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1

Compact gamma ray point sources - Are gamma ray sources optically thick at lower frequencies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hypothesis is discussed that some of the unidentified gamma ray point sources are objects which emit only at the highest frequencies but are optically thick against stimulated Compton scattering or nonthermal electron bremsstrahlung reabsorption at lower frequencies. From the calculated absorption coefficients it follows that such a scenario is only possible for inverse Compton scattering under extreme conditions which may hold in the core of powerful sources. This would mean that these gamma ray point sources are very energetic and compact objects. However, relativistic electron bremsstrahlung optically thick objects do not occur in nature.

Schlickeiser, R.

1982-03-01

2

COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

2009-08-20

3

Color Superconductivity in Compact Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

We study the effects of color superconductivity on the structure and formation of compact stars. We show that it is possible to satisfy most of recent observational boundaries on masses and radii if a diquark condensate forms in a hybrid or a quark star. Moreover, we find that a huge amount of energy, of the order of $10^{53}$ erg, can be released in the conversion from a (metastable) hadronic star into a (stable) hybrid or quark star, if the presence of a color superconducting phase is taken into account. Accordingly to the scenario proposed in Astrophys.J.586(2003)1250, the energy released in this conversion can power a Gamma Ray Burst. This mechanism can explain the recent observations indicating a delay, of the order of days or years, between a few Supernova explosions and the subsequent Gamma Ray Burst.

A. Drago; A. Lavagno; G. Pagliara

2003-04-08

4

Compact Gamma-ray Source Technology Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the applicability of current accelerator and laser technologies to the construction of compact, narrow bandwidth, gamma-ray sources for DHS missions in illicit materials detection. It also identifies research and development areas in which advancement will directly benefit these light sources. In particular, we review the physics of Compton scattering based light sources and emphasize the source properties most important to Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) applications of interest. The influences of laser and electron beam properties on the light source are examined in order to evaluate the utility of different technologies for this application. Applicable bulk and fiber-based laser systems and laser recirculation technologies are discussed and Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerator (linac) technologies are examined to determine the optimal frequency and pulse formats achievable.

Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Rusnak, B

2009-09-25

5

Compact Binary Progenitors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In recent years, detailed observations and accurate numerical simulations have provided support to the idea that mergers of compact binaries containing either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a black hole (BH) may constitute the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The merger of such compact binaries is expected to lead to the production of a spinning BH surrounded by an accreting torus. Several mechanisms can extract energy from this system and power the SGRBs. Here we connect observations and numerical simulations of compact binary mergers, and use the current sample of SGRBs with measured energies to constrain the mass of their powering tori. By comparing the masses of the tori with the results of fully general-relativistic simulations, we are able to infer the properties of the binary progenitors that yield SGRBs. By assuming a constant efficiency in converting torus mass into jet energy epsilon(sub jet) = 10%, we find that most of the tori have masses smaller than 0.01 Solar M, favoring "high-mass" binary NSs mergers, i.e., binaries with total masses approx >1.5 the maximum mass of an isolated NS. This has important consequences for the gravitational wave signals that may be detected in association with SGRBs, since "high-mass" systems do not form a long-lived hypermassive NS after the merger. While NS-BH systems cannot be excluded to be the engine of at least some of the SGRBs, the BH would need to have an initial spin of approx. 0.9 or higher.

Giacomazzo, Bruno; Perna, Rosalba; Rezzolla, Luciano; Troja, Eleonora; Lazzati, Davide

2013-01-01

6

Compact Binary Progenitors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

In recent years, detailed observations and accurate numerical simulations have provided support to the idea that mergers of compact binaries containing either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a black hole (BH) may constitute the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The merger of such compact binaries is expected to lead to the production of a spinning BH surrounded by an accreting torus. Several mechanisms can extract energy from this system and power the SGRBs. Here we connect observations and numerical simulations of compact binary mergers, and use the current sample of SGRBs with measured energies to constrain the mass of their powering tori. By comparing the masses of the tori with the results of fully general-relativistic simulations, we are able to infer the properties of the binary progenitors which yield SGRBs. By assuming a constant efficiency in converting torus mass into jet energy, epsilon_{jet}=10%, we find that most of the tori have masses smaller than 0.01M_{sun}, favoring "high-mass" binary NSs mergers, i.e., binaries with total masses >~1.5 the maximum mass of an isolated NS. This has important consequences for the gravitational-wave signals that may be detected in association with SGRBs, since "high-mass" systems do not form a long-lived hypermassive NS after the merger. While NS-BH systems cannot be excluded to be the engine of at least some of the SGRBs, the BH would need to have an initial spin of ~0.9, or higher.

Bruno Giacomazzo; Rosalba Perna; Luciano Rezzolla; Eleonora Troja; Davide Lazzati

2012-12-11

7

COMPACT BINARY PROGENITORS OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, detailed observations and accurate numerical simulations have provided support to the idea that mergers of compact binaries containing either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a black hole (BH) may constitute the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The merger of such compact binaries is expected to lead to the production of a spinning BH surrounded by an accreting torus. Several mechanisms can extract energy from this system and power the SGRBs. Here we connect observations and numerical simulations of compact binary mergers, and use the current sample of SGRBs with measured energies to constrain the mass of their powering tori. By comparing the masses of the tori with the results of fully general-relativistic simulations, we are able to infer the properties of the binary progenitors that yield SGRBs. By assuming a constant efficiency in converting torus mass into jet energy, {epsilon}{sub jet} = 10%, we find that most of the tori have masses smaller than 0.01 M{sub Sun }, favoring 'high-mass' binary NSs mergers, i.e., binaries with total masses {approx}> 1.5 the maximum mass of an isolated NS. This has important consequences for the gravitational wave signals that may be detected in association with SGRBs, since 'high-mass' systems do not form a long-lived hypermassive NS after the merger. While NS-BH systems cannot be excluded to be the engine of at least some of the SGRBs, the BH would need to have an initial spin of {approx}0.9 or higher.

Giacomazzo, Bruno [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Rezzolla, Luciano [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Potsdam D-14476 (Germany); Troja, Eleonora [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, NC State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

2013-01-10

8

Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

Corvan, D. J., E-mail: dcorvan01@qub.ac.uk; Sarri, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, BT7 1NN Belfast (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, BT7 1NN Belfast (United Kingdom); Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Föstengraben 1, 07740 Jena (Germany)

2014-06-15

9

Science of Compact X- and Gamma-ray Sources: MAXI and GLAST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MAXI and GLAST will be surveying the sky simultaneously. Compact objects that may show variability will be excellent targets for coordinated multiwavelength studies. Gamma-ray bursts (and afterglows), pulsars, high-mass X-ray binaries, microquasars, and active galactic nuclei are all objects whose X- and gamma-ray relationship can be explored by such observations. Of particular interest will be variable unidentified gamma-ray sources, whose contemporaneous observations by MAXI may prove decisive in identifying the source of the high-energy emission.

Thompson, Dave

2008-01-01

10

Self-Shielding of X-rays and Gamma-Rays in Compact Sources  

E-print Network

It is generally supposed that when the "compactness" $l \\equiv L\\sigma_T/(r m_e c^3)$ in photons above the pair-production threshold is large, few $\\gamma$-rays can escape. We demonstrate that even when $l \\gg 1$, if the high energy and low energy photons are produced in geometrically-separated regions, many of the $\\gamma$-rays can, in fact, escape. Pair-production along a thin surface separating the two sources creates enough Compton optical depth to deflect most of the low energy photons away from the high energy ones. Those few low-energy photons which penetrate the shielding surface are reduced in opacity by advection to large distance and small density, by relativistic beaming along the inner edge of the surface, and by Compton upscattering to higher energies inside the surface. The pairs in this surface flow outward relativistically, forming a structure resembling a pair-dominated mildly relativistic jet.

Andrei F. Illarionov; Julian H. Krolik

1996-04-29

11

Searching gamma-ray bursts for gravitational lensing echoes - Implications for compact dark matter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first available 44 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory have been inspected for echo signals following shortly after the main signal. No significant echoes have been found. Echoes would have been expected were the GRBs distant enough and the universe populated with a sufficient density of compact objects composing the dark matter. Constraints on dark matter abundance and GRB redshifts from the present data are presented and discussed. Based on these preliminary results, a universe filled to critical density of compact objects between 10 exp 6.5 and 10 exp 8.1 solar masses are now marginally excluded, or the most likely cosmological distance paradigm for GRBs is not correct. We expect future constraints to be able either to test currently popular cosmological dark matter paradigms or to indicate that GRBs do not lie at cosmological distances.

Nemiroff, R. J.; Norris, J. P.; Wickramasinghe, W. A. D. T.; Horack, J. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.

1993-01-01

12

Compact Gamma-Ray Imager for In-Vivo Gene Imaging  

SciTech Connect

A compact, low-cost, gamma-ray imaging system is needed to study gene expression in small animals. State-of-the-art electronic imaging systems have insufficient resolution and animals must be sacrificed for detailed imaging that precludes time evolution studies. With improved electronics radioactive tracers attached to gene markers can be used to track the absorption and mobility of gene therapy medications in live animals. Other instrumentation being developed for medical applications does not have the response to match the radiation source for this work. The objective of this research was to develop thick film (Cd,Zn)Te detectors matched to the gamma ray energy of {sup 129}I. The detector would be a direct readout device using p-i-n diodes formed from the high Z material absorbing the radiation, with separate readout. Higher quality semiconducting material was expected from epitaxial growth on GaAs, a near lattice matched substrate. In practice, it was difficult to obtain material with high resistance and low leakage current. Spire Corporation achieved the goal of fabricating working detectors in (Cd,Zn)Te deposited on GaAs. The spectra of an alpha emitter ({sup 225}Am) was adequately resolved in thin film devices. Thick p-i-n diodes were fabricated but other processing problems prevented full demonstration of a gamma ray detector.

Greenwald, A. C.

2000-06-01

13

Optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of compact objects in globular clusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the past three years, a new era of study of globular clusters has begun with multiwavelength observations from the current generation of astronomical telescopes in space. We review the recent results obtained from our studies of compact binaries and x-ray sources in globulars with ROSAT and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as well as our balloon-borne hard x-ray telescope EXITE (Energetic X-ray Imaging Telescope Experiment) and ground-based observations (CTIO). With ROSAT, we have obtained the most sensitive high resolution soft x-ray images of clusters which show multiple low luminosity sources in cluster cores that are likely indicative of the long-sought population of cataclysmic variables (CVs). We have obtained deep H-alpha images of two clusters with HST and found CV candiates for 3 of the ROSAT sources in the core of NGC 6397. New CTIO imaging and spectroscopy of two 'dim source' fields in omega-Cen are also described. With EXITE we carried out the first hard x-ray imaging observations of the cluster 47 Tuc; such studies can ultimately limit the populations of millisecond pulsars and pulsar emission mechanisms. A long ROSAT exposure on 47 Tuc also shows probable cluster diffuse emission, possibly due to hot gas from ablating millisecond pulsars. Multiwavelength studies of globular clusters may provide new constraints on problems as diverse as the origin of CVs and low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and the origin of hot gas in globulars.

Grindlay, J. E.

1993-01-01

14

ARE ALL SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS PRODUCED FROM MERGERS OF COMPACT STELLAR OBJECTS?  

SciTech Connect

The origin and progenitors of short-hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain a puzzle and a highly debated topic. Recent Swift observations suggest that these GRBs may be related to catastrophic explosions in degenerate compact stars, denoted as 'Type I' GRBs. The most popular models include the merger of two compact stellar objects (NS-NS or NS-BH). We utilize a Monte Carlo approach to determine whether a merger progenitor model can self-consistently account for all the observations of short-hard GRBs, including a sample with redshift measurements in the Swift era (z-known sample) and the CGRO/BATSE sample. We apply various merger time delay distributions invoked in compact star merger models to derive the redshift distributions of these Type I GRBs, and then constrain the unknown luminosity function of Type I GRBs using the observed luminosity-redshift (L-z) distributions of the z-known sample. The best luminosity function model, together with the adopted merger delay model, is then applied to confront the peak flux distribution (log N-log P distribution) of the BATSE and Swift samples. We find that for all the merger models invoking a range of merger delay timescales (including those invoking a large fraction of 'prompt mergers'), it is difficult to reconcile the models with all the data. The data are instead statistically consistent with the following two possible scenarios. First, that short/hard GRBs are a superposition of compact-star-merger-origin (Type I) GRBs and a population of GRBs that track the star formation history, which are probably related to the deaths of massive stars (Type II GRBs). Second, the entire short/hard GRB population is consistent with a typical delay of 2 Gyr with respect to the star formation history with modest scatter. This may point toward a different Type I progenitor than the traditional compact star merger models.

Virgili, Francisco J.; Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); O'Brien, Paul [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Troja, Eleonora, E-mail: virgilif@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-02-01

15

A Study of Compact Object Mergers as Short Gamma-ray Burst Progenitors  

E-print Network

We present a theoretical study of double compact objects as potential short/hard gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors. An updated population synthesis code StarTrack is used to calculate properties of double neutron stars and black-hole neutron star binaries. We obtain their formation rates, estimate merger times and finally predict their most likely merger locations and afterglow properties for different types of host galaxies. Our results serve for a direct comparison with the recent HETE-II and SWIFT observations of several short bursts, for which afterglows and host galaxies were detected. We also discuss the possible constraints these observations put on the evolutionary models of double compact object formation. We emphasize that our double compact object models can successfully reproduce at the same time short GRBs within both young, star-forming galaxies (e.g., GRB 050709 and GRB 051221A), as well as within old, elliptical hosts (e.g., GRB 050724 and probably GRB 050509B)

Krzysztof Belczynski; Rosalba Perna; Tomasz Bulik; Vassiliki Kalogera; Natalia Ivanova; Donald Q. Lamb

2006-05-27

16

Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources  

SciTech Connect

A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO{sub 2} laser may be used as prototype LSS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO{sub 2} laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 {angstrom}) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of {approximately} 10{sup 19} photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 10{sup 22} photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO{sub 2} laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact ``table-top`` LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

Pogorelsky, I.V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator Test Facility

1996-11-01

17

Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO2 laser may be used for prototype LSS demonstration. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 Ĺ) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ˜1019photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 1022 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO2 laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact "table-top" LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

Pogorelsky, I. V.

1997-03-01

18

Development of a compact 20 MeV gamma-ray source for energy calibration at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a real-time neutrino detector under construction near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. SNO collaboration is developing various calibration sources in order to determine the detector response completely. This paper describes briefly the calibration sources being developed by the collaboration. One of these, a compact {sup 3}H(p,{gamma}){sup 4}He source, which produces 20-MeV {gamma}-rays, is described.

Poon, A.W.P.; Browne, M.C.; Robertson, R.G.H. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Nuclear Physics Lab.; Waltham, C.E. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Kherani, N.P. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, ON (Canada)

1995-12-31

19

DEVELOPMENT OF A PRECISION TUNABLE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE DRIVEN BY A COMPACT X-BAND LINAC  

SciTech Connect

A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G

2009-04-30

20

Diversity of Short Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows from Compact Binary Mergers Hosting Pulsars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (?20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves.

Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela

2014-07-01

21

THE LOCATIONS OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AS EVIDENCE FOR COMPACT OBJECT BINARY PROGENITORS  

SciTech Connect

We present a detailed investigation of Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame UV/optical observations of 22 short gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies and sub-galactic environments. Utilizing the high angular resolution and depth of HST we characterize the host galaxy morphologies, measure precise projected physical and host-normalized offsets between the bursts and host centers, and calculate the locations of the bursts with respect to their host light distributions (rest-frame UV and optical). We calculate a median short GRB projected physical offset of 4.5 kpc, about 3.5 times larger than that for long GRBs, and find that ?25% of short GRBs have offsets of ?> 10 kpc. When compared to their host sizes, the median offset is 1.5 half-light radii (r{sub e} ), about 1.5 times larger than the values for long GRBs, core-collapse supernovae, and Type Ia supernovae. In addition, ?20% of short GRBs having offsets of ?> 5r{sub e} , and only ?25% are located within 1r{sub e} . We further find that short GRBs severely under-represent their hosts' rest-frame optical and UV light, with ?30%-45% of the bursts located in regions of their host galaxies that have no detectable stellar light, and ?55% in the regions with no UV light. Therefore, short GRBs do not occur in regions of star formation or even stellar mass. This demonstrates that the progenitor systems of short GRBs must migrate from their birth sites to their eventual explosion sites, a signature of kicks in compact object binary systems. Utilizing the full sample of offsets, we estimate natal kick velocities of ?20-140 km s{sup –1}. These independent lines of evidence provide the strongest support to date that short GRBs result from the merger of compact object binaries (NS-NS/NS-BH)

Fong, W.; Berger, E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-10-10

22

Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub ?} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

2014-11-15

23

Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr3 crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%-4% in the energy range E? = 3-5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

Nocente, M.; Fazzi, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C.; Rebai, M.; Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V.; Gorini, G.

2014-11-01

24

COMPACT OBJECT COALESCENCE RATE ESTIMATION FROM SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Recent observational and theoretical results suggest that short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) originate from the merger of compact binary systems of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. The observation of SGRBs with known redshifts allows astronomers to infer the merger rate of these systems in the local universe. We use data from the SWIFT satellite to estimate this rate to be in the range {approx}500-1500 Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. This result is consistent with earlier published results which were obtained through alternative approaches. We estimate the number of coincident observations of gravitational-wave signals with SGRBs in the advanced gravitational-wave detector era. By assuming that all SGRBs are created by neutron star-neutron star (neutron star-black hole) mergers, we estimate the expected rate of coincident observations to be in the range {approx_equal} 0.2-1 ({approx_equal} 1-3) yr{sup -1}.

Petrillo, Carlo Enrico [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ''Federico II'', Compl. Univ. Monte S. Angelo, Ed. N, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dietz, Alexander; Cavaglia, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi University, MS 38677-1848 (United States)

2013-04-20

25

Gamma Ray Bursts and the transition to Quark Matter in Compact Stars  

E-print Network

We discuss a model for long Gamma-Ray-Bursts in which the central engine is associated with the conversion process of a metastable hadronic star into a star containing quark matter. We analyze the observational signatures of the model, i.e. the Supernova-GRB temporal connection and the existence of long quiescent times in the temporal structure of Gamma-Ray-Bursts.

Alessandro Drago; Andrea Lavagno; Giuseppe Pagliara

2005-10-01

26

Compact, inexpensive, high-energy-resolution, room-temperature-operated, semiconductor gamma-ray detectors for isotope identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many homeland security applications involving gamma-ray detectors require energy resolution of better than 1%-2% for isotope identification. Existing High-Purity germanium (HPGe) detectors have the needed energy resolution but suffer from large size and the need for liquid-nitrogen or electromechanical cooling. Compact, inexpensive, room-temperature-operated devices are needed for handheld monitors, portal monitors, and monitors for nuclear materials in storage or transit.

P. Ugorowski; A. Ariesanti; D. S. McGregor; A. Kargar

2010-01-01

27

Gamma-rays from the vicinity of accreting neutron stars inside compact high-mass X-ray binaries  

E-print Network

Dense wind of a massive star can be partially captured by a neutron star (NS) inside a compact binary system. Depending on the parameters of NS and the wind, the matter can penetrate the inner NS magnetosphere. At some distance from the NS a very turbulent and magnetized transition region is formed due to the balance between the magnetic pressure and the pressure inserted by accreting matter. This region provides good conditions for acceleration of particles to relativistic energies. The matter at the transition region can farther accrete onto the NS surface (the accretor phase) or is expelled from the NS vicinity (the propeller phase). We consider the consequences of acceleration of electrons at the transition region concentrating on the situation in which at least part of the matter falls onto the NS surface. This matter creates a hot spot on the NS surface which emits thermal radiation. Relativistic electrons lose energy on the synchrotron process and the inverse Compton (IC) scattering of this thermal radiation. We calculate the synchrotron spectra (from X-rays to soft $\\gamma$-rays) and IC spectra (above a few tens MeV) expected in such a scenario. It is argued that a population of recently discovered massive binaries by the INTEGRAL observatory, which contain neutron stars hidden inside dense stellar winds of massive stars, can be detectable by the recently launched {\\it Fermi} LAT telescope at GeV energy range. As an example, we predict the expected $\\gamma$-ray flux from recently discovered source IGR J19140+0951.

W. Bednarek

2008-11-25

28

Topics in gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of gamma rays from solar flares, gamma ray bursts, the Galactic center, galactic nucleosynthesis, SS433, and Cygnus X-3, and their effects on astrophysical problems are discussed. It is observed that gamma ray spectra from solar flares are applicable to the study of particle acceleration and confinement and the determination of chemical abundances in the solar atmosphere. The gamma ray lines from the compact galactic object SS433 are utilized to examine the acceleration of jets, and analysis of the gamma ray lines of Cygnus X-3 reveal that particles can be accelerated in compact sources to ultrahigh energies.

Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1986-01-01

29

Modulated gamma-ray emission from compact millisecond pulsar binary systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. A significant number of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have been discovered within binary systems. Tens of these MSPs emit ?-rays that are modulated with the pulsar period since this emission is produced in the inner pulsar magnetosphere. In several such binary systems, the masses of the companion stars have been derived allowing two classes of objects to be distinguished, which are called the black widow and the redback binaries. Pulsars in these binary systems are expected to produce winds that create conditions for acceleration of electrons, when colliding with stellar winds. These electrons should interact with the anisotropic radiation from the companion stars producing ?-ray emission modulated with the orbital period of the binary system, similar to what is observed in the massive TeV ?-ray binary systems. Aims: We consider the interaction of a MSP wind with a very inhomogeneous stellar wind from the companion star within binary systems of the black widow and redback types. Our aim is to determine the features of ?-ray emission produced in the collision region of the winds from a few typical MSP binary systems. Methods: It is expected that the pulsar wind should mix efficiently with the inhomogeneous stellar wind. The mixed winds move outside the binary with relatively low velocity. Electrons accelerated in such mixed, turbulent winds can interact with the magnetic field and strong radiation from the companion star, producing not only synchrotron radiation but also ?-rays in the inverse Compton process, fluxes of which are expected to be modulated on the periods of the binary systems. Applying numerical methods, we calculated the GeV-TeV gamma-ray spectra and the light curves expected from some MSP binary systems. Results: Gamma-ray emission, produced within the binary systems, is compared with the sensitivities of the present and future gamma-ray telescopes. It is concluded that energetic MSP binary systems create a new class of TeV ?-ray sources that could be detectable by the future Cherenkov arrays (e.g., CTA) and possibly also by the extensive campains with the present arrays (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS). However, ?-ray emission from the MSP binary systems is predicted to have different features than those observed in the case of massive TeV gamma-ray binaries such as LS I 303 61 or LS 5039. The maximum in the TeV ?-ray orbital light curve should appear when the MSP is behind the companion star. This is in contrast to the observations of the orbital light curves from the massive TeV ?-ray binaries (LS I 303 61 or LS 5039). Moreover, the GeV and orbital TeV ?-ray light curves should be positively correlated unlike the case of massive TeV ?-ray binaries. Conclusions: We conclude that TeV ?-ray emission, modulated on the orbital period of MSP binary systems, should be detected by the future CTA. Moreover, some MSP binary systems of the Redback type might also show GeV ?-ray emission modulated on the binary periods on the level detectable by Fermi-LAT.

Bednarek, W.

2014-01-01

30

A compact radio source in the high-redshift soft gamma-ray blazar IGR J12319-0749  

E-print Network

Context. Blazars are powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs) radiating prominently in the whole electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to the X-ray and gamma-ray bands. Their emission is dominated by synchrotron and inverse-Compton radiation from a relativistic jet originating from an accreting central supermassive black hole. The object IGR J12319-0749 has recently been identified as a soft gamma-ray source with the IBIS instrument of the INTEGRAL satellite, coincident with a quasar at high redshift (z=3.12). Aims. We studied the radio structure of IGR J12319-0749 to strengthen its blazar identification by detecting a compact radio jet on the milli-arcsecond (mas) angular scale, and to measure its astrometric position accurate to mas level. Methods. We used the technique of electronic very long baseline interferometry (e-VLBI) to image IGR J12319-0749 with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz on 2012 June 19. Results. IGR J12319-0749 (J1231-0747) is a compact radio source, practically unresolved on inte...

Frey, S; Gabanyi, K E; An, T

2013-01-01

31

Properties of long gamma-ray bursts from massive compact binaries.  

PubMed

We consider the implications of a model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts in which the progenitor is spun up in a close binary by tidal interactions with a massive black-hole companion. We investigate a sample of such binaries produced by a binary population synthesis, and show that the model predicts several common features in the accretion on to the newly formed black hole. In all cases, the accretion rate declines as approximately t(-5/3) until a break at a time of order 10(4)?s. The accretion rate declines steeply thereafter. Subsequently, there is flaring activity, with the flare peaking between 10(4) and 10(5)?s, the peak time being correlated with the flare energy. We show that these times are set by the semi-major axis of the binary, and hence the process of tidal spin-up; furthermore, they are consistent with flares seen in the X-ray light curves of some long gamma-ray bursts. PMID:23630369

Church, Ross P; Levan, Andrew J; Davies, Melvyn B; Kim, Chunglee

2013-06-13

32

Gamma ray line astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The interpretations and implications of the astrophysical observations of gamma-ray lines are reviewed. At the Galactic Center e(+)-e(-) pairs from a compact object produce an annihilation line that shows no redshift, indicating an annihilation site far removed from this object. In the jets of SS433, gamma-ray lines are produced by inelastic excitations, probably in dust grains, although line emission from fusion reactions has also been considered. Observations of diffuse galactic line emission reveal recently synthesized radioactive aluminum in the interstellar medium. In gamma-ray bursts, redshifted pair annihilation lines are consistent with a neutron star origin for the bursts. In solar flares, gamma-ray line emission reveals the prompt acceleration of protons and nuclei, in close association with the flare energy release mechanism.

Ramaty, R.

1984-01-01

33

SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM DYNAMICALLY ASSEMBLED COMPACT BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: PATHWAYS, RATES, HYDRODYNAMICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL SETTING  

SciTech Connect

We present a detailed assessment of the various dynamical pathways leading to the coalescence of compact objects in globular clusters (GCs) and Short Gamma-ray Burst (SGRB) production. We consider primordial binaries, dynamically formed binaries (through tidal two-body and three-body exchange interactions), and direct impacts of compact objects (WD/NS/BH). Here, we show that if the primordial binary fraction is small, close encounters dominate the production rate of coalescing compact systems. We find that the two dominant channels are the interaction of field neutron stars (NSs) with dynamically formed binaries and two-body encounters. Under such conditions, we estimate the redshift distribution and host galaxy demographics of SGRB progenitors, and find that GCs can provide a significant contribution to the overall observed rate. Regarding the newly identified channel of close stellar encounters involving WD/NS/BH, we have carried out precise modeling of the hydrodynamical evolution, giving us a detailed description of the resulting merged system. Our calculations show that there is in principle no problem in accounting for the global energy budget of a typical SGRB. The particulars of each encounter, however, are variable in several aspects and can lead to interesting diversity. First and most importantly, the characteristics of the encounter are highly dependent on the impact parameter. This is in contrast to the merger scenario, where the masses of the compact objects dictate a typical length and luminosity scale for SGRB activity. Second, the nature of the compact star itself can produce very different outcomes. Finally, the presence of tidal tails in which material will fall back onto the central object at a later time is a robust feature of the present set of calculations. The mass involved in these structures is considerably larger than for binary mergers. It is thus possible to account generically in this scenario for a prompt episode of energy release, as well as for activity many dynamical time scales later.

Lee, William H. [Instituto de Astronomia, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico); Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Van de Ven, Glenn, E-mail: wlee@astroscu.unam.m, E-mail: enrico@ucolick.or, E-mail: glenn@mpia.d [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-09-01

34

Compact, high-resolution, gamma ray imaging for scintimammography and other medical diagostic applications  

DOEpatents

A high resolution gamma ray imaging device includes an aluminum housing, a lead screen collimator at an opened end of the housing, a crystal scintillator array mounted behind the lead screen collimator, a foam layer between the lead screen collimator and the crystal scintillator array, a photomultiplier window coupled to the crystal with optical coupling grease, a photomultiplier having a dynode chain body and a base voltage divider with anodes, anode wire amplifiers each connected to four anodes and a multi pin connector having pin connections to each anode wire amplifier. In one embodiment the crystal scintillator array includes a yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) crystal array. In an alternate embodiment, the crystal scintillator array includes a gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (GSO) crystal array.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Grafton, VA); Wojcik, Randolph F. (Yorktown, VA); Steinbach, Daniela (Williamsburg, VA)

1999-01-01

35

Cosmic gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts are discussed and available theoretical models are presented. Emphasis is placed on a cosmological model in which a gamma burst results from a powerful (? 1051–1053 erg) and very short ( ?10 –100 s) energy release which occurs in a compact ( ? 106–107 cm) region and gives rise to a

Konstantin A Postnov

1999-01-01

36

GeV gamma-rays and TeV neutrinos from very massive compact binary systems: The case of WR 20a  

E-print Network

Massive Wolf-Rayet stars in a compact binary systems are characterised by very strong winds which collide creating a shock wave. If the wind nuclei accelerated at the shock can reach large enough energies, they suffer disintegration in collisions with soft thermal radiation from the massive stars injecting relativistic protons and neutrons. Protons collide with the matter of the wind and a fraction of neutrons colide with the massive stars producing gamma-rays and neutrinos. We calculate the gamma-rays fluxes from the inverse Compton pair cascades, initiated by primary gamma-rays and leptons produced by protons, and the neutrino fluxes produced by protons and neutrons for the example compact massive binary WR 20a. From normalization of the gamma-ray spectra to the fluxes of the EGRET sources, 2EG J1021-5835 and 2EG J1049-5847, we conclude that this massive binary can be detected by the IceCube type neutrino detector with the event rate between a few up to a few tens per km^2 per yr.

W. Bednarek

2005-07-24

37

Gamma ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarizes recents results in gamma-ray astronomy, most of which were derived with data from groundbased gamma-ray detectors. Many of the contributions presented at this conference involve multiwavelength studies which combine ground-based gamma-ray measurements with optical data or space-based X-ray and gamma-ray measurements. Besides measurements of the diffuse emission from the Galaxy, observations of blazars, gamma-ray bursts, and supernova

Martin Pohl

2001-01-01

38

Gamma Rays  

MedlinePLUS

... Atoms Radioactive? Radiation and Radioactivity Half-Life Decay Chains Radioactive Equilibrium Curies Alpha Particles Beta Particles Gamma ... Radium-226 is part of the uranium decay chain and commonly occurs with uranium. Top of page ...

39

Hard gamma ray emission from blazars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gamma-ray emission expected from compact extragalactic sources of nonthermal radiation is examined. The highly variable objects in this class should produce copious amounts of self-Compton gamma-rays in the compact relativistic jet. This is shown to be a likely interpretation of the hard gamma-ray emission recently detected from the quasar 3C 279 during a period of strong nonthermal flaring at lower frequencies. Ways of discriminating between the self-Compton model and other possible gamma-ray emission mechanisms are discussed.

Marscher, Alan P.; Bloom, Steven D.

1992-01-01

40

Soft X-Ray Extended Emissions of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts as Electromagnetic Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers: Possible Origin and Detectability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the possible origin of extended emissions (EEs) of short gamma-ray bursts with an isotropic energy of ~1050-51 erg and a duration of a few 10 s to ~100 s, based on a compact binary (neutron star (NS)-NS or NS-black hole (BH)) merger scenario. We analyze the evolution of magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion disks of mass ~0.1 M ? around BHs formed after the mergers and estimate the power of relativistic outflows via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. We show that a rotation energy of the BH up to >~ 1052 erg can be extracted with an observed timescale of >~ 30(1 + z) s with a relatively small disk viscosity parameter of ? < 0.01. Such a BZ power dissipates by clashing with non-relativistic pre-ejected matter of mass M ~ 10-(2-4) M ?, and forms a mildly relativistic fireball. We show that the dissipative photospheric emissions from such fireballs are likely in the soft X-ray band (1-10 keV) for M ~ 10-2 M ?, possibly in NS-NS mergers, and in the BAT band (15-150 keV) for M ~ 10-4 M ?, possibly in NS-BH mergers. In the former case, such soft EEs can provide a good chance of ˜ 6 yr-1 (? ? softEE/4?) (R}GW/40 yr-1) for simultaneous detections of the gravitational waves with a ~0.°1 angular resolution by soft X-ray survey facilities like the Wide-Field MAXI. Here, ??softEE is the beaming factor of the soft EEs and R}GW is the NS-NS merger rate detectable by the advanced LIGO, the advanced Virgo, and KAGRA.

Nakamura, Takashi; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kawai, Nobuyuki

2014-11-01

41

Compact Stellar X-ray Sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1. Accreting neutron stars and black holes: a decade of discoveries D. Psaltis; 2. Rapid X-ray variability M. van der Klis; 3. New views of thermonuclear bursts T. Strohmayer and L. Bildsten; 4. Black hole binaries J. McClintock and R. Remillard; 5. Optical, ultraviolet and infrared observations of X-ray binaries P. Charles and M. Coe; 6. Fast X-ray transients and X-ray flashes J. Heise and J. in 't Zand; 7. Isolated neutron stars V. Kaspi, M. Roberts and A. Harding; 8. Globular cluster X-ray sources F. Verbunt and W. Lewin; 9. Jets from X-ray binaries R. Fender; 10. X-Rays from cataclysmic variables E. Kuulkers, A. Norton, A. Schwope and B. Warner; 11. Super soft sources P. Kahabka and E. van den Heuvel; 12. Compact stellar X-ray sources in normal galaxies G. Fabbiano and N. White; 13. Accretion in compact binaries A. King; 14. Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars: magnetar candidates P. Woods and C. Thompson; 15. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and their host galaxies K. Hurley, R. Sari and S. Djorgovski; 16. Formation and evolution of compact stellar X-ray sources T. Tauris and E. van den Heuvel.

Lewin, Walter; van der Klis, Michiel

2010-11-01

42

Gamma-ray astronomy  

E-print Network

This paper summarizes recents results in gamma-ray astronomy, most of which were derived with data from ground-based gamma-ray detectors. Many of the contributions presented at this conference involve multiwavelength studies which combine ground-based gamma-ray measurements with optical data or space-based X-ray and gamma-ray measurements. Besides measurements of the diffuse emission from the Galaxy, observations of blazars, gamma-ray bursts, and supernova remnants this paper also covers theoretical models for the acceleration of radiating particles and their emission mechanisms in these sources.

Martin Pohl

2001-11-29

43

Sandstone and shale compaction curves derived from sonic and gamma ray logs in offshore wells, North Slope, Alaska; parameters for basin modeling  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Representative compaction curves for the principle lithologies are essential input for reliable models of basin history. Compaction curves influence estimates of maximum burial and erosion. Different compaction curves may produce significantly different thermal histories. Default compaction curves provided by basin modeling packages may or may not be a good proxy for the compaction properties in a given area. Compaction curves in the published literature span a wide range, even within one lithology, e.g., sandstone (see Panel 3). An abundance of geophysical well data for the North Slope, from both government and private sources, provides us with an unusually good opportunity to develop compaction curves for the Cretaceous-Tertiary Brookian sandstones, siltstones, and shales. We examined the sonic and gamma ray logs from 19 offshore wells (see map), where significant erosion is least likely to have occurred. Our data are primarily from the Cretaceous-Tertiary Brookian sequence and are less complete for older sequences. For each well, the fraction of shale (Vsh) at a given depth was estimated from the gamma ray log, and porosity was computed from sonic travel time. By compositing porosities for the near-pure sand (Vsh99%)from many individual wells we obtained data over sufficient depth intervals to define sandstone and shale 'master' compaction curves. A siltstone curve was defined using the sonic-derived porosities for Vsh values of 50%. These compaction curves generally match most of the sonic porosities with an error of 5% or less. Onshore, the curves are used to estimate the depth of maximum burial at the end of Brookian sedimentation. The depth of sonic-derived porosity profiles is adjusted to give the best match with the 'master' compaction curves. The amount of the depth adjustment is the erosion estimate. Using our compaction curves, erosion estimates on the North Slope range from zero in much of the offshore, to as much as 1500 ft along the coast, and to more than 10,000 ft in the foothills (Panel 3). Compaction curves provide an alternative to vitrinite reflectance for estimating erosion. Vitrinite reflectance data are often very sparse in contrast to well log data and are subject to inconsistencies when measurements are made by different labs. The phenomenon of 'recycling' can also make the reflectance values of dispersed vitrinite problematic for quantifying erosion. Recycling is suspected in dispersed vitrinite in North Slope rocks, particularly in the younger, Cretaceous-Tertiary section. The compaction curves defined here are being integrated into our burial history and thermal models to determine the timing of source rock maturation. An example on Panel 3 shows the results of calculating the maturity of the Shublik Fm. at the Tulaga well using two different sets of shale and siltstone compaction curves. Finally, accurate compaction curves improve a model's ability to realistically simulate the pressure regime during burial, including overpressures.

Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hayba, Daniel O.; Nelson, Philip H.; Burns, W. Matthew; Houseknecht, David W.

2003-01-01

44

Gamma-ray waveguides  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an approach for gamma-ray optics using layered structures acting as planar waveguides. Experiments demonstrating channeling of 122 keV gamma rays in two prototype waveguides validate the feasibility of this technology. Gamma-ray waveguides allow one to control the direction of radiation up to a few MeV. The waveguides are conceptually similar to polycapillary optics, but can function at higher gamma-ray energies. Optics comprised of these waveguides will be able to collect radiation from small solid angles or concentrate radiation into small area detectors. Gamma-ray waveguides may find applications in medical imaging and treatment, astrophysics, and homeland security.

Tournear, D. M.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Akhadov, E. A.; Chen, A. T.; Pendleton, S. J.; Williamson, T. L.; Cha, K. C.; Epstein, R. I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2008-04-14

45

Gamma ray astronomy. [survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey of the instruments developed for gamma ray astronomy is given together with a brief summary of the current status of the observational results. These include the studies of galactic gamma ray emission, the diffuse, presumably extragalactic, gamma radiation, and localized gamma ray sources. The study of the spatial distribution of galactic gamma radiation is beginning to provide a new means for the study of galactic structure and dynamics. The diffuse emission may provide evidence of gamma ray emission in the cosmological past, although improved observations must be obtained before the picture can be clarified. The study of localized sources has shown NP0532, the Crab radio pulsar, to be a gamma ray pulsar also and strong emission from Vela may be due to supernova produced cosmic rays interacting with the remnant gas.

Kniffen, D.

1975-01-01

46

Gamma ray detector shield  

DOEpatents

A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

1985-08-26

47

Gamma ray detector shield  

Microsoft Academic Search

A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

R. D. Ohlinger; H. W. Humphrey

1985-01-01

48

Cosmic Rays and Gamma Ray Bursts From Microblazars  

E-print Network

Highly relativistic jets from merger and accretion induced collapse of compact stellar objects, which may produce the cosmological gamma ray bursts (GRBs), are also very efficient and powerful cosmic ray accelerators. The expected luminosity, energy spectrum and chemical composition of cosmic rays from Galactic GRBs, most of which do not point in our direction, can explain the observed properties of Galactic cosmic rays.

Arnon Dar

1998-09-13

49

Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays  

E-print Network

Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

50

Gamma ray transients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

Cline, Thomas L.

1987-01-01

51

Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-print Network

The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

Jim Hinton

2007-12-20

52

Gamma-ray astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

Stecker, F. W. (editor); Trombka, J. I. (editor)

1973-01-01

53

Gamma-Ray Pulsars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

Harding, Alice K.

2011-01-01

54

Gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief description is given of the present status of gamma-ray astronomy, both galactic and extragalactic. More detailed attention is given to a specific question: the nature of the apparent 'gamma-ray sources'. The undoubted correlation of at least some of the sources with dense clouds of gas in the interstellar medium is discussed. A new analysis of the SAS II

B. Houston; A. W. Wolfendale

1982-01-01

55

Gamma-Ray Burst Environments and Progenitors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Likely progenitors for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the mergers of compact objects or the explosions of massive stars. These two cases have distinctive environments for the GRB afterglow: the compact object explosions occur in the interstellar medium (ISM) and those of massive stars occur in the preburst stellar wind. We calculate the expected afterglow for a burst in a Wolf-Rayet

Roger A. Chevalier; Zhi-Yun Li

1999-01-01

56

Last moments in the life of a compact binary system: gravitational waves, gamma-ray bursts and magnetar formation  

E-print Network

The first detections of afterglows from short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have confirmed the previous suspicion that they are triggered by a different central engine than long bursts. In particular, the recent detections of short GRBs in galaxies without star formation lends support to the idea that an old stellar population is involved. Most prominent are mergers of either double neutron stars or of a neutron star with a stellar-mass black hole companion. Since the final identification of the central engine will only come from an integral view of several properties, we review the observable signatures that can be expected from both double neutron stars and neutron star black hole systems. We discuss the gravitational wave emission, the structure of the neutrino-cooled accretion disks, the resulting neutrino signal and possible mechanisms to launch a GRB. In addition, we address the speculative idea that in some cases a magnetar-like object may be the final outcome of a double neutron star merger. We also discuss possibilities to explain the late-time X-ray activity that has been observed in several bursts.

S. Rosswog

2006-12-20

57

Gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review is given of recent papers in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. It is mentioned that the strongest feature of the gamma ray sky is the general radiation from the galactic plane which is superimposed on what appears to be a general diffuse radiation, whose properties are not yet defined. The observation of high-energy galactic gamma radiation by the SAS-2 satellite is considered as is the observation of point and localized sources (the Crab Nebula, Vela, etc.). The observation of diffusive gamma radiation is discussed.

Fichtel, C. E.

1975-01-01

58

Gamma-ray telescopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last half-century has seen dramatic developments in ??ray telescopes, from their initial conception and development through to their blossoming into full maturity as a potent\\u000a research tool in astronomy. Gamma-ray telescopes are leading research in diverse areas such as ??ray bursts, blazars, Galactic transients, and the Galactic distribution of 26Al.

Neil Gehrels; John K. Cannizzo

2009-01-01

59

Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts originate from cosmological distances and represent the largest known explosions in the Universe. The observed temporal and spectral characteristics of bursts in the gamma-ray region, primarily from data obtained with the BATSE experiment on the Compton Observatory, will be described. The talk will concentrate on recent studies of burst properties, correlations of GRB parameters and other statistical studies that have recently come to light. A summary of recent discoveries and observations in other wavelength regions will also be presented, along with their implications for models of the burst emission mechanism. Various models for the energy source of gamma-ray bursts will be described.

Fishman, Gearld J.

2003-01-01

60

Gamma ray optics  

SciTech Connect

Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F38042 Grenoble (France); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-07-09

61

Gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cosmic gamma rays, the physical processes responsible for their production and the astrophysical sites from which they were seen are reported. The bulk of the observed gamma ray emission is in the photon energy range from about 0.1 MeV to 1 GeV, where observations are carried out above the atmosphere. There are also, however, gamma ray observations at higher energies obtained by detecting the Cerenkov light produced by the high energy photons in the atmosphere. Gamma ray emission was observed from sources as close as the Sun and the Moon and as distant as the quasar 3C273, as well as from various other galactic and extragalactic sites. The radiation processes also range from the well understood, e.g. energetic particle interactions with matter, to the still incompletely researched, such as radiation transfer in optically thick electron positron plasmas in intense neutron star magnetic fields.

Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1982-01-01

62

High Energy Gamma Rays  

E-print Network

This article reviews the present status of high energy gamma-ray astronomy at energies above 30 MeV. Observations in the past decade using both space- and ground-based experiments have been primarily responsible for giving a tremendous boost to our knowledge of the high energy Universe. High energy gamma-rays have been detected from a wide range of Galactic and extragalactic astrophysical sources, such as gamma-ray bursters, pulsars, and active galaxies. These observations have established high energy gamma-ray astronomy as a vital and exciting field, that has a bright future. This review summarizes the experimental techniques, observations and results obtained with recent experiments, and concludes with a short description of future prospects.

R. Mukherjee

2000-09-22

63

Gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Miscellaneous tasks related to the development of the Bursts and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory and to analysis of archival data from balloon flight experiments were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

Paciesas, William S.

1991-01-01

64

The gamma-ray observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

1991-01-01

65

Prospects for gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Solar Maximum Mission and the Gamma Ray Experiment aboard the SMM spacecraft are discussed. Mission plans for interplanetary probes are also discussed. The Gamma Ray observatory and its role in future gamma ray astronomy is highlighted. It is concluded that gamma ray astronomy will be of major importance in the development of astronomical models and in the development of comsological theory.

1981-01-01

66

gamma ray astronomy with muons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although gamma ray showers are muon poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard gamma ray spectra there is a relative ``enhancement'' of muons from gamma ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower gamma rays above the

Francis Halzen; Todor Stanev; Gaurang B. Yodh

1997-01-01

67

Gamma ray astronomy and black hole astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The study of soft gamma emissions from black-hole candidates is identified as an important element in understanding black-hole phenomena ranging from stellar-mass black holes to AGNs. The spectra of Cyg X-1 and observations of the Galactic Center are emphasized, since thermal origins and MeV gamma-ray bumps are evident and suggest a thermal-pair cloud picture. MeV gamma-ray observations are suggested for studying black hole astrophysics such as the theorized escaping pair wind, the anticorrelation between the MeV gamma bump and the soft continuum, and the relationship between source compactness and temperature.

Liang, Edison P.

1990-01-01

68

Gamma ray optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape ? ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E2, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E2 extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

Jentschel, M.; Günther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

2012-07-01

69

Cosmic gamma-ray lines - Theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The various processes that lead to gamma-ray line emission and the possible astrophysical sources of such emission are reviewed. The processes of nuclear excitation, radiative capture, positron annihilation, and cyclotron radiation, which may produce gamma-ray line emission from such diverse sources as the interstellar medium, novas, supernovas, pulsars, accreting compact objects, the galactic nucleus and the nuclei of active galaxies are considered. The significance of the relative intensities, widths, and frequency shifts of the lines are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding those gamma-ray lines that have already been observed from astrophysical sources.

Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

1980-01-01

70

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them, with a view towards implications for C.T.A.

Peter Mészáros

2012-04-12

71

Gamma ray camera  

DOEpatents

A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

Perez-Mendez, V.

1997-01-21

72

Gamma ray camera  

DOEpatents

A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01

73

Gamma Ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

Wu, S. T.

2000-01-01

74

Quasars, blazars, and gamma rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper discusses the extragalactic sources that have been discovered with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope. All of the sources demonstrate evidence of blazar properties at other wavelengths, including high optical polarization, extreme optical variability, flat-spectrum radio emission associated with a compact core, and apparent superluminal motion. These properties are believed to be produced by those few rare extragalactic quasars and radio galaxies that are favorably aligned to make it possible to observe almost directly down a relativistically outflowing jet of matter expelled from a supermassive black hole.

Dermer, Charles D.; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

1992-01-01

75

Techniques for gamma rays.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The detecting systems used in high energy astrophysics are generally more similar to particle detectors than to optical devices. The basic design of the gamma ray instrument depends on whether the energy range is below about 10 MeV and therefore in the region where the Compton effect predominates in the absorption of the gamma-rays, or above that energy where electron-positron pair production is most important. The most usual approach to the detector system in the lower of the two energy intervals is to use a scintillation counter in the center of the detector system to absorb the photons and permit a measure of their energy, and to surround it by another detector which is employed as an active anticoincidence shield to discriminate against charged particles. In the gamma-ray interval above about 10 MeV, the very low flux of gamma rays and the high particle background has directed the development of high energy gamma-ray telescopes towards complicated techniques and large detector arrays. As a result, several investigators have now turned to the spark chamber as the heart of a detector system. Generally, it is surrounded by an anticoincidence system and is triggered by a counter telescope.

Fichtel, C. E.

1971-01-01

76

Future prospects for gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As gamma-ray astronomy moves from the discovery to the exploratory phase, the promise of gamma-ray astrophysics noted by theorists in the late 1940s and 1950s is beginning to be realized. In the future, satellites should carry instruments that will have over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far, and, for at least some portions of the gamma-ray energy range, these detectors will also have substantially improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance our knowledge of several astrophysical phenomena including the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects, astrophysical nucleosynthesis, solar particle acceleration, the chemical composition of the planets and other bodies of the solar system, the structure of our galaxy, the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays, high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies especially active ones, and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The gamma-ray results of the forthcoming programs such as Gamma-I, the Gamma Ray Observatory, the gamma-ray burst network, Solar Polar, and very high energy gamma-ray telescopes on the ground will almost certainly provide justification for more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the Space Platform currently under study by N.A.S.A.

Fichtel, C.

1981-01-01

77

Gamma-ray bursts.  

PubMed

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

2012-08-24

78

Gamma Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

2012-01-01

79

Gamma-Ray Emission from Microquasars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microquasars, X-ray binary systems that generate relativistic jets, were discovered in our Galaxy in the last decade of the XXth century. Their name indicates that they are manifestations of the same physics as quasars but on a completely different scale. Parallel to this discovery, the EGRET instrument on board of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detected 271 point like gamma-ray sources 170 of which were not clearly identified with known objects. This marked the beginning of gamma-ray source population studies in the Galaxy. We present in this thesis models for gamma-ray production in microquasars with the aim to propose them as possible parent populations for different groups of EGRET unidentified sources. These models are developed for a variety of scenarios taking into account several possible combinations, i.e. black holes or neutron stars as the compact object, low mass or high mass stellar companions, as well as leptonic or hadronic gamma-ray production processes. We also show that the presented models for gamma-rays emitting microquasars can be used to explain observations from well known sources that are detected in energy ranges other than EGRET's. Finally, we include an alternative gamma-ray producing situation that does not involve microquasars but a specific unidentified EGRET source possibly linked to a magnetized accreting pulsar.

Kaufman Bernado, M. M.

2005-04-01

80

Gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, and their origin and mechanism are the focus of intense research and debate. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with the recently launched Swift satellite. The interplay between these observations and theoretical models

P. Mészáros

2006-01-01

81

Gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Miscellaneous tasks related to the development of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory and to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the MSFC Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

Paciesas, William S.

1991-01-01

82

Gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Miscellaneous tasks related to mission operations and data analysis for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory, to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the Marshall Space Flight Center Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program, and to compilation and analysis of induced radioactivity data were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

Paciesas, William S.

1992-01-01

83

Accretion Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many models of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) involve accretion onto a compact object, usually a black hole, at a mass accretion rate on the order of a fraction of a solar mass per second. If the accretion disk is larger than a few tens or hundreds of Schwarzschild radii, the accretion will proceed via a convection-dominated accretion flow (CDAF) in which

Ramesh Narayan; Tsvi Piran; Pawan Kumar

2001-01-01

84

Gamma-Ray Burst Wallsheet  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Gamma-ray Burst Wallsheet was developed to illustrate the properties of light emanating from a gamma-ray burst as seen by three distant satellites, including NASA's Swift. The back of the wallsheet has one of the three activities in the accompanying educator guide (Angling for Gamma-ray Bursts).

2005-01-01

85

Gamma ray astronomy in perspective  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief overview of the development of gamma ray astronomy is presented. Gamma ray telescopes and other optical measuring instruments are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on findings that were unobtainable before gamma ray astronomy. Information on evolution of the solar system, the relationship of the solar system to the galaxy, and the composition of interstellar matter is discussed.

1981-01-01

86

Compact Electronic Gamma Source For Radiotherapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A compact mono-energetic gamma source is being developed to replace the radiological sources used in radiotherapy and other medical instruments. The electronic gamma source utilizes low-energy nuclear reactions to generate gammas in the 0.5 to 1.0 MeV energy range. Independent control of the ion current and energy is achieved by decoupling the RF-driven ion source and pyroelectric crystal-based acceleration systems The ions are accelerated to voltages above 100 keV and bombard a reaction target to produce gammas. Thermal management of the pyroelectric crystal-based accelerator is achieved by convective dielectric fluid flow around the crystal. This approach provides better temperature uniformity in the crystal and higher dielectric strength for suppressing voltage breakdown and enabling faster thermal cycling rates.

Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

2011-06-01

87

ACCELERATING COMPACT OBJECT MERGERS IN TRIPLE SYSTEMS WITH THE KOZAI RESONANCE: A MECHANISM FOR 'PROMPT' TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE, GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, AND OTHER EXOTICA  

SciTech Connect

White dwarf-white dwarf (WD-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) mergers may produce Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), respectively. A general problem is how to produce binaries with semi-major axes small enough to merge in significantly less than the Hubble time (t{sub H}), and thus accommodate the observation that these events closely follow episodes of star formation. I explore the possibility that such systems are not binaries at all, but actually coeval, or dynamical formed, triple systems. The tertiary induces Kozai oscillations in the inner binary, driving it to high eccentricity, and reducing its gravitational wave (GW) merger timescale. This effect significantly increases the allowed range of binary period P such that the merger time is t{sub merge} < t{sub H}. In principle, Chandrasekhar-mass binaries with P {approx} 300 days can merge in {approx}< t{sub H} if they contain a prograde solar-mass tertiary at high enough inclination. For retrograde tertiaries, the maximum P such that t{sub merge} {approx}< t{sub H} is yet larger. In contrast, P {approx}< 0.3 days is required in the absence of a tertiary. I discuss implications of these findings for the production of transients formed via compact object binary mergers. Based on the statistics of solar-type binaries, I argue that many such binaries should be in triple systems affected by the Kozai resonance. If true, expectations for the mHz GW signal from individual sources, the diffuse background, and the foreground for GW experiments like LISA are modified. This work motivates future studies of triples systems of A, B, and O stars, and new types of searches for WD-WD binaries in triple systems.

Thompson, Todd A., E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2011-11-10

88

Soft gamma rays from black holes versus neutron stars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The recent launches of GRANAT and GRO provide unprecedented opportunities to study compact collapsed objects from their hard x ray and gamma ray emissions. The spectral range above 100 keV can now be explored with much higher sensitivity and time resolution than before. The soft gamma ray spectral data is reviewed of black holes and neutron stars, radiation, and particle energization mechanisms and potentially distinguishing gamma ray signatures. These may include soft x ray excesses versus deficiencies, thermal versus nonthermal processes, transient gamma ray bumps versus power law tails, lines, and periodicities. Some of the highest priority future observations are outlines which will shed much light on such systems.

Liang, Edison P.

1992-01-01

89

Origin of Gamma Ray Bursters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Major advances have been made in the field of gamma-ray bursts in the last two years. The successful discovery of X-ray, optical and radio afterglows has made possible the identification of host galaxies at cosmological distances. The energy release inferred in these outbursts place them among the most energetic and violent events in the Universe. They are thought to be the outcome of a cataclysmic stellar collapse or compact stellar merger, leading to a relativistically expanding fireball, in which particles are accelerated at shocks and produce nonthermal radiation. The substantial agreement between observations and the theoretical predictions of the standard fireball shock model provides confirmation of the basic aspects of this scenario. New issues being raised by the most recent observations concern the amount and the nature of the collimation of the outflow and its implications for the energetics, the production of prompt bright flashes at wavelengths much longer than gamma-rays, the time structure of the afterglow, its dependence on the central engine or progenitor system behavior, and the role of the environment on the evolution of the afterglow.

Mészáros, P.

90

Solar Flares: Gamma Rays  

E-print Network

We briefly review the theory of gamma ray production in solar flares and present the highlights of the observations and their implications. Specifically: (i) the gamma ray data show that a large fraction of the released flare energy is in accelerated ions, mostly around 1 MeV/nucleon; (ii) the accelerated He-3, heavy ion, and relativistic electron abundances are enriched, implying that the particle acceleration is dominated by stochastic gyroresonant interactions with plasma turbulence; (iii) there is evidence for the enhancement of the abundances of ambient chromospheric elements with low first ionization potentials; (iv) the observed Li-7 and Be-7 lines, at 0.429 MeV and 0.478 MeV due to alpha-alpha interactions, show that both the accelerated alpha particle and the ambient He abundances are significantly enhanced.

Reuven Ramaty; Natalie Mandzhavidze

1998-10-06

91

Gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) is one of four instruments on the Compton observatory which was launched by the space shuttle Atlantis on April 5, 1991. As of mid-March, 1994, BATSE detected more than 925 cosmic gamma-ray bursts and more than 725 solar flares. Pulsed gamma rays have been detected from at least 16 sources and emission from at least 28 sources (including most of the pulsed sources) has been detected by the earth occultation technique. UAH participation in BATSE is extensive but can be divided into two main areas, operations and data analysis. The daily BATSE operations tasks represent a substantial level of effort and involve a large team composed of MSFC personnel as well as contractors such as UAH. The scientific data reduction and analysis of BATSE data is also a substantial level of effort in which UAH personnel have made significant contributions.

Paciesas, William S.

1994-01-01

92

Gamma ray collimator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A gamma ray collimator including a housing having first and second sections is disclosed. The first section encloses a first section of depleted uranium which is disposed for receiving and supporting a radiation emitting component such as cobalt 60. The second section encloses a depleted uranium member which is provided with a conical cut out focusing portion disposed in communication with the radiation emitting element for focusing the emitted radiation to the target.

Casanova, Edgar J. (inventor)

1991-01-01

93

Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars  

SciTech Connect

One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

2012-04-02

94

UNIDENTIFIED {gamma}-RAY SOURCES: HUNTING {gamma}-RAY BLAZARS  

SciTech Connect

One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the major improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one-third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated with low-energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of active galactic nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated with the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray LAT catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart to each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

Massaro, F.; Ajello, M. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Gasparrini, D. [ASI Science Data Center, ESRIN, I-00044 Frascati (Italy)

2012-06-10

95

Gamma Ray Astrophysics: New insight into the universe  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray observations of the solar system, the galaxy and extragalactic radiation are reported. Topics include: planets, comets, and asteroids; solar observations; interstellar medium and galactic structure; compact objects; cosmology; and diffuse radiation. The instrumentation used in gamma ray astronomy in covered along with techniques for the analysis of observational spectra.

Fichtel, C. E.; Trombka, J. I.

1981-01-01

96

Gamma-ray Bursts: The Prompt Emission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts are the largest explosions in the Universe. The radiation is thought to come from a hypernova initiated from the collapse of a massive star or perhaps the merger of two compact stars such s neutron stars and/or black holes. Most of the observed energy is radiated as gamma rays, usually lasting from a fraction of a second to several hundred seconds. The energy generation process is usually referred to as the "central engine". Observed properties of this prompt emission, including spectra, time profiles and durations will be discussed. The history of these observations and future GRB spacecraft will also be described.

Fishman, Jerry

2005-01-01

97

Gamma ray astrophysics to the year 2000. Report of the NASA Gamma Ray Program Working Group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Important developments in gamma-ray astrophysics up to energies of 100 GeV during the last decade are reviewed. Also, the report seeks to define the major current scientific goals of the field and proposes a vigorous program to pursue them, extending to the year 2000. The goals of gamma-ray astronomy include the study of gamma rays which provide the most direct means of studying many important problems in high energy astrophysics including explosive nucleosynthesis, accelerated particle interactions and sources, and high-energy processes around compact objects. The current research program in gamma-ray astronomy in the U.S. including the space program, balloon program and foreign programs in gamma-ray astronomy is described. The high priority recommendations for future study include an Explorer-class high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy mission and a Get Away Special cannister (GAS-can) or Scout class multiwavelength experiment for the study of gamma-ray bursts. Continuing programs include an extended Gamma Ray Observatory mission, continuation of the vigorous program of balloon observations of the nearby Supernova 1987A, augmentation of the balloon program to provide for new instruments and rapid scientific results, and continuation of support for theoretical research. Long term recommendations include new space missions using advanced detectors to better study gamma-ray sources, the development of these detectors, continued study for the assembly of large detectors in space, collaboration with the gamma-ray astronomy missions initiated by other countries, and consideration of the Space Station attached payloads for gamma-ray experiments.

1988-01-01

98

Gamma-ray localization of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes.  

PubMed

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high-energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter. We detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with an accuracy of ?5-10° at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the subsatellite point than 400 km. Considering that our gamma rays reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, our measurements provide the first precise direct localization of TGFs from space. PMID:20867680

Marisaldi, M; Argan, A; Trois, A; Giuliani, A; Tavani, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Bulgarelli, A; Longo, F; Barbiellini, G; Del Monte, E; Moretti, E; Trifoglio, M; Costa, E; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; D'Ammando, F; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mereghetti, S; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Piano, G; Pilia, M; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Antonelli, L A; Colafrancesco, S; Cutini, S; Giommi, P; Lucarelli, F; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L

2010-09-17

99

VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAY Tadashi KIFUNE  

E-print Network

VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAY ASTRONOMY Tadashi KIFUNE Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University for the photon of background radiation field. The gamma ray reactions characterize VHE gamma ray astronomy­based tech­ nique to detect TeV gamma rays. The current status of gamma ray astronomy in its growing stage

Enomoto, Ryoji

100

{gamma} ray astronomy with muons  

SciTech Connect

Although {gamma} ray showers are muon poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard {gamma} ray spectra there is a relative {open_quotes}enhancement{close_quotes} of muons from {gamma} ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower {gamma} rays above the photoproduction threshold contribute to the number of muons N{sub {mu}}, which is thus proportional to the primary {gamma} ray energy. With {gamma} ray energy 50 times higher than the muon energy and a probability of muon production by the {gamma}{close_quote}s of about 1{percent}, muon detectors can match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector if their effective area is larger by 10{sup 4}. The muons must have enough energy for sufficiently accurate reconstruction of their direction for doing astronomy. These conditions are satisfied by relatively shallow neutrino detectors such as AMANDA and Lake Baikal, and by {gamma} ray detectors such as MILAGRO. TeV muons from {gamma} ray primaries, on the other hand, are rare because they are only produced by higher energy {gamma} rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy with the AMANDA, Lake Baikal, and MILAGRO detectors. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Halzen, F. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Stanev, T. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)] [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Yodh, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92715 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92715 (United States)

1997-04-01

101

Gamma Ray Astronomy with Muons  

E-print Network

Although gamma ray showers are muon-poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard gamma ray spectra there is a relative `enhancement' of muons from gamma ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower gamma rays above the photoproduction threshold contribute to the number of muons $N_\\mu$, which is thus proportional to the primary gamma ray energy. With gamma ray energy 50 times higher than the muon energy and a probability of muon production by the gammas of about 1\\%, muon detectors can match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector if their effective area is larger by $10^4$. The muons must have enough energy for sufficiently accurate reconstruction of their direction for doing astronomy. These conditions are satisfied by relatively shallow neutrino detectors such as AMANDA and Lake Baikal and by gamma ray detectors like MILAGRO. TeV muons from gamma ray primaries, on the other hand, are rare because they are only produced by higher energy gamma rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy with the AMANDA, Lake Baikal and MILAGRO detectors.

F. Halzen; T. Stanev; G. B. Yodh

1996-08-29

102

The gamma-ray source lsi. II. Multiwavelength emission model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The multi-wavelength spectrum of lsi is summarized. The X-ray to gamma-ray luminosity of Lic~=1.5×1035 erg\\/s is due to inverse Compton emission from relativistic electrons around a pulsar. The X-ray to gamma-ray spectrum determines the electron energy index, which is consistent with the observed radio spectrum if it mainly optically thin. The inverse Compton emission from a compact region of electrons

D. A. Leahy

2004-01-01

103

Gamma Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. There has been tremendous recent progress in our understanding of bursts with the new data from the Swift mission. Swift was launched in November 2004 and is a multiwave length observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. It was developed and is being operated by an international team of scientists from the US, UK and Italian. The first year of findings from the mission will be presented. A large step forward has been made in our understanding of the mysterious short GRBs. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow. These, and other topics, will be discussed.

Gehrels, Neil

2006-01-01

104

Digital Pulse Processing and Gamma Ray Tracking  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Two of the big changes in new generations of Nuclear Physics instrumentation will be the incorporation of digital processing and the use of gamma ray tracking. The Nuclear Physics Group at Daresbury has set up a project to investigate digital pulse processing for gamma ray detectors and how best to implement gamma ray tracking in large Germanium gamma ray detectors. Topics on this site include but are not limited to: gamma ray tracking, overview of the Gamma Ray Tracking Project, pictures of one of the tracking gamma ray detectors (TIGRE), pictures of test experiment, gamma ray tracking project publications, and links to other gamma ray tracking pages.

105

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and the observing program of the first 2 years of the mission. Examples of early discoveries by Compton are enumerated, including the discovery that gamma-ray bursts are isotropic but spatially inhomogeneous in their distribution; the discovery of a new class of high-energy extragalacatic gamma-ray sources, the gamma-ray AGNs; the discovery of emission from SN 1987A in the nuclear line of Co-57; and the mapping of emission from Al-26 in the interstellar medium (ISM) near the Galactic center. Future observations will include deep surveys of selected regions of the sky, long-tem studies of individual objects, correlative studies of objects at gamma-ray and other energies, a Galactic plane survey at intermediate gamma-ray energies, and improved statistics on gamma-ray bursts to search for small anisotropies. After completion of the all-sky survey, a Guest Investigator program is in progress with guest observers' time share increasing from 30% upward for the late mission phases.

Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D.

1994-01-01

106

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and the observing program of the first 2 years of the mission. Examples of early discoveries by Compton are enumerated, including the discovery that gamma-ray bursts are isotropic but spatially inhomogeneous in their distribution; the discovery of a new class of high-energy extragalacatic gamma-ray sources, the gamma-ray AGNs; the discovery of emission from SN 1987A in the nuclear line of Co-57; and the mapping of emission from Al-26 in the interstellar medium (ISM) near the Galactic center. Future observations will include deep surveys of selected regions of the sky, long-tem studies of individual objects, correlative studies of objects at gamma-ray and other energies, a Galactic plane survey at intermediate gamma-ray energies, and improved statistics on gamma-ray bursts to search for small anisotropies. After completion of the all-sky survey, a Guest Investigator program is in progress with guest observers' time share increasing from 30% upward for the late mission phases.

Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D.

1994-06-01

107

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments,

N. Gehrels; E. Chipman; D. Kniffen

1994-01-01

108

High energy gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

Fichtel, Carl E.

1987-01-01

109

Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

2010-01-01

110

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Revolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Isolated neutron stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. In the 1970s, only two sources had been identified, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space in both the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led to breakthrough developments in understanding the structure and physics of neutron star (NS) magnetospheres. In parallel, the 20-year-long chase to understand the nature of Geminga unveiled the existence of a radio-quiet, gamma-ray-emitting INS, adding a new dimension to the INS family. We are living through an extraordinary time of discovery. The current generation of gamma-ray detectors has vastly increased the population of known gamma-ray-emitting NSs. The 100 mark was crossed in 2011, and we are now over 150. The gamma-ray-emitting NS population exhibits roughly equal numbers of radio-loud and radio-quiet young INSs, plus an astonishing, and unexpected, group of isolated and binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). The number of MSPs is growing so rapidly that they are on their way to becoming the most numerous members of the family of gamma-ray-emitting NSs. Even as these findings have set the stage for a revolution in our understanding of gamma-ray-emitting NSs, long-term monitoring of the gamma-ray sky has revealed evidence of flux variability in the Crab Nebula as well as in the pulsed emission from PSR J2021+4026, challenging a four-decades-old, constant-emission paradigm. Now we know that both pulsars and their nebulae can, indeed, display variable emission.

Caraveo, Patrizia A.

2014-08-01

111

Compact x-ray source and panel  

DOEpatents

A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

2008-02-12

112

Unsteady outflow models for cosmological gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 'event' that triggers a gamma-ray burst cannot last for more than a few seconds. This is, however, long compared with the dynamical timescale of a compact stellar-mass object (approximately 10 (exp-3) s). Energy is assumed to be released as an outflow with high mean Lorentz factor Gamma. But a compact stellar-mass collapse or merger is, realistically, likely to generate

M. J. Rees; P. Meszaros

1994-01-01

113

Gamma-ray burst afterglows  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discovery of counterparts in X-ray and optical to radio wavelengths has revolutionized the study of gamma-ray bursts, until recently the most enigmatic of astrophysical phenomena. We now know that gamma-ray bursts are the biggest explosions in nature, caused by the ejection of ultrarelativistic matter from a powerful energy source and its subsequent collision with its environment. We have just

Paradijs van J. A; Chryssa Kouveliotou; Ralph A. M. J. Wijers

2000-01-01

114

VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAY Tadashi KIFUNE  

E-print Network

VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAY ASTRONOMY Tadashi KIFUNE Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University radiation eld. The gamma ray reactions characterize VHE gamma ray astronomy. The Universe, through the high primordial black holes, acted, to some extent, as impetus for promoting gamma ray astronomy. Although

Enomoto, Ryoji

115

Gamma-Ray Burst Lines  

E-print Network

The evidence for spectral features in gamma-ray bursts is summarized. As a guide for evaluating the evidence, the properties of gamma-ray detectors and the methods of analyzing gamma-ray spectra are reviewed. In the 1980's, observations indicated that absorption features below 100 keV were present in a large fraction of bright gamma-ray bursts. There were also reports of emission features around 400 keV. During the 1990's the situation has become much less clear. A small fraction of bursts observed with BATSE have statistically significant low-energy features, but the reality of the features is suspect because in several cases the data of the BATSE detectors appear to be inconsistent. Furthermore, most of the possible features appear in emission rather than the expected absorption. Analysis of data from other instruments has either not been finalized or has not detected lines.

Michael S. Briggs

1999-10-20

116

Gamma Ray Bursts and CETI  

E-print Network

Gamma ray burst sources are isotropically distributed. They could be located at distances $\\sim 1000$ AU. (Katz \\cite{JK92}) GRB signals have many narrow peaks that are unresolved at the millisecond time resolution of existing observations. \\cite{JK87} CETI could use stars as gravitational lenses for interstellar gamma ray laser beam communication. Much better time resolution of GRB signals could rule out (or confirm?) the speculative hypothesis that GRB = CETI.

Frank D. Smith Jr

1993-02-10

117

Multiwavelength Astronomy: Gamma Ray Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dieter Hartmann, a high-energy physicist, presents a story-based lesson on the science of Gamma-Ray astronomy. The lesson focuses on gamma-ray bursts; examining their sources, types, and links to the origin and evolution of the Universe. The story-based format of the lesson also provides insights into the nature of science. Students answer questions based on the reading guide. A list of supplemental websites is also included.

118

Gamma-ray line astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray astronomy is a valuable source of information on solar activity, supernovae, and nucleosynthesis. Cosmic gamma-ray lines were first observed from solar flares and more recently from the galactic center and a transient event. The latter may give an important insight into nuclear reactions taking place near neutron stars and black holes and a measure of the gravitational redshifts of such objects.

Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1979-01-01

119

Swift: Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the late 1960s, scientists accidentally discovered gamma-ray bursts, intense flashes of energy that typically last no more than a few seconds or minutes. For decades after the discovery of these powerful bursts, they remained one of the greatest mysteries in astronomy. This video segment discusses the Swift satellite mission, launched in 2004 to investigate gamma-ray bursts, and presents some theories as to their origins. The segment is four minutes fourteen seconds in length.

120

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY  

E-print Network

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY COLIN ROURKE We propose that a gamma ray burst is a kinematic Gamma ray bursts are intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation of cosmic origin lasting from ten accepted mechanism. We propose that a gamma ray burst is simply a kinematic effect, namely the effect

Rourke, Colin

121

Semiconductor detectors for soft gamma-ray astrophysics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of gamma-ray bursts, compact objects, nucleosynthesis and supernova remnants triggers the most interest today in the soft gamma-ray domain. These topics have various experimental requirements with emphasis either on imaging or on spectroscopy. Recent progress has shown the great potential of semiconductor detectors for both applications at the expense of classical scintillators such as NaI or CsI. They

François Lebrun

2006-01-01

122

Light Curves of Swift Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

Recent observations from the Swift gamma-ray burst mission indicate that a fraction of gamma ray bursts are characterized by a canonical behaviour of the X-ray afterglows. We present an effective theory which allows us to account for X-ray light curves of both (short - long) gamma ray bursts and X-ray rich flashes. We propose that gamma ray bursts originate from massive magnetic powered pulsars.

Paolo Cea

2006-09-22

123

Physics of Gamma Ray Burst Sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During this grant period, the physics of gamma-ray bursts was investigated. A number of new results have emerged. The importance of pair formation in high compactness burst spectra may help explain x-ray flashes; a universal jet shape is a likely explanation for the distribution of jet break times; gravitational waves may be copiously produced both in short bursts from compact mergers and in long bursts arising from collapsars; x-ray iron lines are likely to be due to interaction with the stellar atmosphere of the progenitor; prompt optical flashes from reverse shocks will give diagnostics on the Lorentz factor and the environment; GeV and TeV emission from bursts may be expected in the external shock; etc. The group working with the PI included postdocs Dr. Bing Zhang (now assistant professor at University of Nevada); Dr. Shiho Kobayashi; graduate student Lijun Gou; collaborators Drs. Tim Kallman and Martin Rees. Meszaros shared with Rees and Dr. Bohan Paczynsky the AAS Rossi Prize in 2000 for their work on the theory of gamma ray bursts. The refereed publications and conference proceedings resulting from this research are summarized below. The PI gave a number of invited talks at major conferences, also listed.

Meszaros, Peter

2004-01-01

124

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than that of previous observations. The 16,000 kilogram observatory contains four instruments on a stabilized platform. The mission began normal operations on 16 May 1991 and is now over half-way through a full-sky survey. The mission duration is expected to be from six to ten years. A Science Support Center has been established at Goddard Space Flight Center for the purpose of supporting a vigorous Guest Investigator Program. New scientific results to date include: (1) the establishment of the isotropy, combined with spatial inhomogeneity, of the distribution of gamma-ray bursts in the sky; (2) the discovery of intense high energy (100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 3C 279 and other quasars and BL Lac objects, making these the most distant and luminous gamma-ray sources ever detected; (3) one of the first images of a gamma-ray burst; (4) the observation of intense nuclear and position-annihilation gamma-ray lines and neutrons from several large solar flares; and (5) the detection of a third gamma-ray pulsar, plus several other transient and pulsing hard X-ray sources.

Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

1993-01-01

125

Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

1991-01-01

126

Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory being released from the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-35 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered the Earth's atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, GRO's Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientist to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of star, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in BATSE's science program.

1991-01-01

127

Gamma-Ray Astronomy of Cosmic Rays  

E-print Network

Many of the basic problems in the astrophysics of charged Cosmic Rays remain on principle unresolved by in situ observations in the Solar System due to the chaotic nature of the propagation of these particles in Interstellar space. This concerns the existence and the nature of localized individual particle sources as well as the transport in the Galaxy and establishes the need for astronomical observations of secondary gamma-rays. The only exception may be the highest energy particles at energies around $10^{20}$ eV which possibly reach us on straight line orbits from their production sites. Recently such gamma-ray observations, both in space and on the ground, have made great progress even though the instrumental sensitivities are still low. It is argued that two basic questions, regarding first of all the Supernova Remnant source hypothesis and secondly the contributions to the diffuse gamma-ray background, have come close to an empirical resolution. Apart from motivations deriving from extragalactic astronomy this expectation is at the root of the construction of a new generation of high-sensitivity gamma-ray instruments. As a representative example the H.E.S.S. array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes is described.

Heinrich Voelk

2002-02-22

128

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

ScienceCinema

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Isabelle Grenier

2010-01-08

129

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Grenier, Isabelle (University Paris Diderot and CEA Saclay, France) [University Paris Diderot and CEA Saclay, France

2009-04-01

130

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Isabelle Grenier

2009-04-01

131

A compact neutron beam generator system designed for prompt gamma nuclear activation analysis.  

PubMed

In this work a compact system was designed for bulk sample analysis using the technique of PGNAA. The system consists of (252)Cf fission neutron source, a moderator/reflector/filter assembly, and a suitable enclosure to delimit the resulting neutron beam. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement has been optimised to maximise the thermal neutron component useful for samples analysis with a suitably low level of beam contamination. The neutron beam delivered by this compact system is used to irradiate the sample and the prompt gamma rays produced by neutron reactions within the sample elements are detected by appropriate gamma rays detector. Neutron and gamma rays transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP5). PMID:21129990

Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D

2011-08-01

132

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models.

Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Del Monte, Ettore; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Trois, Alessio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo

2013-08-01

133

Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Mystery Story  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the success of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer currently in orbit, this is quite an exciting time in the history of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The study of GRBs is a modern astronomical mystery story that began over 30 years ago with the serendipitous discovery of these astronomical events by military satellites in the late 1960's. Until the launch of BATSE on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, astronomers had no clue whether GRBs originated at the edge of our solar system, in our own Milky Way Galaxy or incredibly far away near the edge of the observable Universe. Data from BATSE proved that GRBs are distributed isotropically on the sky and thus could not be the related to objects in the disk of our Galaxy. Given the intensity of the gamma-ray emission, an extragalactic origin would require an astounding amount of energy. Without sufficient data to decide the issue, a great debate continued about whether GRBs were located in the halo of our own galaxy or were at extragalactic - even cosmological distances. This debate continued until 1997 when the BeppoSAX mission discovered a fading X-ray afterglow signal in the same location as a GRB. This discovery enabled other telescopes, to observe afterglow emission at optical and radio wavelengths and prove that GRBs were at cosmological distances by measuring large redshifts in the optical spectra. Like BeppoSAX Swift, slews to new GRB locations to measure afterglow emission. In addition to improved GRB sensitivity, a significant advantage of Swift over BeppoSAX and other missions is its ability to slew very quickly, allowing x-ray and optical follow-up measurements to be made as early as a minute after the gamma-ray burst trigger rather than the previous 6-8 hour delay. Swift afterglow measurements along with follow-up ground-based observations, and theoretical work have allowed astronomers to identify two plausible scenarios for the creation of a GRB: either through core collapse of super massive stars or colliding compact objects in distant galaxies. The pieces of the puzzle are beginning to fall into place and yet the story isn't quite finished. I will frame the history of gamma-ray bursts as a mystery story and will end with a description of what we still don't know and what we'll have to do to get the next clues.

Parsons, Ann

2007-01-01

134

A history of gamma ray bursts and other astronomical conundrums  

E-print Network

line between X-ray and gamma ray astronomy has nothing to doray astronomers and gamma-ray astronomy is done by gamma rayGamma Ray Bursts and Other Astronomical Conundrums Virginia Trimble Department of Physics & Astronomy

Trimble, V

2006-01-01

135

Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

Cline, T. L. (editor); Ramaty, R. (editor)

1978-01-01

136

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

We show that the detection of neutrinos from a typical gamma ray burst requires a kilometer-scale detector. We argue that large bursts should be visible with the neutrino telescopes under construction. We emphasize the 3 techniques by which neutrino telescopes can perform this search: by triggering on i) bursts of muons from muon neutrinos, ii) muons from air cascades initiated by high energy gamma rays and iii) showers made by relatively low energy ($\\simeq 100\\,\\mev$) electron neutrinos. Timing of neutrino-photon coincidences may yield a measurement of the neutrino mass to order $10^{-5}$~eV, an interesting range in light of the solar neutrino anomaly.

F. Halzen; G. Jaczko

1996-02-07

137

Gamma-ray Imaging Methods  

SciTech Connect

In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

2006-10-05

138

The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

Thompson, David J.

2012-01-01

139

Short Gamma-Ray Burst Formation Rate from BATSE Data Using Ep -Lp Correlation and the Minimum Gravitational-wave Event Rate of a Coalescing Compact Binary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using 72 short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) with well determined spectral data observed by BATSE, we determine their redshift and luminosity by applying the Ep -Lp correlation for SGRBs found by Tsutsui et al. For 53 SGRBs with an observed flux brighter than 4 × 10-6 erg cm-2 s-1, the cumulative redshift distribution up to z = 1 agrees well with that of 22 Swift SGRBs. This suggests that the redshift determination by the Ep -Lp correlation for SGRBs works well. The minimum event rate at z = 0 is estimated as R_on{-axis}^min = 6.3_{-3.9}^{+3.1} \\times \\, 10^{-10}\\, events\\, Mpc^{-3\\,yr^{-1}}, so that the minimum beaming angle is 0.°6-7.°8 assuming a merging rate of 10-7- 4 × 10-6 events Mpc-3 yr-1 suggested from the binary pulsar data. Interestingly, this angle is consistent with that for SGRB 130603B of ~4°-8°. On the other hand, if we assume a beaming angle of ~6° suggested from four SGRBs with the observed beaming angle value, then the minimum event rate including off-axis SGRBs is estimated as R_all^min=1.15_{-0.66}^{+0.56}\\,\\times \\,10^{-7}\\, events \\,Mpc^{-3\\,yr^{-1}}. If SGRBs are induced by the coalescence of binary neutron stars (NSs) and/or black holes (BHs), then this event rate leads to a minimum gravitational-wave detection rate of 3.8_{-2.2}^{+1.8} \\,(146_{-83}^{+71})\\, events\\, yr^{-1} for an NS-NS (NS-BH) binary, respectively, by a worldwide network with KAGRA, advanced-LIGO, advanced-VIRGO, and GEO.

Yonetoku, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Sawano, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Keitaro; Toyanago, Asuka

2014-07-01

140

Some aspects of gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present state of gamma-ray astronomy is reviewed. The basic understanding of the processes by which gamma radiation is generated and absorbed is outlined. The basic observational results in various gamma-ray energy ranges are presented. The nature of the gamma bursts, the radiation source at the center of the local galaxy, etc., are discussed for the range of soft gamma-ray

Vitalii L Ginzburg

1989-01-01

141

On Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high

Remo Ruffini; M. G. Bernardini; C. L. Bianco; Letizia Caito; Pascal Chardonnet; Christian Cherubini; M. G. Dainotti; Federico Fraschetti; Andrea Geralico; Roberto Guida; Barbara Patricelli; Michael Rotondo; J. A. Rueda Hernandez; Gregory Vereshchagin; She-Sheng Xue

2008-01-01

142

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than

N. Gehrels; E. Chipman; D. A. Kniffen

1993-01-01

143

Gamma-ray camera flyby  

SciTech Connect

Animation based on an actual classroom demonstration of the prototype CCI-2 gamma-ray camera's ability to image a hidden radioactive source, a cesium-137 line source, in three dimensions. For more information see http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/06/02/applied-nuclear-physics/.

None

2010-01-01

144

High-energy gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subject of gamma-ray astronomy is discussed with emphasis on celestial gamma rays with energies in excess of 10 MeV. Early observations of such gamma rays are reviewed, a gamma-ray spark-chamber telescope is described together with a gas Cerenkov-counter telescope, and the gamma-ray sky is delineated. It is shown that the diffuse high-energy gamma radiation from the galactic plane probably results primarily from cosmic-ray interactions with interstellar matter. Mechanisms for gamma-ray production are identified, and it is noted that the general galactic radiation may prove to be of great value in studies of galactic structure. Possible sources are considered for the diffuse celestial radiation, and discrete sources are described, including the Crab pulsar, the Vela remnant, the Cygnus region, and Gould's Belt. Future developments in gamma-ray astronomy are considered.

Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.; Greisen, K.

1975-01-01

145

Advances in gamma-ray line astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray line observations of solar flares, gamma ray transients, and the galactic center are reviewed and interpreted. Prospects of future line detections are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N82-27200

Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1983-01-01

146

IS CALVERA A GAMMA-RAY PULSAR?  

SciTech Connect

Originally selected as a neutron star (NS) candidate in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, 1RXS J141256.0+792204 ('Calvera') was discovered to be a 59 ms X-ray pulsar in a pair of XMM-Newton observations by Zane et al. Surprisingly, their claimed detection of this pulsar in Fermi {gamma}-ray data requires no period derivative, severely restricting its dipole magnetic field strength, spin-down luminosity, and distance to small values. This implies that the cooling age of Calvera is much younger than its characteristic spin-down age. If so, it could be a mildly recycled pulsar, or the first 'orphaned' central compact object (CCO). Here we show that the published Fermi ephemeris fails to align the pulse phases of the two X-ray observations with each other, which indicates that the Fermi detection is almost certainly spurious. Analysis of additional Fermi data also does not confirm the {gamma}-ray detection. This leaves the spin-down rate of Calvera less constrained, and its place among the families of NSs uncertain. It could still be either an ordinary pulsar, a mildly recycled pulsar, or an orphaned CCO.

Halpern, J. P., E-mail: jules@astro.columbia.edu [Astronomy Department, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027-6601 (United States)

2011-07-20

147

Can Fireball or Firecone Models Explain Gamma Ray Bursts?  

E-print Network

The observed afterglows of gamma ray bursts, in particular that of GRB 970228 six months later, seem to rule out relativistic fireballs and relativistic firecones driven by merger or accretion induced collapse of compact stellar objects in galaxies as the origin of GRBs. GRBs can be produced by superluminal jets from such events.

Arnon Dar

1998-01-04

148

Extreme Terrestrial Gamma ray Events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial gamma ray flashes were first discovered by the Compton GRO observatory and such event have been observed later on-board Rhessi satellite and more recently by the Fermi and Agile missions. These events are believed to be associated with the thunderstorm activity in the lower atmosphere. When observed from the satellite instruments, the observed time structure. Shows short milliseconds bursts probably due to lightning discharges , however an other type of long bursts with a duration of a few seconds to a few minutes have been observed only in the lower atmosphere. Such behaviour is natural as the upward moving photons go through a large atmospheric depth several 100 gms which will affect both the time structure and the spectral nature as the thunderstorms normally originate only in the lower troposphere just above the convective boundary layer. We report the observations of extreme terrestrial gamma ray events with time duration ~150-250 min observed during the thunderstorm activity in Hyderabad South, India. At 17.3o lat. and 78.6o long., Hyderabad is located in the convergence zone with high level of thunderstorm activity during the monsoon period. Spectral data suggest a continuum flux of the gamma ray from 100 keV to 10 MeV for hours. Temporal characteristics studied with time resolution of 100 microsec do not show any excess power density at any frequency. The data suggest that unlike gamma ray flashes which are generated just during the lightening flash, large electric field disturbances during long thunderstorm activity may lead to large flux of accelerated particles, which emit continuum gamma rays flux.

Manchanda, R. K.; Kamble, Nilima

2012-07-01

149

Portable compton gamma-ray detection system  

DOEpatents

A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Oldaker, Mark E. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-03-04

150

Gamma-ray astronomy at high energies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress in high-energy gamma-ray astronomy has depended upon the development of sophisticated detectors and analysis techniques. Observations in this decade using space-based and ground-based detectors have observed gamma-ray emission from a variety of sources. For the first time a consistent picture of the gamma-ray sky has emerged. This article describes the detection techniques in gamma-ray astronomy, the nature of the

C. M. Hoffman; C. Sinnis; P. Fleury; M. Punch

1999-01-01

151

Recent developments in semiconductor gamma-ray detectors  

SciTech Connect

The successful development of lithium-drifted Ge detectors in the 1960's marked the beginning of the significant use of semiconductor crystals for direct detection and spectroscopy of gamma rays. In the 1970's, high-purity Ge became available, which enabled the production of complex detectors and multi-detector systems. In the following decades, the technology of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors continued to advance, with significant developments not only in Ge detectors but also in Si detectors and room-temperature compound-semiconductor detectors. In recent years, our group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a variety of gamma ray detectors based on these semiconductor materials. Examples include Ge strip detectors, lithium-drifted Si strip detectors, and coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors. These advances provide new capabilities in the measurement of gamma rays, such as the ability to perform imaging and the realization of highly compact spectroscopy systems.

Luke, Paul N.; Amman, Mark; Tindall, Craig; Lee, Julie S.

2003-10-28

152

Fireballs and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

The sudden release of copious $\\g$-ray photons into a compact region creates an opaque photon--lepton fireball due to the prolific production of electron--positron pairs. The photons that we observe in the bursts emerge only at the end of the fireball phase after it expanded sufficiently to become optically thin or after it converted its energy to the kinetic energy of relativistic baryons which convert it, in turn, to electromagnetic pulse via the interaction with interstellar matter. It is essential, therefore, to analyze the evolution of a fireball in order to comprehend the observed features of $\\gamma$-ray bursts. We discuss various aspects of fireball hydrodynamics and the resulting emitted spectra.

Tsvi Piran

1994-01-17

153

Balloon-borne gamma-ray polarimetry  

E-print Network

The physical processes postulated to explain the high-energy emission mechanisms of compact astrophysical sources often yield polarised soft gamma rays (X-rays). PoGOLite is a balloon-borne polarimeter operating in the 25-80 keV energy band. The polarisation of incident photons is reconstructed using Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption in an array of phoswich detector cells comprising plastic and BGO scintillators, surrounded by a BGO side anticoincidence shield. The polarimeter is aligned to observation targets using a custom attitude control system. The maiden balloon flight is scheduled for summer 2011 from the Esrange Space Centre with the Crab and Cygnus X-1 as the primary observational targets.

Pearce, Mark

2011-01-01

154

Gamma rays from globular clusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Globular clusters are known to contain a relatively large number of pulsars whose individual and collective emission in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands may be detectable by the instruments on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), ROSAT, and possibly SIGMA. We discuss the several types of high-energy emission expected from isolated and interacting binary pulsars in globular clusters. Individual or collective high-energy emission from isolated pulsars is expected to be too low to be detected with current instruments. However, a class of high-luminosity hidden millisecond pulsars enshrouded in the evaporating material from irradiated companion stars can produce unpulsed shock emission detectable by the high-sensitivity instruments of ROSAT and CGRO. Establishing upper limits of high-energy emission from globular clusters will be valuable in constraining models for the formation of cluster millisecond pulsars.

Tavani, Marco

1993-01-01

155

Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays

J. F. Cooper; C. Reppin; D. J. Forrest; E. L. Chupp; G. H. Share; R. L. Kinzer

1985-01-01

156

Gamma ray astrophysics. [emphasizing processes and absorption  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray production processes are reviewed, including Compton scattering, synchrotron radiation, bremsstrahlung interactions, meson decay, nucleon-antinucleon annihilations, and pion production. Gamma ray absorption mechanisms through interactions with radiation and with matter are discussed, along with redshifts and gamma ray fluxes.

Stecker, F. W.

1974-01-01

157

Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1978-01-01

158

Gamma-ray signatures of classical novae  

E-print Network

The role of classical novae as potential gamma-ray emitters is reviewed, on the basis of theoretical models of the gamma-ray emission from different nova types. The interpretation of the up to now negative results of the gamma-ray observations of novae, as well as the prospects for detectability with future instruments (specially onboard INTEGRAL) are also discussed.

M. Hernanz; J. Gomez-Gomar; J. Jose

2001-09-06

159

ROSAT: X ray survey of compact groups  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is the final technical report on grant NAG5-1954, which was awarded under the NASA ROSAT Guest Investigator Program to Columbia University. This grant was awarded for a number of projects on two rather different topics: (1) an x-ray survey of compact groups of galaxies; and (2) the fate of gas in merging galaxies. Progress made in these projects is presented.

Vangorkom, Jacqueline

1993-01-01

160

The Gamma-Ray Observatory mission objectives and its significance for gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is an approved NASA mission, programmed for launch in 1988. Its complement of four detectors has established goals: (1) to study the nature of compact gamma-ray sources such as neutron stars and black holes, or objects whose nature is yet to be understood; (2) to search for evidence of nucleosynthesis especially in the regions of supernovae; (3) to study structural features and dynamical properties of the Galaxy; (4) to explore other galaxies, especially the extraordinary types such as radio, Seyferts, and quasars; and (5) to study cosmological effects by examining the diffuse radiation in detail. This paper discusses the design, objectives, and expected scientific results of each of the GRO instruments in view of the GRO mission goals.

Bertsch, D. L.

1984-01-01

161

Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a final report for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program from 06/01/91-07/31/97. The topics include: 1) Solar Flare Neutron Spectra and Accelerated Ions; 2) Gamma Ray Lines From The Orion Complex; 3) Implications of Nuclear Line Emission From The Orion Complex; 4) Possible Sites of Nuclear Line Emission From Massive OB Associations; 5) Gamma-Ray Burst Repitition and BATSE Position Uncertainties; 6) Effects of Compton Scattering on BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra; and 7) Selection Biases on the Spectral and Temporal Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts.

Lingenfelter, Richard E.

1997-01-01

162

Gravitational collapse as the source of gamma-ray bursts  

E-print Network

If the threshold for $e^{-}e^{+}$ pair production depends on an angle between photon momenta, and if the $\\gamma$-rays are collimated right in gamma-ray burst (GRB) source then another solution of the compactness problem is possible. The list of basic assumptions of the scenario describing the GRB with energy release $< 10^{49}$ erg is adduced: the matter is about an alternative to the ultrarelativistic fireball if all long-duration GRBs are physically connected with core-collapse supernovae (SNe). The questions about radiation pressure and how the jet arises on account of even a small radiation field asymmetry in a compact GRB source of size $\\lesssim 10^8$ cm, and observational consequences of the compact model of GRBs are considered.

V. V. Sokolov

2008-05-21

163

High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

Gehrels, Neil

2012-01-01

164

Gamma-ray burst afterglows  

E-print Network

Extended, fading emissions in multi-wavelength are observed following Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent broad-band observational campaigns led by the Swift Observatory reveal rich features of these GRB afterglows. Here we review the latest observational progress and discuss the theoretical implications for understanding the central engine, composition, and geometric configuration of GRB jets, as well as their interactions with the ambient medium.

Bing Zhang

2007-01-10

165

STS-37: Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents footage of pre-flight activities involving the STS-37 primary payload, the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). The GRO is shown being removed from the transport aircraft to one of the runways at Kennedy. Other footage includes Kennedy work crews moving the GRO into position as well as discussions between the STS-37 astronauts and the work crews regarding GRO operation.

1991-01-01

166

Gamma-ray astronomy: Nuclear transition region  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This monograph reviews the major theoretical and experimental efforts made during the past 12 years in gamma-ray astronomy over the energy range from 10 keV to about 100 MeV, where nuclear-transition lines are expected. Early attempts to detect celestial gamma rays are recounted, mechanisms of gamma-ray line and continuum production are examined, and formulas giving the various possible differential gamma-ray spectral shapes are provided. Predicted fluxes are discussed for solar gamma rays as well as for gamma emission from supernova remnants, supernovae, neutron stars, flare stars, the galactic core and disk, black holes, and diffuse sources. Gamma-ray interactions with matter are analyzed, particularly the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering from free electrons, and pair production in nuclear fields. Significant results are summarized for observations of gamma rays from the sun as well as from point and extended sources within and beyond the Galaxy, including diffuse fluxes and transient gamma-ray bursts. Factors pertaining to the design of gamma-ray astronomy experiments are considered, especially detector background limitations, gamma-ray production within instruments, and present-day detection methods.

Chupp, E. L.

1976-01-01

167

Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

2012-01-01

168

Galaxies and gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comparisons between the recently measured X-ray spectra of active galaxies, the intensity upper limits to the ..gamma..-ray emission above 35 MeV from the same objects obtained from data from SAS 2, and other ..gamma..-ray data are used to address the nature of the high-energy spectra of several types of active galaxies, their contribution to the measured diffuse ..gamma..-ray emission between

G. F. Bignami; C. E. Fichtel; R. C. Hartman; D. J. Thompson

1979-01-01

169

Characteristics of gamma-ray line flares  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of solar gamma rays by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) demonstrate that energetic protons and ions are rapidly accelerated during the impulsive phase. To understand the acceleration mechanisms for these particles, the characteristics of the gamma ray line flares observed by SMM were studied. Some very intense hard X-ray flares without detectable gamma ray lines were also investigated. Gamma ray line flares are distinguished from other flares by: (1) intense hard X-ray and microwave emissions; (2) delay of high energy hard X-rays; (3) emission of type 2 and/or type 4 radio bursts; and (4) flat hard X-ray spectra (average power law index: 3.1). The majority of the gamma ray line flares shared all these characteristics, and the remainder shared at least three of them. Positive correlations were found between durations of spike bursts and spatial sizes of flare loops as well as between delay times and durations of spike bursts.

Bai, T.; Dennis, B.

1983-01-01

170

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Galactic Diffuse Gamma-ray Spectrum from Cosmic-ray In-  

E-print Network

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Galactic Diffuse Gamma-ray Spectrum from Cosmic-ray In- teractions with Gas Clouds Michiko OHISHI and Masaki MORI Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University, Australia Abstract Gamma-ray spectra from cosmic-ray proton and electron interactions with gas clouds have

Mori, Masaki

171

Gravitational microlensing of gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Monte Carlo code is developed to calculate gravitational microlensing in three dimensions when the lensing optical depth is low or moderate (not greater than 0.25). The code calculates positions of microimages and time delays between the microimages. The majority of lensed gamma-ray bursts should show a simple double-burst structure, as predicted by a single point mass lens model. A small fraction should show complicated multiple events due to the collective effects of several point masses (black holes). Cosmological models with a significant fraction of mass density in massive compact objects can be tested by searching for microlensing events in the current BATSE data. Our catalog generated by 10,000 Monte Carlo models is accessible through the computer network. The catalog can be used to take realistic selection effects into account.

Mao, Shude

1993-01-01

172

Gravitational wave: gamma-ray burst connections.  

PubMed

After 35 years of experimental research, we are rapidly approaching the point at which gravitational waves (GWs) from astrophysical sources may be directly detected by the long-baseline detectors LIGO (USA), GEO 600 (Germany/UK), VIRGO (Italy/France) and TAMA 300 (Japan), which are now in or coming into operation.A promising source of GWs is the coalescence of compact binary systems, events which are now believed to be the origin of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, a brief review of the state of the art in detector development and exploitation will be given, with particular relevance to a search for signals associated with GRBs, and plans for the future will be discussed. PMID:17293333

Hough, Jim

2007-05-15

173

Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not primarily a gamma-ray mission, it has added a new dimension to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Along with these new discoveries a firm groundwork has been laid for missions and new technology development that should maintain a healthy and vigorous field throughout most of the next decade. These include the ESA INTEGRAL mission (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, to be launched in mid-2001) and the NASA GLAST mission (Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope) with a likely launch in the middle of the next decade. These two missions will extend the observational capabilities well beyond those of CGRO. New technologies (to gamma-ray astronomy), such as cooled germanium detectors, silicon strip detectors, and CdTe detectors are planned for these new missions. Additional promising new technologies such as CdZnTe strip detectors, scintillator fibers, and a gamma-ray lens for future gamma-ray astronomy missions are under development in laboratories around the world.

Teegarden, B. J.

1999-02-01

174

A tuneable ultra-compact high-power, ultra-short pulsed, bright gamma-ray source based on bremsstrahlung radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons  

SciTech Connect

The laser driven plasma wakefield accelerator is a very compact source of high energy electrons. When the quasi-monoenergetic beam from these accelerators passes through dense material, high energy bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a collimated beam with high flux. We show how a source based on this emission process can produce more than 10{sup 9} photons per pulse with a mean energy of 10 MeV. We present experimental results that show the feasibility of this method of producing high energy photons and compare the experimental results with GEANT4 Montecarlo simulations, which also give the scaling required to evaluate its suitability as method to produce radioisotopes via photo-nuclear reactions or for imaging applications.

Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Vieux, G.; Issac, R. C.; Brunetti, E.; Ersfeld, B.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M. P.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [University of Strathclyde, Physics Department, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Maneuski, D.; Shea, V. O. [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Lemos, N. R. C.; Bendoyro, R. A.; Dias, J. M. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1049-001, Lisbon (Portugal); Rajeev, P. P.; Foster, P. [Central Laser Facility, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bourgeois, N.; Ibbotson, T. P. A. [Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); and others

2012-03-15

175

Gamma-ray burst spectral breaks and source beaming  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The principal discovery of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) concerning gamma-ray bursts is that these sources are isotropic but with a comparative deficiency of fainter sources, suggesting that they are probably cosmological in origin. If they are at such large distances from Earth then they are extremely luminous and compact. A consequence of this is that two-photon pair production attenuation of the gamma-ray continuum cannot be avoided unless the source radiation is substantially beamed. Most sources do not display gamma-ray turnovers although a few gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected by GRO exhibit distinct spectral breaks in the MeV range. A derivation of the relationship defining of the degree of beaming in burst sources with spectral breaks due to gamma-gamma attenuation, as a function of source spectral index and break energy, is presented. It is found that sources at distances of approximately 1 Gpc must typically be beamed with bulk Lorentz factors of around 10(exp 3)-10(exp 4), indicating powerful bulk acceleration in bursts, although these Lorentz factors are reduced markedly for steep source spectra. Since the source spectra are not strongly Comptonized, such beaming will blueshift the gamma-gamma attenuation breaks to energies much higher than 1 MeV; an absolute lower bound to the source bulk Lorentz factor is determined from this additional constraint. This blueshifting suggests that those sources with MeV breaks may not be cosmological, or that their breaks are produced by a mechanism that dominates gamma-gamma attenuation at these energies.

Baring, Matthew G.

1994-01-01

176

Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Prompt TeV Gamma Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as one {\\it possible} class of sources of the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events observed up to energies $\\gsim10^{20}\\ev$. The synchrotron radiation of the highest energy protons accelerated within the GRB source should produce gamma rays up to TeV energies. Here we briefly discuss the implications on the energetics of the GRB from the point of view of the detectability of the prompt TeV gamma rays of proton-synchrotron origin in GRBs in the up-coming ICECUBE muon detector in the south pole.

Pijushpani Bhattacharjee; Nayantara Gupta

2003-05-12

177

Supernovae as sources of gamma rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most supernovae are profoundly radioactive and the Gamma Ray Observatory is an ideal instrument for detecting their unique gamma ray line and X-ray signatures. How the observation of these hard photons can be used to do supernova science will be addressed, with particular emphasis being placed on Type Ia explosions and nearby events.

Burrows, Adam

1992-01-01

178

GRI: The Gamma-Ray Imager mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are the major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime With the INTEGRAL observatory ESA has provided a unique tool to the astronomical community and has put Europe in the lead in the field of gamma-ray astronomy INTEGRAL provides an unprecedented survey of the soft gamma-ray sky revealing hundreds of sources new classes of objects extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes While INTEGRAL has provided the global overview over the soft gamma-ray sky there is a growing need to perform deeper more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources In soft X-rays a comparable step was taken going from the Einstein satellite to the XMM Newton observatory Technological advances in the past years in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques have paved the way towards a gamma-ray mission providing major improvements compared to past missions regarding sensitivity and angular resolution Such a

Knödlseder, J.; Gri Consortium

179

Gamma-ray burst reprocessing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of three theoretical models for the generation of transient optical emission thought to accompany the gamma-ray bursts is presented. The physics of reprocessing by Compton-heated electrons in the magnetosphere of a highly magnetized neutron star, the surface layers of a companion star, and an accretion disk are discussed. The spectral shapes, time scales, and arrival time delays between low and high energy photons predicted by the models are compared. These predictions are so different that broad band monitoring could be used to indicate which of the three scenarios (if any) is correct.

Melia, Fulvio

1988-01-01

180

Gamma-Ray Attenuation Coefficient Measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an earlier paper, published by the authors elsewhere, it was shown that for 661.6-keV gamma rays the measurements of gamma-ray attenuation coefficients would greatly improve if one uses the counting sequence of Conner et al. together with a new criterion mut<1, where mu is the gamma-ray attenuation coefficient and t is the thickness of the sample. In this paper

S. Gopal; B. Sanjeevaiah

1973-01-01

181

The physics of gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma-ray bursts (GRB's), short and intense pulses of low-energy gamma rays, have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in the late sixties. During the last decade, several space missions---BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, BeppoSAX and now HETE II (High-Energy Transient Explorer)---together with ground-based optical, infrared, and radio observatories have revolutionized our understanding

Tsvi Piran

2004-01-01

182

Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

Tanmay Vachaspati

2007-06-08

183

Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not

B. J Teegarden

1999-01-01

184

Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a review of the current status of very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. The development of the atmospheric Cerenkov imaging technique for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has led to a rapid growth in the number of observatories. The detection of TeV gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei was unexpected and is providing new insights into the emission mechanisms in the jets.

Michael Catanese; Trevor C. Weekes

1999-01-01

185

The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts remain one of the greatest mysteries in astrophysics. Observations of gamma-ray bursts made by the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory will be described. Most workers in the field now believe that they originate from cosmological distances. This view has been reinforced by observations this year of several optical afterglow counterparts to gamma-ray bursts. A summary of these recent discoveries will be presented, along with their implications for models of the burst emission mechanism and the energy source of the bursts.

Fishman, Gerald J.

2004-01-01

186

A compact gamma camera for biological imaging  

SciTech Connect

A compact detector, sized particularly for imaging a mouse, is described. The active area of the detector is approximately 46 mm; spl times/ 96 mm. Two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) are coupled to a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator which views the animal through a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator specially designed for {sup 125}I. Although the PSPMTs have insensitive areas at their edges and there is a physical gap, corrections for scintillation light collection at the junction between the two tubes results in a uniform response across the entire rectangular area of the detector. The system described has been developed to optimize both sensitivity and resolution for in-vivo imaging of small animals injected with iodinated compounds. We demonstrate an in-vivo application of this detector, particularly to SPECT, by imaging mice injected with approximately 10-15; spl mu/Ci of {sup 125}I.

Bradley, E.L.; Cella, J.; Majewski, S.; Popov, V.; Jianguo Qian; Saha, M.S.; Smith, M.F.; Weisenberger, A.G.; Welsh, R.E.

2006-02-01

187

The Correlation between Gamma-ray and Radio Emissions in gamma-ray Loud Blazars  

Microsoft Academic Search

We collect 119 gamma-ray-loud blazars (97 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and 22 BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs)), and investigate possible correlations between their gamma-ray emission (maximum, minimum and average values) at 1 GeV and the radio emission at 8.4 GHz. Our main results are as follows. For the lower state gamma-ray data, there is no correlation between the gamma-ray

Jiang-He Yang; Jun-Hui Fan

2005-01-01

188

Gamma-ray burst models.  

PubMed

I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts. PMID:17293332

King, Andrew

2007-05-15

189

Short-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) display a bimodal duration distribution with a separation between the short- and long-duration bursts at about 2 s. The progenitors of long GRBs have been identified as massive stars based on their association with Type Ic core-collapse supernovae (SNe), their exclusive location in star-forming galaxies, and their strong correlation with bright UV regions within their host galaxies. Short GRBs have long been suspected on theoretical grounds to arise from compact object binary mergers (neutron star-neutron star or neutron star-black hole). The discovery of short GRB afterglows in 2005 provided the first insight into their energy scale and environments, as well as established a cosmological origin, a mix of host-galaxy types, and an absence of associated SNe. In this review, I summarize nearly a decade of short GRB afterglow and host-galaxy observations and use this information to shed light on the nature and properties of their progenitors, the energy scale and collimation of the relativistic outflow, and the properties of the circumburst environments. The preponderance of the evidence points to compact object binary progenitors, although some open questions remain. On the basis of this association, observations of short GRBs and their afterglows can shed light on the on- and off-axis electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave sources from the Advanced LIGO/Virgo experiments.

Berger, Edo

2014-08-01

190

X-ray and gamma ray astronomy detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

X-ray and gamma ray astronomy was made possible by the advent of space flight. Discovery and early observations of celestial x-rays and gamma rays, dating back almost 40 years, were first done with high altitude rockets, followed by Earth-orbiting satellites> once it became possible to carry detectors above the Earth's atmosphere, a new view of the universe in the high-energy part of the electromagnetic spectrum evolved. Many of the detector concepts used for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy were derived from radiation measuring instruments used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other fields. However, these instruments, when used in x-ray and gamma ray astronomy, have to meet unique and demanding requirements related to their operation in space and the need to detect and measure extremely weak radiation fluxes from celestial x-ray and gamma ray sources. Their design for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy has, therefore, become a rather specialized and rapidly advancing field in which improved sensitivity, higher energy and spatial resolution, wider spectral coverage, and enhanced imaging capabilities are all sought. This text is intended as an introduction to x-ray and gamma ray astronomy instruments. It provides an overview of detector design and technology and is aimed at scientists, engineers, and technical personnel and managers associated with this field. The discussion is limited to basic principles and design concepts and provides examples of applications in past, present, and future space flight missions.

Decher, Rudolf; Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert

191

X-ray and gamma ray astronomy detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

X-ray and gamma ray astronomy was made possible by the advent of space flight. Discovery and early observations of celestial x-rays and gamma rays, dating back almost 40 years, were first done with high altitude rockets, followed by Earth-orbiting satellites> once it became possible to carry detectors above the Earth's atmosphere, a new view of the universe in the high-energy part of the electromagnetic spectrum evolved. Many of the detector concepts used for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy were derived from radiation measuring instruments used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other fields. However, these instruments, when used in x-ray and gamma ray astronomy, have to meet unique and demanding requirements related to their operation in space and the need to detect and measure extremely weak radiation fluxes from celestial x-ray and gamma ray sources. Their design for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy has, therefore, become a rather specialized and rapidly advancing field in which improved sensitivity, higher energy and spatial resolution, wider spectral coverage, and enhanced imaging capabilities are all sought. This text is intended as an introduction to x-ray and gamma ray astronomy instruments. It provides an overview of detector design and technology and is aimed at scientists, engineers, and technical personnel and managers associated with this field. The discussion is limited to basic principles and design concepts and provides examples of applications in past, present, and future space flight missions.

Decher, Rudolf; Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert

1994-01-01

192

Instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current status of gamma-ray-telescope technology for ground, airborne, and space observations is surveyed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs and tables of typical data. For the low- and medium-energy ranges, consideration is given to detectors and detector cooling systems, background-rejection methods, radiation damage, large-area detectors, gamma-ray imaging, data analysis, and the Compton-interaction region. Also discussed are the gamma-ray interaction process at high energies; multilevel automated spark-chamber gamma-ray telescopes; the Soviet Gamma-1 telescope; the EGRET instrument for the NASA Gamma-Ray Observatory; and Cerenkov, air-shower, and particle-detector instruments for the TeV and PeV ranges. Significant improvements in resolution and sensitivity are predicted for the near future.

Bertsch, David L.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Trombka, Jacob I.

1988-01-01

193

The 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 1 X-ray and Gamma-ray Measurements  

E-print Network

of gamma-rays has become a field of astronomy after succeeding in the reduction of overwhelming backgroundThe 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 1 X-ray and Gamma-ray Measurements Masaki Mori and gamma-ray measurements, of the 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference. 1. Introduction Thick

Enomoto, Ryoji

194

The status of low-energy gamma-ray astronomy and the Gamma-Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief sketch of the objectives and status of the various subdisciplines in gamma-ray astronomy (below 10 GeV) are presented. The Gamma-Ray Observatory planned for launch in 1988 is described. This NASA observatory and several planned French-Soviet spacecraft are expected to elevate gamma-ray astronomy into a mature observational science for the Space Station era.

Fishman, G. J.

1985-01-01

195

Modeling gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. This shell model code can be used to constrain broadband observations of GRB 090926A, which showed two flares in both the Swift UVOT and XRT bands. Using the prompt emission fluence to constrain the total energy contained in the blastwave, the internal shock model requires that Lorentz factors of the shells causing flares must be less than the Lorentz factor of the blastwave when the shells are ejected. Recent observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) revealed a power law decay feature of the high energy emission (above 100 MeV), which led to the suggestion that it originates from an external shock. We analyze four GRBs (080916C, 090510, 090902B and 090926A) jointly detected by Fermi LAT and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), which have high quality lightcurves in both instrument energy bands. Using the MeV prompt emission (GBM) data, we can record the energy output from the central engine as a function of time. Assuming a constant radiative efficiency, we are able to track energy accumulation in the external shock using our internal/external shell model code and show that the late time lightcurves fit well within the external shock model, but the early time lightcurves are dominated by the internal shock component which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave.

Maxham, Amanda

196

NEAR Gamma Ray Spectrometer Characterization and Repair  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report covers the work completed in the third year of the contract. The principle activities during this period were (1) the characterization of the NEAR 2 Gamma Ray Spectrometer using a neutron generator to generate complex gamma ray spectra and a large Ge Detecter to identify all the major peaks in the spectra; (2) the evaluation and repair of the Engineering Model Unit of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer for the NEAR mission; (3) the investigation of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray detection; and (4) technology transfer from NASA to forensic science.

Groves, Joel Lee; Vajda, Stefan

1998-01-01

197

Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research activities in cosmic rays, gamma rays, and astrophysical plasmas are covered. The activities are divided into sections and described, followed by a bibliography. The astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays, gamma rays, and of the radiation and electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets are investigated. These investigations are performed by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons.

Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

1989-01-01

198

Internal Energy Dissipation of Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with Swift: Precursors, Prompt Gamma-Rays, Extended Emission, and Late X-Ray Flares  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We jointly analyze the gamma-ray burst (GRB) data observed with Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and X-ray Telescope on board the Swift mission to present a global view on the internal energy dissipation processes in GRBs, including precursors, prompt gamma-ray emission, extended soft gamma-ray emission, and late X-ray flares. The Bayesian block method is utilized to analyze the BAT light curves to identify various emission episodes. Our results suggest that these emission components likely share the same physical origin, which is the repeated activation of the GRB central engine. What we observe in the gamma-ray band may be a small part of more extended underlying activities. The precursor emission, which is detected in about 10% of Swift GRBs, is preferably detected in those GRBs that have a massive star core-collapse origin. The soft extended emission tail, on the other hand, is preferably detected in those GRBs that have a compact star merger origin. Bright X-ray emission is detected during the BAT quiescent phases prior to subsequent gamma-ray peaks, implying that X-ray emission may be detectable prior the BAT trigger time. Future GRB alert instruments with soft X-ray capability are essential for revealing the early stages of GRB central engine activities, and shedding light on jet composition and the jet launching mechanism in GRBs.

Hu, You-Dong; Liang, En-Wei; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Peng, Fang-Kun; Lu, Rui-Jing; Lü, Lian-Zhong; Zhang, Bing

2014-07-01

199

Gamma-ray burster recurrence timescales  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three optical transients have been found which are associated with gamma-ray bursters (GRBs). The deduced recurrence timescale for these optical transients (tau sub opt) will depend on the minimum brightness for which a flash would be detected. A detailed analysis using all available data of tau sub opt as a function of E(gamma)/E(opt) is given. For flashes similar to those found in the Harvard archives, the best estimate of tau sub opt is 0.74 years, with a 99% confidence interval from 0.23 years to 4.7 years. It is currently unclear whether the optical transients from GRBs also give rise to gamma-ray events. One way to test this association is to measure the recurrence timescale of gamma-ray events tau sub gamma. A total of 210 gamma-ray error boxes were examined and it was found that the number of observed overlaps is not significantly different from the number expected from chance coincidence. This observation can be used to place limits on tau sub gamma for an assumed luminosity function. It was found that tau sub gamma is approx. 10 yr if bursts are monoenergetic. However, if GRBs have a power law luminosity function with a wide dynamic range, then the limit is tau sub gamma 0.5 yr. Hence, the gamma-ray data do not require tau sub gamma and tau sub opt to be different.

Schaefer, B. E.; Cline, T. L.

1984-01-01

200

X-ray echoes from gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The identification of an echo of reflected radiation in time histories of gamma-ray burst spectra can provide important information about the existence of binary companions or accretion disks in gamma-ray burst systems. Because of the nature of Compton scattering, the spectrum of the echo will be attenuated at gamma-ray energies compared with the spectrum of the primary burst emission. The expected temporal and spectral signatures of the echo and a search for such echoes are described, and implications for gamma-ray burst models are discussed.

Dermer, Charles D.; Hurley, Kevin C.; Hartmann, Dieter H.

1991-01-01

201

Special issue on compact x-ray sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on compact x-ray sources, to appear in the winter of 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. The potential for high-brilliance x- and gamma-ray sources driven by advanced, compact accelerators has gained increasing attention in recent years. These novel sources—sometimes dubbed 'fifth generation sources'—will build on the revolutionary advance of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). New radiation sources of this type have widespread applications, including in ultra-fast imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic medicine, and studies of matter under extreme conditions. Rapid advances in compact accelerators and in FEL techniques make this an opportune moment to consider the opportunities which could be realized by bringing these two fields together. Further, the successful development of compact radiation sources driven by compact accelerators will be a significant milestone on the road to the development of high-gradient colliders able to operate at the frontiers of particle physics. Thus the time is right to publish a peer-reviewed collection of contributions concerning the state-of-the-art in: advanced and novel acceleration techniques; sophisticated physics at the frontier of FELs; and the underlying and enabling techniques of high brightness electron beam physics. Interdisciplinary research connecting two or more of these fields is also increasingly represented, as exemplified by entirely new concepts such as plasma based electron beam sources, and coherent imaging with fs-class electron beams. We hope that in producing this special edition of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (iopscience.iop.org/0953-4075/) we may help further a challenging mission and ongoing intellectual adventure: the harnessing of newly emergent, compact advanced accelerators to the creation of new, agile light sources with unprecedented capabilities. New schemes for compact accelerators: laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators; dielectric laser accelerators; THz accelerators. Latest results for compact accelerators. Target design and staging of advanced accelerators. Advanced injection and phase space manipulation techniques. Novel diagnostics: single-shot measurement of sub-fs bunch duration; measurement of ultra-low emittance. Generation and characterization of incoherent radiation: betatron and undulator radiation; Thomson/Compton scattering sources, novel THz sources. Generation and characterization of coherent radiation. Novel FEL simulation techniques. Advances in simulations of novel accelerators: simulations of injection and acceleration processes; simulations of coherent and incoherent radiation sources; start-to-end simulations of fifth generation light sources. Novel undulator schemes. Novel laser drivers for laser-driven accelerators: high-repetition rate laser systems; high wall-plug efficiency systems. Applications of compact accelerators: imaging; radiography; medical applications; electron diffraction and microscopy. Please submit your article by 15 May 2014 (expected web publication: winter 2014); submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue.

Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

2014-04-01

202

Measurement of $gamma$-ray attenuation coefficients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma-ray attenuation coefficients have been determined for aluminum, ; copper, tin, platinum and lead (elements with Z between 13 and 82) using gamma -; rays with energies between 295 and 2440 keV from a sealed Ra-226 source. A ; lithium-drifted germanium detector was employed without collimation or shielding. ; The average standard error of the experimental results was 1%. (auth)

Christmas

1974-01-01

203

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: mission status  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) is the second in NASA's series of Great Observatories. Compton has now been operating for over two and a half years, and has given a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made and

N. Gehrels; E. Chipman; D. A. Kniffen

1994-01-01

204

Temperature distribution in gamma-ray shielding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analytical expressions are obtained for the temperature distributions in gamma ray shielding for isotropic and unidirectional beams with boundary conditions of the third kind. These are solved numerically for concrete shielding, and the effects of shield thickness, gamma-ray scattering, boundary conditions and beam geometry on the temperature distribution profile are examined.

D. P. Osanov

1965-01-01

205

Concept of new gamma ray detector  

E-print Network

We present a concept of a new gamma ray detector in order to observe undetected TeV gamma ray background. We measure a track of an electron-positron pair made by a pair creation in a magnet. By using Si as a tracker in a magnetic field 3 T, an energy range is up to 10 TeV.

S. Osone

2004-03-15

206

Gamma Ray Burst All-Sky Spectrometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gamma Ray Burst All-Sky Spectrometer Experiment (GASE) is designed to detect radio emission from gamma ray bursts (GRB's). Radio emission from GRB's could help us better understand the plasma physics of the blast and might also help us measure dark energy. GASE uses short-baseline interferometry with eight dipole antennas located at the MIT Haystack Observatory. These antennas measure the

Arielle Steger

2011-01-01

207

AGILE and gamma-ray astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of ? rays is fundamental for our understanding of the universe: ? rays probe the most energetic phenomena occurring in nature, and several signatures of new physics are associated with the emission of ? rays. The main science objectives and the status of the new generation high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics experiment AGILE are presented.

Longo, F.; Argan, A.; Auricchio, N.; Barbiellini, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Celesti, E.; Chen, A.; Cocco, V.; Costa, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Fedel, G.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Froysland, T.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Mauri, A.; Marisaldi, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Morelli, E.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Paladin, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Picozza, P.; Pittori, C.; Pontoni, C.; Porrovecchio, J.; Preger, B.; Prest, M.; Rapisarda, M.; Rossi, E.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.; Tavani, M.; Traci, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.; Zanello, D.

2003-09-01

208

Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.  

PubMed

Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized. PMID:17293337

Chadwick, Paula M

2007-05-15

209

Atmospheric gamma-ray and neutron flashes  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray pulses are calculated from 2D numerical simulations of an upward atmospheric discharge in a self-consistent electric field using the multigroup approach to the kinetics of relativistic runaway electrons (REs). Computed {gamma}-ray numbers and spectra are consistent with those of terrestrial {gamma}-ray flashes (TGFs) observed aboard spacecrafts. The RE flux is concentrated mainly within the domain of the Blue Jet fluorescence. This confirms that exactly the domain adjacent to a thundercloud is the source of the observed {gamma}-ray flashes. The yield of photonuclear neutrons is calculated. One {gamma}-ray pulse generates {approx}10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} neutrons. The possibility of the direct deposition of REs to the detector readings and the origin of the lightning-advanced TGFs are discussed.

Babich, L. P., E-mail: babich@elph.vniief.ru; Kudryavtsev, A. Yu., E-mail: kay@sar.ru; Kudryavtseva, M. L., E-mail: kay@sar.ru; Kutsyk, I. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

2008-01-15

210

Future Missions for Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray astronomy has made great advances in recent years, due largely to the recently completed 9-year mission of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. In this talk I will give an overview of what advances we may expect in the near future, with particular emphasis on earth-orbiting missions scheduled for flight within the next 5 years. Two missions, the High Energy Transient Explorer and Swift, will provide important new information on the sources of gamma-ray bursts. The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope will investigate high energy emission from a wide variety of sources, including active galaxies and gamma-ray pulsars. The contributions of ground-based and multiwavelength observations will also be addressed.

Meegan, Charles; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

211

Gamma-ray Astronomy and GLAST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high energy gamma-ray (30 MeV to 100 GeV) sky has been relatively poorly studied. Most of our current knowledge comes from observations made by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which revealed that the GeV gamma-ray sky is rich and vibrant. Studies of astrophysical objects at GeV energies are interesting for several reasons: The high energy gamma-rays are often produced by a different physical process than the better studied X-ray and optical emission, thus providing a unique information for understanding these sources. Production of such high-energy photons requires that charged particles are accelerated to equally high energies, or much greater. Thus gamma-ray astronomy is the study of extreme environments, with natural and fundamental connections to cosmic-ray and neutrino astrophysics. The launch of GLAST in 2008 will herald a watershed in our understanding of the high energy gamma-ray sky, providing dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. GLAST will open a new avenue to study our Universe as well as to answer scientific questions EGRET observations have raised. In this talk, I will describe the GLAST instruments and capabilities and highlight some of the science we expect to address.

McEnery, Julie

2007-01-01

212

Photoconductor x/. gamma. -ray detectors and x-ray bolometers  

SciTech Connect

Photoconductors are very promising x/..gamma..-ray detectors and x-ray bolometers for pulsed x/..gamma..-ray measurements. They are fast, sensitive, and theoretically flat in spectral response for low energy x rays. We report our tests of InP:Fe, GaAs, and GaAs:Cr, both neutron damaged and undamaged, at Nova laser, Febetrons, and electron linear accelerators. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed.

Wang, C.L.; Eckels, J.D.; Morgan, W.V.; Pocha, M.D.; Slaughter, D.R.; Davis, B.A.; Kania, D.R.; Wagner, R.S.

1986-08-01

213

Swift Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Swift mission, launched on 20 November 2004, is detecting ~ 100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) each year, and immediately (within ~ 90 s) starting X-ray and UV\\/optical observations of the afterglow. It has already collected an impressive database including prompt emission to higher sensitivities than BATSE, uniform monitoring of afterglows, and rapid follow-up by other observatories notified through the Gamma-ray

Neil Gehrels

2008-01-01

214

Correlated X-Ray and Very High Energy Emission in the Gamma-Ray Binary LS I +61 303  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emitting X-ray binaries has triggered an intense effort to better understand the particle acceleration, absorption, and emission mechanisms in compact binary systems, which provide variable conditions along eccentric orbits. Despite this, the nature of some of these systems, and of the accelerated particles producing the VHE emission, is unclear. To answer some

H. Anderhub; L. A. Antonelli; P. Antoranz; M. Backes; C. Baixeras; S. Balestra; J. A. Barrio; D. Bastieri; J. Becerra González; J. K. Becker; W. Bednarek; K. Berger; E. Bernardini; A. Biland; O. Blanch Bigas; R. K. Bock; G. Bonnoli; P. Bordas; D. Borla Tridon; V. Bosch-Ramon; D. Bose; I. Braun; T. Bretz; D. Britzger; M. Camara; E. Carmona; A. Carosi; P. Colin; S. Commichau; J. L. Contreras; M. T. Costado; S. Covino; F. Dazzi; A. De Angelis; E. de Cea del Pozo; R. De los Reyes; B. De Lotto; M. De Maria; F. De Sabata; C. Delgado Mendez; A. Domínguez; D. Dominis Prester; D. Dorner; M. Doro; D. Elsaesser; M. Errando; D. Ferenc; E. Fernández; R. Firpo; M. V. Fonseca; N. Galante; R. J. García López; M. Garczarczyk; N. Godinovic; F. Goebel; D. Hadasch; A. Herrero; D. Hildebrand; D. Höhne-Mönch; J. Hose; D. Hrupec; C. C. Hsu; T. Jogler; S. Klepser; D. Kranich; A. La Barbera; A. Laille; E. Leonardo; E. Lindfors; S. Lombardi; F. Longo; M. López; E. Lorenz; P. Majumdar; G. Maneva; N. Mankuzhiyil; K. Mannheim; L. Maraschi; M. Mariotti; M. Martínez; D. Mazin; M. Meucci; J. M. Miranda; R. Mirzoyan; H. Miyamoto; J. Moldón; M. Moles; A. Moralejo; D. Nieto; K. Nilsson; J. Ninkovic; R. Orito; I. Oya; R. Paoletti; J. M. Paredes; M. Pasanen; D. Pascoli; F. Pauss; R. G. Pegna; M. A. Perez-Torres; L. Peruzzo; F. Prada; E. Prandini; N. Puchades; I. Puljak; I. Reichardt; W. Rhode; M. Ribó; J. Rico; M. Rissi; A. Robert; S. Rügamer; A. Saggion; T. Y. Saito; M. Salvati; M. Sánchez-Conde; K. Satalecka; V. Scalzotto; V. Scapin; T. Schweizer; M. Shayduk; S. N. Shore; N. Sidro; A. Sierpowska-Bartosik; J. Sitarek; D. Sobczynska; F. Spanier; S. Spiro; A. Stamerra; L. S. Stark; T. Suric; L. Takalo; F. Tavecchio; P. Temnikov; D. Tescaro; M. Teshima; D. F. Torres; N. Turini; H. Vankov; R. M. Wagner; V. Zabalza; F. Zandanel; R. Zanin; J. Zapatero; A. Falcone; L. Vetere; N. Gehrels; S. Trushkin; V. Dhawan; P. Reig

2009-01-01

215

"Short, Hard Gamma-Ray Bursts - Mystery Solved?????"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After over a decade of speculation about the nature of short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the recent detection of afterglow emission from a small number of short bursts has provided the first physical constraints on possible progenitor models. While the discovery of afterglow emission from long GRBs was a real breakthrough linking their origin to star forming galaxies, and hence the death of massive stars, the progenitors, energetics, and environments for short gamma-ray burst events remain elusive despite a few recent localizations. Thus far, the nature of the host galaxies measured indicates that short GRBs arise from an old (> 1 Gyr) stellar population, strengthening earlier suggestions and providing support for coalescing compact object binaries as the progenitors. On the other hand, some of the short burst afterglow observations cannot be easily explained in the coalescence scenario. These observations raise the possibility that short GRBs may have different or multiple progenitors systems. The study of the short-hard GRB afterglows has been made possible by the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer, launched in November of 2004. Swift is equipped with a coded aperture gamma-ray telescope that can observe up to 2 steradians of the sky and can compute the position of a gamma-ray burst to within 2-3 arcmin in less than 10 seconds. The Swift spacecraft can slew on to this burst position without human intervention, allowing its on-board x ray and optical telescopes to study the afterglow within 2 minutes of the original GRB trigger. More Swift short burst detections and afterglow measurements are needed before we can declare that the mystery of short gamma-ray burst is solved.

Parsons, A.

2006-01-01

216

PANGU: A high resolution gamma-ray space telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the instrument concept of a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV (from >=10 MeV to >=1 GeV) gamma-ray photon detection. This mission, named PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), has been suggested as a candidate for the joint small mission between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with PANGU, covering Galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for dark matter decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented point spread function can be achieved with a pair-production telescope with a large number of thin active tracking layers to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The frequent full-sky survey at sub-GeV with PANGU's large field of view and significantly improved point spread function would provide crucial information to GeV-TeV astrophysics for current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA, and other multi-wavelength telescopes.

Wu, Xin; Su, Meng; Bravar, Alessandro; Chang, Jin; Fan, Yizhong; Pohl, Martin; Walter, Roland

2014-07-01

217

Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays  

SciTech Connect

The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,..cap alpha..), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,..gamma..) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide.

Tuli, J.K.

1983-01-01

218

Optical reprocessing of gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One model for the optical flashes associated with three cosmic gamma-ray burst sources invokes the reprocessing of some of the gamma-radiation emitted by a hypothesized collapsed object in the surface layers of a nearby companion star. This model was investigated by carrying out detail, fully hydrodynamical calculations of such reprocessing in the surface layers of very low mass stars. It is found that, at most, 7 percent of the gamma-ray fluence incident on the companion star is reprocessed into the blue band; the time scale for this reprocessing is typically 100 s, which is long compared to the duration of the gamma-ray burst itself. Using this result, it is shown that there is marginal agreement between the observed and calculated ratios of gamma-ray fluence to optical fluence at earth.

Melia, F.; Rappaport, S.; Joss, P. C.

1986-01-01

219

Optical reprocessing of gamma-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect

One model for the optical flashes associated with three cosmic gamma-ray burst sources invokes the reprocessing of some of the gamma-radiation emitted by a hypothesized collapsed object in the surface layers of a nearby companion star. This model was investigated by carrying out detail, fully hydrodynamical calculations of such reprocessing in the surface layers of very low mass stars. It is found that, at most, 7 percent of the gamma-ray fluence incident on the companion star is reprocessed into the blue band; the time scale for this reprocessing is typically 100 s, which is long compared to the duration of the gamma-ray burst itself. Using this result, it is shown that there is marginal agreement between the observed and calculated ratios of gamma-ray fluence to optical fluence at earth. 18 references.

Melia, F.; Rappaport, S.; Joss, P.C.

1986-06-01

220

Gamma-ray burst reprocessing in an accretion disk  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The observational consequences of the reprocessing of gamma-ray burst (GRB) photons by an accretion disk surrounding a neutron star are explored. Reprocessing of gamma rays by cold disks driven by dynamical viscosity of nonrelativistic, degenerate electrons results in an optical/UV fluence relative to the gamma-ray fluence at earth of greater than 0.001, for GRB energies of (1-10) x 10 to the 37th ergs, and distances of 15-250 pc. The spectrum peaks in the optical/UV with a soft X-ray cutoff due to the inner edge of the disk, which lies very near the surface of the neutron star for magnetic fields less than 1 TG. The optical/UV peak is partially due to reprocessing in the outer part of the cold disk, which remains optically thick to gamma rays. At these distances, a positive identification of a quiescent counterpart is expected at an IR (K) sensitivity less than 2 microJy. On the other hand, compact binary systems with standard alpha disks and accretion rates resulting from Roche-lobe overflow must be located at least several hundred pc away in order to have escaped detection down to the current IR sensitivity. The optical/UV fluence resulting from reprocessing in these systems is deficient by at least an order of magnitude compared to the observed values.

Melia, Fulvio

1988-01-01

221

Gamma-ray burst reprocessing in an accretion disk  

SciTech Connect

The observational consequences of the reprocessing of gamma-ray burst (GRB) photons by an accretion disk surrounding a neutron star are explored. Reprocessing of gamma rays by cold disks driven by dynamical viscosity of nonrelativistic, degenerate electrons results in an optical/UV fluence relative to the gamma-ray fluence at earth of greater than 0.001, for GRB energies of (1-10) x 10 to the 37th ergs, and distances of 15-250 pc. The spectrum peaks in the optical/UV with a soft X-ray cutoff due to the inner edge of the disk, which lies very near the surface of the neutron star for magnetic fields less than 1 TG. The optical/UV peak is partially due to reprocessing in the outer part of the cold disk, which remains optically thick to gamma rays. At these distances, a positive identification of a quiescent counterpart is expected at an IR (K) sensitivity less than 2 microJy. On the other hand, compact binary systems with standard alpha disks and accretion rates resulting from Roche-lobe overflow must be located at least several hundred pc away in order to have escaped detection down to the current IR sensitivity. The optical/UV fluence resulting from reprocessing in these systems is deficient by at least an order of magnitude compared to the observed values. 35 references.

Melia, F.

1988-01-01

222

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies with GLAST  

E-print Network

Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

D. J. Thompson

2007-11-27

223

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST  

SciTech Connect

Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

2011-11-23

224

Interpretations and implications of gamma ray lines from solar flares, the galactic center in gamma ray transients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations and theories of astrophysical gamma ray line emission are reviewed and prospects for future observations by the spectroscopy experiments on the planned Gamma Ray Observatory are discussed.

Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1980-01-01

225

Gamma-ray spectroscopy: An historical perspective  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of MeV-range gamma-rays from extraterrestrial sources had been speculated on by cosmic-ray physicists since the late 1940's. The first definitive detection occurred with balloon-borne cosmic-ray instrumentation during a class 2 solar flare in March 1958, apparently associated with the acceleration of a nonthermal particle population. Following this detection, physicists were motivated to develop instrumentation specific for observation of astronomical gamma-ray sources. Gamma-ray lines were also first observed during the flares of August 1972, apparently associated with accelerated particles undergoing nuclear interactions in the solar atmosphere. The development of low background, high resolution Ge counters has permitted construction of gamma-ray telescopes with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. Even modest versions of these devices have measured discrete gamma-ray lines from sources as diverse as cosmic gamma-ray bursts, the galactic center and the galactic plane. Many other predictions are within the range of modern detectors.

Peterson, L.E.

1988-09-25

226

Implications of Gamma-Ray Transparency Constraints in Blazars: Minimum Distances and Gamma-Ray Collimation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We develop a general expression for the gamma - gamma absorption coefficient, alpha(sub gamma(gamma)) for gamma-rays propagating in an arbitrary direction at an arbitrary point in space above an X-ray-emitting accretion disk. The X-ray intensity is assumed to vary as a power law in energy and radius between the outer disk radius, R(sub 0), and the inner radius, R(sub ms) which is the radius of marginal stability for a Schwarzschild black hole. We use our result for alpha(sub gamma(gamma)) to calculate the gamma - gamma optical depth, tau(sub gamma(gamma)) for gamma - rays created at height z and propagating at angle Phi relative to the disk axis, and we show that for Phi = 0 and z greater than or approx equal to R(sub 0), tau(sub gamma(gamma)) proportional to Epsilon(sup alpha)z(sup -2(alpha) - 3), where alpha is the X-ray spectral index and Epsilon is the gamma - ray energy. As an application, we use our formalism to compute the minimum distance between the central black hole and the site of production of the gamma-rays detected by EGRET during the 1991 June flare of 3C 279. In order to obtain an upper limit, we assume that all of the X-rays observed contemporaneously by Ginga were emitted by the disk. Our results suggest that the observed gamma - rays may have originated within less than or approx equal to 45 GM/sq c from a black hole of mass greater than or approx equal to 10(exp 9) solar mass, perhaps in active plasma located above the central funnel of the accretion disk. This raises the possibility of establishing a direct connection between the production of the observed gamma - rays and the accretion of material onto the black hole. We also consider the variation of the optical depth as a function of the angle of propagation Phi. Our results indicate that the "focusing" of the gamma - rays along the disk axis due to pair production is strong enough to explain the observed degree of alignment in blazar sources. If the gamma - rays are produced isotropically in gamma - ray blazars, then these objects should appear as bright MeV sources when viewed along off-axis lines of sight.

Becker, Peter A.; Kafatos, Menas

1995-01-01

227

Gamma-Ray Burst Early Afterglows  

E-print Network

The successful launch and operation of NASA's Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer open a new era for the multi-wavelength study of the very early afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRB early afterglow information is essential to explore the unknown physical composition of GRB jets, the link between the prompt gamma-ray emission and the afterglow emission, the GRB central engine activity, as well as the immediate GRB environment. Here I review some of the recent theoretical efforts to address these problems and describe how the latest Swift data give answers to these outstanding questions.

Bing Zhang

2005-09-19

228

Detecting axionlike particles with gamma ray telescopes.  

PubMed

We propose that axionlike particles (ALPs) with a two-photon vertex, consistent with all astrophysical and laboratory bounds, may lead to a detectable signature in the spectra of high-energy gamma-ray sources. This occurs as a result of gamma rays being converted into ALPs in the magnetic fields of efficient astrophysical accelerators according to the "Hillas criterion", such as jets of active galactic nuclei or hot spots of radio galaxies. The discovery of such an effect is possible by GLAST in the 1-100 GeV range and by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes in the TeV range. PMID:18233353

Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D

2007-12-01

229

Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

E-print Network

We present a review of the current status of very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. The development of the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has led to a rapid growth in the number of observatories. The detection of TeV gamma rays from Active Galactic Nuclei was unexpected and is providing new insights into the emission mechanisms in the jets. Next generation telescopes are under construction and will increase dramatically the knowledge available at this extreme end of the cosmic electromagnetic spectrum.

Michael Catanese; Trevor C. Weekes

1999-06-30

230

Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discussed here is research in cosmic ray and gamma ray astrophysics at the Space Radiation Laboratory (SRL) of the California Institute of Technology. The primary activities discussed involve the development of new instrumentation and techniques for future space flight. In many cases these instrumentation developments were tested in balloon flight instruments designed to conduct new investigations in cosmic ray and gamma ray astrophysics. The results of these investigations are briefly summarized. Specific topics include a quantitative investigation of the solar modulation of cosmic ray protons and helium nuclei, a study of cosmic ray positron and electron spectra in interplanetary and interstellar space, the solar modulation of cosmic rays, an investigation of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of cosmic ray isotopic abundances, and a balloon measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon, and nitrogen.

Stone, Edward C.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Prince, Thomas A.

1992-01-01

231

THE X-RAY EVOLUTION OF HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS  

SciTech Connect

The Hickson compact groups, displaying regions of high galaxy densities, should provide environments where galaxy evolution occurs rapidly. The repeated galaxy interactions and mergers present in compact groups increase the rate of star formation and increase the number of X-ray binaries. A fraction of the H I gas will also become heated via stirring and shocks, which yields extended diffuse, hot gas halos that can encompass all members of a compact group. Using a sample of 16 Hickson compact groups from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory archives, we report on a correlation between the diffuse X-ray gas and the total X-ray point source population luminosities. The correlation of the X-ray gas and point source luminosities is further examined to establish a general evolutionary trend.

Fuse, C.; Broming, E., E-mail: cfuse@rollins.edu, E-mail: ebroming@rollins.edu [Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL 32789 (United States)

2013-02-20

232

Nature of gamma-ray burst spectra  

SciTech Connect

The recent discovery of low-energy absorption features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) reported by Murakami et al. (1988) is discussed in the context of a new model for gamma-ray emission in isolated neutron-star sources. It is shown that the whole GRB spectrum may be due to irradiation of a reprocessing and reflecting boundary near a source of power-law gamma radiation. In this picture, the gamma-rays originate far above the surface of a magnetized neutron star where attenuation of the spectrum by pair production is minimal. The surface layers of the neutron star absorb a fraction of the gamma-ray energy and reflect some of the gamma-rays. The resultant spectrum is comprised of a power law at high energy, a steep component at intermediate energy, and a thermal component at low energy. There is a slight enhancement of the gamma-ray flux near E0 that may be the cause of the apparent d(-)d(+) annihilation line seen in some bursts. 27 references.

Melia, F.

1988-11-01

233

117Fermi Detects Gamma-Rays from Messier 82 The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space  

E-print Network

telescope is red; Hubble space telescope observations of hydrogen line emission is orange, and the bluest117Fermi Detects Gamma-Rays from Messier 82 The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has recently rays/sec/cm 2 at energies of 10,000 and 100,000 MeV. Space Math http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12

234

Gamma-ray binaries and related systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

After initial claims and a long hiatus, it is now established that several binary stars emit high- (0.1-100 GeV) and very high-energy (>100 GeV) gamma rays. A new class has emerged called "gamma-ray binaries", since most of their radiated power is emitted beyond 1 MeV. Accreting X-ray binaries, novae and a colliding wind binary ( ? Car) have also been detected—"related systems" that confirm the ubiquity of particle acceleration in astrophysical sources. Do these systems have anything in common? What drives their high-energy emission? How do the processes involved compare to those in other sources of gamma rays: pulsars, active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants? I review the wealth of observational and theoretical work that have followed these detections, with an emphasis on gamma-ray binaries. I present the current evidence that gamma-ray binaries are driven by rotation-powered pulsars. Binaries are laboratories giving access to different vantage points or physical conditions on a regular timescale as the components revolve on their orbit. I explain the basic ingredients that models of gamma-ray binaries use, the challenges that they currently face, and how they can bring insights into the physics of pulsars. I discuss how gamma-ray emission from microquasars provides a window into the connection between accretion-ejection and acceleration, while ? Car and novae raise new questions on the physics of these objects—or on the theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Indeed, explaining the gamma-ray emission from binaries strains our theories of high-energy astrophysical processes, by testing them on scales and in environments that were generally not foreseen, and this is how these detections are most valuable.

Dubus, Guillaume

2013-08-01

235

The Gamma-Ray Imager GRI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are the major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. With the INTEGRAL observatory, ESA has provided a unique tool to the astronomical community revealing hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes. While INTEGRAL provides the global overview over the soft gamma-ray sky, there is a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources. In soft X-rays a comparable step was taken going from the Einstein and the EXOSAT satellites to the Chandra and XMM/Newton observatories. Technological advances in the past years in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction and multilayer coated mirror techniques have paved the way towards a gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements compared to past missions regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow to study particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

Wunderer, Cornelia B.; GRI Collaboration

2006-09-01

236

GRI: the gamma-ray imager mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are the major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. With the INTEGRAL observatory, ESA has provided a unique tool to the astronomical community revealing hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes. While INTEGRAL provides the global overview over the soft gamma-ray sky, there is a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources. In soft X-rays a comparable step was taken going from the Einstein and the EXOSAT satellites to the Chandra and XMM/Newton observatories. Technological advances in the past years in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques hav paved the way towards a gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements compared to past missions regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow to study particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

Knödlseder, Jürgen

2006-06-01

237

Neutrinos and Gamma Rays from Galaxy Clusters  

E-print Network

The next generation of neutrino and gamma-ray detectors should provide new insights into the creation and propagation of high-energy protons within galaxy clusters, probing both the particle physics of cosmic rays interacting with the background medium and the mechanisms for high-energy particle production within the cluster. In this paper we examine the possible detection of gamma-rays (via the GLAST satellite) and neutrinos (via the ICECUBE and Auger experiments) from the Coma cluster of galaxies, as well as for the gamma-ray bright clusters Abell 85, 1758, and 1914. These three were selected from their possible association with unidentified EGRET sources, so it is not yet entirely certain that their gamma-rays are indeed produced diffusively within the intracluster medium, as opposed to AGNs. It is not obvious why these inconspicuous Abell-clusters should be the first to be seen in gamma-rays, but a possible reason is that all of them show direct evidence of recent or ongoing mergers. Their identification with the EGRET gamma-ray sources is also supported by the close correlation between their radio and (purported) gamma-ray fluxes. Under favorable conditions (including a proton spectral index of 2.5 in the case of Abell 85, and sim 2.3 for Coma, and Abell 1758 and 1914), we expect ICECUBE to make as many as 0.3 neutrino detections per year from the Coma cluster of galaxies, and as many as a few per year from the Abell clusters 85, 1758, and 1914. Also, Auger may detect as many as 2 events per decade at ~ EeV energies from these gamma-ray bright clusters.

Brandon Wolfe; Fulvio Melia; Roland M. Crocker; Raymond R. Volkas

2008-07-04

238

Gamma Ray Astronomy with Magnetized Zevatrons  

E-print Network

Nearby sources of cosmic rays up to a ZeV(=10^21 eV) could be observed with a multi-messenger approach including secondary gamma-rays and neutrinos. If cosmic rays above ~10^18 eV are produced in magnetized environments such as galaxy clusters, the flux of secondary gamma-rays below ~1 TeV can be enhanced up to several orders of magnitudes compared to unmagnetized sources. A particular source of enhancement are synchrotron and cascade photons from e^+e^- pairs produced by protons from sources with relatively steep injection spectra proportional to E^-2.6. Such sources should be visible at the same time in ultra-high energy cosmic ray experiments and gamma-ray telescopes.

Eric Armengaud; Guenter Sigl; Francesco Miniati

2005-11-09

239

Observations of short gamma-ray bursts.  

PubMed

We review recent observations of short-hard gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. The launch and successful ongoing operations of the Swift satellite, along with several localizations from the High-Energy Transient Explorer mission, have provoked a revolution in short-burst studies: first, by quickly providing high-quality positions to observers; and second, via rapid and sustained observations from the Swift satellite itself. We make a complete accounting of Swift-era short-burst localizations and proposed host galaxies, and discuss the implications of these observations for the distances, energetics and environments of short bursts, and the nature of their progenitors. We then review the physical modelling of short-burst afterglows: while the simplest afterglow models are inadequate to explain the observations, there have been several notable successes. Finally, we address the case of an unusual burst that threatens to upset the simple picture in which long bursts are due to the deaths of massive stars, and short bursts to compact-object merger events. PMID:17293336

Fox, Derek B; Roming, Peter W A

2007-05-15

240

Gamma-ray albedo of the moon  

E-print Network

We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalisation; this makes it a useful "standard candle" for gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo gamma rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

Igor V. Moskalenko; Troy A. Porter

2007-08-15

241

Gamma rays produce superior seedless citrus  

SciTech Connect

Using gamma radiation, seedless forms of some varieties of oranges and grapefruit are being produced. Since it has long been known that radiation causes mutations in plants and animals, experiments were conducted to determine if seediness could be altered by exposing seeds or budwood to higher than natural doses of gamma radiation. Orange and grapefruit seeds and cuttings exposed to gamma rays in the early 1970's have produced trees that bear fruit superior to that now on the market.

Pyrah, D.

1984-10-01

242

Neutron Detection Gamma Ray Sensitivity Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The shortage of 3He has triggered the search for effective alternative neutron detection technologies for national security and safeguards applications. Any new detection technology must satisfy two basic criteria: (1) it must meet a neutron detection efficiency requirement, and (2) it must be insensitive to gamma-ray interference at a prescribed level, while still meeting the neutron detection requirement. It is the purpose of this paper to define measureable gamma ray sensitivity criteria for neutron detectors. Quantitative requirements are specified for: intrinsic gamma ray detection efficiency and gamma ray absolute rejection. The ratio GARRn is defined, and it is proposed that the requirement for neutron detection be 0.9 < GARRn < 1.1 at a 10 mR/h exposure rate. An example of results from a 3He based neutron detector are provided showing that this technology can meet the stated requirements. Results from tests of some alternative technologies are also reported.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Mace, Emily K.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2011-10-21

243

Study of gamma-ray strength functions  

SciTech Connect

The use of gamma-ray strength function systematics to calculate neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra is discussed. The ratio of the average capture width, GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar, to the average level spacing, D/sub obs/, both at the neutron separation energy, can be derived from such systematics with much less uncertainty than from separate systematics for values of GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar and D/sub obs/. In particular, the E1 gamma-ray strength function is defined in terms of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR line shape is modeled with the usual Lorentzian function and also with a new energy-dependent, Breit-Wigner (EDBW) function. This latter form is further parameterized in terms of two overlapping resonances, even for nuclei where photonuclear measurements do not resolve two peaks. In the mass ranges studied, such modeling is successful for all nuclei away from the N = 50 closed neutron shell. Near the N = 50 shell, a one-peak EDBW appears to be more appropriate. Examples of calculated neutron capture excitation functions and capture gamma-ray spectra using the EDBW form are given for target nuclei in the mass-90 region and also in the Ta-Au mass region. 20 figures.

Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Dietrich, F.S.

1980-08-07

244

VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants  

SciTech Connect

Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2007-01-22

245

Development micro-satellite TSUBAME for polarimetry of gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most drastic and intriguing phenomena in high energy astrophysics. The nature of relativistic collimated outflows that bight be generated by gravitational collapses of massive stars is to investigate the physical process just around the central engines by constraining magnetic environment. For this purpose we developed a compact and high sensitive hard x-ray polarimeter aboard a

Yoichi Yatsu; Takahiro Enomoto; Kosuke Kawakami; Kazuki Tokoyoda; Takahiro Toizumi; Nobuyuki Kawai; Kazuya Ishizaka; Saburo Matsunaga; Takeshi Nakamori; Jun Kataoka; Sin Kubo

2011-01-01

246

Gamma Ray Astronomy and the Origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays  

E-print Network

Diffusive shock acceleration operating at expanding supernova remnant shells is by far the most popular model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Despite the general consensus received by this model, an unambiguous and conclusive proof of the supernova remnant hypothesis is still missing. In this context, the recent developments in gamma ray astronomy provide us with precious insights into the problem of the origin of galactic cosmic rays, since production of gamma rays is expected both during the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova remnant shocks and during their subsequent propagation in the interstellar medium. In particular, the recent detection of a number of supernova remnants at TeV energies nicely fits with the model, but it still does not constitute a conclusive proof of it, mainly due to the difficulty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma ray emission. In this paper, the most relevant cosmic-ray-related results of gamma ray astronomy are briefly summarized, and the foreseeable contribution of future gamma ray observations to the final solution of the problem of cosmic ray origin is discussed.

Stefano Gabici

2008-11-05

247

Gamma Ray Bursts from Ordinary Cosmic Strings  

E-print Network

We give an upper estimate for the number of gamma ray bursts from ordinary (non-superconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic string induced flux of gamma ray bursts.

R. H. Brandenberger; A. T. Sornborger; M. Trodden

1993-02-12

248

Classification of Swift's gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts have been identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by durations shorter and longer than about 2 s. There are, however, some indications for the existence of a third class. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for gamma-ray bursts. Therefore we reanalyze the durations and their distribution and also the classi-

I. Horváth; L. G. Balázs; Z. Bagoly; P. Veres

2008-01-01

249

High altitude balloons and gamma ray astronomy  

SciTech Connect

The author's experience with scientific high altitude ballooning will be presented. Usefulness of satellite versus balloon platforms will be contrasted in the context of gamma ray astronomy. General principles of gamma ray astronomy instrumentation will be discussed and illustrated in terms of our current instrument, GRIS. Some words about the supernova phenomenon and its necessity for the existence of life in the universe will be followed by a brief glimpse of our preliminary data from Supernova 1987a.

MacCallum, C.J.

1988-01-01

250

The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts remain on of the greatest mysteries in astrophysics in spite of recent observational advances and intense theoretical work. Although some of the basic properties of bursts were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory in the past five years. Recent observations of bursts and some proposed models will be discussed.

Fishman, Gerald J.

1998-01-01

251

Gamma Ray Astronomy with Underground Detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Underground detectors measure the directions of up-coming muons of neutrino origin. They can also observe down-going muons made by gamma rays in the Earth's atmosphere. Although gamma ray showers are muon-poor, they produce a sufficient number of muons to detect the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes. With a threshold higher by one hundred and a probability of muon

F. Halzen; T. Stanev

1995-01-01

252

VHE gamma-ray astronomy: observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent operation of a new generation of Cherenkov telescopes is providing unprecedented results which are opening in the last months a truly new age in VHE cosmic gamma-ray observations. We're in the down of the setting of a new window in our observation of the cosmos: VHE gamma-ray astronomy. The techniques and concepts used by these new telescopes is

Manel Martínez

2006-01-01

253

Gamma ray astronomy with COS-B  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observational results in the field of gamma-ray astronomy that have been obtained to date with the COS-B satellite are discussed and questions raised by these observations are summarized. Following a brief review of the instrumental characteristics of COS-B and the extent of COS-B gamma-ray coverage of the sky, particular attention is given to the questions raised by the discovery of

B. N. Swanenburg

1981-01-01

254

Microsatellite gamma-ray spectroscopy experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preliminary results from Gamma ray experiment installed on a micro-satellite, Techsat 1, are reported. The experiment is based on CdZnTe detectors coupled to custom designed CMOS electronics, which includes low noise charge sensitive preamplifiers, pulse shaping amplifiers and sampling circuits. It was realized as a mile stone towards a micro- satellite mounted Gamma ray space telescope. The experiment is a

G. Asa; Arie Ruzin; Claudio G. Jakobson; G. Shaviv; Yael Nemirovsky

1999-01-01

255

Development of a Compact Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a compact scanning transmission X-ray microscope newly designed and developed at the Photon Factory. The microscope has very compact size and is equipped with fully digitized control electronics to realize high stability, precise positioning and fast data acquisition. The hardware design of the microscope is described in detail. Results of measurement using test samples are also presented.

Takeichi, Y.; Inami, N.; Suga, H.; Ueno, T.; Kishimoto, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Ono, K.

2014-04-01

256

Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the global properties of the Universe B. Schmidt; How good are SNe Ia as standard candles? A. Sandage, G. Tammann and A. Saha; Type Ia supernovae and their implications for cosmology M. Livio; Conference summary: supernovae and gamma-ray bursts J. Wheeler.

Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

2001-07-01

257

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,  

E-print Network

grail of gamma-ray burst astronomy for a quarter of a century. From the discovery of gamma-ray burstsThe Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts, The Most Violent Explosions in The Universe J. I a Gamma-Ray Burst Kill the Dinosaurs? Will a Burst Kill Us? ¡ Glossary ¡ Sources ¡ Index viii #12;Chapter

Katz, Jonathan I.

258

Searching for Gamma-Ray Binaries using the Fermi Second Source Catalog  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is an imaging high-energy gamma-ray telescope on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope spacecraft. The Fermi LAT Second Source Catalog contains 1873 gamma-ray sources. A large fraction of these sources remain unidentified. Recently, a new class of gamma-ray source has emerged, the so-called "gamma-ray binaries", composed of a compact object and a massive star, distinguished by their relatively high gamma-ray luminosity in the 0.1-100 GeV range. However, only 5 gamma-ray systems have been identified thus far. Here we present an attempt to discover new gamma-ray binaries by studying unidentified Fermi LAT sources. First we identify radio sources from the NRAO/VLA Sky Survey which are positionally coincident with a Fermi source: the radio error circles are then searched for optical counterparts consistent with those of a gamma-ray binary (via optical/IR colors and spectroscopy). Here we present our attempts to identify 2 such systems - 2FGLJ0359.1+6003 and 2FGLJ0747.5-3305.

O'Shaughnessy, L.; Callanan, P.; Chernyakova, M.

2014-07-01

259

Gamma ray spectrometer for ITER  

SciTech Connect

Gamma diagnostics is considered to be primary for the confined ?-particles and runaway electrons measurements on ITER. The gamma spectrometer will be embedded into a neutron dump of the ITER Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic complex. It will supplement NPA measurements on the fuel isotope ratio and confined alphas/fast ions. In this paper an update on ITER gamma spectrometer developments is given. A new geometry of the system is described and detailed analysis of expected signals for the spectrometer is presented.

Gin, D.; Chugunov, I.; Shevelev, A.; Khilkevitch, E.; Doinikov, D.; Naidenov, V.; Pasternak, A.; Polunovsky, I. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Polytechnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Kiptily, V. [EURATOM / CCFE Fusion Association, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2014-08-21

260

Gamma ray spectrometer for ITER  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gamma diagnostics is considered to be primary for the confined ?-particles and runaway electrons measurements on ITER. The gamma spectrometer will be embedded into a neutron dump of the ITER Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic complex. It will supplement NPA measurements on the fuel isotope ratio and confined alphas/fast ions. In this paper an update on ITER gamma spectrometer developments is given. A new geometry of the system is described and detailed analysis of expected signals for the spectrometer is presented.

Gin, D.; Chugunov, I.; Shevelev, A.; Khilkevitch, E.; Doinikov, D.; Naidenov, V.; Pasternak, A.; Polunovsky, I.; Kiptily, V.

2014-08-01

261

Galaxies and gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nature of the high-energy spectra of several types of active galaxies and their contribution to the measured diffuse gamma-ray emission between 1 and 150 MeV are considered, using X-ray spectra of active galaxies and SAS 2 data regarding the intensity upper limits to the gamma-ray emission above 35 MeV. It is found that a substantial increase in slope of the photon energy spectrum must occur in the low energy gamma-ray region for Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and emission line galaxies; the power-law spectra observed in the X-ray range must steepen substantially between 50 keV and 50 MeV. In addition, a cosmological integration shows that Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and quasars may account for most of the 1-150 MeV diffuse background, even without significant evolution.

Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

1979-01-01

262

Gamma-ray bursts from stellar remnants: probing the Universe at high redshift  

Microsoft Academic Search

A gamma-ray burst (GRB) releases an amount of energy similar to that of a\\u000asupernova explosion, which combined with its rapid variability suggests an\\u000aorigin related to neutron stars or black holes. Since these compact stellar\\u000aremnants form from the most massive stars not long after their birth, gamma-ray\\u000abursts should trace the star formation rate in the Universe; we

Ralph A. M. J. Wijers; Joshua S. Bloom; Jasjeet S. Bagla; Priyamvada Natarajan

1997-01-01

263

On Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

(Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the process of gravitational collapse, leading to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma: the basic self-accelerating system explaining both the energetics and the high energy Lorentz factor observed in GRBs. We then turn to recall the two basic interpretational paradigms of our GRB model. [...] We then turn to the special role of the baryon loading in discriminating between "genuine" short and long or "fake" short GRBs [...] We finally turn to the GRB-Supernova Time Sequence (GSTS) paradigm: the concept of induced gravitational collapse. [...] We then present some general conclusions.

Remo Ruffini; Maria Grazia Bernardini; Carlo Luciano Bianco; Letizia Caito; Pascal Chardonnet; Christian Cherubini; Maria Giovanna Dainotti; Federico Fraschetti; Andrea Geralico; Roberto Guida; Barbara Patricelli; Michael Rotondo; Jorge Armando Rueda Hernandez; Gregory Vereshchagin; She-Sheng Xue

2008-04-17

264

High energy gamma-rays from massive binary systems  

E-print Network

During last years a few massive binary systems have been detected in the TeV gamma-rays. This gamma-ray emission is clearly modulated with the orbital periods of these binaries suggesting its origin inside the binary system. In this paper we summarize the anisotropic IC e-p pair cascade model as likely explanation of these observations. We consider scenarios in which particles are accelerated to relativistic energies, either due to the presence of an energetic pulsar inside the binary, or as a result of accretion process onto the compact object during which the jet is launched from the inner part of the accretion disk, or in collisions of stellar winds from the massive companions.

W. Bednarek

2008-06-27

265

Radiation detection system for portable gamma-ray spectroscopy  

DOEpatents

A portable gamma ray detection apparatus having a gamma ray detector encapsulated by a compact isolation structure having at least two volumetrically-nested enclosures where at least one is a thermal shield. The enclosures are suspension-mounted to each other to successively encapsulate the detector without structural penetrations through the thermal shields. A low power cooler is also provided capable of cooling the detector to cryogenic temperatures without consuming cryogens, due to the heat load reduction by the isolation structure and the reduction in the power requirements of the cooler. The apparatus also includes a lightweight portable power source for supplying power to the apparatus, including to the cooler and the processing means, and reducing the weight of the apparatus to enable handheld operation or toting on a user's person.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Dublin, CA); Jessup, James L. (Tracy, CA); Bianchini, Greg M. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Wayne O. (Livermore, CA)

2006-06-20

266

High-energy gamma-ray absorption in relativistic magnetospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Calculations are made of the propagation of gamma-rays around neutron stars with a dipole magnetic field, including the effects of general relativity and the absorption by the one-photon magnetic pair production process, as a model for the high-energy transport in gamma-ray burst sources and pulsars. The paper discusses the escaping photon beam characteristics as seen by distant observers at different angles with respect to the magnetic axis, for radiation arising from the polar caps of neutron stars of varying degrees of compactness and surface field strengths. The observed beaming depends strongly on the surface field only up to B of about 0.05 times the critical field value, being essentially constant above the value 0.1. The gravitational light bending contributes significantly to broaden the beam profiles especially at low energies above threshold, being sensitive to the stellar radius to mass ratio.

Riffert, H.; Meszaros, P.; Bagoly, Z.

1989-01-01

267

The Gamma-Ray Imager GRI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. ESA's INTEGRAL observatory currently provides the astronomical community with a unique tool to investigate the sky up to MeV energies and hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes have been discovered. NASA's GLAST mission will similarly take the next step in surveying the high-energy ( GeV) sky, and NuSTAR will pioneer focusing observations at hard X-ray energies (to 80 keV). There will be clearly a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources in the 100-keV to MeV regime. Recent technological advances in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques have paved the way towards a gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements compared to past missions regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow the study of particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

Wunderer, Cornelia B.; GRI Collaboration

2008-03-01

268

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2  

E-print Network

Energy Gamma Ray Astronomy (HEGRA) has been published for emission above 20 TeV from GRB 920925c (PadillaCONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2 W. Benbow,3 11; accepted 2005 June 3 ABSTRACT The Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory employs a water Cerenkov detector

California at Santa Cruz, University of

269

DISCOVERY OF LOCALIZED TEV GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AND DIFFUSE TEV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC  

E-print Network

OF PHILOSOPHY Department of Physics and Astronomy 2007 #12;ABSTRACT DISCOVERY OF LOCALIZED TEV GAMMA-RAY SOURCESDISCOVERY OF LOCALIZED TEV GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AND DIFFUSE TEV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC AND DIFFUSE TEV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC PLANE WITH MILAGRO USING A NEW BACKGROUND REJECTION

California at Santa Cruz, University of

270

Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

1990-01-01

271

High energy gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The physics results of high energy gamma-ray astronomy are reported,\\u000aemphasizing recent achievements with ground-based detectors. This includes some\\u000aof the instrumental developments and latest projects. The fundamental\\u000acontribution of the field to the question of Cosmic Ray origin is highlighted.

H. J. Völk

2005-01-01

272

High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

E-print Network

The physics results of high energy gamma-ray astronomy are reported, emphasizing recent achievements with ground-based detectors. This includes some of the instrumental developments and latest projects. The fundamental contribution of the field to the question of Cosmic Ray origin is highlighted.

H. J. Voelk

2004-01-19

273

High energy cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos from AGN  

E-print Network

The author reviews a model for the emission of high energy cosmic rays, gamma-rays and neutrinos from AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) that he has proposed since 1985. Further discussion of the knee energy phenomenon of the cosmic ray energy spectrum requires the existence of a heavy particle with mass in the knee energy range. A possible method of detecting such a particle in the Pierre Auger Project is suggested. Also presented is a relation between the spectra of neutrinos and gamma-rays emitted from AGN. This relation can be tested by high energy neutrino detectors such as ICECUBE, the Mediterranean Sea Detector and possibly by the Pierre Auger Project.

Yukio Tomozawa

2008-02-03

274

Hard X-ray and gamma-rays from supernovae  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The hard electromagnetic radiation produced by and accompanying the explosion of supernovae is discussed. This radiation may have three origins: (i) the eruption of the shock wave from the surface of the star; (ii) radioactive decay of unstable isotopes produced during the explosion; and (iii) gamma-rays produced by neutrino annihilation following accretion-induced collapse. Though the latter has been proposed as a mechanism for making cosmological gamma-ray bursts, it is shown that this is unlikely.

Woosley, S. E.

1993-01-01

275

GRI: The Gamma-Ray Imager mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the INTEGRAL observatory, ESA has provided a unique tool to the astronomical community revealing hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes. While INTEGRAL provides the global overview over the soft gamma-ray sky, there is a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources. In soft X-rays a comparable step was taken going from the Einstein and the EXOSAT satellites to the Chandra and XMM/Newton observatories. Technological advances in the past years in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction have paved the way towards a new gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow the study of particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

Knödlseder, Jürgen; GRI Consortium

2006-06-01

276

GRI: The Gamma-Ray Imager mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the INTEGRAL observatory ESA has provided a unique tool to the astronomical community revealing hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes. While INTEGRAL provides the global overview over the soft gamma-ray sky, there is a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources. In soft X-rays a comparable step was taken going from the Einstein and the EXOSAT satellites to the Chandra and XMM/Newton observatories. Technological advances in the past years in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction have paved the way towards a new gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow studies of particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

Knödlseder, Jürgen

277

The Pulsing Gamma-ray Sky  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fermi Space Telescope, with its discovery of nearly 150 gamma-ray pulsars has solidified and extended the suspicions of the EGRET era: energetic spin-powered pulsars are fantastic particle accelerators, they emit most of their photon energy in the GeV range and they paint their gamma-ray beams over much of the sky. I summarize here the suite of gamma-ray discoveries and what it has taught us about pulsar populations. Young, classical radio-detectable pulsars, gamma-ray only `Gemingas' and energetic millisecond pulsars are equally represented in the Fermi sky. This sample certainly reveals much about magnetospheric physics. However, by chasing down the pulsars responsible for Fermi sources we continue to discover exotic systems whose study impacts a wide range of high energy astrophysics. Gamma-ray pulsars are revealing details of close binary evolution, testing the equation of state of ultra-dense matter, helping us understand the cosmic ray positrons, and aiding in the search for ultra-low frequency gravitational radiation. I summarize recent progress on these fronts and the prospects for more exciting discoveries to come.

Romani, Roger W.

2014-01-01

278

Gamma-ray binaries: pulsars in disguise?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context: .LS 5039 and LS I+61°303 are unique amongst high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) for their spatially-resolved radio emission and their counterpart at >GeV gamma-ray energies, canonically attributed to non-thermal particles in an accretion-powered relativistic jet. The only other HMXB known to emit very high-energy (VHE) gamma-rays, PSR B1259-63, harbours a non-accreting millisecond pulsar. Aims: .The purpose is to investigate whether

Guillaume Dubus; Marie Curie

2006-01-01

279

Ground-Based Gamma Ray Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is the write-up of a rapporteur talk given by the author at the 33rd International Cosmic Ray Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2013. It attempts to summarize results and developments in ground-based gamma-ray observations and instrumentation from among the ˜300 submissions to the gamma-ray sessions of the meeting. Satellite observations and theoretical developments were covered by a companion rapporteur (Stawarz, L., 33rd ICRC, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Rapporteur talk: Space-based Gamma-Ray Astronomy, 2013). Any review of this nature is unavoidably subjective and incomplete. Nevertheless, the article should provide a useful status report for those seeking an overview of this exciting and fast-moving field.

Holder, Jamie

2014-10-01

280

Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

Gehrels, Neil

2011-01-01

281

PANGU: A High Resolution Gamma-Ray Space Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV gamma-ray astronomy as a candidate for the CAS-ESA joint small mission. This mission, called PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), will open up a unique window of electromagnetic spectrum that has never been explored with great precision. A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with a telescope that has an angular resolution about one order of magnitude better than the currently operating Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) in the sub-GeV range, covering galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for Dark Matter (DM) decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented resolution can be achieved with a pair-production telescope that, instead of the high-Z converter commonly used, relies on a large number of thin active tracking layers to increase the photon conversion probability, and to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon conversion identification and photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range, where the opening angle between the electron and positron is relatively large. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The sub-GeV full sky survey by PANGU would provides crucial link with GeV to TeV maps from current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA.

Su, Meng

2014-08-01

282

Gamma-ray astronomy and the origin of cosmic rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent observations of cosmic gamma radiation are reviewed. It is shown that this radiation consists of an extragalactic background as well as a bright band of galactic radiation lying in the plane of the Milky Way and produced primarily by cosmic-ray collisions with interstellar gas atoms. The galactic gamma radiation is divided into a near component apparently associated with Gould's belt and a far component originating about 15,000 light years away and narrowly confined to the galactic plane. A Great Galactic Ring is identified which is 35,000 light years in diameter and in which most galactic cosmic rays are produced and supernovae and pulsars are concentrated. The physical mechanisms responsible for the production of most of the cosmic gamma rays in the Galaxy are examined, and the origin of galactic cosmic rays is considered. It is concluded that the cosmic rays are produced either in supernova explosions or in the pulsars they leave behind

Stecker, F. W.

1978-01-01

283

The project EGRET (energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope) on NASA's Gamma-Ray Observatory GRO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is currently planned for a launch from the space shuttle in 1990. After the long hiatus in high-energy gamma-ray astronomy since the end of the COS-B mission in 1982, the Soviet missions Granat and Gamma-1 and the NASA mission GRO will resume observations in the energy range from below 100 keV and extending to above

G. Kanbach; D. L. Bertsch; A. Favale; C. E. Fichtel; R. C. Hartman; R. Hofstadter; E. B. Hughes; S. D. Hunter; B. W. Hughlock; D. A. Kniffen; Y. C. Lin; H. A. Mayer-Hasselwander; P. L. Nolan; K. Pinkau; H. Rothermel; E. Schneid; M. Sommer; D. J. Thompson

1989-01-01

284

Gamma-ray Emission from the gamma-ray-loud BL Lac Objects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the HST observation data of BL Lac objects by Urry et al. and gamma-ray observation data, we find that there is a correlation between Fgamma and Fnuclei for gamma-ray-loud BL Lac objects (correlation coefficients: gamma=0.63, p=4.0 × 10-2), but no correlation between Fgamma and FOhost, where FOnuclei and FOhost are the fluxes of nuclei and host galaxy in V-band.

Guang-Zhong Xie; Ben-Zhong Dai; En-Wei Liang; Zhao-Hua Xie

2001-01-01

285

Gamma-rays, cosmic rays, and galactic structure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The relation of SAS-2 observations of galactic gamma-rays to the large scale distribution of cosmic rays and interstellar gas in the galaxy is reviewed. Starting with a discussion of production rates, the case for pion decay being the predominant production mechanism in the galactic disk above 100 MeV is reestablished, and it is also pointed out that Compton gamma-rays can be a significant source near l = 0. The concepts of four distinct galactic regions are defined, viz. the nebulodisk, ectodisk, radiodisk and exodisk. Bremsstrahlung and pion decay gamma-rays are associated with the first two (primarily the first) regions, and Compton gamma-rays and synchrotron radiation are associated with the latter two regions. On a large scale, the cosmic rays, interstellar gas (primarily H2 clouds in the inner galaxy) and gamma-ray emissivity all peak between 5 and 6 kpc from the galactic center. This correlation is related to correlation with other population I phenomena and is discussed in terms of the density wave concept of galactic structure.

Stecker, F. W.

1976-01-01

286

Cosmic Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts in the Galaxy  

E-print Network

The rate of terrestrial irradiation events by galactic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is estimated using recent standard-energy results. We assume that GRBs accelerate high-energy cosmic rays, and present results of three-dimensional simulations of cosmic rays moving in the Galactic magnetic field and diffusing through pitch-angle scattering. An on-axis GRB extinction event begins with a powerful prompt gamma-ray and neutron pulse, followed by a longer-lived phase from cosmic-ray protons and neutron-decay protons that diffuse towards Earth. Our results force a reinterpretation of reported ~ 10^{18} eV cosmic-ray anisotropies and offer a rigorous test of the model where high-energy cosmic rays originate from GRBs, which will soon be tested with the Auger Observatory.

Charles D. Dermer; Jeremy M. Holmes

2005-06-16

287

Observing Gamma-ray Bursts with GLAST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) is a satellite-based observatory to study the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The Large Area Telescope, the main instrument, is a pair-conversion telescope which will survey the sky in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. The LAT's wide field of view (greater than 2 sr), large effective area and low deadtime combine to provide excellent high-energy gamma-ray observations of GRB. To tie these frontier high-energy observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 8 keV to 30 MeV range. Upon detection of a GRB by the LAT or the GBM, the spacecraft can autonomously repoint to keep the GRB location within the LAT field of view, allowing high-energy afterglow observations. We describe how the instruments, spacecraft, and ground system work together to provide observations of gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to over 300 GeV and provide rapid notification of these observations to the wider gamma-ray burst community. Analysis and simulation tools dedicated to the GRB science have been developed. In this contribution we show the expected LAT sensitivity obtained with such simulations, and illustrate the results we expect from GLAST observations with spectral and temporal analysis of simulated GRB.

McEnery, Julie

2008-01-01

288

ADP study of gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This grant supported study of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts through analysis of Ginga and HEAO-1 archival data, and modeling of the results in terms of radiation transfer calculations of cyclotron scattering in a strong magnetic field. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer code with which we are able to calculate the expected properties of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts was developed. The extensive software necessary in order to carry out fits of these model spectra to gamma-ray burst spectral data, including folding of the model spectra through the detector response functions was also developed. Fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB880205 were completed and fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB870303 are being carried out. These fits have allowed us to test our software, as well as to garner new scientific results. This work has demonstrated that cyclotron resonant scattering successfully accounts for the locations, strengths, and widths of the observed line features in GB870303 and GB880205. The success of the model provides compelling evidence that these gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin, resolving longstanding controversies about the nature and distance of the burst sources. These results were reported in two papers which are in press in the proceedings of the Taos Workshop on Gamma-Ray Bursts, and in a paper submitted for publication.

Lamb, Don Q.; Wang, John C. L.; Heuter, Geoffry J.; Graziani, Carlo; Loredo, Tom; Freeman, Peter

1991-01-01

289

Gamma-ray Emission from Nova Outbursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of gamma-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from 7Be and 22Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission, with the 511 keV line and a continuum. Gamma-ray spectra and light curves are potential unique tools to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope. Another possible origin of gamma-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce gamma-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected with the Fermi satellite in V407 Cyg, a nova in a symbiotic binary, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main sequence star as in the cataclysmic variables hosting classical novae. Two more novae have been detected recently (summer 2012) by Fermi, apparently in non symbiotic binaries, thus challenging our understanding of the emission mechanism. Both scenarios (radioactivities and acceleration) of gamma-ray production in novae are discussed.

Hernanz, M.

2014-12-01

290

LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the electrodynamic structure of a pulsar outer-magnetospheric particle accelerator and the resulting gamma-ray emission. By considering the condition for the accelerator to be self-sustained, we derive how the trans-magnetic-field thickness of the accelerator evolves with the pulsar age. It is found that the thickness is small but increases steadily if the neutron-star envelope is contaminated by sufficient light elements. For such a light element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity of the accelerator is kept approximately constant as a function of age in the initial 10,000 yr, forming the lower bound of the observed distribution of the gamma-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars. If the envelope consists of only heavy elements, on the other hand, the thickness is greater, but it increases less rapidly than a light element envelope. For such a heavy element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity decreases relatively rapidly, forming the upper bound of the observed distribution. The gamma-ray luminosity of a general pulsar resides between these two extreme cases, reflecting the envelope composition and the magnetic inclination angle with respect to the rotation axis. The cutoff energy of the primary curvature emission is regulated below several GeV even for young pulsars because the gap thickness, and hence the acceleration electric field, is suppressed by the polarization of the produced pairs.

Hirotani, Kouichi, E-mail: hirotani@tiara.sinica.edu.tw [Postal address: TIARA, Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan. (China)] [Postal address: TIARA, Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan. (China)

2013-04-01

291

BASIC GAMMA-RAY DATA FOR ART HEAT DEPOSITION CALCULATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heat deposition rates from gamma rays in the ART were required for ; thermal stress calculations. The basic physical data necessary in determining ; these rates are reported. U²³⁾ prompt gamma rays, capture and decay gammas ; in the fuel and reflector, aad gamma rays from inelastic scattering of neutrons ; are included. Buildup factors and absorption coefficients are considered.

H. W. Bertini; C. M. Copenhaver; A. M. Perry; R. B. Stevenson

1956-01-01

292

Gamma-ray emitting radio galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A number of radio galaxies has been detected by Fermi/LAT in the gamma-ray domain. The question remains why these objects, where the relativistic jet is not pointed at the observer, are observable gamma-ray emitters in the first place, and what distinguishes them from the vast majority of gamma-ray silent radio galaxies. In some cases, like Cen A and M 87, these objects have been seen even in the TeV range by Cherenkov telescopes. Whereas the gamma-ray emission is likely to be connected with the non-thermal jet emission, dominating also the radio band, the situation is less clear at hard X-rays. While the smoothly curved continuum emission and the overall spectral energy distribution indicate non-thermal emission, other features such as the iron line emission and the low variability appear to be rather of Seyfert type, i.e. created in the accretion disk and corona around the central black hole. We analysed the case of the 15 gamma-ray detected radio galaxies known so far. Using X-ray data from the soft X-ray band (e.g. Chandra, XMM-Newton, Suzaku/XIS) to the hard X-ray band (e.g. Suzaku/PIN, INTEGRAL, Swift) we determine the emission processes dominant between 0.5 keV and several 100 keV. In the case of M87 we report, for the first time, a detection in the 10-50 keV band. In most cases, the X-ray band of gamma-ray detected radio galaxies is produced in the inverse Compton branch, which can be seen in the fact that most have X-ray spectrum with a photon index <2.0 (i.e. a rising spectral energy distribution). Three different origins of the X-ray flux can be identified. The emission can be purely non-thermal and caused by the jet, as in the case of M 87, or thermal inverse Compton emission from the Seyfert type core (Cen A), or appears to be a superposition of non-thermal and thermal inverse Compton emission, as we observe in 3C 111. The iron fluorescence line Fe Kalpha is visible in the X-ray spectra of some, but not all radio galaxies. In three cases (OH-342, M87, and 3C 78) the X-ray emission is dominated by synchrotron processes, as indicated by X-ray photon indices >2.0. Gamma-ray bright radio galaxies host all kinds of AGN cores, Seyfert 1 and 2, BL Lacs, and also LINER, and can appear as FR-I and FR-II types. But the overall emission as seen in the spectral energy distribution can be modeled by a simple synchrotron self Compton model as typical for BL Lac objects, i.e. no additional strong photon field giving rise to an external Compton component is required. This indicates that the site of the gamma-ray emission is not exposed to a luminous broad line region or other dense photon field, as observed for example in FSRQ. Based on the number counts, it appears that within the Fermi/LAT data there are a dozen gamma-ray bright radio galaxies already detected but not yet identified as radio galaxies.

Beckmann, Volker; Soldi, Simona; De Jong, Sandra

293

OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

2010-05-18

294

Gamma-ray astronomy and the origin of cosmic rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New surveys of galactic gamma ray emission together with millimeter wave radio surveys indicated that cosmic rays were produced as the result of supernova explosions in our galaxy with the most intense production occurring in a Great Galactic Ring about 35,000 light years in diameter where supernova remnants and pulsars were concentrated.

Stecker, F. W.

1978-01-01

295

Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

2002-05-19

296

Gamma-Ray Attenuation-Coefficient Measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total gamma-ray attenuation coefficients have been measured at nine energies in the range of 88 keV to 2.75 MeV for the following elements: Be, C, Mg, Al, S, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ag, Sn, La, Gd, Hf, W, Au, Pb, Th, U, and Pu. Radioactive isotopes were used as sources of monoenergetic gamma radiation in a

A. L. Conner; H. F. Atwater; Elizabeth H. Plassmann; J. H. McCrary

1970-01-01

297

Gamma rays from pulsar wind shock acceleration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A shock forming in the wind of relativistic electron-positron pairs from a pulsar, as a result of confinement by surrounding material, could convert part of the pulsar spin-down luminosity to high energy particles through first order Fermi acceleration. High energy protons could be produced by this mechanism both in supernova remnants and in binary systems containing pulsars. The pion-decay gamma-rays resulting from interaction of accelerated protons with surrounding target material in such sources might be observable above 70 MeV with EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) and above 100 GeV with ground-based detectors. Acceleration of protons and expected gamma-ray fluxes from SN1987A, Cyg X-3 type sources and binary pulsars are discussed.

Harding, Alice K.

1990-01-01

298

Fuzzy correlations of gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The origin of gamma-ray bursts is not known, both in the sense of the nature of the source emitting the radiation and literally, the position of the burst on the sky. Lacking unambiguously identified counterparts in any wavelength band studied to date, statistical approaches are required to determine the burster distance scale. Angular correlation analysis is one of the most powerful tools in this regard. However, poor detector resolution gives large localization errors, effectively beam smearing the positions. The resulting fuzzy angular correlation function is investigated and the generic isotropization that smearing induces on any intrinsic clustering is discussed. In particular, the extent to which gamma-ray burst observations by the BATSE detector aboard the Gamma-Ray Observatory might recover an intrinsic source correlation is investigated.

Hartmann, Dieter H.; Linder, Eric V.; Blumenthal, George R.

1991-01-01

299

Solar gamma rays and neutron observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present status of knowledge concerning the impulsive and the continuous emission of solar gamma rays and neutrons is reviewed in the light of the recent solar activity in early August 1972. The gamma ray spectrometer on OSO-7 has observed the sun continuously for most of the activity period except for occultation by the earth. In association with the 2B flare on 4 August 1972 and the 3B flare on 7 August 1972, the monitor provides evidence for solar gamma ray line emission in the energy range from 300 keV to 10 MeV. A summary of all the results available from preliminary analysis of the data will be given. Significant improvements in future experiments can be made with more sensitive instruments and more extensive time coverage of the sun.

Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.

1972-01-01

300

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Evidence of TeV Gamma-Ray Radiation in Binary  

E-print Network

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Evidence of TeV Gamma-Ray Radiation in Binary CYGNUS X-3 V-ALATOO mountain observatory (altitude 3338m), has been collecting Very High Energy gamma-ray data from Galactic structure on micro and macro scales. The gamma-astronomy is a unique experimental possibility of high

Enomoto, Ryoji

301

Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approx. 0.01 deg (E(sub gamma) > 100 GeV), the energy resolution approx. 1% (E(sub gamma) > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approx 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

Galper, A.M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A.I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.

2012-01-01

302

Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

2012-01-01

303

Gamma-ray burst source locations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Instrumentation for observing cosmic gamma-ray bursts has been provided for widely separated spacecraft, including the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, ISEE-3, Helios-B, Venera 10 and 11, and Prognoz 7. Simultaneous observations have been made of several gamma bursts with various combinations of these spacecraft and near-earth satellites. Locations of the gamma-burst sources have been calculated for those events where precise timing and ephemeris data are available. The results of optical and HEAO-B observations of the resultant error boxes will be discussed.

Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B.; Pizzichini, G.; Margon, B.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.

1980-01-01

304

The origin and implications of gamma rays from solar flares  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solar flares studied in the gamma ray region provide essential information on accelerated nuclei that can be obtained in no other way. A multitude of physical processes, such as particle acceleration, nuclear reactions, positron and neutron physics, and kinematical line broadening, come into consideration at gamma ray energies. Gamma ray observations are complementary to hard X ray observations, since both provide information on accelerated particles. It appears that only in the gamma ray region do these particles produce distinct spectral lines.

Ramaty, R.

1975-01-01

305

Statistics of cosmological gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A phenomenological model of gamma-ray burst spectra is used to calculate the statistics of gamma-ray bursts originating at cosmological distances. A model of bursters with no source evolution in a q sub 0 = 1/2 Friedmann cosmology is in accord with recent observations of the differential V/Vmax distribution. The data are best fit with an average peak-burst luminosity of (4 +/- 2) x 10 exp 51 ergs/s and a present-day source emissivity of 940 +/- 440 bursts/(10 exp 10 yr) cu Mpc. A spectral test of the cosmological hypothesis is proposed.

Dermer, Charles D.

1992-01-01

306

Noiseless coding for the Gamma Ray spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The payload of several future unmanned space missions will include a sophisticated gamma ray spectrometer. Severely constrained data rates during certain portions of these missions could limit the possible science return from this instrument. This report investigates the application of universal noiseless coding techniques to represent gamma ray spectrometer data more efficiently without any loss in data integrity. Performance results demonstrate compression factors from 2.5:1 to 20:1 in comparison to a standard representation. Feasibility was also demonstrated by implementing a microprocessor breadboard coder/decoder using an Intel 8086 processor.

Rice, R.; Lee, J. J.

1985-01-01

307

Analyzing gamma-ray burst spectral data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper describes an improved method for calculating gamma-ray spectra of gamma-ray bursts. This method is independent of any assumed model for the incident spectrum. In many cases it makes it possible to perform chi-squared model fitting without detailed knowledge of the instrument response functions. The results of extensive calculations using simulated data and realistic response functions are presented; the Backus-Gilbert technique produces model-independent spectral estimates that are quantitatively accurate and easy to calculate.

Loredo, Thomas J.; Epstein, Richard I.

1989-01-01

308

A supersymmetric model of gamma ray bursts  

E-print Network

We propose a model for gamma ray bursts in which a star subject to a high level of fermion degeneracy undergoes a phase transition to a supersymmetric state. The burst is initiated by the transition of fermion pairs to sfermion pairs which, uninhibited by the Pauli exclusion principle, can drop to the ground state of minimum momentum through photon emission. The jet structure is attributed to the Bose statistics of sfermions whereby subsequent sfermion pairs are preferentially emitted into the same state (sfermion amplification by stimulated emission). Bremsstrahlung gamma rays tend to preserve the directional information of the sfermion momenta and are themselves enhanced by stimulated emission.

L. Clavelli; G. Karatheodoris

2005-08-08

309

Gamma ray bursts from magnetospheric plasma oscillations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neutron star Magnetospheric Plasma Oscillations (MPO), can account for the energetics, decay time scale, and spectra of typical Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The soft photon source is likely to be due to backwarming of the reprocessing boundary by the incipient gamma rays. It is shown that the observed fraction of bursts displaying low energy absorption features may be understood in the context of an MPO model. Moreover, it is found that GRB spectra should display these cyclotron lines about 18 percent of the time, which is consistent with the KONUS and Ginga sets of data.

Melia, Fulvio

1989-01-01

310

Gamma Ray Astronomy With IceCube  

E-print Network

We demonstrate that the South Pole kilometer-scale neutrino observatory IceCube can detect multi-TeV gamma rays continuously over a large fraction of the southern sky. While not as sensitive as pointing atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, IceCube can roughly match the sensitivity of Milagro. Also, IceCube is complementary to Milagro because it will observe, without interruption, a relatively poorly studied fraction of the southern sky. The information which IceCube must record to function as a gamma ray observatory is only the directions and possibly energies of down-going muons.

Francis Halzen; Dan Hooper

2003-05-13

311

Gamma ray spectrometer for Lunar Scout 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We review the current status of the Los Alamos program to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-II mission, which is the second of two Space Exploration Initiative robotic precursor missions to study the Moon. This instrument will measure gamma rays in the energy range of approximately 0.1 - 10 MeV to determine the composition of the lunar surface. The instrument is a high-purity germanium crystal surrounded by an CsI anticoincidence shield and cooled by a split Stirling cycle cryocooler. It will provide the abundance of many elements over the entire lunar surface.

Moss, C. E.; Burt, W. W.; Edwards, B. C.; Martin, R. A.; Nakano, George H.; Reedy, R. C.

1993-01-01

312

Gamma-ray Burst Skymap Website  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Gamma-ray Burst Skymap website automatically updates for each gamma-ray burst as it occurs, whether detected by Swift or other orbiting satellites. For each burst, the location on the sky, star map, constellation and detecting mission are generated automatically. It is then quickly updated by hand to include a written description of the burst properties and scientific significance, as observations continue. Note: In order to view the content of the website, users need to download and install Silverlight on their computers.

2012-12-06

313

Radioactivities and gamma-rays from supernovae  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An account is given of the implications of several calculations relevant to the estimation of gamma-ray signals from various explosive astronomical phenomena. After discussing efforts to constrain the amounts of Ni-57 and Ti-44 produced in SN 1987A, attention is given to the production of Al-27 in massive stars and SNs. A 'delayed detonation' model of type Ia SNs is proposed, and the gamma-ray signal which may be expected when a bare white dwarf collapses directly into a neutron star is discussed.

Woosley, S. E.

1991-01-01

314

A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV-9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr3:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20-30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2-5 m from the station.

Granja, Carlos; Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin; Owens, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek; Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Valach, Ondrej

2015-01-01

315

X-ray emission from compact groups of galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The existence of very compact groups, or 'poor clusters,' of galaxies as a category of X-ray source is reported. By analogy with X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies, it is assumed that the extended X-ray emission is due to thermal bremsstrahlung from hot gas in the groups. The derived X-ray temperatures, luminosities, and sizes are similar to those for X-ray emitting, rich clusters of galaxies. It is inferred that these groups are in a late evolutionary stage because of the presence of a dominant galaxy, the absence of spiral galaxies, and the short cooling time inferred for 2A 0335 + 096.

Schwartz, D. A.; Schwarz, J.; Tucker, W.

1980-01-01

316

Spectral formation in compact X-ray sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method is described for calculating the transfer of X-rays through gas that is optically thick to Compton scattering. The method permits the simultaneous solution of the radiation-dominated temperature and ionization structure of the medium as well as the effects of incoherent Compton scattering of photons. Self-consistent results are obtained for idealized models of compact X-ray sources, represented as point sources of continuum X-rays surrounded by spherical shells of gas, demonstrating the range of spectral features that might result from such optically thick transfer. Some implications for the analysis of X-ray spectra of galactic X-ray sources are discussed.

Ross, R. R.

1979-01-01

317

Compact Stars in low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-print Network

We propose a model for compact stars in low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs) namely KS 1731-260, EXO 1745-248 and 4U 1608-52. Here we investigate the physical phenomena of a compact star in the LMXBs. Using our model, we have calculated central density, surface density, mass(M) and red-shift for the above mentioned compact stars, which is very much consistent with the reported data. We also obtain the possible equation of state(EOS) of the stars which is physically acceptable.

Sk. Monowar Hossein; Sajahan Molla; Md. Abdul Kayum Jafry; Mehedi Kalam

2014-08-13

318

Cosmic Ray and Tev Gamma Ray Generation by Quasar Remnants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results from new broadband (radio to X-ray) high-resolution imaging studies of the dormant quasar remnant cores of nearby giant elliptical galaxies are now shown to permit the harboring of compact dynamos capable of generating the highest energy cosmic ray particles and associated curvature radiation of TeV photons. Confirmation would imply a global inflow of interstellar gas all the way to the accretion powered supermassive black hole at the center of the host galaxy.

Boldt, Elihu; Loewenstein, Michael; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

319

Development of Compton gamma-ray sources at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

Compact Compton scattering gamma-ray sources offer the potential of studying nuclear photonics with new tools. The optimization of such sources depends on the final application, but generally requires maximizing the spectral density (photons/eV) of the gamma-ray beam while simultaneously reducing the overall bandwidth on target to minimize noise. We have developed an advanced design for one such system, comprising the RF drive, photoinjector, accelerator, and electron-generating and electron-scattering laser systems. This system uses a 120 Hz, 250 pC, 2 ps, 0.35 mm mrad electron beam with 250 MeV maximum energy in an X-band accelerator scattering off a 150 mJ, 10 ps, 532 nm laser to generate 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} photons/eV/s/Sr at 0.5 MeV with an overall bandwidth of less than 1%. The source will be able to produce photons up to energies of 2.5 MeV. We also discuss Compton scattering gamma-ray source predictions given by numerical codes.

Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Hartemann, F. V.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M. J.; Prantil, M. A.; Wu, S.; Barty, C. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF and Photon Science, 7000 East avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2012-12-21

320

Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

E-print Network

Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has become an active astrophysical discipline with four confirmed sources of TeV gamma rays, two plerionic supernova remnants (SNRs) and two BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). An additional nine objects (one plerion, three shell-type SNRs, one X-ray binary, and four BL Lacs) have been detected but have not been confirmed by independent detections. None of the galactic sources require the presence of hadronic cosmic rays, so definitive evidence of their origin remains elusive. Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 are weak EGRET sources but they exhibit extremely variable TeV emission with spectra that extend beyond 10 TeV. They also exhibit correlations with lower energy photons during multi-wavelength campaigns, providing tests of emission models. Next generation telescopes like VERITAS hold the promise of moving this field dramatically forward.

Michael Catanese

1999-11-09

321

Modeling Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Upward positive intra-cloud (IC) lightning may drive the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) to become self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and back-scattered x-rays. This causes the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting x-ray and gamma-ray emission, to grow exponentially until ionization causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and causing the number of runaway electrons to decline. A new transport code is presented that models runaway electron avalanche growth along with the positron and x-ray feedback processes. Specifically, the model includes the production, propagation, diffusion and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons, the production and propagation of x-rays and gamma-rays, and the production, propagation and annihilation of runaway positrons. In the model, the large scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including 2 and 3-body electron attachment and recombination. Simulation results will be presented that show that when relativistic feedback is taken into account, bright gamma-ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, intensities, current-moments, and energy spectra as the terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) measured by the RHESSI and Fermi spacecraft.

Dwyer, J. R.

2011-12-01

322

Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  This report covers developments in the field of gamma-ray astronomy, essentially in the energy range 300 GeV to 300 TeV, reported\\u000a at the XXIV International Cosmic-Ray Conference in Rome in 1995. Highlights which receive the main attention are the failure\\u000a of several experiments to detect TeV photons from several supernova remnants at the level predicted on current models of shock

A. M. Hillas

1996-01-01

323

The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Swift mission, scheduled for launch in 2004, is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy. It is a first-of-its-kind autonomous rapid-slewing satellite for transient astronomy and pioneers the way for future rapid-reaction and multiwavelength missions. It will be far more powerful than any previous GRB mission, observing more than 100 bursts yr-1 and performing detailed X-ray and UV\\/optical

N. Gehrels; G. Chincarini; P. Giommi; K. O. Mason; J. A. Nousek; A. A. Wells; N. E. White; S. D. Barthelmy; D. N. Burrows; L. R. Cominsky; K. C. Hurley; F. E. Marshall; P. Mészáros; P. W. A. Roming; L. Angelini; L. M. Barbier; T. Belloni; S. Campana; P. A. Caraveo; M. M. Chester; O. Citterio; T. L. Cline; M. S. Cropper; J. R. Cummings; A. J. Dean; E. D. Feigelson; E. E. Fenimore; D. A. Frail; A. S. Fruchter; G. P. Garmire; K. Gendreau; G. Ghisellini; J. Greiner; J. E. Hill; S. D. Hunsberger; H. A. Krimm; S. R. Kulkarni; P. Kumar; F. Lebrun; N. M. Lloyd-Ronning; C. B. Markwardt; B. J. Mattson; R. F. Mushotzky; J. P. Norris; J. Osborne; B. Paczynski; D. M. Palmer; H.-S. Park; A. M. Parsons; J. Paul; M. J. Rees; C. S. Reynolds; J. E. Rhoads; T. P. Sasseen; B. E. Schaefer; A. T. Short; A. P. Smale; I. A. Smith; L. Stella; G. Tagliaferri; T. Takahashi; M. Tashiro; L. K. Townsley; J. Tueller; M. J. L. Turner; M. Vietri; W. Voges; M. J. Ward; R. Willingale; F. M. Zerbi; W. W. Zhang

2004-01-01

324

X-ray spectral properties of {gamma}-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect

The authors summarize the spectral characteristics of a sample of 22 bright gamma-ray bursts detected with the gamma-ray burst sensors aboard the satellite Ginga. This instrument employed a proportional and scintillation counter to provide sensitivity to photons in the 2--400 keV range, providing a unique opportunity to characterize the largely unexplored X-ray properties of gamma-ray bursts. The photon spectra of the Ginga bursts are well described by a low energy slope, a bend energy, and a high energy slope. In the energy range where they can be compared, this result is consistent with burst spectral analyses obtained from the BATSE experiment aboard the Compton Observatory. However, below 20 keV they find evidence for a positive spectral number index in approximately 40% of their burst sample, with some evidence for a strong rolloff at lower energies in a few events. They find that the distribution of spectral bend energies extends below 10 keV. The observed ratio of energy emitted in the X-rays relative to the gamma-rays can be much larger than a few percent and, in fact, is sometimes larger than unity. The average for their sample is 24%.

Strohmayer, T.E. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Fenimore, E.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Murakami, Toshio [ISAS, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Yoshida, Atsumasa [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

1997-09-01

325

THE RELATION BETWEEN AGN GAMMA-RAY EMISSION AND PARSEC-SCALE RADIO JETS  

SciTech Connect

We have compared the radio emission from a sample of parsec-scale active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets as measured by the VLBA at 15 GHz, with their associated {gamma}-ray properties that are reported in the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) three month bright source list. We find in our radio-selected sample that the {gamma}-ray photon flux correlates well with the quasi-simultaneously measured compact radio flux density. The LAT-detected jets in our radio-selected complete sample generally have higher compact radio flux densities, and their parsec-scale cores are brighter (i.e., have higher brightness temperature) than the jets in the LAT nondetected objects. This suggests that the jets of bright {gamma}-ray AGN have preferentially higher Doppler-boosting factors. In addition, AGN jets tend to be found in a more active radio state within several months from LAT-detection of their strong {gamma}-ray emission. This result becomes more pronounced for confirmed {gamma}-ray flaring sources. We identify the parsec-scale radio core as a likely location for both the {gamma}-ray and radio flares, which appear within typical timescales of up to a few months of each other.

Kovalev, Y. Y.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Ros, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany)], E-mail: ykovalev@mpifr.de, E-mail: apushkar@mpifr.de, E-mail: ros@mpifr.de (and others)

2009-05-01

326

Fission-fragment gamma-ray multiplicities  

SciTech Connect

The gamma ray multiplicity (M{gamma}) of fission fragments is a valuable experimental clue to the physics of the fission process in particular and the dynamics of heavy-ion collisions in general. Apparatus for measuring M{gamma} as a function of mass asymmetry was constructed and commissioned. The apparatus consisted of a time-of-flight telescope with a time resolution for fission fragments of {approx}1.5 ns and a solid angle of some 0.04 strad. The telescope was constructed using a micro-channel plate start detector and a parallel plate avalanche counter as a stop detector. Gamma rays from the fragments were detected in an array of three 5{double prime} {times} 6{double prime} NaI(Tl) detectors placed approximately 55 cm from the target. When used in beam this apparatus provided sufficient mass resolution for the detected fission fragments and allowed excellent separation of the {gamma}-rays and neutrons from the reaction on the basis of their time-of-flight.

Hook, D.E.

1987-01-01

327

Gamma rays from supernova remnants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent galactic plane surveys with space- and ground-based detectors revealed a number of high and very-high energy ?-ray sources associated with young and middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs). These results imply effective production of relativistic particles, most likely through the process of diffusive shock acceleration. The interpretation of ?-ray data from several prominent representatives of young SNRs within the so-called ‘hadronic models’ demands hard proton spectra extending to 100 TeV, and total energy released in accelerated protons and ions WCR?1050 erg. This can be treated as a support of the SNR paradigm of galactic cosmic rays. However, the hadronic models are not free of pitfalls, and pose in fact non-trivial challenges. Moreover, in many cases ?-ray data can be successfully explained also by the inverse Compton scattering of directly accelerated electrons. Future deep spectroscopic and morphological studies of SNRs with the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) over four decades in energy, from approximately 30 GeV to 300 TeV, promise a breakthrough regarding the identification of radiation mechanisms. The extension of studies beyond the shells of SNRs will be another important objective aimed at the extraction of information about the highest energy particles which have left remnants at the early epochs of their evolution. These particles, which potentially carry an answer to a key question whether SNRs operate as PeVatrons, can be traced via ?-ray emission outside the remnants. Finally, the expected significant increase of the number of ?-ray emitting SNRs by CTA should allow compelling population studies - a key issue for the proof of the SNR origin of galactic cosmic rays.

Aharonian, Felix A.

2013-03-01

328

X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

Cominsky, L

2004-03-23

329

Gamma-Ray-Burst Beaming and Gravitational-Wave Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within ?j=30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of ?10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if ?j?30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E.

2013-11-01

330

Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.  

PubMed

Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within ?(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if ?(j)?30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB. PMID:24237502

Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

2013-11-01

331

Nuclear isomer suitable for gamma ray laser  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The operation of gamma ray lasers (gasers) are studied. It is assumed that the nuclear isomers mentioned in previously published papers have inherent limitations. It is further assumed that the judicious use of Bormann effect or the application of the total external reflection of low energy gamma radiation at grazing angle of incidence may permit the use of a gaser crystal sufficiently long to achieve observable stimulated emission. It is suggested that a long lived 0(+) isomer decaying by low energy gamma ray emission to a short lived 2(+) excited nuclear state would be an attractive gaser candidate. It is also suggested that the nuclear isomer be incorporated in a matrix of refractory material having an electrostatic field gradient whose principal axis lies along the length of the medium. This results in the preferential transmission of electric quadrupole radiation along the length of the medium.

Jha, S.

1979-01-01

332

Gamma-ray Burst Educator Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This guide accompanies an educational wallsheet that uses Gamma-ray Bursts as an engagement to teach selected topics in physical science and mathematics. It features four curriculum enhancement activities, background information, assessment information, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities, and detailed information about the physical science and mathematics content standards for grades 9-12.

333

Gamma-ray bursts: Restarting the Engine  

E-print Network

Recent gamma-ray burst observations have revealed late-time, highly energetic events which deviate from the simplest expectations of the standard fireball picture. Instead they may indicate that the central engine is active or restarted at late times. We suggest that fragmentation and subsequent accretion during the collapse of a rapidly rotating stellar core offers a natural mechanism for this.

Andrew King; Paul T. O'Brien; Michael R. Goad; Julian Osborne; Emma Olsson; Kim Page

2005-08-04

334

Solar gamma rays. [of flare origin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Calculations are presented for the production of gamma-ray lines and continuum emission in solar flares. The interaction models used in the calculations are described, neutron-producing reactions are identified, and formation of the 2.2-MeV line is analyzed. The most important prompt gamma-ray lines that can be observed during solar flares are determined, and the production of gamma-ray continuum emission by electron-proton bremsstrahlung is examined. The results are compared with data on the solar flare of August 4, 1972, to deduce the number and spectrum of accelerated particles at the sun as well as the energy deposited by them in the solar atmosphere. Problems concerning the formation of the 0.51-MeV line by positron annihilation are investigated, and estimates are made for the high-energy gamma-ray and neutron fluxes (at earth) produced by the August 4 flare. The main findings for that flare are: (1) the strongest line, at 2.2 MeV, was due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere; (2) the intensity of that line depended on the photospheric He-3 abundance; (3) the neutrons were produced mainly in proton-alpha reactions by accelerated particles with energies in excess of 30 MeV/nucleon; and (4) the strongest prompt lines were due to deexcitation of excited states in C-12, O-16, and N-15.

Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1975-01-01

335

Measurements of Gamma-Ray Attenuation Coefficients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements have been made to determine gamma-ray attenuation coefficients very accurately by using an extremely-narrow-collimated-beam transmission method which effectively excluded corrections due to small-angle and multiple scattering of photons. The measured mass attenuation coefficients with maximum errors less than 3% for 34 elements in the range from hydrogen to lead are given.

B. Goswami; N. Chaudhuri

1973-01-01

336

Gamma-Ray Telescope and Uncertainty Principle  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is one of the important basic principles of quantum mechanics. In most of the books on quantum mechanics, this uncertainty principle is generally illustrated with the help of a gamma ray microscope, wherein neither the image formation criterion nor the lens properties are taken into account. Thus a better…

Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

2012-01-01

337

The Supernova Gamma-Ray Burst Connection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chief distinction between ordinary supernovae and long-soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the degree of differential rotation in the inner several solar masses when a massive star dies, and GRBs are rare mainly because of the difficulty achieving the necessary high rotation rate. Models that do provide the necessary angular momentum are discussed, with emphasis on a new single star

Stan Woosley; A. Heger

2006-01-01

338

Gamma-Ray Bursts The Second Revolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma-ray bursts GRBs are among the most mysterious astronomical phenomenon ever discovered. Unlike most astronomical discoveries which were explained within weeks or months after their initial discovery, GRBs remain a puzzle for more than thirty years. During the last decade our understanding of GRBs has undergone two major revolutions. First, BATSE discovered that GRBs are distributed isotropically over the sky

Tsvi Piran

1998-01-01

339

Three Types of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multivariate analysis of gamma-ray burst (GRB) bulk properties is presented to discriminate between distinct classes of GRBs. Several variables representing burst duration, fluence, and spectral hardness are considered. Two multivariate clustering procedures are used on a sample of 797 bursts from the Third BATSE Catalog, a nonparametric average linkage hierarchical agglomerative clustering procedure validated with Wilks' Lambda^* and other

Soma Mukherjee; Eric D. Feigelson; Gutti Jogesh Babu; Fionn Murtagh; Chris Fraley; Adrian Raftery

1998-01-01

340

Gamma Ray Burst Detectives (Elementary School)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive resource invites students to join NASA to find the source of gamma ray bursts, the single biggest explosions in the Universe since the Big Bang. The web site features an animation, information on three possible star sources, and a check yes or no for each star with feedback.

2010-04-28

341

Gamma Ray Burst Detectives (High School)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

>This WPSU interactive resource invites students to join NASA to find the source of gamma ray bursts, the single biggest explosions in the Universe since the Big Bang by exploring three aspects of the death of stars: energy, duration, and variability.

WPSU

2011-04-27

342

Theories of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gamma ray burst phenomenon is reviewed from a theoretical point of view, with emphasis on the fireball shock scenario of the prompt emission and the longer wavelength afterglow. Recent progress and issues are discussed, including spectral-temporal evolution, localizations, jets, spectral lines, environmental and cosmological aspects, as well as some prospects for future experiments in both electromagnetic and nonelectromagnetic channels.

P. Mészáros

2002-01-01

343

The Gamma-Ray Observatory: An overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) is a 16,000 kg spacecraft containing four instruments which span almost six decades of energy from about 50 keV to about 30 GeV. It will provide the first opportunity to make simultaneous observations over such a broad band of gamma-ray energies. GRO is assembled and undergoing testing prior to its scheduled June 4, 1990 launch aboard the Space Shuttle. The orbit will be circular with an altitude of 450 km and with an inclination of 28 degrees. Data will be recorded at 32 kilobits per second and dumped once per orbit via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and timing will be maintained to .1 ms. The observing schedule will begin with an all sky survey, consisting of 30 two week pointings, covering the first 15 months of science operations. Following observations will emphasize source studies and deep searches. Originally selected as a Principal Class spacecraft with a two year mission, extension of the mission to six to ten years makes a vigorous Guest Investigator Program both possible and desirable. Such a program will be fully in place by the third year of the mission, with limited opportunities earlier. Each of the four instruments has a capability for observing both gamma-ray bursts and solar flare gamma-rays, and there is some solar neutron capability. Correlated observations with those at other wavelengths is also receiving considerable attention in the mission planning.

Kniffen, Donald A.

1989-01-01

344

High redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

Ten years of operations of the Swift satellite have allow us to collect a small sample of long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) at redshift larger than six. I will review here the present status of this research field and discuss the possible use of GRBs as a fundamental new tool to explore the early Universe, complementary to quasar and galaxy surveys.

Salvaterra, R

2015-01-01

345

New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

1969-01-01

346

Neutron production in terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) are brief bursts of photons with energies up to 20 MeV typically observed in association with lightning. Such energetic photons may undergo photonuclear reactions with nontrivial cross section in the vicinity of the giant dipole resonance. Pulses of neutrons have been observed experimentally in coincidence with lightning, suggesting such reactions are observable. We present simulations

B. E. Carlson; N. G. Lehtinen

2010-01-01

347

First RHESSI terrestrial gamma ray flash catalog  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a summary of data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) catalog. We describe the RHESSI search algorithm and discuss its limitations due to its design emphasis on cleanliness rather than completeness. This search algorithm has identified 820 TGFs between March of 2002 and February of 2008. Radiation damage to

B. W. Grefenstette; D. M. Smith; B. J. Hazelton; L. I. Lopez

2009-01-01

348

Persistent Counterparts to Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent discovery of persistent gamma-ray burst (GRB) counterparts at lower frequencies permits several important conclusions to be drawn. The spectrum of GRB 970508 is not consistent with an external shock origin for both the prompt GRB and the persistent emission, suggesting that at least the prompt radiation is produced by internal shocks. Comparisons among three GRBs with counterparts (or

J. I. Katz; T. Piran

1997-01-01

349

GAMMA RAY IMAGING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The research is a three year development program to apply high resolution gamma-ray imaging technologies to environmental remediation of radioactive hazards. High resolution, position-sensitive germanium detectors are being developed at the Naval Research Laboratory for space app...

350

Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector Interactive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This product illustrates how scientists learn about the composition of an asteroid by studying energy and neutrons that emanate from it. The Dawn spacecraft contains three instruments -- the Gamma Ray and Neutro Detector (GRaND), the Visible Infrared Spectrometer, and the Framing Camera -- that will provide answers to questions about the formation and evolution of the early solar system.

John Ristvey

2009-04-22

351

Performance of the most recent avalanche photodiodes for future X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on the performance of the most recent avalanche photodiodes produced by Hamamatsu Photonics, as low-energy X-rays and gamma-rays detectors. APDs share good features of both photo diodes and PMTs, as they are very compact, produce an internal gain of 10-100, and have a high quantum efficiency close to 100% in the visible right. Until very recently, however, APDs

Jun Kataoka; Tomoko Ikagawa; Yoichi Yatsu; Yusuke Kuramoto; Takao Saito; Nobuyuki Kawai; Yuuri Serino; Junichi Kotoku; Yoshitaka Ishikawa; Nobuyuki Kawabata

2004-01-01

352

Investigation of gamma rays from the galactic center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data from Argentine balloon flights made to investigate gamma ray emission from the galactic center are summarized. Data are also summarized from a Palestine, Texas balloon flight to measure gamma rays from NP 0532 and Crab Nebulae.

Helmken, H. F.

1973-01-01

353

Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst - Duration: 1:04.  

NASA Video Gallery

On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

354

Gamma Ray Telescope Senses High-Energy Radiation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from NASA describes the GLAST satellite, which is equipped with a gamma-ray telescope, and shares some background about the kinds of extreme universal phenomena indicated by the presence of gamma rays.

WNET

2011-11-02

355

GeV-TeV Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-print Network

Recent results of GeV and TeV observations of gamma-rays from the Universe are briefly reviewed. Topics include observational technique, diffuse gamma-rays, pulsars, unidentified sources, plerions, supernova remnants and AGNs.

Masaki Mori

2001-08-29

356

Gamma ray lines from the Galactic Center and gamma ray transients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The observations and interpretations of cosmic (nonsolar) gamma ray lines are discussed. The most prominent of these lines is the e(+)e(-) annihilation line which was observed from the Galactic Center and from several gamma ray transients. At the Galactic Center the e(+)e(-) pairs are probably produced by an accreting massive black hole (solar mass of approximately one million) and annihilate within the central light year to produce a line at almost exactly 0.511 MeV. In gamma ray transients the annihilation line is redshifted by factors consistent with neutron star surface redshifts. Other observed transient gamma ray lines appear to be due to cyclotron absorption in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars, and nuclear deexcitations and neutron capture, which could also occur on or around these objects.

Ramaty, R.; Leiter, D.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1981-01-01

357

Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

1998-01-01

358

Observations of cosmic gamma ray sources and their contribution to the diffuse gamma ray background  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to study soft gamma ray emission in the 0.1 to 10 MeV energy band for selected active galactic nuclei and explore how much they contribute to the total diffuse gamma ray background. A series of imaging observations of extragalactic objects in the low energy gamma-ray region were carried out by the Coded Aperture Directional Gamma-ray Telescope (DGT). The DGT was successfully flown at stratospheric balloon altitudes, and observations were made of the Crab, NGC 1275, MKN 421, and NGC 4151. The measured Crab spectrum is consistent with a featureless power-law of the form. Significant emission was detected up to 500 keV from the Seyfert galaxy, NGC 4151. To increase the total sky exposure the extragalactic field images were analyzed, including the 3C 273 region, obtained by the DGT.

Bhattacharya, D.

1990-01-01

359

Relativistic fireballs and their impact on external matter - Models for cosmological gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss the production of cosmological gamma-ray bursts intense enough to be detected at cosmological distances. Events such as the coalescence of compact binaries can create sufficient energy on time scales much less than 1 s. A short 'primary' burst is expected when the resultant fireball becomes optically thin, but this may be weak because the bulk of the radiative

P. Meszaros; M. J. Rees

1993-01-01

360

Short gamma-ray bursts from binary neutron star mergers in globular clusters  

E-print Network

ARTICLES Short gamma-ray bursts from binary neutron star mergers in globular clusters JONATHAN produced in globular clusters, in which extreme densities of very old stars can create and exchange compact binaries efficiently. Here we present a simple scaling from the DNS binary observed in the globular cluster

Loss, Daniel

361

An Electronically-collimated Gamma-ray Detector for Localization of Radiation Sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small hand-held radiation detectors that can image a gamma-ray source and yet can be transported by a single operator could have numerous applications, either in medical intraoperative procedures or in nuclear security field work. We report on the design of a device intended for such applications and we present results of simulations that indicate expected performance for such a compact

Blair Smith; Kenneth L. Matthews II; Adam Lackie; W. H. Hill; Wei-Hsung Wang; M. L. Cherry

2006-01-01

362

Temporal Deconvolution study of Long and Short Gamma-Ray Burst Light curves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The light curves of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects

P. N. Bhat; Michael S. Briggs; Valerie Connaughton; Chryssa Kouveliotou; Alexander J. van der Horst; William Paciesas; Charles A. Meegan; Elisabetta Bissaldi; Michael Burgess; Vandiver Chaplin; Roland Diehl; Gerald Fishman; Gerard Fitzpatrick; Suzanne Foley; Melissa Gibby; Misty M. Giles; Adam Goldstein; Jochen Greiner; David Gruber; Sylvain Guiriec; Andreas von Kienlin; Marc Kippen; Sheila McBreen; Robert Preece; Arne Rau; Dave Tierney; Colleen Wilson-Hodge

2011-01-01

363

Miniaturization in x ray and gamma ray spectroscopy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper presents advances in two new sensor technologies and a miniaturized associated electronics technology which, when combined, can allow for very significant miniaturization and for the reduction of weight and power consumption in x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems: (1) Mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray technology, which allows for the first time the construction of truly portable, high-energy resolution, non-cryogenic x-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analyzer systems, with parameters approaching those of laboratory quality cryogenic instruments; (2) the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD), which is a solid-state light sensitive device with internal amplification, capable of uniquely replacing the vacuum photomultiplier tube in scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer applications, and offering substantial improvements in size, ruggedness, low power operation and energy resolution; and (3) miniaturized (hybridized) low noise, low power amplification and processing electronics, which take full advantage of the favorable properties of these new sensors and allow for the design and fabrication of advanced, highly miniaturized x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. The paper also presents experimental results and examples of spectrometric systems currently under construction. The directions for future developments are discussed.

Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Bradley, James G.

1993-01-01

364

Cosmogenic gamma rays and the composition of cosmic rays  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the prospects of detecting the sources of ultrahigh energy (UHE) cosmic ray (CR) nuclei via their emission of cosmogenic {gamma} rays in the GeV to TeV energy range. These {gamma} rays result from electromagnetic cascades initiated by high energy photons, electrons, and positrons that are emitted by CRs during their propagation in the cosmic radiation background and are independent of the simultaneous emission of {gamma} rays in the vicinity of the source. The corresponding production power by UHE CR nuclei (with mass number A and charge Z) is dominated by pion photo production ({proportional_to}A) and Bethe-Heitler pair production ({proportional_to}Z{sup 2}). We show that the cosmogenic {gamma}-ray signal from a single steady UHE CR source is typically more robust with respect to variations of the source composition and injection spectrum than the accompanying signal of cosmogenic neutrinos. We study the diffuse emission from the sum of extragalactic CR sources as well as the point-source emission of the closest sources.

Ahlers, Markus [C. N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3840 (United States); Salvado, Jordi [Departament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, 647 Diagonal, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2011-10-15

365

Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRBs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Details on the project to search for serendipitous time correlated optical photographic observations of Gamma Ray Bursters (GRB's) are presented. The ongoing photographic observations at nine observatories are used to look for plates which were exposed simultaneously with a gamma ray burst detected by the gamma ray instrument team (BATSE) and contain the burst position. The results for the first two years of the gamma ray instrument team operation are presented.

Greiner, J.; Wenzel, W.; Hudec, R.; Moskalenko, E. I.; Metlov, V.; Chernych, N. S.; Getman, V. S.; Ziener, Rainer; Birkle, K.; Bade, N.

1994-01-01

366

Gamma-ray astronomy--A status report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-rays provide us with powerful insight into the highest energy processes occurring in the cosmos. This review highlights some of the progress in our understanding of gamma-ray astronomy that has been enabled by new data from GRANAT and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observaatory, and suggests requirements for future progress. In particular, the unique role of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission and concurrent multiwavelength observations is highlighted.

Holt, Stephen S.

1994-01-01

367

Fermi Gamma-Ray Imaging of a Radio Galaxy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of

A. A. Abdo; M. Ackermann; M. Ajello; W. B. Atwood; L. Baldini; J. Ballet; G. Barbiellini; D. Bastieri; B. M. Baughman; K. Bechtol; R. Bellazzini; B. Berenji; R. D. Blandford; E. D. Bloom; E. Bonamente; A. W. Borgland; J. Bregeon; A. Brez; M. Brigida; P. Bruel; T. H. Burnett; S. Buson; G. A. Caliandro; R. A. Cameron; P. A. Caraveo; J. M. Casandjian; E. Cavazzuti; C. Cecchi; Ö. Çelik; A. Chekhtman; C. C. Cheung; J. Chiang; S. Ciprini; R. Claus; J. Cohen-Tanugi; S. Colafrancesco; L. R. Cominsky; J. Conrad; L. Costamante; S. Cutini; D. S. Davis; C. D. Dermer; A. de Angelis; F. de Palma; S. W. Digel; E. do Couto e Silva; P. S. Drell; R. Dubois; D. Dumora; C. Farnier; C. Favuzzi; S. J. Fegan; J. Finke; W. B. Focke; P. Fortin; Y. Fukazawa; S. Funk; P. Fusco; F. Gargano; D. Gasparrini; N. Gehrels; M. Georganopoulos; S. Germani; B. Giebels; N. Giglietto; F. Giordano; M. Giroletti; T. Glanzman; G. Godfrey; I. A. Grenier; J. E. Grove; L. Guillemot; S. Guiriec; Y. Hanabata; A. K. Harding; M. Hayashida; E. Hays; R. E. Hughes; M. S. Jackson; Jóhannesson G; S. Johnson; T. J. Johnson; W. N. Johnson; T. Kamae; H. Katagiri; J. Kataoka; N. Kawai; M. Kerr; J. Knödlseder; M. L. Kocian; M. Kuss; J. Lande; L. Latronico; M. Lemoine-Goumard; F. Loparco; B. Lott; M. N. Lovellette; P. Lubrano; G. M. Madejski; A. Makeev; M. N. Mazziotta; W. McConville; J. E. McEnery; C. Meurer; P. F. Michelson; W. Mitthumsiri; T. Mizuno; A. A. Moiseev; C. Monte; M. E. Monzani; A. Morselli; I. V. Moskalenko; S. Murgia; P. L. Nolan; J. P. Norris; E. Nuss; T. Ohsugi; N. Omodei; E. Orlando; J. F. Ormes; D. Paneque; D. Parent; V. Pelassa; M. Pesce-Rollins; F. Piron; T. A. Porter; S. Rainň; R. Rando; M. Razzano; S. Razzaque; A. Reimer; O. Reimer; T. Reposeur; S. Ritz; L. S. Rochester; A. Y. Rodriguez; R. W. Romani; M. Roth; F. Ryde; H. F.-W. Sadrozinski; R. Sambruna; D. Sanchez; A. Sander; P. M. Saz Parkinson; J. D. Scargle; C. Sgrň; J. Siskind; D. A. Smith; P. D. Smith; G. Spandre; P. Spinelli; J.-L. Starck; L. Stawarz; M. S. Strickman; D. J. Suson; H. Takahashi; T. Takahashi; T. Tanaka; J. B. Thayer; J. G. Thayer; D. J. Thompson; L. Tibaldo; D. F. Torres; G. Tosti; A. Tramacere; Y. Usher Uchiyama T. L; V. Vasileiou; N. Vilchez; V. Vitale; A. P. Waite; E. Wallace; P. Wang; B. L. Winer; K. S. Wood; T. Ylinen; M. Ziegler; M. J. Hardcastle; D. Kazanas

2010-01-01

368

The future of high energy gamma ray astronomy and its potential astrophysical implications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future satellites should carry instruments having over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far as well as improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance knowledge of: the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects; the structure of our galaxy; the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays; the high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies; and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The relevant aspects of extragalactic gamma ray phenomena are emphasized along with the instruments planned. The high energy gamma ray results of forthcoming programs such as GAMMA-1 and the Gamma Ray Observatory should justify even more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the space station currently being considered by NASA.

Fichtel, C. E.

1982-01-01

369

Gamma-ray line investigations with the Durham gamma-ray spectrometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A description is presented of a program undertaken to investigate gamma-ray lines with the aid of an actively shielded high purity Ge detector cooled by liquid nitrogen. The active NaI(Tl) shielding elements limit the opening angle of the telescope to 5.2 deg. The basic crystal has a gamma-ray detection efficiency of 23% relative to a standard 3 in. x 3

C. A. Ayre; A. Owens; W. M. Summers; M. G. Thompson; P. N. Bhat

1981-01-01

370

CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital gamma ray spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the design and analysis of a new gamma ray spectrometer for planetary science that uses an array of CdZnTe detectors to achieve the detection efficiency needed for orbital measurements. The use of CdZnTe will provide significantly improved pulse height resolution relative to scintillation-based detectors, with commensurate improvement in the accuracy of elemental abundances determined by gamma ray and

T. H. Prettyman; W. C. Feldman; K. R. Fuller; S. A. Storms; S. A. Soldner; David J. Lawrence; M. C. Browne; C. E. Moss

2001-01-01

371

Gamma-ray burst observations by the HEAO3 high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of cosmic gamma-ray bursts with the JPL High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometer on HEAO-3 are discussed. Two bursts seen on 1979 November 16 are of particular interest. The first event occurred at 14:16:41 UT and lasted for eight seconds. This event was detected only by the instrument’s five CsI shield segments. The second event occurred 61 sec later, at 14:17:42 UT,

Wm. A. Wheaton; James C. Ling; William A. Mahoney; Guenter R. Riegler; Allan S. Jacobson

1982-01-01

372

Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics—and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear

Cornelia B. Wunderer; Peter v. Ballmoos; Nicolas Barriere; Angela Bazzano; Steven E. Boggs; Finn Christensen; Filippo Frontera; Margarida Hernanz; Jürgen Knodlseder; Andreas Zoglauer

2009-01-01

373

Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Solar gamma ray astronomy on solar maximum mission. [experimental design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SMM gamma ray experiment and the important scientific capabilities of the instrument are discussed. The flare size detectable as a function of spectrum integration time was studied. A preliminary estimate indicates that a solar gamma ray line at 4.4 MeV one-fifth the intensity of that believed to have been emitted on 4 August 1972 can be detected in approximately 1000 sec with a confidence level of 99%.

Forrest, D. J.

1978-01-01

374

Physical constraints on models of gamma-ray bursters  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with the constraints that can be placed on models of gamma-ray burst sources based on only the well-established observational facts and physical principles. The premise is developed that the very hard x-ray and gamma-ray continua spectra are well-established aspects of gamma-ray bursts. Recent theoretical work on gamma-ray bursts are summarized with emphasis on the geometrical properties of the models. Constraints on the source models which are implied by the x-ray and gamma-ray spectra are described. The allowed ranges for the luminosity and characteristic dimension for gamma-ray burst sources are shown. Some of the deductions and inferences about the nature of the gamma-ray burst sources are summarized. 67 refs., 3 figs.

Epstein, R.I.

1985-01-01

375

Diagnosing ICF gamma-ray physics  

SciTech Connect

Gamma rays produced in an ICF environment open up a host of physics opportunities we are just beginning to explore. A branch of the DT fusion reaction, with a branching ratio on the order of 2e-5 {gamma}/n, produces 16.7 MeV {gamma}-rays. These {gamma}-rays provide a direct measure of fusion reaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Reaction-rate history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental quantities that will be used to optimize ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) that convert fusion {gamma}-rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. Demonstrated absolute timing calibrations allow bang time measurements with accuracy better than 30 ps. System impulse response better than 95 ps fwhm have been made possible by the combination of low temporal dispersion GCDs, ultra-fast microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and high-bandwidth Mach Zehnder fiber optic data links and digitizers, resulting in burn width measurement accuracy better than 10ps. Inherent variable energy-thresholding capability allows use of GCDs as {gamma}-ray spectrometers to explore other interesting nuclear processes. Recent measurements of the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}) {gamma}-rays produced as 14.1 MeV DT fusion neutrons pass through plastic capsules is paving the way for a new CH ablator areal density measurement. Insertion of various neutron target materials near target chamber center (TCC) producing secondary, neutron-induced {gamma}y-rays are being used to study other nuclear interactions and as in-situ sources to calibrate detector response and DT branching ratio. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics, based on the GCD concept, are now being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases: (1) four PMT-based channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at {approx}6m from TCC (GRH-6m) for the 3e13-3e16 DT neutron yield range expected during the early ignition-tuning campaigns; and (2) several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from TCC (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs for the 1e16-1e20 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign. Multiple channels at each phase will allow for increased redundancy, reliability, accuracy and flexibility. This suite of diagnostics will make possible exploration of interesting {gamma}-ray physics well beyond the ignition campaign.

Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Y H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Evoy, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, C S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoffman, N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, S H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dauffy, L [LLNL; Stoeffl, W [LLNL; Malone, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaufman, M I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cox, B C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tunnel, T W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, E K [NSTEC/SB; Ali, Z A [NSREC/LIVERMORE; Horsfield, C J [AWE; Rubery, M [AWE

2010-01-01

376

Highly compact binary X-ray sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is proposed that many of the X-ray sources associated with the galactic bulge are accreting neutron stars or black holes with masses of at least about 1 solar mass in ultrashort-period binary systems with very low-mass (no more than about 0.5 solar mass) stellar companions. It is demonstrated that this hypothesis may provide a coherent picture of the evolutionary history and observational properties of these sources, including the apparent lack of conspicuous optical counterparts and the apparent absence of X-ray eclipses.

Joss, P. C.; Rappaport, S.

1979-01-01

377

More data on (possible) gamma ray (point) sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 2CG catalog of gamma ray sources was compiled before detailed knowledge was available on the fine-scale structure of the diffuse Galactic gamma-ray emission. Two independent analyses to discriminate sources which are either compact objects of due to very local and strong enhancements in the Galactic cosmic-ray distribution from those which are artifacts due to the clumpy gas distribution are about to be completed: a maximum likelihood analysis and a cross correlation analysis. Arguments are given why differences, and therefore confusion, and in resulting source lists can be expected. Detailed analysis of all COS-B gamma-ray data on Geminga (2CG195+04), reveals the existence of a drastic spectral break below 200 MeV. A power-law spectrum with index -1.88 fits the data above about 100 MeV to 3.2 GeV, however, there are also indications for a spectral break above these energies. For energies above about 100 MeV no evidence for a long-term time variability was found. The error region of Geminga was searched for a radio counterpart at wavelengths of 90, 49, 21, 6, and 2 cm using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and the Very Large Array. So far, 16 sources were detected in this error region. In the direction of 1E0630+178, the Einstein x ray source proposed to be a Vela-like pulsar and the counterpart of Geminga, no radio source was found at 21, 49, and 90 cm with 3 sigma upper limits on the flux densities ranging from 0.5 mJy at 21 cm to 4.5 mJy at 90 cm. Detailed structures in local molecular cloud complexes are so far only resolved in gamma rays for the closet and most massive complexes, namely those in the Orion-Monoceros and the Ophiuchus regions. For both region, there is circumstantial evidence for gamma ray emission from molecular gas that was photodissociated after the passage of a SN shell.

Hermsen, W.

1990-01-01

378

Intergalactic thermonuclear gamma-ray line  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The possibility of thermonculear reactions occurring in dilute space is briefly considered. X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies demonstrates that perhaps as much as 10 to the 14th solar masses of hot gas (T of about 100 million K) may often surround galaxies in clusters with a density of perhaps 0.004/cu cm. If the ion temperature is 100 million K, the thermonuclear reaction p + d to He-3 + gamma ray should emit gamma rays at a rate of roughly 4 x 10 to the 41st/sec with energy 5.516 + or -0.016 MeV. Such a source in teh virgo cluster at 15.7 Mpc would present a line flux of 1 x 10 to the -11th/sq cm/sec.

Clayton, D. D.

1985-01-01

379

The diffuse galactic gamma ray emission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope) detector will provide a much more detailed view of the diffuse galactic gamma ray intensity in terms of higher resolution, greater statistical significance, and broader energy range than earlier missions. These observations will furnish insight into a number of very important questions related to the dynamics and structure of the Galaxy. A diffuse emission model is being developed that incorporates the latest information on matter distribution and source functions. In addition, it is tailored to the EGRET instrument response functions. The analysis code of the model maintains flexibility to accommodate the quality of the data that is anticipated. The discussion here focuses on the issues of the distributions of matter, cosmic rays, and radiation fields, and on the important source functions that enter into the model calculation of diffuse emission.

Bertsch, David L.

1990-01-01

380

SuperAGILE and Gamma Ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect

The solid-state hard X-ray imager of AGILE gamma-ray mission -- SuperAGILE -- has a six arcmin on-axis angular resolution in the 15-45 keV range, a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. The instrument is very light: 5 kg only. It is equipped with an on-board self triggering logic, image deconvolution, and it is able to transmit the coordinates of a GRB to the ground in real-time through the ORBCOMM constellation of satellites. Photon by photon Scientific Data are sent to the Malindi ground station at every contact. In this paper we review the performance of the SuperAGILE experiment (scheduled for a launch in the middle of 2006), after its first onground calibrations, and show the perspectives for Gamma Ray Bursts.

Pacciani, Luigi; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Frutti, Massimo; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Lapshov, Igor; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Tavani, Marco [IASF-INAF Rome (Italy); Barbiellini, Guido [INFN Trieste (Italy); Mastropietro, Marcello [CNR Montelibretti (Italy); Morelli, Ennio [IASF-INAF-Bologna (Italy); Rapisarda, Massimo [ENEA Frascati (Italy)

2006-05-19

381

Characteristics of Double Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Double gamma-ray bursts (DGRBs) have two well-separated sub-bursts in the main prompt emission and the typical time interval between them is in the hundreds of seconds. Among DGRBs, gamma-ray bursts (DGRBs) 110801A and 120716A are the ones with known redshifts. However, unlike GRB 110801A, we show that the two sub-bursts of GRB 120716A is severally similar to the short- and long-duration GRBs, thus it is difficult to explain the origin of GRB 120716A by the popular models on the central engine of GRBs. We suggest that some mechanisms of x-ray flares in GRBs, i.e., a post-merger millisecond pulsars or the jet precession in a black hole hyperaccretion system may produce the DGRB.

Liu, Tong; Sun, Mou-Yuan; Hou, Shu-Jin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Fu-Wen; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu

2014-11-01

382

Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus  

DOEpatents

X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation. 6 figs.

Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P.

1992-06-02

383

New, room-temperature gamma-ray detector for improved assay of plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray spectroscopy for portable and unattended assay of nuclear materials requires rugged, reliable, room-temperature detectors that are stable in variable environments and detect gamma rays with good efficiency and energy resolution. For portable assays especially, compact detectors address needs for large numbers of measurements performed in rapid succession with heavy shielding and collimation by a user who must carry the spectroscopy equipment. Most measurements are made with compact NaI detectors. The assay of variable-burnup plutonium and other plutonium materials of variable isotopic composition challenges low-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in numerous safeguards applications including holdup measurements, safeguards inspections, monitoring, and safeguards close-out in decontamination and decommissioning. A new, commercial-prototype coplanar-grid CdZnTe detector has been evaluated using the assay of variable-burnup plutonium as a metric indicator to show the substantial benefit of its improved performance compared to results of the same measurements performed with the compact NaI detector. Detector performance, spectrum-quality, and assay results as well as gamma-ray spectra of reference sources are compared for the coplanar-grid CdZnTe and compact NaI detectors to illustrate the advantages of the new room-temperature gamma-ray detector. Isotope identification with the coplanar-grid CdZnTe detector is demonstrated. Preliminary calculations (Monte Carlo coupled to simulations of radiation transport and charge collection) of the spectral response of the detector to plutonium indicate promise for the use of the coplanar-grid CdZnTe detector for further improvements in the accuracy of assays and for analysis of gamma-ray isotopic distributions.

Russo, P.A.; Meier, A.P.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. [and others

1997-11-01

384

Gamma-Ray Telescopes: 400 Years of Astronomical Telescopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The last half-century has seen dramatic developments in gamma-ray telescopes, from their initial conception and development through to their blossoming into full maturity as a potent research tool in astronomy. Gamma-ray telescopes are leading research in diverse areas such as gamma-ray bursts, blazars, Galactic transients, and the Galactic distribution of Al-26.

Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

2010-01-01

385

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,  

E-print Network

as it was happening, which had been the holy grail of gamma-ray burst astronomy for a quarter of a century. FromThe Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts, The Most Violent Explosions in The Universe J. I. Did a Gamma-Ray Burst Kill the Dinosaurs? Will a Burst Kill Us? #15; Glossary #15; Sources #15; Index

Katz, Jonathan I.

386

Gamma-Ray Bursts Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963  

E-print Network

Lecture 18 Gamma-Ray Bursts #12;Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963 First Vela satellite pair launched and their predecessors, Vela 4, discovered the first gamma-ray bursts. The discovery was announced by Klebesadel, Strong, and Olson (ApJ, 182, 85) in 1973. #12;First Gamma-Ray Burst The Vela 5 satellites functioned from July, 1969

Harrison, Thomas

387

The Compton Effect--Compton Scattering and Gamma Ray Spectroscopy  

E-print Network

The Compton Effect-- Compton Scattering and Gamma Ray Spectroscopy by Dr. James E. Parks Department and procedures for measuring gamma-ray energy distributions, (7) to learn about photomultipliers the interactions of high energy, electromagnetic photon radiation with materials in general. Gamma rays are high

Dai, Pengcheng

388

Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

Weekes, Trevor C.

1986-01-01

389

On gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Photons in the visible range form the basis of astronomy. They move in straight lines, which preserves source information,\\u000a but they arise only very indirectly from nuclear or high-energy processes. Cosmic-ray particles, on the other hand, arise\\u000a directly from high-energy processes in astronomical objects of various classes, but carry no information about source direction.\\u000a Radio emissions are still more complex

P. Morrison

1958-01-01

390

RADIO/GAMMA-RAY TIME DELAY IN THE PARSEC-SCALE CORES OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect

We report the detection of a non-zero time delay between radio emission measured by the VLBA at 15.4 GHz and {gamma}-ray radiation ({gamma}-ray leads radio) registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for a sample of 183 radio and {gamma}-ray bright active galactic nuclei. For the correlation analysis, we used 0.1-100 GeV {gamma}-ray photon fluxes, taken from monthly binned measurements from the first Fermi LAT catalog, and 15.4 GHz radio flux densities from the MOJAVE VLBA program. The correlation is most pronounced if the core flux density is used, strongly indicating that the {gamma}-ray emission is generated within the compact region of the 15 GHz VLBA core. Determining the Pearson's r and Kendall's {tau} correlation coefficients for different time lags, we find that for the majority of sources the radio/{gamma}-ray delay ranges from 1 to 8 months in the observer's frame and peaks at approximately 1.2 months in the source's frame. We interpret the primary source of the time delay to be synchrotron opacity in the nuclear region.

Pushkarev, A. B.; Kovalev, Y. Y. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Lister, M. L., E-mail: apushkar@mpifr.d, E-mail: yyk@asc.rssi.r, E-mail: mlister@purdue.ed [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

2010-10-10

391

Cosmic-ray effects on diffuse gamma-ray measurements.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evaluation of calculations and experimental evidence from 600-MeV proton irradiation indicating that cosmic-ray-induced radioactivity in detectors used to measure the diffuse gamma-ray background produces a significant counting rate in the energy region around 1 MeV. It is concluded that these counts may be responsible for the observed flattening of the diffuse photon spectrum at this energy.

Fishman, G. J.

1972-01-01

392

X-ray counterparts of Gamma Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

An important recent progress in the field of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) has been made possible by fast positioning with arcminute accuracy of the X-ray counterpart of GRBs. These are obtained with two Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) on board BeppoSAX, sensitive in the range 2-30 keV. The WFCs have a sufficiently large field of view (40x40 degree, Full Width Zero

J. Heise

1997-01-01

393

Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

2012-12-01

394

A Search for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Pulsars, and the Application of Kalman Filters to Gamma-Ray Reconstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Part I describes the analysis of periodic and transient signals in EGRET data. A method to search for the transient flux from gamma-ray bursts independent of triggers from other gamma-ray instruments is developed. Several known gamma-ray bursts were independently detected, and there is evidence for a previously unknown gamma-ray burst candidate. Statistical methods using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference are

Brian Jones

2002-01-01

395

Solar gamma rays. [in solar flares  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The theory of gamma ray production in solar flares is treated in detail. Both lines and continuum are produced. Results show that the strongest line predicted at 2.225 MeV with a width of less than 100 eV and detected at 2.24 + or - 2.02 MeV, is due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere. Its intensity is dependent on the photospheric He-3 abundance. The neutrons are produced in nuclear reactions of flare accelerated particles which also produce positrons and prompt nuclear deexcitation lines. The strongest prompt lines are at 4.43 MeV from c-12 and at approximately 6.2 from 0-16 and N-15. The gamma ray continuum, produced by electron bremsstrahlung, allows the determination of the spectrum and number of accelerated electrons in the MeV region. From the comparison of the line and continuum intensities a proton-to-electron ratio of about 10 to 100 at the same energy for the 1972, August 4 flare. For the same flare the protons above 2.5 MeV which are responsible for the gamma ray emission produce a few percent of the heat generated by the electrons which make the hard X rays above 20 keV.

Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1974-01-01

396

The Properties of Gamma-ray Binaries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are a small but growing number of high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that also exhibit emission above 100 MeV. All of these "gamma-ray binaries" exhibit variable emission across the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to TeV energies, that is modulated with the binary orbital period. The optical stellar companions in these gamma-ray binaries fall into a range of spectral classes: Wolf-Rayet, O main sequence, B supergiant, and Be. Their high energy emission is probably powered by the collision of stellar wind or disk outflows with relativistic pulsar winds in a shock region. These sources present a unique opportunity to study particle acceleration in nearby, Galactic sources. I will review the observed multiwavelength properties of known gamma-ray binaries and discuss the population in the context of the late stages of massive star evolution. I am grateful for support from the Fermi Cycle 4 program through NASA grant NNX11AO41G and from NSF grant AST-1109247.

McSwain, M. Virginia

2013-06-01

397

Tracking and imaging gamma ray experiment (TIGRE) for 1 to 100 MeV gamma ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large international collaboration from the high energy astrophysics community has proposed the Tracking and Imaging Gamma Ray Experiment (TIGRE) for future space observations. TIGRE will image and perform energy spectroscopy measurements on celestial sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 1 to 100 MeV. TIGRE is both a double scatter Compton and gamma-ray pair telescope with direct

A. Alpar; D. Bhattacharya; R. Buccheri; K. Dotson; D. Forrest; W. N. Johnson; G. Kanbach; U. Kiziloglu; R. Kroeger; J. Kurfess; M. McConnell; H. Ögelman; B. O'Neill; T. O'Neill; A. Owens; B. Pi; B. Pierce; J. Ryan; B. Sacco; G. Simnett; T. Tümer; W. Wheaton; R. S. White; A. Zych

1994-01-01

398

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Visibility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PSR J0437-4715 is a millisecond pulsar (MSP) thought to be ``pair formation starved'' (having limited pair cascades due to magnetic photon absorption). Fortunately the general relativistic (GR) electrodynamical model under consideration applicable to this pulsar have few free parameters. We model PSR J0437-4715's visibility, using a 3D model which incorporates the variation of the GR E-field over the polar cap (PC), taking different observer and inclination angles into account. Using this pulsar as a case study, one may generalize to conducting a pulsar population visibility study. We lastly comment on the role of the proposed South African SKA (Square Kilometre Array) prototype, KAT (Karoo Array Telescope), for GLAST ?-ray pulsar identification.

Venter, Christo; de Jager, Ocker C.; Tiplady, Adrian

2005-11-01

399

THE NEW CANGAROO TELESCOPE AND THE PROSPECT OF VHE GAMMA RAY OBSERVATION AT  

E-print Network

and prospect of gamma ray astronomy. Emission of gamma rays are due to copious production of electron to gamma rays, linking the gamma ray data to the other bands. A new telescope for VHE gamma ray astronomy of VHE gamma ray astronomy that provides us with the probe for the nonthermal high energy phenomena

Enomoto, Ryoji

400

The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) is a satellite-based observatory to study the high energy gamma-ray sky. The main instrument on GLAST, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-conversion telescope that will survey the sky from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. With the GLAST launch in 2007, the LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high energy phenomena, including supermassive black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and cosmic ray acceleration and dark matter. A second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), greatly enhances GLAST s capability to study GRB by providing important spectral and timing information in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We describe how the instruments, spacecraft and ground system work together to provide observations of gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV - 300 GeV and to provide rapid notification of bursts to the wider gamma-ray burst community.

McEnery, Julie; Ritz, Steve

2006-01-01

401

Gamma-rays from cosmic ray interactions in supernova shells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model is presented for the transport and interaction of cosmic rays accelerated by a pulsar and confined inside an expanding supernova remnant. Assuming that protons are accelerated at the reverse shock in the confined pulsar wind and convected into the shell via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the diffusion and interaction of these protons in the expanding envelope is modeled. The resulting gamma-ray flux is lower than previous estimates due primarily to the inclusion of proton adiabatic losses in the expanding pulsar wind. Energy-dependent diffusion causes the higher energy gamma-ray light curves to decay faster than those at lower energy. The predicted flux from SN1987A, for proton luminosity less than 10 exp 40 erg/s, is below the present detector sensitivities at both GeV and TeV energies, although supernovae occurring within the Galaxy may be detectable.

Harding, A. K.; Mastichiadis, A.; Protheroe, R. J.; Szabo, A. P.

1991-01-01

402

Gamma-ray sources as Comptonized X-ray sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The possible contribution of Compton scattering to the formation of gamma-ray burst spectra is analyzed. Monte Carlo calculations are used to study the spectral distribution emerging from a plasma at temperatures typical of gamma-ray burst spectra (above 100 keV) with an underlying source of photons reprocessed by inverse Compton scattering surrounding a point source of blackbody radiation. Comparison of the computations with the observed spectrum of the burst GB781104 results in a best fit with a blackbody X-ray source at 2.4 keV, plasma temperature of about 150 eV and plasma column density of 4 x 10 to the 24th electrons/sq cm. The Comptonization model is also shown to be capable of accounting for the two-component spectra observed for bursts GB790329 and GB790524, and the moving low-energy spectral cut-off in the burst of November 18, 1978.

Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Stockdale, R. E.; Kane, S. R.

1982-01-01

403

Fissile interrogation using gamma rays from oxygen  

DOEpatents

The subject apparatus provides a means to identify the presence of fissionable material or other nuclear material contained within an item to be tested. The system employs a portable accelerator to accelerate and direct protons to a fluorine-compound target. The interaction of the protons with the fluorine-compound target produces gamma rays which are directed at the item to be tested. If the item to be tested contains either a fissionable material or other nuclear material the interaction of the gamma rays with the material contained within the test item with result in the production of neutrons. A system of neutron detectors is positioned to intercept any neutrons generated by the test item. The results from the neutron detectors are analyzed to determine the presence of a fissionable material or other nuclear material.

Smith, Donald; Micklich, Bradley J.; Fessler, Andreas

2004-04-20

404

Lorentz violation from gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The constancy of light speed is a basic assumption in Einstein’s special relativity, and consequently the Lorentz invariance is a fundamental symmetry of space-time in modern physics. However, it is speculated that the speed of light becomes energy-dependent due to the Lorentz invariance violation (LV) in various new physics theories. We analyse the data of the energetic photons from the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, and find more events to support the energy dependence in the light speed with both linear and quadratic form corrections. We provide two scenarios to understand all the new-released Pass 8 data of bright GRBs by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, with predictions from such scenarios being testable by future detected GRBs.

Zhang, Shu; Ma, Bo-Qiang

2015-02-01

405

The gamma ray north-south effect  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Theoretical calculations are presented that explain the balloon observations by O'Neill et al. (1987) of a strong north-south anisotropy of atmospheric gamma rays over the Southern Hemisphere, and to predict the north-south ratios. It is shown that the gamma rays that originate at the longest distances from the telescopes give the largest north-south ratios. Comparisons are made of the experimental north-south ratios measured on balloons launched from Alice Springs, Australia, and from Palestine, Texas, U.S., and predictions are made for ratios at other geomagnetic latitudes and longitudes. It is pointed out that observers who measure backgrounds for celestial sources may be misled unless they correct for the north-south effect.

White, R. S.; O'Neill, T. J.; Tumer, O. T.; Zych, A. D.

1988-01-01

406

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: mission status.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) is the second in NASA's series of Great Observatories. Compton has now been operating for over two and a half years, and has given a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made and continue to be made. The authors describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments and the observing programs for the first three years of the mission. During Phases 2 and 3 of the mission a Guest Investigator program has been in progress with the Guest Observers' time share increasing from 30% to over 50% for the later mission phases.

Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

407

The GAMCIT gamma ray burst detector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GAMCIT payload is a Get-Away-Special payload designed to search for high-energy gamma-ray bursts and any associated optical transients. This paper presents details on the design of the GAMCIT payload, in the areas of battery selection, power processing, electronics design, gamma-ray detection systems, and the optical imaging of the transients. The paper discusses the progress of the construction, testing, and specific design details of the payload. In addition, this paper discusses the unique challenges involved in bringing this payload to completion, as the project has been designed, constructed, and managed entirely by undergraduate students. Our experience will certainly be valuable to other student groups interested in taking on a challenging project such as a Get-Away-Special payload.

Mccall, Benjamin J.; Grunsfeld, John M.; Sobajic, Srdjan D.; Chang, Chinley Leonard; Krum, David M.; Ratner, Albert; Trittschuh, Jennifer E.

1993-01-01

408

Nucleosynthesis and astrophysical gamma ray spectroscopy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The HEAO-3 gamma ray spectrometer has provided evidence in the quest for the understanding of complex element formation in the universe with the discovery of Al-26 in the interstellar medium. It has demonstrated that the synthesis of intermediate mass nuclei is currently going on in the galaxy. This discovery was confirmed by the Solar Maximum Mission. The flux is peaked near the galactic center and indicates about 3 solar masses of Al-26 in the interstellar medium, with an implied ratio of Al-26/Al-27 = .00001. Several possible distributions were studied but the data gathered thus far do not allow discrimination between them. It is felt that only the spaceflight of a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer with adequate sensitivity will ultimately resolve the issue of the source of this material.

Jacobson, Allan S.

1987-01-01

409

Gamma Ray Bursts from Binary Black Holes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a scenario for the longest duration gamma ray bursts, resulting from the collapse of a massive rotating star in a close binary system with a companion black hole (BH). The primary BH born during the core collapse is first being spun up and increases its mass during the fallback of the stellar envelope just after its birth. As the companion BH enters the outer envelope, it provides an additional angular momentum to the gas. After the infall and spiral-in toward the primary, the two BHs merge inside the circumbinary disk. The second episode of mass accretion and high final spin of the postmerger BH prolongs the gamma ray burst central engine activity. The observed events should have two distinct peaks in the electromagnetic signal, separated by the gravitational wave emission. The gravitational recoil of the burst engine is also possible.

Janiuk, A.; Bejger, M.; Charzynski, S.

2014-07-01

410

Directional detector of gamma ray sources.  

PubMed

This work describes the design, development, and characterization of an ionization chamber to detect and locate gamma ray sources with intensities down to 100 mu Gy h(-1). The results show that sources of x ray and gamma radiation in the energy range of 14 to 1,250 keV can be located. The directional sensitivity of this type of monitor is dependent on several parameters, such as photon energy, intensity, and the degree of complexity in terms of the number and type of sources in a contaminated area. An application important to the Army is to identify hotspots in a contaminated area and thereby indicate to personnel safer paths around them. Another possible use for this type of monitor may be in security applications in the prevention of shipping or storing clandestine sources. PMID:8617590

Kronenberg, S; Bruckner, G J; Bechtel, E; Gentner, F

1996-04-01

411

Gamma-Ray Polarimetry with Compton Telescope  

SciTech Connect

Compton telescope is a promising technology to achieve very high sensitivity in the soft gamma-ray band (0.1-10 MeV) by utilizing Compton kinematics. Compton kinematics also enables polarization measurement which will open new windows to study gamma-ray production mechanism in the universe. CdTe and Si semiconductor technologies are key technologies to realize the Compton telescope in which their high energy resolution is crucial for high angular resolution and background rejection capability. We have assembled a prototype module using a double-sided silicon strip detector and CdTe pixel detectors. In this paper, we present expected polarization performance of a proposed mission (NeXT/SGD). We also report results from polarization measurements using polarized synchrotron light and validation of EGS4 MC simulation.

Tajima, H

2004-07-06

412

Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser  

DOEpatents

A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01

413

MULTIFREQUENCY STRATEGIES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF GAMMA-RAY SOURCES  

E-print Network

MULTIFREQUENCY STRATEGIES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF GAMMA-RAY SOURCES Reshmi Mukherjee Barnard studies of the gamma-ray fields. 1. Introduction and historical overview The discovery of point-like high energy sources in the -ray sky has been one of the most exciting results in the field of -ray astronomy

Mukherjee, Reshmi

414

Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

Thompson, David J.

2010-01-01

415

Comptonization of gamma rays by cold electrons  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytic method is developed for calculating the emergent spectrum of gamma-rays and X-rays scattered in a homogeneous medium with low-temperature electrons. The Klein-Nishina corrections of the scattering cross section and absorption processes are taken in account. The wavelength relaxation and the spatial diffusion problems are solved separately, and the emergent spectrum is calculated by convolving the evolution function of the spectrum in an infinite medium with the photon luminosity resulting from the spatial diffusion in a finite sphere. The analytic results are compared with that of Monte Carlo calculations and it is concluded that the analytic result is quite accurate.

Xu, Yueming; Ross, Randy R.; Mccray, Richard

1991-01-01

416

Swift: A Gamma Ray Bursts Explorer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Swift is a NASA gamma-ray burst MIDEX mission that is in development for launch in December 2003. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. It will also.perform a survey of the hard X-ray sky to a sensitivity level of -1 mCrab. A wide-field camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 5 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled 'swift' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many of the bursts. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approximately 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The hardware is currently in final stages of fabrication and initial stages of integration and test. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift.

Gehrels, Neil

2003-01-01

417

Gamma rays from extragalactic radio sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is proposed that the important connection between 3C 273 and 3C 279, the first two extragalactic sources detected at greater than 100 MeV energies, is their superluminal nature. In support of this conjecture, we propose a radiation mechanism that focuses gamma rays in the superluminal direction, due to Compton scattering of accretion-disk photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons in the jet.

Dermer, Charles D.; Schlickeiser, Reinhard; Mastichiadis, Apostolos

1992-01-01

418

Common Gamma-ray Glows above Thunderclouds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gamma-ray glows are continuous, long duration gamma- and x-ray emission seen coming from thunderclouds. The Airborne for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) observed 12 gamma-ray glows during its summer 2009 flight campaign over the areas of Colorado and Florida in the United States. For these glows we shall present their spectra, relationship to lightning activity and how their duration and size changes as a function of distance. Gamma-ray glows follow the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) spectrum and have been previously measured from the ground and inside the cloud. ADELE measured most glows as it flew above the screening layer of the cloud. During the brightest glow on August 21, 2009, we can show that we are flying directly into a downward facing relativistic runaway avalanche, indicative of flying between the upper positive and negative screening layer of the cloud. In order to explain the brightness of this glow, RREA with an electric field approaching the limit for relativistic feedback must be occurring. Using all 12 glows, we show that lightning activity diminishes during the onset of the glow. Using this along with the fact that glows occur as the field approaches the level necessary for feedback, we attempt to distinguish between two possibilities: that glows are evidence that RREA with feedback, rather than lightning, is sometimes the primary channel for discharging the cloud, or else that the overall discharging is still controlled by lightning, with glows simply appearing during times when a subsidence of lightning allows the field to rise above the threshold for RREA.

Kelley, Nicole; Smith, David; Dwyer, Joseph; Hazelton, Bryna; Grefenstette, Brian; Lowell, Alex; Splitt, Michael; Lazarus, Steven; Rassoul, Hamid

2013-04-01

419

Gamma rays from active galactic nuclei  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The general properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and quasars are reviewed with emphasis on their continuum spectral emission. Two general classes of models for the continuum are outlined and critically reviewed in view of the impending GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory) launch and observations. The importance of GRO in distinguishing between these models and in general in furthering the understanding of AGN is discussed. The very broad terms the status of the current understanding of AGN are discussed.

Kazanas, Demosthenes

1990-01-01

420

Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

I review the observational status of the Supernova\\/Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) connection. Available data suggest that Supernovae (SNe) associated with GRBs form an heterogeneous class of objects including bright and faint hypernovae (Hyp) and perhaps also `standard' Ib\\/c events. Current estimates of SN and GRB rates and beaming angles yield ratios GRB\\/SNe-Ibc ?2% and GRB\\/Hyp ?25%. In the few SN\\/GRB associations

Massimo Della Valle

2006-01-01

421

The cannonball model of gamma ray bursts  

E-print Network

The cannonball model (CB) of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) is incredibly more successful than the standard blast-wave models (SM) of GRBs, which suffer from profound inadequacies and limited predictive power. The CB model is falsifiable in its hypothesis and results. Its predictions are summarized in simple analytical expressions, derived, in fair approximations, from first principles. It provides a good description on a universal basis of the properties of long-duration GRBs and of their afterglows (AGs).

Arnon Dar

2003-01-20

422

Short-hard gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two types of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are observed: short-duration hard spectrum GRBs and long-duration soft spectrum GRBs. For many years long GRBs were the focus of intense research while the lack of observational data limited the study of short-hard GRBs (SHBs). In 2005 a breakthrough occurred following the first detections of SHB afterglows, longer wavelength emission that follows the burst

Ehud Nakar

2007-01-01

423

Observations of short gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review recent observations of short-hard gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. The launch and successful ongoing operations of the Swift satellite, along with several localizations from the High-Energy Transient Explorer mission, have provoked a revolution in short-burst studies: first, by quickly providing high-quality positions to observers; and second, via rapid and sustained observations from the Swift satellite itself. We make

Derek B. Fox; Peter W. A. Roming

2007-01-01

424

EBT-P gamma ray shielding analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

First, a one-dimensional scoping study was performed for the gamma ray shield of the ELMO Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle device to define appropriate shielding material and determine the required shielding thickness. The dose equivalent results are analyzed as a function of the radiation shield thickness for different shielding options. A sensitivity analysis for the pessimistic case is given. The recommended shielding

Gohar

1983-01-01

425

Are Gamma-Ray Bursts Standard Candles?  

E-print Network

By dividing a sample of 48 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into four groups with redshift from low to high and fitting each group with the Amati relation log Eiso = a + b log Epeak, I find that parameters a and b vary with the mean redshift of the GRBs in each group systematically and significantly. The results suggest that GRBs evolve strongly with the cosmic redshift and hence are not standard candles.

Li-Xin Li

2007-05-30

426

Terrestrial gamma ray flashes and lightning discharges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of ELF\\/VLF broadband data from Palmer Station, Antarctica indicates that 76% Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected on the RHESSI spacecraft occur in association with lightning-generated radio atmospherics arriving from near the footprint of RHESSI and within a few ms of the TGF. The remaining TGFs are not associated with any radio atmospheric, thus by implication CG lightning. The peak

M. B. Cohen; R. K. Said; D. M. Smith; L. I. Lopez

2006-01-01

427

Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI  

E-print Network

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

David M. Smith

2004-04-30

428

Cosmological parametrization of gamma ray burst models  

E-print Network

Using three parametrizations of the gamma ray burst count data comparison is made to cosmological source models. While simple models can fit and faint end slope constraints, the addition of a logarithmic count range variable describing the curvature of the counts shows that models with no evolution or evolution power law in redshift with index less than 10 fail to satisfy simultaneously all three descriptors of the burst data. The cosmological source density that would be required for a fit is illustrated.

Eric V. Linder

1996-07-02

429

The Tools of Gamma Ray Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NASA scientist, Neil Gehrels, serves as your guide to this online lesson on gamma ray tools, which focuses on advances in detector technologies since the 1980s that have enabled us to capture and image high-energy phenomena. Dr. Gehrels explains different methods for detecting and imaging high-energy particles, how they work, and the advantages and disadvantages of each, using examples and imagery from NASA missions.

430

The AGILE gamma-ray astronomy mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the AGILE gamma-ray astronomy satellite which has recently been selected as the first Small Scientific Mission of the Italian Space Agency. With a launch in 2002, AGILE will provide a unique tool for high-energy astrophysics in the 30 MeV-50 GeV range before GLAST. Despite the much smaller weight and dimensions, the scientific performances of AGILE are comparable to

S. Mereghetti; G. Barbiellini; G. Budini; P. Caraveo; E. Costa; V. Cocco; G. Di Cocco; M. Feroci; C. Labanti; F. Longo; E. Morelli; A. Morselli; A. Pellizzoni; F. Perotti; P. Picozza; M. Prest; P. Soffitta; L. Soli; M. Tavani; E. Vallazza; S. Vercellone

2000-01-01

431

Gamma ray astronomy with IceCube  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate that the South Pole kilometre-scale neutrino observatory IceCube can detect multi-TeV gamma rays continuously over a large fraction of the southern sky. While not as sensitive as pointing atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, IceCube can roughly match the sensitivity of Milagro. Also, IceCube is complementary to Milagro because it will observe, without interruption, a relatively poorly studied fraction of the

Francis Halzen; Dan Hooper

2003-01-01

432

Gamma-ray bursts: a Centauro's cry?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new candidate for the gamma-ray bursts central engine is proposed: if in\\u000asome energetic cosmic event a macroscopic amount of bubbles of the disoriented\\u000achiral condensate can be formed, then their subsequent decays will produce a\\u000arelativistic fireball without the baryon loading problem. The neutron star to\\u000astrange star transition is considered as a candidate example of such cosmic

Z. K. Silagadze

2003-01-01

433

COMPACT CdZnTe-BASED GAMMA CAMERA FOR PROSTATE CANCER IMAGING  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we discuss the design of a compact gamma camera for high-resolution prostate cancer imaging using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) radiation detectors. Prostate cancer is a common disease in men. Nowadays, a blood test measuring the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for screening for the disease in males over 50, followed by (ultrasound) imaging-guided biopsy. However, PSA tests have a high false-positive rate and ultrasound-guided biopsy has a high likelihood of missing small cancerous tissues. Commercial methods of nuclear medical imaging, e.g. PET and SPECT, can functionally image the organs, and potentially find cancer tissues at early stages, but their applications in diagnosing prostate cancer has been limited by the smallness of the prostate gland and the long working distance between the organ and the detectors comprising these imaging systems. CZT is a semiconductor material with wide band-gap and relatively high electron mobility, and thus can operate at room temperature without additional cooling. CZT detectors are photon-electron direct-conversion devices, thus offering high energy-resolution in detecting gamma rays, enabling energy-resolved imaging, and reducing the background of Compton-scattering events. In addition, CZT material has high stopping power for gamma rays; for medical imaging, a few-mm-thick CZT material provides adequate detection efficiency for many SPECT radiotracers. Because of these advantages, CZT detectors are becoming popular for several SPECT medical-imaging applications. Most recently, we designed a compact gamma camera using CZT detectors coupled to an application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC). This camera functions as a trans-rectal probe to image the prostate gland from a distance of only 1-5 cm, thus offering higher detection efficiency and higher spatial resolution. Hence, it potentially can detect prostate cancers at their early stages. The performance tests of this camera have been completed. The results show better than 6-mm resolution at a distance of 1 cm. Details of the test results are discussed in this paper.

CUI, Y.; LALL, T.; TSUI, B.; YU, J.; MAHLER, G.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.; VASKA, P.; DeGERONIMO, G.; O'CONNOR, P.; MEINKEN, G.; JOYAL, J.; BARRETT, J.; CAMARDA, G.; HOSSAIN, A.; KIM, K.H.; YANG, G.; POMPER, M.; CHO, S.; WEISMAN, K.; SEO, Y.; BABICH, J.; LaFRANCE, N.; AND JAMES, R.B.

2011-10-23

434

Compact CdZnTe-based gamma camera for prostate cancer imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we discuss the design of a compact gamma camera for high-resolution prostate cancer imaging using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) radiation detectors. Prostate cancer is a common disease in men. Nowadays, a blood test measuring the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for screening for the disease in males over 50, followed by (ultrasound) imaging-guided biopsy. However, PSA tests have a high falsepositive rate and ultrasound-guided biopsy has a high likelihood of missing small cancerous tissues. Commercial methods of nuclear medical imaging, e.g. PET and SPECT, can functionally image the organs, and potentially find cancer tissues at early stages, but their applications in diagnosing prostate cancer has been limited by the smallness of the prostate gland and the long working distance between the organ and the detectors comprising these imaging systems. CZT is a semiconductor material with wide band-gap and relatively high electron mobility, and thus can operate at room temperature without additional cooling. CZT detectors are photon-electron direct-conversion devices, thus offering high energy-resolution in detecting gamma rays, enabling energy-resolved imaging, and reducing the background of Compton-scattering events. In addition, CZT material has high stopping power for gamma rays; for medical imaging, a few-mm-thick CZT material provides adequate detection efficiency for many SPECT radiotracers. Because of these advantages, CZT detectors are becoming popular for several SPECT medical-imaging applications. Most recently, we designed a compact gamma camera using CZT detectors coupled to an application-specific-integratedcircuit (ASIC). This camera functions as a trans-rectal probe to image the prostate gland from a distance of only 1-5 cm, thus offering higher detection efficiency and higher spatial resolution. Hence, it potentially can detect prostate cancers at their early stages. The performance tests of this camera have been completed. The results show better than 6-mm resolution at a distance of 1 cm. Details of the test results are discussed in this paper.

Cui, Yonggang; Lall, Terry; Tsui, Benjamin; Yu, Jianhua; Mahler, George; Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Vaska, Paul; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; O'Connor, Paul; Meinken, George; Joyal, John; Barrett, John; Camarda, Giuseppe; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; Yang, Ge; Pomper, Marty; Cho, Steve; Weisman, Ken; Seo, Youngho; Babich, John; LaFrance, Norman; James, Ralph B.

2011-06-01

435

A gamma-ray discriminating neutron scintillator  

SciTech Connect

A neutron scintillator has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory which responds directly to as little as 10 mrem/hour dose equivalent rate fast neutron fields. The scintillator is composed of CaF{sub 2}:Eu or of NaI grains within a silicone rubber or polystyrene matrix, respectively. Neutrons colliding with the plastic matrix provide knockon protons, which in turn deposit energy within the grains of phosphor to produce pulses of light. Neutron interactions are discriminated from gamma-ray events on the basis of pulse height. Unlike NE-213 liquid scintillators, this solid scintillator requires no pulseshape discrimination and therefore requires less hardware. Neutron events are anywhere from two to three times larger than the gamma-ray exposures are compared to 0.7 MeV gamma-ray exposures. The CaF{sub 2}:Eu/silicone rubber scintillator is nearly optically transparent, and can be made into a very sizable detector (4 cm x 1.5 cm) without degrading pulse height. This CaF{sub 2}:Eu scintillator has been observed to have an absolute efficiency of 0.1% when exposed to 5-MeV accelerator-generated neutrons (where the absolute efficiency is the ratio of observed neutron events divided by the number of fast neutrons striking the detector).

Eschbach, P.A.; Miller, S.D.; Cole, M.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31

436

Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

2006-08-28

437

The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ESO Telescopes Observe "Lightning" in the Young Universe Summary Observations with telescopes at the ESO La Silla and Paranal observatories (Chile) have enabled an international team of astronomers [1] to measure the distance of a "gamma-ray burst", an extremely violent, cosmic explosion of still unknown physical origin. It turns out to be the most remote gamma-ray burst ever observed . The exceedingly powerful flash of light from this event was emitted when the Universe was very young, less than about 1,500 million years old, or only 10% of its present age. Travelling with the speed of light (300,000 km/sec) during 11,000 million years or more, the signal finally reached the Earth on January 31, 2000. The brightness of the exploding object was enormous, at least 1,000,000,000,000 times that of our Sun, or thousands of times that of the explosion of a single, heavy star (a "supernova"). The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) was also involved in trail-blazing observations of another gamma-ray burst in May 1999, cf. ESO PR 08/99. PR Photo 28a/00 : Sky field near GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28b/00 : The fading optical counterpart of GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28c/00 : VLT spectrum of GRB 000131 . What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the mysterious events known as "gamma-ray bursts" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by instruments on orbiting satellites. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite much effort, it is only within the last few years that it has become possible to locate the sites of some of these events (e.g. with the Beppo-Sax satellite ). Since the beginning of 1997, astronomers have identified about twenty optical sources in the sky that are associated with gamma-ray bursts. They have been found to be situated at extremely large (i.e., "cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy release during a gamma-ray burst within a few seconds is larger than that of the Sun during its entire life time (about 10,000 million years). "Gamma-ray bursts" are in fact by far the most powerful events since the Big Bang that are known in the Universe. While there are indications that gamma-ray bursts originate in star-forming regions within distant galaxies, the nature of such explosions remains a puzzle. Recent observations with large telescopes, e.g. the measurement of the degree of polarization of light from a gamma-ray burst in May 1999 with the VLT ( ESO PR 08/99), are now beginning to cast some light on this long-standing mystery. The afterglow of GRB 000131 ESO PR Photo 28a/00 ESO PR Photo 28a/00 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 475 pix - 41k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 949 pix - 232k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1200 x 1424 pix - 1.2Mb] ESO PR Photo 28b/00 ESO PR Photo 28b/00 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 480 pix - 67k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 959 pix - 288k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1200 x 1439 pix - 856k] Caption : PR Photo 28a/00 is a colour composite image of the sky field around the position of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 that was detected on January 31, 2000. It is based on images obtained with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal. The object is indicated with an arrow, near a rather bright star (magnitude 9, i.e., over 1 million times brighter than the faintest objects visible on this photo). This and other bright objects in the field are responsible for various unavoidable imaging effects, caused by optical reflections (ring-shaped "ghost images", e.g. to the left of the brightest star) and detector saturation effects (horizontal and vertical straight lines and coloured "coronae" at the bright objects, and areas of "bleeding", e.g. below the bright star). PR Photo 28b/00 shows the rapid fading of the optical counterpart of GRB 000131 (slightly left of the centre), by means of exposures with the VLT on February 4 (upper left), 6 (upper right), 8 (lower left) and March 5 (lower right). It is no longer visible on the last photo. Techni

2000-10-01

438

The HEAO 3 gamma-ray spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The third High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO 3), successfully launched into low earth orbit on September 20, 1979, carries a large high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer designed for cosmic nuclear spectroscopy. This gamma-ray spectrometer (the HEAO C-1 experiment) consists of a cluster of four coaxial high-purity germanium detectors, each with a volume of approximately 100 cu cm. Surrounding the germanium detectors is a 6.6-cm thick CsI shield operating in active anticoincidence with the central detectors and defining a field of view of about 30 deg FWHM. An initial energy resolution of 3 keV FWHM at 1.46 MeV was achieved for each detector. All valid events in the germanium detectors are individually analyzed by an 8192-channel pulse area analyzer and transmitted at a maximum rate of 15.6 evens/s for each detector. During a 6-month mission, the experiment will perform a complete sky survey for narrow cosmic gamma-ray line emission to the sensitivity level of about 0.0001 photons/sq cm s over an operating energy range of 0.05-10 MeV.

Mahoney, W. A.; Ling, J. C.; Jacobson, A. S.; Tapphorn, R. M.

1980-01-01

439

Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 10(exp 12) Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

Harding, Alice K.

1990-01-01

440

Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 1012 Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

Harding, Alice K.

1990-01-01

441

Gamma Ray Astronomy with Underground Detectors  

E-print Network

Underground detectors measure the directions of up-coming muons of neutrino origin. They can also observe down-going muons made by gamma rays in the Earth's atmosphere. Although gamma ray showers are muon-poor, they produce a sufficient number of muons to detect the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes. With a threshold higher by one hundred and a probability of muon production of about $1\\%$ for the shallower AMANDA and Lake Baikal detectors, these instruments can, for a typical GRO source, match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector since their effective area is larger by a factor $10^4$. The muons must have enough energy for accurate reconstruction of their direction. Very energetic muons on the other hand are rare because they are only produced by higher energy gamma rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy in the 100~GeV energy region which nicely matches the threshold energies of the AMANDA and Lake Baikal detectors.

F. Halzen; T. Stanev

1995-07-20

442

VERITAS Observations of Gamma-Ray Blazars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations of several active galaxies of the blazar class with VERITAS located at the Fred Laurence Whipple Observatory in Southern Arizona. The VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) experiment consisting of four Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (12m diameter each) is the most sensitive instruments in the northern hemisphere for the measurement of VHE gamma-rays in the energy range between 100 GeV to greater than 10 TeV. VERITAS has discovered VHE emission from several blazars and measured their spectral and temporal behavior. Of particular interest are the ``intermediate'' BL Lac objects, a sub-class of blazars not previously detected in VHE gamma rays by ground-based experiments. One of the main scientific goals of VERITAS is understanding VHE phenomena in the vicinity of accreting black holes, and studying particle acceleration in extragalactic astrophysical sources such as blazars. Here we present results on the time variability and spectral properties of the blazars, and discuss implications of the data.

Mukherjee, Reshmi

2009-05-01

443

Gamma-ray burster counterparts - Archival data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reports on the results of a search for optical transient images associated with gamma-ray bursters based on the collection of archival photographs at the Harvard College Observatory. This study searched through over 32,000 plates showing 16 gamma-ray burst error regions. The primary result is the identification of three optical transient images. The recurrence time scale for optical events with a gamma-ray to optical fluence ratio of less than 1000 is estimated to be 1.3 yr (with a 99-percent confidence interval of between 0.41 and 4.8 yr). A control study was simultaneously made where regions of the sky with no bursters were examined. The control region was 15.6 times larger than the burst search region, yet no optical transients were found. This paper describes in detail the methodology and the statistical results. Close attention is paid to a detailed analysis of the three optical transient images.

Schaefer, Bradley E.

1990-01-01

444

Gamma Ray Burst All-Sky Spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gamma Ray Burst All-Sky Spectrometer Experiment (GASE) is designed to detect radio emission from gamma ray bursts (GRB's). Radio emission from GRB's could help us better understand the plasma physics of the blast and might also help us measure dark energy. GASE uses short-baseline interferometry with eight dipole antennas located at the MIT Haystack Observatory. These antennas measure the radiofrequency sky at 30 MHz over a 4 MHz bandwidth and are able to collect information from the entire sky. Since the entire sky is surveyed, radio frequency interference occurring at the horizon can be eliminated as a transient source. Along with the SWIFT satellite and the Gamma Ray Burst Coordinate system, we will be able measure blast time, duration and position. We are currently designing techniques to calibrate and image the full sky in radio. In addition to locating and measuring GRB's, GASE may be able to measure dark energy due to the dispersion by the IGM. The pulse of radio emission is delayed as it travels through the intergalactic plasma, with longer wavelengths taking longer to arrive than shorter wavelengths. With the known free electron density (?m) we will use the dispersion measure to calculate the line of sight distance to the GRB and compare to the observed redshift to measure dark energy.

Steger, Arielle

2011-05-01

445

Sub-TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics using Large Air Cerenkov Toru Tanimori3)  

E-print Network

of Very High Energy gamma-ray Astronomy are also described including the perspective of TeV gamma-ray during recent 40 years in X-ray, medium energy gamma-ray, and TeV gamma- ray astronomy. High energy energy gamma-ray(TeV re- gion) astronomy, respectively. As is well known, X-ray astronomy is es

Enomoto, Ryoji

446

Numerical simulations of planetary gamma-ray spectra induced by galactic cosmic rays  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of cosmic-ray-produced gamma rays escaping from Mars were calculated using the LAHET Code System and basic nuclear data for {gamma}-ray production. Both surface water content and atmospheric thickness strongly affect the fluxes of {gamma}-ray lines escaping from Mars.

Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

1994-07-01

447

The solar gamma ray and neutron capabilities of COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The imaging Compton telescope COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has unusual spectroscopic capabilities for measuring solar gamma-ray and neutron emission. The launch of the GRO is scheduled for June 1990 near the peak of the sunspot cycle. With a 30 to 40 percent probability for the Sun being in the COMPTEL field-of-view during the sunlit part of an orbit, a large number of flares will be observed above the 800 keV gamma-ray threshold of the telescope. The telescope energy range extends to 30 MeV with high time resolution burst spectra available from 0.1 to 10 MeV. Strong Compton tail suppression of instrumental gamma-ray interactions will facilitate improved spectral analysis of solar flare emissions. In addition, the high signal to noise ratio for neutron detection and measurement will provide new neutron spectroscopic capabilities. Specifically, a flare similar to that of 3 June 1982 will provide spectroscopic data on greater than 1500 individual neutrons, enough to construct an unambiguous spectrum in the energy range of 20 to 200 MeV. Details of the instrument and its response to solar gamma-rays and neutrons will be presented.

Ryan, James M.; Lockwood, John A.

1989-01-01

448

A link between prompt optical and prompt gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts.  

PubMed

The prompt optical emission that arrives with the gamma-rays from a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a signature of the engine powering the burst, the properties of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of the explosion, and the ejecta's interactions with the surroundings. Until now, only GRB 990123 had been detected at optical wavelengths during the burst phase. Its prompt optical emission was variable and uncorrelated with the prompt gamma-ray emission, suggesting that the optical emission was generated by a reverse shock arising from the ejecta's collision with surrounding material. Here we report prompt optical emission from GRB 041219a. It is variable and correlated with the prompt gamma-rays, indicating a common origin for the optical light and the gamma-rays. Within the context of the standard fireball model of GRBs, we attribute this new optical component to internal shocks driven into the burst ejecta by variations of the inner engine. The correlated optical emission is a direct probe of the jet isolated from the medium. The timing of the uncorrelated optical emission is strongly dependent on the nature of the medium. PMID:15889084

Vestrand, W T; Wozniak, P R; Wren, J A; Fenimore, E E; Sakamoto, T; White, R R; Casperson, D; Davis, H; Evans, S; Galassi, M; McGowan, K E; Schier, J A; Asa, J W; Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J R; Gehrels, N; Hullinger, D; Krimm, H A; Markwardt, C B; McLean, K; Palmer, D; Parsons, A; Tueller, J

2005-05-12

449

Gamma-400 Science Objectives Built on the Current HE Gamma-Ray and CR Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main scientific interest of the Russian Gamma-400 team: Observe gamma-rays above approximately 50 GeV with excellent energy and angular resolution with the goals of: (1) Studying the fine spectral structure of the isotropic high-energy gamma-radiation, (2) Attempting to identify the many still-unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources. Gamma-400 will likely be the only space-based gamma-ray observatory operating at the end of the decade. In our proposed Gamma-400-LE version, it will substantially improve upon the capabilities of Fermi LAT and AGILE in both LE and HE energy range. Measuring gamma-rays from approx 20 MeV to approx 1 TeV for at least 7 years, Gamma-400-LE will address the topics of dark matter, cosmic ray origin and propagation, neutron stars, flaring pulsars, black holes, AGNs, GRBs, and actively participate in multiwavelength campaigns.

Moiseev, Alexander; Mitchell, John; Thompson, David

2012-01-01

450

The nature of the outflow in gamma-ray bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Swift satellite has enabled us to follow the evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) fireballs from the prompt gamma-ray emission to the afterglow phase. The early-time X-ray and optical data for GRBs obtained by telescopes aboard the Swift satellite show that the source for prompt gamma-ray emission, the emission that heralds these bursts, is short lived, and is distinct from

P. Kumar; E. McMahon; A. Panaitescu; R. Willingale; P. O'Brien; D. Burrows; J. Cummings; N. Gehrels; S. Holland; S. B. Pandey; D. vanden Berk; S. Zane

2007-01-01

451

Modeling of a slanted-hole collimator in a compact endo-cavity gamma camera.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Having the ability to take an accurate 3D image of a tumor greatly helps doctors diagnose it and then create a treatment plan for a patient. One way to accomplish molecular imaging is to inject a radioactive tracer into a patient and then measure the gamma rays emitted from regions with high-uptake of the tracer, viz., the cancerous tissues. In large, expensive PET- or SPECT-imaging systems, the 3D imaging easily is accomplished by rotating the gamma-ray detectors and then employing software to reconstruct the 3D images from the multiple 2D projections at different angles of view. However, this method is impractical in a very compact imaging system due to anatomical considerations, e.g., the transrectal gamma camera under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for detection of intra-prostatic tumors. The camera uses pixilated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detectors with matched parallel-hole collimator. Our research investigated the possibility of using a collimator with slanted holes to create 3D pictures of a radioactive source. The underlying concept is to take 2D projection images at different angles of view by adjusting the slant angle of the collimator, then using the 2D projection images to reconstruct the 3D image. To do this, we first simulated the response of a pixilated CZT detector to radiation sources placed in the field of view of the camera. Then, we formulated an algorithm to use the simulation results as prior knowledge and estimate the distribution of a shaped source from its 2D projection images. From the results of the simulation, we measured the spatial resolution of the camera as ~7-mm at a depth of 13.85-mm when using a detector with 2.46-mm pixel pitch and a collimator with 60° slant angle.

Kamuda, Mark; Cui, Yonggang; Lall, Terry; Ionson, Jim; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Hossain, Anwar; Yang, Ge; Roy, Utpal N.; James, Ralph B.

2013-09-01

452

The Milky Way in Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Light  

E-print Network

is Gamma-Ray Light so useful in Astronomy? X-rays Optical Infrared (IR) Radio Gamma-rays (low energyThe Milky Way in Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Light 2511 Gamma-Ray Light: What is it? Detecting Very High Energy Gamma-Rays with the H.E.S.S. Gamma-Ray Telescopes The Milky Way in Very High Energy Gamma-Ray

Adelaide, University of

453

A NEW CLASSIFICATION METHOD FOR GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

Recent Swift observations suggest that the traditional long versus short gamma-ray burst (GRB) classification scheme does not always associate GRBs to the two physically motivated model types, i.e., Type II (massive star origin) versus Type I (compact star origin). We propose a new phenomenological classification method of GRBs by introducing a new parameter {epsilon} = E{sub {gamma},iso,52}/E {sup 5/3}{sub p,z,2}, where E{sub {gamma},iso} is the isotropic gamma-ray energy (in units of 10{sup 52} erg) and E{sub p,z} is the cosmic rest-frame spectral peak energy (in units of 100 keV). For those short GRBs with 'extended emission', both quantities are defined for the short/hard spike only. With the current complete sample of GRBs with redshift and E{sub p} measurements, the {epsilon} parameter shows a clear bimodal distribution with a separation at {epsilon} {approx} 0.03. The high-{epsilon} region encloses the typical long GRBs with high luminosity, some high-z 'rest-frame-short' GRBs (such as GRB 090423 and GRB 080913), as well as some high-z short GRBs (such as GRB 090426). All these GRBs have been claimed to be of Type II origin based on other observational properties in the literature. All the GRBs that are argued to be of Type I origin are found to be clustered in the low-{epsilon} region. They can be separated from some nearby low-luminosity long GRBs (in 3{sigma}) by an additional T{sub 90} criterion, i.e., T{sub 90,z} {approx}< 5 s in the Swift/BAT band. We suggest that this new classification scheme can better match the physically motivated Type II/I classification scheme.

Lue Houjun; Liang Enwei [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.c, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

2010-12-20

454

GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-08-20

455

Iron K Lines from Gamma Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present models for reprocessing of an intense flux of X-rays and gamma rays expected in the vicinity of gamma ray burst sources. We consider the transfer and reprocessing of the energetic photons into observable features in the X-ray band, notably the K lines of iron. Our models are based on the assumption that the gas is sufficiently dense to allow the microphysical processes to be in a steady state, thus allowing efficient line emission with modest reprocessing mass and elemental abundances ranging from solar to moderately enriched. We show that the reprocessing is enhanced by down-Comptonization of photons whose energy would otherwise be too high to absorb on iron, and that pair production can have an effect on enhancing the line production. Both "distant" reprocessors such as supernova or wind remnants and "nearby" reprocessors such as outer stellar envelopes can reproduce the observed line fluxes with Fe abundances 30-100 times above solar, depending on the incidence angle. The high incidence angles required arise naturally only in nearby models, which for plausible values can reach Fe line to continuum ratios close to the reported values.

Kallman, T. R.; Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

2003-01-01

456

THE YIELD OF $gamma$RAY RADIATIVE CAPTURE FROM IRON  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of measurement is reported for the determination of the yield ; of capture gamma rays from the surface of the iron shield of a neutron reactor by ; a single-crystal scintillation gamma spectrometer. The results of these ; measurements on the capture gamma rays of iron were normalized to an energy of ; 7.5 Mev over the range

A. T. Bakov; S. P. Belov; U. A. Kazanski; V. I. Popov

1962-01-01

457

Simulation of prompt gamma-ray emission during proton radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The measurement of prompt gamma rays emitted from proton-induced nuclear reactions has been proposed as a method to verify in vivo the range of a clinical proton radiotherapy beam. A good understanding of the prompt gamma-ray emission during proton therapy is key to develop a clinically feasible technique, as it can facilitate accurate simulations and uncertainty analysis of gamma detector

Joost M Verburg; Helen A Shih; Joao Seco

2012-01-01

458

The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova Remnant CTA 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a

A. A. Abdo; M. Ackermann; W. B. Atwood; L. Baldini; J. Ballet; G. Barbiellini; M. G. Baring; D. Bastieri; B. M. Baughman; K. Bechtol; R. Bellazzini; B. Berenji; R. D. Blandford; E. D. Bloom; G. Bogaert; E. Bonamente; A. W. Borgland; J. Bregeon; A. Brez; M. Brigida; P. Bruel; T. H. Burnett; G. A. Caliandro; R. A. Cameron; P. A. Caraveo; P. Carlson; J. M. Casandjian; C. Cecchi; E. Charles; A. Chekhtman; C. C. Cheung; J. Chiang; S. Ciprini; R. Claus; J. Cohen-Tanugi; L. R. Cominsky; J. Conrad; S. Cutini; D. S. Davis; C. D. Dermer; A. de Angelis; F. de Palma; S. W. Digel; M. Dormody; E. do Couto e Silva; P. S. Drell; R. Dubois; D. Dumora; Y. Edmonds; C. Farnier; W. B. Focke; Y. Fukazawa; S. Funk; P. Fusco; F. Gargano; D. Gasparrini; N. Gehrels; S. Germani; B. Giebels; N. Giglietto; F. Giordano; T. Glanzman; G. Godfrey; I. A. Grenier; M.-H. Grondin; J. E. Grove; L. Guillemot; S. Guiriec; A. K. Harding; R. C. Hartman; E. Hays; R. E. Hughes; G. Jóhannesson; A. S. Johnson; R. P. Johnson; T. J. Johnson; W. N. Johnson; T. Kamae; Y. Kanai; G. Kanbach; H. Katagiri; N. Kawai; M. Kerr; T. Kishishita; B. Kiziltan; J. Knödlseder; M. L. Kocian; N. Komin; F. Kuehn; M. Kuss; L. Latronico; M. Lemoine-Goumard; F. Longo; V. Lonjou; F. Loparco; B. Lott; M. N. Lovellette; P. Lubrano; A. Makeev; M. N. Mazziotta; J. E. McEnery; S. McGlynn; C. Meurer; P. F. Michelson; T. Mineo; W. Mitthumsiri; T. Mizuno; A. A. Moiseev; C. Monte; M. E. Monzani; A. Morselli; I. V. Moskalenko; S. Murgia; T. Nakamori; P. L. Nolan; E. Nuss; M. Ohno; T. Ohsugi; A. Okumura; N. Omodei; E. Orlando; J. F. Ormes; M. Ozaki; D. Paneque; J. H. Panetta; D. Parent; V. Pelassa; M. Pesce-Rollins; G. Piano; L. Pieri; F. Piron; T. A. Porter; S. Rainň; R. Rando; P. S. Ray; M. Razzano; A. Reimer; O. Reimer; T. Reposeur; S. Ritz; L. S. Rochester; A. Y. Rodriguez; R. W. Romani; M. Roth; F. Ryde; H. F.-W. Sadrozinski; D. Sanchez; A. Sander; P. M. Saz Parkinson; T. L. Schalk; A. Sellerholm; C. Sgrň; E. J. Siskind; D. A. Smith; P. D. Smith; G. Spandre; P. Spinelli; J.-L. Starck; M. S. Strickman; D. J. Suson; H. Takahashi; T. Takahashi; T. Tanaka; J. B. Thayer; J. G. Thayer; D. J. Thompson; S. E. Thorsett; L. Tibaldo; D. F. Torres; G. Tosti; A. Tramacere; T. L. Usher; A. Van Etten; N. Vilchez; V. Vitale; P. Wang; K. Watters; B. L. Winer; K. S. Wood; H. Yasuda; T. Ylinen; M. Ziegler

2008-01-01

459

SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND DARK MATTER SEEDING IN NEUTRON STARS  

SciTech Connect

We present a mechanism based on internal self-annihilation of dark matter accreted from the galactic halo in the inner regions of neutron stars that may trigger full or partial conversion into a quark star. We explain how this effect may induce a gamma-ray burst (GRB) that could be classified as short, according to the usual definition based on time duration of the prompt gamma-ray emission. This mechanism differs in many aspects from the most discussed scenario associating short GRBs with compact object binary mergers. We list possible observational signatures that should help distinguish between these two possible classes of progenitors.

Perez-Garcia, M. Angeles [Department of Fundamental Physics and IUFFyM, University of Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Daigne, F.; Silk, J., E-mail: mperezga@usal.es, E-mail: daigne@iap.fr, E-mail: j.silk1@physics.ox.ac.uk [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

2013-05-10

460

CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital gamma ray spectroscopy.  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and analysis of a new gamma ray spectrometer for planetary science that uses an array of CdZnTe detectors to achieve the detection efficiency needed for orbital measurements. The use of CdZnTe will provide significantly improved pulse height resolution relative to scintillation-based detectors, with commensurate improvement in the accuracy of elemental abundances determined by gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. The spectrometer can be flown either on the instrument deck of the spacecraft or on a boom. For deck-mounted systems, a BGO anticoincidence shield is included in the design to suppress the response of the CdZnTe detector to gamma rays that originate in the spacecraft. The BGO shield also serves as a backup spectrometer, providing heritage from earlier planetary science missions and reducing the risk associated with the implementation of new technology.

Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.); Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Fuller, K. R. (Kenneth R.); Storms, S. A. (Steven A.); Soldner, S. A.; Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Browne, M. C. (Michael C.); Moss, C. E. (Calvin E.)

2001-01-01