. 2.95 × e4 ± 1.50 × e4 ppcc; p ≤ 0.001), and the mean frequency of in-commute offensive odour detection (2.1 vs. 2.8; p = 0.019), dust and soot observation (1.7 vs. 2.3; p = 0.038) and nasopharyngeal irritation (1.5 vs. 1.9; p = 0.007). There were no significant differences between LOW and HIGH in the commute distance and duration (12.8 ± 7.1 vs. 12.0 ± 6.9 km and 44 ± 17 vs. 42 ± 17 min, respectively), or other indices of

  9. Classical limits of quantum mechanics on a non-commutative configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Benatti, Fabio; Gouba, Laure

    2013-06-15

    We consider a model of non-commutative quantum mechanics given by two harmonic oscillators over a non-commutative two dimensional configuration space. We study possible ways of removing the non-commutativity based on the classical limit context known as anti-Wick quantization. We show that removal of non-commutativity from the configuration space and from the canonical operators is not commuting operation.

  10. Non-commutativity, teleology and GRB time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Pang, Yi; Wang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model in which an energy-dependent time delay of a photon originates from space-time non-commutativity, the time delay is due to a non-commutative coupling between dilaton and photon. We predict that in our model, high energy photons with different momentum can either be delayed or superluminal, this may be related to a possible time delay reported by the Fermi LAT and Fermi GBM Collaborations.

  11. What interventions increase commuter cycling? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Glenn; Anokye, Nana Kwame; Pokhrel, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify interventions that will increase commuter cycling. Setting All settings where commuter cycling might take place. Participants Adults (aged 18+) in any country. Interventions Individual, group or environmental interventions including policies and infrastructure. Primary and secondary outcome measures A wide range of ‘changes in commuter cycling’ indicators, including frequency of cycling, change in workforce commuting mode, change in commuting population transport mode, use of infrastructure by defined populations and population modal shift. Results 12 studies from 6 countries (6 from the UK, 2 from Australia, 1 each from Sweden, Ireland, New Zealand and the USA) met the inclusion criteria. Of those, 2 studies were randomised control trials and the remainder preintervention and postintervention studies. The majority of studies (n=7) evaluated individual-based or group-based interventions and the rest environmental interventions. Individual-based or group-based interventions in 6/7 studies were found to increase commuter cycling of which the effect was significant in only 3/6 studies. Environmental interventions, however, had small but positive effects in much larger but more difficult to define populations. Almost all studies had substantial loss to follow-up. Conclusions Despite commuter cycling prevalence varying widely between countries, robust evidence of what interventions will increase commuter cycling in low cycling prevalence nations is sparse. Wider environmental interventions that make cycling conducive appear to reach out to hard to define but larger populations. This could mean that environmental interventions, despite their small positive effects, have greater public health significance than individual-based or group-based measures because those interventions encourage a larger number of people to integrate physical activity into their everyday lives. PMID:26275902

  12. A Homemade Autosampler/Injector Commutator for Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, Eduardo Costa; de Souza, Leandro Ruela; de Magalhães, Cristiana Schmidt; Wisniewski, Célio

    2006-01-01

    An autosampler/injector commutator for flow injection analysis (FIA) was constructed with electronic components of used equipments. The apparatus is controlled by commercially available multifunctional interface (PCL711B) connected to a personal computer, and the software was written in Visual Basic language. The system was applied to water analysis and it presented satisfactory results. The low cost and simplicity are the principal characteristics of the autosampler/injector commutator. PMID:17671617

  13. Electronically commutated serial-parallel switching for motor windings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.

    2012-03-27

    A method and a circuit for controlling an ac machine comprises controlling a full bridge network of commutation switches which are connected between a multiphase voltage source and the phase windings to switch the phase windings between a parallel connection and a series connection while providing commutation discharge paths for electrical current resulting from inductance in the phase windings. This provides extra torque for starting a vehicle from lower battery current.

  14. The Langley turbo-prop commuter design: A complete project description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttram, Greg; Horton, Keith; Keeter, Tim; Millhouse, Paul; Newberry, Kelli; Obyrne, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to propose and prove the possibility of a new, advanced technology commuter aircraft design. Among the specifications were short to medium range capabilities, low seat per mile cost, fuel efficiency, and passenger comfort. Based on market evaluation, we found that the optimum size for new regional aircraft is around 50 passengers; we have designed our aircraft for this capacity. Turboprop engines provide substantial reductions in operating costs due to lower fuel consumption. We have therefore chosen an advanced turboprop engine. Composite materials, while more expensive to purchase and manufacture, result in decreased costs later through weight savings and ease of replacement.

  15. The impact of a Bus Rapid Transit system on commuters' exposure to Benzene, CO, PM 2.5 and PM 10 in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhrnschimmel, Henry; Zuk, Miriam; Martínez-Villa, Gerardo; Cerón, Julia; Cárdenas, Beatriz; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Fernández-Bremauntz, Adrián

    Carbon monoxide (CO), benzene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and suspended particles PM 2.5 and PM 10 were measured inside public transportation vehicles, before and after a new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system was implemented in Mexico City in June 2005. The objective was to evaluate the BRT system's impact on commuters' exposure to these air pollutants. The BRT system replaced conventional transport modes along 20 km of Insurgentes Avenue, and features confined corridors and new articulated diesel buses. We assessed the impact of the transportation mode on commuters' exposure using least squares regression models. We also analyzed the chemical composition of VOCs to evaluate the possible origin of these species. The implementation of the BRT system resulted in reductions in commuters' exposure to CO, benzene and PM 2.5 ranging between 20% and 70%. No significant reductions in PM 10 exposure were observed. Lower commuting times further reduced total commuters' exposure. Major sources affecting VOCs inside all transport modes are likely to be related to traffic and to emissions from the use of Liquefied Petroleum Gas. The results suggest that BRT systems could in general be an effective means of reducing human exposure to traffic related air pollutants and associated health impacts.

  16. Massive neutrinos in almost-commutative geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Christoph A.

    2007-02-01

    In the noncommutative formulation of the standard model of particle physics by Chamseddine and Connes [Commun. Math. Phys. 182, 155 (1996), e-print hep-th/9606001], one of the three generations of fermions has to possess a massless neutrino. [C. P. Martin et al., Phys. Rep. 29, 363 (1998), e-print hep-th-9605001]. This formulation is consistent with neutrino oscillation experiments and the known bounds of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix (PMNS matrix). But future experiments which may be able to detect neutrino masses directly and high-precision measurements of the PMNS matrix might need massive neutrinos in all three generations. In this paper we present an almost-commutative geometry which allows for a standard model with massive neutrinos in all three generations. This model does not follow in a straightforward way from the version of Chamseddine and Connes since it requires an internal algebra with four summands of matrix algebras, instead of three summands for the model with one massless neutrino.

  17. Massive neutrinos in almost-commutative geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Christoph A.

    2007-02-15

    In the noncommutative formulation of the standard model of particle physics by Chamseddine and Connes [Commun. Math. Phys. 182, 155 (1996), e-print hep-th/9606001], one of the three generations of fermions has to possess a massless neutrino. [C. P. Martin et al., Phys. Rep. 29, 363 (1998), e-print hep-th-9605001]. This formulation is consistent with neutrino oscillation experiments and the known bounds of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix (PMNS matrix). But future experiments which may be able to detect neutrino masses directly and high-precision measurements of the PMNS matrix might need massive neutrinos in all three generations. In this paper we present an almost-commutative geometry which allows for a standard model with massive neutrinos in all three generations. This model does not follow in a straightforward way from the version of Chamseddine and Connes since it requires an internal algebra with four summands of matrix algebras, instead of three summands for the model with one massless neutrino.

  18. Hunton Group core workshop and field trip

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.S.

    1993-12-31

    The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

  19. Predictors of trips to food destinations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Food environment studies have focused on ethnic and income disparities in food access. Few studies have investigated distance travelled for food and did not aim to inform the geographic scales at which to study the relationship between food environments and obesity. Further, studies have not considered neighborhood design as a predictor of food purchasing behavior. Methods Atlanta residents (N = 4800) who completed a travel diary and reported purchasing or consuming food at one of five food locations were included in the analyses. A total of 11,995 food-related trips were reported. Using mixed modeling to adjust for clustering of trips by participants and households, person-level variables (e.g. demographics), neighborhood-level urban form measures, created in GIS, and trip characteristics (e.g. time of day, origin and destination) were investigated as correlates of distance travelled for food and frequency of grocery store and fast food outlet trips. Results Mean travel distance for food ranged from 4.5 miles for coffee shops to 6.3 miles for superstores. Type of store, urban form, type of tour, day of the week and ethnicity were all significantly related to distance travelled for food. Origin and destination environment, type of tour, day of week, age, gender, income, ethnicity, vehicle access and obesity status were all significantly related to visiting a grocery store. Home neighborhood environment, day of week, type of tour, gender, income, education level, age, and obesity status were all significantly related to likelihood of visiting a fastfood outlet. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that people travel sizeable distances for food and this distance is related to urban. Results suggest that researchers need to employ different methods to characterize food environments than have been used to assess urban form in studies of physical activity. Food is most often purchased while traveling from locations other than home, so future studies

  20. Study of an intraurban travel demand model incorporating commuter preference variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holligan, P. E.; Coote, M. A.; Rushmer, C. R.; Fanning, M. L.

    1971-01-01

    The model is based on the substantial travel data base for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. The model is of the abstract type, and makes use of commuter attitudes towards modes and simple demographic characteristics of zones in a region to predict interzonal travel by mode for the region. A characterization of the STOL/VTOL mode was extrapolated by means of a subjective comparison of its expected characteristics with those of modes characterized by the survey. Predictions of STOL demand were made for the Bay Area and an aircraft network was developed to serve this demand. When this aircraft system is compared to the base case system, the demand for STOL service has increased five fold and the resulting economics show considerable benefit from the increased scale of operations. In the previous study all systems required subsidy in varying amounts. The new system shows a substantial profit at an average fare of $3.55 per trip.

  1. The active commuting route environment scale (ACRES): development and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Route environments can be a potentially important factor in influencing people's behaviours in relation to active commuting. To better understand these possible relationships, assessments of route environments are needed. We therefore developed a scale; the Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES), for the assessment of bicyclists' and pedestrians' perceptions of their commuting route environments. Here we will report on the development and the results of validity and reliability assessments thereof. Methods Active commuters (n = 54) were recruited when they bicycled in Stockholm, Sweden. Traffic planning and environmental experts from the Municipality of Stockholm were assembled to form an expert panel (n = 24). The active commuters responded to the scale on two occasions, and the expert panel responded to it once. To test criterion-related validity, differences in ratings of the inner urban and suburban environments of Greater Stockholm were compared between the experts and the commuters. Furthermore, four items were compared with existing objective measures. Test-retest reproducibility was assessed with three types of analysis: order effect, typical error and intraclass correlation. Results There was a concordance in sizes and directions of differences in ratings of inner urban and suburban environments between the experts and the commuters. Furthermore, both groups' ratings were in line with existing objectively measured differences between the two environmental settings. Order effects between test and retest were observed in 6 of 36 items. The typical errors ranged from 0.93 to 2.54, and the intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 'moderate' (0.42) to 'almost perfect' (0.87). Conclusions The ACRES was characterized by considerable criterion-related validity and reasonable test-retest reproducibility. PMID:20609250

  2. Mediating cultural borders during science field trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebak, Kimberly

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, I analyze teacher and student roles in the teaching and learning of science at an informal learning center, The Outdoor Classroom. As a white middle class informal learning science teacher, I examine my struggles to teach science to students across boundaries of race, class, gender, and experience with the outdoors during field trips. Through the field trip I did not have the time or face-to-face experience to make sense of the students' culture, see their culture in terms of capital, and align my enactment to benefit their learning. Likewise, the students did not have the time or face-to-face experience with me in order to adapt their cultural capital and build the essential stocks of symbolic and social capital. This research demonstrates how the classroom teacher draws upon previous transactions and emotions to successfully engage her students in practices that promote the participation and learning of science. Through creating culturally adaptive ways of transacting, teachers can provide opportunities for their students to generate positive emotional energy and group solidarity in the learning of science at an informal science center.

  3. Venus round trip using solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, KaiJian; Zhang, RongZhi; Xu, Dong; Wang, JiaSong; Li, ShaoMin

    2012-08-01

    Trajectory optimization and simulation is performed for Venus round trip (VeRT) mission using solar sail propulsion. Solar gravity is included but atmospheric drag and shadowing effects are neglected in the planet-centered escape and capture stages. The spacecraft starts from the Geostationary orbit (GEO) at a predetermined time to prepare a good initial condition for the Earth-Venus transfer, although the launch window is not an issue for spacecraft with solar sails. The Earth-Venus phase and the return trip are divided into three segments. Two methods are adopted to maintain the mission trajectory for the VeRT mission and then compared through a numerical simulation. According to the first approach, Planet-centered and heliocentric maneuvers are modeled using a set of blended analytical control laws instead of the optimal control techniques. The second procedure is the Direct Attitude Angle Optimization in which the attitude angles of the solar sail are adopted as the optimization variables during the heliocentric transfer. Although neither of the two methods guarantees a globally optimal trajectory, they are more efficient and will produce a near-optimal solution if employed properly. The second method has produced a better result for the minimum-time transfer of the VeRT mission demonstrating the effectiveness of the methods in the preliminary design of the complex optimal interplanetary orbit transfers.

  4. Increased commuting to school time reduces sleep duration in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erico Felden; Moreno, Claudia; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli

    2014-02-01

    Active travel to school has been referred to as one way of increasing the level of daily physical exercise, but the actual impacts on student's general health are not clear. Recently, a possible association between active travel to school and the duration of sleep was suggested. Thus, the aim was of this study to investigate the associations between the type of transportation and travel time to school, the time in bed and sleepiness in the classroom of high school students. Information on sleeping habits and travel to school of 1126 high school students were analyzed, where 55.1% were girls with an average age of 16.24 (1.39) years old, in Santa Maria Municipality, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Multiple linear regression and adjusted prevalence rates analyses were carried out. The frequency of active travel found was 61.8%. Associations between time in bed, sleepiness in the classroom and the type of transportation (active or passive) were not identified. Nevertheless, the time in bed was inversely associated with the travel time (p = 0.036) and with a phase delay. In the adjusted analysis, active travel was more incident for the students of schools in the suburbs (PR: 1.68; CI: 1.40-2.01) in comparison with the students of schools in the center. Therefore, longer trips were associated with a reduction of sleep duration of morning and night groups. Interventions concerning active travel to school must be carried out cautiously in order not to cause a reduction of the sleeping time. PMID:24152062

  5. INSTRUCTIONAL TRIPS, A PROGRAM FOR ENRICHING EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FINK, ALLAN; AND OTHERS

    A TEACHER GUIDE FOR FIELD TRIPS IN THE PASADENA, CALIFORNIA, AREA IS PRESENTED. EACH TRIP SHOULD BE PRECEDED BY AN EXPLANATION OF THE PURPOSES OF THE TRIP IN RELATION TO PRESENT COURSE OF STUDY. AS A FOLLOWUP ACTIVITY, DISCUSSION OF IDEAS GAINED DURING THE TRIP SHOULD BE ENCOURAGED. THE RULES, REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES OF THE TRIP ARE GIVEN. TRIP…

  6. Gate drive latching circuit for an auxiliary resonant commutation circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Eladio Clemente (Inventor); Kheraluwala, Mustansir Hussainy (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A gate drive latching circuit for an auxiliary resonant commutation circuit for a power switching inverter includes a current monitor circuit providing a current signal to a pair of analog comparators to implement latching of one of a pair of auxiliary switching devices which are used to provide commutation current for commutating switching inverters in the circuit. Each of the pair of comparators feeds a latching circuit which responds to an active one of the comparators for latching the associated gate drive circuit for one of the pair of auxiliary commutating switches. An initial firing signal is applied to each of the commutating switches to gate each into conduction and the resulting current is monitored to determine current direction and therefore the one of the switches which is carrying current. The comparator provides a latching signal to the one of the auxiliary power switches which is actually conducting current and latches that particular power switch into an on state for the duration of current through the device. The latching circuit is so designed that the only time one of the auxiliary switching devices can be latched on is during the duration of an initial firing command signal.

  7. Geometric properties of commutative subalgebras of partial differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheglov, A. B.; Kurke, H.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate further algebro-geometric properties of commutative rings of partial differential operators, continuing our research started in previous articles. In particular, we start to explore the simplest and also certain known examples of quantum algebraically completely integrable systems from the point of view of a recent generalization of Sato's theory, developed by the first author. We give a complete characterization of the spectral data for a class of 'trivial' commutative algebras and strengthen geometric properties known earlier for a class of known examples. We also define a kind of restriction map from the moduli space of coherent sheaves with fixed Hilbert polynomial on a surface to an analogous moduli space on a divisor (both the surface and the divisor are part of the spectral data). We give several explicit examples of spectral data and corresponding algebras of commuting (completed) operators, producing as a by-product interesting examples of surfaces that are not isomorphic to spectral surfaces of any (maximal) commutative ring of partial differential operators of rank one. Finally, we prove that any commutative ring of partial differential operators whose normalization is isomorphic to the ring of polynomials k \\lbrack u,t \\rbrack is a Darboux transformation of a ring of operators with constant coefficients. Bibliography: 39 titles.

  8. Time geography for ad-hoc shared-ride trip planning in mobile geosensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubal, Martin; Winter, Stephan; Teβmann, Sven; Gaisbauer, Christian

    Ad-hoc shared-ride trip planning in an urban environment is a complex task within a non-deterministic transportation network. Mobile geosensor networks provide the technical environment for realizing ad-hoc shared-ride trip planning: Network nodes are autonomous agents that interact locally by ad-hoc short-range communication and arrange for shared rides. In a mobile geosensor network, communication costs are critical because of constraints regarding bandwidth, available energy, and memory. This paper introduces spatio-temporal concepts from time geography, which can be employed during the planning process to significantly reduce communication costs. We will integrate network-based algorithms and different wayfinding strategies to assist both shared-ride clients and hosts in finding optimal travel assignments. Multi-agent geosimulation in a real street network is used to demonstrate the applicability of the approach and quantitatively confirm the theoretically foreseen reduction in communication costs.

  9. Development of Teacher Attitude Scale towards the Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortop, Hasan Said

    2012-01-01

    A field trip is an excursion by group of students with teachers to a place away from classroom such as natural field, science center, and zoo. So, it is an important tool for renewable energy education. This study was carried out to develop a new scale for measuring teacher attitudes towards the field trip. Teacher attitude scale towards the field…

  10. The "Science" Behind a Successful Field Trip to the Zoo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Catherine Marie; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    A field trip to the local zoo is often a staple in many elementary school curricula. Many zoos offer free entry to local teachers and their students. Teachers take students on field trips to enrich the curriculum, make connections to what students are learning in school, and provide students with meaningful learning experiences (Kisiel 2007).…