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Sample records for compact hemielliptic dielectric

  1. Near-field compact dielectric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuermann, Daniel; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2006-08-01

    Aplanatic optics crafted from transparent dielectrics can approach the etendue limit for radiative transfer in pragmatic near-field systems. Illustrations are presented for the more demanding realm of high numerical aperture (NA) at the source and/or target. These light couplers can alleviate difficulties in aligning system components, and can achieve the fundamental compactness limit for optical devices that satisfy Fermat's principle.

  2. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  3. Engineering Prototype for a Compact Medical Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zografos, Anthony; Hening, Andy; Joshkin, Vladimir; Leung, Kevin; Pearson, Dave; Pearce-Percy, Henry; Rougieri, Mario; Parker, Yoko; Weir, John; Blackfield, Donald; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Poole, Brian; Hamm, Robert W.; Becker, Reinard

    2011-12-01

    A compact accelerator system architecture based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) for medical proton beam therapy has been developed by the Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation (CPAC). The major subsystems are a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) injector linac, a pulsed kicker to select the desired proton bunches, and a DWA linear accelerator incorporating a high gradient insulator (HGI) with stacked Blumleins to produce the required acceleration energy. The Blumleins are switched with solid state laser-driven optical switches integrated into the Blumlein assemblies. Other subsystems include a high power pulsed laser, fiber optic distribution system, electrical charging system, and beam diagnostics. An engineering prototype has been constructed and characterized, and these results will be used within the next three years to develop an extremely compact 150 MeV system capable of modulating energy, beam current, and spot size on a shot-to-shot basis. This paper presents the details the engineering prototype, experimental results, and commercialization plans.

  4. Compact Dielectric-Rod White-Light Delay Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    Optical delay lines of a proposed type would be made from rods of such dielectric materials as calcium fluoride, fused silica, or sapphire. These would offer advantages over prior optical delay lines, as summarized below. Optical delay lines are key components of opto-electronic microwave oscillators, narrow-band opto-electronic microwave filters, evanescent-field optical biochemical detectors, and some Fourier-Transform spectrum analyzers. Heretofore, optical delay lines used in such applications have been of two types: resonators and coiled long optical fibers, both of which have disadvantages: Resonators are compact, but excitation must be provided by narrow-band lasers. Wide-band (including noisy) laser light cannot be coupled efficiently to narrow-band resonators. When light is coupled into a narrowband resonator from a source of reasonably high power, a significant amount of optical energy circulates within the resonator, causing nonlinear loss and significant noise. Typically, a coil-type optical delay line is made of fused-silica fiber, which exhibits fundamental loss. To overcome the limit imposed by the optical loss in fused silica, it would be necessary to use fibers having crystalline cores. Although space is saved by winding fibers into coils, fiber-coil delay lines are still inconveniently bulky. The proposed compact dielectric-rod delay lines would exploit the special class of non-diffracting light beams that are denoted Bessel beams because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have large values of angular momentum. They can be generated with the help of whispering-gallery-mode optical resonators, as described, for example, in "Simplified Generation of High-Angular-Momentum Light Beams" (NPO-42965) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 3 (March 2007), page 8a. In a delay line according to the proposal, the dielectric rod would be dimensioned to function as a multimode

  5. Exact off-resonance near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic 2-D lenses illuminated by plane waves.

    PubMed

    Boriskin, Artem V; Sauleau, Ronan; Nosich, Alexander I

    2009-02-01

    The near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic lenses made of rexolite and isotropic quartz and illuminated by E- and H-polarized plane waves are studied. Variations in the focal domain size, shape, and location are reported versus the angle of incidence of the incoming wave. The problem is solved numerically in a two-dimensional formulation. The accuracy of results is guaranteed by using a highly efficient numerical algorithm based on the combination of the Muller boundary integral equations, the method of analytical regularization, and the trigonometric Galerkin discretization scheme. The analysis fully accounts for the finite size of the lens as well as its curvature and thus can be considered as a reference solution for other electromagnetic solvers. Moreover, the trusted description of the focusing ability of a finite-size hemielliptic lens can be useful in the design of antenna receivers. PMID:19183675

  6. Compact microwave lamp having a tuning block and a dielectric located in a lamp cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.E.

    2000-02-29

    A microwave lamp having a compact structure utilizing a coupling slot which has a dielectric member extending there through and a tuning block adjoining the coupling slot. A non-conventional waveguide is used which has about the width of a WR-284 waveguide and about the length of a WR-340 waveguide.

  7. Compact microwave lamp having a tuning block and a dielectric located in a lamp cavity

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, James E.

    2000-01-01

    A microwave lamp having a compact structure utilizing a coupling slot which has a dielectric member extending therethrough and a tuning block adjoining the coupling slot. A non-conventional waveguide is used which has about the width of a WR-284 waveguide and about the length of a WR-340 waveguide.

  8. Development of compact slip detection sensor using dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-young; Hwang, Do-Yeon; Kim, Baek-chul; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a resistance tactile sensor that can detect a slip on the surface of sensor structure. The presented sensor device has fingerprint-like structures that are similar with the role of the humans finger print. The resistance slip sensor that the novel developed uses acrylo-nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) as a dielectric substrate and graphene as an electrode material. We can measure the slip as the structure of sensor makes a deformation and it changes the resistance through forming a new conductive route. To manufacture our sensor, we developed a new imprint process. By using this process, we can produce sensor with micro unit structure. To verify effectiveness of the proposed slip detection, experiment using prototype of resistance slip sensor is conducted with an algorithm to detect slip and slip is successfully detected. We will discuss the slip detection properties.

  9. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  10. Remote estimation of dielectric permittivity of lunar surface regolith using compact polarimetric synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Porwal, A.; Dhingra, S.; De, S.; Venkataraman, G.

    2015-12-01

    A new model has been developed to estimate the dielectric permittivity of the lunar surface regolith using S-band hybrid compact polarimetric SAR data obtained from Mini-RF aboard LRO. The surface regolith is modeled as a random medium consisting of elementary ellipsoidal particles smaller than the incident wavelength of S-band. The data, available in the form of Stokes vector, are used to derive a coherency matrix, under the reflection symmetry condition, whose elements are used to calculate the particle anisotropy parameter. Since the anisotropy is bounded by the dielectric permittivity, its relationship with the latter is used for the required estimation. The method is applied to compute the dielectric permittivity of Apollo 17 landing site in Taurus-Littrow valley and to a part of Sinus Iridum. The estimated mean dielectric permittivity values (2.87 ± 0.31) and (3.04 ± 0.31), respectively, are consistent with the previous estimates. The dielectric permittivity values have also been used to discern different units of regolith in both the regions. The advantage of our model is that it does not require any a priori knowledge about the density or composition of the regolith. The available data in the form of Stokes parameters are sufficient for the computation. The model predicts a thin layer of low density, porous fine grained dust on the lunar surface.

  11. A Compact Linac for Proton Therapy Based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Mackie, T R; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y -; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Reckwerdt, P J; Schmidt, R; Pearson, D; Flynn, R W; Matthews, D; Purdy, J

    2007-10-29

    A novel compact CT-guided intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) system is described. The system is being designed to deliver fast IMPT so that larger target volumes and motion management can be accomplished. The system will be ideal for large and complex target volumes in young patients. The basis of the design is the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The DWA uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The IMPT planning system will optimize delivery characteristics. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. Feasibility tests of an optimization system for selecting the position, energy, intensity and spot size for a collection of spots comprising the treatment are underway. A prototype is being designed and concept designs of the envelope and environmental needs of the unit are beginning. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  12. Beam Transport in a Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Caporaso, G; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2011-03-16

    To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator, the DWA will be operated in the 'virtual' traveling mode with potentially non-uniform and time-dependent axial accelerating field profiles, especially near the DWA entrance and exit, which makes beam transport challenging. We have established a baseline transport case without using any external lenses. Results of simulations using the 3-D, EM PIC code, LSP indicate that the DWA transport performance meets the medical specifications for proton treatment. Sensitivity of the transport performance to Blumlein block failure will be presented.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT RADIOGRAPHY ACCELERATOR USING DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; McCarrick, J; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2005-06-02

    We are developing an inexpensive compact accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. Design characteristics are an 8 MeV endpoint energy, 2 kA beam current, a cell gradient of approximately 3 MV/m (for an overall accelerator length is 2-3 m), and <$1/Volt capital costs. Such designs have been made possible with the development of high specific energy dielectrics (>10J/cm{sup 3}), specialized transmission line designs and multi-gap laser triggered low jitter (<1 ns) gas switches. In this geometry, the pulse forming lines, switches, and insulator/beam pipe are fully integrated within each cell to form a compact, stand-alone, stackable unit. We detail our research and modeling to date, recent high voltage test results, and the integration concept of the cells into a radiographic system.

  14. Development of a compact cylindrical reaction cavity for a microwave dielectric heating system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsik; Kim, Kwangsoo

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a compact reaction cavity for a microwave-assisted synthesis system. The microwave dielectric heating is a key technology to improve synthesizing yield, however, the large size of the microwave generation and reaction parts in an all-in-one system is a major obstacle when applying the technique to various systems, of which the installation space is limited. For this particular problem, a compact stand-alone cylindrical reaction cavity was developed in the current study. A microwave excited from a monopole probe, which is inserted into the side of the cavity, is transferred to a reaction mixture through the upper hole of the cavity. The cavity is miniaturized by filling it with an alumina ceramic dielectric. Fine-tuning of the resonance frequency becomes available by controlling the length of the inserted screw between the probe and the upper hole. The physical properties of the cavity were simulated using high frequency structural simulator (HFSS) and the produced cavity was tested using an Agilent E8357A network analyzer. The test results show that the developed cavity is able to send enough energy to various solvents. PMID:22462944

  15. Evolutionary optimization of compact dielectric lens for farfield sub-wavelength imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of conventional optical lenses is limited by diffraction. For decades researchers have made various attempts to beat the diffraction limit and realize subwavelength imaging. Here we present the approach to design modified solid immersion lenses that deliver the subwavelength information of objects into the far field, yielding magnified images. The lens is composed of an isotropic dielectric core and anisotropic or isotropic dielectric matching layers. It is designed by combining a transformation optics forward design with an inverse design scheme, where an evolutionary optimization procedure is applied to find the material parameters for the matching layers. Notably, the total radius of the lens is only 2.5 wavelengths and the resolution can reach λ/6. Compared to previous approaches based on the simple discretized approximation of a coordinate transformation design, our method allows for much more precise recovery of the information of objects, especially for those with asymmetric shapes. It allows for the far-field subwavelength imaging at optical frequencies with compact dielectric devices. PMID:26017657

  16. A compact square loop patch antenna on high dielectric ceramic-PTFE composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. Habib; Islam, M. T.

    2013-10-01

    Design and prototyping of a low profile, compact square loop microstrip line fed miniature patch antenna on 1.9 mm thick ceramic-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) high dielectric composite material substrate is presented in this paper. The measured -10 dB return loss bandwidths of the antenna are 300 MHz (0.75-1.05 GHz) and 800 MHz (2.4-3.2 GHz) with 3.4 dBi, 8.86 dBi and 7.42 dBi at 900 MHz, 2.5 GHz and 3.0 GHz, respectively. The measured symmetric and almost stable radiation pattern makes the proposed antenna suitable for RFID, GSM, ZIGBEE, WBAN, LR-WPAN etc. integrated mobile devices.

  17. High-speed, compact, adaptive lenses using in-line transparent dielectric elastomer actuator membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shian, Samuel; Diebold, Roger M.; Clarke, David R.

    2013-04-01

    Electrically tunable adaptive lenses provide several advantages over traditional lens assemblies in terms of compactness, speed, efficiency, and flexibility. We present an elastomer-liquid lens system which makes use of an in-line, transparent electroactive polymer actuator. The lens has two liquid-filled cavities enclosed within two frames, with two passive outer elastomer membranes and an internal transparent electroactive membrane. Advantages of the lens design over existing systems include large apertures, flexibility in choosing the starting lens curvature, and electrode encapsulation with a dielectric liquid. A lens power change up to 40 diopters, corresponding to focal length variation up to 300%, was recorded during actuation, with a response time on the order of tens of milliseconds.

  18. Compact double-p slotted inset-fed microstrip patch antenna on high dielectric substrate.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M R; Islam, M T; Habib Ullah, M; Mahadi, W N L; Latef, T A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a compact sized inset-fed rectangular microstrip patch antenna embedded with double-P slots. The proposed antenna has been designed and fabricated on ceramic-PTFE composite material substrate of high dielectric constant value. The measurement results from the fabricated prototype of the antenna show -10 dB reflection coefficient bandwidths of 200 MHz and 300 MHz with center resonant frequency of 1.5 GHz and 4 GHz, respectively. The fabricated antenna has attained gains of 3.52 dBi with 81% radiation efficiency and 5.72 dBi with 87% radiation efficiency for lower band and upper band, respectively. The measured E- and H-plane radiation patterns are also presented for better understanding. Good agreement between the simulation and measurement results and consistent radiation patterns make the proposed antenna suitable for GPS and C-band applications. PMID:25165750

  19. A compact, low-loss, tunable phase shifter on defect mitigated dielectrics up to 40 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orloff, Nathan; Long, Christian; Lu, Xifeng; Nair, Hari; Dawley, Natalie; Schlom, Darrell; Booth, James

    With the emergence of the internet-of-things and increased connectivity of modern commerce, consumers have driven demand for wireless spectrum beyond current capacity and infrastructure capabilities. One way the telecommunications industry is addressing this problem is by pushing front-end electronics to higher frequencies, introducing carrier aggregation schemes, and developing spectrum-sharing techniques. Some of these solutions require frequency agile components that are vastly different from what is in today's marketplace. Perhaps the most basic and ubiquitous component in front-end electronics is the phase shifter. Phase shifters are particularly important for compact beam-forming antennas that may soon appear in commercial technology. Here, we demonstrate a compact, tunable phase shifter with very low insertion loss up to 40 GHz on a defect mitigated tunable dielectric. We demonstrate performance compared to barium-doped strontium titanate phase shifters. Such phase shifters could potentially meet the stringent size and performance characteristics demanded by telecommunications industry, readily facilitating massive multiple-input multiple-output antennas in the next-generation of mobile handsets.

  20. Laboratory measurements of dielectric properties of compact and granular materials, in relation with Rosetta mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Y.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Encrenaz, P.; Gheudin, M.; Ciarletti, V.; Gulkis, S.; Jambon, A.; Ruffié, G.; Prigent, C.

    2012-04-01

    different sizes distributions (i.e. surface to volume ratios), and possibly porosities. Dielectric constant determination at 190 GHz typically suggests that the real part of dielectric constant slowly increases with grain size: 2.86 ± 0.06, 2.96 ± 0.02 and 3.13 ± 0.05 for sizes respectively lower than 50 µm, between 50 and 160 µm and between 160 and 355 µm. Additional series of measurements on compact and granular samples of meteoritic analogues, such as carbonaceous chondrites are also to take place. [1] Gulkis et al. , Space Sci. Rev., 128, 561-597, 2007. [2] Kofman et al. , Space Sci. Rev., 128, 413-432, 2007. [3] Gulkis et al. , Space. Sci. Rev., 58, 1077-1087, 2010. [4] Gulkis et al. , Space. Sci. Rev., doi: 10.1016/j.pss.2011.12.004, 2011. [5] Levasseur-Regourd et al. , Planet. Space Sci., 57, 221-228, 2009. [6] McFadden et al., 40th LPSC, 2887, 2009. [7] Brouet el al. , EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting, p. 1083, 2011.

  1. A compact 300 kV solid-state high-voltage nanosecond generator for dielectric wall accelerator.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yi; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang; Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Jun; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-05-01

    Compact solid-state system is the main development trend in pulsed power technologies. A compact solid-state high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator with output voltage of 300 kV amplitude, 10 ns duration (FWHM), and 3 ns rise-time was designed for a dielectric wall accelerator. The generator is stacked by 15 planar-plate Blumlein pulse forming lines (PFL). Each Blumlein PFL consists of two solid-state planar transmission lines, a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch, and a laser diode trigger. The key components of the generator and the experimental results are reported in this paper. PMID:26026561

  2. A compact 300 kV solid-state high-voltage nanosecond generator for dielectric wall accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yi; Xia, Liansheng Zhang, Huang; Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Jun; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-05-15

    Compact solid-state system is the main development trend in pulsed power technologies. A compact solid-state high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator with output voltage of 300 kV amplitude, 10 ns duration (FWHM), and 3 ns rise-time was designed for a dielectric wall accelerator. The generator is stacked by 15 planar-plate Blumlein pulse forming lines (PFL). Each Blumlein PFL consists of two solid-state planar transmission lines, a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch, and a laser diode trigger. The key components of the generator and the experimental results are reported in this paper.

  3. Compact Double-P Slotted Inset-Fed Microstrip Patch Antenna on High Dielectric Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, M. R.; Islam, M. T.; Habib Ullah, M.; Mahadi, W. N. L.; Latef, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a compact sized inset-fed rectangular microstrip patch antenna embedded with double-P slots. The proposed antenna has been designed and fabricated on ceramic-PTFE composite material substrate of high dielectric constant value. The measurement results from the fabricated prototype of the antenna show −10 dB reflection coefficient bandwidths of 200 MHz and 300 MHz with center resonant frequency of 1.5 GHz and 4 GHz, respectively. The fabricated antenna has attained gains of 3.52 dBi with 81% radiation efficiency and 5.72 dBi with 87% radiation efficiency for lower band and upper band, respectively. The measured E- and H-plane radiation patterns are also presented for better understanding. Good agreement between the simulation and measurement results and consistent radiation patterns make the proposed antenna suitable for GPS and C-band applications. PMID:25165750

  4. Wakefield Generation in Compact Rectangular Dielectric Loaded Structures Using Flat Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Peter; Piot, Philippe; Cowan, Ben; Lemery, Francois; Mihalcea, Daniel; Prokop, Chris; Smith, Jonathan; Smithe, David

    2011-10-01

    Wakefields with amplitude in the 10s MV/m range can be routinely generated by passing electron beams through dielectric-loaded structures. The main obstacle in obtaining high field amplitude (in the GV/m range) is the ability to focus the high-peak-current electron beam in the transverse plane to micron level, and to maintain the focusing all the way along the dielectric structure. In this paper we explore the use of a flat, high-peak current, electron beams to be produced at the Fermilab NML facility to drive dielectric loaded structures. Based on beam dynamics simulation we anticipate that we can obtain flat beams with very small vertical size (under 100 microns) and peak current is in excess of 1 kA. We present simulations of the wakefield generation based on theoretical models and PIC simulations with VORPAL. Work supported by DTRA Grant Number HDTRA1-10-1-0051.

  5. Development of a Compact Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator at 11.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    This paper presents a progress report on the development of a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the Magnicon Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The accelerator will be powered by an 11.4-GHz magnicon amplifier that provides up to 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator includes a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures of up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Euclid Techlabs, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone rf testing at NRL at accelerating gradients up to 15 MV/m. The first stage of the accelerator, including the 5-MeV injector, has recently begun operation, and initial operation of the complete dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  6. Compact High-Velocity Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Plasma Jet in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annette, Meiners; Michael, Leck; Bernd, Abel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet at high streaming velocity operating with ambient air is highlighted. In the present technological approach, the employment of air poses a significant challenge. The high oxygen concentration in air results in a reduced concentration of reactive species in combination with a short species lifetime. The plasma jet assembly presented here contains a special dielectric barrier with a high secondary emission coefficient. In this way, the electron density and in turn the density of reactive species is increased. In addition, the plasma jet assembly is equipped with a short electrode. This leads to a higher voltage across the discharge gap and in turn to an increased density of reactive plasma species. The plasma jet is formed within and emitted by a small conical nozzle. A high-speed gas flow with gas velocity of 340 m/s was achieved at the end of the nozzle. In the jet the concentration of toxic and unwanted neutral plasma species like O3 or NOx is significantly reduced because of the shorter residence time within the plasma. The range of short-lived active plasma species is in turn considerably enhanced. The jet efficiency and action range measured through the oxidation of a test surface were determined by measuring the increase of surface tension of a polypropylene substrate via contact angle measurements after plasma treatment. Numerical modeling of the plasma plume indicates that oxygen atoms are in fact the main active species in the plasma plume.

  7. Assessment of in-situ compaction degree of HMA pavement surface layers using GPR and novel dielectric properties-based algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Fokion

    2015-04-01

    Field compaction of asphalt pavements is ultimately conducted to achieve layer(s) with suitable mechanical stability. However, the achieved degree of compaction has a significant influence on the performance of asphalt pavements. Providing all desirable mixture design characteristics without adequate compaction could lead to premature permanent deformation, excessive aging, and moisture damage; these distresses reduce the useful life of asphalt pavements. Hence, proper construction of an asphalt pavement is necessary to develop a long lasting roadway that will help minimize future maintenance. This goal is achieved by verifying and confirming that design specifications, in this case density specifications are met through the use of Quality Assurance (QA) practices. With respect to in-situ compaction degree of hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavement surface layers, nearly all agencies specify either cored samples or nuclear/ non nuclear density gauges to provide density measurement of the constructed pavement. Typically, a small number of spot tests (with either cores or nuclear gauges) are run and a judgment about the density level of the entire roadway is made based on the results of this spot testing. Unfortunately, density measurement from a small number of spots may not be representative of the density of the pavement mat. Hence, full coverage evaluation of compaction quality of the pavement mat is needed. The Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), as a Non Destructive Testing (NDT) technique, is an example of a non-intrusive technique that favors over the methods mentioned above for assessing compaction quality of asphalt pavements, since it allows measurement of all mat areas. Further, research studies in recent years have shown promising results with respect to its capability, coupled with the use of novel algorithms based on the dielectric properties of HMA, to predict the in-situ field density. In view of the above, field experimental surveys were conducted to assess the

  8. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  9. Resistive and magnetoresistive properties of compacted CrO2 powders with different types of intergranular dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalakova, N. V.; Belevtsev, B. I.; Beliayev, E. Yu.; Bludov, A. N.; Pashchenko, V. N.; Osmolovsky, M. G.; Osmolovskaya, O. M.

    2012-12-01

    Resistive, magnetoresistive and magnetic properties of four types of pressed CrO2 powders synthesized from chromic anhydride by the hydrothermal method were investigated. The new synthesis method allowed controlling the thickness of dielectric shells. The powders consisted of rounded particles (≈120 nm in dia.) or acicular crystals (≈22.9 nm in dia. and 302 nm in length). The particles were covered with a surface dielectric shell of different thickness and type (e.g. β-CrOOH oxyhydroxide or chromium oxide Cr2O3). The influence of the properties and the thickness of intergranular dielectric layers as well as the shape of CrO2 particles on the tunneling resistance and magnetoresistance (MR) of the pressed powders was studied. It was found that at low temperatures all the investigated samples displayed a nonmetallic temperature dependence of resistance and a giant negative MR. The maximal values of MR at T ≈ 5 K were found to be approx. 37% in relatively low magnetic fields (0.5 T). The MR decreased rapidly with increasing temperature (down to approx. 1% in 1 T at T ≈ 200 K). At low temperatures the powders with acicular particles exhibited a new type of MR hysteresis and nonmonotonous dependence of MR with increasing magnetic field. A nonmonotonous temperature dependence Hp(T), where Hp is the field in which the resistance is maximal, mismatch between the values of Hp and coercive force Hc, and the anisotropy of MR as a function of mutual orientation of transport current and magnetic field were observed.

  10. Plasma treatment of poly(dimethylsiloxane) surfaces using a compact atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge device for adhesion improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Fellype; Parada, Sergio; Moshkalev, Stanislav; Machida, Munemasa

    2016-02-01

    Results of the treatment of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces using novel atmospheric pressure pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasmas are presented. Different gases (argon, helium, nitrogen) as well as their mixtures with water vapor were compared in terms of the improvement of adhesion between two PDMS samples after processing by plasma. The plasma was characterized by optical emission spectroscopy to identify the emitting species and determine the plasma temperatures. For all the gases studied, plasma processing resulted in increase of adhesion between PDMS samples if long exposure time (larger than 150 s) is applied. However, for very short treatment times (20 plasma pulses, total processing time about 3 s) the highest efficiency was found for helium plasmas. Water contact angles at PDMS surfaces as function of plasma processing time was analyzed. Atomic force microscopy analysis was performed to show reduction in the surface roughness after plasma treatment, which is likely to be the responsible for increase of the surface contact area and thus the adhesion between two PDMS surfaces. The role of the two mechanisms in the improvement of adhesion (enhanced wettability and changes in the surface morphology), for different time scales, is discussed. Interestingly, for the minimum processing time (20 plasma pulses), the improvement in adhesion and reduction of surface roughness are observed although the changes in the water contact angle are insignificant.

  11. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  12. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  13. Trends of microwave dielectric materials for antenna application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulong, T. A. T.; Osman, R. A. M.; Idris, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Rapid development of a modern microwave communication system requires a high quality microwave dielectric ceramic material to be used as mobile and satellite communication. High permittivity of dielectric ceramics leads to fabrication of compact device for electronic components. Dielectric ceramics which used for microwave applications required three important parameters such as high or appropriate permittivity (ɛr), high quality factor (Q f ≥ 5000GH z) and good temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (τf). This paper review of various dielectric ceramic materials used as microwave dielectric materials and related parameters for antenna applications.

  14. STATUS OF THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Carroll, J; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-04-22

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system is capable of accelerating any charge to mass ratio particle. Applications of high gradient proton and electron versions of this accelerator will be discussed. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  15. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  16. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  17. Dielectric permittivity of suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, M. Ya.

    2007-08-15

    A strict macroscopic analysis of the limiting long-wavelength permittivity of a model suspension is presented in which the suspension is considered as a finely dispersed system consisting of isotropic dielectric balls with piecewise-continuous radial permittivity profile. The analysis is performed within the framework of the notion of compact groups of inhomogeneities and the procedure of field averaging over volumes significantly exceeding the scale of these groups. The indicated value is described by the Lorentz-Lorenz formula. The effective polarizability of balls in the suspension is reconstructed from their parameters and the parameters of the medium by means of integration. The result is valid for any concentration of the balls at which the suspension remains macroscopically homogeneous and isotropic with respect to the field and for an arbitrary difference between the ball and medium permittivities.

  18. Dielectric laser accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  19. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  20. Superbackscattering from single dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate that superbackscattering responses can be excited in subwavelength dielectric particles with simple geometries. The superbackscattering response arises from the simultaneous, coherent excitation of electric dipole and magnetic quadrupole resonances. Its signature is a superdirective scattering pattern simultaneously pointing towards both the forward and backward directions. The practical implementation of this effect with Tellurium particles operating in the thermal infrared is also addressed. The examples presented reveal that spherical resonators outperform array-based superbackscatterers in terms of the backscattering peak, compact size, robustness against losses and isotropic response.

  1. Mechanically Tunable Dielectric Resonator Metasurfaces at Visible Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Gutruf, Philipp; Zou, Chengjun; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sriram, Sharath; Fumeaux, Christophe

    2016-01-26

    Devices that manipulate light represent the future of information processing. Flat optics and structures with subwavelength periodic features (metasurfaces) provide compact and efficient solutions. The key bottleneck is efficiency, and replacing metallic resonators with dielectric resonators has been shown to significantly enhance performance. To extend the functionalities of dielectric metasurfaces to real-world optical applications, the ability to tune their properties becomes important. In this article, we present a mechanically tunable all-dielectric metasurface. This is composed of an array of dielectric resonators embedded in an elastomeric matrix. The optical response of the structure under a uniaxial strain is analyzed by mechanical-electromagnetic co-simulations. It is experimentally demonstrated that the metasurface exhibits remarkable resonance shifts. Analysis using a Lagrangian model reveals that strain modulates the near-field mutual interaction between resonant dielectric elements. The ability to control and alter inter-resonator coupling will position dielectric metasurfaces as functional elements of reconfigurable optical devices. PMID:26617198

  2. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  3. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  4. Compact accelerator concept for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporaso, G. J.; Sampayan, S.; Chen, Y.-J.; Harris, J.; Hawkins, S.; Holmes, C.; Krogh, M.; Nelson, S.; Nunnally, W.; Paul, A.; Poole, B.; Rhodes, M.; Sanders, D.; Selenes, K.; Sullivan, J.; Wang, L.; Watson, J.

    2007-08-01

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash X-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  5. Compact Radiative Control Structures for Millimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari D.; Chuss, David T.; Chervenak, James A.; Henry, Ross M.; Moseley, s. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested compact radiative control structures, including antireflection coatings and resonant absorbers, for millimeter through submillimeter wave astronomy. The antireflection coatings consist of micromachined single crystal silicon dielectric sub-wavelength honeycombs. The effective dielectric constant of the structures is set by the honeycomb cell geometry. The resonant absorbers consist of pieces of solid single crystal silicon substrate and thin phosphorus implanted regions whose sheet resistance is tailored to maximize absorption by the structure. We present an implantation model that can be used to predict the ion energy and dose required for obtaining a target implant layer sheet resistance. A neutral density filter, a hybrid of a silicon dielectric honeycomb with an implanted region, has also been fabricated with this basic approach. These radiative control structures are scalable and compatible for use large focal plane detector arrays.

  6. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  7. Compaction behavior of roller compacted ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-06-01

    The effect of roller compaction pressure on the bulk compaction of roller compacted ibuprofen was investigated using instrumented rotary tablet press. Three different roller pressures were utilized to prepare granules and Heckel analysis, Walker analysis, compressibility, and tabletability were performed to derive densification, deformation, course of volume reduction and bonding phenomenon of different pressure roller compacted granules. Nominal single granule fracture strength was obtained by micro tensile testing. Heckel analysis indicated that granules prepared using lower pressure during roller compaction showed lower yield strength. The reduction in tabletability was observed for higher pressure roller compacted granules. The reduction in tabletability supports the results of granule size enlargement theory. Apart from the granule size enlargement theory, the available fines and relative fragmentation during compaction is responsible for higher bonding strength and provide larger areas for true particle contact at constant porosity for lower pressure roller compacted granules. Overall bulk compaction parameters indicated that granules prepared by lower roller compaction pressure were advantageous in terms of tabletability and densification. Overall results suggested that densification during roller compaction affects the particle level properties of specific surface area, nominal fracture strength, and compaction behavior. PMID:18280716

  8. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  9. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  10. Compact dc link

    SciTech Connect

    Flairty, C. )

    1991-10-01

    The EPRI Compact Substation Project (a HVDC Converter Station) was developed, designed, and constructed per EPRI Agreement RP213. In December 1983, the converter station operated at its rating (100 MW power transmission and 300 kV dc bias plus 100 kV operating voltage). From January to May 1984, the converter station operated at various power transmission levels. Operation was intermittent due to a randomly occurring voltage breakdown. The voltage breakdown was isolated to the steel tanks containing the thyristor valves in an SF{sub 6} environment. The type of insulators stressed within the valve tanks were: (1) the epoxy cone shape insulators providing an interface to the bus entering the valve tank; (2) epoxy fiberglass hydraulic columns for the flow of the R113 refrigerant to and from the thyristor valves; and (3) the epoxy fiberglass support columns supporting the thyristor valves from the floor of the valve tank. The cause of the randomly occurring breakdown was investigated and determined to be the epoxy fiberglass support columns. The random dielectric breakdowns were due to excessive voltage gradients existing at the epoxy fiberglass support columns. This probably was caused by the misplacement of an internal insert within the column with respect to an external shield on the column. The cost and time to retrofit the support columns outweighed the benefits expected from resuming the project. Consequently, work was terminated and the equipment disassembled. Examination of the epoxy fiberglass support columns revealed several arcing tracks along the inside surface confirming the earlier hypothesis. 53 figs., 32 tabs.

  11. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  12. Dielectrically loaded horns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, S. M.; Bustamante, R.; Williams, N.

    Dielectrically loaded horns have been proposed as alternatives to conical corrugated horns in high-performance primary feeds in virtue both of their lower cost and theoretical indications of superior operational bandwidth performance, while retaining circularly symmetric radiation, low sidelobes, and low cross-polarization. A prototype dielectric core-loaded horn, and a dual-band transmit/receive horn antenna incorporating a dielectric rod inside a small corrugated horn, have been developed and tested; the dielectric used for the rod is Rexolite. The high performance obtainable by this inexpensive technology has been experimentally demonstrated.

  13. Gaseous dielectrics V

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.; Bouldin, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    This symposium represents a transdisciplinary and comprehensive approach to the study of gaseous dielectrics. The goal of the symposium was to demonstrate the effective coupling between basic and applied research and modern technology achieved in this area, and to guide future research and development and industrial use of gaseous dielectrics. Separate abstracts were prepared for 85 papers in these proceedings. (DWL)

  14. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  15. Composite dielectric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, E.; Atsuki, K.; Kuzuya, R.

    1980-09-01

    The modal analysis of a composite circular dielectric waveguide (CCDW) is presented. Computed values of the propagation constant of a CCDW are compared with those of the homogeneous circular dielectric waveguides (HCDW). Microwave experiments concerning the propagation constant of a CCDW of Teflon and Rexolite are described.

  16. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  17. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  18. Electrical and dielectric behavior of manganese-dioxide electrochemical electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moalleminejad, Morteza

    Manganese dioxide (MnO2) is widely used in battery electrodes. The dielectric and electrical conduction properties of MnO2 electrochemical electrodes with and without carbon black (CB, an electrically conductive additive), with and without an electrolyte (15 vol.% sulfuric acid), have been studied for various volume fractions of MnO2 and CB. The case without the electrolyte pertains to MnO2 particle compacts (40-75 vol.% MnO2). The case with the electrolyte pertains to MnO2 particle pastes (30-83 vol.% MnO2). As the MnO2 volume fraction increases from 40% to 75%, the relative dielectric constant increases from 58 to 72 for the MnO2 compact and from 61 to 75 for the MnO2 solid in the compact, and the resistivity decreases from 18000 to 11000 Ω.cm for the compact and from 9700 to 8100 Ω.cm for the MnO2 solid in the compact. Increase in the MnO2 volume fraction increases the relative dielectric constant of the MnO2 solid in both compacts and pastes, due to the increasing dielectric connectivity of the MnO2 particles. However, it decreases the resistivity of the MnO2 solid in compacts and increases this resistivity in pastes. The presence of the electrolyte has negligible effect on the relative dielectric constant of the MnO 2 solid, but significantly decreases the resistivity of the MnO 2 solid. The interparticle interface enhances the compact resistivity, but reduces the paste resistivity. The compacts are effectively modeled as MnO2 and air in parallel electrically, whereas the pastes are effectively modeled as MnO2 and the electrolyte in series. The CB resistivity is significantly decreased and the CB relative dielectric constant is increased by the presence of the electrolyte, indicating that the electrolyte helps the CB electrical/dielectric connectivity. The CB resistivity in the presence of MnO2 is higher than that in the absence of MnO 2, indicating that the CB electrical connectivity is reduced by the presence of MnO2. The resistivity of CB in an MnO2

  19. Gigavolt-per-Meter Wakefields in Annular Dielectric Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Brendan Donald

    A wakefield accelerator uses a medium capable of sustaining appropriate electric fields to transfer energy from a drive beam to a witness beam. Examples of such systems include electron beam driven plasma wakefields, laser driven plasma wakefields and electron beam driven dielectric wakefield structures. Dielectrics and plasmas are of particular interest because they are capable of maintaining electric fields on the order of GV/m and in the case of plasmas upwards of TV/m. These systems provide a significant step beyond current radiofrequency accelerating structures capable of peak electric fields on the order of 100 MV/m and average effective electric fields of 20 MV/m. Furthermore, beam driven dielectric structures produce a wakefield which is phase synchronous with the beam, these structures do not suffer from transit time or dephasing effects. In the case of dielectric wakefield accelerators, the structures under study in this publication, the modes generated by the driving beam are in the terahertz (THz) regime. Thus development of dielectric wakefield accelerators is seen as a path to smaller, more compact accelerating systems and as a means to generate THz radiation. Here we demonstrate a beam-driven dielectric wakefield accelerating structure that produces sustained fields of 1.35 GV/m for many hundreds of thousands of drive beam pulses. In addition we show beam-driven dielectric structures have the potential to produce single mode, high spectral purity THZ radiation of unprecedented energy scale.

  20. Peristaltic pump made of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Peter; Matysek, Marc; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2009-03-01

    The functional principle of peristaltic motion is inspired by the pattern in which hollow organs move. The technology of dielectric elastomer actuators provides the possibility to design a very compact peristaltic pump. The geometries of the whole pump and the actuator elements have been determined by numerical simulations of the mechanical behaviour and the fluid dynamics. With eight independent actuators the pumping channel is self-sealing and there is no need for any valves. The first generation of this pump is able to generate flow rates up to 0.36 μl/min.

  1. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  2. Tunable lenses using transparent dielectric elastomer actuators.

    PubMed

    Shian, Samuel; Diebold, Roger M; Clarke, David R

    2013-04-01

    Focus tunable, adaptive lenses provide several advantages over traditional lens assemblies in terms of compactness, cost, efficiency, and flexibility. To further improve the simplicity and compact nature of adaptive lenses, we present an elastomer-liquid lens system which makes use of an inline, transparent electroactive polymer actuator. The lens requires only a minimal number of components: a frame, a passive membrane, a dielectric elastomer actuator membrane, and a clear liquid. The focal length variation was recorded to be greater than 100% with this system, responding in less than one second. Through the analysis of membrane deformation within geometrical constraints, it is shown that by selecting appropriate lens dimensions, even larger focusing dynamic ranges can be achieved. PMID:23571956

  3. Dielectric elastomer actuators for adaptive photonic microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Marcus; Schröder, Henning; Marx, Sebastian; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Various applications in the field of photonic microsystems for Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) were shown with this research. DEA belong to the class of Electro Active Polymers (EAP) and have the potential to substitute common technologies like piezoelectric actuators. DEAs offers several advantages like compact and variable shapes, large actuation ranges and cost efficient production processes that have to be emphasized. For the market of adaptive photonic microsystems especially area actuators are very suitable. They can be used e.g. as tuneable lens, mirror or grating component and tool for optical fiber alignment. These area actuators have a similar structure like a capacitor. They consist of three layers, two electrode layers on top and bottom and one dielectric layer in the center. The dielectric layer is made of a deformable and prestretched elastomer film. When applying a voltage between both electrode layers the thickness of the dielectric film is compressed and the actuator is displaced in the plane. The use of material compositions like a polymer matrix with graphite, carbon nano particles or carbon nano tubes as well as thin metal films for the electrodes were studied. The paper presents results on suitable dielectric and electrode materials, actuator geometries and respective adaptive photonic components. The manufacturing process of area actuators is described in detail. As a basic size of the area actuators (20 × 20) mm2 were chosen. Onto the produced area actuators polymer lenses or mirrors were assembled. The deflection of the optical beam path is calculated with optical simulations and measured at the prepared adaptive optical components. Static actuations of about +/-15 μm are achieved when applying a voltage of 200 V. Also the function of a tuneable beam splitter is demonstrated to show further applications.

  4. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  5. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  6. Higher-order laser mode converters with dielectric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Yongli; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Yachao; Zhou, Junxiao; Ke, Yougang; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2015-12-01

    A simple and compact converter based on the dielectric metasurface is proposed for the transformation of Gaussian mode to Hermite-Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian modes. We establish the relationship between the phase of a desired mode and the local orientation of the optical axis based on the evolution of Pancharatnam-Berry phase on Poincaré sphere. By controlling the local orientation of the optical axis in the dielectric metasurface, we can achieve any desired higher-order laser mode. PMID:26625037

  7. Metal-dielectric interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    There is a wide variety of situations wherein metals are in solid state contact with dielectric materials. The paper reviews some of the factors that influence solid state interactions for metals in contact with dielectric surfaces. Since surfaces play an important part in these reactions, the use of analytical tools in characterizing surfaces is discussed. Adhesion, friction, and wear are utilized as indicators of the nature of interfacial bonding between metals and dielectrics can be effectively determined with adhesion and friction force measurements. Films present on the surface, such as oxygen or water vapor, markedly alter adhesive bond strength which in turn affects friction force and interfacial fracture when attempts are made to separate the contact regions. Analytical surface tools such as the field ion microscope, Auger emission spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are very effective in providing insight into the effect of contact on the surfaces of metals and dielectrics.

  8. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  9. Dielectric spectroscopy in agrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skierucha, W.; Wilczek, A.; Szypłowska, A.

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents scientific foundation and some examples of agrophysical applications of dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The aim of agrophysics is to apply physical methods and techniques for studies of materials and processes which occur in agriculture. Dielectric spectroscopy, which describes the dielectric properties of a sample as a function of frequency, may be successfully used for examinations of properties of various materials. Possible test materials may include agrophysical objects such as soil, fruit, vegetables, intermediate and final products of the food industry, grain, oils, etc. Dielectric spectroscopy techniques enable non-destructive and non-invasive measurements of the agricultural materials, therefore providing tools for rapid evaluation of their water content and quality. There is a limited number of research in the field of dielectric spectroscopy of agricultural objects, which is caused by the relatively high cost of the respective measurement equipment. With the fast development of modern technology, especially in high frequency applications, dielectric spectroscopy has great potential of expansion in agrophysics, both in cognitive and utilitarian aspects.

  10. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    PubMed

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  11. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  12. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alun; Lewin, Paul

    2011-08-01

    In 2011, the biennial meeting of the Dielectrics Group of the IOP, Dielectrics 2011, was held for the first time in a number of years at the University of Kent at Canterbury. This conference represents the most recent in a long standing series that can trace its roots back to a two-day meeting that was held in the spring of 1968 at Gregynog Hall of the University of Wales. In the intervening 43 years, this series of meetings has addressed many topics, including dielectric relaxation, high field phenomena, biomaterials and even molecular electronics, and has been held at many different venues within the UK. However, in the early 1990s, a regular venue was established at the University of Kent at Canterbury and, it this respect, this year's conference can be considered as "Dielectrics coming home". The format for the 2011 meeting followed that established at Dielectrics 2009, in breaking away from the concept of a strongly themed event that held sway during the mid 2000s. Rather, we again adopted a general, inclusive approach that was based upon four broad technical areas: Theme 1: Insulation/HV Materials Theme 2: Dielectric Spectroscopy Theme 3: Modelling Dielectric Response Theme 4: Functional Materials The result was a highly successful conference that attracted more than 60 delegates from eight countries, giving the event a truly international flavour, and which included both regular and new attendees; it was particularly pleasing to see the number of early career researchers at the meeting. Consequently, the organizing committee would like to thank our colleagues at the IOP, the invited speakers, our sponsors and all the delegates for making the event such a success. Finally, we look forward to convening again in 2013, when we will be returning to The University of Reading. Prof Alun Vaughan and Prof Paul Lewin, Editors

  13. Microstructure and dielectric properties of silver-barium titanate nanocomplex materials by wet chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Shintaro; Sakamoto, Yasunao; Nakashima, Kouichi; Wada, Satoshi

    2014-09-01

    To develop ceramic capacitors with a high effective dielectric constant, we attempted to fabricate BaTiO3 (BT) complexes with embedded Ag nanoparticles by wet chemical processes. Ag nanoparticle-adsorbed dendritic BT particles, Ag-BT hybrid particles, were synthesized from the sol-gel-derived precursor gel powders containing Ag, Ba, and Ti by hydrothermal treatment. These particles were pressed with BT fillers and TiO2 precursor nanoparticles into green compacts, and then, the green compacts were chemically converted into the Ag/BT nanocomplex compacts in Ba(OH)2 aqueous solution under the hydrothermal condition at 160 °C. The effective dielectric constant of the resultant Ag/BT nanocomplexes increases with an increase in Ag content. The maximal effective dielectric constant of approximately 900 was recorded for the nanocomplex with the Ag content of 10.7 vol %.

  14. ACOUSTIC COMPACTION LAYER DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The depth and strength of compacted layers in fields have been determined traditionally using the ASAE standardized cone penetrometer method. However, an on-the-go method would be much faster and much less labor intensive. The soil measurement system described here attempts to locate the compacted...

  15. Dynamical compactness and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Khilko, Danylo; Kolyada, Sergiĭ; Zhang, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    To link the Auslander point dynamics property with topological transitivity, in this paper we introduce dynamically compact systems as a new concept of a chaotic dynamical system (X , T) given by a compact metric space X and a continuous surjective self-map T : X → X. Observe that each weakly mixing system is transitive compact, and we show that any transitive compact M-system is weakly mixing. Then we discuss the relationships between it and other several stronger forms of sensitivity. We prove that any transitive compact system is Li-Yorke sensitive and furthermore multi-sensitive if it is not proximal, and that any multi-sensitive system has positive topological sequence entropy. Moreover, we show that multi-sensitivity is equivalent to both thick sensitivity and thickly syndetic sensitivity for M-systems. We also give a quantitative analysis for multi-sensitivity of a dynamical system.

  16. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  17. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: R and D needs

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    This report on the Compact Ignition Tokamak Program supplies information concerning: segmented vacuum vessel joint development; first wall tile attachments; first wall/tile development - composite materials; vacuum leak detection; high frequency rf sources; Faraday shield development; design and testing of rf launchers for high power, ling pulse operation; radiation hardened, low loss, dielectric windows for rf, IR, visible, UV and X-rays, mirrors for changing direction and focusing IR, visible and UV radiation; radiation resistant optical dielectric wave guides; radiation resistant HV insulation for diagnostic magnetic pickup coils; compact radiation and/or magnetic shielding for in-vault diagnostics that need some attenuation to reduce S/N ratio; radiation hardened line-of-sight sensors such as bolometers, UV and soft X-ray detectors, neutral particle analyzers, torus pressure gauges; special maintenance fixtures and tools; material properties - design data base - all materials; and insulation - electrical/thermal and mechanical properties.

  19. Compact bends for multi-mode photonic crystal waveguides with high transmission and suppressed modal crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate an extremely compact bend for a photonic crystal waveguide supporting three spatial modes. The bend exhibits nearly 100% transmission over a relative bandwidth of 1% with less than 1% crosstalk. We show that our design is robust with respect to fabrication errors. Our design method is applied to create a structure consisting of dielectric rods, as well as a structure consisting of air holes in a dielectric background. PMID:23571897

  20. Controlling birefringence in dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Aaron J.; Tyc, Tomáš; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    Birefringence, from the very essence of the word itself, refers to the splitting of light rays into two parts. In natural birefringent materials, this splitting is a beautiful phenomenon, resulting in the perception of a double image. In optical metamaterials, birefringence is often an unwanted side effect of forcing a device designed through transformation optics to operate in dielectrics. One polarization is usually implemented in dielectrics, and the other is sacrificed. Here we show, with techniques beyond transformation optics, that this need not be the case, that both polarizations can be controlled to perform useful tasks in dielectrics, and that rays, at all incident angles, can even follow different trajectories through a device and emerge together as if the birefringence did not exist at all. A number of examples are shown, including a combination Maxwell fisheye/Luneburg lens that performs a useful task and is achievable with current fabrication materials.

  1. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  2. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  3. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiloucas, Sillas; Blackburn, John

    2013-11-01

    This volume records the 42nd Dielectrics Group Proceedings of the Dielectrics Conference that took place at the University of Reading UK from 10-12 April 2013. The meeting is part of the biennial Dielectrics series of the Dielectrics Group, and formerly Dielectrics Society, and is organised by the Institute of Physics. The conference proceedings showcase some of the diversity and activity of the Dielectrics community worldwide, and bring together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experiences from the Physics, Chemistry and Engineering communities. It is interesting to note some continuing themes such as Insulation/HV Materials, Dielectric Spectroscopy, Dielectric Measurement Techniques and Ferroelectric materials have a growing importance across a range of technologically important areas from the Energy sector to Materials research, Semiconductor and Electronics industries, and Metrology. We would like to thank all of our colleagues and friends in the Dielectrics community who have supported this event by contributing manuscripts and participating in the event. The conference has provided excellent networking opportunities for all delegates. Our thanks go also to our theme chairs: Dr Stephen Dodd (University of Leicester) on Insulation/HV Materials, Professor Darryl Almond (University of Bath) on Dielectric Spectroscopy, Dr John Blackburn (NPL) on Dielectric Measurement Techniques and Professor Anthony R West (University of Sheffield) on Ferroelectric Materials. We would also like to thank the other members of the Technical Programme Committee for their support, and refereeing the submitted manuscripts. Our community would also like to wish a full recovery to our plenary speaker Prof John Fothergill (City University London) who was unexpectedly unable to give his talk as well as thank Professor Alun Vaughan for stepping in and giving an excellent plenary lecture in his place at such very short notice. We are also

  4. Dielectric elastomer generators that stack up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, T. G.; Rosset, S.; Anderson, I. A.; Shea, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a soft dielectric elastomer power generator with a volume of less than 1 cm3. The generator is well suited to harvest energy from ambient and from human body motion as it can harvest from low frequency (sub-Hz) motions, and is compact and lightweight. Dielectric elastomers are highly stretchable variable capacitors. Electrical energy is produced when the deformation of a stretched, charged dielectric elastomer is relaxed; like-charges are compressed together and opposite-charges are pushed apart, resulting in an increased voltage. This technology provides an opportunity to produce soft, high energy density generators with unparalleled robustness. Two major issues block this goal: current configurations require rigid frames that maintain the dielectric elastomer in a prestretched state, and high energy densities have come at the expense of short lifetime. This paper presents a self-supporting stacked generator configuration which does not require rigid frames. The generator consists of 48 generator films stacked on top of each other, resulting in a structure that fits within an 11 mm diameter footprint while containing enough active material to produce useful power. To ensure sustainable power production, we also present a mathematical model for designing the electronic control of the generator which optimizes energy production while limiting the electrical stress on the generator below failure limits. When cyclically compressed at 1.6 Hz, our generator produced 1.8 mW of power, which is sufficient for many low-power wireless sensor nodes. This performance compares favorably with similarly scaled electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and electrostatic generators. The generator’s small form factor and ability to harvest useful energy from low frequency motions such as tree swaying or shoe impact provides an opportunity to deliver power to remote wireless sensor nodes or to distributed points in the human body

  5. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  6. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  7. Thermally switchable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

    2013-04-30

    Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

  8. Dielectric behaviour of polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shabasy, M.; Riad, A. S.

    1996-05-01

    The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss of polycarbonate are investigated in the frequency range 30-10 5 Hz and at temperature from 297 to 365 K. The frequency dependence of the impedance spectra plotted in the complex plane shows semicircles. The system could be represented by an equivalent circuit of a bulk resistance in series with a parallel surface resistance-capacitance combination. The Cole-Cole diagrams have been used to determine the molecular relaxation time τ. The temperature dependence of τ is expressed by a thermally activated process. Analysis of the AC conductivity reveals semiconducting features based predominantly on a hopping mechanism.

  9. Compact gas-insulated transformer. Fourteenth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Objective is to develop a compact, more efficient, quieter transformer which does not rely on mineral oil insulation. Compressed SF/sub 6/ is used as the external insulation and polymer film as the insulation between turns. A separate liquid cooling system is also provided. This document reports progress made in design, mechanical, dielectric, short circuit, thermal, materials, prototype, accessories, commercialization, and system studies. (DLC)

  10. Rupture force of adsorbed self-assembled surfactant layers. Effect of the dielectric exchange force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Ceotto, G.; de Souza, E. F.

    2001-08-01

    The tip applied force necessary to obtain tip/substrate contact, i.e., rupture force between adsorbed layers of self-assembled surfactant films and atomic force microscope (AFM) tips in water has been measured. A substantial contribution of this rupture force is due to the dielectric exchange force (DEF). The DEF model is in agreement with the observation that the surfactant layer rupture forces are smaller in the thickest layers, where the compactness of the adsorbed film results in the smallest values of the dielectric permittivity. Within experimental accuracy a dielectric permittivity value of ˜4 for bilayers and of ˜36 for monolayers is found.

  11. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, L.D.

    1996-12-10

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. 5 figs.

  12. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1996-01-01

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made.

  13. Interfaces: nanometric dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, T. J.

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanometric size particles in a matrix to form dielectric composites shows promise of materials (nanodielectrics) with new and improved properties. It is argued that the properties of the interfaces between the particles and the matrix, which will themselves be of nanometric dimensions, will have an increasingly dominant role in determining dielectric performance as the particle size decreases. The forces that determine the electrical and dielectric properties of interfaces are considered, with emphasis on the way in which they might influence composite behaviour. A number of examples are given in which interfaces at the nanometric level exercise both passive and active control over dielectric, optical and conductive properties. Electromechanical properties are also considered, and it is shown that interfaces have important electrostrictive and piezoelectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that the process of poling, namely subjecting macroscopic composite materials to electrical stress and raised temperatures to create piezoelectric materials, can be explained in terms of optimizing the collective response of the nanometric interfaces involved. If the electrical and electromechanical features are coupled to the long-established electrochemical properties, interfaces represent highly versatile active elements with considerable potential in nanotechnology.

  14. Dielectric elastomer memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas G.; Xie, Sheng Q.; Calius, Emilio P.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2011-04-01

    Life shows us that the distribution of intelligence throughout flexible muscular networks is a highly successful solution to a wide range of challenges, for example: human hearts, octopi, or even starfish. Recreating this success in engineered systems requires soft actuator technologies with embedded sensing and intelligence. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator(s) (DEA) are promising due to their large stresses and strains, as well as quiet flexible multimodal operation. Recently dielectric elastomer devices were presented with built in sensor, driver, and logic capability enabled by a new concept called the Dielectric Elastomer Switch(es) (DES). DES use electrode piezoresistivity to control the charge on DEA and enable the distribution of intelligence throughout a DEA device. In this paper we advance the capabilities of DES further to form volatile memory elements. A set reset flip-flop with inverted reset line was developed based on DES and DEA. With a 3200V supply the flip-flop behaved appropriately and demonstrated the creation of dielectric elastomer memory capable of changing state in response to 1 second long set and reset pulses. This memory opens up applications such as oscillator, de-bounce, timing, and sequential logic circuits; all of which could be distributed throughout biomimetic actuator arrays. Future work will include miniaturisation to improve response speed, implementation into more complex circuits, and investigation of longer lasting and more sensitive switching materials.

  15. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  16. Dark compact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We investigate compact objects formed by dark matter admixed with ordinary matter made of neutron-star matter and white-dwarf material. We consider non-self annihilating dark matter with an equation of state given by an interacting Fermi gas. We find new stable solutions, dark compact planets, with Earth-like masses and radii from a few Km to few hundred Km for weakly interacting dark matter which are stabilized by the mutual presence of dark matter and compact star matter. For the strongly interacting dark matter case, we obtain dark compact planets with Jupiter-like masses and radii of few hundred Km. These objects could be detected by observing exoplanets with unusually small radii. Moreover, we find that the recently observed 2 M⊙ pulsars set limits on the amount of dark matter inside neutron stars which is, at most, 1 0-6 M⊙ .

  17. Compact baby Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, C.; Klimas, P.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2009-11-15

    For the baby Skyrme model with a specific potential, compacton solutions, i.e., configurations with a compact support and parabolic approach to the vacuum, are derived. Specifically, in the nontopological sector, we find spinning Q-balls and Q-shells, as well as peakons. Moreover, we obtain compact baby skyrmions with nontrivial topological charge. All these solutions may form stable multisoliton configurations provided they are sufficiently separated.

  18. Model of dissipative dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang Foo, Choon; Cai, Shengqiang; Jin Adrian Koh, Soo; Bauer, Siegfried; Suo, Zhigang

    2012-02-01

    The dynamic performance of dielectric elastomer transducers and their capability of electromechanical energy conversion are affected by dissipative processes, such as viscoelasticity, dielectric relaxation, and current leakage. This paper describes a method to construct a model of dissipative dielectric elastomers on the basis of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. We characterize the state of the dielectric elastomer with kinematic variables through which external loads do work, and internal variables that measure the progress of the dissipative processes. The method is illustrated with examples motivated by existing experiments of polyacrylate very-high-bond dielectric elastomers. This model predicts the dynamic response of the dielectric elastomer and the leakage current behavior. We show that current leakage can be significant under large deformation and for long durations. Furthermore, current leakage can result in significant hysteresis for dielectric elastomers under cyclic voltage.

  19. ULTRA-COMPACT ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLICATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Carazo, V; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Guse, S; Harris, J R; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Paul, A C; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Schmidt, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sitaraman, S; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2009-06-11

    We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve {approx}10 MV/m gradients for 10s of nanoseconds pulses and to {approx}100 MV/m gradients for {approx}1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We detail the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

  20. Antenna with Dielectric Having Geometric Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A. (Inventor); Cravey, Robin L. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An antenna includes a ground plane, a dielectric disposed on the ground plane, and an electrically-conductive radiator disposed on the dielectric. The dielectric includes at least one layer of a first dielectric material and a second dielectric material that collectively define a dielectric geometric pattern, which may comprise a fractal geometry. The radiator defines a radiator geometric pattern, and the dielectric geometric pattern is geometrically identical, or substantially geometrically identical, to the radiator geometric pattern.

  1. Broadband local dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labardi, M.; Lucchesi, M.; Prevosto, D.; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A route to extend the measurement bandwidth of local dielectric spectroscopy up to the MHz range has been devised. The method is based on a slow amplitude modulation at a frequency Ω of the excitation field oscillating at a frequency ω and the coherent detection of the modulated average electric force or force gradient at Ω. The cantilever mechanical response does not affect the measurement if Ω is well below its resonant frequency; therefore, limitations on the excitation field frequency are strongly reduced. Demonstration on a thin poly(vinyl acetate) film is provided, showing its structural relaxation spectrum on the local scale up to 45 °C higher than glass temperature, and nanoscale resolution dielectric relaxation imaging near conductive nanowires embedded in the polymer matrix was obtained up to 5 MHz frequency, with no physical reason to hinder further bandwidth extension.

  2. Temperature switchable polymer dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ross Stefan

    2010-08-01

    Materials with switchable states are desirable in many areas of science and technology. The ability to thermally transform a dielectric material to a conductive state should allow for the creation of electronics with built-in safety features. Specifically, the non-desirable build-up and discharge of electricity in the event of a fire or over-heating would be averted by utilizing thermo-switchable dielectrics in the capacitors of electrical devices (preventing the capacitors from charging at elevated temperatures). We have designed a series of polymers that effectively switch from a non-conductive to a conductive state. The thermal transition is governed by the stability of the leaving group after it leaves as a free entity. Here, we present the synthesis and characterization of a series of precursor polymers that eliminate to form poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV's).

  3. Dielectric coated wire antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Newman, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    An electrically thin dielectric insulating shell on an antenna composed of electrically thin circular cylindrical wires is examined. A moment method solution is obtained, and the insulating shell is modeled by equivalent volume polarization currents. These polarization currents are related in a simple manner to the surface charge density on the wire antenna. In this way the insulating shell causes no new unknowns to be introduced, and the size of the impedance matrix is the same as for the uninsulated wires. The insulation is accounted for entirely through a modification of the symmetric impedance matrix. This modification influences the current distribution, impedance, efficiency, field patterns, and scattering properties. The theory is compared with measurement for dielectric coated antennas in air.

  4. All-dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahani, Saman; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    The ideal material for nanophotonic applications will have a large refractive index at optical frequencies, respond to both the electric and magnetic fields of light, support large optical chirality and anisotropy, confine and guide light at the nanoscale, and be able to modify the phase and amplitude of incoming radiation in a fraction of a wavelength. Artificial electromagnetic media, or metamaterials, based on metallic or polar dielectric nanostructures can provide many of these properties by coupling light to free electrons (plasmons) or phonons (phonon polaritons), respectively, but at the inevitable cost of significant energy dissipation and reduced device efficiency. Recently, however, there has been a shift in the approach to nanophotonics. Low-loss electromagnetic responses covering all four quadrants of possible permittivities and permeabilities have been achieved using completely transparent and high-refractive-index dielectric building blocks. Moreover, an emerging class of all-dielectric metamaterials consisting of anisotropic crystals has been shown to support large refractive index contrast between orthogonal polarizations of light. These advances have revived the exciting prospect of integrating exotic electromagnetic effects in practical photonic devices, to achieve, for example, ultrathin and efficient optical elements, and realize the long-standing goal of subdiffraction confinement and guiding of light without metals. In this Review, we present a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index metamaterials and anisotropic metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics, as well as biomimetic metasurfaces.

  5. All-dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Saman; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    The ideal material for nanophotonic applications will have a large refractive index at optical frequencies, respond to both the electric and magnetic fields of light, support large optical chirality and anisotropy, confine and guide light at the nanoscale, and be able to modify the phase and amplitude of incoming radiation in a fraction of a wavelength. Artificial electromagnetic media, or metamaterials, based on metallic or polar dielectric nanostructures can provide many of these properties by coupling light to free electrons (plasmons) or phonons (phonon polaritons), respectively, but at the inevitable cost of significant energy dissipation and reduced device efficiency. Recently, however, there has been a shift in the approach to nanophotonics. Low-loss electromagnetic responses covering all four quadrants of possible permittivities and permeabilities have been achieved using completely transparent and high-refractive-index dielectric building blocks. Moreover, an emerging class of all-dielectric metamaterials consisting of anisotropic crystals has been shown to support large refractive index contrast between orthogonal polarizations of light. These advances have revived the exciting prospect of integrating exotic electromagnetic effects in practical photonic devices, to achieve, for example, ultrathin and efficient optical elements, and realize the long-standing goal of subdiffraction confinement and guiding of light without metals. In this Review, we present a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index metamaterials and anisotropic metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics, as well as biomimetic metasurfaces. PMID:26740041

  6. Dielectric spectroscopy of polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, R.D.; Matveeva, E.M.

    1993-12-31

    Polyaniline films (PANI) are being considered as attractive new galvanic sources, electrochromic displays, chemical sensors, etc. So far much work has been done to study their optical, electrochemical and electrical properties. However, there are still doubts about the basic electric conductivity mechanisms of PANI. The aim of this paper is to study the influence of water molecules and acid anions on the properties of PANI films by dielectric spectroscopy.

  7. Low-k Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    As CMOS transistors were scaled, interconnects to link them are also shrunk to reduce the line pitches [1-10]. As shown in Fig. 22.1, the interconnect pitches have been shrunk from 180 nm, 140 nm, and 100 nm for 65 [4], 45 [32], and 32 nm nodes [10] LSIs, respectively. To eliminate the interconnect parasitic capacitance, low-k dielectric films which have lower permittivity than the conventional silica (SiO2) dielectrics have been introduced. Figure 22.2 shows the technology trend of the k-value and the deposition process, in which the low-k films are deposited by spin-on-dielectric (SOD) method or plasma-enhanced CVD. In the case of SOD, precursor solution is poured on a rotated wafer, and the precursor film is heated to vaporize the solvent followed by reaction and densification to make a low-k film. In the case of PECVD [36, 42], on the other hand, precursor solution is vaporized with inert carrier gas such as He, and the precursor gas is introduced into PECVD chamber with RF power. The vaporized precursor gas is exited from plasma, depositing a low-k film on a wafer heated in high vacuum. The SOD method is advantageous to decrease the k-value, while PECVD method is superior in the adhesion strength due to the possibility of in-suite plasma surface treatment in vacuum just before the low-k deposition.

  8. Tunable Dielectric Properties of Ferrite-Dielectric Based Metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, K.; Huang, K.; Zeng, L. Y.; Zhou, M. H.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  9. Tunable dielectric properties of ferrite-dielectric based metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Bi, K; Huang, K; Zeng, L Y; Zhou, M H; Wang, Q M; Wang, Y G; Lei, M

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  10. New silicone dielectric elastomers with a high dielectric constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Liwu; Fan, Jiumin; Yu, Kai; Liu, Yanju; Shi, Liang; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers (Des) are a type of EAPs with unique electrical properties and mechanical properties: high actuation strains and stresses, fast response times, high efficiency, stability, reliability and durability. The excellent figures of merit possessed by dielectric elastomers make them the most performing materials which can be applied in many domains: biomimetics, aerospace, mechanics, medicals, etc. In this paper, we present a kind of electroactive polymer composites based on silicone Dielectric elastomers with a high dielectric constant. Novel high DEs could be realized by means of a composite approach. By filling an ordinary elastomer (e.g. silicone) with a component of functional ceramic filler having a greater dielectric permittivity, it is possible to obtain a resulting composite showing the fruitful combination of the matrix's advantageous elasticity and the filler's high permittivity. Here we add the ferroelectric relaxor ceramics (mainly BaTiO3) which has high dielectric constant (>3000) to the conventional silicone Dielectric elastomers, to get the dielectric elastomer which can exhibit high elastic energy densities induced by an electric field of about 15 MV/m. Tests of the physical and chemical properties of the dielectric elastomers are conducted, which verify our supposes and offer the experimental data supporting further researches.

  11. Compact and stable multibeam fiber injector

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L. F., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    A compact and stable 20-beam injector was built for launching laser light into fibers for Fabry Perot velocity measurements of shock-driven surfaces. The fiber injector uses commercial mounts on mini-rails. Dielectric-coated beamsplitters provide accurate amplitude division. Minimal adjustments for stable operation are permitted by the use of a real-time video-viewer. The video system includes a non-linear camera for CW alignment and a linearized camera with a frame grabber for pulsed measurement and analysis. All 20-injection points are displayed on a single monitor. Optical requirements are given for image relay and magnification. Stimulated Brillouin scattering limitations on high-power are quantified.

  12. Investigation of HMA compactability using GPR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    . Actually, the prediction is not regulated by any standards or specifications, although the practice is considered to be workable. In view of the above, an extensive experiment was carried out in both the laboratory and the field based on a trial asphalt pavement section under construction. In the laboratory, the study focused on the estimation of the density of HMA specimens achieved through three different roller compaction modes (static, vibratory and a combination of both) targeted to simulate field compaction and assess the asphalt mix compactability. In the field, the different compaction modes were successively implemented on three subsections of the trial pavement section. Along each subsection, GPR data was collected in order to determine the new material's dielectric properties and based on that, to predict its density using proper algorithm. Thus, cores were extracted to be used as ground truth data. The comparison of the new asphalt material compactability as obtained from the laboratory specimens, the predictions based on GPR data and the field cores provided useful information that facilitated the selection of the most effective compaction mode yielding the proper compaction degree in the field. This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar."

  13. Compact Nonlinear Yagi-Uda Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y. Z.; Jiang, Li Jun; Sha, Wei E. I.; Lo, Yat Hei; Chew, Weng Cho

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas have demonstrated unprecedented capabilities for manipulating the intensity and direction of light emission over a broad frequency range. The directional beam steering offered by nanoantennas has important applications in areas including microscopy, spectroscopy, quantum computing, and on-chip optical communication. Although both the physical principles and experimental realizations of directional linear nanoantennas has become increasingly mature, angular control of nonlinear radiation using nanoantennas has not been explored yet. Here we propose a novel concept of nonlinear Yagi-Uda nanoantenna to direct second harmonic radiation from a metallic nanosphere. By carefully tuning the spacing and dimensions of two lossless dielectric elements, which function respectively as a compact director and reflector, the second harmonic radiation is deflected 90 degrees with reference to the incident light (pump) direction. This abnormal light-bending phenomenon is due to the constructive and destructive interference between the second harmonic radiation governed by a special selection rule and the induced electric dipolar and magnetic quadrupolar radiation from the two dielectric antenna elements. Simultaneous spectral and spatial isolation of scattered second harmonic waves from incident fundamental waves pave a new way towards nonlinear signal detection and sensing.

  14. Compact Nonlinear Yagi-Uda Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y Z; Jiang, Li Jun; Sha, Wei E I; Lo, Yat Hei; Chew, Weng Cho

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas have demonstrated unprecedented capabilities for manipulating the intensity and direction of light emission over a broad frequency range. The directional beam steering offered by nanoantennas has important applications in areas including microscopy, spectroscopy, quantum computing, and on-chip optical communication. Although both the physical principles and experimental realizations of directional linear nanoantennas has become increasingly mature, angular control of nonlinear radiation using nanoantennas has not been explored yet. Here we propose a novel concept of nonlinear Yagi-Uda nanoantenna to direct second harmonic radiation from a metallic nanosphere. By carefully tuning the spacing and dimensions of two lossless dielectric elements, which function respectively as a compact director and reflector, the second harmonic radiation is deflected 90 degrees with reference to the incident light (pump) direction. This abnormal light-bending phenomenon is due to the constructive and destructive interference between the second harmonic radiation governed by a special selection rule and the induced electric dipolar and magnetic quadrupolar radiation from the two dielectric antenna elements. Simultaneous spectral and spatial isolation of scattered second harmonic waves from incident fundamental waves pave a new way towards nonlinear signal detection and sensing. PMID:26738692

  15. Compact Nonlinear Yagi-Uda Nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y. Z.; Jiang, Li Jun; Sha, Wei E. I.; Lo, Yat Hei; Chew, Weng Cho

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas have demonstrated unprecedented capabilities for manipulating the intensity and direction of light emission over a broad frequency range. The directional beam steering offered by nanoantennas has important applications in areas including microscopy, spectroscopy, quantum computing, and on-chip optical communication. Although both the physical principles and experimental realizations of directional linear nanoantennas has become increasingly mature, angular control of nonlinear radiation using nanoantennas has not been explored yet. Here we propose a novel concept of nonlinear Yagi-Uda nanoantenna to direct second harmonic radiation from a metallic nanosphere. By carefully tuning the spacing and dimensions of two lossless dielectric elements, which function respectively as a compact director and reflector, the second harmonic radiation is deflected 90 degrees with reference to the incident light (pump) direction. This abnormal light-bending phenomenon is due to the constructive and destructive interference between the second harmonic radiation governed by a special selection rule and the induced electric dipolar and magnetic quadrupolar radiation from the two dielectric antenna elements. Simultaneous spectral and spatial isolation of scattered second harmonic waves from incident fundamental waves pave a new way towards nonlinear signal detection and sensing. PMID:26738692

  16. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  17. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  18. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  19. Compact pulsed electron beam system for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Deb, P.; Shukla, R.; Banerjee, P.; Prabaharan, T.; Adhikary, B.; Verma, R.; Sharma, A.; Shyam, A.

    2012-11-01

    A compact 180 kV electron beam system is designed for high power microwave generation. The electron beam system is consists of a secondary energy storage device, which can deliver energy to the load at faster rate than usual primary energy storage system such as tesla transformers or marx generator. The short duration, high voltage pulse with fast rise time and good flattop is applied to vacuum diode for high power microwave generation. The compact electron beam system is made up of single turn primary tesla transformer which charges a helical pulse forming line and transfers its energy to vacuum diode through a high voltage pressurized spark gap switch. We have used helical pulse forming line which has higher inductance as compared to coaxial pulse forming line, which in turns increases, the pulse width and reduce the length of the pulse forming line. Water dielectric medium is used because of its high dielectric constant, high dielectric strength and efficient energy storage capability. The time dependent breakdown property and high relative permittivity of water makes it an ideal choice for this system. The high voltage flat-top pulse of 90 kV, 260 ns is measured across the matched load. In this article we have reported the design details, simulation and initial experimental results of 180 kV pulsed electron beam system for high power microwave generation.

  20. Square dielectric THz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Aflakian, N; Yang, N; LaFave, T; Henderson, R M; O, K K; MacFarlane, D L

    2016-06-27

    A holey cladding dielectric waveguide with square cross section is designed, simulated, fabricated and characterized. The TOPAS waveguide is designed to be single mode across the broad frequency range of 180 GHz to 360 GHz as shown by finite-difference time domain simulation and to robustly support simultaneous TE and TM mode propagation. The square fiber geometry is realized by pulling through a heat distribution made square by appropriate furnace design. The transmitted mode profile is imaged using a vector network analyzer with a pinhole at the receiver module. Good agreement between the measured mode distribution and the calculated mode distribution is demonstrated. PMID:27410645

  1. Low Dielectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venumbaka, Sreenivasulu R.; Cassidy, Patrick E.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained from research funded through Research Cooperative Agreement No. NCC-1-01033-"Low Dielectric Polymers" (from 5/10/01 through 5/09/02). Results are reported in three of the proposed research areas (Tasks 1-3 in the original proposal): (1) Repeat and confirm the preparation and properties of the new alkyl-substituted PEK, 6HC17-PEK, (2) Prepare and evaluate polymers derived from a highly fluorinated monomer, and (3) Prepare and evaluate new silicon and/or fluorine-containing polymers expected to retain useful properties at low temperature.

  2. Boron nitride as two dimensional dielectric: Reliability and dielectric breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Pan, Chengbin; Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Lian, Xiaojuan; Miao, Feng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Larcher, Luca; Wu, Ernest; Lanza, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Boron Nitride (BN) is a two dimensional insulator with excellent chemical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, which make it especially attractive for logic device applications. Nevertheless, its insulating properties and reliability as a dielectric material have never been analyzed in-depth. Here, we present the first thorough characterization of BN as dielectric film using nanoscale and device level experiments complementing with theoretical study. Our results reveal that BN is extremely stable against voltage stress, and it does not show the reliability problems related to conventional dielectrics like HfO2, such as charge trapping and detrapping, stress induced leakage current, and untimely dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we observe a unique layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown, both at the nanoscale and device level. These findings may be of interest for many materials scientists and could open a new pathway towards two dimensional logic device applications.

  3. Plasmonic modes in a conductor-corrugated gap-dielectric system at telecommunication wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Wei; Jiang, Xunya

    2016-04-01

    We propose a conductor-corrugated gap-dielectric structure to realize broadband plasmonic modes at telecommunication wavelength. The structure consists of a corrugated low-index dielectric gap layer sandwiched by high-index dielectric and conductor layers. The electric field of the plasmonic modes is primarily concentrated in the corrugated gap, which not only reduces the metal absorption resulting in long propagation length but also causes good field confinement. It is proved that periodic modulation introduced into the gap can significantly increase the cutoff gap thickness of the structure. The effective medium theory and numerical simulation demonstrate that the cutoff gap thickness can be further increased by decreasing the filling factor of the low-index dielectric in the corrugated gap. Meanwhile, the scattering effects induced by the periodic modulation are also investigated. The results not only provide a new understanding of the surface plasmonic modes but also benefit the designing of compact devices.

  4. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  5. Voltage sensor and dielectric material

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2006-10-17

    A voltage sensor is described that consists of an arrangement of impedance elements. The sensor is optimized to provide an output ratio that is substantially immune to changes in voltage, temperature variations or aging. Also disclosed is a material with a large and stable dielectric constant. The dielectric constant can be tailored to vary with position or direction in the material.

  6. Microwave Propagation in Dielectric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonc, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment designed to verify quantitatively the effect of a dielectric fluid's dielectric constant on the observed wavelength of microwave radiation propagating through the fluid. The fluid used is castor oil, and results agree with the expected behavior within 5 percent. (Author/CS)

  7. Ferroelectric-dielectric tunable composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Vladimir O.; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava; Iddles, David; Price, Tim

    2006-04-01

    The dielectric response of ferroelectric-dielectric composites is theoretically addressed. Dielectric permittivity, tunability (relative change of the permittivity driven by dc electric field), and loss tangent are evaluated for various composite models. The analytical results for small dielectric concentration and relative tunability are obtained in terms of the traditional electrostatic consideration. The results for large tunability are obtained numerically. A method is proposed for the evaluation of the tunability and loss at large concentrations of the dielectric. The basic idea of the method is to reformulate the effective medium approach in terms of electrical energies stored and dissipated in the composite. The important practical conclusion of the paper is that, for random ferroelectric-dielectric composite, the addition of small amounts of a linear dielectric into the tunable ferroelectric results in an increase of the tunability of the mixture. The loss tangent of such composites is shown to be virtually unaffected by the addition of moderate amounts of the low-loss dielectric. The experimental data for (Ba,Sr)TiO3 based composites are analyzed in terms of the theory developed and shown to be in a reasonable agreement with the theoretical results.

  8. Degradation Of Reflectors And Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Cuddihy, Edward F.; Maag, Carl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes important degrading effects of atmosphere and outer-space environments on reflective surfaces and dielectrics. For reflective surfaces, terrestrial effects include soiling on glass surfaces and changing with time. Space effects include ultraviolet enhancement of contamination and possible surface erosion due to solar radiation, impact of debris, and interactions with atomic oxygen. Dielectrics similarly affected in both environments.

  9. Low dielectric polyimide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature resistant polyimide fiber that has a dielectric constant of less than 3 is presented. The fiber was prepared by first reacting 2,2-bis (4-(4aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane with 2,2-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride in an aprotic solvent to form a polyamic acid resin solution. The polyamic acid resin solution is then extruded into a coagulation medium to form polyamic acid fibers. The fibers are thermally cured to their polyimide form. Alternatively, 2,2-bis(4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane is reacted with 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride to form a polyamic acid, and the polyamic acid is chemically converted to its polyimide form. The polyimide is then dissolved in a solvent to form a polyimide resin solution, and the polyimide resin is extruded into a coagulation medium to form a polyimide wet gel filament. In order to obtain polyimide fibers of increased tensile properties, the polyimide wet gel filaments are stretched at elevated temperatures. The tensile properties of the fibers were measured and found to be in the range of standard textile fibers. Polyimide fibers obtained by either method will have a dielectric constant similar to that of the corresponding polymer, viz., less than 3 at 10 GHz.

  10. Plasmonics without negative dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic phenomena are exhibited in light-matter interaction involving materials whose real parts of permittivity functions attain negative values at operating wavelengths. However, such materials usually suffer from dissipative losses, thus limiting the performance of plasmon-based optical devices. Here, we utilize an alternative methodology that mimics a variety of plasmonic phenomena by exploiting the well-known structural dispersion of electromagnetic modes in bounded guided-wave structures filled with only materials with positive permittivity. A key issue in the design of such structures is prevention of mode coupling, which can be achieved by implementing thin metallic wires at proper interfaces. This method, which is more suitable for lower frequencies, allows designers to employ conventional dielectrics and highly conductive metals for which the loss is low at these frequencies, while achieving plasmonic features. We demonstrate, numerically and analytically, that this platform can provide surface plasmon polaritons, local plasmonic resonance, plasmonic cloaking, and epsilon-near-zero-based tunneling using conventional positive-dielectric materials.

  11. Experimental study of soil compaction effects on GPR signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Hu, Zhenqi; Zhao, Yanling; Li, Xinju

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical operations may lead to soil compaction hazard in land consolidation projects. Aiming to quantitatively guarantee soil compaction status with ground penetrating radar (GPR), we should clearly understand the relationship between bulk density/penetration resistance (PR) and GPR signals. This research adopted GPR with a central frequency of 500 MHz and the experimental design with laboratory test and outdoor test. Because soil dielectric constant receives combination influence of soil properties, statistical methods were used to analyze the influence of soil bulk density on electromagnetic wave velocity. Significant correlation exists between electromagnetic wave velocity and bulk density, with a partial correlation coefficient of 0.882 and two-tailed significance of 0.020. While soil dielectric constant strongly depends on soil water content, the growing of soil bulk density usually reduces free water content, increases bound water content and finally influences GPR signals. The results also showed that high soil PR value accompanied with low amplitude values of electromagnetic wave and fast decay rate of the amplitude back to noise level. More experimental data would be acquired for accurate quantification between soil compaction and GPR signals with statistic methods in the future research.

  12. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    Dielectric polymers are widely used in a plurality of applications, such as electrical insulation, dielectric capacitors, and electromechanical actuators. Dielectric polymers with large strain deformations under an electric field are named dielectric elastomers (DE), because of their relative low modulus, high elongation at break, and outstanding resilience. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are superior to traditional transducers as a muscle-like technology: large strains, high energy densities, high coupling efficiency, quiet operation, and light weight. One focus of this dissertation is on the design of DE materials with high performance and easy processing. UV radiation curing of reactive species is studied as a generic synthesis methodology to provide a platform for material scientists to customize their own DE materials. Oligomers/monomers, crosslinkers, and other additives are mixed and cured at appropriate ratios to control the stress-strain response, suppress electromechanical instability of the resulting polymers, and provide stable actuation strains larger than 100% and energy densities higher than 1 J/g. The processing is largely simplified in the new material system by removal of the prestretching step. Multilayer stack actuators with 11% linear strain are demonstrated in a procedure fully compatible with industrial production. A multifunctional DE derivative material, bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP), is invented enabling repeatable rigid-to-rigid deformation without bulky external structures. Bistable actuation allows the polymer actuator to have two distinct states that can support external load without device failure. Plasticizers are used to lower the glass transition temperature to 45 °C. Interpenetrating polymer network structure is established inside the BSEP to suppress electromechanical instability, providing a breakdown field of 194 MV/m and a stable bistable strain as large as 228% with a 97% strain fixity. The application of BSEP

  13. Compact Two-Liquid Microfluidic Hyperelastic Capacitive Strain Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanliangzi; Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Applications of liquid metal microfluidic devices include flexible electronics, biomedical devices, and soft robotics. In addition to single channel resistive strain sensors, two channel capacitive sensors have also been developed. However, these capacitive strain sensors have low capacitance with a footprint of about a square centimeter, making strain-output correlation quite complex. To address this issue, we developed a compact two liquid single straight channel capacitive strain sensor with a dielectric liquid sandwiched between two liquid metal electrodes. Formation of the capacitor with a liquid dielectric instead of PDMS enables capacitance increase through selection of high permittivity liquid. Using a custom experimental setup, we show that use of water and glycerol instead of silicone oil in-between the liquid metal electrodes can increase the device capacitance by fivefold. We discuss the effect of channel diameter, dielectric spacing, interfacial meniscus shape, and the liquid flow on device capacitance as well as response to strain. In addition, we discuss the effect of gallium oxide shell formation at the dielectric-liquid metal interface. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  14. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  15. Compact waveguide splitter networks.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yusheng; Song, Jiguo; Kim, Seunghyun; Hu, Weisheng; Nordin, Gregory P

    2008-03-31

    We demonstrate compact waveguide splitter networks in siliconon- insulator (SOI) rib waveguides using trench-based splitters (TBSs) and bends (TBBs). Rather than a 90 degrees geometry, we use 105 degrees TBSs to facilitate reliable fabrication of high aspect ratio trenches suitable for 50/50 splitting when filled with SU8. Three dimensional (3D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation is used for splitter and bend design. Measured TBB and TBS optical efficiencies are 84% and 68%, respectively. Compact 105 degrees 1 x 4, 1 x 8, and 1 x 32 trench-based splitter networks (TBSNs) are demonstrated. The measured total optical loss of the 1 x 32 TBSN is 9.15 dB. Its size is only 700 microm x 1600 microm for an output waveguide spacing of 50 microm. PMID:18542598

  16. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  17. Compact heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kays, W.M.; London, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    This third edition is an update of the second edition published in 1964. New data and more modern theoretical solutions for flow in the simple geometries are included, although this edition does not differ radically from the second edition. It contains basic test data for eleven new surface configurations, including some of the very compact ceramic matrices. Al dimensions are given in both the English and the Systeme International (SI) system of units.

  18. Compact infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Hong, S.; Moacanin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Broadband IR detector integrated into compact package for pollution monitoring and weather prediction is small, highly responsive, and immune to high noise. Sensing material is transparent sheet metalized with reflecting coating and overcoated with black material on same side. Pulse produced by chopping of infrared source beam creates transient "thermal lens" that temporarily defocuses laser beam probe. Detector monitoring beam measures defocusing which parallels infrared intensity.

  19. Granule consolidation during compaction.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M H

    1976-03-01

    The deformation of small cylindrical aggregates of dibasic calcium phosphate was measured during compaction. An analogy between these aggregates and cylindrical granules was proposed. No change in the original shape of the aggregates occurred; the cylindrical shape was maintained even at high compaction pressures. Relaxation of the aggregates occurred at pressures higher than 420 MNm-2 (60.9 x 10(3) lb in.-2) when removed from the compacts, but no relaxation took place at pressures below this value. In addition, the aggregates relaxed by an increase in thickness only; there was no corresponding change in diameter. Up to a pressure of 200 MNm-2 (29.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), an increase in aggregate diameter occurred, which was accompanied by a reduction in thickness. This change produced only a small reduction in volume, which was attributable to interparticulate slippage resulting in a closer packed arrangement. At a pressure of 200 MNm-2, the aggregate diameter no longer increased because solid bridges were formed between the particles and the die wall, preventing further spreading. From 200 to 420 MNm-2, failure of the material occurred by plastic deformation, which produced only a decrease in aggregate thickness. From 420 to 800 MNm-2 (116.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), a structure was formed that could support the applied load without further reduction of thickness, and this structure was shown to behave elastically. PMID:1263085

  20. Multilayer optical dielectric coating

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A highly damage resistant, multilayer, optical reflective coating includes alternating layers of doped and undoped dielectric material. The doping levels are low enough that there are no distinct interfaces between the doped and undoped layers so that the coating has properties nearly identical to the undoped material. The coating is fabricated at high temperature with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques to eliminate defects, reduce energy-absorption sites, and maintain proper chemical stoichiometry. A number of differently-doped layer pairs, each layer having a thickness equal to one-quarter of a predetermined wavelength in the material are combined to form a narrowband reflective coating for a predetermined wavelength. Broadband reflectors are made by using a number of narrowband reflectors, each covering a portion of the broadband.

  1. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  2. Photometry of compact galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.; Usher, P. D.; Barrett, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Photometric histories of the N galaxies 3C 390.3 and PKS 0521-36. Four other compact galaxies, Markarian 9, I Zw 92, 2 Zw 136, and III Zw 77 showed no evidence of variability. The photometric histories were obtained from an exhaustive study of those plates of the Harvard collection taken with large aperture cameras. The images of all galaxies reported were indistinguishable from stars due to the camera f-ratios and low surface brightness of the outlying nebulosities of the galaxies. Standard techniques for the study of variable stars are therefore applicable.

  3. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  4. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  5. Compact multiframe blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Hope, Douglas A; Jefferies, Stuart M

    2011-03-15

    We describe a multiframe blind deconvolution (MFBD) algorithm that uses spectral ratios (the ratio of the Fourier spectra of two data frames) to model the inherent temporal signatures encoded by the observed images. In addition, by focusing on the separation of the object spectrum and system transfer functions only at spatial frequencies where the measured signal is above the noise level, we significantly reduce the number of unknowns to be determined. This "compact" MFBD yields high-quality restorations in a much shorter time than is achieved with MFBD algorithms that do not model the temporal signatures; it may also provide higher-fidelity solutions. PMID:21403711

  6. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  7. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  8. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  9. Relativistic plasma dielectric tensor evaluation based on the exact plasma dispersion functions concept

    SciTech Connect

    Castejon, F.; Pavlov, S. S.

    2006-07-15

    The fully relativistic plasma dielectric tensor for any wave and plasma parameter is estimated on the basis of the exact plasma dispersion functions concept. The inclusion of this concept allows one to write the tensor in a closed and compact form and to reduce the tensor evaluation to the calculation of those functions. The main analytical properties of these functions are studied and two methods are given for their evaluation. The comparison between the exact dielectric tensor with the weakly relativistic approximation, widely used presently in plasma waves calculations, is given as well as the range of plasma temperature, harmonic number, and propagation angle in which the weakly relativistic approximation is valid.

  10. Ka-band Dielectric Waveguide Antenna Array for Millimeter Wave Active Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Weihai; Fei, Peng; Nian, Feng; Yang, Yujie; Feng, Keming

    2014-11-01

    Ka-band compact dielectric waveguide antenna array for active imaging system is given. Antenna array with WR28 metal waveguide direct feeding is specially designed with small size, high gain, good radiation pattern, easy realization, low insertion loss and low mutual coupling. One practical antenna array for 3-D active imaging system is shown with theoretic analysis and experimental results. The mutual coupling of transmitting and receiving units is less than -30dB, the gain from 26.5GHz to 40GHz is (12-16) dB. The results in this paper provide guidelines for the designing of millimeter wave dielectric waveguide antenna array.

  11. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  12. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  13. Dielectric properties of marsh vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetkova, Tatiana D.; Suslyaev, Valentin I.; Shcheglova, Anna S.

    2015-10-01

    The present work is devoted to the measurement of the dielectric properties of mosses and lichens in the frequency range from 500 MHz to 18 GHz. Subjects of this research were three species of march vegetation - moss (Dicranum polysetum Michx), groundcedar (Diphasiastrum complanatum (L.) Holub) and lichen (Cladonia stellaris). Samples of vegetation were collected in Tomsk region, Western Siberia, Russia. Complex dielectric permittivity was measured in coaxial section by Agilent Technologies vector network analyzer E8363B. Green samples was measured for some moisture contents from 100% to 3-5 % during a natural drying. The measurements were performed at room temperature, which remained within 21 ÷ 23 ° C. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant for the three species of marsh vegetation differ markedly. Different parts of the complex permittivity dependency on moisture were fitted by line for all frequency points. Two break point were observed corresponding to the transition of water in the vegetation in various phase states. The complex permittivity spectra of water in the vegetation allow determining the most likely corresponding dielectric model of water in the vegetation by the method of hypothesis testing. It is the Debye's model. Parameters of Debye's model were obtained by numerical methods for all of three states of water. This enables to calculate the dielectric constant of water at any frequency range from 500 MHz to 18 GHz and to find the parameters of the dielectric model of the vegetation.

  14. Ultra-compact Marx-type high-voltage generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D.A.; Wilson, M.J.

    2000-05-09

    An ultra-compact Marx-type high-voltage generator includes individual high-performance components that are closely coupled and integrated into an extremely compact assembly. In one embodiment, a repetitively-switched, ultra-compact Marx generator includes low-profile, annular-shaped, high-voltage, ceramic capacitors with contoured edges and coplanar extended electrodes used for primary energy storage; low-profile, low-inductance, high-voltage, pressurized gas switches with compact gas envelopes suitably designed to be integrated with the annular capacitors; feed-forward, high-voltage, ceramic capacitors attached across successive switch-capacitor-switch stages to couple the necessary energy forward to sufficiently overvoltage the spark gap of the next in-line switch; optimally shaped electrodes and insulator surfaces to reduce electric field stresses in the weakest regions where dissimilar materials meet, and to spread the fields more evenly throughout the dielectric materials, allowing them to operate closer to their intrinsic breakdown levels; and uses manufacturing and assembly methods to integrate the capacitors and switches into stages that can be arranged into a low-profile Marx generator.

  15. Ultra-compact Marx-type high-voltage generator

    DOEpatents

    Goerz, David A.; Wilson, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    An ultra-compact Marx-type high-voltage generator includes individual high-performance components that are closely coupled and integrated into an extremely compact assembly. In one embodiment, a repetitively-switched, ultra-compact Marx generator includes low-profile, annular-shaped, high-voltage, ceramic capacitors with contoured edges and coplanar extended electrodes used for primary energy storage; low-profile, low-inductance, high-voltage, pressurized gas switches with compact gas envelopes suitably designed to be integrated with the annular capacitors; feed-forward, high-voltage, ceramic capacitors attached across successive switch-capacitor-switch stages to couple the necessary energy forward to sufficiently overvoltage the spark gap of the next in-line switch; optimally shaped electrodes and insulator surfaces to reduce electric field stresses in the weakest regions where dissimilar materials meet, and to spread the fields more evenly throughout the dielectric materials, allowing them to operate closer to their intrinsic breakdown levels; and uses manufacturing and assembly methods to integrate the capacitors and switches into stages that can be arranged into a low-profile Marx generator.

  16. Metal-dielectric interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Metal direlectric surface interactions and dielectric films on metal substrates were investigated. Since interfacial interaction depends so heavily on the nature of the surfaces, analytical surface tools such as Auger emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field ion microscopy were used to assist in surface and interfacial characterization. The results indicate that with metals contacting certain glasses in the clean state interfacial, bonding produces fractures in the glasses while when a film such as water is present, fractures occur in the metal near the interface. Friction forces were used to measure the interfacial bond strengths. Studies with metals contacting polymers using field ion microscopy revealed that strong bonding forces could develop being between a metal and polymer surface with polymer transferring to the metal surface in various ways depending upon the forces applied to the surface in contact. With the deposition of refractory carbides, silicides and borides onto metal and alloy substrates the presence of oxides at the interface or active gases in the deposition plasma were shown to alter interfacial properties and chemistry. Auger ion depth profile analysis indicated the chemical composition at the interface and this could be related to the mechanical, friction, and wear behavior of the coating.

  17. Dielectric optical invisibility cloaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J.; Tamma, V. A.; Park, W.; Summers, C. J.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, metamaterial cloaks for the microwave frequency range have been designed using transformative optics design techniques and experimentally demonstrated. The design of these structures requires extreme values of permittivity and permeability within the device, which has been accomplished by the use of resonating metal elements. However, these elements severely limit the operating frequency range of the cloak due to their non-ideal dispersion properties at optical frequencies. In this paper we present designs to implement a simpler demonstration of cloaking, the carpet cloak, in which a curved reflective surface is compressed into a flat reflective surface, effectively shielding objects behind the curve from view with respect to the incoming radiation source. This approach eliminates the need for metallic resonant elements. These structures can now be fabricated using only high index dielectric materials by the use of electron beam lithography and standard cleanroom technologies. The design method, simulation analysis, device fabrication, and near field optical microscopy (NSOM) characterization results are presented for devices designed to operate in the 1400-1600nm wavelength range. Improvements to device performance by the deposition/infiltration of linear, and potentially non-linear optical materials, were investigated.

  18. Dielectric and permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Using the unabridged Maxwell equations (including vectors D, E and H) new effects in collisionless plasmas are uncovered. In a steady state, it is found that spatially varying energy density of the electric field (E perpendicular) orthogonal to B produces electric current leading, under certain conditions, to the relationship P perpendicular+B(2)/8 pi-epsilon E perpendicular(2)/8 pi = constant, where epsilon is the dielectric constant of the plasma for fields orthogonal to B. In steady state quasi-two-dimensional flows in plasmas, a general relationship between the components of electric field parallel and perpendicular to B is found. These effects are significant in goephysical and astrophysical plasmas. The general conditions for a steady state in collisionless plasma are deduced. With time variations in a plasma, slow compared to ion-gyroperiod, there is a general current, (j*), which includes the well-known polarisation current, given by J*=d/dt (ExM)+(PxB)xB B(-2) where M and P are the magnetization and polarization vectors respectively.

  19. METHOD OF FORMING ELONGATED COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Larson, H.F.

    1959-05-01

    A powder compacting procedure and apparatus which produces elongated compacts of Be is described. The powdered metal is placed in a thin metal tube which is chemically compatible to lubricant, powder, atmosphere, and die material and will undergo a high degree of plastic deformation and have intermediate hardness. The tube is capped and placed in the die, and punches are applied to the ends. During the compacting stroke the powder seizes the tube and a thickening and shortening of the tube occurs. The tube is easily removed from the die, split, and peeled from the compact. (T.R.H.)

  20. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  1. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  2. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  4. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  5. Compact SPS - Power delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospisil, M.; Pospisilova, L.

    1982-09-01

    The power deliverable by a compact solar Space Power Station (SPS) is a function of its outer surface shape. Methods of fitting the power delivery curve of such a system to different patterns of daily power demand are considered that involve the appropriate choice of the number of satellites, their maximal power, height to width ratio and the shift of longitude with respect to the receiving station. Changes in the daily delivery curve can be made by altering the longitudes and orientations of the satellites. Certain limitations to the choice of parameters exist, such as: the height to width ratio should be near 1.2, and the sum of longitude and orientation changes will probably not be greater than 50 deg. The optimization of the peak to average power ratio is also discussed.

  6. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarov, Viktor; Cermak, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Stekl, Ivan

    2009-11-09

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  7. Compact ultraviolet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Brian Walter

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation presents theoretical analysis and experimental investigation of a compact ultraviolet laser, comprising an unstable resonator semiconductor (URSL) laser-pumped potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) periodically segmented waveguide (PSW) laser. A comprehensive survey of existing short wavelength visible and near ultraviolet laser technologies suitable for the development of compact ultraviolet lasers is presented. This survey establishes the suitability of a diode-pumped KTP PSW laser as an attractive approach for developing a compact ultraviolet laser. Requirements for an efficient diode-pumped KTP PSW laser are given, leading to the selection of a frequency-stabilized URSL and hydrothermal KTP PSWs as the component technologies to be developed and integrated. Since the design requirements for the URSL and KTP PSW are critically dependent on a thorough understanding of the spatial mode properties of KTP PSWs, analyses and modeling of the spatial mode properties of these devices is presented using effective index method (EIM) and beam propagation method (BPM) models. In addition, a new expression for the normalized conversion efficiency is presented which explicitly incorporates the dependence of this important parameter on the lateral variation of the refractive index and d coefficient. To assess the theoretical performance of an URSL-pumped KTP PSW, the BPM model was extended to incorporate second harmonic generation. This represents an important contribution to the development of numerical methods for modeling nonlinear waveguides, in general, and provides important information on the cooperative effects of diffraction and spatial mode beating on the SHG output from KTP PSWs. Extensive optical characterization of NUV SHG in hydrothermal KTP PSWs using an argon-ion laser-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser as the infrared laser pump source is presented. Spectral characterization, spatial mode characterization, and the temperature dependence of the QPM

  8. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  9. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  10. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  11. A Periodic Dielectric Resonator Structure for Terahertz Wave Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawole, Olutosin; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2014-03-01

    We present a periodic Slow Wave Structure (SWS) that consists of an arrangement of closely spaced cylindrical resonators with low dielectric constant. In this compact arrangement, coupling between resonators was via evanescent field coupling. This arrangement contrasts earlier infinite high dielectric constant SWSs with widely spaced resonators coupled via magnetic dipole moments. The presented periodic structure is an alternative to the metallic slow wave structures that have been proposed for TWT THz amplifiers. The fabricated low frequency (8 GHz) prototype of our structure consists of an array of cylindrical resonators with dielectric constant 9.2, diameter 12 mm, and height 6.35 mm. Slow waves, which setup a TE01δ-like electric field mode in each resonator, propagate in the structure when then the structure was excited with a microstrip line. We will present detailed simulation and experimental results of this prototype at the conference. Furthermore, efforts to scale the SWS to THz frequency and to interact the SWS with high-energy particle beams will be presented.

  12. Methods and apparatus for vertical coupling from dielectric waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Yaacobi, Ami; Cordova, Brad Gilbert

    2014-06-17

    A frequency-chirped nano-antenna provides efficient sub-wavelength vertical emission from a dielectric waveguide. In one example, this nano-antenna includes a set of plasmonic dipoles on the opposite side of a SiYV.sub.4 waveguide from a ground plane. The resulting structure, which is less than half a wavelength long, emits a broadband beam (e.g., >300 nm) that can be coupled into an optical fiber. In some embodiments, a diffractive optical element with unevenly shaped regions of high- and low-index dielectric material collimates the broadband beam for higher coupling efficiency. In some cases, a negative lens element between the nano-antenna and the diffractive optical element accelerates the emitted beam's divergence (and improves coupling efficiency), allowing for more compact packaging. Like the diffractive optical element, the negative lens element includes unevenly shaped regions of high- and low-index dielectric material that can be designed to compensate for aberrations in the beam emitted by the nano-antenna.

  13. A comparison of different powder compaction processes adopted for synthesis of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, M. L. V.; Bhanu Prasad, V. V.; James, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Barium zirconium titanate, Ba(Zr0.15Ti0.85)O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized using high energy ball milling. The calcined powders were compacted adopting two different approaches viz. the conventional uniaxial pressing and cold-isostatic pressing (CIP) and the compacts were sintered at 1350 °C. A single phase perovskite structure was observed in both cases. BZT ceramics compacted using CIP technique exhibited enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties compared to ceramics compacted by uniaxial pressing. The polarization current peaks have been used in this paper as an experimental evidence to prove the existence of ferroelectricity in the BZT ceramics under study. The peak polarization current was found to be ~700% higher in case of cold iso-statically compacted ceramics. Similarly electric field induces strain showed a maximum strain ( S max) of 0.08% at an electric field of 28 kV/cm. The dielectric and ferroelectric properties observed are comparable to single crystals of the same material.

  14. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  15. The Meaning of a Compact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  16. Analysis and design of ring-resonator integrated hemi-elliptical lens antenna at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Kumud Ranjan; Singh, G.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a novel lens integrated ring-resonator microstrip antenna is analyzed and simulated at 600 GHz. A mathematical model to compute the directivity of this kind of the antenna has been developed and the directivity of the antenna has been computed which is 18 dBi. The proposed model has been simulated by using CST Microwave Studio a commercially available simulator based on finite integral technique and similar result has been obtained. Further, the directivity of the antenna has also been computed by using the techniques reported in the literature and in this case also we have obtained the similar result. Later, a probe-fed patch integrated lens antenna has also been investigated to validate the correctness of the numerical method. To find the potential advantages of this kind of the structure, the - 10 dB impedance bandwidth of the antenna has been compared to a lens-integrated probe-fed microstrip patch antenna and a significant enhancement in the bandwidth has been observed.

  17. Agricultural applications of dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Stuart O

    2004-01-01

    A brief account of interest in dielectric properties of agricultural materials is presented, and some examples of dielectric spectroscopy applied to agricultural problems are discussed. Included are wide frequency range (250 Hz to 12 GHz) permittivity, or dielectric properties, measurements on adult rice weevils and hard red winter wheat, for the purpose of assessing selective dielectric heating of the insects, and broadband (200 MHz to 20 GHz) permittivity measurements on tissues of fresh fruits and vegetables. Similar measurements are shown for tree-ripened peaches, which were obtained to assess possibilities for a permittivity-based maturity index. Broadband (10 MHz to 1.8 GHz) permittivity measurements are shown for several fruits and vegetables as a function of temperature from 5 to 95 degrees C. Measurements over the same frequency range and similar temperature ranges are presented for two other food products, whey protein gel and apple juice. A few comments are offered on likely future dielectric spectroscopy applications in agriculture. PMID:15719907

  18. Sensing Based on Fano-Type Resonance Response of All-Dielectric Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Semouchkina, Elena; Duan, Ran; Semouchkin, George; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    A new sensing approach utilizing Mie resonances in metamaterial arrays composed of dielectric resonators is proposed. These arrays were found to exhibit specific, extremely high-Q factor (up to 15,000) resonances at frequencies corresponding to the lower edge of the array second transmission band. The observed resonances possessed with features typical for Fano resonances (FRs), which were initially revealed in atomic processes and recently detected in macro-structures, where they resulted from interference between local resonances and a continuum of background waves. Our studies demonstrate that frequencies and strength of Fano-type resonances in all-dielectric arrays are defined by interaction between local Mie resonances and Fabry-Perot oscillations of Bloch eigenmodes that makes possible controlling the resonance responses by changing array arrangements. The opportunity for obtaining high-Q responses in compact arrays is investigated and promising designs for sensing the dielectric properties of analytes in the ambient are proposed. PMID:25905701

  19. Sensing based on Fano-type resonance response of all-dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Semouchkina, Elena; Duan, Ran; Semouchkin, George; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    A new sensing approach utilizing Mie resonances in metamaterial arrays composed of dielectric resonators is proposed. These arrays were found to exhibit specific, extremely high-Q factor (up to 15,000) resonances at frequencies corresponding to the lower edge of the array second transmission band. The observed resonances possessed with features typical for Fano resonances (FRs), which were initially revealed in atomic processes and recently detected in macro-structures, where they resulted from interference between local resonances and a continuum of background waves. Our studies demonstrate that frequencies and strength of Fano-type resonances in all-dielectric arrays are defined by interaction between local Mie resonances and Fabry-Perot oscillations of Bloch eigenmodes that makes possible controlling the resonance responses by changing array arrangements. The opportunity for obtaining high-Q responses in compact arrays is investigated and promising designs for sensing the dielectric properties of analytes in the ambient are proposed. PMID:25905701

  20. Anomalous relaxation and dielectric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goychuk, Igor

    2007-10-01

    It is shown that all the known experimental (quasi)stationary dielectric response functions of glassy media can be derived from a standard generalized Langevin description of overdamped torsional dipole oscillators in trapping potentials with random orientations under some minimal assumptions. The non-Markovian theory obeys the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the Onsager regression theorem. Moreover, it displays no aging on the time scale of the dielectric response, all in assumption of local thermal (quasi)equilibrium. Aging might come from jumping among metastable traps. It occurs on a quite different time scale which is not related to the principal dielectric response. We put the old phenomenological theory of Cole and Cole, Davidson and Cole, and others on a firm basis within a stochastic, thermodynamically consistent approach.

  1. A Compact Ring Design with Tunable Momentum Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2012-05-17

    A storage ring with tunable momentum compaction has the advantage in achieving different RMS bunch length with similar RF capacity, which is potentially useful for many applications, such as linear collider damping ring and predamping ring where injected beam has a large energy spread and a large transverse emittance. A tunable bunch length also makes the commissioning and fine tuning easier in manipulating the single bunch instabilities. In this paper, a compact ring design based on a supercell is presented, which achieves a tunable momentum compaction while maintaining a large dynamic aperture.

  2. USDA/ARS and dielectric properties research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of the research is presented, including RF dielectric heating for seed treatment, insect control, product conditioning, and moisture and quality sensing applications, equipment used, dielectric properties measurement techniques, broad- frequency- range data obtained, and research results...

  3. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  4. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  5. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  6. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  7. Compact Doppler magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Moynihan, Philip I.; Vaughan, Arthur H.; Cacciani, Alessandro

    1998-11-01

    We designed a low-cost flight instrument that images the full solar disk through two narrow band filters at the red nd blue 'wings' of the solar potassium absorption line. The images are produced on a 1024 X 1024 charge-coupled device with a resolution of 2 arcsec per pixel. Four filtergrams taken in a very short time at both wings in the left and right states of circular polarization are used to yield a Dopplergram and a magnetogram simultaneously. The noise-equivalent velocity associated with each pixel is less than 3 m/s. The measured signal is linearly proportional to the velocity in the range +/- 4000 m/s. The range of magnetic fields is from 3 to 3000 Gauss. The optical system of the instrument is simple and easily aligned. With a pixel size of 12 micrometers , the effective focal length is 126 cm. A Raleigh resolution limit of 4 arcsec is achieved with a 5-cm entrance apertures, providing an f/25 focal ratio. The foreoptic is a two-component telephoto lens serving to limit the overall optical length to 89 cm or less. The mass of the instrument is 14 kg. the power required is less than 30 Watts. The Compact Doppler Magnetograph can be used in space mission with severe mass and power requirements. It can also be effectively used for ground-based observations: large telescope, dome or other observatory facilities are not required.

  8. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  9. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  10. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  11. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Schütz, A.; Klute, F. D.; Kratzer, J.; Franzke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges for optical spectrometric detection in analytical chemistry. In contrast to usual discharges with a direct current the electrodes are separated by at least one dielectric barrier. There are two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges: they can serve as dissociation and excitation devices as well as ionization sources, respectively. This article portrays various application fields of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry used for elemental and molecular detection with optical spectrometry.

  12. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipič, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-07-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters ɛ and σv, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  13. Applications for Dielectric Properties of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of dielectric properties of agricultural products for sensing moisture in grain and seed and their application in radio-frequency and microwave dielectric heating are discussed briefly. Values for the dielectric properties of a number of products, including grain, fruit, and poultry products...

  14. Dielectric properties of agricultural products and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of dielectric properties of agricultural products for sensing moisture in grain and seed and their application in radio-frequency and microwave dielectric heating is discussed briefly. Values for the dielectric properties of a number of products, including grain and seed, fruits and vegetab...

  15. An Ultra-Compact Marx-Type High-Voltage Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D; Ferriera, T; Nelson, D; Speer, R; Wilson, M

    2001-06-15

    This paper discusses the design of an ultra-compact, Marx-type, high-voltage generator. This system incorporates high-performance components that are closely coupled and integrated into an extremely compact assembly. Low profile, custom ceramic capacitors with coplanar extended electrodes provide primary energy storage. Low-inductance, spark-gap switches incorporate miniature gas cavities imbedded within the central region of the annular shaped capacitors, with very thin dielectric sections separating the energy storage capacitors. Carefully shaped electrodes and insulator surfaces are used throughout to minimize field enhancements, reduce fields at triple-point regions, and enable operation at stress levels closer to the intrinsic breakdown limits of the dielectric materials. Specially shaped resistors and inductors are used for charging and isolation during operation. Forward-coupling ceramic capacitors are connected across successive switch-capacitor-switch stages to assist in switching. Pressurized SF, gas is used for electrical insulation in the spark-gap switches and throughout the unit. The pressure housing is constructed entirely of dielectric materials, with segments that interlock with the low-profile switch bodies to provide an integrated support structure for all of the components. This ultra-compact Marx generator employs a modular design that can be sized as needed for a particular application. Units have been assembled with 4, 10, and 30 stages and operated at levels up to 100 kV per stage.

  16. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  17. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  18. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  19. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Scattering from Thin Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectric properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T is sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes (T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  1. Counteracting Gravitation In Dielectric Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E.; Jackson, Henry W.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Force of gravity in variety of dielectric liquids counteracted by imposing suitably contoured electric fields. Technique makes possible to perform, on Earth, variety of experiments previously performed only in outer space and at great cost. Also used similarly in outer space to generate sort of artificial gravitation.

  2. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  3. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  4. A compact rotary vane attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D. L.; Otosh, T. Y.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1969-01-01

    Rotary vane attenuator, when used as a front end attenuator, introduces an insertion loss that is proportional to the angle of rotation. New technique allows the construction of a shortened compact unit suitable for most installations.

  5. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  6. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-03-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  7. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-28

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  8. Mesoscale Simulations of Powder Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya.; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  9. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  10. Dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Müller, S; Gurevich, E L; Franzke, J

    2011-06-21

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry. Special about this discharge is-and in contrast to usual discharges with direct current-that the plasma is separated from one or two electrodes by a dielectric barrier. This gives rise to two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges; it can serve as dissociation and excitation device and as ionization mechanism, respectively. The article portrays the various application fields for dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry, for example the use for elemental detection with optical spectrometry or as ionization source for mass spectrometry. Besides the introduction of different kinds of dielectric barrier discharges used for analytical chemistry from the literature, a clear and concise classification of dielectric barrier discharges into capacitively coupled discharges is provided followed by an overview about the characteristics of a dielectric barrier discharge concerning discharge properties and the ignition mechanism. PMID:21562672

  11. Fluorescence Spectroscopy with Metal-Dielectric Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Szmacinski, Henryk; Ray, Krishanu; Descrovi, Emiliano; Ricciardi, Serena; Zhang, Douguo; Chen, Junxue; Huo, Yiping; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a hybrid metal-dielectric waveguide structures (MDWs) with numerous potential applications in the biosciences. These structures consist of a thin metal film coated with a dielectric layer. Depending on the thickness of the dielectric layer, the modes can be localized near the metal, within the dielectric, or at the top surface of the dielectric. The optical modes in a metal-dielectric waveguide can have either S (TE) or P (TM) polarization. The dielectric spacer avoids the quenching, which usually occurs for fluorophores within about 5 nm from the metal. Additionally, the resonances display a sharp angular dependence and can exhibit several hundred-fold increases in intensity (E2) at the silica-air interface relative to the incident intensity. Fluorophores placed on top of the silica layer couple efficiently with the metal, resulting in a sharp angular distribution of emission through the metal and down from the bottom of the structure. This coupling occurs over large distances to several hundred nm away from the metal and was found to be consistent with simulations of the reflectivity of the metal-dielectric waveguides. Remarkably, for some silica thicknesses, the emission is almost completely coupled through the structure with little free-space emission away from the metal-dielectric waveguide. The efficiency of fluorophore coupling is related to the quality of the resonant modes sustained by the metal-dielectric waveguide, resulting in coupling of most of the emission through the metal into the underlying glass substrates. Metal-dielectric waveguides also provide a method to resolve the emission from surface-bound fluorophores from the bulk-phase fluorophores. Metal-dielectric waveguides are simple to fabricate for large surface areas, the resonance wavelength can be adjusted by the dielectric thickness, and the silica surface is suitable for coupling to biomolecules. Metal-dielectric waveguides can have numerous applications in diagnostics and high

  12. Tailoring dielectric properties of ferroelectric-dielectric multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kesim, M. T.; Zhang, J.; Cole, M. W.; Misirlioglu, I. B.

    2014-01-13

    We develop a nonlinear thermodynamic model for multilayer ferroelectric heterostructures that takes into account electrostatic and electromechanical interactions between layers. We concentrate on the effect of relative layer fractions and in-plane thermal stresses on dielectric properties of Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3}-, BaTiO{sub 3}-, and PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PZT)-SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) multilayers on Si and c-sapphire. We show that dielectric properties of such multilayers can be significantly enhanced by tailoring the growth/processing temperature and the STO layer fraction. Our computations show that large tunabilities (∼90% at 400 kV/cm) are possible in carefully designed barium strontium titanate-STO and PZT-STO even on Si for which there exist substantially large in-plane strains.

  13. Two-phase mixed media dielectric with macro dielectric beads for enhancing resistivity and breakdown strength

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Meyer, Glenn A; Tang, Vincent; Guethlein, Gary

    2014-06-10

    A two-phase mixed media insulator having a dielectric fluid filling the interstices between macro-sized dielectric beads packed into a confined volume, so that the packed dielectric beads inhibit electro-hydrodynamically driven current flows of the dielectric liquid and thereby increase the resistivity and breakdown strength of the two-phase insulator over the dielectric liquid alone. In addition, an electrical apparatus incorporates the two-phase mixed media insulator to insulate between electrical components of different electrical potentials. And a method of electrically insulating between electrical components of different electrical potentials fills a confined volume between the electrical components with the two-phase dielectric composite, so that the macro dielectric beads are packed in the confined volume and interstices formed between the macro dielectric beads are filled with the dielectric liquid.

  14. Optical Transmission Properties of Dielectric Aperture Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao

    Optical detection devices such as optical biosensors and optical spectrometers are widely used in many applications for the functions of measurements, inspections and analysis. Due to the large dimension of prisms and gratings, the traditional optical devices normally occupy a large space with complicated components. Since cheaper and smaller optical devices are always in demand, miniaturization has been kept going for years. Thanks to recent fabrication advances, nanophotonic devices such as semiconductor laser chips have been growing in number and diversity. However, the optical biosensor chips and the optical spectrometer chips are seldom reported in the literature. For the reason of improving system integration, the study of ultra-compact, low-cost, high-performance and easy-alignment optical biosensors and optical spectrometers are imperative. This thesis is an endeavor in these two subjects and will present our research work on studying the optical transmission properties of dielectric aperture arrays and developing new optical biosensors and optical spectrometers. The first half of the thesis demonstrates that the optical phase shift associated with the surface plasmon (SP) assisted extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) in nano-hole arrays fabricated in a metal film has a strong dependence on the material refractive index value in close proximity to the holes. A novel refractive index sensor based on detecting the EOT phase shift is proposed by building a model. This device readily provides a 2-D biosensor array platform for non-labeled real-time detection of a variety of organic and biological molecules in a sensor chip format, which leads to a high packing density, minimal analyte volumes, and a large number of parallel channels while facilitating high resolution imaging and supporting a large space-bandwidth product (SBP). Simulation (FDTD Solutions, Lumerical Solutions Inc) results indicate an achievable sensitivity limit of 4.37x10-9 refractive index

  15. Compact boson stars in K field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Grandi, N.; Klimas, P.; Sánchez-Guillén, J.; Wereszczyński, A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

  16. Applications of high dielectric materials in high field magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Kristina Noel

    At high magnetic fields, radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of components all contribute to losses in conventional RF MRI coil designs. The hypothesis tested here is that these problems can be combated by the use of high permittivity ceramic materials at high fields. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in compact structures at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study NMR probes were constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) and 900 MHz (21.1 Tesla) using inductively fed CaTiO3 (relative permittivity of 156-166) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonators. The designs showed the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore, which accommodates the sample. The 600 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. The 900 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value of 940 and shows Q performance five times better than Alderman-Grant and loop-gap resonators of similar dimensions. High resolution images were acquired of an excised mouse spinal cord (25 microm 3) and an excised rat soleus muscle (20 microm3). The spatial distribution of electromagnetic fields within the human body can be tailored using external dielectric materials. Here, a new material is introduced with high dielectric constant and low background MRI signal. The material is based upon metal titanates, which can be made into geometrically formable suspensions in de-ionized water. The suspension's material properties are

  17. Boron Nitride Nanotube Mat as a Low- k Dielectric Material with Relative Dielectric Constant Ranging from 1.0 to 1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xinghua; Wang, Daojun; Chung, D. D. L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports that a boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) mat containing air and 1.4 vol.% BNNTs is a low- k dielectric material for microelectronic packaging, exhibiting relative dielectric constant of 1.0 to 1.1 (50 Hz to 2 MHz) and elastic modulus of 10 MPa. The mat is prepared by compacting BNNTs at 5.8 kPa. This paper also presents measurements of the dielectric properties of BNNTs (mostly multiwalled). The relative dielectric constant of the BNNT solid in the mat decreases with increasing frequency, with attractively low values ranging from 3.0 to 6.2; the alternating-current (AC) electrical conductivity increases with increasing frequency, with attractively low values ranging from 10-10 S/m to 10-6 S/m and an approximately linear relationship between log conductivity and log frequency. The specific contact capacitance of the interface between BNNTs and the electrical contact decreases with increasing frequency, with attractively high values ranging from 1.6 μF/m2 to 2.3 μF/m2. The AC electrical resistivity of the BNNT-contact interface decreases with increasing frequency, with high values ranging from 0.14 MΩ cm2 to 440 MΩ cm2.

  18. Modelling of compaction in planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wladimir; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2014-07-01

    Aims: Compaction of initially porous material prior to melting is an important process that has influenced the interior structure and the thermal evolution of planetesimals in their early history. On the one hand, compaction decreases the porosity resulting in a reduction of the radius and on the other hand, the loss of porosity results in an increase of the thermal conductivity of the material and thus in a more efficient cooling. Porosity loss by hot pressing is the most efficient process of compaction in planetesimals and can be described by creep flow, which depends on temperature and stress. Hot pressing has been repeatedly modelled using a simplified approach, for which the porosity is gradually reduced in some fixed temperature interval between ≈650 K and 700 K. This approach neglects the dependence of compaction on stress and other factors such as matrix grain size and creep activation energy. In the present study, we compare this parametrised method with a self-consistent calculation of porosity loss via a creep related approach. Methods: We use our thermal evolution model from previous studies to model compaction of an initially porous body and consider four basic packings of spherical dust grains (simple cubic, orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and body-centred cubic). Depending on the grain packing, we calculate the effective stress and the associated porosity change via the thermally activated creep flow. For comparison, compaction is also modelled by simply reducing the initial porosity linearly to zero between 650 K and 700 K. As we are interested in thermal metamorphism and not melting, we only consider bodies that experience a maximum temperature below the solidus temperature of the metal phase. Results: For the creep related approach, the temperature interval in which compaction takes place depends strongly on the size of the planetesimal and is not fixed as assumed in the parametrised approach. Depending on the radius, the initial grain size, the

  19. Stripline dipole with dielectric covering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hansen, V.

    The use of stripline antennas has greatly increased during the last ten years. In connection with an employment of the antennas, it is often necessary to provide an additional dielectric covering layer to protect the antenna against atmospheric conditions. Water or ice layers can also be described as dielectric layers. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of such additional layers on the radiation characteristics of stripline dipoles. A description is presented of a procedure for the calculation of all important antenna characteristics, taking into account current distribution, input impedance, radiation characteristics, the excitation of surface waves, and aspects of coupling. With the aid of a number of examples it is shown that even a thin covering layer can have a pronounced effect. Such layers can, therefore, also be employed to modify the antenna radiation characteristics to improve their suitability for a given application.

  20. Applications of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Heydt, Richard; Kofod, Guggi; Pei, Qibing; Gravesen, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators, based on the field-induced deformation of elastomeric polymers with compliant electrodes, can produce a large strain response, combined with a fast response time and high electromechanical efficiency. This unique performance, combined with other factors such as low cost, suggests many potential applications, a wide range of which are under investigation. Applications that effectively exploit the properties of dielectric elastomers include artificial muscle actuators for robots; low-cost, lightweight linear actuators; solid- state optical devices; diaphragm actuators for pumps and smart skins; acoustic actuators; and rotary motors. Issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the actuation technology for specific applications include the durability of the actuator, the performance of the actuator under load, operating voltage and power requirements, and electronic driving circuitry, to name a few.

  1. Blue ellipticals in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    1990-01-01

    By studying galaxies in compact groups, the authors examine the hypothesis that mergers of spiral galaxies make elliptical galaxies. The authors combine dynamical models of the merger-rich compact group environment with stellar evolution models and predict that roughly 15 percent of compact group ellipticals should be 0.15 mag bluer in B - R color than normal ellipticals. The published colors of these galaxies suggest the existence of this predicted blue population, but a normal distribution with large random errors can not be ruled out based on these data alone. However, the authors have new ultraviolet blue visual data which confirm the blue color of the two ellipticals with blue B - R colors for which they have their own colors. This confirmation of a population of blue ellipticals indicates that interactions are occurring in compact groups, but a blue color in one index alone does not require that these ellipticals are recent products of the merger of two spirals. The authors demonstrate how optical spectroscopy in the blue may distinguish between a true spiral + spiral merger and the swallowing of a gas-rich system by an already formed elliptical. The authors also show that the sum of the luminosity of the galaxies in each group is consistent with the hypothesis that the final stage in the evolution of compact group is an elliptical galaxy.

  2. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  3. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  4. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    2000-01-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed is a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  5. Radiation Resistances of Dielectric Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Somoano, Robert B.

    1987-01-01

    Report presents data on effects of ionizing radiation on dielectric liquids for high-energy-density, pulsed-power capacitors. Based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory test results, search of NASA and Department of Energy computer files, survey of open literature, and contacts with manufacturers and suppliers. Covers 22 organic liquids, although detailed data found for only one compound, polydimethyl siloxane. Generic data on effects of radiation on compounds with similar chemical structures provided where data on specific compounds lacking.

  6. Dielectric Relaxation of Hexadeutero Dimethylsulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betting, H.; Stockhausen, M.

    1999-11-01

    The dielectric relaxation parameters of the title substance (DMSO-d6) in its pure liquid state are determined from meas-urements up to 72 GHz at 20°C in comparison to protonated DMSO. While the relaxation strengths do not differ, the relax-ation time of DMSO-d 6 is significantly longer (21.3 ps) than that of DMSO (19.5 ps).

  7. Electrical conduction in polymer dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotts, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The use of polymer dielectrics with moderate resistivities could reduce or eliminate problems associated with spacecraft charging. The processes responsible for conduction and the properties of electroactive polymers are reviewed, and correlations drawn between molecular structure and electrical conductivity. These structure-property relationships led to the development of several new electroactive polymer compositions and the identification of several systems that have the requisite thermal, mechanical, environmental and electrical properties for use in spacecraft.

  8. Asymmetric Dielectric Elastomer Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a dielectric elastomer composite material comprising a plurality of elastomer-coated electrodes arranged in an assembly. Embodiments of the invention provide improved force output over prior DEs by producing thinner spacing between electrode surfaces. This is accomplished by coating electrodes directly with uncured elastomer in liquid form and then assembling a finished component (which may be termed an actuator) from coated electrode components.

  9. A metal-dielectric cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Han-Wu; Shu, Ting; Zhou, Heng; Yuan, Cheng-Wei; Zhang, Jun; Luo, Ling

    2008-07-01

    In order to improve the pulse repetition rate and the maintenance-free lifetime of an improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) previously developed in our laboratory, a metal-dielectric cathode is investigated experimentally. It consists of three components: a stainless steel base, bronze foils, and double-sided printed boards. The experimental results show that the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the diode voltage and current is very good and the performances of the improved MILO are steady. In addition, no observable degradation could be detected in the emissive characteristic of the metal-dielectric cathode after 350 shots. The experimental results prove that the metal-dielectric cathode is a promising cathode for repetitively pulsed MILO operation. However, the leading edge of the radiated microwave pulse is gradually delayed during the repetition rate. A likely reason is that high pressure results in gas ionization in the beam-microwave interaction region, and plasma formation delays the time that the improved MILO achieves nonlinear steady state.

  10. Dielectric decrement effects in electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figliuzzi, Bruno; Chan, Wai Hong Ronald; Buie, Cullen; Moran, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the nonlinear phenomena that occur in the electric double layer (EDL) that forms at charged surfaces is a key issue in electrokinetics. In recent studies, Nakayama and Andelman [J. Chem. Physics 2015] Hatlo et al. [EPL 2012], and Zhao and Zhai [JFM 2013] demonstrated that dielectric decrement significantly influences the ionic concentration in the electric double layer (EDL) at high zeta potential, leading to the formation of a condensed layer near the particle's surface. In this presentation, we apply the dielectric decrement model to study two archetypal problems in electrokinetics, namely the electrophoresis of particles with fixed surface charges and the electrophoresis of ideally polarizable particles. Our aim is to rely on numerical simulations to incorporate nonlinear effects including crowding effects due to the finite size of ions, dielectric decrement in the EDL, surface conduction, concentration polarization and advection in the bulk solution. In parallel, we derive a simplified composite layer model that enables us to obtain analytical estimates of the physical quantities involved in the physical description of the problem.

  11. Microwave dielectric spectrum of rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bengal, T.; East, J.; Dobson, M. C.; Garvin, J.; Evans, D.

    1988-01-01

    A combination of several measurement techniques was used to investigate the dielectric properties of 80 rock samples in the microwave region. The real part of the dielectric constant, epsilon', was measured in 0.1 GHz steps from 0.5 to 18 GHz, and the imaginary part, epsilon'', was measured at five frequencies extending between 1.6 and 16 GHz. In addition to the dielectric measurements, the bulk density was measured for all the samples and the bulk chemical composition was determined for 56 of the samples. The study shows that epsilon' is frequency-dependent over the 0.5 to 18 GHz range for all rock samples, and that the bulk density rho accounts for about 50 percent of the observed variance of epsilon'. For individual rock types (by genesis), about 90 percent of the observed variance may be explained by the combination of density and the fractional contents of SiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, and TiO2. For the loss factor epsilon'', it was not possible to establish statistically significant relationships between it and the measured properties of the rock samples (density and chemical composition).

  12. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  13. Compaction Behavior of Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endicott, Mark R.; Kenkre, V. M.; Glass, S. Jill; Hurd, Alan J.

    1996-03-01

    We report the results of our recent study of compaction of granular materials. A theoretical model is developed for the description of the compaction of granular materials exemplified by granulated ceramic powders. Its predictions are compared to observations of uniaxial compaction tests of ceramic granules of PMN-PT, spray dried alumina and rutile. The theoretical model employs a volume-based statistical mechanics treatment and an activation analogy. Results of a computer simulation of random packing of discs in two dimensions are also reported. The effect of type of particle size distribution and other parameters of that distribution on the calculated quantities are discussed. We examine the implications of the results of the simulation for the theoretical model.

  14. Compact Couplers for Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin; Lin, M.C.; Schwartz, Brian; Byer, Robert; McGuinness, Christopher; Colby, Eric; England, Robert; Noble, Robert; Spencer, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Photonic crystal waveguides are promising candidates for laser-driven accelerator structures because of their ability to confine a speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure. Because of the difference between the group velocity of the waveguide mode and the particle bunch velocity, fields must be coupled into the accelerating waveguide at frequent intervals. Therefore efficient, compact couplers are critical to overall accelerator efficiency. We present designs and simulations of high-efficiency coupling to the accelerating mode in a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide from a waveguide adjoining it at 90{sup o}. We discuss details of the computation and the resulting transmission. We include some background on the accelerator structure and photonic crystal-based optical acceleration in general.

  15. Compact electron acceleration and bunch compression in THz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Fallahi, Arya; Kärtner, Franz X

    2013-04-22

    We numerically investigate the acceleration and bunch compression capabilities of 20 mJ, 0.6 THz-centered coherent terahertz pulses in optimized metallic dielectric-loaded cylindrical waveguides. In particular, we theoretically demonstrate the acceleration of 1.6 pC and 16 pC electron bunches from 1 MeV to 10 MeV over an interaction distance of 20mm, the compression of a 1.6 pC 1 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 2 fs (50 times compression) over an interaction distance of about 18mm, and the compression of a 1.6 pC 10 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 1.61 fs (62 times) over an interaction distance of 42 cm. The obtained results show the promise of coherent THz pulses in realizing compact electron acceleration and bunch compression schemes. PMID:23609686

  16. Compact single-channel Raman detector for macular pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Raman detection of macular pigments (MP) holds promise as a novel noninvasive technology for the quantification of lutein and zeaxanthin carotenoids, which are thought to prevent or delay the onset of age-related macular degeneration. Using resonant excitation in the visible, we measure the Raman signals that originate from the double-bond stretch vibrations of the p-conjugated carotenoid molecule's carbon backbone. In this paper we describe the construction and performance of a new, compact, and low-cost MP Raman instrument using dielectric, angle-tuned band-pass filters for wavelength selection and single-channel photo-multiplier detection of carotenoid Raman responses. MP concentration measurements are fast and accurate, as seen in experiments with model eyes and living human eyes. The ease and rapidity of Raman MP measurements, the relative simplicity of the instrumentation, the high accuracy of the measurements, and the lack of significant systematic errors should make this technology useful for widespread clinical research.

  17. Compact x-ray lasers in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1988-10-03

    Compact x-ray lasers in the laboratory can be produced with ultrahigh gradient rf linacs based on recent advances in linac technology by an SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be converted to soft x rays in the range of 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high field strength wigglers. Alternatively, the beam can pump a low density dielectric to produce x rays via recombination. Such linear light sources can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Compact Low Frequency Radio Antenna

    DOEpatents

    Punnoose, Ratish J.

    2008-11-11

    An antenna is disclosed that comprises a pair of conductive, orthogonal arches and a pair of conductive annular sector plates, wherein adjacent legs of each arch are fastened to one of the annular sector plates and the opposite adjacent pair of legs is fastened to the remaining annular sector plate. The entire antenna structure is spaced apart from a conductive ground plane by a thin dielectric medium. The antenna is driven by a feed conduit passing through the conductive ground plane and dielectric medium and attached to one of the annular sector plates, wherein the two orthogonal arched act as a pair of crossed dipole elements. This arrangement of elements provides a radiation pattern that is largely omni-directional above the horizon.

  19. High-gradient compact linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-gradient linear accelerator comprises a solid-state stack in a vacuum of five sets of disc-shaped Blumlein modules each having a center hole through which particles are sequentially accelerated. Each Blumlein module is a sandwich of two outer conductive plates that bracket an inner conductive plate positioned between two dielectric plates with different thicknesses and dielectric constants. A third dielectric core in the shape of a hollow cylinder forms a casing down the series of center holes, and it has a dielectric constant different that the two dielectric plates that sandwich the inner conductive plate. In operation, all the inner conductive plates are charged to the same DC potential relative to the outer conductive plates. Next, all the inner conductive plates are simultaneously shorted to the outer conductive plates at the outer diameters. The signal short will propagate to the inner diameters at two different rates in each Blumlein module. A faster wave propagates quicker to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the closer spacing and lower dielectric constant. When the faster wave reaches the inner extents of the outer and inner conductive plates, it reflects back outward and reverses the field in that segment of the dielectric core. All the field segments in the dielectric core are then in unipolar agreement until the slower wave finally propagates to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the wider spacing and higher dielectric constant. During such unipolar agreement, particles in the core are accelerated with gradients that exceed twenty megavolts per meter.

  20. High-gradient compact linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Carder, B.M.

    1998-05-26

    A high-gradient linear accelerator comprises a solid-state stack in a vacuum of five sets of disc-shaped Blumlein modules each having a center hole through which particles are sequentially accelerated. Each Blumlein module is a sandwich of two outer conductive plates that bracket an inner conductive plate positioned between two dielectric plates with different thicknesses and dielectric constants. A third dielectric core in the shape of a hollow cylinder forms a casing down the series of center holes, and it has a dielectric constant different that the two dielectric plates that sandwich the inner conductive plate. In operation, all the inner conductive plates are charged to the same DC potential relative to the outer conductive plates. Next, all the inner conductive plates are simultaneously shorted to the outer conductive plates at the outer diameters. The signal short will propagate to the inner diameters at two different rates in each Blumlein module. A faster wave propagates quicker to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the closer spacing and lower dielectric constant. When the faster wave reaches the inner extents of the outer and inner conductive plates, it reflects back outward and reverses the field in that segment of the dielectric core. All the field segments in the dielectric core are then in unipolar agreement until the slower wave finally propagates to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the wider spacing and higher dielectric constant. During such unipolar agreement, particles in the core are accelerated with gradients that exceed twenty megavolts per meter. 10 figs.

  1. High-gradient compact linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Carder, Bruce M.

    1998-01-01

    A high-gradient linear accelerator comprises a solid-state stack in a vacuum of five sets of disc-shaped Blumlein modules each having a center hole through which particles are sequentially accelerated. Each Blumlein module is a sandwich of two outer conductive plates that bracket an inner conductive plate positioned between two dielectric plates with different thicknesses and dielectric constants. A third dielectric core in the shape of a hollow cylinder forms a casing down the series of center holes, and it has a dielectric constant different that the two dielectric plates that sandwich the inner conductive plate. In operation, all the inner conductive plates are charged to the same DC potential relative to the outer conductive plates. Next, all the inner conductive plates are simultaneously shorted to the outer conductive plates at the outer diameters. The signal short will propagate to the inner diameters at two different rates in each Blumlein module. A faster wave propagates quicker to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the closer spacing and lower dielectric constant. When the faster wave reaches the inner extents of the outer and inner conductive plates, it reflects back outward and reverses the field in that segment of the dielectric core. All the field segments in the dielectric core are then in unipolar agreement until the slower wave finally propagates to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the wider spacing and higher dielectric constant. During such unipolar agreement, particles in the core are accelerated with gradients that exceed twenty megavolts per meter.

  2. Dielectric properties of conductive ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Robert James

    Ion and polymer dynamics of ion-containing polymers were investigated, with the majority of results obtained from application of a physical model of electrode polarization (EP) to dielectric spectroscopy data. The physical model of MacDonald, further developed by Coelho, was extended for application to tan delta (the ratio of dielectric loss to dielectric constant) as a function of frequency. The validity of this approach was confirmed by plotting the characteristic EP time as a function of thickness and comparing the actual and predicted unrelaxed dielectric constant for a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based ionomer neutralized by lithium, sodium, and cesium. Results were obtained for ion mobility and mobile ion concentration for a neat PEO-based ionomer, two (methoxyethoxy-ethoxy phosphazene) (MEEP) -based ionomers, two MEEP-based salt-doped polymers, sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) neutralized by sodium with a high sulfonation fraction, and SPS neutralized by zinc with a low sulfonation fraction. Additionally, the conductivity parameters of six plasticized forms of a neat PEO-based ionomer were characterized, but the method apparently failed to correctly evaluate bulk ionic behavior. In all cases except the SPS ionomers ion mobility follows a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) temperature dependence. In all cases, mobile ion concentration follows an Arrhenius temperature dependence. Fitting parameters from these two relationships yielded direct information about the state of ionic diffusion and ion pairing in each system. Combination of these two functionalities predicts a relationship for conductivity that is significantly different than the VFT relation typically used in the literature to fit conductivity. The most outstanding result was the extremely small fraction of ions found to be mobile. For ionomers it can be concluded that the primary reason for low conductivities arises from the low fraction of mobile ions. The local and segmental dynamics of the neat and

  3. The Dielectric Properties of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Walter A.

    1999-06-01

    It is indeed remarkable that aspects of solids as diverse as the bonding and the dielectric properties should be described by the same elementary theory. Phillips (1973) noted such a connection and defined an ionicity of the bonds in semiconductors in terms of the dielectric constant, rather than in terms of the bond energy as had been done by Pauling (1960). They gave remarkably similar ionicity scales, but Phillips argued that the dielectric basis was better because of its more direct relation to the electronic structure. We would agree with this, noting that the bond energy (cf. Eq. (2-34)) contains a term Epro and a complicated dependence upon polarity, while we shall find a rather simple dependence ( proportionality to αc3 = (1- αP2)3/2) for the susceptibility and approximately the same for the dielectric constant. The defining of an ionicity to be used to scale properties from one system to another is of course a much less ambitious undertaking than a derivation of the properties in terms of the electronic structure. On the other hand, because of its empirical content it can be a more accurate predictor of experimental values. It can be used, for example, to accurately predict the elastic constant of GaAs by interpolating between Ge and ZnSe which are isoelectronic with it. The result will be much more accurate than our prediction of the value from Eq. (3-11). On the other hand, because our value does not depend on empirical values for similar systems we can make predictions for totally different systems and obtain the dependence upon other features, such as the bond length or metallicity. The goals are completely different. The fact that our polarity is a similar concept to ionicity (in fact related more closely to the square root of the ionicity of Pauling and Phillips than to the ionicity itself (Harrison(1980), p. 190, Christensen, Satpathy, and Pawlowska(1987)), should not be allowed to confuse the totally different goals and

  4. Casimir force between dielectric media with free charges.

    PubMed

    Høye, Johan S; Brevik, Iver

    2009-07-01

    The statistical mechanical approach to Casimir problems for dielectrics separated by a vacuum gap turns out to be compact and effective. A central ingredient of this method is the effect of interacting fluctuating dipole moments of the polarizable particles. At arbitrary temperature the path-integral formulation of quantized particles, developed by Høye-Stell and others, is needed. At high temperature-the limit considered in the present paper-the classical theory is, however, sufficient. Our present theory is related to an idea put forward earlier by Jancovici and Samaj (2004), namely, to evaluate the Casimir force between parallel plates invoking an electronic plasma model and the Debye-Hückel theory for electrolytes. Their result was recently recovered by Høye (2008), using a related statistical mechanical method. In the present paper we generalize this by including a constant permittivity in the description. The present paper generalizes our earlier theory for parallel plates (1998), as well as for spherical dielectrics (2001). We also consider the Casimir force between a polarizable particle and a conductor with a small density of charges, finding agreement with the result recently derived by Pitaevskii (2008). PMID:19658650

  5. Directional excitation of surface plasmons by dielectric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengjun; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Fumeaux, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    An important aim of current research on plasmonics is to develop compact components to manipulate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and specifically to develop efficient SPP couplers. The commonly used metallic resonators are inefficient to couple free-space waves to SPPs and metallic gratings require oblique incidence for achieving unidirectional propagation. In this article, we propose to use nanoscale nonuniform arrays of dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) to realize unidirectional launching of SPPs. DRAs are made of low-loss high-permittivity nanostructures operating on a metal surface. The applications of metallodielectric nanostructures can produce resonances mainly in the low-loss dielectric parts and hence the power dissipated through oscillating current in metal can be reduced. Similar to metallic resonators, DRAs operating near resonance can provide phase control when coupling incident waves into SPPs, adding degrees of freedom in controlling propagation direction. The theoretical analysis in this article, with numerical validation, shows efficient SPPs launching by nonuniform array of cylindrical DRAs into a predesigned direction. Furthermore, with proper patterning, optimal launching can be achieved by avoiding power leakage via deflection into free space. The SPP launching condition and the influence of propagation loss are also mathematically analyzed from the viewpoint of antenna array theory. The SPPs launchers based on DRAs have a potential for applications in highly efficient integrated optics and optical waveguides.

  6. Dielectric elastomer vibrissal system for active tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Andrew T.; Pearson, Martin J.; Pipe, Anthony G.; Welsby, Jason; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    Rodents are able to dexterously navigate confined and unlit environments by extracting spatial and textural information with their whiskers (or vibrissae). Vibrissal-based active touch is suited to a variety of applications where vision is occluded, such as search-and-rescue operations in collapsed buildings. In this paper, a compact dielectric elastomer vibrissal system (DEVS) is described that mimics the vibrissal follicle-sinus complex (FSC) found in rodents. Like the vibrissal FSC, the DEVS encapsulates all sensitive mechanoreceptors at the root of a passive whisker within an antagonistic muscular system. Typically, rats actively whisk arrays of macro-vibrissae with amplitudes of up to +/-25°. It is demonstrated that these properties can be replicated by exploiting the characteristic large actuation strains and passive compliance of dielectric elastomers. A prototype DEVS is developed using VHB 4905 and embedded strain gauges bonded to the root of a tapered whisker. The DEVS is demonstrated to produce a maximum rotational output of +/-22.8°. An electro-mechanical model of the DEVS is derived, which incorporates a hyperelastic material model and Euler- Bernoulli beam equations. The model is shown to predict experimental measurements of whisking stroke amplitude and whisker deflection.

  7. Dielectric relaxation of α -tocopherol acetate (vitamin E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Maslanka, S.; Ziolo, J.; Paluch, M.; McGrath, K. J.; Roland, C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric loss spectra are reported for α -tocopherol acetate (an isomer of vitamin E) in the supercooled and glassy states. The α -relaxation times, τα , measured over a 190° range of temperatures, T , at pressures, P , up to 400MPa can be expressed as a single function of TV3.9 ( V is specific volume, measured herein as a function of T and P ). At ambient pressure, there is no dynamic crossover over eight decades of measured τα . The relaxation spectra above the glass transition temperature Tg show ionic conductivity and an excess wing on the high-frequency flank of the α -relaxation loss peak. Temperature-pressure superpositioning is valid for the α process; moreover, the peak shape is constant (stretch exponent equal to 0.65). However, application of pressure changes the shape of the dielectric spectrum at higher frequencies due to the shift of the excess wing to form a resolved peak. Additionally, another relaxation process, absent at atmospheric pressure, emerges on the high-frequency side of the α -process. We propose that this new peak reflects a more compact conformation of the α -tocopherol acetate molecule. Drawing on the coupling model, the experimentally determined relaxation times, activation energy, and activation volume for the Johari-Goldstein process are compared to values calculated from the properties of the α relaxation. The agreement is generally satisfactory, at least for T

  8. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  9. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  10. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  11. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    1987-09-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas, the model treats sub-tuned RDL antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mock-ups of RDL antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  12. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  13. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  14. VARIABLE MOMENTUM COMPACTION LATTICE STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    KRAMER,S.; MURPHY,J.B.

    1999-03-29

    The VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was used to study the impact of changes in the momentum compaction factors over a large range from positive to negative values. Changes in bunch length and synchrotron tune were measured versus current and RF parameters for these different lattices. By controlling both the first and second-order momentum compaction factors, a lattice was developed in which a pair of alpha buckets was created within the energy aperture of the vacuum chamber and beam was stored simultaneously in both buckets.

  15. Dielectric constant of water in the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ˜5 to 18 Å.

  16. Dielectric relaxation of high-k oxides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Frequency dispersion of high-k dielectrics was observed and classified into two parts: extrinsic cause and intrinsic cause. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant (dielectric relaxation), that is the intrinsic frequency dispersion, could not be characterized before considering the effects of extrinsic frequency dispersion. Several mathematical models were discussed to describe the dielectric relaxation of high-k dielectrics. For the physical mechanism, dielectric relaxation was found to be related to the degree of polarization, which depended on the structure of the high-k material. It was attributed to the enhancement of the correlations among polar nanodomain. The effect of grain size for the high-k materials' structure mainly originated from higher surface stress in smaller grain due to its higher concentration of grain boundary. PMID:24180696

  17. Dielectric constant of water in the interface.

    PubMed

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ∼5 to 18 Å. PMID:27394114

  18. Test results of a prototype dielectric microcalorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfafman, T. E.; Silver, E.; Labov, S.; Beeman, J.; Goulding, F.; Hansen, W.; Landis, D.; Madden, N.

    1990-01-01

    The initial development work on a dielectric microcalorimeter is presented. It focuses on the dielectric properties of the ferroelectric material KTa(1-x)Nb(x)O3 (KTN). Measurements of the temperature dependent dielectric constant are given together with the first alpha particle detection results from a prototype composite microcalorimeter operating at 1.3 K. A nonthermal mechanism for detecting 6 MeV alpha particles in a monolithic KTN sample is also reported.

  19. Dielectric behavior of semiconductors at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, Jai N.

    1992-01-01

    A cylindrical microwave resonant cavity in TE(011) (Transverse Electric) mode is used to study the dielectric relaxation in germanium and silicon. The samples of these semiconductors are used to perturb the electric field in the cavity, and Slater's perturbation equations are used to calculate the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant. The dielectric loss of germanium and silicon is studied at different temperatures, and Debye's equations are used to calculate the relaxation time at these temperatures.

  20. Dielectric constant microscopy for biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valavade, A. V.; Kothari, D. C.; Löbbe, C.

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the work on the development of Dielectric Constant Microscopy for biological materials using double pass amplitude modulation method. The dielectric constant information can be obtained at nanometer scales using this technique. Electrostatic force microscopy images of biological materials are presented. The images obtained from the EFM technique mode clearly show inversion contrast and gives the spatial variation of tip-sample capacitance. The EFM images are further processed to obtain dielectric constant information at nanometer scales.

  1. A microwave dielectric resonant oscillatory circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigov, A. S.; Shvartsburg, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Bias currents in a thin dielectric nonconducting torus are investigated, and the resonant mode of excitation of these currents is established. The similarity of the frequency spectrum of such a dielectric element to the spectra of a classical Thomson oscillatory circuit and a metamaterial with negative permittivity is demonstrated. The resonant frequency of electromagnetic oscillations of the ring dielectric circuit and magnetic and electric fields of such a circuit under resonant excitation are determined.

  2. Realizing optical magnetism from dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ginn, James C; Brener, Igal; Peters, David W; Wendt, Joel R; Stevens, Jeffrey O; Hines, Paul F; Basilio, Lorena I; Warne, Larry K; Ihlefeld, Jon F; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, an all-dielectric metamaterial composite in the midinfrared based on micron-sized, high-index tellurium dielectric resonators. Dielectric resonators are desirable compared to conventional metallodielectric metamaterials at optical frequencies as they are largely angular invariant, free of Ohmic loss, and easily integrated into three-dimensional volumes. Measurements and simulation provide evidence of optical magnetism, which could be used for infrared magnetic mirrors, hard or soft surfaces, and subwavelength cavities. PMID:22463666

  3. 75 FR 62568 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... of the Council should notify the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Compact Officer, Mr. Gary S..., FBI Compact Officer, Compact Council Office, Module D3, 1000 Custer Hollow Road, Clarksburg,...

  4. Dielectric particle injector for material processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device for use as an electrostatic particle or droplet injector is disclosed which is capable of injecting dielectric particles or droplets. The device operates by first charging the dielectric particles or droplets using ultraviolet light induced photoelectrons from a low work function material plate supporting the dielectric particles or droplets, and then ejecting the charged particles or droplets from the plate by utilizing an electrostatic force. The ejected particles or droplets are mostly negatively charged in the preferred embodiment; however, in an alternate embodiment, an ion source is used instead of ultraviolet light to eject positively charged dielectric particles or droplets.

  5. Cantor dielectric resonators for microwave waveguide applicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Diovisalvi, Annunziata; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Scaglione, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Dielectric resonators are structures consisting of a stack of two (or more) different dielectric materials arranged in a certain sequence. The present paper is focused on Cantor dielectric resonators whose construction is determined according to the fractal Cantor scheme. Cantor microwave applicators can be realized by inserting a Cantor resonator in a metallic rectangular waveguide. This applicator can be useful for processing low loss materials due to the field localization occurring in the Cantor resonator. Investigations for different dielectric materials constituting the resonator have been done. Experimental results obtained using a prototype of the Cantor applicator show a good agreement between measured and theoretically calculated field amplitude profiles.

  6. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0dielectric layer is disposed on the back surface of the portion of the substrate. A semiconductor layer is disposed on the silicon oxynitride dielectric layer.

  7. The Compact Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The National Alliance of Business (NAB) surveyed the 12 sites that participated in the Compact Project to develop and implement programs of business-education collaboration. NAB studied start-up activities, key players, conditions for collaboration, accomplishments, challenges, and future plans. Program outcomes indicated that building successful…

  8. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  9. Generalized high order compact methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, William F.; Kominiarczuk, Jakub

    2010-09-01

    The fundamental ideas of the high order compact method are combined with the generalized finite difference method. The result is a finite difference method that works on unstructured, nonuniform grids, and is more accurate than one would classically expect from the number of grid points employed.

  10. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  11. Mesoscale simulations of powder compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-06-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to experimental match compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show evidence of hard-to-explain reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line, which have also been observed in the experiments. We found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations, since 2D results tend to underpredict stress levels for high-porosity powders regardless of material properties. We developed a process to extract macroscale information for the simulation which can be directly used in calibration of continuum model for heterogeneous media.

  12. Compact color schlieren optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, Donald R.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1993-01-01

    A compact optical system for use with rainbow schlieren deflectometry is described. Both halves of the optical system consist of well-corrected telescopes whose refractive elements are all from manufacturer's stock catalogs, with the reflective primary being a spherical surface. As a result, the system is relatively easy to construct and meets the requirement of long focal length for quantitative rainbow schlieren measurements.

  13. Calculation of Dielectric Response in Molecular Solids for High Capacitance Organic Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzer, Henry Matthew

    The dielectric response of a material is critically important in numerous scientific processes spanning the fields of biology, chemistry, materials science, and physics. While important across these fundamental disciplines, it remains difficult to determine theoretically the dielectric environment of a system. With recent advances in nanotechnology, biochemistry, and molecular electronics, it has become necessary to determine the dielectric response in molecular systems that are difficult to measure experimentally, such as nanoscale interfaces, highly disordered biological environments, or molecular materials that are difficult to synthesize. In these scenarios it is highly advantageous to determine the dielectric response through efficient and accurate calculations. A good example of where a theoretical prediction of dielectric response is critical is in the development of high capacitance molecular dielectrics. Molecular dielectrics offer the promise of cheap, flexible, and mass producible electronic devices when used in conjunction with organic semiconducting materials to form Organic Field Effect Transistors (OFETs). To date, molecular dielectrics suffer from poor dielectric properties resulting in low capacitances. A low capacitance dielectric material requires a much larger power source to operate the device in OFETs, leading to modest device performance. Development of better performing dielectric materials has been hindered due to the time it takes to synthesize and fabricate new molecular materials. An accurate and efficient theoretical technique could drastically decrease this time by screening potential dielectric materials and providing design rules for future molecular dielectrics. Here in, the methodology used to calculate dielectric properties of molecular materials is described. The validity of the technique is demonstrated on model systems, capturing the frequency dependence of the dielectric response and achieving quantitative accuracy compared

  14. Compact CFB: The next generation CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Utt, J.

    1996-12-31

    The next generation of compact circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers is described in outline form. The following topics are discussed: compact CFB = pyroflow + compact separator; compact CFB; compact separator is a breakthrough design; advantages of CFB; new design with substantial development history; KUHMO: successful demo unit; KUHMO: good performance over load range with low emissions; KOKKOLA: first commercial unit and emissions; KOKKOLA: first commercial unit and emissions; compact CFB installations; next generation CFB boiler; grid nozzle upgrades; cast segmented vortex finders; vortex finder installation; ceramic anchors; pre-cast vertical bullnose; refractory upgrades; and wet gunning.

  15. Compaction in the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boorman, S.; Boudreau, A.

    2003-12-01

    Compaction in the mush zone of a crystallizing chamber is a model for fractionation, whereby evolved interstitial liquid expelled from the compacting crystal pile is returned to the magma chamber. If compaction was important during crystallization of the Lower and Critical Zones of the Bushveld Complex, certain textural features are expected; and, these features should correlate to position in the section, as well as to the number of mineral phases present. We report on a spectrum of textural data for 30 samples form the Lower and Critical Zones of the Bushveld Complex. Crystal Size Distributions (CSDs) are a semi-log plot of population density against crystal size, and provide information about magmatic processes such as crystal accumulation, removal and aging. Changes to the magmatic system are reflected in the shape of the CSD plot. CSDs of Bushveld rocks show a log-linear trend overturned at smaller grain sizes, a result consistent with both crystal aging, wherein larger grains grow at the expense of small ones in the crystallizing pile, and melt migration, where nucleation is suppressed by the loss of late melt fractions. CSD slope and intercept data vary with stratigraphy. Slopes in the Critical Zone are steeper, indicating less recrystallization and less of a compaction effect. In contrast, slopes in the Lower Zone are shallower, a result consistent with slower cooling and a greater compaction/recrystallization effect. Likewise, lower CSD intercepts are associated with the shallower slopes of the lower zone and vice versa. The extent of foliation is measured as alignment factor (AF), determined by orientation statistics of the major axes of the grains of interest. AF decreases with stratigraphic height and foliation is best developed in the nearly monomineralic harzburgite of the Lower Zone (AF avg=64). At the Lower Zone-Critical Zone transition, plagioclase content increases, decreasing bulk density and thus, the systems ability to accommodate compaction

  16. Techniques for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectrics and dielectric properties of materials are defined generally, and methods for measuring dielectric properties of agricultural products are described for several frequency ranges from audio frequencies through microwave frequencies. These include measurement with impedance and admittance...

  17. Dielectric strength of parylene HT

    SciTech Connect

    Diaham, S. Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Khazaka, R.; Tenailleau, C.

    2014-02-07

    The dielectric strength of parylene HT (PA-HT) films was studied at room temperature in a wide thickness range from 500 nm to 50 μm and was correlated with nano- and microstructure analyses. X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscopy have revealed an enhancement of crystallization and spherulites development, respectively, with increasing the material thickness (d). Moreover, a critical thickness d{sub C} (between 5 and 10 μm) is identified corresponding to the beginning of spherulite developments in the films. Two distinct behaviors of the dielectric strength (F{sub B}) appear in the thickness range. For d ≥ d{sub C}, PA-HT films exhibit a decrease in the breakdown field following a negative slope (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup −0.4}), while for d < d{sub C}, it increases with increasing the thickness (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup 0.3}). An optimal thickness d{sub optim} ∼ 5 μm corresponding to a maximum dielectric strength (F{sub B} ∼ 10 MV/cm) is obtained. A model of spherulite development in PA-HT films with increasing the thickness is proposed. The decrease in F{sub B} above d{sub C} is explained by the spherulites development, whereas its increase below d{sub C} is induced by the crystallites growth. An annealing of the material shows both an enhancement of F{sub B} and an increase of the crystallites and spherulites dimensions, whatever the thickness. The breakdown field becomes thickness-independent below d{sub C} showing a strong influence of the nano-scale structural parameters. On the contrary, both nano- and micro-scale structural parameters appear as influent on F{sub B} for d ≥ d{sub C}.

  18. Dielectric relaxations in aliphatic polyesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Sudeepto

    2001-07-01

    The dielectric technique was used to study the relaxation processes of five linear aliphatic polyesters. The polyesters studied were poly (ethylene succinate/adipate) or PESA, poly (trimethylene succinate/adipate) or PTSA, poly (butylene succinate/adipate) or PBSA, poly (ethylene succinate) or PES, and poly (ethylene adipate) or PEA. Three of the polyesters were copolymers (PESA, PTSA, and PBSA), and the remaining two (PES and PEA) were homopolymers. Two of the five were amorphous (PESA and PTSA), and the remaining three (PBSA, PES, and PEA) were semicrystalline. All the five polyesters were synthesized in the laboratory using a poly-condensation reaction between a series of aliphatic diols and diesters. The succinic and adipic groups in the copolymers are in equimolar amounts. The polymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and density measurements. Elemental analysis done on the polymers confirmed that their compositions matched theoretical estimates. The relaxation processes were studied dielectrically using an IMASS time domain dielectric spectrometer (TDS) and an HP 4284A LCR meter. Together they allowed a frequency range from 0.001 Hz to 1 MHz. Typically in the subglass region, good data were obtained between 0.01 Hz and 100 kHz. In the glass transition region, good data were occasionally available over the entire range. Two relaxation processes were detected in the subglass temperature region for all the polymers, and in the case of the copolymers PTSA and PBSA, they were also well resolved. Both the processes showed Arrhenius behavior with modest activation energies characteristic of subglass processes in general. They also progressively merged with increasing temperature, which implies a lower activation energy for the faster process which is consistent with the current understanding of relaxation phenomena. The glass transition region of all the polymers also showed a merging of the dominant alpha relaxation with the subglass

  19. Dielectric strength of parylene HT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaham, S.; Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Khazaka, R.; Tenailleau, C.; Kumar, R.

    2014-02-01

    The dielectric strength of parylene HT (PA-HT) films was studied at room temperature in a wide thickness range from 500 nm to 50 μm and was correlated with nano- and microstructure analyses. X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscopy have revealed an enhancement of crystallization and spherulites development, respectively, with increasing the material thickness (d). Moreover, a critical thickness dC (between 5 and 10 μm) is identified corresponding to the beginning of spherulite developments in the films. Two distinct behaviors of the dielectric strength (FB) appear in the thickness range. For d ≥ dC, PA-HT films exhibit a decrease in the breakdown field following a negative slope (FB ˜ d-0.4), while for d < dC, it increases with increasing the thickness (FB ˜ d0.3). An optimal thickness doptim ˜ 5 μm corresponding to a maximum dielectric strength (FB ˜ 10 MV/cm) is obtained. A model of spherulite development in PA-HT films with increasing the thickness is proposed. The decrease in FB above dC is explained by the spherulites development, whereas its increase below dC is induced by the crystallites growth. An annealing of the material shows both an enhancement of FB and an increase of the crystallites and spherulites dimensions, whatever the thickness. The breakdown field becomes thickness-independent below dC showing a strong influence of the nano-scale structural parameters. On the contrary, both nano- and micro-scale structural parameters appear as influent on FB for d ≥ dC.

  20. The Dielectric Properties of Poly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Alfredo

    The dielectric properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVF(,2)) are discussed in this work. A review of the literature concerning the five known dielectric relaxations of PVF(,2) is presented and the general theory of dielectric relaxations in polymers is summarized. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of several samples of PVF(,2) were measured as a function of frequency, temperature and pressure. In the temperature experiment covering the range from 5 K to 380 K at five audio frequencies (100 Hz to 10 KHz), four relaxations were found: (alpha), (beta), (delta) and (epsilon). The (alpha) relaxation at temperatures between 345 and 370 K at 1000 Hz, was found to be dependent on the history and preparation method of the sample and also to have a Debye like behavior. The (beta) relaxation around 250 K at 1000 Hz was found to be related to the glass transition of PVF(,2) and its behavior is parametrized by using the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. The (delta) relaxation around 76 K at 1000 Hz was found to be Debye like and associated with the (alpha)-phase of PVF(,2). The (epsilon) relaxation was found in (beta)-phase PVF(,2) at 14.5 K at 1000 Hz. Evidence of the relaxation was found also in (alpha)-phase PVF(,2). In the pressure experiments the (beta) relaxation was studied in the temperature range from 240 to 360 K and at pressures from 0.0001 to 0.6 GPa. The behavior was explained by using the WLF free volume model and comparison between the calculated glass transition temperature parameter in the WLF equation and the experimental peak temperature is made. It was found that even though the WLF equation mathematically describes the (beta) relaxation, the T(,g) parameter does not represent the real transition temperature behavior with pressure. The peak temperature of the (beta) relaxation, was found to be a better guide to the behavior of the real T(,g).

  1. Femtosecond laser structuring in dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juodkazis, Saulius

    2008-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structuring of glasses, crystals, and polymers by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses is a promising technique for microfluidic, micro-optical, photonic crystal and micro-mechanical applications [1-4]. The 3D laser micro-structuring of resists is demonstrated by direct laser writing [1] and holographic recording using phase control of interfering pulses [2]. Tightly focused laser pulses can reach dielectric breakdown irradiance without self-focusing when sub-1 ps pulses are used for laser-structuring inside dielectrics. The limiting case of microstructuring, a void recording, can be achieved [3]. The mechanism of void formation has been explained as a result of dielectric breakdown and micro-explosion. The absorption is localized within a skin depth of tens-of-nanometers in the plasma at the focus. This defines an ultimate localization of the energy delivery by a laser pulse. The absorbance reaches 0.6 in a fully ionized solid state density breakdown plasma. The high temperature and pressure buildup is large enough to generate a shock wave (strong micro-explosion). For example, a single 100 nJ laser pulse forms a void under tight focusing conditions even in the high strength sapphire (Young modulus of 400 GPa). It is considered that material fails upon compression rather than tension for which the mechanical failure threshold is by an order of magnitude smaller. This scenario of breakdown by compression is corroborated by numerical modeling of the strong explosion at our experimental conditions. Modification of materials by tightly focused femtosecond pulses opens new material processing routes for inert dielectrics [4] and can possibly be used for creation of new high-temperature and pressure phases inside the volume of irradiated samples. These regions with altered nano-structure have different chemical properties as was found in silica glass, quartz, and sapphire by wet etching of the ``shocked'' regions in aqueous solution of

  2. Dielectric cure monitoring: Preliminary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B. E.; Semmel, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been conducted on two types of dielectric cure monitoring systems employing both epoxy resins and phenolic composites. An Audrey System was used for 23 cure monitoring runs with very limited success. Nine complete cure monitoring runs have been investigated using a Micromet System. Two additional measurements were performed to investigate the Micromet's sensitivity to water absorption in a post-cure carbon-phenolic material. While further work is needed to determine data significance, the Micromet system appears to show promise as a feedback control device during processing.

  3. Special issue on compact x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

    2014-04-01

    . New schemes for compact accelerators: laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators; dielectric laser accelerators; THz accelerators. Latest results for compact accelerators. Target design and staging of advanced accelerators. Advanced injection and phase space manipulation techniques. Novel diagnostics: single-shot measurement of sub-fs bunch duration; measurement of ultra-low emittance. Generation and characterization of incoherent radiation: betatron and undulator radiation; Thomson/Compton scattering sources, novel THz sources. Generation and characterization of coherent radiation. Novel FEL simulation techniques. Advances in simulations of novel accelerators: simulations of injection and acceleration processes; simulations of coherent and incoherent radiation sources; start-to-end simulations of fifth generation light sources. Novel undulator schemes. Novel laser drivers for laser-driven accelerators: high-repetition rate laser systems; high wall-plug efficiency systems. Applications of compact accelerators: imaging; radiography; medical applications; electron diffraction and microscopy. Please submit your article by 15 May 2014 (expected web publication: winter 2014); submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue.

  4. Inhibiting electro-thermal breakdown of acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators by dielectric gel coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) is very localized; a spark and a pinhole (puncture) in dielectric ends up with short-circuit. This letter shows that prevention of electrothermal breakdown helps defer failure of DEAs even with conductive-grease electrodes. Dielectric gel encapsulation or coating (Dow Corning 3-4170) helps protect acrylic elastomer (VHB 4905), making it thermally more stable and delaying its thermal oxidation (burn) from 218 °C to 300 °C. Dielectric-gel-coated acrylic DEAs can withstand higher local leak-induced heating and thus achieve higher dielectric strengths than non-coated DEAs do.

  5. Multi-resonant compact nanoaperture with accessible large nearfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Arif E.; Turkmen, Mustafa; Aksu, Serap; Etezadi, Dordaneh; Altug, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    We present a compact and multi-resonant aperture system supporting large local electromagnetic fields, which is highly advantageous for applications demanding high signal-to-noise ratio. The system is composed of subwavelength H-shaped apertures with extended arms fabricated through thin metal films on a free-standing dielectric membranes. Through finite-difference time-domain calculations, we numerically investigate the multi-resonant spectral nature of the compact system in detail, which is associated with the individual optical response of the constituting aperture elements. In order to realize the aperture systems working in the spectral region of interest, we introduce a fine-tuning mechanism of the optical responses through geometrical device parameters. Furthermore, we present a circuit analog of the system demonstrating the impedance characteristics of the plasmonic modes supported by the aperture arrays. The highly accessible large electromagnetic fields extending over a large volume improve the sensitivity of the nanostructured platform to the surface conditions by enhancing the overlap between biomolecules in the vicinity and the local optical fields. We also experimentally demonstrate this highly advantageous field generation capability through large absorption signal enhancements in the surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy of protein bilayers.

  6. Preliminary investigation of an improved metal-dielectric cathode for magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoping Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Jun; Fan, Yuwei; Li, Zhiqiang

    2015-02-15

    In order to explore the cathode with good repetition quality for the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillators, an improved metal-dielectric cathode is proposed and investigated experimentally. The cathode is designed to be step-like shape, and thin copper plated boards are periodically and compactly arrayed on the surface of the cathode base, which ensures the uniformity of the electrons emitted from the cusps of the copper plated boards. According to the numerical simulation results, the step-like shape is beneficial to convert the kinetic energy of the magnetic insulating current partially and enhance the beam-wave interaction efficiency. Finally, a preliminary experiment of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with the improved metal-dielectric cathode is carried out. A high power microwave (HPM) with an average power of 1.95 GW is generated from the MILO, with an efficiency of 13.5%. Under the same experiment condition, the output power and main frequency with the presented cathode are almost the same to those with the velvet cathode. Apart from that, metal-dielectric cathode has the merits of small outgassing and long lifetime, and all of these make the improved metal-dielectric cathode significantly promising for the MILO repetition operation.

  7. Plasma treatment of polymer dielectric films to improve capacitive energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yializis, A.; Binder, M.; Mammone, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Demand for compact instrumentation, portable field equipment, and new electromagnetic weapons is creating a need for new dielectric materials with higher energy storage capabilities. Recognizing the need for higher energy storage capacitors, the Army Research Lab at Fort Monmouth, NJ, initiated a program a year ago to investigate potential methods for increasing the dielectric strength of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) film, which is the highest energy density material commercially available today. Treatment of small area PVDF films in a CF4/O2 plasma showed that the dielectric strength of PVDF films can be increased by as much as 20 percent when treated in a 96 percent CF4/4 percent O2 plasma. This 44 percent increase in energy storage of a PVDF capacitor is significant considering that the treatment can be implemented in a conventional metallizing chamber, with minimum capital investment. The data shows that improved breakdown strength may be unique to PVDF film and the particular CF4/O2 gas mixture, because PVDF film treated with 100 percent CF4, 100 percent O2, Ar gas plasma, and electron irradiation shows no improvement in breakdown strength. Other data presented includes dissipation factor, dielectric constant, and surface tension measurements.

  8. Crosslinked polymeric dielectric materials and electronic devices incorporating same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, Tobin J. (Inventor); Facchetti, Antonio (Inventor); Wang, Zhiming (Inventor); Choi, Hyuk-Jin (Inventor); Suh, legal representative, Nae-Jeong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Solution-processable dielectric materials are provided, along with precursor compositions and processes for preparing the same. Composites and electronic devices including the dielectric materials also are provided.

  9. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using a multi layer configuration

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A loss dielectric includes at least one high dielectric loss layer and at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. A method of manufacturing a loss dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. The systems and methods provide advantages because the loss dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  10. A simple method for reducing inevitable dielectric loss in high-permittivity dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, F. B.; Yu, L.; Mazurek, P.; Skov, A. L.

    2016-07-01

    Commercial viability of dielectric elastomers (DEs) is currently limited by a few obstacles, including high driving voltages (in the kV range). Driving voltage can be lowered by either decreasing the Young’s modulus or increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone elastomers, or a combination thereof. A decrease in the Young’s modulus, however, is often accompanied by a loss in mechanical stability, whereas increases in dielectric permittivity are usually followed by a large increase in dielectric loss followed by a decrease in breakdown strength and thereby the lifetime of the DE. A new soft elastomer matrix, with high dielectric permittivity and a low Young’s modulus, aligned with no loss of mechanical stability, was prepared through the use of commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil mixed into a tough commercial liquid silicone rubber silicone elastomer. The addition of chloropropyl-functional silicone oil in concentrations up to 30 phr was found to improve the properties of the silicone elastomer significantly, as dielectric permittivity increased to 4.4, dielectric breakdown increased up to 25% and dielectric losses were reduced. The chloropropyl-functional silicone oil also decreased the dielectric losses of an elastomer containing dielectric permittivity-enhancing TiO2 fillers. Commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil thus constitutes a facile method for improved silicone DEs, with very low dielectric losses.

  11. Dielectric Spectroscopy of Fresh Chicken Breast Meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dielectric properties of fresh chicken breast meat were measured at temperatures from 5 to 85 'C over the frequency range from 10 MHz to 1.8 GHz by dielectric spectroscopy techniques with an open-ended coaxial-line probe and impedance analyzer. Samples were cut from both the Pectoralis major an...

  12. Dielectric Spectroscopy of Fresh Chicken Breast Meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical abstract The dielectric properties of fresh chicken breast meat were measured at temperatures from 5 to 85 degrees °C over the frequency range from 10 MHz to 1.8 GHz by dielectric spectroscopy techniques with an open-ended coaxial-line probe and impedance analyzer. Samples were cut from ...

  13. Dielectric Study of Water Binding in Grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of wheat samples, in which moisture equilibrium was upset by adding water, were tracked versus time in the frequency range between 5 GHz and 15 GHz at room temperature (23 oC). Results presented at 10 GHz show an initial drop in the dielectric constant and loss factor, which r...

  14. Microwave Dielectric Properties of Cereal Grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of five cereal grains (wheat, corn, barley, oats, and grain sorghum) were 19 measured at 23 oC over broad microwave frequency range (5 GHz to 15 GHz) with a free-space-transmission 20 technique. Results of dielectric properties measurement are tabulated for each material for mo...

  15. Dielectric spectroscopy of watermelons for quality sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Stuart O.; Guo, Wen-chuan; Trabelsi, Samir; Kays, Stanley J.

    2007-07-01

    Dielectric properties of four small-sized watermelon cultivars, grown and harvested to provide a range of maturities, were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe and an impedance analyser over the frequency range from 10 MHz to 1.8 GHz. Probe measurements were made on the external surface of the melons and also on tissue samples from the edible internal tissue. Moisture content and soluble solids content (SSC) were measured for internal tissue samples, and SSC (sweetness) was used as the quality factor for correlation with the dielectric properties. Individual dielectric constant and loss factor correlations with SSC were low, but a high correlation was obtained between the SSC and permittivity from a complex-plane plot of dielectric constant and loss factor, each divided by SSC. However, SSC prediction from the dielectric properties by this relationship was not as high as expected (coefficient of determination about 0.4). Permittivity data (dielectric constant and loss factor) for the melons are presented graphically to show their relationships with frequency for the four melon cultivars and for external surface and internal tissue measurements. A dielectric relaxation for the external surface measurements, which may be attributable to a combination of bound water, Maxwell-Wagner, molecular cluster or ion-related effects, is also illustrated. Coefficients of determination for complex-plane plots, moisture content and SSC relationship, and penetration depth are also shown graphically. Further studies are needed for determining the practicality of sensing melon quality from their dielectric properties.

  16. Interface Modification of Pentacene OFET Gate Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakabovič, Ján; Kováč, Jaroslav; Srnánek, Rudolf; Kováč, Jaroslav; Sokolský, Michal; Cirák, Július; Haško, Daniel; Resel, Roland; Zojer, Egbert

    Pentacene organic field effect transistors (OFETs) electrical and structural properties have already been analysed from the point of view of different gate dielectric and growth conditions utilization. The AFM and micro Raman investigations show that the first organic monolayer at the pentacene/dielectric interface are essential determinants of carrier transport phenomena and achievable drain current of pentacene OFETs.

  17. Microwave dielectric method for moisture sensing almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dielectric –based method was developed for rapid and nondestructive determination of moisture content in almond kernels independent of bulk density from measurement of their dielectric properties at a single microwave frequency. Calibration equations for moisture determination with temperature com...

  18. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  19. Graphene-Dielectric Integration for Graphene Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lei; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2010-01-01

    Graphene is emerging as an interesting electronic material for future electronics due to its exceptionally high carrier mobility and single-atomic thickness. Graphene-dielectric integration is of critical importance for the development of graphene transistors and a new generation of graphene based electronics. Deposition of dielectric materials onto graphene is of significant challenge due to the intrinsic material incompatibility between pristine graphene and dielectric oxide materials. Here we review various strategies being researched for graphene-dielectric integration. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) can be used to directly deposit dielectric materials on graphene, but often introduces significant defects into the monolayer of carbon lattice; Atomic layer deposition (ALD) process has also been explored to to deposit high-κ dielectrics on graphene, which however requires functionalization of graphene surface with reactive groups, inevitably leading to a significant degradation in carrier mobilities; Using naturally oxidized thin aluminum or polymer as buffer layer for dielectric deposition can mitigate the damages to graphene lattice and improve the carrier mobility of the resulted top-gated transistors; Lastly, a physical assembly approach has recently been explored to integrate dielectric nanostructures with graphene without introducing any appreciable defects, and enabled top-gated graphene transistors with the highest carrier mobility reported to date. We will conclude with a brief summary and perspective on future opportunities. PMID:21278913

  20. Dielectric relaxation of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Lakhwant; Awasthi, A.M.; Lochab, S.P.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The present article reports the effect of gamma irradiation on the dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica. • Dielectric and electrical relaxations have been analyzed in the framework of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and Cole–Cole formalisms. • The frequency dependent electrical conductivity has been rationalized using Johnsher’s universal power law. • The experimentally measured electric modulus and conductivity data have been fitted using Havriliak–Negami dielectric relaxation function. - Abstract: In the present research, the dielectric relaxation of gamma irradiated muscovite mica was studied in the frequency range of 0.1 Hz–10 MHz and temperature range of 653–853 K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The dielectric constants (ϵ′ and ϵ′′) are found to be high for gamma irradiated muscovite mica as compared to the pristine sample. The frequency dependence of the imaginary part of complex electric modulus (M′′) and dc conductivity data conforms Arrhenius law with single value of activation energy for pristine sample and two values of activation energy for gamma irradiated mica sample. The experimentally assessed electric modulus and conductivity information have been interpreted by the Havriliak–Negami dielectric relaxation explanation. Using the Cole–Cole framework, an analysis of real and imaginary characters of the electric modulus for pristine and gamma irradiated sample was executed which reflects the non-Debye relaxation mechanism.

  1. Polycarbonate based three-phase nanocomposite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Goyal, R. K.; Prasad, Y. V. S. S.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Three-phase polycarbonate (PC) matrix nanocomposites are prepared using the solution method. One of the nanocomposite fillers is dielectric and the other is conducting. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is used as the dielectric filler. The conducting fillers, nano-Cu and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), are used to make two different nanocomposites, MWCNT–PZT–PC and Cu–PZT–PC. The prepared nanocomposites are characterized using density measurement, x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Percolation is absent in both three-phase nanocomposites within the study’s concentration window of conducting fillers. The dielectric properties of the nanocomposites are evaluated using a precision impedance analyser. The dielectric constant of the Cu–PZT–PC nanocomposite increases to 14 (a dissipation factor of 0.17), whereas in the case of the MWCNT–PZT–PC nanocomposite it increases to 8.5 (a dissipation factor of 0.002). The melting point of both nanocomposites decreases with respect to the control PC. The frequency (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and temperature (room temperature to 200 °C) dependence of the dielectric constant and dissipation factor are examined. For the Cu–PZT–PC nanocomposites, the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency, whereas in the case of the MWCNT–PZT–PC nanocomposites the dielectric constant is almost constant. The dielectric constant and dissipation factor exhibit a slight temperature dependence.

  2. Dielectric Loss Measurements on Raw Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwanje, J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment used to study dielectric properties of materials. Values of the dielectric loss tangent can be determined at low frequencies from Lissajous figures formed on an oscilloscope. Some mineral rock specimens show Debye-type relaxation peaks at frequencies in the region of 1 to 500 Hz. (Author/DS)

  3. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  4. Dielectric bow-tie nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijing; Shu, Fang-Jie; Zou, Chang-Ling

    2013-12-15

    We propose a novel dielectric bow-tie (DBT) nanocavity consisting of two opposing tip-to-tip triangle semiconductor nanowires, whose end faces are coated by silver nanofilms. Based on the advantages of the dielectric slot and tip structures, and the high reflectivity of the silver mirror, light can be confined in this nanocavity with low loss. We demonstrate that at 4.5 K (300 K) around the resonance wavelength of 1550 nm, the mode excited in this nanocavity has a deep subwavelength mode volume of 2.8×10(-4) μm³ and a high quality factor of 4.9×10(4) (401.3), corresponding to an ultrahigh Purcell factor of 1.6×10(7) (1.36×10(5)). This DBT nanocavity may find applications for integrated nanophotonic circuits, such as high-efficiency single photon sources, thresholdless nanolasers, and strong coupling in cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. PMID:24322245

  5. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting a sub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  6. Powder compaction in systems of bimodal distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, A. K.; Whittemore, O. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The compaction of mixtures involving different particle sizes is discussed. The various stages of the compaction process include the rearrangement of particles, the filling of the interstices of the large particles by the smaller ones, and the change in particle size and shape upon further densification through the application of pressure. Experimental approaches and equipment used for compacting material are discussed together with the theoretical relations of the compacting process.

  7. Dielectric ridge waveguide gas laser apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaria, A.J.; Bridges, W.

    1989-03-14

    A dielectric ridged waveguide flowing gas laser apparatus is described, comprising in combination; a dielectric substrate having a predetermined number of the grooves formed theron, the grooves extending along the longitudinal axis of the dielectric substrate, an electrically conductive member in parallel alignment with the grooved side of the dielectric substrate such that an air gasp is formed therebetween the air gap containing an active laser gas medium, electrically conductive strips disposed on the outside of the dielectric substrate forming electrodes, the conductive strips being aligned with the grooves and having the same length and width as the grooves, and an excitation source connected between the conductive member and the conductive strips, to provide lasing in the ridged waveguide.

  8. Anticipating electrical breakdown in dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muffoletto, Daniel P.; Burke, Kevin M.; Zirnheld, Jennifer L.

    2013-04-01

    The output strain of a dielectric elastomer actuator is directly proportional to the square of its applied electric field. However, since the likelihood of electric breakdown is elevated with an increased applied field, the maximum operating electric field of the dielectric elastomer is significantly derated in systems employing these actuators so that failure due to breakdown remains unlikely even as the material ages. In an effort to ascertain the dielectric strength so that stronger electric fields can be applied, partial discharge testing is used to assess the health of the actuator by detecting the charge that is released when localized instances of breakdown partially bridge the insulator. Pre-stretched and unstretched samples of VHB4910 tape were submerged in dielectric oil to remove external sources of partial discharges during testing, and the partial discharge patterns were recorded just before failure of the dielectric sample.

  9. Explicit model for direct tunneling current in double-gate MOSFETs through a dielectric stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Ferney; Jiménez, David; Suñé, Jordi

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present an explicit compact quantum model for the direct tunneling current through dual layer SiO2/high-K dielectrics in Double Gate (DG) structures. Specifically, an explicit closed-form expression is proposed, useful to study the impact of dielectric constants and band offsets in determining the gate leakage, allowing to identify materials to construct these devices, and useful for the fast evaluation of the gate leakage in the context of electrical circuit simulators. A comparison with self-consistent numerical solution of Schrödinger-Poisson (SP) equations has been performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the model. Finally, a benchmarking test of different gate stacks have been proposed searching to fulfill the gate tunneling limits as projected by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  10. Laser acceleration and deflection of 963 keV electrons with a silicon dielectric structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leedle, Kenneth J.; Pease, R. Fabian; Byer, Robert L.; Harris, James S.

    2015-02-12

    Radio frequency particle accelerators are ubiquitous in ultrasmall and ultrafast science, but their size and cost have prompted exploration of compact and scalable alternatives such as the dielectric laser accelerator. We present the first demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, of high gradient laser acceleration and deflection of electrons with a silicon structure. Driven by a 5 nJ, 130 fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at 907 nm wavelength, our devices achieve accelerating gradients in excess of 200 MeV/m and suboptical cycle streaking of 96.30 keV electrons. These results pave the way for high gradient silicon dielectric laser accelerators using commercialmore » lasers and subfemtosecond electron beam experiments.« less

  11. Numerically optimized structures for dielectric asymmetric dual-grating laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Aimidula, A.; Bake, M. A.; Wan, F.; Xie, B. S.; Welsch, C. P.; Xia, G.; Mete, O.; Uesaka, M.; Matsumura, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Koyama, K.

    2014-02-15

    Optical scale dielectric structures are promising candidates to realize future compact, low cost particle accelerators, since they can sustain high acceleration gradients in the range of GeV/m. Here, we present numerical simulation results for a dielectric asymmetric dual-grating accelerator. It was found that the asymmetric dual-grating structures can efficiently modify the laser field to synchronize it with relativistic electrons, therefore increasing the average acceleration gradient by ∼10% in comparison to symmetric structures. The optimum pillar height which was determined by simulation agrees well with that estimated analytically. The effect of the initial kinetic energy of injected electrons on the acceleration gradient is also discussed. Finally, the required laser parameters were calculated analytically and a suitable laser is proposed as energy source.

  12. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber. PMID:22129008

  13. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P.; Shukla, R.; Prabaharan, T.; Shyam, A.

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO3) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber.

  14. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  15. Low-profile high-voltage compact gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D.A.; Wilson, M.J.; Speer, R.D.

    1997-06-30

    This paper discusses the development and testing of a low-profile, high-voltage, spark-gap switch designed to be closely coupled with other components into an integrated high-energy pulsed-power source. The switch is designed to operate at 100 kV using SF6 gas pressurized to less than 0.7 MPa. The volume of the switch cavity region is less than 1.5 cm3, and the field stress along the gas-dielectric interface is as high as 130 kV/cm. The dielectric switch body has a low profile that is only I -cm tall at its greatest extent and nominally 2-mm thick over most of its area. This design achieves a very low inductance of less than 5 nH, but results in field stresses exceeding 500 kV/cm in the dielectric material. Field modeling was done to determine the appropriate shape for the highly stressed insulator and electrodes, and special manufacturing techniques were employed to mitigate the usual mechanisms that induce breakdown and failure in solid dielectrics. Static breakdown tests verified that the switch operates satisfactorily at 100 kV levels. The unit has been characterized with different shaped electrodes having nominal gap spacings of 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 mm. The relationship between self-break voltage and operating pressure agrees well with published data on gas properties, accounting for the field enhancements of the electrode shapes being used. Capacitor discharge tests in a low inductance test fixture exhibited peak currents up to 25 kA with characteristic frequencies of the ringdown circuit ranging from 10 to 20 MHz. The ringdown waveforms and scaling of measured parameters agree well with circuit modeling of the switch and test fixture. Repetitive operation has been demonstrated at moderate rep-rates up to 15 Hz, limited by the power supply being used. Preliminary tests to evaluate lifetime of the compact switch assembly have been encouraging. In one case, after more than 7,000 high-current ringdown tests with approximately 30 C of total charge transferred, the

  16. Nuclear Physics for Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.

    2009-05-04

    A brief overview is given of the different lines of research developed under the INFN project 'Compact Stellar Objects and Dense Hadronic Matter' (acronym CT51). The emphasis of the project is on the structure of Neutron Stars (NS) and related objects. Starting from crust, the different Nuclear Physics problems are described which are encountered going inside a NS down to its inner core. The theoretical challenges and the observational inputs are discussed in some detail.

  17. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

  18. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  19. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  20. Compact color schlieren optical system.

    PubMed

    Buchele, D R; Griffin, D W

    1993-08-01

    A compact optical system for use with rainbow schlieren deflectometry is described. Both halves of the optical system consist of well-corrected telescopes whose refractive elements are all from manufacturer's stock catalogs, with the reflective primary being a spherical surface. As a result, the system is relatively easy to construct and meets the requirement of long focal length for quantitative rainbow schlieren measurements. PMID:20830072

  1. Compact Color Schlieren Optical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, Donald R.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1996-01-01

    Compact, rugged optical system developed for use in rainbow schlieren deflectometry. Features unobscured telescope with focal-length/aperture-width ratio of 30. Made of carefully selected but relatively inexpensive parts. All of lenses stock items. By-product of design is optical system with loose tolerances on interlens spacing. One of resulting advantages, insensitivity to errors in fabrication of optomechanical mounts. Another advantage is ability to compensate for some of unit-to-unit variations inherent in stock lenses.

  2. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-12-20

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

  3. Thixoforming of Stellite Powder Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, S. C.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-07

    Thixoforming involves processing metallic alloys in the semi-solid state. The process requires the microstructure to be spheroidal when part-solid and part-liquid i.e. to consist of solid spheroids surrounded by liquid. The aim of this work was to investigate whether powder compacts can be used as feedstock for thixoforming and whether the consolidating pressure in the thixoformer can be used to remove porosity from the compact. The powder compacts were made from stellite 6 and stellite 21 alloys, cobalt-based alloys widely used for e.g. manufacturing prostheses. Isothermal heat treatments of small samples in the consolidated state showed the optimum thixoforming temperature to be in the range 1340 deg. C-1350 deg. C for both materials. The alloys were thixoformed into graphite dies and flowed easily to fill the die. Porosity in the thixoformed components was lower than in the starting material. Hardness values at various positions along the radius of the thixoformed demonstrator component were above the specification for both alloys.

  4. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  5. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  6. Strings in compact cosmological spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Konechny, Anatoly

    2013-10-01

    We confront the problem of giving a fundamental definition to perturbative string theory in spacetimes with totally compact space (taken to be a torus for simplicity, though the nature of the problem is very general) and non-compact time. Due to backreaction induced by the presence of even a single string quantum, the usual formulation of perturbative string theory in a fixed classical background is infrared-divergent at all subleading orders in the string coupling, and needs to be amended. The problem can be seen as a closed string analogue of D0-brane recoil under an impact by closed strings (a situation displaying extremely similar infrared divergences). Inspired by the collective coordinate treatment of the D0-brane recoil, whereby the translational modes of the D0-brane are introduced as explicit dynamical variables in the path integral, we construct a similar formalism for the case of string-induced gravitational backreaction, in which the spatially uniform modes of the background fields on the compact space are quantized explicitly. The formalism can equally well be seen as an ultraviolet completion of a minisuperspace quantum cosmology with string degrees of freedom. We consider the amplitudes for the universe to have two cross-sections with specified spatial properties and string contents, and show (at the first non-trivial order) that they are finite within our formalism.

  7. Thixoforming of Stellite Powder Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, S. C.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-01

    Thixoforming involves processing metallic alloys in the semi-solid state. The process requires the microstructure to be spheroidal when part-solid and part-liquid i.e. to consist of solid spheroids surrounded by liquid. The aim of this work was to investigate whether powder compacts can be used as feedstock for thixoforming and whether the consolidating pressure in the thixoformer can be used to remove porosity from the compact. The powder compacts were made from stellite 6 and stellite 21 alloys, cobalt-based alloys widely used for e.g. manufacturing prostheses. Isothermal heat treatments of small samples in the consolidated state showed the optimum thixoforming temperature to be in the range 1340°C-1350°C for both materials. The alloys were thixoformed into graphite dies and flowed easily to fill the die. Porosity in the thixoformed components was lower than in the starting material. Hardness values at various positions along the radius of the thixoformed demonstrator component were above the specification for both alloys.

  8. Label transfer by measuring compactness.

    PubMed

    Varga, Robert; Nedevschi, Sergiu

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a new automatic image annotation algorithm. First, we introduce a new similarity measure between images: compactness. This uses low level visual descriptors for determining the similarity between two images. Compactness shows how close test image features lie to training image feature cluster centers. The measure provides the core for a k-nearest neighbor type image annotation method. Afterward, a formalism for defining different transfer techniques is devised and several label transfer techniques are provided. The method as whole is evaluated on four image annotation benchmarks. The results on these sets validate the accuracy of the approach, which outperforms many state-of-the-art annotation methods. The method presented here requires a simple training process, efficiently combines different feature types and performs better than complex learning algorithms, even in this incipient form. The main contributions of this paper are the usage of compactness as a similarity measure that enables efficient low level feature comparison and an annotation algorithm based on label transfer. PMID:23955754

  9. Aluminum nanoparticle/acrylate copolymer nanocomposites for dielectric elastomers with high dielectric constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei; Zhang, Suki N.; Niu, Xiaofan; Liu, Chao; Pei, Qibing

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers are useful for large-strain actuation and energy harvesting. Their application has been limited by their low dielectric constants and consequently high driving voltage. Various fillers with high dielectric constants have been incorporated into different elastomer systems to improve the actuation strain, force output and energy density of the compliant actuators and generators. However, agglomeration may happen in these nanocomposites, resulting in a decrease of dielectric strength, an increase of leakage current, and in many instances the degree of enhancement of the dielectric constant. In this work, we investigated aluminum nanoparticles as nanofillers for acrylate copolymers. This metallic nanoparticle was chosen because the availability of free electrons could potentially provide an infinite value of dielectric constant as opposed to dielectric materials including ferroelectric nanocrystals. Moreover, aluminum nanoparticles have a self-passivated oxide shell effectively preventing the formation of conductive path. The surfaces of the aluminum nanoparticles were functionalized with methacrylate groups to assist the uniform dispersion in organic solutions and additionally enable copolymerization with acrylate copolymer matrix during bulk polymerization, and thus to suppress large range drifting of the nanoparticles. The resulting Al nanoparticle-acrylate copolymer nanocomposites were found to exhibit higher dielectric constant and increased stiffness. The leakage current under high electric fields were significantly lower than nanocomposites synthesized without proper nanoparticle surface modification. The dielectric strengths of the composites were comparable with the pristine polymers. In dielectric actuation evaluation, the actuation force output and energy specific work density were enhanced in the nanocomposites compared to the pristine copolymer.

  10. Standards for dielectric elastomer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Anderson, Iain; Bauer, Siegfried; Frediani, Gabriele; Gallone, Giuseppe; Gei, Massimiliano; Graaf, Christian; Jean-Mistral, Claire; Kaal, William; Kofod, Guggi; Kollosche, Matthias; Kornbluh, Roy; Lassen, Benny; Matysek, Marc; Michel, Silvain; Nowak, Stephan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Pei, Qibing; Pelrine, Ron; Rechenbach, Björn; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2015-10-01

    Dielectric elastomer transducers consist of thin electrically insulating elastomeric membranes coated on both sides with compliant electrodes. They are a promising electromechanically active polymer technology that may be used for actuators, strain sensors, and electrical generators that harvest mechanical energy. The rapid development of this field calls for the first standards, collecting guidelines on how to assess and compare the performance of materials and devices. This paper addresses this need, presenting standardized methods for material characterisation, device testing and performance measurement. These proposed standards are intended to have a general scope and a broad applicability to different material types and device configurations. Nevertheless, they also intentionally exclude some aspects where knowledge and/or consensus in the literature were deemed to be insufficient. This is a sign of a young and vital field, whose research development is expected to benefit from this effort towards standardisation.

  11. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  12. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2009: Measurement Analysis and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alun; Williams, Graham

    2009-07-01

    The conference Dielectrics 2009: Measurements, Analysis and Applications represents a significant milestone in the evolution of dielectrics research in the UK. It is reasonable to state that the academic study of dielectrics has led to many fundamental advances and that dielectric materials underpin the modern world in devices ranging from field effect transistors, which operate at extremely high fields, albeit low voltages, to the high voltage plants that provide the energy that powers our economy. The origins of the Dielectrics Group of the Institute of Physics (IOP), which organized this conference, can be traced directly back to the early 1960s, when Professor Mansel Davies was conducting research into the dielectric relaxation behaviour of polar liquids and solids at The Edward Davies Chemical Laboratories of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. He was already well-known internationally for his studies of molecular structure and bonding of small molecules, using infra-red-spectroscopy, and of the physical properties of hydrogen-bonded liquids and solids, using thermodynamic methods. Dielectric spectroscopy was a fairly new area for him and he realized that opportunities for scientists in the UK to gather together and discuss their research in this developing area of physical chemistry/chemical physics were very limited. He conceived the idea of forming a Dielectrics Discussion Group (DDG), which would act as a meeting point and provide a platform for dielectrics research in the UK and beyond and, as a result, a two-day Meeting was convened in the spring of 1968 at Gregynog Hall of the University of Wales, near Newtown, Montgomeryshire. It was organized by Mansel Davies, Alun Price and Graham Williams, all physical chemists from the UCW, Aberystwyth. Fifty scientists attended, being a mix of physical chemists, theoretical chemists, physicists, electrical engineers, polymer and materials scientists, all from the UK, except Dr Brendan Scaife of Trinity

  13. Dielectric investigation of some woven fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerovic, Dragana D.; Dojcilovic, Jablan R.; Asanovic, Koviljka A.; Mihajlidi, Tatjana A.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the temperature dependence of dielectric properties (relative dielectric permeabilities and dielectric tangents of losses) for woven fabrics of hemp, jute, flax, cotton, polyester (PES), cotton-PES mixture, and wool. The measurements have been carried out at a temperature range from -50 to 50 °C in the electric periodic field at a frequency 1 MHz in vacuum. For the same specimens, the values of the dielectric properties have also been measured at an air temperature of 21 °C and at relative humidities of 40%, 60%, and 80%. At different frequencies from 80 kHz to 5 MHz, the dielectric properties have been measured at a relative humidity of 40% and at a temperature of 21 °C. An investigation of the dielectric properties of woven fabrics can provide a better understanding of the relation between the dielectric properties of woven fabrics and the different raw material compositions, temperatures, relative air humidities, and frequencies for specimens. Hence, this investigation helps to improve textile material properties.

  14. Dielectric Heaters for Testing Spacecraft Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert; Bitteker, Leo; Godfroy, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A document proposes the development of radio-frequency-(RF)-driven dielectric heaters for non-nuclear thermal testing of the cores of nuclear-fission reactors for spacecraft. Like the electrical-resistance heaters used heretofore for such testing, the dielectric heaters would be inserted in the reactors in place of nuclear fuel rods. A typical heater according to the proposal would consist of a rod of lossy dielectric material sized and shaped like a fuel rod and containing an electrically conductive rod along its center line. Exploiting the dielectric loss mechanism that is usually considered a nuisance in other applications, an RF signal, typically at a frequency .50 MHz and an amplitude between 2 and 5 kV, would be applied to the central conductor to heat the dielectric material. The main advantage of the proposal is that the wiring needed for the RF dielectric heating would be simpler and easier to fabricate than is the wiring needed for resistance heating. In some applications, it might be possible to eliminate all heater wiring and, instead, beam the RF heating power into the dielectric rods from external antennas.

  15. A nonlinear field theory of deformable dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Zhigang; Zhao, Xuanhe; Greene, William H.

    Two difficulties have long troubled the field theory of dielectric solids. First, when two electric charges are placed inside a dielectric solid, the force between them is not a measurable quantity. Second, when a dielectric solid deforms, the true electric field and true electric displacement are not work conjugates. These difficulties are circumvented in a new formulation of the theory in this paper. Imagine that each material particle in a dielectric is attached with a weight and a battery, and prescribe a field of virtual displacement and a field of virtual voltage. Associated with the virtual work done by the weights and inertia, define the nominal stress as the conjugate to the gradient of the virtual displacement. Associated with the virtual work done by the batteries, define the nominal electric displacement as the conjugate to the gradient of virtual voltage. The approach does not start with Newton's laws of mechanics and Maxwell-Faraday theory of electrostatics, but produces them as consequences. The definitions lead to familiar and decoupled field equations. Electromechanical coupling enters the theory through material laws. In the limiting case of a fluid dielectric, the theory recovers the Maxwell stress. The approach is developed for finite deformation, and is applicable to both elastic and inelastic dielectrics. As applications of the theory, we discuss material laws for elastic dielectrics, and study infinitesimal fields superimposed upon a given field, including phenomena such as vibration, wave propagation, and bifurcation.

  16. Extending applications of dielectric elastomer artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Seiki; Waki, Mikio; Kornbluh, Roy; Pelrine, Ron

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated high energy density and high strains as well as high electromechanical efficiency and fast speeds of response. These properties, combined with their projected low cost make them attractive for a variety of actuator applications including linear actuators, diaphragm pumps, rotary motors, and haptic displays. Dielectric elastomers have also been shown to offer high energy density, high efficiency, and large strains when operated as generators. Dielectric elastomers have reached a stage of development where standardized products can be applied to new applications. In some cases, dielectric elastomer devices are improvements over existing devices. In other cases, however, dielectric elastomers can enable new types of devices that cannot be made with existing technologies, such as new types of loudspeakers and power generating devices. A new dipole loudspeaker system was developed using a commercially available push-pull diaphragm configuration. This same transducer configuration was used to develop a new power generating system. This generator system enables a power generation of 0.06 to 0.12 W by manually displacing the device by 5 to 6 mm once a second. By introducing a voltage step-down conversion circuit, the device was able to power wireless communications, allowing the control of devices separated by a distance of a few meters. These two devices are examples of the new applications that are enabled as the dielectric elastomer technology commercially emerges. Future improvements to dielectric elastomers could enable new capabilities in clean electrical power generation from ocean waves, for example.

  17. Microwave dielectric behavior of vegetation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrayes, Mohamed A.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1987-01-01

    The microwave dielectric behavior of vegetation was examined through the development of theoretical models involving dielectric dispersion by both bound and free water and supported by extensive dielectric measurements conducted over a wide range of conditions. The experimental data were acquired using an open-ended coaxial probe that was developed for sensing the dielectric constant of thin layers of materials, such as leaves, from measurements of the complex reflection coefficient using a network analyzer. The probe system was successfully used to record the spectral variation of the dielectric constant over a wide frequency range extending from 0.5 to 20.4 GHz at numerous temperatures between -40 to +40 C. The vegetation samples were measured over a wide range of moisture conditions. To model the dielectric spectrum of the bound water component of the water included in vegetation, dielectric measurements were made for several sucrose-water solutions as analogs for the situation in vegetation. The results were used in conjunction with the experimental data for leaves to determine some of the constant coefficients in the theoretical models. Two models, both of which provide good fit to the data, are proposed.

  18. Dielectric resonances in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, L.; Laugier, J.-M.; Schäfer, S.; Albinet, G.

    2003-02-01

    Binary disordered systems are usually obtained by mixing two ingredients in variable proportions: conductor and insulator, or conductor and super-conductor. They present very specific properties, in particular the second-order percolation phase transition, with its fractal geometry and the multi-fractal properties of the current moments. These systems are naturally modeled by regular bi-dimensional or tri-dimensional lattices, on which sites or bonds are chosen randomly with given probabilities. The two significant parameters are the ratio h = σ1/σ of the complex conductances, σ and σ1, of the two components, and their relative abundances p (or, respectively, 1 - p). In this article, we calculate the impedance of the composite by two independent methods: the so-called spectral method, which diagonalises Kirchhoff's Laws via a Green function formalism, and the Exact Numerical Renormalization method (ENR). These methods are applied to mixtures of resistors and capacitors (R-C systems), simulating e.g. ionic conductor-insulator systems, and to composites constituted of resistive inductances and capacitors (LR-C systems), representing metal inclusions in a dielectric bulk. The frequency dependent impedances of the latter composites present very intricate structures in the vicinity of the percolation threshold. In this paper, we analyse the LR-C behavior of compounds formed by the inclusion of small conducting clusters (``n-legged animals'') in a dielectric medium. We investigate in particular their absorption spectra who present a pattern of sharp lines at very specific frequencies of the incident electromagnetic field, the goal being to identify the signature of each animal. This enables us to make suggestions of how to build compounds with specific absorption or transmission properties in a given frequency domain.

  19. Shortcut to adiabaticity in full-wave optics for ultra-compact waveguide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Valle, Giuseppe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Longhi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    We extend the concept of shortcuts to adiabaticity to full-wave optics and provide an application to the design of an ultra-compact waveguide junction. In particular, we introduce a procedure allowing one to synthesize a purely dielectric optical potential that precisely compensates for non-adiabatic losses of the transverse electric fundamental mode in any (sufficiently regular) two-dimensional waveguide junction. Our results are corroborated by finite-element method numerical simulations in a Pöschl–Teller waveguide mode expander.

  20. Dielectric constants of soils at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, F. E.; Williams, D.

    1972-01-01

    A knowledge of the complex dielectric constant of soils is essential in the interpretation of microwave airborne radiometer data of the earth's surface. Measurements were made at 37 GHz on various soils from the Phoenix, Ariz., area. Extensive data have been obtained for dry soil and soil with water content in the range from 0.6 to 35 percent by dry weight. Measurements were made in a two arm microwave bridge and results were corrected for reflections at the sample interfaces by solution of the parallel dielectric plate problem. The maximum dielectric constants are about a factor of 3 lower than those reported for similar soils at X-band frequencies.

  1. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  2. Test results of a prototype dielectric microcalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Pfafman, T.E.; Silver, E.; Labov, S. ); Beeman, J.; Goulding, F.; Hansen, W.; Landis, D.; Madden, N. )

    1990-08-13

    The initial development work on a dielectric microcalorimeter is presented. It focuses on the dielectric properties of the ferroelectric material KTa{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3} (KTN). Measurements of the temperature dependent dielectric constant are given together with the first alpha particle detection results from a prototype composite microcalorimeter operating at 1.3 K. a non-thermal mechanism for detecting 6 MeV alpha particles in a monolithic KTN sample is also reported. 7 refs, 16 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Development of dielectric-barrier-discharge ionization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng'an; Tang, Fei; Chen, Jin; Wang, Xiaohao; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-03-01

    Dielectric-barrier-discharge ionization is an ambient-ionization technique. Since its first description in 2007, it has attracted much attention in such fields as biological analysis, food safety, mass-spectrometry imaging, forensic identification, and reaction monitoring for its advantages, e.g., low energy consumption, solvent-free method, and easy miniaturization. In this review a brief introduction to dielectric barrier discharge is provided, and then a detailed introduction to the dielectric-barrier-discharge-ionization technique is given, including instrumentation, applications, and mechanistic studies. Based on the summary of reported work, possible future uses of this type of ionization source are discussed at the end. PMID:25510973

  4. Measurement of the dielectric function spectra of low dielectric constant using the spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Masahiro; Postava, Kamil; Yamaguchi, Tomuo; Akashika, Kumiko; Hayashi, Hideki; Kitamura, Fujikazu

    2003-05-01

    The dielectric function spectra of low dielectric constants (low-k) materials have been determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry, normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, and Fourier transform infrared transmission spectrometry over a wide spectral range from 0.03 to 5.4 eV (230nm to 40.5um wavelength region). The electric and ionic contributions to the overall static dielectric constants were determined for representative materials used in the semiconductor industry for interlayer dielectrics: (1) FLARE - organic spin-on polymer, (2) HOSP - spin-on hybrid organic-siloxane polymer from the Honeywell Electric Materials Company, and (3) SiLK- organic dielectric resin from the Dow Chemical Company. The main contributions to the static dielectric constant of the low-k materials studied were found to be the electric and ionic absorption.

  5. Compaction of Space Mission Wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.

    2004-01-01

    The current solid waste management system employed on the International Space Station (ISS) consists of compaction, storage, and disposal. Wastes such plastic food packaging and trash are compacted manually and wrapped in duct tape footballs by the astronauts. Much of the waste is simply loaded either into the empty Russian Progress vehicle for destruction on reentry or into Shuttle for return to Earth. This manual method is wasteful of crew time and does not transition well to far term missions. Different wastes onboard spacecraft vary considerably in their characteristics and in the appropriate method of management. In advanced life support systems for far term missions, recovery of resources such as water from the wastes becomes important. However waste such as plastic food packaging, which constitutes a large fraction of solid waste (roughly 21% on ISS, more on long duration missions), contains minimal recoverable resource. The appropriate management of plastic waste is waste stabilization and volume minimization rather than resource recovery. This paper describes work that has begun at Ames Research Center on development of a heat melt compactor that can be used on near term and future missions, that can minimize crew interaction, and that can handle wastes with a significant plastic composition. The heat melt compactor takes advantage of the low melting point of plastics to compact plastic materials using a combination of heat and pressure. The US Navy has demonstrated successful development of a similar unit for shipboard application. Ames is building upon the basic approach demonstrated by the Navy to develop an advanced heat melt type compactor for space mission type wastes.

  6. Permeability of compacting porous lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P. A.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K.-U.; Aulock, F. W.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Vasseur, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    The highly transient nature of outgassing commonly observed at volcanoes is in part controlled by the permeability of lava domes and shallow conduits. Lava domes generally consist of a porous outer carapace surrounding a denser lava core with internal shear zones of variable porosity. Here we examine densification using uniaxial compression experiments on variably crystalline and porous rhyolitic dome lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Experiments were conducted at 900°C and an applied stress of 3 MPa to 60% strain, while monitoring acoustic emissions to track cracking. The evolution of the porous network was assessed via X-ray computed tomography, He-pycnometry, and relative gas permeability. High starting connected porosities led to low apparent viscosities and high strain rates, initially accompanied by abundant acoustic emissions. As compaction ensued, the lavas evolved; apparent viscosity increased and strain rate decreased due to strain hardening of the suspensions. Permeability fluctuations resulted from the interplay between viscous flow and brittle failure. Where phenocrysts were abundant, cracks had limited spatial extent, and pore closure decreased axial and radial permeability proportionally, maintaining the initial anisotropy. In crystal-poor lavas, axial cracks had a more profound effect, and permeability anisotropy switched to favor axial flow. Irrespective of porosity, both crystalline samples compacted to a threshold minimum porosity of 17-19%, whereas the crystal-poor sample did not achieve its compaction limit. This indicates that unconfined loading of porous dome lavas does not necessarily form an impermeable plug and may be hindered, in part by the presence of crystals.

  7. A Compact 5.5 GHz Band-Rejected UWB Antenna Using Complementary Split Ring Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. M.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.

    2014-01-01

    A band-removal property employing microwave frequencies using complementary split ring resonators (CSRRs) is applied to design a compact UWB antenna wishing for the rejection of some frequency band, which is meanwhile exercised by the existing wireless applications. The reported antenna comprises optimization of a circular radiating patch, in which slotted complementary SRRs are implanted. It is printed on low dielectric FR4 substrate material fed by a partial ground plane and a microstrip line. Validated results exhibit that the reported antenna shows a wide bandwidth covering from 3.45 to more than 12 GHz, with a compact dimension of 22 × 26 mm2, and VSWR < 2, observing band elimination of 5.5 GHz WLAN band. PMID:24971379

  8. A compact high power pulsed modulator based on spiral Blumlein line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinliang; Yin, Yi; Ge, Bin; Cheng, Xinbing; Feng, Jiahuai; Zhang, Jiande; Wang, Xinxin

    2007-10-01

    A compact high power pulsed modulator based on spiral water Blumlein line, which consists of primary storage capacitors, a Tesla transformer, a spiral Blumlein line of water dielectric, and a field-emission diode, is described. The experimental results showed that the diode voltage is more than 500 kV, the electron beam current of diode is about 32 kA, and the pulse duration is about 180 ns. The distributions for electrical field in the spiral water Blumlein line were obtained by the simulations. In addition, the process of the charging a spiral Blumlein line was simulated through the PSPICE software to get the wave form of charging voltage of pulse forming line, the diode voltage, and diode current of modulator. The theoretical and simulated results are in agreement. This accelerator is very compact and works stably and reliably. PMID:17979411

  9. A compact 5.5 GHz band-rejected UWB antenna using complementary split ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Islam, M M; Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T

    2014-01-01

    A band-removal property employing microwave frequencies using complementary split ring resonators (CSRRs) is applied to design a compact UWB antenna wishing for the rejection of some frequency band, which is meanwhile exercised by the existing wireless applications. The reported antenna comprises optimization of a circular radiating patch, in which slotted complementary SRRs are implanted. It is printed on low dielectric FR4 substrate material fed by a partial ground plane and a microstrip line. Validated results exhibit that the reported antenna shows a wide bandwidth covering from 3.45 to more than 12 GHz, with a compact dimension of 22 × 26 mm(2), and VSWR < 2, observing band elimination of 5.5 GHz WLAN band. PMID:24971379

  10. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  11. Two Piece Compaction Die Design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Ethan N

    2010-03-01

    Compaction dies used to create europium oxide and tantalum control plates were modeled using ANSYS 11.0. Two-piece designs were considered in order to make the dies easier to assemble than the five-piece dies that were previously used. The two areas of concern were the stresses at the interior corner of the die cavity and the distortion of the cavity wall due to the interference fit between the two pieces and the pressure exerted on the die during the compaction process. A successful die design would have stresses less than the yield stress of the material and a maximum wall distortion on the order of 0.0001 in. Design factors that were investigated include the inner corner radius, the value of the interference fit, the compaction force, the size of the cavity, and the outer radius and geometry of the outer ring. The results show that for the europium oxide die, a 0.01 in. diameter wire can be used to create the cavity, leading to a 0.0055 in. radius corner, if the radial interference fit is 0.003 in. For the tantalum die, the same wire can be used with a radial interference fit of 0.001 in. Also, for the europium oxide die with a 0.003 in. interference fit, it is possible to use a wire with a diameter of 0.006 in. for the wire burning process. Adding a 10% safety factor to the compaction force tends to lead to conservative estimates of the stresses but not for the wall distortion. However, when the 10% safety factor is removed, the wall distortion is not affected enough to discard the design. Finally, regarding the europium oxide die, when the cavity walls are increased by 0.002 in. per side or the outer ring is made to the same geometry as the tantalum die, all the stresses and wall distortions are within the desired range. Thus, the recommendation is to use a 0.006 in. diameter wire and a 0.003 in. interference fit for the europium oxide die and a 0.01 in. diameter wire and a 0.001 in. interference fit for the tantalum die. The dies can also be made to have the

  12. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  13. Comparison of Obturation Quality in Modified Continuous Wave Compaction, Continuous Wave Compaction, Lateral Compaction and Warm Vertical Compaction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Namjou, Sara; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce modified continuous wave compaction (MCWC) technique and compare its obturation quality with that of lateral compaction (LC), warm vertical compaction (WVC) and continuous wave compaction techniques (CWC). The obturation time was also compared among the four techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four single-rooted teeth with 0–5° root canal curve and 64 artificially created root canals with 15° curves in acrylic blocks were evaluated. The teeth and acrylic specimens were each divided into four subgroups of 16 for testing the obturation quality of four techniques namely LC, WVC, CWC and MCWC. Canals were prepared using the Mtwo rotary system and filled with respect to their group allocation. Obturation time was recorded. On digital radiographs, the ratio of area of voids to the total area of filled canals was calculated using the Image J software. Adaptation of the filling materials to the canal walls was assessed at three cross-sections under a stereomicroscope (X30). Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc HSD test, the Kruskal Wallis test and t-test. Results: No significant difference existed in adaptation of filling materials to canal walls among the four subgroups in teeth samples (P ≥ 0.139); but, in artificially created canals in acrylic blocks, the frequency of areas not adapted to the canal walls was significantly higher in LC technique compared to MCWC (P ≤ 0.02). The void areas were significantly more in the LC technique than in other techniques in teeth (P < 0.001). The longest obturation time belonged to WVC technique followed by LC, CW and MCWC techniques (P<0.05). The difference between the artificially created canals in blocks and teeth regarding the obturation time was not significant (P = 0.41). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, MCWC technique resulted in better adaptation of gutta-percha to canal walls than LC at all cross-sections with

  14. New charged anisotropic compact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  15. Experimental compact space power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospisil, M.; Pospisilova, L.; Hanzelka, Z.; Prochazka, M.

    1980-09-01

    A hexagonal structure of 1-km diameter and a weight of 500 metric tons situated at geosynchronous orbit is proposed for testing a space power station of 64 MW peak power in operation and for evaluating materials, means and methods needed for production of large stations. In this compact space power station, solar blankets and microwave sources are situated on one supporting structure, thus saving a lot of auxiliary parts, but the exploitation of solar elements is 3.3 times lower than for an earlier concept.

  16. Shock compaction of molybdenum powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Kostka, D.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Schwarz, R. B.; Kasiraj, P.

    1983-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments which were carried out in the 9 to 12 GPa range on 1.4 distension Mo and appear adequate to compact to full density ( 45 (SIGMA)m) powders were examined. The stress levels, however, are below those calculated to be from 100 to approx. 22 GPa which a frictional heating model predicts are required to consolidate approx. 10 to 50 (SIGMA)m particles. The model predicts that powders that have a distension of m=1.6 shock pressures of 14 to 72 GPa are required to consolidate Mo powders in the 50 to 10 (SIGMA)m range.

  17. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  18. Identification of Structural Relaxation in the Dielectric Response of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Kisliuk, Alexander; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Gainaru, Catalin

    2016-06-01

    One century ago pioneering dielectric results obtained for water and n -alcohols triggered the advent of molecular rotation diffusion theory considered by Debye to describe the primary dielectric absorption in these liquids. Comparing dielectric, viscoelastic, and light scattering results, we unambiguously demonstrate that the structural relaxation appears only as a high-frequency shoulder in the dielectric spectra of water. In contrast, the main dielectric peak is related to a supramolecular structure, analogous to the Debye-like peak observed in monoalcohols.

  19. Thermoluminescence and dielectric response of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Sukhnandan Singh, Surinder Singh, Lakhwant; Lochab, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    The effect of gamma radiation dose on the thermoluminescence (TL) and dielectric properties of muscovite mica was studied. TL glow curves exhibited a single peak around 141 {sup 0}C and its activation energy was estimated to be about 0.89 eV. Different dielectric parameters like dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity have been calculated in both pristine and gamma irradiated samples. These dielectric parameters have been studied as a function of irradiation dose.

  20. Laboratory measurement of the complex dielectric constant of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, M. L.

    1971-01-01

    The dielectric constant of a material is an extremely important parameter when considering passive radiometric remote sensing applications. This is because the emitted energy measured by a microwave radiometer is dependent on the dielectric constant of the surface being scanned. Two techniques of measuring dielectric constants are described. The first method involves a dielectric located in air. The second method uses basically the same theoretical approach, but the dielectric under consideration is located inside a section of waveguide.

  1. Study of dielectric relaxation process in nanocomposite of Li{sub 2}O−SiO{sub 2} nanoglass-CuO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dhriti Ranjan Chakravorty, Dipankar

    2014-04-24

    Dielectric behaviour of a nanocomposite consisting of 23Li{sub 2}O⋅77SiO{sub 2} nanoglass within the pores of compacted CuO nanoparticles was studied. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity of the material were measured over the temperature range 313 to 363 K. The results indicated a relaxation behaviour. The data were explained by a space charge polarization model developed in the case of a laminar conductor. The activation energy of the relaxation process was in close agreement with that of lithium ion conduction in the nanoglass.

  2. Chemically prepared lead magnesium niobate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Olson, W.R.; Goy, D.M.

    1998-11-01

    A chemical solution powder synthesis technique has been developed that produces first, uniform powders of lead magnesium niobate (PMN) with 60 to 80 nm crystallite size. The synthesis technique was based on the dissolution of lead acetate and alkoxide precursors in acetic acid followed by precipitation with oxalic acid/propanol solutions. Lead magnesium niobate ceramics fabricated from these chemically derived powders had smaller, more uniform grain size and higher dielectric constants than ceramics fabricated from mixed oxide powders that were processed under similar thermal conditions. Chem-prep PMN dielectrics with peak dielectric constants greater than 22,000 and polarizations in excess of 29 {micro}C/cm{sup 2} were obtained for 1,100 C firing treatments. Substantial decreases in dielectric constant and polarization were measured for chemically prepared PMN ceramics fired at lower temperatures, consistent with previous work on mixed oxide materials.

  3. Rheo-Dielectric Behavior of Soft Matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Matsumiya, Yumi; Horio, Kazushi; Masubuchi, Yuichi; Uneyama, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    Soft matters are highly susceptible to fast flow without exhibiting macroscopic rupture, and the constituent elements therein can be readily brought into a non-equilibrium state. The dynamics of these elements in this state can be detected with the dielectric method rather easily if the elements have electrical dipoles (and/or net charge). Thus, the rheo-dielectric behavior of the soft matters, detected with a weak electric field superimposed on the flow field, provides us with interesting information for the non-equilibrium dynamics of the constituent elements. This chapter presents a brief summary of the rheo-dielectric behavior of polymers, liquid crystals, and composites to demonstrate the similarities/differences of these materials as well as the usefulness of the rheo-dielectric method

  4. Dielectric films improve life of polymeric insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudis, M.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    Degradation of polymeric insulators may be significantly reduced when polymer surfaces are coated with film having gradation of dielectric constants, larger where it is in contact with polymer and smaller at its exposed surface.

  5. New electrode materials for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Lam, Tuling; Biggs, James; Hu, Liangbing; Yu, Zhibin; Ha, Soonmok; Xi, Dongjuan; Senesky, Matthew K.; Grüner, George; Pei, Qibing

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators exert strain due to an applied electric field. With advantageous properties such as high efficiency and their light weight, these actuators are attractive for a variety of applications ranging from biomimetic robots, medical prosthetics to conventional pumps and valves. The performance and reliability however, are limited by dielectric breakdown which occurs primarily from localized defects inherently present in the polymer film during actuation. These defects lead to electric arcing, causing a short circuit that shuts down the entire actuator and can lead to actuator failure at fields significantly lower than the intrinsic strength of the material. This limitation is particularly a problem in actuators using large-area films. Our recent studies have shown that the gap between the strength of the intrinsic material and the strength of large-area actuators can be reduced by electrically isolating defects in the dielectric film. As a result, the performance and reliability of dielectric elastomers actuators can be substantially improved.

  6. All-dielectric subwavelength metasurface focusing lens.

    PubMed

    West, Paul R; Stewart, James L; Kildishev, Alexander V; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Shkunov, Vladimir V; Strohkendl, Friedrich; Zakharenkov, Yuri A; Dodds, Robert K; Byren, Robert

    2014-10-20

    We have proposed, designed, manufactured and tested low loss dielectric micro-lenses for infrared (IR) radiation based on a dielectric metamaterial layer. This metamaterial layer was created by patterning a dielectric surface and etching to sub-micron depths. For a proof-of-concept lens demonstration, we have chosen a fine patterned array of nano-pillars with variable diameters. Gradient index (GRIN) properties were achieved by engineering the nano-pattern characteristics across the lens, so that the effective optical density of the dielectric metamaterial layer peaks around the lens center, and gradually drops at the lens periphery. A set of lens designs with reduced reflection and tailorable phase gradients have been developed and tested, demonstrating focal distances of a few hundred microns, beam area contraction ratio up to three, and insertion losses as low as 11%. PMID:25401653

  7. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  8. Incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Boesenberg, J.S.; Britt, D.T.; Rovers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2010-01-22

    We document the size distributions and locations of voids present within five highly porous equilibrated ordinary chondrites using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) and helium pycnometry. We found total porosities ranging from {approx}10 to 20% within these chondrites, and with {mu}CT we show that up to 64% of the void space is located within intergranular voids within the rock. Given the low (S1-S2) shock stages of the samples and the large voids between mineral grains, we conclude that these samples experienced unusually low amounts of compaction and shock loading throughout their entire post accretionary history. With Fe metal and FeS metal abundances and grain size distributions, we show that these chondrites formed naturally with greater than average porosities prior to parent body metamorphism. These materials were not 'fluffed' on their parent body by impact-related regolith gardening or events caused by seismic vibrations. Samples of all three chemical types of ordinary chondrites (LL, L, H) are represented in this study and we conclude that incomplete compaction is common within the asteroid belt.

  9. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1997-10-14

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

  10. A compact THz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sešek, Aleksander; Å vigelj, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is the development of a compact low cost imaging THz system, usable for observation of the objects near to the system and also for stand-off detection. The performance of the system remains at the high standard of more expensive and bulkiest system on the market. It is easy to operate as it is not dependent on any fine mechanical adjustments. As it is compact and it consumes low power, also a portable system was developed for stand-off detection of concealed objects under textile or inside packages. These requirements rule out all optical systems like Time Domain Spectroscopy systems which need fine optical component positioning and requires a large amount of time to perform a scan and the image capture pixel-by-pixel. They are also almost not suitable for stand-off detection due to low output power. In the paper the antenna - bolometer sensor microstructure is presented and the THz system described. Analysis and design guidelines for the bolometer itself are discussed. The measurement results for both near and stand-off THz imaging are also presented.

  11. The Planck Compact Source Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Caniego, Marcos

    2015-12-01

    The Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources is a catalogue of sources observed over the entire sky at nine different frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz. It consists of Galactic and extragalactic objects detected in the Planck single-frequency full mission total intensity maps. Compact sources detected in the lower frequency channels are assigned to the PCCS2, while at higher frequencies they are assigned to one of two sub·catalogues, the PCCS2 or PCCS2E, depending on their location on the sky. The PCCS2 covers most of the sky and can be used to produce subsamples at higher reliabilities than the target 80% integral reliability of the catalogue. The PCCS2E contains sources located in certain regions where the complex background makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections. Both the PCCS2 and PCCS2E include polarization measurements, in the form of polarized flux densities, or upper limits, and orientation angles for all seven polarization-sensitive Planck channels.

  12. Cold compaction of water ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; McKinnon, W.B.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrostatic compaction of granulated water ice was measured in laboratory experiments at temperatures 77 K to 120 K. We performed step-wise hydrostatic pressurization tests on 5 samples to maximum pressures P of 150 MPa, using relatively tight (0.18-0.25 mm) and broad (0.25-2.0 mm) starting grain-size distributions. Compaction change of volume is highly nonlinear in P, typical for brittle, granular materials. No time-dependent creep occurred on the lab time scale. Significant residual porosity (???0.10) remains even at highest P. Examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals a random configuration of fractures and broad distribution of grain sizes, again consistent with brittle behavior. Residual porosity appears as smaller, well-supported micropores between ice fragments. Over the interior pressures found in smaller midsize icy satellites and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), substantial porosity can be sustained over solar system history in the absence of significant heating and resultant sintering. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  14. Structural properties of compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Carvalho, R. R.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a systematic study of galaxies in the regions of Hickson compact groups. Our sample is composed of the 22 Hickson groups which are located in the southern hemisphere and have cz less than 9000 km/s. Making use of digitized images of IIIa-J plates that cover an area of 0.5 x 0.5 deg around each group, we were able to detect and classify images down to a magnitude limit of 19.5 in the B band. This limit is typically three magnitudes fainter than previous studies. Most groups show a statistically significant excess of fainter galaxies compared to the background. These fainter galaxies typically have a somewhat more extended spatial distribution than the brighter galaxies originally classified by Hickson. Our data suggest that Hickson groups have a wide range in density and radius, ranging from very compact structures with overdensities of the order of 10(exp 2) and crossing times of roughly 0.01 H(sub 0 sup -1), to much more diffuse structures, similar to loose groups, with overdensities of about 3 and crossing times of roughly 0.5 H(sub 0 sup -1).

  15. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  16. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, Ronald Alfred; Lewis, Irwin Charles

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counterelectrode.

  17. Dense and Homogeneous Compaction of Fine Ceramic and Metallic Powders: High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki Y.

    2008-02-01

    High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process (HCP) is a variation of colloidal compacting method, in which the powders sediment under huge centrifugal force. Compacting mechanism of HCP differs from conventional colloidal process such as slip casting. The unique compacting mechanism of HCP leads to a number of characteristics such as a higher compacting speed, wide applicability for net shape formation, flawless microstructure of the green compacts, etc. However, HCP also has several deteriorative characteristics that must be overcome to fully realize this process' full potential.

  18. Dense and Homogeneous Compaction of Fine Ceramic and Metallic Powders: High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki Y.

    2008-02-15

    High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process (HCP) is a variation of colloidal compacting method, in which the powders sediment under huge centrifugal force. Compacting mechanism of HCP differs from conventional colloidal process such as slip casting. The unique compacting mechanism of HCP leads to a number of characteristics such as a higher compacting speed, wide applicability for net shape formation, flawless microstructure of the green compacts, etc. However, HCP also has several deteriorative characteristics that must be overcome to fully realize this process' full potential.

  19. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  20. Pyroelectric and dielectric properties of ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, A. K.; Moxon, Ryan; Guggilla, Padmaja; Aggarwal, M. D.; Edwards, M. E.

    2010-08-01

    Ferroelectric oxide ceramics have been investigated as possible alternatives to highly sensitive triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals for their use in room temperature infrared detectors. In this paper dielectric and pyroelectric properties of some ceramics based on modified lead titanate and others are presented. The figures-of-merit of these ceramics calculated using the measured dielectric and pyroelectric data are presented. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the principal ceramic systems are also compared with existing materials reported in the literature.

  1. Method of casting patterned dielectric structures

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2001-01-01

    A pattern of dielectric structures are formed directly on a substrate in a single step using sol-gel chemistry and molding procedures. The resulting dielectric structures are useful in vacuum applications for electronic devices. Porous, lightweight structures having a high aspect ratio that are suitable for use as spacers between the faceplate and baseplate of a field emission display can be manufactured using this method.

  2. Dielectric polarization evolution equations and relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Baker-Jarvis, James; Riddle, Bill; Janezic, Michael D.

    2007-05-15

    In this paper we develop dielectric polarization evolution equations, and the resulting frequency-domain expressions, and relationships for the resulting frequency dependent relaxation times. The model is based on a previously developed equation that was derived using statistical-mechanical theory. We extract relaxation times from dielectric data and give illustrative examples for the harmonic oscillator and derive expressions for the frequency-dependent relaxation times and a time-domain integrodifferential equation for the Cole-Davidson model.

  3. Composite Dielectric Materials for Electrical Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.

    1999-04-25

    Composites that consist of a dielectric host containing a particulate conductor as a second phase are of interest for electrical switching applications. Such composites are "smart" materials that can function as either voltage or current limiters, and the difference in fimction depends largely upon whether the dielectric is filled to below or above the percolation threshold. It also is possible to combine current and voltage limiting in a single composite to make a "super-smart" material.

  4. Lumped elements characterize Q in dielectric resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, Chase P.

    1993-01-01

    It has been earlier observed (Podcameni et al., 1981) that, as the coupling factor between a microstrip-coupled dielectric resonator and the line becomes much larger than unity, the unloaded quality factor (Q) of the resonator decreases. In this paper it is shown that this effect can be explained using lumped-element models of the coupling line, when the dielectric resonator is either overcoupled or undercoupled to the line.

  5. Low-loss coupling to dielectric resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.; Bradshaw, E. S.; Trew, R. J.; Hefner, B. B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A compilation is presented of experimental observations and arguments concerning the use of dielectric resonators in applications requiring both tight coupling (beta greater than 10) and high unloaded Q, such as low loss bandpass filters. The microstrip coupled dielectric resonator is the primary focus, but an alternative coupling technique is discussed and comparatively evaluated. It is concluded that coupling factors as large as 65 are achievable.

  6. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2009: Measurement Analysis and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alun; Williams, Graham

    2009-07-01

    The conference Dielectrics 2009: Measurements, Analysis and Applications represents a significant milestone in the evolution of dielectrics research in the UK. It is reasonable to state that the academic study of dielectrics has led to many fundamental advances and that dielectric materials underpin the modern world in devices ranging from field effect transistors, which operate at extremely high fields, albeit low voltages, to the high voltage plants that provide the energy that powers our economy. The origins of the Dielectrics Group of the Institute of Physics (IOP), which organized this conference, can be traced directly back to the early 1960s, when Professor Mansel Davies was conducting research into the dielectric relaxation behaviour of polar liquids and solids at The Edward Davies Chemical Laboratories of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. He was already well-known internationally for his studies of molecular structure and bonding of small molecules, using infra-red-spectroscopy, and of the physical properties of hydrogen-bonded liquids and solids, using thermodynamic methods. Dielectric spectroscopy was a fairly new area for him and he realized that opportunities for scientists in the UK to gather together and discuss their research in this developing area of physical chemistry/chemical physics were very limited. He conceived the idea of forming a Dielectrics Discussion Group (DDG), which would act as a meeting point and provide a platform for dielectrics research in the UK and beyond and, as a result, a two-day Meeting was convened in the spring of 1968 at Gregynog Hall of the University of Wales, near Newtown, Montgomeryshire. It was organized by Mansel Davies, Alun Price and Graham Williams, all physical chemists from the UCW, Aberystwyth. Fifty scientists attended, being a mix of physical chemists, theoretical chemists, physicists, electrical engineers, polymer and materials scientists, all from the UK, except Dr Brendan Scaife of Trinity

  7. Thin film dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Gibbons, Brady J.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Park, Bae Ho

    2002-01-01

    A dielectric composite material comprising at least two crystal phases of different components with TiO.sub.2 as a first component and a material selected from the group consisting of Ba.sub.1-x Sr.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.3 to 0.7, Pb.sub.1-x Ca.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.4 to 0.7, Sr.sub.1-x Pb.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, Ba.sub.1-x Cd.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.02 to 0.1, BaTi.sub.1-x Zr.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Sn.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.15 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Hf.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.24 to 0.3, Pb.sub.1-1.3x La.sub.x TiO.sub.3+0.2x where x is from 0.23 to 0.3, (BaTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFeo.sub.0.5 Nb.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.75 to 0.9, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.- (PbCo.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.1 to 0.45, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbMg.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, and (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFe.sub.0.5 Ta.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0 to 0.2, as the second component is described. The dielectric composite material can be formed as a thin film upon suitable substrates.

  8. Diffractive coherence in multilayer dielectric gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Feit, M.D.; Perry, M.D.; Boyd, R.D.; Britten, J.A.; Li, Lifeng

    1995-05-26

    Successful operation of large-scale high-power lasers, such as those in use and planned at LLNL and elsewhere, require optical elements that can withstand extremely high fluences without suffering damage. Of particular concern are dielectric diffraction gratings used for beam sampling and pulse compression. Laser induced damage to bulk dielectric material originates with coupling of the electric field of the radiation to bound electrons, proceeding through a succession of mechanisms that couple the electron kinetic energy to lattice energy and ultimately to macroscopic structural changes (e.g. melting). The constructive interference that is responsible for the diffractive behavior of a grating or the reflective properties of a multilayer dielectric stack can enhance the electric field above values that would occur in unstructured homogeneous material. Much work has been done to model damage to bulk matter. The presence of nonuniform electric fields, resulting from diffractive coherence, has the potential to affect damage thresholds and requires more elaborate theory. We shall discuss aspects of work directed towards understanding the influence of dielectric structures upon damage, with particular emphasis on computations and interpretation of electric fields within dielectric gratings and multilayer dielectric stacks, noting particularly the interference effects that occur in these structures.

  9. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Stiubianu, George; Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian; Ignat, Mircea

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles.

  10. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  11. Dielectric Properties of Low-Level Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    L. E. Lagos; M. A. Ebadian

    1998-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to develop a data collection containing values for the dielectric properties of various low-level liquid waste (LLLW) simulants measured as a function of frequency, temperature, and composition. The investigation was motivated by current interest in the use of microwave processing for the treatment of radioactive waste. A large volume of transuranic liquid and sludge produced by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) during the production of nuclear fiel bars is stored at several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites around the United States. Waste storage and disposal space is scarce, expensive, and must be minimized. Thus, several DOE sites are pursuing the use of microwave heating as a means of achieving volume reduction and solidification of low-level liquid wastes. It is important to know which microwave frequencies should be employed tc achieve the most efficient processing at a range of different temperatures. The dielectric properties of the LLLW simulants can be utilized to determine the optimum frequencies for use with a particular LLLW or with other LLLWS of similar composition. Furthermore, nonlinear thermal processes, such as thermal runaway, which occur in the material being treated cannot be modeled without a knowledge of the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties. Often, this data does not exist; however, when it does, only very limited data near room temperature are available. The data collection generated in this study can be used to predict the behavior of a variety of microwave thermal treatment technologies, which have the potential of substantially reducing the volume of the LLLWS that are currently stored at many DOE sites. This information should help the users of the microwave reduction and solidification technology to optimize microwave processes used in the treatment of LLLW. The microwave reduction and solidification technology has clear advantages over other methods of reducing LLLWS. These

  12. Combined method of compaction of collapsible soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarov, Yu.A.

    1994-07-01

    The writer proposes a combined method of compaction of collapsible soils. He presents results of investigations carried out to study compacted zones of pads punched (tamped-out) by rammers 10 and 20 tons in mass, as well as a comparative analysis of the pads over against compacted zones obtained by means of plane rammers. The analysis results are illustrated by the {open_quotes}arch effect{close_quotes} on the stress conditions of the soaked soil mass.

  13. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  14. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  15. Baryon currents in QCD with compact dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lucini, B.; Patella, A.; Pica, C.

    2007-06-15

    On a compact space with nontrivial cycles, for sufficiently small values of the radii of the compact dimensions, SU(N) gauge theories coupled with fermions in the fundamental representation spontaneously break charge conjugation, time reversal, and parity. We show at one loop in perturbation theory that a physical signature for this phenomenon is a nonzero baryonic current wrapping around the compact directions. The persistence of this current beyond the perturbative regime is checked by lattice simulations.

  16. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Methane Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chong; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil

    2015-09-01

    With the large amount of nature gas discovery every year, there is an increasing interest on modification of methane. The fact that methane is gaseous makes it less economic and efficient than liquid fuel. Here we propose a new way of converting methane from gas phase to liquid phase. Dielectric barrier discharge is used to treat methane and nitrogen mixture bubbles inside of liquid fuel. Nitrogen is here to help activate methane into an excited state, then it is possible for the excited molecules to react with other liquid hydrocarbon. Gaseous methane is converted in to liquid phase when excited methane replace a hydrogen and add onto the carbon chain. In this study some preliminary experiments is done to verify this hypothesis. There is equivalent weight increases with methane and nitrogen mixture discharging in diesel when compare to only nitrogen discharging in diesel. The same experiment have also been done with gas mixture discharged in 1-methylnaphthalene. And FTIR analysis of the after treatment hydrocarbon liquid all indicates that there is an increasing in C-H bond concentration and a decreasing in phenyl ring structure.

  17. Chromosome Compaction by Active Loop Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Goloborodko, Anton; Marko, John F; Mirny, Leonid A

    2016-05-24

    During cell division, chromosomes are compacted in length by more than a 100-fold. A wide range of experiments demonstrated that in their compacted state, mammalian chromosomes form arrays of closely stacked consecutive ∼100 kb loops. The mechanism underlying the active process of chromosome compaction into a stack of loops is unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that chromosomes are compacted by enzymatic machines that actively extrude chromatin loops. When such loop-extruding factors (LEF) bind to chromosomes, they progressively bridge sites that are further away along the chromosome, thus extruding a loop. We demonstrate that collective action of LEFs leads to formation of a dynamic array of consecutive loops. Simulations and an analytically solved model identify two distinct steady states: a sparse state, where loops are highly dynamic but provide little compaction; and a dense state, where there are more stable loops and dramatic chromosome compaction. We find that human chromosomes operate at the border of the dense steady state. Our analysis also shows how the macroscopic characteristics of the loop array are determined by the microscopic properties of LEFs and their abundance. When the number of LEFs are used that match experimentally based estimates, the model can quantitatively reproduce the average loop length, the degree of compaction, and the general loop-array morphology of compact human chromosomes. Our study demonstrates that efficient chromosome compaction can be achieved solely by an active loop-extrusion process. PMID:27224481

  18. 75 FR 17161 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Justice. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: The... of Investigation. BILLING CODE 4410-02-M...

  19. 76 FR 20044 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: The purpose of... Justice Information Services Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation. BILLING CODE......

  20. Dielectric tube waveguides with absorptive cladding for broadband, low-dispersion and low loss THz guiding.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hualong; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-01-01

    Research on terahertz waveguides is experiencing a tremendous growth due to their importance for compact and robust THz systems. However, designing compact, broadband, mechanically stable and environmentally shielded THz waveguides is still a challenge due to high losses of both metals and dielectrics in this frequency range. Here we report on a novel twist on the classical tube waveguide where we deliberately introduce a thick and highly lossy cladding layer. By this we attenuate the field in the cladding and thus prevent interference with the core field. This mechanism breaks the well-known ARROW guiding mechanism, and as a result, extremely broad bandwidth and low dispersion can be achieved with a very simple design. Since the main part of the field propagates inside the air-core, the propagation loss is still kept at a very low level. Simulations, analytical modelling and experiments verify our findings. The proposed THz waveguide is robust, insensitive to external perturbation and easy to handle, and thus the design represents a significant advance of the field of THz dielectric waveguides suitable for the 0.3-1 THz band which in the future will be important for ultrafast wireless communication systems. PMID:25557284

  1. Dielectric tube waveguides with absorptive cladding for broadband, low-dispersion and low loss THz guiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hualong; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-01-01

    Research on terahertz waveguides is experiencing a tremendous growth due to their importance for compact and robust THz systems. However, designing compact, broadband, mechanically stable and environmentally shielded THz waveguides is still a challenge due to high losses of both metals and dielectrics in this frequency range. Here we report on a novel twist on the classical tube waveguide where we deliberately introduce a thick and highly lossy cladding layer. By this we attenuate the field in the cladding and thus prevent interference with the core field. This mechanism breaks the well-known ARROW guiding mechanism, and as a result, extremely broad bandwidth and low dispersion can be achieved with a very simple design. Since the main part of the field propagates inside the air-core, the propagation loss is still kept at a very low level. Simulations, analytical modelling and experiments verify our findings. The proposed THz waveguide is robust, insensitive to external perturbation and easy to handle, and thus the design represents a significant advance of the field of THz dielectric waveguides suitable for the 0.3-1 THz band which in the future will be important for ultrafast wireless communication systems.

  2. Conceptual Design of Dielectric Accelerating Structures for Intense Neutron and Monochromatic X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Blanovsky, Anatoly

    2004-12-07

    Bright compact photon sources, which utilize electron beam interaction with periodic structures, may benefit a broad range of medical, industrial and scientific applications. A class of dielectric-loaded periodic structures for hard and soft X-ray production has been proposed that would provide a high accelerating gradient when excited by an external RF and/or primary electron beam. Target-distributed accelerators (TDA), in which an additional electric field compensates for lost beam energy in internal targets, have been shown to provide the necessary means to drive a high flux subcritical reactor (HFSR) for nuclear waste transmutation. The TDA may also be suitable for positron and nuclear isomer production, X-ray lithography and monochromatic computer tomography. One of the early assumptions of the theory of dielectric wake-field acceleration was that, in electrodynamics, the vector potential was proportional to the scalar potential. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of TDA design aspects including the wave model of observed phenomena, a layered compound separated by a Van der Waals gap and a compact energy source based on fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector. The FEC is a high-voltage power source that directly converts the kinetic energy of the fission fragments into electrical potential of about 2MV.

  3. Power burner for compact furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, J.A.

    1980-09-23

    A compact gas power burner is provided which includes a cylindrical mixing tube into which combustion air is discharged tangentially from a centrifugal blower located adjacent the closed end of the mixing tube, and gaseous fuel is admitted into the discharge airstream of the blower upstream from the admission location of the airstream into the mixing tube so that the swirling component of the air in the mixing tube during its passage to the open end of the tube will promote the mixing of the air and gaseous fuel, the mixing tube being provided with a honeycomb ceramic disc at its end to which it is attached to a cylindrical heat exchanger, and ignition means and flame sensors are provided on the downstream side of the ceramic disc.

  4. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  5. Compact anti-radon facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I.; Fojtík, P.; Hýža, M.; Hůlka, J.; Jílek, K.; Stoček, P.; Veselý, J.; Busto, J.

    2015-08-01

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m3/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ˜10mBq/m3). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  6. Anisotropic models for compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Ray, Saibal; Dayanandan, Baiju

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper we obtain an anisotropic analog of the Durgapal and Fuloria (Gen Relativ Gravit 17:671, 1985) perfect fluid solution. The methodology consists of contraction of the anisotropic factor with the help of both metric potentials and . Here we consider the same as Durgapal and Fuloria (Gen Relativ Gravit 17:671, 1985) did, whereas is as given by Lake (Phys Rev D 67:104015, 2003). The field equations are solved by the change of dependent variable method. The solutions set mathematically thus obtained are compared with the physical properties of some of the compact stars, strange star as well as white dwarf. It is observed that all the expected physical features are available related to the stellar fluid distribution, which clearly indicates the validity of the model.

  7. Saloplastics: processing compact polyelectrolyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Pierre; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2015-04-17

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) are prepared by mixing solutions of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. These diffuse, amorphous precipitates may be compacted into dense materials, CoPECs, by ultracentrifugation (ucPECs) or extrusion (exPECs). The presence of salt water is essential in plasticizing PECs to allow them to be reformed and fused. When hydrated, CoPECs are versatile, rugged, biocompatible, elastic materials with applications including bioinspired materials, supports for enzymes and (nano)composites. In this review, various methods for making CoPECs are described, as well as fundamental responses of CoPEC mechanical properties to salt concentration. Possible applications as synthetic cartilage, enzymatically active biocomposites, self-healing materials, and magnetic nanocomposites are presented. PMID:25771881

  8. Compact K-edge densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cowder, L.R.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Augustson, R.H.; Esmailpour, A.; Hawkins, R.; Kuhn, E.

    1984-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed, built, and is currently testing a compact K-edge densitometer for use by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. The unit, which can easily be moved from one location to another within a facility, is positioned outside a glovebox with the body of the instrument inserted into the glove. A fixture inside the glovebox fits around the body and positions a sample holder. A hand-held high-purity germanium detector powered by a battery pack and a Davidson portable multichannel analyzer (MCA) is used to measure the transmission through plutonium nitrate solutions at E/sub Y/ = 121.1 and 122.2 keV. The Davidson MCA is programmed to lead the user through the measurement procedure and perform all the data analyses. The instrument is currently installed at the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, where IAEA personnel are evaluating its accuracy, ease of operation, and safety. 5 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  9. A Compact Wakefield Measurement Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2015-10-01

    The conceptual design of a compact, photoinjector-based, facility for high precision measurements of wakefields is presented. This work is motivated by the need for a thorough understanding of beam induced wakefield effects for any future linear collider. We propose to use a high brightness photoinjector to generate (approximately) a 2 nC, 2 mm-mrad drive beam at 20 MeV to excite wakefields and a second photoinjector to generate a 5 MeV, variably delayed, trailing witness beam to probe both the longitudinal and transverse wakefields in the structure under test. Initial estimates show that we can detect a minimum measurable dipole transverse wake function of 0.1 V/pC/m/mm and a minimum measurable monopole longitudinal wake function of 2.5 V/pC/m. Simulations results for the high brightness photoinjector, calculations of the facility's wakefield measurement resolution, and the facility layout are presented.

  10. Compact anti-radon facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I.

    2015-08-17

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m{sup 3}/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ∼10mBq/m{sup 3}). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  11. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 {mu}s pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity.

  12. A compact solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Bhabana; Park, Eric D.; Stebbins, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    A compact laser producing green wavelength with a volume of < 8 cm3 and a weight of < 80 g finds its application in many fields from military to space based. We built a small solid-state laser that produces 1 mJ of energy per-pulse at a 1 - 20 Hz repetition rate. The laser is passively Q-switched using a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber to generate pulses <10 ns. A nonlinear crystal doubles the frequency to generate light at 523 nm. The laser is side-pumped by a single bar diode laser using a unique pump cavity to homogenize the pump intensity in the laser rod. The laser components can easily be modified to change the output wavelength from UV to mid IR.

  13. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1983-01-04

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa < 1), increases as R/sup -2/, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency.

  14. Compact Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2009-04-01

    ): In this paper we present design considerations, thermal and optical modeling results, and device performance for a ruggedized, compact laser transmitter that utilizes a room temperature quantum cascade (QC) laser source. The QC laser transmitter is intended for portable mid-infrared (3-12 µm) spectroscopy applications, where the atmospheric transmission window is relatively free of water vapor interference and where the molecular rotational vibration absorption features can be used to detect and uniquely identify chemical compounds of interest. Initial QC laser-based sensor development efforts were constrained by the complications of cryogenic operation. However, improvements in both QC laser designs and fabrication processes have provided room-temperature devices that now enable significant miniaturization and integration potential for national security, environmental monitoring, atmospheric science, and industrial safety applications.

  15. Compact Sources of Ultrashort Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duling, Irl N., III

    2006-11-01

    List of contributors; Acronyms and abbreviations; Preface; 1. Short pulse generation H. A. Haus; 2. Passive modelocking in solid state lasers Thomas Brabec, Stephen M. J. Kelly and Ferenc Krausz; 3. Compact modelocked solid state lasers pumped by laser diodes John R. M. Barr; 4. Modelocking of all-fiber lasers Irl N. Duling, III and Michael L. Dennis; 5. Nonlinear polarization evolution in passively modelocked fiber lasers Martin E. Fermann; 6. Ultrafast vertical cavity semiconductor lasers Wenbin Jiang and John Bowers; 7. High power ultrafast semiconductor for injection diode lasers Peter J. Delfyett; 8. The hybrid soliton pulse source Paul A. Morton; 9. Monolithic colliding pulse modelocked diode lasers Ming C. Wu and Young-Kai Chen; Index.

  16. Fruit and Vegetable Quality Assessment via Dielectric Sensing.

    PubMed

    El Khaled, Dalia; Novas, Nuria; Gazquez, Jose A; Garcia, Rosa M; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost. This fact enhances the possibility of improving the quality of horticultural products, leading towards healthier consumption of fruits and vegetables. A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose. Moreover, a focused study of dielectric spectroscopy and advanced dielectric sensing is a highly interesting topic. This review explains the dielectric property basics and classifies the dielectric spectroscopy measurement techniques. It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions. An in-depth definition of dielectric spectroscopy and its usefulness in the electric characterization of food materials is presented, along with the various sensor techniques used for dielectric measurements. The collective data are tabulated in a summary of the dielectric findings in horticultural field investigations, which will facilitate more advanced and focused explorations in the future. PMID:26131680

  17. Fruit and Vegetable Quality Assessment via Dielectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    El Khaled, Dalia; Novas, Nuria; Gazquez, Jose A.; Garcia, Rosa M.; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost. This fact enhances the possibility of improving the quality of horticultural products, leading towards healthier consumption of fruits and vegetables. A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose. Moreover, a focused study of dielectric spectroscopy and advanced dielectric sensing is a highly interesting topic. This review explains the dielectric property basics and classifies the dielectric spectroscopy measurement techniques. It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions. An in-depth definition of dielectric spectroscopy and its usefulness in the electric characterization of food materials is presented, along with the various sensor techniques used for dielectric measurements. The collective data are tabulated in a summary of the dielectric findings in horticultural field investigations, which will facilitate more advanced and focused explorations in the future. PMID:26131680

  18. Temperature and moisture dependent dielectric properties of legume flours associated with dielectric heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of flour samples from four legumes (chickpea, green pea, lentil, and soybean) at four different moisture contents were measured using an open-ended coaxial probe and impedance analyzer at frequencies of 10 to 1800 MHz and temperatures of 20 to 90°C. The dielectric constant and ...

  19. Temperature and Moisture Dependent Dielectric Properties of Legume Flours Associated with Dielectric Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric property data are important in developing thermal treatments using radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) energy and essential to estimate the heating uniformity in electromagnetic fields. Dielectric properties of flour samples from four legumes (chickpea, green pea, lentil, and soybean)...

  20. Graphene encapsulated rubber latex composites with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and low percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Liqun; Liu, Suting; Zan, Xiaoqing; Nishi, Toshio; Ning, Nanying

    2014-09-15

    A dielectric composite with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and low percolation threshold was prepared by using the combined strategy of encapsulating of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS) on carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR) latex particles and the in situ thermal reduction in GONS at a moderate temperature. The encapsulation of GONS on XNBR latex particles was mainly realized via the hydrogen bonding interactions between GONS and XNBR during latex mixing. A segregated graphene network was obtained at a low content of thermally reduced graphene (TRG), resulting in a low percolation threshold (0.25 vol.%). The dielectric constant at 100 Hz obviously increased from 23 for pure XNBR to 2211 and 5542 for the composite with 0.5 vol.% and 0.75 vol.% of TRG, respectively. The dielectric loss of the composites retained at a low value (less than 1.5). Meanwhile, the elastic modulus only slightly increased with the presence of 0.1-0.5 vol.% of TRG, keeping the good flexibility of the dielectric composites. This study provides a simple, low-cost and effective method to prepare high performance dielectric composites, facilitating the wide application of dielectric materials. PMID:24972295

  1. Physical aspects of 0-3 dielectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Bass, Patrick; Cheng, Z.-Y.

    2015-05-01

    0-3 dielectric composites with high dielectric constants have received great interest for various technological applications. Great achievements have been made in the development of high performance of 0-3 composites, which can be classified into dielectric-dielectric (DDCs) and conductor-dielectric composites (CDCs). However, predicting the dielectric properties of a composite is still a challenging problem of both theoretical and practical importance. Here, the physical aspects of 0-3 dielectric composites are reviewed. The limitation of current understanding and new developments in the physics of dielectric properties for dielectric composites are discussed. It is indicated that the current models cannot explain well the physical aspects for the dielectric properties of 0-3 dielectric composites. For the CDCs, experimental results show that there is a need to find new equations/models to predict the percolative behavior incorporating more parameters to describe the behavior of these materials. For the DDCs, it is indicated that the dielectric loss of each constituent has to be considered, and that it plays a critical role in the determination of the dielectric response of these types of composites. The differences in the loss of the constituents can result in a higher dielectric constant than both of the constituents combined, which breaks the Wiener limits.

  2. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  3. Dielectric relaxations and dielectric response in multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hunpratub, Sitchai; Thongbai, Prasit; Maensiri, Santi; Yamwong, Teerapon; Yimnirun, Rattikorn

    2009-02-09

    Single-phase multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} ceramics were fabricated using pure precipitation-prepared BiFeO{sub 3} powder. Dielectric response of BiFeO{sub 3} ceramics was investigated over a wide range of temperature and frequency. Our results reveal that the BiFeO{sub 3} ceramic sintered at 700 deg. C exhibited high dielectric permittivity, and three dielectric relaxations were observed. A Debye-type dielectric relaxation at low temperatures (-50 to 20 deg. C) is attributed to the carrier hopping process between Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The other two dielectric relaxations at the temperature ranges 30-130 deg. C and 140-200 deg. C could be due to the grain boundary effect and the defect ordering and/or the conductivity, respectively.

  4. Casimir-Lifshitz interaction between dielectrics of arbitrary geometry: A dielectric contrast perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Golestanian, Ramin

    2009-07-15

    The general theory of electromagnetic-fluctuation-induced interactions in dielectric bodies as formulated by Dzyaloshinskii, Lifshitz, and Pitaevskii is rewritten as a perturbation theory in terms of the spatial contrast in (imaginary) frequency dependent dielectric function. The formulation can be used to calculate the Casimir-Lifshitz forces for dielectric objects of arbitrary geometry, as a perturbative expansion in the dielectric contrast, and could thus complement the existing theories that use perturbation in geometrical features. We find that expansion in dielectric contrast recasts the resulting Lifshitz energy into a sum of the different many-body contributions. The limit of validity and convergence properties of the perturbation theory is discussed using the example of parallel semi-infinite objects for which the exact result is known.

  5. Development of a 20-MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.G.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R.W.; Bruce, R.L.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lewis, D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /LET Corp., Washington /Argonne /SLAC /Tsinghua U., Beijing

    2005-06-22

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron inector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx} 8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRl, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  6. Polarization-tuned Dynamic Color Filters Incorporating a Dielectric-loaded Aluminum Nanowire Array

    PubMed Central

    Raj Shrestha, Vivek; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured spectral filters enabling dynamic color-tuning are saliently attractive for implementing ultra-compact color displays and imaging devices. Realization of polarization-induced dynamic color-tuning via one-dimensional periodic nanostructures is highly challenging due to the absence of plasmonic resonances for transverse-electric polarization. Here we demonstrate highly efficient dynamic subtractive color filters incorporating a dielectric-loaded aluminum nanowire array, providing a continuum of customized color according to the incident polarization. Dynamic color filtering was realized relying on selective suppression in transmission spectra via plasmonic resonance at a metal-dielectric interface and guided-mode resonance for a metal-clad dielectric waveguide, each occurring at their characteristic wavelengths for transverse-magnetic and electric polarizations, respectively. A broad palette of colors, including cyan, magenta, and yellow, has been attained with high transmission beyond 80%, by tailoring the period of the nanowire array and the incident polarization. Thanks to low cost, high durability, and mass producibility of the aluminum adopted for the proposed devices, they are anticipated to be diversely applied to color displays, holographic imaging, information encoding, and anti-counterfeiting. PMID:26211625

  7. Polarization-tuned Dynamic Color Filters Incorporating a Dielectric-loaded Aluminum Nanowire Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj Shrestha, Vivek; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured spectral filters enabling dynamic color-tuning are saliently attractive for implementing ultra-compact color displays and imaging devices. Realization of polarization-induced dynamic color-tuning via one-dimensional periodic nanostructures is highly challenging due to the absence of plasmonic resonances for transverse-electric polarization. Here we demonstrate highly efficient dynamic subtractive color filters incorporating a dielectric-loaded aluminum nanowire array, providing a continuum of customized color according to the incident polarization. Dynamic color filtering was realized relying on selective suppression in transmission spectra via plasmonic resonance at a metal-dielectric interface and guided-mode resonance for a metal-clad dielectric waveguide, each occurring at their characteristic wavelengths for transverse-magnetic and electric polarizations, respectively. A broad palette of colors, including cyan, magenta, and yellow, has been attained with high transmission beyond 80%, by tailoring the period of the nanowire array and the incident polarization. Thanks to low cost, high durability, and mass producibility of the aluminum adopted for the proposed devices, they are anticipated to be diversely applied to color displays, holographic imaging, information encoding, and anti-counterfeiting.

  8. Parametric generation of energetic short mid-infrared pulses for dielectric laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandel, S.; Xu, G.; Yin, Y.; Jovanovic, I.

    2014-12-01

    Laser-driven high-gradient electron acceleration in dielectric photonic structures is an enabling technology for compact and robust sources of tunable monochromatic x-rays. Such advanced x-ray sources are sought in medical imaging, security, industrial, and scientific applications. The use of long-wavelength pulses can mitigate the problem of laser-induced breakdown in dielectric structures at high optical intensities, relax the structure fabrication requirements, and allow greater pulse energy to be injected into the structure. We report on the design and construction of a simple and robust, short-pulse parametric source operating at a center wavelength 5 μm, to be used as a pump for a dielectric photonic structure for laser-driven acceleration. The source is based on a two-stage parametric downconversion design, consisting of a β-BaB2O4-based 2.05 μm optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a ZnGeP2-based 5 μm OPA. The 2.05 μm OPA is presently pumped by a standard Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplified laser, which will be replaced with direct laser pumping at wavelengths \\gt 2 μ m in the future. The design and performance of the constructed short-pulse mid-infrared source are described. The demonstrated architecture is also of interest for use in other applications, such as high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse production.

  9. High Q calcium titanate cylindrical dielectric resonators for magnetic resonance microimaging.

    PubMed

    Haines, K; Neuberger, T; Lanagan, M; Semouchkina, E; Webb, A G

    2009-10-01

    At high magnetic fields radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of typical components all contribute to increased losses in conventional RF coil designs. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in a compact structure at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study an NMR probe was constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1T) using an inductively fed CaTiO(3) (relative permittivity of 156) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonator. The design has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000, and the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore which accommodates the sample. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm(3), have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. PMID:19656696

  10. High Q calcium titanate cylindrical dielectric resonators for magnetic resonance microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, K.; Neuberger, T.; Lanagan, M.; Semouchkina, E.; Webb, A. G.

    2009-10-01

    At high magnetic fields radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of typical components all contribute to increased losses in conventional RF coil designs. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in a compact structure at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study an NMR probe was constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 T) using an inductively fed CaTiO 3 (relative permittivity of 156) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonator. The design has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000, and the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore which accommodates the sample. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 μm 3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures.

  11. 77 FR 20051 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: The purpose of... notify the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Compact Officer, Mr. Gary S. Barron at......

  12. 78 FR 61384 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation, DOJ. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: The purpose... Council should notify the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Compact Officer, Mr. Gary S.......

  13. Applications of dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Falkenstein, Z.

    1998-12-31

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in oxygen and air are well established for the production of large quantities of ozone and are more recently being applied to a wider range of plasmachemical processes. Here, the application of DBDs for ozone synthesis, the non-thermal oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air, the generation of incoherent (V)UV radiation and surface processing (etching, ashing) is presented. The main plasmaphysical features of sinusoidally-driven DBDs (transient, filamented, non-thermal plasmas at atmospheric pressure) are described, and a simple plasmachemical reaction pathway for ozone synthesis are give. Experimental results on the degradation of VOCs (2-propanol, trichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride), as well as byproduct formation is presented for stand-alone DBD treatment, as well as for simultaneous (V)UV illumination of the discharge. Illumination of the discharge with (V)UV can change the plasmachemistry by enhanced formation of certain species of radicals--and thereby change byproduct formation--but also can change the discharge physics, known as the Joshi effect. As an example for generation of excited dimers and exiplexes for the production of incoherent UV light, experimental results on a XeBr* excimer UV light source are presented. Effects of the total and partial pressure of a Xe/Br{sub 2} system, the gap spacing and the applied driving frequency on the UV radiant efficiency are shown. For the application of DBDs for surface processing, experimental results of photoresist ashing on Si wafers using DBDs in oxygen are shown function of gas pressure, gap spacing and applied frequency.

  14. Compact Process Development at Babcock & Wilcox

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; Jeffrey Phillips

    2012-03-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  15. The Compact Route from Boston to London.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Brian

    1988-01-01

    The author describes the development and implementation of a business/secondary school compact in East London, based on the original Boston Compact. This cooperative relationship helps disadvantaged students attain employability skills and work experience, while employers gain a trained labor force for their entry-level jobs. (CH)

  16. Strength of field compacted clayey embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Lovell, C. W.

    1982-02-01

    The shearing behavior of a plastic Indiana clay (St. Croix) was studied for both laboratory and field compaction. This interim report deals with the field compacted phase. The strength tests were performed by unconsolidated undrained (UU) and saturated consolidated undrained (CIU) triaxials. These were run at various confining pressures to approximate the end of construction and long term conditions at several embankment depths.

  17. Physics of compact ignition tokamak designs

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Ku, L.P.; Bateman, G.; Seidl, F.; Sugihara, M.

    1986-03-01

    Models for predicting plasma performance in compact ignition experiments are constructed on the basis of theoretical and empirical constraints and data from tokamak experiments. Emphasis is placed on finding transport and confinement models which reproduce results of both ohmically and auxiliary heated tokamak data. Illustrations of the application of the models to compact ignition designs are given.

  18. The non-compact Weyl equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doikou, Anastasia; Ioannidou, Theodora

    2011-04-01

    A non-compact version of the Weyl equation is proposed, based on the infinite dimensional spin zero representation of the mathfrak{s}{mathfrak{l}_2} algebra. Solutions of the aforementioned equation are obtained in terms of the Kummer functions. In this context, we discuss the ADHMN approach in order to construct the corresponding non-compact BPS monopoles.

  19. Compaction within the South Belridge diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Chase C.A. Jr.; Dietrich, J.K. )

    1989-11-01

    Compaction is incorporated into a field-scale finite-difference thermal simulator to allow practical engineering analysis of reservoir compaction caused by fluid withdrawal. Capabilities new to petroleum applications include hysteresis in the form of limited rebound during fluid injection and the concept of relaxation time (i.e., creep).

  20. Magnetoresistance of a Low-k Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Brian Thomas

    Low-k dielectrics have been incorporated into advanced computer chip technologies as a part of the continuous effort to improve computer chip performance. One drawback associated with the implementation of low-k dielectrics is the large leakage current which conducts through the material, relative to silica. Another drawback is that the breakdown voltage of low-k dielectrics is low, relative to silica [1]. This low breakdown voltage makes accurate reliability assessment of the failure mode time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) in low-k dielectrics critical for the successful implementation of these materials. The accuracy with which one can assess this reliability is currently a topic of debate. These material drawbacks have motivated the present work which aims both to contribute to the understanding of electronic conduction mechanisms in low-k dielectrics, and to improve the ability to experimentally characterize changes which occur within the material prior to TDDB failure. What follows is a study of the influence of an applied magnetic field on the conductivity of a low-k dielectric, or in other words, a study of the material's magnetoresistance. This study shows that low-k dielectrics used as intra-level dielectrics exhibit a relatively large negative magnetoresistance effect (˜2%) at room temperature and with modest applied magnetic fields (˜100 Oe). The magnetoresistance is attributed to the spin dependence of trapping electrons from the conduction band into localized electronic sites. Mixing of two-electron spin states via interactions between electron spins and the the spins of hydrogen nuclei is suppressed by an applied magnetic field. As a result, the rate of trapping is reduced, and the conductivity of the material increases. This study further demonstrates that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance changes as a function of time subjected to electrical bias and temperature stress. The rate that the magnetoresistance changes correlates to the

  1. Nanoactuators Based on Electrostatic Forces on Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2005-01-01

    Nanoactuators of a proposed type would exploit the forces exerted by electric fields on dielectric materials. As used here, "nanoactuators" includes motors, manipulators, and other active mechanisms that have dimensions of the order of nanometers and/or are designed to manipulate objects that have dimensions of the order of nanometers. The underlying physical principle can be described most simply in terms of the example of a square parallel-plate capacitor in which a square dielectric plate is inserted part way into the gap between the electrode plates (see Figure Typically, the force is small from our macroscopic human perspective. The above equation shows that the force depends on the ratio between the capacitor dimensions but does not depend on the size. In other words, the force remains the same if the capacitor and the dielectric slab are shrunk to nanometer dimensions. At the same time, the masses of all components are proportional to third power of their linear dimensions. Therefore the force-to-mass ratio (and, consequently, the acceleration that can be imparted to the dielectric slab) is much larger at the nanoscale than at the macroscopic scale. The proposed actuators would exploit this effect. The upper part of Figure 2 depicts a simple linear actuator based on a parallel- plate capacitor similar to Figure 1. In this case, the upper electrode plate would be split into two parts (A and B) and the dielectric slab would be slightly longer than plate A or B. The actuator would be operated in a cycle. During the first half cycle, plate B would be grounded to the lower plate and plate A would be charged to a potential, V, with respect to the lower plate, causing the dielectric slab to be pulled under plate A. During the second half cycle, plate A would be grounded and plate B would be charged to potential V, causing the dielectric slab to be pulled under plate B. The back-and-forth motion caused by alternation of the voltages on plates A and B could be used

  2. Higher order microfibre modes for dielectric particle trapping and propulsion.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Aili; Truong, Viet Giang; Sergides, Marios; Gusachenko, Ivan; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2015-01-01

    Optical manipulation in the vicinity of optical micro- and nanofibres has shown potential across several fields in recent years, including microparticle control, and cold atom probing and trapping. To date, most work has focussed on the propagation of the fundamental mode through the fibre. However, along the maximum mode intensity axis, higher order modes have a longer evanescent field extension and larger field amplitude at the fibre waist compared to the fundamental mode, opening up new possibilities for optical manipulation and particle trapping. We demonstrate a microfibre/optical tweezers compact system for trapping and propelling dielectric particles based on the excitation of the first group of higher order modes at the fibre waist. Speed enhancement of polystyrene particle propulsion was observed for the higher order modes compared to the fundamental mode for particles ranging from 1 μm to 5 μm in diameter. The optical propelling velocity of a single, 3 μm polystyrene particle was found to be 8 times faster under the higher order mode than the fundamental mode field for a waist power of 25 mW. Experimental data are supported by theoretical calculations. This work can be extended to trapping and manipulation of laser-cooled atoms with potential for quantum networks. PMID:25766925

  3. Experimental Results from a Resonant Dielectric Laser Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Rodney; McNeur, Joshua; Sozer, Esin; Travish, Gil; Hazra, Kiran Shankar; Matthews, Brian; England, Joel; Peralta, Edgar; Wu, Ziran

    2015-04-01

    Laser-powered accelerators have the potential to operate with very large accelerating gradients (~ GV/m) and represent a path toward extremely compact colliders and accelerator technology. Optical-scale laser-powered devices based on field-shaping structures (known as dielectric laser accelerators, or DLAs) have been described and demonstrated recently. Here we report on the first experimental results from the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), a DLA based on a slab-symmetric resonant optical-scale structure. As a resonant (rather than near-field) device, the MAP is distinct from other DLAs. Its cavity resonance enhances its accelerating field relative to the incoming laser fields, which are coupled efficiently through a diffractive optic on the upper face of the device. The MAP demonstrated modest accelerating gradients in recent experiments, in which it was powered by a Ti:Sapphire laser well below its breakdown limit. More detailed results and some implications for future developments will be discussed. Supported in part by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (UCLA); U.S. Dept of Energy (SLAC); and DARPA (SLAC).

  4. Active dielectric antenna on chip for spatial light modulation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ciyuan; Chen, Jianbo; Xia, Yang; Xu, Qianfan

    2012-01-01

    Integrated photonic resonators are widely used to manipulate light propagation in an evanescently-coupled waveguide. While the evanescent coupling scheme works well for planar optical systems that are naturally waveguide based, many optical applications are free-space based, such as imaging, display, holographics, metrology and remote sensing. Here we demonstrate an active dielectric antenna as the interface device that allows the large-scale integration capability of silicon photonics to serve the free-space applications. We show a novel perturbation-base diffractive coupling scheme that allows a high-Q planer resonator to directly interact with and manipulate free-space waves. Using a silicon-based photonic crystal cavity whose resonance can be rapidly tuned with a p-i-n junction, a compact spatial light modulator with an extinction ratio of 9.5 dB and a modulation speed of 150 MHz is demonstrated. Method to improve the modulation speed is discussed. PMID:23152946

  5. Higher order microfibre modes for dielectric particle trapping and propulsion

    PubMed Central

    Maimaiti, Aili; Truong, Viet Giang; Sergides, Marios; Gusachenko, Ivan; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2015-01-01

    Optical manipulation in the vicinity of optical micro- and nanofibres has shown potential across several fields in recent years, including microparticle control, and cold atom probing and trapping. To date, most work has focussed on the propagation of the fundamental mode through the fibre. However, along the maximum mode intensity axis, higher order modes have a longer evanescent field extension and larger field amplitude at the fibre waist compared to the fundamental mode, opening up new possibilities for optical manipulation and particle trapping. We demonstrate a microfibre/optical tweezers compact system for trapping and propelling dielectric particles based on the excitation of the first group of higher order modes at the fibre waist. Speed enhancement of polystyrene particle propulsion was observed for the higher order modes compared to the fundamental mode for particles ranging from 1 μm to 5 μm in diameter. The optical propelling velocity of a single, 3 μm polystyrene particle was found to be 8 times faster under the higher order mode than the fundamental mode field for a waist power of 25 mW. Experimental data are supported by theoretical calculations. This work can be extended to trapping and manipulation of laser-cooled atoms with potential for quantum networks. PMID:25766925

  6. Evaluation of high temperature capacitor dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Myers, Ira T.

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate four candidate materials for high temperature capacitor dielectric applications. The materials investigated were polybenzimidazole polymer and three aramid papers: Voltex 450, Nomex 410, and Nomex M 418, an aramid paper containing 50 percent mica. The samples were heat treated for six hours at 60 C and the direct current and 60 Hz alternating current breakdown voltages of both dry and impregnated samples were obtained in a temperature range of 20 to 250 C. The samples were also characterized in terms of their dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and conductivity over this temperature range with an electrical stress of 60 Hz, 50 V/mil present. Additional measurements are underway to determine the volume resistivity, thermal shrinkage, and weight loss of the materials. Preliminary data indicate that the heat treatment of the films slightly improves the dielectric properties with no influence on their breakdown behavior. Impregnation of the samples leads to significant increases in both alternating and direct current breakdown strength. The results are discussed and conclusions made concerning their suitability as high temperature capacitor dielectrics.

  7. Accelerating Dielectrics Design Using Thinking Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramprasad, R.

    2013-03-01

    High energy density capacitors are required for several pulsed power and energy storage applications, including food preservation, nuclear test simulations, electric propulsion of ships and hybrid electric vehicles. The maximum electrostatic energy that can be stored in a capacitor dielectric is proportional to its dielectric constant and the square of its breakdown field. The current standard material for capacitive energy storage is polypropylene which has a large breakdown field but low dielectric constant. We are involved in a search for new classes of polymers superior to polypropylene using first principles computations combined with statistical and machine learning methods. Essential to this search are schemes to efficiently compute the dielectric constant of polymers and the intrinsic dielectric breakdown field, as well as methods to determine the stable structures of new classes of polymers and strategies to efficiently navigate through the polymer chemical space offered by the periodic table. These methodologies have been combined with statistical learning paradigms in order to make property predictions rapidly, and promising classes of polymeric systems for energy storage applications have been identified. This work is being supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  8. Dielectric Genome of van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kirsten; Latini, Simone; Thygesen, Kristian S

    2015-07-01

    Vertical stacking of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, has recently lead to a new class of materials known as van der Waals heterostructures (vdWHs) with unique and highly tunable electronic properties. Ab initio calculations should in principle provide a powerful tool for modeling and guiding the design of vdWHs, but in their traditional form such calculations are only feasible for commensurable structures with a few layers. Here we show that the dielectric properties of realistic, incommensurable vdWHs comprising hundreds of layers can be efficiently calculated using a multiscale approach where the dielectric functions of the individual layers (the dielectric building blocks) are computed ab initio and coupled together via the long-range Coulomb interaction. We use the method to illustrate the 2D-3D transition of the dielectric function of multilayer MoS2 crystals, the hybridization of quantum plasmons in thick graphene/hBN heterostructures, and to demonstrate the intricate effect of substrate screening on the non-Rydberg exciton series in supported WS2. The dielectric building blocks for a variety of 2D crystals are available in an open database together with the software for solving the coupled electrodynamic equations. PMID:26047386

  9. Evaluation of high temperature capacitor dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Myers, Ira T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate four candidate materials for high temperature capacitor dielectric applications. The materials investigated were polybenzimidazole polymer and three aramid papers: Voltex 450, Nomex 410, and Nomex M 418, an aramid paper containing 50 percent mica. The samples were heat treated for six hours at 60 C and the direct current and 60 Hz alternating current breakdown voltages of both dry and impregnated samples were obtained in a temperature range of 20 to 250 C. The samples were also characterized in terms of their dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and conductivity over this temperature range with an electrical stress of 60 Hz, 50 V/mil present. Additional measurements are underway to determine the volume resistivity, thermal shrinkage, and weight loss of the materials. Preliminary data indicate that the heat treatment of the films slightly improves the dielectric properties with no influence on their breakdown behavior. Impregnation of the samples leads to significant increases in both alternating and direct current breakdown strength. The results are discussed and conclusions made concerning their suitability as high temperature capacitor dielectrics.

  10. Secondary structures in long compact polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberdorf, Richard; Ferguson, Allison; Jacobsen, Jesper L.; Kondev, Jané

    2006-11-01

    Compact polymers are self-avoiding random walks that visit every site on a lattice. This polymer model is used widely for studying statistical problems inspired by protein folding. One difficulty with using compact polymers to perform numerical calculations is generating a sufficiently large number of randomly sampled configurations. We present a Monte Carlo algorithm that uniformly samples compact polymer configurations in an efficient manner, allowing investigations of chains much longer than previously studied. Chain configurations generated by the algorithm are used to compute statistics of secondary structures in compact polymers. We determine the fraction of monomers participating in secondary structures, and show that it is self-averaging in the long-chain limit and strictly less than 1. Comparison with results for lattice models of open polymer chains shows that compact chains are significantly more likely to form secondary structure.

  11. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus_minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a ``steer`s head.`` it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  12. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a steer's head.'' it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  13. Secondary structures in long compact polymers.

    PubMed

    Oberdorf, Richard; Ferguson, Allison; Jacobsen, Jesper L; Kondev, Jané

    2006-11-01

    Compact polymers are self-avoiding random walks that visit every site on a lattice. This polymer model is used widely for studying statistical problems inspired by protein folding. One difficulty with using compact polymers to perform numerical calculations is generating a sufficiently large number of randomly sampled configurations. We present a Monte Carlo algorithm that uniformly samples compact polymer configurations in an efficient manner, allowing investigations of chains much longer than previously studied. Chain configurations generated by the algorithm are used to compute statistics of secondary structures in compact polymers. We determine the fraction of monomers participating in secondary structures, and show that it is self-averaging in the long-chain limit and strictly less than 1. Comparison with results for lattice models of open polymer chains shows that compact chains are significantly more likely to form secondary structure. PMID:17279930

  14. Compact atmospheric pressure plasma self-resonant drive circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, V. J.; Anghel, S. D.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on compact solid-state self-resonant drive circuits that are specifically designed to drive an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge of small volume (0.5 cm3). The atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) device can be operated with helium, argon or a mixture of both. Equivalent electrical models of the self-resonant drive circuits and discharge are developed and used to estimate the plasma impedance, plasma power density, current density or electron number density of three APP devices. These parameters and the kinetic gas temperature are dependent on the self-resonant frequency of the APP device. For a fixed switching frequency and APP device geometry, the plasma parameters are controlled by adjusting the dc voltage at the primary coil and the gas flow rate. The resonant frequency is controlled by the selection of the switching power transistor and means of step-up voltage transformation (ferrite core, flyback transformer, or Tesla coil). The flyback transformer operates in the tens of kHz, the ferrite core in the hundreds of kHz and Tesla coil in the MHz range. Embedded within this work is the principle of frequency pulling which is exemplified in the flyback transformer circuit that utilizes a pickup coil for feedback control of the switching frequency.

  15. Investigation of compressibility and compactibility parameters of roller compacted Theophylline and its binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hadžović, Ervina; Betz, Gabriele; Hadžidedić, Seherzada; El-Arini, Silvia Kocova; Leuenberger, Hans

    2011-09-15

    Roller compaction is a dry granulation method which results in tablets with inferior tensile strength comparing to direct compaction. The effect of roller compaction on compressibility and compactibility of tablets prepared from Theophylline anhydrate powder, Theophylline anhydrate fine powder and Theophylline monohydrate was investigated by measuring tensile strength of tablets as well as calculating compressibility and compactibility parameters by Leuenberger equation. The tablets under the same conditions were prepared by direct compaction and roller compaction. The binary mixtures of Theophylline anhydrate powder, Theophylline anhydrate fine powder, Theophylline monohydrate and microcrystalline cellulose were prepared in order to determine the optimal ratio of active material and excipients which delivers a sufficient mechanical strength of tablets. Tensile strength of MCC tablets and compactibility parameters calculated by Leuenberger equation after roller compaction was significantly decreased, while THAP, THAFP and THMO tablets showed only a minor reduction in compactibility and compressibility. Adding MCC to a mixture with Theophylline showed that the right choice and ratio of excipients can enable a sufficient mechanical strength of the tablets after roller compaction. PMID:21704142

  16. Effects of sintering process on microstructure and microwave dielectric properties of Ba(Co1/3Nb2/3)O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhefei; Wu, Jiajia; Wang, Lixi; Fu, Zhenxiao; Zhang, Qitu

    2014-11-01

    Ba(Co1/3Nb2/3)O3 (BCN) ceramics were prepared using a conventional solid-state route. Effects of sintering on microstructure and microwave dielectric properties of Ba(Co1/3Nb2/3)O3 ceramics were systematically investigated. Appropriate sintering temperature could restrain the evaporation of CoO and the formation of Nb-rich phase. The dielectric constants and temperature coefficients of resonant frequency changed slightly with the variation in sintering temperatures. The high Q × f value with prolonged sintering time was related to the improvement of 1: 2 ordered arrangement in the B site, rather than the compactness of ceramics. Excellent microwave dielectric properties ( ɛ r=32.6, Q × f =86857 GHz, τ f=-14 ppm/°C) were obtained in the Ba(Co1/3Nb2/3)O3 ceramics sintered at 1380°C for 12 h.

  17. Studies on metal-dielectric plasmonic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Chettiar, Uday K.; Liu, Zhengtong; Thoreson, Mark D.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Drachev, Vladimir P.; Pack, Michael Vern; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Nyga, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of light with nanostructured metal leads to a number of fascinating phenomena, including plasmon oscillations that can be harnessed for a variety of cutting-edge applications. Plasmon oscillation modes are the collective oscillation of free electrons in metals under incident light. Previously, surface plasmon modes have been used for communication, sensing, nonlinear optics and novel physics studies. In this report, we describe the scientific research completed on metal-dielectric plasmonic films accomplished during a multi-year Purdue Excellence in Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. A variety of plasmonic structures, from random 2D metal-dielectric films to 3D composite metal-dielectric films, have been studied in this research for applications such as surface-enhanced Raman sensing, tunable superlenses with resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, enhanced molecular absorption, infrared obscurants, and other real-world applications.

  18. Dielectric and phase behavior of dipolar spheroids.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Benight, Stephanie J; Barnes, Robin; Robinson, Bruce H

    2015-04-23

    The Stockmayer fluid, composed of dipolar spheres, has a well-known isotropic-ferroelectric phase transition at high dipole densities. However, there has been little investigation of the ferroelectric transition in nearly spherical fluids at dipole densities corresponding to those found in many polar solvents and in guest-host organic electro-optic materials. In this work, we examine the transition to ordered phases of low-aspect-ratio spheroids under both unperturbed and poled conditions, characterizing both the static dielectric response and thermodynamic properties of spheroidal systems. Spontaneous ferroelectric ordering was confined to a small region of aspect ratios about unity, indicating that subtle changes in sterics can have substantial influence on the behavior of coarse-grained liquid models. Our results demonstrate the importance of molecular shape in obtaining even qualitatively correct dielectric responses and provide an explanation for the success of the Onsager model as a phenomenological representation for the dielectric behavior of polar organic liquids. PMID:25821921

  19. Spectroscopic Investigations of Amorphous Complex Dielectric Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad

    1989-03-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A discussion of general properties of three systems of dielectric films i.e. MoO_3 and the mixed oxide systems MoO_3/In _2O_3 and MoO_3/SiO is presented. Composition, film thickness, substrate deposition temperature and annealing, all have a substantial effect on the structure and various properties of the films. General properties of these three systems of dielectric films include analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, U.V/VIS and infra-red spectroscopy including the Fourier transform technique, electrical properties both D.C and A.C at both low and high fields, and electron paramagnetic resonance. A comprehensive comparison of all the results is carried out in a correlated manner and some new ideas are presented on an established semiconducting/dielectric material. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  20. Tuneable dielectric films having low electrical losses

    DOEpatents

    Dimos, Duane Brian; Schwartz, Robert William; Raymond, Mark Victor; Al-Shareef, Husam Niman; Mueller, Carl; Galt, David

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for forming dielectric thin films having substantially reduced electrical losses at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies relative to conventional dielectric thin films. The reduction in losses is realized by dramatically increasing the grain sizes of the dielectric films, thereby minimizing intergranular scattering of the microwave signal due to grain boundaries and point defects. The increase in grain size is realized by heating the film to a temperature at which the grains experience regrowth. The grain size of the films can be further increased by first depositing the films with an excess of one of the compoents, such that a highly mobile grain boundary phase is formed.

  1. Modeling of ac dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, J. S.; Huang, P. G.

    2010-06-15

    The qualitative electrodynamic field of the dielectric barrier discharge in air is studied by a three-component, drift-diffusion plasma model including the Poisson equation of plasmadynamics. The critical media interface boundary conditions independent of the detailed mechanisms of surface absorption, diffusion, recombination, and charge accumulation on electrode or dielectrics are developed from the theory of electromagnetics. The computational simulation duplicates the self-limiting feature of dielectric barrier discharge for preventing corona-to-spark transition, and the numerical results of the breakdown voltage are compared very well with data. According to the present modeling, the periodic electrodynamic force due to charge separation over the electrodes also exerts on alternative directions from the exposed to encapsulated electrodes over a complete ac cycle as experimental observations.

  2. Tailorable Dielectric Material with Complex Permittivity Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon Mark (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A dielectric material includes a network of nanosubstrates, such as but not limited to nanotubes, nanosheets, or other nanomaterials or nanostructures, a polymer base material or matrix, and nanoparticles constructed at least partially of an elemental metal. The network has a predetermined nanosubstrate loading percentage by weight with respect to a total weight of the dielectric material, and a preferential or predetermined longitudinal alignment with respect to an orientation of an incident electrical field. A method of forming the dielectric material includes depositing the metal-based nanoparticles onto the nanosubstrates and subsequently mixing these with a polymer matrix. Once mixed, alignment can be achieved by melt extrusion or a similar mechanical shearing process. Alignment of the nanosubstrate may be in horizontal or vertical direction with respect to the orientation of an incident electrical field.

  3. Novel Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic Material System Composed of Dielectrics with Different Dielectric Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Sadaaki; Adachi, Hiroshige; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Sugimoto, Yasutaka; Takada, Takahiro

    2013-09-01

    We found that the co-firing low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) materials of different dielectric constants (ɛr) with Cu wiring is achievable using a novel, original design. It was confirmed that the dielectric characteristics of the dielectrics designed in this study are very suitable for the use of the dielectrics in electronic components such as filters mounted in high-speed radio communication equipment. The dielectric constants of the lower- and higher-dielectric-coefficient materials were 8.1 and 44.5, respectively, which are sufficiently effective for downsizing LTCC components. Observing the co-fired interface, it was confirmed that excellent co-firing conditions resulted in no mechanical defects such as delamination or cracks. On the basis of the results of wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry (WDX) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), it was confirmed that co-firing with minimal interdiffusion was realized using the same glass for both dielectrics. It is concluded that the materials developed are good for co-firing in terms of the mechanical defects and interdiffusion that appear in them.

  4. Microporous polyimide films for reduced dielectric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, R.S.; Aubert, J.H.; McNamara, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    With all the advances in the microelectronics industry, a limiting factor to computer chip speed and size is becoming the dielectric constant of the interlayer insulating materials. Dielectric constants of these layers have been reduced in going from inorganic to organic type materials. A further reduction in dielectric constant, coupled with better mechanical properties are still required for these types of materials. The authors have developed a technique involving spincoating in conjunction with a thermodynamic process called {open_quotes}Non-solvent Induced Phase Separation{close_quotes} (NSIPS) to create microporous polyimide films that exhibit both a lower dielectric constant and better stress reduction properties compared to their solid film counterparts. In this technique, the authors spincoat a soluble polyimide solution in 1,3-dimethoxybenzene solvent onto a silicon wafer, and then immediately submerse the {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} polymer film into a non-solvent bath, typically toluene. Phase separation of the polymer occurs on a micron size scale and the resulting microporous structure becomes locked in by the high glass transition temperature of the polyimide. The authors have determined the factors affecting the film morphology, thickness, pore size, and percent porosity; these factors include the polymer concentration, spin speed, and the type of non-solvent used. The different morphologies obtained for the varying non-solvents are explained in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation and diffusion, using an idealized ternary phase diagram. One particular film having a porosity of 68%, thickness of 22 microns and pore size of 1.4 microns had a measured dielectric constant of 1.88 and dielectric loss of 0.002. Stress measurements indicated that the microporous film reduced surface stress on the wafer by more than a factor of 10 when compared to the analogous solid polyimide film.

  5. Polyamide 66 as a Cryogenic Dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Messman, Jamie M; Aytug, Tolga

    2009-01-01

    Improvements in superconductor and cryogenic technologies enable novel power apparatus, \\eg, cables, transformers, fault current limiters, generators, \\etc, with better device characteristics than their conventional counterparts. In these applications electrical insulation materials play an important role in system weight, footprint (size), and voltage level. The trend in the electrical insulation material selection has been to adapt or to employ conventional insulation materials to these new systems. However, at low temperatures, thermal contraction and loss of mechanical strength in many materials make them unsuitable for superconducting power applications. In this paper, a widely used commercial material was characterized as a potential cryogenic dielectric. The material is used in ``oven bag'' a heat-resistant polyamide (nylon) used in cooking (produced by Reynolds\\textregistered, Richmond, VA, USA). It is first characterized by Fourier transform infrared and x-ray diffraction techniques and determined to be composed of polyamide 66 (PA66) polymer. Secondly the complex dielectric permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength of the PA66 films are investigated. The dielectric data are then compared with data reported in the literature. A comparison of dielectric strength with a widely used high-temperature superconductor electrical insulation material, polypropylene-laminated paper (PPLP\\texttrademark\\ a product of Sumitomo Electric Industries, Japan), is provided. It is observed that the statistical analysis of the PA66 films yields 1\\% failure probability at $127\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$; this value is approximately $46\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$ higher than PPLP\\texttrademark. It is concluded that PA66 may be a good candidate for cryogenic applications. Finally, a summary of dielectric properties of some of the commercial tape insulation materials and various polymers is also provided.

  6. Compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.Z.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Tate, J.; Chen, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    A compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling wave amplifier is being developed. The device is a three-stage tube with the output section running as a fourth harmonic gyro-TWT, the input section running as a fundamental gyro-TWT, and the middle operating at the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. Radiation is suppressed by servers between the sections. The operating beam of the tube is produced by a magnetron injection gun (MIG). A TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit consisting of mode converters and a filter waveguide is employed for both input and output sections to solve the mode competition problem, which is pervasive in gyro-TWT operation. The input section has an input coupler designed as a TE{sub 0n} mode launcher. It excites a signal at the fundamental cyclotron frequency (17.5 GHz), which is amplified in the first TWT interaction region. So far the device is similar to a two-stage harmonic gyro-TWT. The distinction is that in the three-stage device the second section will be optimized not for output power but for fourth harmonic bunching of the beam. A gyroklystron amplifier has also been designed. The configuration is similar to the gyro-TWT but with the traveling wave interaction structures replaced by mode selective special complex cavities. Cold test results of the wideband input coupler and the TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit have been obtained.

  7. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector. PMID:27417510

  8. Dynamic compaction of granular materials

    PubMed Central

    Favrie, N.; Gavrilyuk, S.

    2013-01-01

    An Eulerian hyperbolic multiphase flow model for dynamic and irreversible compaction of granular materials is constructed. The reversible model is first constructed on the basis of the classical Hertz theory. The irreversible model is then derived in accordance with the following two basic principles. First, the entropy inequality is satisfied by the model. Second, the corresponding ‘intergranular stress’ coming from elastic energy owing to contact between grains decreases in time (the granular media behave as Maxwell-type materials). The irreversible model admits an equilibrium state corresponding to von Mises-type yield limit. The yield limit depends on the volume fraction of the solid. The sound velocity at the yield surface is smaller than that in the reversible model. The last one is smaller than the sound velocity in the irreversible model. Such an embedded model structure assures a thermodynamically correct formulation of the model of granular materials. The model is validated on quasi-static experiments on loading–unloading cycles. The experimentally observed hysteresis phenomena were numerically confirmed with a good accuracy by the proposed model. PMID:24353466

  9. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  10. Compact drilling and sample system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Petercsak, Doug

    1998-01-01

    The Compact Drilling and Sample System (CDSS) was developed to drill into terrestrial, cometary, and asteroid material in a cryogenic, vacuum environment in order to acquire subsurface samples. Although drills were used by the Apollo astronauts some 20 years ago, this drill is a fraction of the mass and power and operates completely autonomously, able to drill, acquire, transport, dock, and release sample containers in science instruments. The CDSS has incorporated into its control system the ability to gather science data about the material being drilled by measuring drilling rate per force applied and torque. This drill will be able to optimize rotation and thrust in order to achieve the highest drilling rate possible in any given sample. The drill can be commanded to drill at a specified force, so that force imparted on the rover or lander is limited. This paper will discuss the cryo dc brush motors, carbide gears, cryogenic lubrication, quick-release interchangeable sampling drill bits, percussion drilling and the control system developed to achieve autonomous, cryogenic, vacuum, lightweight drilling.

  11. Shift and elimination of microwave Fabry-Perot resonances in a dielectric covered with a thin metal layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragulis, Paulius; Simniškis, Rimantas; Kancleris, Žilvinas

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we consider a plane electromagnetic wave incident onto a dielectric plate, which has one surface covered with a thin layer of metal. An oblique incident angle was considered for the TE (s polarization in optic) and TM (p polarization) plane waves. The thin metal layer is treated as an infinitesimal thickness. It was characterized by a surface conductivity and accounted for by a tangential magnetic field component step induced by the current flow in the metal layer. Compact expressions, which describe the reflection, transmission and absorption in a dielectric plate covered with a thin layer of metal, have been obtained. It was shown that by choosing the appropriate surface conductivity, the Fabry-Perot transmission resonances can be shifted to the position where the maximum reflection is observed in the case of an uncovered dielectric. On the other hand, the elimination of the Fabry-Perot resonances can be also achieved by choosing a proper metal surface conductivity. Measurements of the reflection from the glass covered with a thin layer of metal have been performed in a wide microwave frequency range (2-12 GHz) revealing a large difference in the measured reflection coefficient from the dielectric and metalized surfaces. The measured results fit well with those calculated by employing analytical expressions obtained in this paper.

  12. Rescaled temperature dependence of dielectric behavior of ferroelectric polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hai-Yan; Nan, Ce-Wen; Xie, Dan; Yin, Yi; Tjong, S. C.

    2005-04-01

    Rescaled temperature dependence of dielectric behavior of ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) filled with electroactive ceramic particles of rocksalt-type Li and Ti codoped NiO (LTNO) was studied at wide frequency ranges. Dielectric behavior of the flexible PVDF-LTNO composites with LTNO filler at the volumetric function of 0.3 exhibits a dielectric constant value, ɛ ≈50 at broad temperature range (290-360 K), and the value is frequency independent from 103 to 106Hz. The dielectric response of the composite is almost in accordance to that of pure PVDF matrix polymer. It was found that though the dielectric constant value of the composites is high due to an introduction of the rock salt-type LTNO ceramic particles with high dielectric constant, the glass transition of the polymer and dielectric relaxation related to the wide-angle oscillation of polar groups attached to the main polymer chain determine the dielectric behavior of the composite.

  13. Frequency-wavelength calculator with table of dielectric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. L.

    1972-01-01

    Frequency-wavelength calculator has been developed which rapidly and accurately calculates wavelength of given frequency in specific dielectric material. Unit fits into shirt pocket and includes table of dielectric properties and one-step calculator.

  14. Method for fabrication of crack-free ceramic dielectric films

    DOEpatents

    Ma, Beihai; Narayanan, Manoj; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Chao, Sheng; Liu, Shanshan

    2016-05-31

    The invention provides a process for forming crack-free dielectric films on a substrate. The process comprises the application of a dielectric precursor layer of a thickness from about 0.3 .mu.m to about 1.0 .mu.m to a substrate. The deposition is followed by low temperature heat pretreatment, prepyrolysis, pyrolysis and crystallization step for each layer. The deposition, heat pretreatment, prepyrolysis, pyrolysis and crystallization are repeated until the dielectric film forms an overall thickness of from about 1.5 .mu.m to about 20.0 .mu.m and providing a final crystallization treatment to form a thick dielectric film. The process provides a thick crack-free dielectric film on a substrate, the dielectric forming a dense thick crack-free dielectric having an overall dielectric thickness of from about 1.5 .mu.m to about 20.0 .mu.m.

  15. Method for fabrication of crack-free ceramic dielectric films

    DOEpatents

    Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Chao, Sheng; Liu, Shanshan; Narayanan, Manoj

    2014-02-11

    The invention provides a process for forming crack-free dielectric films on a substrate. The process comprise the application of a dielectric precursor layer of a thickness from about 0.3 .mu.m to about 1.0 .mu.m to a substrate. The deposition is followed by low temperature heat pretreatment, prepyrolysis, pyrolysis and crystallization step for each layer. The deposition, heat pretreatment, prepyrolysis, pyrolysis and crystallization are repeated until the dielectric film forms an overall thickness of from about 1.5 .mu.m to about 20.0 .mu.m and providing a final crystallization treatment to form a thick dielectric film. Also provided was a thick crack-free dielectric film on a substrate, the dielectric forming a dense thick crack-free dielectric having an overall dielectric thickness of from about 1.5 .mu.m to about 20.0 .mu.m.

  16. Gold nanoparticles extraction from dielectric scattering background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xin; Wang, Jingxin

    2014-11-01

    The unique advantages such as brightness, non-photobleaching, good bio-compatibility make gold nanoparticles desirable labels and play important roles in biotech and related research and applications. Distinguishing gold nanoparticles from other dielectric scattering particles is of more importance, especially in bio-tracing and imaging. The enhancement image results from the localized surface plasmon resonance associated with gold nanopartilces makes themselves distinguishable from other dielectric particles, based on which, we propose a dual-wavelength detection method by employing a high sensitive cross-polarization microscopy.

  17. Polariton spectrum in nonlinear dielectric medium.

    PubMed

    Dzedolik, Igor V; Karakchieva, Olga

    2013-05-01

    We obtain theoretically the phonon-polariton spectrum in nonlinear dielectric medium with the third-order Kerr-type nonlinearity. We investigate the dependence of number of the polariton spectrum branches on the intensity of electromagnetic field and demonstrate that the appearance of new branches located in the polariton spectrum gap is caused by the influence of dispersion of the third-order dielectric susceptibility at the intensive electromagnetic field in the medium. The modulation instability of new spectrum branch waves leads to the appearance of the cnoidal waves or solitons. These new nonlinear waves one can use for designing optical devices such as the nonlinear optical filter converter. PMID:23669776

  18. Development of dielectric barrier discharging power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yinghui; Liu, Kun; Fu, Rongyao; Sun, Yaohong; Yan, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Due to the demand of a dielectric barrier discharge power supply, a high voltage and high frequency AC power supply was designed and implemented. Its output voltage is standard or approximate standard sine waveform with the frequency range of 1 kHz to 50 kHz. The output voltage and output frequency can be adjusted individually. The maximum output power of the power supply is 2 kW. It can be operated through local or remote control. The power supply has been used in the dielectric barrier discharging research under different conditions.

  19. Dispersion analysis with inverse dielectric function modelling.

    PubMed

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    We investigate how dispersion analysis can profit from the use of a Lorentz-type description of the inverse dielectric function. In particular at higher angles of incidence, reflectance spectra using p-polarized light are dominated by bands from modes that have their transition moments perpendicular to the surface. Accordingly, the spectra increasingly resemble inverse dielectric functions. A corresponding description can therefore eliminate the complex dependencies of the dispersion parameters, allow their determination and facilitate a more accurate description of the optical properties of single crystals. PMID:27294550

  20. DIELECTRIC-LOADED WAVE-GUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Mullett, L.B.

    1957-04-23

    This patent presents a particular arrangement for delectric loading of a wave-guide carrying an electromagnetic wave in the E or TM mode of at least the second order, to reduce the power dissipated as the result of conduction loss in the wave-guide walls. To achieve this desirabie result, the effective dielectric constants in the radial direction of adjacent coaxial tubular regions bounded approximateiy by successive nodai surfaces within the electromagnetic field are of two different values alternating in the radial direction, the intermost and outermost regions being of the lower value, and the dielectric constants between nodes are uniform.

  1. Dipolar fluids near a dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziwei; Luijten, Erik

    The behavior of dipolar fluids near an interface is of fundamental importance in a broad variety of fields, including colloid chemistry, electrochemistry, biochemistry and surface science. The structural properties of such a fluid are affected not only by the presence of surface charge, but also by a dielectric mismatch across the interface. Using large-scale Monte Carlo simulations that explicitly take into account dielectric effects, we investigate a prototypical dipolar fluid. In addition to the organization of the fluid, characterized through the dipolar orientations and spatial correlations, we also calculate the surface tension by employing simulations in the grand-canonical ensemble.

  2. Dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Lakhwant; Singh, Mohan; Awasthi, A. M.; Kumar, Jitender

    2014-04-01

    In the present work, the dielectric relaxation phenomenon in muscovite mica has been studied over the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and in the temperature range of 653-853K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The values of the activation energy obtained from electric modulus and conductivity data are found to be nearly similar, suggesting that same types of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation mechanism. This type of study will explore the potential of this material for various applications in electrical engineering.

  3. Thin film dielectric microstrip kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Sank, Daniel; McHugh, Sean; Lucero, Erik A.; Merrill, Andrew; Gao, Jiansong; Pappas, David; Moore, David; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2010-03-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors, or MKIDs, are a type of low temperature detector that exhibit intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing at microwave frequencies. We present the first theory and measurements on a MKID based on a microstrip transmission line resonator. A complete characterization of the dielectric loss and noise properties of these resonators is performed, and agrees well with the derived theory. A competitive noise equivalent power of 5×10-17 W Hz-1/2 at 10 Hz has been demonstrated. The resonators exhibit the highest quality factors known in a microstrip resonator with a deposited thin film dielectric.

  4. Method for producing high dielectric strength microvalves

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Brian J.; Reichmuth, David S.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2006-04-04

    A microvalve having a cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, polymer monolith for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. The microvalve contains a porous fluorinated polymer monolithic element whose pores are filled with an electrically insulating, high dielectric strength fluid, typically a perfluorinated liquid. This combination provides a microvalve that combines high dielectric strength with extremely low electrical conductivity. These microvalves have been shown to have resistivities of at least 100 G.OMEGA. and are compatible with solvents such as water at a pH between 2.7 and 9.0, 1-1 propanol, acetonitrile, and acetone.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of compact formation; compaction, unloading, and ejection. I. Design and development of a compaction calorimeter and mechanical and thermal energy determinations of powder compaction.

    PubMed

    DeCrosta, M T; Schwartz, J B; Wigent, R J; Marshall, K

    2000-03-30

    The aim of this investigation was to determine and evaluate the thermodynamic properties, i.e. heat, work, and internal energy change, of the compaction process by developing a 'Compaction Calorimeter'. Compaction of common excipients and acetaminophen was performed by a double-ended, constant-strain tableting waveform utilizing an instrumented 'Compaction Simulator.' A constant-strain waveform provides a specific quantity of applied compaction work. A calorimeter, built around the dies, used a metal oxide thermistor to measure the temperature of the system. A resolution of 0.0001 degrees C with a sampling time of 5 s was used to monitor the temperature. An aluminum die within a plastic insulating die, in conjunction with fiberglass punches, comprised the calorimeter. Mechanical (work) and thermal (heat) calibrations of the elastic punch deformation were performed. An energy correction method was outlined to account for system heat effects and mechanical work of the punches. Compaction simulator transducers measured upper and lower punch forces and displacements. Measurements of the effective heat capacity of the samples were performed utilizing an electrical resistance heater. Specific heat capacities of the samples were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. The calibration techniques were utilized to determine heat, work, and the change in internal energies of powder compaction. Future publications will address the thermodynamic evaluation of the tablet sub-processes of unloading and ejection. PMID:10722955

  6. Foster Wheeler compact CFB boiler with INTREX

    SciTech Connect

    Hyppaenen, T.; Rainio, A.; Kauppinen, K.V.O.; Stone, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Foster Wheeler has introduced a new COMPACT Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler design based on the rectangular hot solids separator. The Compact design also enables easy implementation of new designs for INTREX fluid bed heat exchangers. These new products result in many benefits which affect the boiler economy and operation. After initial development of the Compact CFB design it has been applied in demonstration and industrial scale units. The performance of Compact CFB has been proved to be equivalent to conventional Foster Wheeler CFB has been proved to be equivalent to conventional Foster Wheeler CFB boilers with high availability. Several new Foster Wheeler Compact boilers are being built or already in operation. Operational experiences from different units will be discussed in this paper. There are currently Compact units with 100--150 MW{sub e} capacity under construction. With the scale-up experience with conventional CFB boilers and proven design approach and scale-up steps, Foster Wheeler will have the ability to provide large Compact CFB boilers up to 400--600 MW{sub e} capacity.

  7. Compaction of North-sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Dániel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The Ekofisk field is the largest petroleum field in the Norwegian North Sea territory where oil is produced from chalk formations. Early stage of oil production caused considerable changes in pore fluid pressure which led to a reservoir compaction. Pore collapse mechanism caused by the dramatic increase of effective stress, which in turn was caused by the pressure reduction by hydrocarbon depletion, was early identified as a principal reason for the reservoir compaction (Sulak et al. 1991). There have been several attempts to model this compaction. They performed with variable success on predicting the Ekofisk subsidence. However, the most of these models are based on empirical relations and do not investigate in detail the phenomena involved in the compaction. In sake of predicting the Ekofisk subsidence while using only independently measurable variables we used a chalk compaction model valid on geological time-scales (Japsen et al. 2011) assuming plastic pore-collapse mechanism at a threshold effective stress level. We identified the phenomena involved in the pore collapse. By putting them in a sequential order we created a simple statistical analytical model. We also investigated the time-dependence of the phenomena involved and by assuming that one of the phenomena is rate-limiting we could make estimations of the compaction rate at smaller length-scales. By carefully investigating the nature of pressure propagation we could upscale our model to reservoir scale. We found that the predicted compaction rates are close enough to the measured rates. We believe that we could further increase accuracy by refining our model. Sulak, R. M., Thomas, L. K., Boade R. R. (1991) 3D reservoir simulation of Ekofisk compaction drive. Journal of Petroleum Technology, 43(10):1272-1278, 1991. Japsen, P., Dysthe, D. K., Hartz, E. H., Stipp, S. L. S., Yarushina, V. M., Jamtveit. (2011) A compaction front in North Sea chalk. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978

  8. Measurements of the phase shift on reflection for low-order infrared Fabry-Perot interferometer dielectric stack mirrors.

    PubMed

    Mielke, S L; Ryan, R E; Hilgeman, T; Lesyna, L; Madonna, R G; Van Nostrand, W C

    1997-11-01

    A simple technique based on a Fizeau interferometer to measure the absolute phase shift on reflection for a Fabry-Perot interferometer dielectric stack mirror is described. Excellent agreement between the measured and predicted phase shift on reflection was found. Also described are the salient features of low-order Fabry-Perot interferometers and the demonstration of a near ideal low-order (1-10) Fabry-Perot interferometer through minimizing the phase dispersion on reflection of the dielectric stack. This near ideal performance of a low-order Fabry-Perot interferometer should enable several applications such as compact spectral imagers for solid and gas detection. The large free spectral range of such systems combined with an active control system will also allow simple interactive tuning of wavelength agile laser sources such as CO(2) lasers, external cavity diode lasers, and optical parametric oscillators. PMID:18264347

  9. A new analytical threshold voltage model for symmetrical double-gate MOSFETs with high- k gate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, T. K.; Chen, M. L.

    2007-03-01

    Based on the fully two-dimensional (2D) Poisson's solution in both silicon film and insulator layer, a compact and analytical threshold voltage model, which accounts for the fringing field effect of the short channel symmetrical double-gate (SDG) MOSFETs, has been developed. Exploiting the new model, a concerned analysis combining FIBL-enhanced short-channel effects and high- k gate dielectrics assess their overall impact on SDG MOSFET's scaling. It is found that for the same equivalent oxide thickness, the gate insulator with high- k dielectric constant which keeps a great characteristic length allows less design space than SiO 2 to sustain the same FIBL induced threshold voltage degradation.

  10. PICOBIT: A Compact Scheme System for Microcontrollers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Amour, Vincent; Feeley, Marc

    Due to their tight memory constraints, small microcontroller based embedded systems have traditionally been implemented using low-level languages. This paper shows that the Scheme programming language can also be used for such applications, with less than 7 kB of total memory. We present PICOBIT, a very compact implementation of Scheme suitable for memory constrained embedded systems. To achieve a compact system we have tackled the space issue in three ways: the design of a Scheme compiler generating compact bytecode, a small virtual machine, and an optimizing C compiler suited to the compilation of the virtual machine.

  11. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  12. Compacting a Kentucky coal for quality logs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Li, Z.; Mao, S.

    1999-07-01

    A Kentucky coal was found more difficult to be compacted into large size strong logs. Study showed that compaction parameters affecting the strength of compacted coal logs could be categorized into three groups. The first group is coal inherent properties such as elasticity and coefficient of friction, the second group is machine properties such as mold geometry, and the third group is the coal mixture preparation parameters such as particle size distribution. Theoretical analysis showed that an appropriate backpressure can reduce surface cracks occurring during ejection. This has been confirmed by the experiments conducted.

  13. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  14. Use of material dielectric properties for agricultural applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of dielectric properties of materials for applications in agriculture are reviewed, and research findings on use of dielectric heating of materials and on sensing of product moisture content and other quality factors are discussed. Dielectric heating applications, include treatment of seed...

  15. Dielectric Properties of Agricultural Products and Some Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: The use of dielectric properties of agricultural products for sensing moisture in grain and seed and their application in radio-frequency and microwave dielectric heating is discussed briefly. Values for the dielectric properties of a number of products, including grain and seed, fruits ...

  16. Electrode/Dielectric Strip For High-Energy-Density Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.

    1994-01-01

    Improved unitary electrode/dielectric strip serves as winding in high-energy-density capacitor in pulsed power supply. Offers combination of qualities essential for high energy density: high permittivity of dielectric layers, thinness, and high resistance to breakdown of dielectric at high electric fields. Capacitors with strip material not impregnated with liquid.

  17. Dielectric Spectroscopy Measurements on Fruit, Meat, and Grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric spectroscopy is the study of dielectric properties (electrical characteristics) of materials and their variation with frequency or wavelength. Dielectric properties are electrical properties that determine how materials interact with electric fields such as those of high-frequency and m...

  18. Norbornylene-based polymer systems for dielectric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2012-07-17

    A capacitor having at least one electrode pair being separated by a dielectric component, with the dielectric component being made of a polymer such as a norbornylene-containing polymer with a dielectric constant greater than 3 and a dissipation factor less than 0.1 where the capacitor has an operating temperature greater than 100.degree. C. and less than 170.degree. C.

  19. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Popovic, Milorad; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  20. Ceramic-polymer nanocomposites with increased dielectric permittivity and low dielectric loss

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Sumit Paul, Joginder; Raina, K. K.; Thakur, N. S.; Kumar, Ravi

    2014-04-24

    The use of lead free materials in device fabrication is very essential from environmental point of view. We have synthesized the lead free ferroelectric polymer nanocomposite films with increased dielectric properties. Lead free bismuth titanate has been used as active ceramic nanofillers having crystallite size 24nm and PVDF as the polymer matrix. Ferroelectric β-phase of the polymer composite films was confirmed by X-ray diffraction pattern. Mapping data confirms the homogeneous dispersion of ceramic particles into the polymer matrix. Frequency dependent dielectric constant increases up to 43.4 at 100Hz, whereas dielectric loss decreases with 7 wt% bismuth titanate loading. This high dielectric constant lead free ferroelectric polymer films can be used for energy density applications.